Science.gov

Sample records for position-sensitive ion detection

  1. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  2. Position sensitive radioactivity detection for gas and liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Joseph L.; McCarthy, John F.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the position sensitive detection of radioactivity in a fluid stream, particularly in the effluent fluid stream from a gas or liquid chromatographic instrument. The invention represents a significant advance in efficiency and cost reduction compared with current efforts.

  3. Position sensitive detection of neutrons in high radiation background field

    SciTech Connect

    Vavrik, D.; Jakubek, J.; Pospisil, S.; Vacik, J.

    2014-01-15

    We present the development of a high-resolution position sensitive device for detection of slow neutrons in the environment of extremely high γ and e{sup −} radiation background. We make use of a planar silicon pixelated (pixel size: 55 × 55 μm{sup 2}) spectroscopic Timepix detector adapted for neutron detection utilizing very thin {sup 10}B converter placed onto detector surface. We demonstrate that electromagnetic radiation background can be discriminated from the neutron signal utilizing the fact that each particle type produces characteristic ionization tracks in the pixelated detector. Particular tracks can be distinguished by their 2D shape (in the detector plane) and spectroscopic response using single event analysis. A Cd sheet served as thermal neutron stopper as well as intensive source of gamma rays and energetic electrons. Highly efficient discrimination was successful even at very low neutron to electromagnetic background ratio about 10{sup −4}.

  4. Spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms using position-sensitive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, K. W.; Livingston, A. E.; Serpa, F. G.; Zacarias, A. S.; Berry, H. G.; Dunford, R. W.; Kanter, E.; Cheng, S.; Suleiman, J.; Curtis, L. J.; Träbert, E.

    1993-06-01

    We report new results of atomic structure and atomic lifetime measurements in highly-ionized few electron atoms obtained using position-sensitive detection of extreme ultraviolet emission from excited fast ions. Data is presented from experiments run at the Notre Dame Tandem Accelerator and at the Argonne ATLAS facility using beam-foil spectroscopy with a photon-counting position-sensitive imaging detector. The results include excited state lifetimes in Si XI and Si XII involving both resonance transitions and Rydberg transitions, spectra of high-ionized He-like, Li-like, and Be-like nickel including comparisons of electron capture and excitation processes for charge selected beams and spectra and lifetimes in highly-charged bromine ions for both allowed and forbidden transitions.

  5. Michrochannel plate for position sensitive alpha particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Hurley and James Tinsley

    2007-08-31

    This paper will describe the use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as the associated particle detector on a sealed tube neutron generator. The generator produces neutrons and associated alpha particles for use as a probe to locate and identify hidden explosives in associated particle imaging (API). The MCP measures the position in two dimensions and precise timing of the incident alpha particle, information which is then used to calculate the emission time and direction of the corresponding neutron. The MCP replaces the position-sensitive photomultipler tube (PSPMT) which, until recently, had been the only detector available for measuring position and timing for alpha particles in neutron generator applications. Where the PSPMT uses charge division for generating position information, a process that requires a first order correction to each pulse, the MCP uses delay-line timing, which requires no correction. The result is a device with an order of magnitude improvement in both position resolution and timing compared to the PSPMT. Hardware and software development and the measurements made to characterize the MCP for API applications are described.

  6. Three-dimensional, position-sensitive radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    He, Zhong; Zhang, Feng

    2010-04-06

    Disclosed herein is a method of determining a characteristic of radiation detected by a radiation detector via a multiple-pixel event having a plurality of radiation interactions. The method includes determining a cathode-to-anode signal ratio for a selected interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions based on electron drift time data for the selected interaction, and determining the radiation characteristic for the multiple-pixel event based on both the cathode-to-anode signal ratio and the electron drift time data. In some embodiments, the method further includes determining a correction factor for the radiation characteristic based on an interaction depth of the plurality of radiation interactions, a lateral distance between the selected interaction and a further interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions, and the lateral positioning of the plurality of radiation interactions.

  7. A position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbaumer, S.; Bergmaier, A.; Dollinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    A new 2D position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD has been developed. The detector features separate time and position measurement in a straight geometry. An electrostatic lens focuses the secondary electrons ejected from a carbon foil onto a channel plate stack maintaining the position information despite the electron momentum distribution. For position readout a 2D Backgammon anode is used. A position resolution of <0.6 mm (FWHM) and a time resolution of 96 ps (FWHM) is demonstrated.

  8. Development of a Position Sensitive Heavy Ion Detector for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Need, Emily; Blackmon, J. C.; Deibel, C. M.; Lai, J.; Lindhart, L. E.; Macon, K. T.; Matos, M.; Rasco, B. C.; Rogachev, G.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2012-10-01

    The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array used to study reactions with radioactive beams at FSU and the NSCL. One of the main goals is to improve our understanding of nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. One important component of ANASEN is a heavy ion detector located downstream of the target that is used to identify the atomic number of heavy ions based upon their energy loss through the gas-filled chamber. We have developed a new version of this detector with major design changes to improve data collection and allow much greater selectivity for the reactions of interest. These changes include anodes based on custom printed circuit boards that provide position sensitivity, larger grids to provide greater acceptance, and a change in wire spacing on the grids to improve transmission. We will present the new design and results from initial tests.

  9. Characterization of two resistive anode encoder position sensitive detectors for use in ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham, Robert H.; Bleiler, Roger J.; McNitt, Paul J.; Reed, David A.; Fleming, Ronald H.

    1993-02-01

    Both the standard resistive anode encoder (RAE) position sensitive ion detector and a new faster version have been adapted for use with CAMECA IMS-3f/4f imaging secondary-ion mass spectroscopy instruments. Each detector includes a dual microchannel plate image intensifier mounted in front of a resistive anode. The conversion efficiencies of the standard and fast detectors are 60% and 55%, respectively. The high count rates attainable with the fast detector require high strip-current microchannel plates for optimum performance. The mass bias of these detectors is proportional to (mass)1/2 and can be compensated by adjustment of detector supply voltage. The response across the active area of these detectors is uniform to within 3% with the greatest deviations occurring at the periphery. Distortion and pixel-to-pixel bias are negligible with the standard RAE, but noticeable in the prototype of the fast RAE. Software has been developed that corrects pixel-to-pixel bias. The dead times of the standard and fast RAE systems are 4.3±0.1 μs and 330±2 ns which limit practical count rates to about 40 000 and 600 000 Hz, respectively. For many applications, the higher ion arrival rates and dynamic range of the fast RAE imaging system more than compensate for the increased pixel-to-pixel bias and distortion and the small decrease in conversion efficiency.

  10. Imaging, Detection, and Identification Algorithms for Position-Sensitive Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Christopher G.

    Three-dimensional-position-sensitive semiconductors record both the locations and energies of gamma-ray interactions with high resolution, enabling spectroscopy and imaging of gamma-ray-emitting materials. Imaging enables the detection of point sources of gamma rays in an otherwise extended-source background, even when the background spectrum is unknown and may share the point source's spectrum. The generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT) and source-intensity test (SIT) are applied to this situation to detect one-or-more unshielded point sources from a library of isotopes in a spectrally unknown or known background when the background intensity varies spatially by a factor of two or less. In addition to estimating the number of sources present, their activities, isotopes, and directions from the detector are estimated. Experimental and some simulated results are presented for a single detector and an 18-detector array of 2 cm by 2 cm by 1.5 cm CdZnTe crystals and compared with the performance of spectral-only detection when the background and source are assumed to be spectrally different. Furthermore, the expected detection performance of the 18-detector array system is investigated statistically using experimental data in the case where the background is distinct spectrally from the point source and the possible source location and isotopic identity are known. Including imaging gave at least 7% higher SNR compared to ignoring the image dimension. Also, imaging methods based on the maximum-likelihood, expectation-maximization method are introduced to determine the spatial distribution of isotopes and to find the activity distributions within targets moving with known motion through a radioactive background. Software has also been developed to support the analysis of the data from 3D-position-sensitive spectroscopic systems, for a range of detector designs and applications. The software design and unique features that allow fast multidimensional data analysis are

  11. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, L. J.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Makela, M.; Morris, C. L.; Tang, Z.; Adamek, E. R.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Ding, X.; Geltenbort, P.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Ito, T. M.; Leung, K. K.; Liu, C.-Y.; Morley, D. J.; Ortiz, Jose D.; Pattie, R. W.; Ramsey, J. C.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, S. K.; Wexler, J.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-09-01

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15 μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE =m0 gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. This method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.

  12. Using Berrys phase for position-sensitive acoustical and stress detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2002-10-01

    Berry showed that a quantum system, upon an excursion around a closed path in phase space, can lead to a geometric phase. The polarization state of light in a fiber is a classical analog that is called the Pancharantnam phase. While most experiments have focused on esoteric issues, I show that, in theory, Berrys phase (or Pancharantnams phase) can be used to make a position-sensitive acoustical or stress sensor. 2002 Optical Society of America

  13. High-speed measurement of rotational anisotropy nonlinear optical harmonic generation using position-sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Harter, J W; Niu, L; Woss, A J; Hsieh, D

    2015-10-15

    We present a method of performing high-speed rotational anisotropy nonlinear optical harmonic generation experiments at rotational frequencies of several hertz by projecting the harmonic light reflected at different angles from a sample onto a stationary position-sensitive detector. The high rotational speed of the technique, 10(3) to 10(4) times larger than existing methods, permits precise measurements of the crystallographic and electronic symmetries of samples by averaging over low frequency laser-power, beam-pointing, and pulse-width fluctuations. We demonstrate the sensitivity of our technique by resolving the bulk fourfold rotational symmetry of GaAs about its [001] axis using second-harmonic generation. PMID:26469591

  14. Reciprocal space mapping of epitaxial materials using position-sensitive x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Doyle, B.L.; Drummond, T.J.; Medernach, J.W.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Reciprocal space mapping can be efficiently carried out using a position-sensitive x-ray detector (PSD) coupled to a traditional double-axis diffractometer. The PSD offers parallel measurement of the total scattering angle of all diffracted x-rays during a single rocking-curve scan. As a result, a two-dimensional reciprocal space map can be made in a very short time similar to that of a one-dimensional rocking-curve scan. Fast, efficient reciprocal space mapping offers numerous routine advantages to the x-ray diffraction analyst. Some of these advantages are the explicit differentiation of lattice strain from crystal orientation effects in strain-relaxed heteroepitaxial layers; the nondestructive characterization of the size, shape and orientation of nanocrystalline domains in ordered-alloy epilayers; and the ability to measure the average size and shape of voids in porous epilayers. Here, the PSD-based diffractometer is described, and specific examples clearly illustrating the advantages of complete reciprocal space analysis are presented.

  15. Simulated Performance of Algorithms for the Localization of Radioactive Sources from a Position Sensitive Radiation Detecting System (COCAE)

    SciTech Connect

    Karafasoulis, K.; Zachariadou, K.; Seferlis, S.; Kaissas, I.; Potiriadis, C.; Lambropoulos, C.; Loukas, D.

    2011-12-13

    Simulation studies are presented regarding the performance of algorithms that localize point-like radioactive sources detected by a position sensitive portable radiation instrument (COCAE). The source direction is estimated by using the List Mode Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (LM-ML-EM) imaging algorithm. Furthermore, the source-to-detector distance is evaluated by three different algorithms based on the photo-peak count information of each detecting layer, the quality of the reconstructed source image, and the triangulation method. These algorithms have been tested on a large number of simulated photons over a wide energy range (from 200 keV to 2 MeV) emitted by point-like radioactive sources located at different orientations and source-to-detector distances.

  16. Reciprocal-Space Analysis of Compositional Modulation in Short-Period Superlattices Using Position-Sensitive X-Ray Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lee, S.R.; Millunchick, J.M.; Norman, A.G.; Reno, J.L.; Twesten, R.D.

    1998-11-10

    Epitaxial growth of AlAs-InAs short-period superlattices on (001) InP can lead to heterostructures exhibiting strong, quasi-periodic, lateral modulation of the alloy composition; transverse satellites arise in reciprocal space as a signature of the compositional modulation. Using an x-ray diffractometer equipped with a position-sensitive x-ray detector, we demonstrate reciprocal-space mapping of these satellites as an efficient, nondestructive means for detecting and characterizing the occurrence of compositional modulation. Systematic variations in the compositional modulation due to the structural design and the growth conditions of the short-period superlattice are characterized by routine mapping of the lateral satellites. Spontaneous compositional modulation occurs along the growth front during molecular-beam epitaxy of (AlAs) (InAs)n short-period superlattices. The modulation is quasi-periodic and forms a lateral superlattice superimposed on the intended SPS structure. Corresponding transverse satellites arise about each reciprocal lattice point, and x-ray diffraction can be routinely used to map their local reciprocal-space structure. The integrated intensity, spacing, orientation, and shape of these satellites provide a reliable means for nondestructively detecting and characterizing the compositional modulation in short-period superlattices. The analytical efficiency afforded by the use of a PSD has enabled detailed study of systematic vacations in compositional modulation as a function of the average composition, the period, and the growth rate of the short- period superlattice

  17. Direct high-resolution ion beam-profile imaging using a position-sensitive Faraday cup array.

    PubMed

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F

    2009-11-01

    Ion sources have wide-spread use in a multitude of applications. For many, an accurate knowledge, or better, an accurate imaging, of the beam profile and intensity is an important criterion. We are developing an ion source to calibrate instruments for space-based measurements of solar wind and suprathermal particles in the energy range from below 1 keV/nuc to above 200 keV/nuc. In order to establish accurate beam profiles for calibration purposes, we have developed a new method based on an array of very small (diameter = 0.3 mm) Faraday cups. Here, we describe the experimental setup and discuss how to achieve several requirements such as a large thermal load due to the approximately 40 W of beam power.

  18. Direct high-resolution ion beam-profile imaging using a position-sensitive Faraday cup array

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2009-11-15

    Ion sources have wide-spread use in a multitude of applications. For many, an accurate knowledge, or better, an accurate imaging, of the beam profile and intensity is an important criterion. We are developing an ion source to calibrate instruments for space-based measurements of solar wind and suprathermal particles in the energy range from below 1 keV/nuc to above 200 keV/nuc. In order to establish accurate beam profiles for calibration purposes, we have developed a new method based on an array of very small (diameter = 0.3 mm) Faraday cups. Here, we describe the experimental setup and discuss how to achieve several requirements such as a large thermal load due to the {approx}40W of beam power.

  19. Position Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadleir, J. E.; Hammock, C.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Stahle, C. K.; Bandler, S.; Saab, T.; Lindeman, M.; Porter, F. S.; Chervenak, J.; Brown, G.

    2004-01-01

    A Position Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (PoST) is a microcalorimeter device capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. The device consists of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) connected to the ends of a long X-ray absorbing strip. The energy of a photon hitting the absorber and the position of the absorption event along the strip is measured from the response in the two sensors by analyzing the relative signal sizes, pulse rise times, and the sum of the pulses measured at each sensor, We report on the recent PoST effort at Goddard for applications to large field of view, high-energy- resolution, X-ray astrophysics.

  20. A BGO/GSO position sensitive block detector for a high resolution positron emission tomography with depth of interaction detection capability

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.

    1996-12-31

    We developed a position sensitive block detector with depth of interaction detection capability for positron emission tomography (PET). The detector consists of 6 x 8 array of GSO scintillators, 6 x 8 array of BGO scintillators and two dual photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The GSO scintillators are optically coupled to front surface of the BGO scintillators. The position of 6 x 8 scintillators are determined by the Anger principle and depth of interaction position is determined by using the pulse shape analysis of GSOs and BGOs. Performance of the block detector was measured. Position distribution of the developed BGO/GSO block detector was little distorted. However the separation of the spots was still enough to distinguish the scintillators in transaxial and axial directions. Since pulse shape distribution using a developed simple pulse shape analyzer had two peaks, it is possible to separate the GSOs and BGOs for depth of interaction detection. With these results, a high resolution PET with depth of interaction detection capability will be possible using the developed BGO/GSO block detectors.

  1. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lemasson, A.; Rejmund, M.; Fremont, G.; Pancin, J.; Navin, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Goupil, J.; Spitaels, C.; Jacquot, B.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, the interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) μm for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the γ-rays, detected in the γ-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  2. Relating to ion detection

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  3. Low-distortion resistive anodes for two-dimensional position-sensitive MCP systems. [Microchannel Plates for ion, electron and photon image sensing and conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Carlson, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are frequently used with resistive anodes to detect charged particles or photons and yield analog signals from which event positions can be decoded. The paper discusses a four-corner concave circular arc terminated resistive anode that permits theoretically distortionless encoding of Cartesian event positions into pulse charge ratios. The theory of the circular arc terminated anode is discussed along with anode design and performance. Electron beam images obtained by using such an anode are presented to confirm the usefulness of the approach.

  4. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  5. Photoelectrochemical detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-07-21

    Depending on the situation, metal ions may either play beneficial roles or be harmful to human health and ecosystems. Sensitive and accurate detection of metal ions is thus a critical issue in the field of analytical sciences and great efforts have been devoted to the development of various metal ion sensors. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection is an emerging technique for the bio/chemical detection of metal ions, and features a fast response, low cost and high sensitivity. Using representative examples, this review will first introduce the fundamentals and summarize recent progress in the PEC detection of metal ions. In addition, interesting strategies for the design of particular PEC metal ion sensors are discussed. Challenges and opportunities in this field are also presented. PMID:27297834

  6. Development of the Position Sensitive Ionization Chamber for ANASEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah; Blackmon, Jeff; Deibel, Catherine; Gardiner, Emily; Lai, Jianping; Lauer, Amber; Linhardt, Laura; Macon, Kevin; Rasco, Charlie; Baby, Lagy; Koshchiy, Yevegn; Rogachev, Grigory; Santiago-Gonzales, Daniel; Wiedenhoever, Ingo; Bardayan, Dan; Matos, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array developed for reaction studies using radioactive ion beams to help improve understanding of the nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. A gas-filled ionization chamber with two position-sensitive anode wire grid planes read out in 32 channels, and 12 alternating anode/cathode planes was developed and tested for use with ANASEN to identify the kinematic trajectory and atomic number of recoiling heavy ions by their relative energy loss. The position sensitive grids are arranged perpendicularly to each other in order to determine the x-y position of each ion with better than 4 mm resolution. This ionization chamber was tested using a stable beam of 12C at FSU. We report on the performance of this test experiment and plans for measurements with radioactive ion beams at FSU. Two other versions of the detector have been constructed and are now in place at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and at the ATLAS accelerator facility at Argonne National Laboratory.

  7. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wave length shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event.

  8. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-02-22

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wavelength shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event. 6 figures.

  9. Exploring the spatial resolution of position-sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    High amplification and excellent timing make microchannel plate (MCP) detectors excellent devices for detection of photons, electrons, and ions. In addition to providing sub-nanosecond time resolution MCP detectors can also provide spatial resolution, thus making them useful in imaging applications. Use of a resistive anode (RA) is a routinely used approach to make an MCP position-sensitive. The spatial resolution of the RA associated with detection of a single incident electron was determined. Factors impacting the spatial resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved spatial resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Recently, a novel approach has been developed to provide position-sensitivity for an MCP detector. In this approach, namely the induced signal approach, the position of the incident particle is determined by sensing the electron cloud emanating from a MCP stack. By utilizing the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a spatial resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Work to improve the spatial resolution of the induced signal approach further will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  10. Development of a novel position-sensitive microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2015-10-01

    Position sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detectors which measure the position of an incident electron, ion, or photon, are useful in imaging applications. Recently, a novel detector, which utilizes an induced approach to provide position sensitivity, has been developed. In the prototype detector, using only the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a position resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Implementing a differential readout may improve on this resolution. To realize this differential approach, a better understanding of the dependence of the induced signal shape on the position of the electron cloud is required. To characterize the dependence of the induced signal shape on position a resistive anode (RA) has been incorporated into the detector. The RA will allow determination of the centroid of the electron cloud. Factors impacting the position resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved position resolution of 157 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  11. Recent advances and future perspectives of position sensitive PMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Mattioli, M.; Trotta, C.; Montani, L.; Iurlaro, G.; Trotta, G.; D'Addio, L.; Ridolfi, S.; De Vincentis, G.; Weinberg, I. N.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in developing compact gamma cameras to improve gamma ray imaging for application in nuclear medicine as well as in astrophysics, radiation physics and high energy physics. The gamma cameras based on position sensitive photomultipliers could be the best chance to obtain a realistic and low cost compact gamma camera. Since 1985 the development of position sensitive photo multiplier tubes (PSPMT) has shown the highest rate in technological advancement achieving very compact size (25 × 25 × 20 mm 3) by a novel charge multiplication system. The PSPMT shows the same advantages of a standard gamma camera with the additional possibility to utilize scintillation arrays with pixel dimension less than 1 mm, thus achieving sub-millimeter spatial resolution values. The last technological advance is a PSPMT with Flat Panel structure, named H8500. Its dimension is 50 × 50 mm 2 with a narrow peripheral dead zone to place closely different modules achieving large detection areas. In this paper the technological development of different PSPMT generations is reviewed and some measurements of the first Flat Panel PMT prototype are presented and compared with ones from previous generation. Flat Panel PMT could be the best trade-off between compactness, large detection areas, effective area (packing density) and imaging performance.

  12. Practical Considerations for Optimizing Position Sensitivity in Arrays of Position-sensitive TES's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.; Bandler, Simon R.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Encetali; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porder, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing Position-Sensitive Transitions-Edge Sensors (PoST's) for future X-ray astronomy missions such as NASA's Constellation-X. The PoST consists of one or more Transitions Edge Sensors (TES's) thermally connected to a large X-ray absorber, which through heat diffusion, gives rise to position dependence. The development of PoST's is motivated by the desire to achieve the largest the focal-plan coverage with the fewest number of readout channels. In order to develop a practical array, consisting of an inner pixellated core with an outer array of large absorber PoST's, we must be able to simultaneously read out all (-1800) channels in the array. This is achievable using time division multiplexing (TDM), but does set stringent slew rate requirements on the array. Typically, we must damp the pulses to reduce the slew rate of the input signal to the TDM. This is achieved by applying a low-pass analog filter with large inductance to the signal. This attenuates the high frequency components of the signal, essential for position discrimination in PoST's, relative to the white noise of the readout chain and degrades the position sensitivity. Using numerically simulated data, we investigate the position sensing ability of typical PoST designs under such high inductance conditions. We investigate signal-processing techniques for optimal determination of the event position and discuss the practical considerations for real-time implementation.

  13. Particle tracking with scintillating fibers and position sensitive photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    C.F. Perdrisat; R. Pourang; D. Koechner; D. Raine, III; B. Kross; S. Majewski; A. Weisenberger; R. Wojcik; K. Zorn; V. Punjabi; A. Day

    1991-11-01

    The use of position-sensitive phototubes in conjunction with scintillating plastic fibers for a particle tracking application in a future focal plane polarimeter (FPP) in the hadron arm of the hall A HRS 2 facility at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Current results indicate that the design parameters of the FPP in the hadron arm of the double spectrometer facility HRS2 can be met with a design which couples round or square fibers 3 mm in size to Hamamatsu R4135 phototubes. Position resolutions {sigma}x or {sigma}y on the order of 0.6 mm are obtained in the phototubes. Detector structures with staggered double fiber layers lead to overall resolution of {sigma}=1 mm, and detection efficiencies close to 1. The characteristic speed of these detectors makes them particularly appropriate for the high rates which are expected with the 200-{micro}A continuous wave beam at CEBAF.

  14. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L.; Margato, L. M. S.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transfer models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed show good agreement with simulations.

  15. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  16. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  17. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  18. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  19. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  20. High resolution, position sensitive detector for energetic particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, E. P.; Strathman, M. D.; Reed, D. A.; Morse, D. H.; Pontau, A. E.; Odom, R. W.

    1993-05-01

    The performance and design of an imaging position sensitive, particle beam detector will be presented. The detector is minimally invasive, operates over a wide dynamic range (> 10 10), and exhibits high spatial resolution. The secondary electrons produced when a particle beam passes through a thin foil are imaged using stigmatic ion optics onto a two-dimensional imaging detector. Due to the low scattering cross section of the 6 nm carbon foil the detector is a minimal perturbation on the primary beam. A prototype detector with an image resolution of approximately 5 μm for a field of view of 1 mm has been reported [R.W. Odom, M.D. Strathman, S.E. Buttrill, Jr., and S.M. Bauman, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B44 (1990) 465]. A higher resolution detector for imaging small beams (< 50 μm) with an image resolution of better than 0.5 μm has since been developed and its design is presented.

  1. Single photon emission imaging by position sensitive PMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Soluri, A.; De Vincentis, G.; Scafè, R.; Pergola, A.

    1998-02-01

    Position Sensitive Photo Multiplier Tube (PSPMT) represents a strong technological improvement for Nuclear Medicine imaging. Over the last 10 years Hamamatsu has developed a number of PSPMTs with different shapes and sizes, from 1 in. square up to more recent prototype of 8 in. diameter. The position is continuously detected by centroid method and spatial resolution represents its statistical uncertainty. By coupling PSPMTs to scintillating arrays it was possible to push PMTs near their intrinsic limit. A number of scintillating crystals arranged in a matrix were tested such as: YAP : Ce, NaI(Tl), CsI(Tl) and CsI(Na) with different pixel size (from 0.3×0.3 mm 2 to 2×2 mm 2) with overall dimension from 4×4 cm 2 up to 11 cm diameter. A number of applications in Nuclear Medicine were performed, such as miniature gamma cameras for radiopharmaceutical investigations on little animals where sub-millimeter spatial resolution values were carried out. More recently, the first prototype of dedicated gamma camera for scintimammography has been developed for small cancer detection in the breast.

  2. ASIC for High Rate 3D Position Sensitive Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, E.; De Geronimo, G.; Ackley, K.; Fried, J.; He, Z.; Herman, C.; Zhang, F.

    2010-06-16

    We report on the development of an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position sensitive detectors (3D PSD). The ASIC is designed to operate with pixelated wide bandgap sensors like Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), Mercuric Iodide (Hgl2) and Thallium Bromide (TIBr). It measures the amplitudes and timings associated with an ionizing event on 128 anodes, the anode grid, and the cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with peaking time adjustable from 250 ns to 12 {micro}s, gain adjustable to 20 mV/fC or 120 mV/fC (for a dynamic range of 3.2 MeV and 530 keV in CZT), amplitude discrimination with 5-bit trimming, and positive and negative peak and timing detections. The readout can be full or sparse, based on a flag and single- or multi-cycle token passing. All channels, triggered channels only, or triggered with neighbors can be read out thus increasing the rate capability of the system to more than 10 kcps. The ASIC dissipates 330 mW which corresponds to about 2.5 mW per channel.

  3. READOUT ASIC FOR 3D POSITION-SENSITIVE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; VERNON, E.; ACKLEY, K.; DRAGONE, A.; FRIED, J.; OCONNOR, P.; HE, Z.; HERMAN, C.; ZHANG, F.

    2007-10-27

    We describe an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position-sensitive detectors. It was optimized for pixelated CZT sensors, and it measures, corresponding to an ionizing event, the energy and timing of signals from 121 anodes and one cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping, along with peak- and timing-detection. The cathode's timing can be measured in three different ways: the first is based on multiple thresholds on the charge amplifier's voltage output; the second uses the threshold crossing of a fast-shaped signal; and the third measures the peak amplitude and timing from a bipolar shaper. With its power of 2 mW per channel the ASIC measures, on a CZT sensor Connected and biased, charges up to 100 fC with an electronic resolution better than 200 e{sup -} rms. Our preliminary spectral measurements applying a simple cathode/mode ratio correction demonstrated a single-pixel resolution of 4.8 keV (0.72 %) at 662 keV, with the electronics and leakage current contributing in total with 2.1 keV.

  4. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis set up for electronic sputtering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Tripathi, A.; Kabiraj, D.; Sugathan, P.; Chaudhary, G. K.; Barua, P.

    2006-04-01

    Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) set up with a large solid angle (greater than or similar to 4.8 msr) Delta E - E position-sensitive telescope detector is developed at Inter University Accelerator Centre as a dedicated facility for the study of electronic sputtering of thin films under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The detector consists of a gas ionization chamber (Delta E ) and a solid-state surface barrier detector ( E ) housed in a same assembly. The electronic sputtering yield (atoms/ion) is determined by analyzing on-line fluence-dependent ERDA data obtained from a variety of thin films. Large erosion (> 10 5 atoms/ion) of carbon from a-C:H by 150 MeV Ag 13+ ions, evolution of nitrogen (greater than or similar to 880 atoms/ion) from copper nitride and depletion of oxygen (greater than or similar to 1000 atoms/ion) from copper oxide film under 200 MeV Au 15+ ion impact are studied and reported in this work. The electronic sputtering of these materials is discussed on the basis of the thermal spike model of SHI and solid interaction.

  5. Construction and commissioning of a position-sensitive ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwag, M. S.; Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Kim, A.; Kim, M. J.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    A position-sensitive ionization chamber has been constructed and commissioned at the Physics Department of Sungkyunkwan University to extract position information on incident charged particles for future nuclear reaction measurements. By utilizing the newly-designed position-sensitive anodes and the previously-commissioned portable gas-filled ionization chamber by Chae et al., position information on incident particles could be obtained. The device was tested with an 241Am α-emitting source, and the standard deviation of the fitted Gaussian distribution was measured to be 1.76 mm when a collimator with a 2 mm hole was used.

  6. Self-Balancing Position-Sensitive Detector (SBPSD)

    PubMed Central

    Porrazzo, Ryan; Lydecker, Leigh; Gattu, Suhasini; Bakhru, Hassaram; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS technology, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. An innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using two back-to-back connected photodiodes. These so called self-balancing position-sensitive detectors (SBPSDs) eliminate the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Fabricated prototype devices demonstrate linear, symmetric coordinate characteristics and a spatial resolution of 200 μm for a 74 mm device. PSDs are commercially available only up to a length of 37 mm. Prototype devices were fabricated with various lengths up to 100 mm and can be scaled down to any size below that. PMID:26205266

  7. Self-Balancing Position-Sensitive Detector (SBPSD).

    PubMed

    Porrazzo, Ryan; Lydecker, Leigh; Gattu, Suhasini; Bakhru, Hassaram; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS technology, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. An innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using two back-to-back connected photodiodes. These so called self-balancing position-sensitive detectors (SBPSDs) eliminate the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Fabricated prototype devices demonstrate linear, symmetric coordinate characteristics and a spatial resolution of 200 μm for a 74 mm device. PSDs are commercially available only up to a length of 37 mm. Prototype devices were fabricated with various lengths up to 100 mm and can be scaled down to any size below that.

  8. Development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Isaac; Huang Rongxin; Henderson, Kevin; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Raizen, Mark G.

    2008-10-15

    We report the development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector. The detector uses a fiber-optic bundle that spatially splits the incident beam, followed by a fast balanced photodetector. The detector is applied to the study of Brownian motion of particles on fast time scales with 1 A spatial resolution. Future applications include the study of molecule motors, protein folding, as well as cellular processes.

  9. A novel method for assessing position-sensitive detector performance

    SciTech Connect

    Clinthorne, N.H.; Rogers, W.L.; Shao, L.; Hero, A.O. III; Koral, K.F.

    1989-02-01

    A marked point process model of a position-sensitive detector is developed which includes the effects of detector efficiency, spatial response, energy response, and source statistics. The average mutual information between the incident distribution of ..gamma.. rays and the detector response is derived and used as a performance index for detector optimization. A brief example is presented which uses this figure-of-merit for optimization of light guide dimensions for a modular scintillation camera.

  10. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector—the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups.

  11. A position sensitive microchannel photomultiplier for ultraviolet space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1986-01-01

    The 25-mm microchannel-plate, position-sensitive UV astronomy photomultiplier tube presented is intended for the EOM-1 Spacelab Mission's FAUST payload and conducts wide-field imaging surveys in the VUV over the 1400-1800-A range. The sealed detector encompasses a CsI photocathode deposited on the inner surface of a MgF2 window, a stack of microchannel plates, and a wedge-and-strip two-dimensional position-sensing anode. Since the wedge-and-strip principle requires only three anode signals, flight electronics can be reduced to three charge amplifiers and three analog-to-digital converters.

  12. Position-Sensitive Nuclear Spectroscopy with Pixel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Granja, Carlos; Vykydal, Zdenek; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2007-10-26

    State-of-the-art hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors such as Medipix2 are suitable for energy- and position-sensitive nuclear spectroscopy. In addition to excellent energy- and spatial-resolution, these devices can operate in spectroscopic, single-quantum counting and/or on-line tracking mode. A devoted compact USB-readout interface provides functionality and ease of operation. The compact and versatile Medipix2/USB radiation camera provides visualization, vacuum and room-temperature operation as a real-time portable active nuclear emulsion.

  13. Position sensitivity of the first SmartPET HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. J.; Turk, G.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Mather, A. R.; Nolan, P. J.; Hall, C. J.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lewis, R. A.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we discuss the Smart Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging system being developed by the University of Liverpool in conjunction with CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory. We describe the motivation for the development of a semiconductor-based PET system and the advantages it will offer over current tomographs. Details of the detectors and associated electronics are discussed and results of high precision scans are presented. Analysis of this scan data has facilitated full characterization of the detector response function and calibration of the three-dimensional position sensitivity. This work presents the analysis of the depth sensitivity of the detector.

  14. DETECTION OF THE AMMONIUM ION IN SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B.; Fuente, A.; Domenech, J. L.; Cueto, M.; Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Marcelino, N.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Pearson, J.

    2013-07-01

    We report on the detection of a narrow feature at 262816.73 MHz toward Orion and the cold prestellar core B1-bS which we attribute to the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} line of the deuterated ammonium ion, NH{sub 3}D{sup +}. The observations were performed with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope. The carrier has to be a light molecular species as it is the only feature detected over 3.6 GHz of bandwidth. The hyperfine structure is not resolved, indicating a very low value for the electric quadrupolar coupling constant of nitrogen which is expected for NH{sub 3}D{sup +} as the electric field over the N nucleus is practically zero. Moreover, the feature is right at the predicted frequency for the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} transition of the ammonium ion, 262817 {+-} 6 MHz (3{sigma}), using rotational constants derived from new infrared data obtained in our laboratory in Madrid. The estimated column density is (1.1 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. Assuming a deuterium enhancement similar to that of NH{sub 2}D, we derive N(NH{sub 4}{sup +}) {approx_equal} 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, i.e., an abundance for ammonium of a few 10{sup -11}.

  15. Ion-Selective Detection with Glass Nanopipette for Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, T.; Son, J. W.; Kang, E. J.; Deng, X. L.; Kawai, T.; Lee, S.-W.; Park, B. H.

    2013-05-01

    We developed a method to probe local ion concentration with glass nanopipette in which poly(vinyl chloride) membrane containing ionophore for separate ion detection is prepared. Here we demonstrate how ion-selective detections are available for living cells such as HeLa cell, rat vascular myocyte, and neuron cell.

  16. Detection method for dissociation of multiple-charged ions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.; Rockwood, Alan L.

    1991-01-01

    Dissociations of multiple-charged ions are detected and analyzed by charge-separation tandem mass spectrometry. Analyte molecules are ionized to form multiple-charged parent ions. A particular charge parent ion state is selected in a first-stage mass spectrometer and its mass-to-charge ratio (M/Z) is detected to determine its mass and charge. The selected parent ions are then dissociated, each into a plurality of fragments including a set of daughter ions each having a mass of at least one molecular weight and a charge of at least one. Sets of daughter ions resulting from the dissociation of one parent ion (sibling ions) vary in number but typically include two to four ions, one or more multiply-charged. A second stage mass spectrometer detects mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of the daughter ions and a temporal or temporo-spatial relationship among them. This relationship is used to correlate the daughter ions to determine which (m/z) ratios belong to a set of sibling ions. Values of mass and charge of each of the sibling ions are determined simultaneously from their respective (m/z) ratios such that the sibling ion charges are integers and sum to the parent ion charge.

  17. Optical methods for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. N.; Bessmertnykh-Lemeune, A.; Guilard, R.; Averin, A. D.; Beletskaya, I. P.

    2014-03-01

    The review covers an important area of the modern chemistry, namely, the detection of heavy metal ions using optical molecular detectors. The role of this method in metal ion detection and the physicochemical grounds of operation of chemosensors are discussed, and examples of detection of most abundant heavy metal ions and synthetic approaches to molecular detectors are presented. The immobilization of molecular detectors on solid substrates for the design of analytical sensor devices is described. The bibliography includes 178 references.

  18. Position sensitive x-ray spectrophotometer using microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Bumble, Bruce; Day, Peter K.; Eckart, Megan E.; Golwala, Sunil; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2006-11-27

    The surface impedance of a superconductor changes when energy is absorbed and Cooper pairs are broken to produce single electron (quasiparticle) excitations. This change may be sensitively measured using a thin-film resonant circuit called a microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID). The practical application of MKIDs for photon detection requires a method of efficiently coupling the photon energy to the MKID. The authors present results on position sensitive x-ray detectors made by using two aluminum MKIDs on either side of a tantalum photon absorber strip. Diffusion constants, recombination times, and energy resolution are reported. MKIDs can easily be scaled into large arrays.

  19. Reconstruction-free sensitive wavefront sensor based on continuous position sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Godin, Thomas; Fromager, Michael; Cagniot, Emmanuel; Brunel, Marc; Aït-Ameur, Kamel

    2013-12-01

    We propose a new device that is able to perform highly sensitive wavefront measurements based on the use of continuous position sensitive detectors and without resorting to any reconstruction process. We demonstrate experimentally its ability to measure small wavefront distortions through the characterization of pump-induced refractive index changes in laser material. In addition, it is shown using computer-generated holograms that this device can detect phase discontinuities as well as improve the quality of sharp phase variations measurements. Results are compared to reference Shack-Hartmann measurements, and dramatic enhancements are obtained.

  20. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  1. A New Positioning Algorithm for Position-Sensitive Avalanche Photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Olcott, Peter D; Levin, Craig S

    2007-06-01

    We are using a novel position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) for the construction of a high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) camera. Up to now most researchers working with PSAPDs have been using an Anger-like positioning algorithm involving the four corner readout signals of the PSAPD. This algorithm yields a significant non-linear spatial "pin-cushion" distortion in raw crystal positioning histograms. In this paper, we report an improved positioning algorithm, which combines two diagonal corner signals of the PSAPD followed by a 45° rotation to determine the X or Y position of the interaction. We present flood positioning histogram data generated with the old and new positioning algorithms using a 3 × 4 array of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) and a 3 × 8 array of 1 × 1 × 3 mm(3) of LSO crystals coupled to 8 × 8 mm(2) PSAPDs. This new algorithm significantly reduces the pin-cushion distortion in raw flood histogram image. PMID:24307743

  2. Pulsed neutron imaging using 2-dimensional position sensitive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Y.; Kamiyama, T.; Kino, K.; Sato, H.; Sato, S.; Uno, S.

    2014-07-01

    2-dimensional position sensitive detectors are used for pulsed neutron imaging and at each pixel of the detector a time of flight spectrum is recorded. Therefore, a transmission spectrum through the object has wavelength dependent structure reflecting the neutron total cross section. For such measurements, the detectors are required to have ability to store neutron events as a function of the flight time as well as to have good spatial resolution. Furthermore, high counting rate is also required at the high intensity neutron sources like J-PARC neutron source in Japan. We have developed several types of detectors with different characteristics; two counting type detectors for high counting rate with coarse spatial resolution and one camera type detector for high spatial resolution. One of counting type detectors is a pixel type. The highest counting rate is about 28 MHz. Better spatial resolution is obtained by a GEM detector. Effective area is 10 × 10 cm2, pixel size is 0.8 mm. The maximum counting rate is 3.65 MHz. To get higher spatial resolution we are now developing the camera type detector system using a neutron image intensifier, which have image integration function as a function of time of flight. We have succeeded to obtain time dependent images in this camera system. By using these detectors we performed transmission measurements for obtaining the crystallographic information and elemental distribution images.

  3. Canadian Penning Trap Mass Measurements using a Position Sensitive MCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuta, Trenton; Aprahamian, Ani; Marley, Scott; Nystrom, Andrew; Clark, Jason; Perez Galvan, Adrian; Hirsh, Tsviki; Savard, Guy; Orford, Rodney; Morgan, Graeme

    2015-10-01

    The primary focus of the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) located at Argonne National Lab is to determine the masses of various isotopes produced in the spontaneous fission of Californium. Currently, the CPT is operating in conjunction with CARIBU at the ATLAS facility in an attempt to measure neutron-rich nuclei produced by a 1.5 Curie source of Californium 252. The masses of nuclei produced in fission is accomplished by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the isotopes circling within the trap. This frequency is determined by a position sensitive MCP, which records the relative position of the isotope in the trap at different times. Using these position changes over time in connection with a center spot, angles between these positions are calculated and used to determine the frequency. Most of the work currently being conducted on the CPT is focused on the precision of these frequency measurements. The use of traps has revolutionized the measurements of nuclear masses to very high precision. The optimization methods employed here include focusing the beam in order to reduce the spread on the position of the isotope as well as the tuning of the MR-ToF, a mass separator that is intended on removing contaminants in the beam. This work was supported by the nuclear Grant PHY-1419765 for the University of Notre Dame.

  4. Negative ion spectrometry for detecting nitrated explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, H. G.; Yinon, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ionization procedure is modified to produce mainly negative ions by electron capture. Peaks of negative ions are monitored conventionally. Nitrated organic materials could be identified directly from sample sniff inlet stream by suitably modified mass spectrometer because of unique electronegativity which nitro group imparts to organic material.

  5. Method of detecting luminescent target ions with modified magnetic microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Kaminski, Michael D

    2014-05-13

    This invention provides methods of using modified magnetic microspheres to extract target ions from a sample in order to detect their presence in a microfluidic environment. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules on the surface that allow the target ions in the sample to form complexes with specific ligand molecules on the microsphere surface. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules that sequester the target ions from the sample, but specific ligand molecules in solution subsequently re-extract the target ions from the microspheres into the solution, where the complexes form independent of the microsphere surface. Once the complexes form, they are exposed to an excitation wavelength light source suitable for exciting the target ion to emit a luminescent signal pattern. Detection of the luminescent signal pattern allows for determination of the presence of the target ions in the sample.

  6. Nanopore detection of copper ions using a polyhistidine probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guihua; Wang, Liang; Han, Yujing; Zhou, Shuo; Guan, Xiyun

    2014-03-15

    We report a stochastic nanopore sensing method for the detection of Cu(2+) ions. By employing a polyhistidine molecule as a chelating agent, and based on the different signatures of the events produced by the translocation of the chelating agent through an α-hemolysin pore in the absence and presence of target analytes, trace amounts of copper ions could be detected with a detection limit of 40 nM. Importantly, although Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+) also interacts with the polyhistidine molecule, since the event residence times and/or blockage amplitudes for these metal chelates are significantly different from those of copper chelates, these metal ions do not interfere with Cu(2+) detection. This chelating reaction approach should find useful application in the development of nanopore sensors for other metal ions.

  7. Ion Trap with Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes for Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Oleg Y.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm in ion trap (cell) design for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) is the ion detection with wide aperture detection electrodes. Specifically, excitation and detection electrodes are typically 90° wide and positioned radially at a similar distance from the ICR cell axis. Here, we demonstrate that ion detection with narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) positioned radially inward of the cell's axis is feasible and advantageous for FT-ICR MS. We describe design details and performance characteristics of a 10 T FT-ICR MS equipped with a NADEL ICR cell having a pair of narrow aperture (flat) detection electrodes and a pair of standard 90° excitation electrodes. Despite a smaller surface area of the detection electrodes, the sensitivity of the NADEL ICR cell is not reduced attributable to improved excite field distribution, reduced capacitance of the detection electrodes, and their closer positioning to the orbits of excited ions. The performance characteristics of the NADEL ICR cell are comparable with the state-of-the-art FT-ICR MS implementations for small molecule, peptide, protein, and petroleomics analyses. In addition, the NADEL ICR cell's design improves the flexibility of ICR cells and facilitates implementation of advanced capabilities (e.g., quadrupolar ion detection for improved mainstream applications). It also creates an intriguing opportunity for addressing the major bottleneck in FTMS—increasing its throughput via simultaneous acquisition of multiple transients or via generation of periodic non-sinusoidal transient signals.

  8. Ion detection device and method with compressing ion-beam shutter

    DOEpatents

    Sperline, Roger P [Tucson, AZ

    2009-05-26

    An ion detection device, method and computer readable medium storing instructions for applying voltages to shutter elements of the detection device to compress ions in a volume defined by the shutter elements and to output the compressed ions to a collector. The ion detection device has a chamber having an inlet and receives ions through the inlet, a shutter provided in the chamber opposite the inlet and configured to allow or prevent the ions to pass the shutter, the shutter having first and second shutter elements, a collector provided in the chamber opposite the shutter and configured to collect ions passed through the shutter, and a processing unit electrically connected to the first and second shutter elements. The processing unit applies, during a first predetermined time interval, a first voltage to the first shutter element and a second voltage to the second shutter element, the second voltage being lower than the first voltage such that ions from the inlet enter a volume defined by the first and second shutter elements, and during a second predetermined time interval, a third voltage to the first shutter element, higher than the first voltage, and a fourth voltage to the second shutter element, the third voltage being higher than the fourth voltage such that ions that entered the volume are compressed as the ions exit the volume and new ions coming from the inlet are prevented from entering the volume. The processing unit is electrically connected to the collector and configured to detect the compressed ions based at least on a current received from the collector and produced by the ions collected by the collector.

  9. Ion Source Development for Ultratrace Detection of Uranium and Thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Batchelder, Jon Charles; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Stracener, Daniel W

    2015-01-01

    A hot-cavity surface ionization source and a hot-cavity laser ion source are evaluated in terms of ionization efficiencies for generating ion beams of U and Th. The work is motivated by the need for more efficient ion sources for detecting ultratrace U and Th impurities in a copper matrix by mass spectrometry techniques such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The performances of the ion sources are characterized using uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate sample materials and sample sizes of 20 - 40 g of U or Th. For the surface source, the dominant ion beams observed are UO+ or ThO+ and ionization efficiencies of 2-4% have been obtained with W and Re cavities. Three-step resonant photoionization of U atoms is studied and an ionization efficiency of 8.7% has been obtained with the laser ion source. The positive ion sources promise more than an order of magnitude more efficient than conventional Cs-sputter negative ion sources used for AMS. In addition, the laser ion source is highly selective and effective in suppressing interfering and ions. Work is in progress to improve the efficiencies of both positive ion sources.

  10. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  11. Measuring Relative-Story Displacement and Local Inclination Angle Using Multiple Position-Sensitive Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Matsuya, Iwao; Katamura, Ryuta; Sato, Maya; Iba, Miroku; Kondo, Hideaki; Kanekawa, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Motoichi; Hatada, Tomohiko; Nitta, Yoshihiro; Tanii, Takashi; Shoji, Shuichi; Nishitani, Akira; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel sensor system for monitoring the structural health of a building. The system optically measures the relative-story displacement during earthquakes for detecting any deformations of building elements. The sensor unit is composed of three position sensitive detectors (PSDs) and lenses capable of measuring the relative-story displacement precisely, even if the PSD unit was inclined in response to the seismic vibration. For verification, laboratory tests were carried out using an Xθ-stage and a shaking table. The static experiment verified that the sensor could measure the local inclination angle as well as the lateral displacement. The dynamic experiment revealed that the accuracy of the sensor was 150 μm in the relative-displacement measurement and 100 μrad in the inclination angle measurement. These results indicate that the proposed sensor system has sufficient accuracy for the measurement of relative-story displacement in response to the seismic vibration. PMID:22163434

  12. 3D scanning characteristics of an amorphous silicon position sensitive detector array system.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Javier; Gomes, Luis; Filonovich, Sergej; Correia, Nuno; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Isabel

    2012-02-13

    The 3D scanning electro-optical characteristics of a data acquisition prototype system integrating a 32 linear array of 1D amorphous silicon position sensitive detectors (PSD) were analyzed. The system was mounted on a platform for imaging 3D objects using the triangulation principle with a sheet-of-light laser. New obtained results reveal a minimum possible gap or simulated defect detection of approximately 350 μm. Furthermore, a first study of the angle for 3D scanning was also performed, allowing for a broad range of angles to be used in the process. The relationship between the scanning angle of the incident light onto the object and the image displacement distance on the sensor was determined for the first time in this system setup. Rendering of 3D object profiles was performed at a significantly higher number of frames than in the past and was possible for an incident light angle range of 15 ° to 85 °.

  13. Mass-dependent channel electron multiplier operation. [for ion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. A.; Burch, J. L.; Oran, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute counting efficiency and pulse height distributions of a continuous-channel electron multiplier used in the detection of hydrogen, argon and xenon ions are assessed. The assessment technique, which involves the post-acceleration of 8-eV ion beams to energies from 100 to 4000 eV, provides information on counting efficiency versus post-acceleration voltage characteristics over a wide range of ion mass. The charge pulse height distributions for H2 (+), A (+) and Xe (+) were measured by operating the experimental apparatus in a marginally gain-saturated mode. It was found that gain saturation occurs at lower channel multiplier operating voltages for light ions such as H2 (+) than for the heavier ions A (+) and Xe (+), suggesting that the technique may be used to discriminate between these two classes of ions in electrostatic analyzers.

  14. Detection of gunpowder stabilizers with ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    West, C; Baron, G; Minet, J-J

    2007-03-01

    This study is the first reported ion mobility detection of ethyl centralite and diphenylamine (DPA) smokeless gunpowder stabilizers, together with the nitroso and nitro derivatives of diphenylamine. First, the applicability of the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for the substances of interest was determined. The existence of numerous peaks, both in positive and negative modes, clearly demonstrates the success of these experiments. All mono and di-nitro derivatives of DPA tested were detected with this method. Unfortunately, many of the ions generated were not accurately identified. However, reduced mobility constants representative of each ion generated under defined operating conditions could be used for purpose of compound identification. The method was then successfully tested on real gunpowder samples. By the use of IMS, we managed to establish a rapid, simple and sensitive screening method for the detection and identification of smokeless gunpowder organic components.

  15. Ion source development for ultratrace detection of uranium and thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Batchelder, J. C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Chu, R.; Fan, S.; Romero-Romero, E.; Stracener, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Efficient ion sources are needed for detecting ultratrace U and Th impurities in a copper matrix by mass spectrometry techniques such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Two positive ion sources, a hot-cavity surface ionization source and a resonant ionization laser ion source, are evaluated in terms of ionization efficiencies for generating ion beams of U and Th. The performances of the ion sources are characterized using uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate sample materials with sample sizes between 20 and 40 μg of U or Th. For the surface ion source, the dominant ion beams observed are UO+ or ThO+ and ionization efficiencies of 2-4% have been obtained with W and Re cavities. With the laser ion source, three-step resonant photoionization of U atoms has been studied and only atomic U ions are observed. An ionization efficiency of about 9% has been demonstrated. The performances of both ion sources are expected to be further improved.

  16. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-06-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ⩾2). 14N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (Cn+ → C-) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14C in enriched samples of CO2 gas with 14C/12C isotopic ratio down to the 10-9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development.

  17. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Laptev, A.; Rusev, G.; Shields, D. W.; White, M.; Blakeley, R. E.; Mader, D. M.; Hecht, A. A.

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flight times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.

  18. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    DOE PAGES

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Laptev, A.; Rusev, G.; Shields, D. W.; White, M.; et al

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flightmore » times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.« less

  19. Method of nonlinear correction of two-dimensional position sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Changtao; Wang, Ming; Zhang, Guoyu

    2007-12-01

    The position sensitive detector (PSD) is photo-electronic sensor which can detect the position of a light spot incident on its surface. Many types of non-contact dynamic displacement monitoring instruments could be constructed using PSD. How to overcome the influence of non-linearity action is the most important problem to improve measuring precision and reliability of the instrument. The output characteristic of PSD is analyzed. It is found that the output response of sensor is non-linear when the measuring range is large. In this paper we propose a method for correcting non-linearity of PSD sensor based on high precision linearization sub-block integration neural network interpolation. By using conjugate gradient algorithm of neural network which have characteristic to approach arbitrary nonlinear function, the nonlinear mapping between detecting the voltage of sensor and the outputting results are obtained by training neural network under different nonlinear condition. Experiment results indicate that not only the influence of non-linearity is eliminated effectively, but also the output of nerve network is linear.

  20. Position sensitivity of graphene field effect transistors to X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalas, Edward Moore, Michael E.; Jovanovic, Igor; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-06-01

    Device architectures that incorporate graphene to realize detection of electromagnetic radiation typically utilize the direct absorbance of radiation by graphene. This limits their effective area to the size of the graphene and their applicability to lower-energy, less penetrating forms of radiation. In contrast, graphene-based transistor architectures that utilize the field effect as the detection mechanism can be sensitive to interactions of radiation not only with graphene but also with the surrounding substrate. Here, we report the study of the position sensitivity and response of a graphene-based field effect transistor (GFET) to penetrating, well-collimated radiation (micro-beam X-rays), producing ionization in the substrate primarily away from graphene. It is found that responsivity and response speed are strongly dependent on the X-ray beam distance from graphene and the gate voltage applied to the GFET. To develop an understanding of the spatially dependent response, a model is developed that incorporates the volumetric charge generation, transport, and recombination. The model is in good agreement with the observed spatial response characteristics of the GFET and predicts a greater response potential of the GFET to radiation interacting near its surface. The study undertaken provides the necessary insight into the volumetric nature of the GFET response, essential for development of GFET-based detectors for more penetrating forms of ionizing radiation.

  1. Barium Qubit State Detection and Ba Ion-Photon Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnova, Ksenia; Inlek, Ismail Volkan; Crocker, Clayton; Lichtman, Martin; Monroe, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    A modular ion-trap network is a promising framework for scalable quantum-computational devices. In this architecture, different ion-trap modules are connected via photonic buses while within one module ions interact locally via phonons. To eliminate cross-talk between photonic-link qubits and memory qubits, we use different atomic species for quantum information storage (171 Yb+) and intermodular communication (138 Ba+). Conventional deterministic Zeeman-qubit state detection schemes require additional stabilized narrow-linewidth lasers. Instead, we perform fast probabilistic state detection utilizing efficient detectors and high-NA lenses to detect emitted photons from circularly polarized 493 nm laser excitation. Our method is not susceptible to intensity and frequency noise, and we show single-shot detection efficiency of ~ 2%, meaning that we can discriminate between the two qubits states with 99% confidence after as little as 50 ms of averaging. Using this measurement technique, we report entanglement between a single 138 Ba+ ion and its emitted photon with 86% fidelity. This work is supported by the ARO with funding from the IARPA MQCO program, the DARPA Quiness program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Transduction, and the ARL Center for Distributed Quantum Information.

  2. LABORATORY DETECTION OF PLASTICS IN SEEDCOTTON WITH ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  3. Fluorescence sensor for sequential detection of zinc and phosphate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Miran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Seo, Hansol; Helal, Aasif; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2016-12-01

    A new, highly selective turn-on fluorescent chemosensor based on 2-(2‧-tosylamidophenyl)thiazole (1) for the detection of zinc and phosphate ions in ethanol was synthesized and characterized. Sensor 1 showed a high selectivity for zinc compared to other cations and sequentially detected hydrogen pyrophosphate and hydrogen phosphate. The fluorescence mechanism can be explained by two different mechanisms: (i) the inhibition of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and (ii) chelation-induced enhanced fluorescence by binding with Zn2 +. The sequential detection of phosphate anions was achieved by the quenching and subsequent revival of ESIPT.

  4. Automatic detection of mass-resolved ion conics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Mark F.; Bjorklund, Carolyn M.; Peterson, William K.; Collin, Henry L.

    1993-01-01

    A processing algorithm to automatically detect a specific type of ion distribution (called the ion conic distribution) in data obtained from a space-based mass spectrometer has been devised. Automation of this task is necessary due to the sparseness of conic events within the very large databases typical of space plasma instruments. This paper reports on the algorithm used to perform this automated analysis, along with a description of the methods used to verify the algorithm and a summary of initial results on the characterization of the near-earth space plasma.

  5. Performance of BF{sub 3} Filled Position Sensitive Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Shraddha S.; Devan, Shylaja; Krishna, P. S. R.

    2011-07-15

    {sup 3}He filled position sensitive detectors (PSD)s developed in-house are successfully used for neutron scattering studies at Dhruva. However recent global scarcity of {sup 3}He has made it essential to find an alternative. It is very difficult to meet performance capabilities of {sup 3}He for neutron detection in any of the alternate materials. Among various alternatives, BF{sub 3} gas can be one. We have recently put an effort to evaluate performance of BF{sub 3} based PSD. For that a PSD filled with BF{sub 3} gas at 0.8 bar pressure is fabricated and characterized. Performances of the same with Pu-Be source and at Hi-Q Diffractometer, Dhruva are reported in this paper. Diffraction spectra from standard samples Fe and Si at wavelength 0.783 A were recorded. It is found that while position resolution of the BF{sub 3} filled PSD is comparable but the efficiency is 20 times less than that of a {sup 3}He(12 bar) filled PSD.

  6. Position-sensitive proportional counter with low-resistance metal-wire anode

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.

    1980-01-01

    A position-sensitive proportional counter circuit is provided which allows the use of a conventional (low-resistance, metal-wire anode) proportional counter for spatial resolution of an ionizing event along the anode of the counter. A pair of specially designed active-capacitance preamplifiers are used to terminate the anode ends wherein the anode is treated as an RC line. The preamplifiers act as stabilized active capacitance loads and each is composed of a series-feedback, low-noise amplifier, a unity-gain, shunt-feedback amplifier whose output is connected through a feedback capacitor to the series-feedback amplifier input. The stabilized capacitance loading of the anode allows distributed RC-line position encoding and subsequent time difference decoding by sensing the difference in rise times of pulses at the anode ends where the difference is primarily in response to the distributed capacitance along the anode. This allows the use of lower resistance wire anodes for spatial radiation detection which simplifies the counter construction and handling of the anodes, and stabilizes the anode resistivity at high count rates (>10.sup.6 counts/sec).

  7. The ion mobility spectrometer for high explosive vapor detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.J.; Stimac, R.M.; Wernlund, R.F.

    1984-07-01

    The Phemto-Chem /SUP R/ Model 100 Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) operates in air and measures a number of explosive vapors at levels as low as partsper-trillion in seconds. The theory and operation of this instrument is discussed. The IMS inhales the vapor sample in a current of air and generates characteristic ions which are separated by time-of -ion drift in the atmospheric pressure gas. Quantitative results, using a dilution tunnel and standard signal generator with TNT, nitroglycerine, ethylene glycol dinitrate, cyclohexanone, methylamine, octafluoronaphthalene and hexafluorobenzene, are given. Rapid sample treatment with sample concentrations, microprocessor signal readout and chemical identification, offer a realistic opportunity of rapid explosive vapor detection at levels down to 10/sup -14/ parts by volume in air.

  8. Ion chromatography detection of fluoride in calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Jamie E; Ivey, Michelle M

    2011-09-01

    Fluoride in aquatic systems is increasing due to anthropogenic pollution, but little is known about how this fluoride affects organisms that live in and around aquatic habitats. Fluoride can bioaccumulate in structures comprised of calcium carbonate, such as shells and skeletons of both freshwater and saltwater species as diverse as snails, corals, and coccolithophorid algae. In this article, ion chromatography (IC) techniques are developed to detect and quantify fluoride in a matrix of calcium carbonate. Solid samples are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, pretreated to remove the majority of the chloride ions, and then analyzed using IC. With these methods, the 3σ limit of detection is 0.2 mg of fluoride/kg of calcium carbonate. PMID:21859530

  9. Azamacrocycle activated quantum dot for zinc ion detection.

    PubMed

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2008-11-01

    A new fluorescent nanosensor family for Zn (2+) determination is reported based on azamacrocycle derivatization of CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dot nanoparticles. They are the first zinc ion sensors using QD nanoparticles in a host-guest and receptor-fluorophore system. Three azamacrocycles are demonstrated as receptors: TACN (1,4,7-triazacyclononane), cyclen (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane), and cyclam (1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). Azamacrocycles conjugated to QDs via an amide link interact directly with one of the photoinduced QD charge carriers, probably transferring the hole in the QD to the azamacrocycle, thereby disrupting the radiative recombination process. When zinc ion enters the aza-crown, the lone pair electrons of the nitrogen atom become involved in the coordination and the energy level is no longer available for the hole-transfer mechanism, switching on the QD emission and a dramatic increase of the fluorescence intensity results, allowing the detection of low concentrations of zinc ions. Using this operating principle, three zinc ion sensors based on CdSe-ZnS core-shell QD nanoparticles showed a very good linearity in the range 5-500 microM, with detection limits lower than 2.4 microM and RSDs approximately 3% ( n = 10). In addition, the versatility of the sensors was demonstrated, since different sizes (and colors) of QDs can be employed and will respond to zinc in a similar way. In a study of interferences, the zinc-sensitive QDs showed good selectivity in comparison with other physiologically important cations and other transition metals tested. The results from fetal calf serum and samples mimicking physiological conditions suggested very good applicability in the determination of zinc ion in physiological samples.

  10. Detection of Biological Materials Using Ion Mobility Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodacy, P.J.; Sterling, J.P.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-03-01

    Traditionally, Ion Mobility Spectroscopy has been used to examine ions of relatively low molecular weight and high ion mobility. In recent years, however, biomolecules such as bradykinin, cytochrome c, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), apomyoglobin, and lysozyme, have been successfully analyzed, but studies of whole bio-organisms have not been performed. In this study an attempt was made to detect and measure the mobility of two bacteriophages, {lambda}-phage and MS2 using electrospray methods to inject the viruses into the ion mobility spectrometer. Using data from Yeh, et al., which makes a comparison between the diameter of non-biologic particles and the specific particle mobility, the particle mobility for the MS2 virus was estimated to be 10{sup {minus}2} cm{sup 2}/volt-sec. From this mobility the drift time of these particles in our spectrometer was calculated to be approximately 65 msec. The particle mobility for the {lambda}-phage virus was estimated to be 10{sup {minus}3} cm{sup 2}/volt-sec. which would result in a drift time of 0.7 sec. Spectra showing the presence of a viral peak at the expected drift time were not observed. However, changes in the reactant ion peak that could be directly attributed to the presence of the viruses were observed. Virus clustering, excessive collisions, and the electrospray injection method limited the performance of this IMS. However, we believe that an instrument specifically designed to analyze such bioagents and utilizing other injection and ionization methods will succeed in directly detecting viruses and bacteria.

  11. Fine Structural Detection of Calcium Ions by Photoconversion

    PubMed Central

    Poletto, V.; Galimberti, V.; Guerra, G.; Rosti, V.; Moccia, F.; Biggiogera, M.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a tool for a rapid high-resolution detection of calcium ions which can be used in parallel with other techniques. We have applied a new approach by photo-oxidation of diaminobenzidine in presence of the emission of an excited fluorochrome specific for calcium detection. This method combines the selectivity of available fluorophores to the high spatial resolution offered by transmission electron microscopy to detect fluorescing molecules even when present in low amounts in membrane-bounded organelles. We show in this paper that Mag-Fura 2 photoconversion via diaminobenzidine oxidation is an efficient way for localizing Ca2+ ions at electron microscopy level, is easily carried out and reproducible, and can be obtained on a good amount of cells, since the exposure in our conditions is not limited to the direct irradiation of the sample via an objective but obtained with a germicide lamp. The end product is sufficiently electron dense to be detected clearly when present in sufficient amount within a membrane boundary. PMID:27734989

  12. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  13. Theoretical Noise Analysis on a Position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the theoretical noise analysis for a position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter (MMC), consisting of MMC read-out at both ends of a large X-ray absorber. Such devices are under consideration as alternatives to other cryogenic technologies for future X-ray astronomy missions. We use a finite-element model (FEM) to numerically calculate the signal and noise response at the detector outputs and investigate the correlations between the noise measured at each MMC coupled by the absorber. We then calculate, using the optimal filter concept, the theoretical energy and position resolution across the detector and discuss the trade-offs involved in optimizing the detector design for energy resolution, position resolution and count rate. The results show, theoretically, the position-sensitive MMC concept offers impressive spectral and spatial resolving capabilities compared to pixel arrays and similar position-sensitive cryogenic technologies using Transition Edge Sensor (TES) read-out.

  14. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoto, G.; Cirillo, E. N. M.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (≈ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  15. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection.

    PubMed

    Sam, Sabrina S; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F; Etcheberry, Arnaud A; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization.The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  16. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Sabrina S.; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F.; Etcheberry, Arnaud A.; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl- N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  17. Nanoscale detection of bacteriophage triggered ion cascade (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobozi-King, Maria; Seo, Sungkyu; Kim, Jong U.; Cheng, Mosong; Kish, Laszlo B.; Young, Ryland

    2005-05-01

    In an era of potential bioterrorism and pandemics of antibiotic-resistant microbes, bacterial contaminations of food and water supplies is a major concern. There is an urgent need for the rapid, inexpensive and specific identification of bacteria under field conditions. Here we describe a method that combines the specificity and avidity of bacteriophages with fluctuation analysis of electrical noise. The method is based on the massive, transitory ion leakage that occurs at the moment of phage DNA injection into the host cell. The ion fluxes require only that the cells be physiologically viable (i.e., have energized membranes) and can occur within seconds after mixing the cells with sufficient concentrations of phage particles. To detect these fluxes, we have constructed a nano-well, a lateral, micron-size capacitor of titanium electrodes with gap size of 150 nm, and used it to measure the electrical field fluctuations in microliter (mm3) samples containing phage and bacteria. In mixtures where the analyte bacteria were sensitive to the phage, large stochastic waves with various time and amplitude scales were observed, with power spectra of approximately 1/f2 shape over at 1 - 10 Hz. Development of this SEPTIC (SEnsing of Phage-Triggered Ion Cascades) technology could provide rapid detection and identification of live, pathogenic bacteria on the scale of minutes, with unparalleled specificity. The method has a potential ultimate sensitivity of 1 bacterium/microliter (1 bacterium/mm3).

  18. New Data Collection Subsystem for Powder Neutron Diffractometer with Position Sensitive Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drab, Martin; Kalvoda, Ladislav; Vratislav, Stanislav; Dlouha, Maja

    2012-02-01

    Project INDECS (Integrated Neutron Diffraction Experiment Control System) is a newly developed software system created for the purpose of data acquisition from, and controlling of the upgraded version of the KSN-2 powder neutron diffractometer equipped with Position Sensitive Detectors. The KSN-2 neutron diffractometer (belonging to LND, DSSE, FNSPE, CTU in Prague, CZ, placed at the NRI, Řež near Prague, CZ) was recently upgraded with the possibility to contain up to three parallel linear PSDs which can be mounted on the detector arm instead of the original single counter detector. That was the motivation for the project INDECS to be started. For the actual data acquisition and initial data analysis of the raw sampled signals within the project INDECS a special modular structure called the PSD Acquisition Path (or PSDAP) was designed. Raw sampled signals from either end of the PSD are taken as the main input to the subsystem. The signals are then split into multiple events, analyzed for the position of the obtained events on the PSD, and a histogram of the diffraction events is created as the main output of this subsystem. Moreover, the PSDAP is capable of storing the raw signals either before event splitting or after, so that later the whole process of acquisition can be replayed in software, perhaps with different settings of the processing parameters or perhaps even algorithms. It can also be switched into a mode where under special conditions a correction curve specific for the given PSD can be constructed and later in normal operation it can be used to do the corrections of detected event positions to enhance the results on that particular PSD. This whole subsystem then acts as a single modular command unit (External Execution Module or EEM) within the entire system of project INDECS.

  19. Ion sensors based on novel fiber organic electrochemical transistors for lead ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuedan; Zhou, Zhou; Qing, Xing; Zhong, Weibing; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wang, Wenwen; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Fiber organic electrochemical transistors (FECTs) based on polypyrrole and nanofibers have been prepared for the first time. FECTs exhibited excellent electrical performances, on/off ratios up to 10(4) and low applied voltages below 2 V. The ion sensitivity behavior of the fiber organic electrochemical transistors was investigated. It exhibited that the transfer curve of FECTs shifted to lower gate voltage with increasing cations concentration, the sensitivity reached to 446 μA/dec in the 10(-5)-10(-2) M Pb(2+) concentration range. The ion selective properties of the FECTs have also been systematically studied for the detection of potassium, calcium, aluminum, and lead ions. The devices with different cations showed great difference in response curves. It was suitable for selectively monitoring Pb(2+) with respect to other cations. The results indicated FECTs were very effective for electrochemical sensing of lead ion, which opened a promising perspective for wearable electronics in healthcare and biological application. Graphical Abstract The schematic diagram of fiber organic electrochemical transistors based on polypyrrole and nanofibers for ion sensing.

  20. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooraghi, A. A.; Vu, N. T.; Silverman, R. W.; Farrell, R.; Shah, K. S.; Wang, J.; Heath, J. R.; Chatziioannou, A. F.

    2013-06-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm-2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm-2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ˜180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ˜200 µm of additional LDPE film. Lastly

  1. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    PubMed Central

    Dooraghi, AA; Vu, NT; Silverman, RW; Farrell, R; Shah, KS; Wang, J; Heath, JR; Chatziioannou, AF

    2013-01-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm−2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm−2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ~180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ~200 µm of additional LDPE film

  2. Detection of negative pickup ions at Saturn's moon Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Hand, K. P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Negative ions may be formed in both tenuous and dense planetary atmospheres and have been observed in-situ at Earth, Titan [Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Wellbrock et al., 2013] and Enceladus [Coates et al., 2010] as well as at comet Halley [Chaizy et al., 1991]. In the case of Titan, heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile based ions with masses reaching almost 14,000 amu/q have been observed using the CAPS Electron Spectrometer (ELS) onboard Cassini. These are believed to form even more massive organic aerosols termed tholins which fall to lower altitudes where they make up the distinct haze layers, and eventually rain down onto Titan's surface perhaps forming the organic-rich dunes. Very tenuous atmospheres were predicted at the smaller icy moons of Saturn [Sittler et al., 2004; Saur and Strobel, 2005], and subsequently detected [Teolis et al., 2010; Tokar et al., 2012]. These are produced when charged particles from Saturn's magnetosphere interact with moon surfaces, ejecting neutral species. Some portion of these atmospheric neutrals will in turn become ionized and 'picked up' by Saturn's corotating magnetosphere. These pickup ions will then move in cycloidal trajectories that we may intercept using the Cassini spacecraft, even at considerable distance from the moon itself. In this fashion, negative and positive pickup ions have been used to infer a tenuous CO2-O2 atmosphere at Saturn's moon Rhea [Teolis et al., 2010], and positive pickup ions at Dione [Tokar et al., 2012]. Here we report on the detection of negative pickup ions during a close flyby of Dione by the Cassini CAPS ELS instrument, and the implications that these observations may have for the Dionian atmosphere. Chaizy, P., et al. (1991), Nature, 349(6308), 393-396 Coates, A. J., et al. (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett., 34(22), 6-11 Coates, A. J., et al. (2009), Planet. Space Sci., 57(14-15), 1866-1871 Coates, A. J., et al. (2010), Icarus, 206(2), 618-622 Saur, J., and D. F. Strobel (2005), Astrophys. J. Lett., 620

  3. Recent progress in fluorescent and colorimetric chemosensors for detection of precious metal ions (silver, gold and platinum ions).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun Feng; Zhou, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung; Kim, Jong Seung

    2011-07-01

    Due to the wide range of applications and biological significance, the development of optical probes for silver, gold and platinum ions has been an active research area in the past few years. This tutorial review focuses on the recent contributions concerning the fluorescent or colorimetric sensors for these metal ions, and is organized according to their structural classifications (for Ag(+) detection) and unique mechanisms between the sensors and metal ions (for Au(3+) and Pt(2+) detection).

  4. Sealed position sensitive hard X-ray detector having large drift region for all sky camera with high angular resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Perlman, D.; Parsignault, D.; Burns, R.

    1979-01-01

    A sealed position sensitive proportional counter filled with two atmospheres of 95% xenon and 5% methane, and containing a drift region of 24 atm cm, has operated in a stable manner for many months. The detector contains G-10 frames to support the anode and cathode wires. The detector was sealed successfully by a combination of vacuum baking the G-10 frames at 150 C for two weeks followed by assembly into the detector in an environment of dry nitrogen, and the use of passive internal getters. The counter is intended for use with a circumferential cylindrical collimator. Together they provide a very broad field of view detection system with the ability to locate cosmic hard X-ray and soft gamma ray sources to an angular precision of a minute of arc. A set of instruments based on this principle have been proposed for satellites to detect and precisely locate cosmic gamma ray bursts.

  5. Urinary thiosulfate determined by suppressed ion chromatography with conductimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Cole, D E; Evrovski, J; Pirone, R

    1995-10-01

    Thiosulfate is a naturally occurring product of sulfur metabolism. Assays of urinary thiosulfate have been based on the reaction with cyanide to form thiocyanate. However, matrix interferences and background variation in endogenous thiocyanate excretion place serious constraints on this method for determination of physiological amounts of thiosulfate in urine. We describe a column-switching ion chromatographic separation for urinary thiosulfate that allows for sensitive and accurate detection by ion conductimetry. In 20 adult volunteers, we found a lower urinary thiosulfate (8.50 +/- 7.39 mumol/24 h, mean +/- S.D.) than others have described, although the upward skew of the results (median, 6.90; range, 0.84-32 mumol/24 h) was similar. However, we have not observed any of the interferences and the sensitivity of our technique (< 0.2 mumol/24 h) allows for detection of thiosulfate in all control samples. This sort of methodological improvement will be essential for any study of physiological thiosulfate metabolism.

  6. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems. PMID:27439180

  7. Ion trace detection algorithm to extract pure ion chromatograms to improve untargeted peak detection quality for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Wang, San-Yuan; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Tseng, Yufeng J

    2015-03-01

    Able to detect known and unknown metabolites, untargeted metabolomics has shown great potential in identifying novel biomarkers. However, elucidating all possible liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) ion signals in a complex biological sample remains challenging since many ions are not the products of metabolites. Methods of reducing ions not related to metabolites or simply directly detecting metabolite related (pure) ions are important. In this work, we describe PITracer, a novel algorithm that accurately detects the pure ions of a LC/TOF-MS profile to extract pure ion chromatograms and detect chromatographic peaks. PITracer estimates the relative mass difference tolerance of ions and calibrates the mass over charge (m/z) values for peak detection algorithms with an additional option to further mass correction with respect to a user-specified metabolite. PITracer was evaluated using two data sets containing 373 human metabolite standards, including 5 saturated standards considered to be split peaks resultant from huge m/z fluctuation, and 12 urine samples spiked with 50 forensic drugs of varying concentrations. Analysis of these data sets show that PITracer correctly outperformed existing state-of-art algorithm and extracted the pure ion chromatograms of the 5 saturated standards without generating split peaks and detected the forensic drugs with high recall, precision, and F-score and small mass error.

  8. Initial characterization of a position-sensitive photodiode/BGO detector for PET (positron emission tomography)

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.; Jackson, H.G.; Turko, B.T.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.B.; Vuletich, T.

    1988-11-01

    We present initial results of a position-sensitive photodiode/BGO detector for high resolution, multi-layer positron emission tomography (PET). Position sensitivity is achieved by dividing the 3 mm /times/ 20 mm rectangular photosensitive area along the diagonal to form two triangular segments. Each segment was individually connected to a low-noise amplifier. The photodiodes and crystals were cooled to /minus/100/degree/C to reduce dark current and increase the BGO signal. With an amplifier peaking time of 17 ..mu..sec, the sum of the signals (511 keV photopeak) was 3200 electrons with a full width at half maximum (fwhm) of 750 electrons. The ratio of one signal to the sum determined the depth of interaction with a resolution of 11 mm fwhm. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  9. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: New test and analysis of position-sensitive-silicon-detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Ge, Yu-Cheng; Wang, He; Fan, Feng-Ying; Qiao, Rui; Lu, Fei; Song, Yu-Shou; Zheng, Tao; Ye, Yan-Lin

    2009-01-01

    We have tested and analyzed the properties of two-dimensional Position-Sensitive-silicon-Detector (PSD) with new integrated preamplifiers. The test demonstrates that the best position resolution for 5.5 MeV α particles is 1.7 mm (FWHM), and the best energy resolution is 2.1%, which are notably better than the previously reported results. A scaling formula is introduced to make the absolute position calibration.

  10. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Urbain, X; Bech, D; Van Roy, J-P; Géléoc, M; Weber, S J; Huetz, A; Picard, Y J

    2015-02-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme. PMID:25725834

  11. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Urbain, X; Bech, D; Van Roy, J-P; Géléoc, M; Weber, S J; Huetz, A; Picard, Y J

    2015-02-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  12. Implementation of Complex Signal Processing Algorithms for Position-Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported on a theoretical digital signal-processing algorithm for improved energy and position resolution in position-sensitive, transition-edge sensor (POST) X-ray detectors [Smith et al., Nucl, lnstr and Meth. A 556 (2006) 2371. PoST's consists of one or more transition-edge sensors (TES's) on a large continuous or pixellated X-ray absorber and are under development as an alternative to arrays of single pixel TES's. PoST's provide a means to increase the field-of-view for the fewest number of read-out channels. In this contribution we extend the theoretical correlated energy position optimal filter (CEPOF) algorithm (originally developed for 2-TES continuous absorber PoST's) to investigate the practical implementation on multi-pixel single TES PoST's or Hydras. We use numerically simulated data for a nine absorber device, which includes realistic detector noise, to demonstrate an iterative scheme that enables convergence on the correct photon absorption position and energy without any a priori assumptions. The position sensitivity of the CEPOF implemented on simulated data agrees very well with the theoretically predicted resolution. We discuss practical issues such as the impact of random arrival phase of the measured data on the performance of the CEPOF. The CEPOF algorithm demonstrates that full-width-at- half-maximum energy resolution of < 8 eV coupled with position-sensitivity down to a few 100 eV should be achievable for a fully optimized device.

  13. 2 Dimensional position sensitive XAFS by using in-house X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Kozo; Suzuki, Shigeru; Kuribayashi, Masaru; Taguchi, Takeyoshi

    2009-09-01

    Position sensitive XAFS measurements by using the in-house X-ray spectrometer and the position sensitive X-ray detector were attempted. The in-house spectrometer produces monochromized divergent X-ray beam. Therefore, an extended direct-beam image projected on the detector can be taken, and its extension rate is depending on the arrangement of the sample and the detector. A position sensitive XAFS measurement was demonstrated by using Ni metal foil and NiO powder as a model sample. Ge(220) or Si(400) Johansson-type bent single-crystal was used as monochromator, and Mo and LaB6 were used as the target and filament, respectively. Tube voltage and current were operated at 16 kV and 100 mA (1.6 kW). XAFS spectra were measured by transmission-mode with sample set/reset method and required time of each experiment is about 6 hours in total. It was confirmed that metal and oxide spectra with enough quality for structural analysis were clearly separated by each position in the sample.

  14. Development of arrays of position-sensitive microcalorimeters for Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kolbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing arrays of position-sensitive transition-edge sensor (POST) X-ray detectors for future astronomy missions such as NASA's Constellation-X. The POST consists of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the TES. This results in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enables position discrimination between the absorber elements. POST'S are motivated by the desire to achieve the largest possible focal plane area with the fewest number of readout channels and are ideally suited to increasing the Constellation-X focal plane area, without comprising on spatial sampling. Optimizing the performance of POST'S requires careful design of key parameters such as the thermal conductances between the absorbers, TES and the heat sink. as well as the absorber heat capacities. Using recently developed signal processing algorithms we have investigated the trade-off between position-sensitivity, energy resolution and pulse decay time. based on different device design parameters for PoST's. Our new generation of PoST's utilize technology successfully developed on high resolution (approximately 2.5eV) single pixels arrays of Mo/Au TESs. also under development for Constellation-X. This includes noise mitigation features on the TES and low resistivity electroplated absorbers. We report on the first experimental results from these new one and two-channel PoST"s, consisting of all Au and composite Au/Bi absorbers, which are designed to achieve an energy resolution of < 10 eV. coupled with count-rates of 100's per pixel per second and position sensitivity over the energy range 0.3-10 keV.

  15. Evaluation of a Compton scattering camera using 3-D position sensitive CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y. F.; He, Z.; Knoll, G. F.; Wehe, D. K.; Li, W.

    2001-01-01

    A CZT Compton Camera (CCC) is being built using two three-dimensional (3-D) position-sensitive CZT detectors. Expected system performance was analyzed by analytical and Monte Carlo approaches. Based on the measurement of detector energy and position resolution, the expected angular resolution is ˜3° and ˜2° for a ±30° FOV for 511 keV and 1 MeV γ-rays, respectively. The intrinsic efficiency for a point source 10 cm from the first detector surface ranges from 1.5×10 -4 to 8.8×10 -6 for 500 keV-3 MeV.

  16. Fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry using a spherical moderator with position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Taosheng; Yang, Lianzhen; Ma, Jizeng; Fang, Dong

    2007-01-01

    A neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurement system has been developed based on a different design of the divided regions for a sphere, with three position-sensitive counters. The characteristics of the measurement system have been investigated in the reference radiation fields of Am-Be and (252)Cf sources. When realistic input spectra are used for the unfolding, the overall deviations of the calculated results for four dosimetric quantities are less than +/-10%. The results of other input spectra are also discussed in this report.

  17. A Monte Carlo simulation comparing hydrocarbons as stopping gases for position sensitive neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumas, A.; Smith, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    Various neutron detectors are being developed for the next generation user facilities, which incorporate new as well as existing approaches for the detection of thermal neutrons. Improvements in neutron detector efficiency, detector size and position resolution have occurred over the last three decades and further advances are expected in the next ten years. Since gas detectors are expected to continue in a key role for future thermal neutron experiments, it is advantageous to review some of the criteria for the choice of proton/triton stopping gases for gas-based detectors. Monte Carlo simulations, using the group of programs "Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter", have been run to determine key performance characteristics for neutron detectors which utilize the reaction 3He(n,p)t. This paper will focus on investigating the use of three common hydrocarbons and CF 4 as stopping gases for thermal neutron detectors. A discussion of these gases will include their behavior in terms of proton and triton range, ion distribution and straggle.

  18. Tentative Detection of the Nitrosylium Ion in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernicharo, J.; Bailleux, S.; Alekseev, E.; Fuente, A.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Tercero, B.; Treviño-Morales, S. P.; Marcelino, N.; Bachiller, R.; Lefloch, B.

    2014-11-01

    We report the tentative detection in space of the nitrosylium ion, NO+. The observations were performed toward the cold dense core Barnard 1-b. The identification of the NO+ J = 2-1 line is supported by new laboratory measurements of NO+ rotational lines up to the J = 8-7 transition (953207.189 MHz), which leads to an improved set of molecular constants: B 0 = 59597.1379(62) MHz, D 0 = 169.428(65) kHz, and eQq 0(N) = -6.72(15) MHz. The profile of the feature assigned to NO+ exhibits two velocity components at 6.5 and 7.5 km s-1, with column densities of 1.5 × 1012 and 6.5 × 1011 cm-2, respectively. New observations of NO and HNO, also reported here, allow us to estimate the following abundance ratios: X(NO)/X(NO+) ~= 511, and X(HNO)/X(NO+) ~= 1. This latter value provides important constraints on the formation and destruction processes of HNO. The chemistry of NO+ and other related nitrogen-bearing species is investigated by the means of a time-dependent gas phase model which includes an updated chemical network according to recent experimental studies. The predicted abundance for NO+ and NO is found to be consistent with the observations. However, that of HNO relative to NO is too high. No satisfactory chemical paths have been found to explain the observed low abundance of HNO. HSCN and HNCS are also reported here with an abundance ratio of ~= 1. Finally, we have searched for NNO, NO2, HNNO+, and NNOH+, but only upper limits have been obtained for their column density, except for the latter for which we report a tentative 3σ detection. This work was based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  19. Sensitive detection of copper ions via ion-responsive fluorescence quenching of engineered porous silicon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jangsun; Hwang, Mintai P.; Choi, Moonhyun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Hong, Jinkee; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution has been a problem since the advent of modern transportation, which despite efforts to curb emissions, continues to play a critical role in environmental pollution. Copper ions (Cu2+), in particular, are one of the more prevalent metals that have widespread detrimental ramifications. From this perspective, a simple and inexpensive method of detecting Cu2+ at the micromolar level would be highly desirable. In this study, we use porous silicon nanoparticles (NPs), obtained via anodic etching of Si wafers, as a basis for undecylenic acid (UDA)- or acrylic acid (AA)-mediated hydrosilylation. The resulting alkyl-terminated porous silicon nanoparticles (APS NPs) have enhanced fluorescence stability and intensity, and importantly, exhibit [Cu2+]-dependent quenching of fluorescence. After determining various aqueous sensing conditions for Cu2+, we demonstrate the use of APS NPs in two separate applications – a standard well-based paper kit and a portable layer-by-layer stick kit. Collectively, we demonstrate the potential of APS NPs in sensors for the effective detection of Cu2+. PMID:27752120

  20. Position sensitivity in 3"×3" Spectroscopic LaBr3:Ce Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, N.; Giaz, A.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2015-06-01

    The position sensitivity of a thick, cylindrical and continuous 3" × 3" (7.62 cm × 7.62 cm) LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces was investigated. Nuclear physics basic research uses thick LaBr3:Ce crystals (> 3cm) to measure medium or high energy gamma rays (0.5 MeV < Eγ< 20 MeV). In the first measurement the PMT photocathode entrance window was covered by black absorber except for a small window 1 cm × 1cm wide. A complete scan of the detector over a 0.5 cm step grid was performed. The data show that even in a 3" thick LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces the position of the full energy peak centroid depends on the source position. The position of the full energy peak centroids are sufficient to identify the collimated gamma source position. The crystal was then coupled to four Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT). We acquired the signals from the 256 segments of the four PSPMTs grouping them into 16 elements. An event by event analysis shows a positon resolution of the order of 2 cm.

  1. An improved method of energy calibration for position-sensitive silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Huang, Tian-Heng; Liu, Zhong; Ding, Bing; Yang, Hua-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ma, Long; Yu, Lin; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Gan, Zai-Guo; Xiao-Hong, Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors is achieved by parabolic fitting in the traditional method, where the systematic variations of vertex and curvature of the parabola with energy must be considered. In this paper we extend the traditional method in order to correct the fitting function, simplify the procedure of calibration and improve the experimental data quality. Instead of a parabolic function as used in the traditional method, a new function describing the relation of position and energy is introduced. The energy resolution of the 8.088 MeV α decay of 213Rn is determined to be about 87 keV (FWHM), which is better than the result of the traditional method, 104 keV (FWHM). The improved method can be applied to the energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors with various performances. Supported by ‘100 Person Project’ of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405224 and 11435014)

  2. Position-sensitive detectors of the detector group at Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, R.; Clemens, U.; Kemmerling, G.; Nöldgen, H.; Schelten, J.

    2009-06-01

    The detector group of the Central Institute of Electronics at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH was founded in 1968. First developments aimed at a detector system with a position-sensitive BF 3 proportional counter for small-angle neutron scattering, which was later used at a beamline of the research reactor FRJ2. At the end of the 1970s first measurements were carried out with photomultiplier (PM)-based detector systems linked with a LiI crystal from Harshaw. Based on this experience we started with the spectrum of position-sensitive neutron scintillation detectors, which have been developed and designed in our institute during the last three decades comprising several high-resolution linear and two-dimensional detectors. The general design of those detectors is based on a modified Anger principle using an array of PMs and a 1 mm 6Li glass scintillator. The sensitive detector area varies on the type of the PMs used and is related to the spatial resolution of the detector type. The neutron sensitivity at 1 Å is about 65% and the remaining gamma sensitivity is less than 10 -4 with a maximum count rate up to 500 kHz depending on the used detector system.

  3. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  4. Development of Position-sensitive Transition-edge Sensor X-ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckard, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. s.; Sad (eor. K/ E/); Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of position-sensitive transition-edge sensors (PoST's) for future x-ray astronomy missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), currently under study by NASA and ESA. PoST's consist of multiple absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). This differential thermal coupling between absorbers and TES's results in different characteristic pulse shapes and allows position discrimination between the different pixels. The development of PoST's is motivated by a desire to achieve maximum focal-plane area with the least number of readout channels and as such. PoST's are ideally suited to provide a focal-plane extension to the Constellation-X microcalorimeter array. We report the first experimental results of our latest one and two channel PoST's, which utilize fast thermalizing electroplated Au/Bi absorbers coupled to low noise Mo/Au TES's - a technology already successfully implemented in our arrays of single pixel TES's. We demonstrate 6 eV energy resolution coupled with spatial sensitivity in the keV energy range. We also report on the development of signal processing algorithms to optimize energy and position sensitivity of our detectors.

  5. Triboelectrification-Enabled Self-Powered Detection and Removal of Heavy Metal Ions in Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoling; Chen, Jun; Guo, Hengyu; Fan, Xing; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Yu, Chongwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-20

    A fundamentally new working principle into the field of self-powered heavy-metal-ion detection and removal using the triboelectrification effect is introduced. The as-developed tribo-nanosensors can selectively detect common heavy metal ions. The water-driven triboelectric nanogenerator is taken as a sustainable power source for heavy-metal-ion removal by recycling the kinetic energy from flowing wastewater.

  6. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Direct Detection of Transmitted Helium Ions with a Multichannel Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor; White, Ryan; Keller, Robert

    A multichannel plate was used as an ion sensitive transmission detector in a commercial helium ion microscope for annular dark-field imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy. In contrast to previous transmission helium ion microscopy approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach directly detects transmitted helium ions on an annular detector. Monte Carlo simulations are used to predict detector collection angles at which annular dark-field images with atomic number contrast are obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. While the resolution of this transmission technique is limited by beam broadening in the substrate, we image magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field scanning transmission ion microscopy will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques, such as direct mass-thickness determination, and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  8. Using metal complex ion-molecule reactions in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer to detect chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Graichen, Adam M; Vachet, Richard W

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n](y+) complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n](2+) complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  9. Rapid and highly sensitive detection of lead ions in drinking water based on a strip immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Hua; Xing, Changrui; Hao, Changlong; Liu, Liqiang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-03-28

    In this study, we have first developed a rapid and sensitive strip immunosensor based on two heterogeneously-sized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) probes for the detection of trace lead ions in drinking water. The sensitivity was 4-fold higher than that of the conventional LFA under the optimized conditions. The visual limit of detection (LOD) of the amplified method for qualitative detection lead ions was 2 ng/mL and the LOD for semi-quantitative detection could go down to 0.19 ng/mL using a scanning reader. The method suffered from no interference from other metal ions and could be used to detect trace lead ions in drinking water without sample enrichment. The recovery of the test samples ranged from 96% to 103%. As the detection method could be accomplished within 15 min, this method could be used as a potential tool for preliminary monitoring of lead contamination in drinking water.

  10. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Lead Ions in Drinking Water Based on a Strip Immunosensor

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Hua; Xing, Changrui; Hao, Changlong; Liu, Liqiang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have first developed a rapid and sensitive strip immunosensor based on two heterogeneously-sized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) probes for the detection of trace lead ions in drinking water. The sensitivity was 4-fold higher than that of the conventional LFA under the optimized conditions. The visual limit of detection (LOD) of the amplified method for qualitative detection lead ions was 2 ng/mL and the LOD for semi-quantitative detection could go down to 0.19 ng/mL using a scanning reader. The method suffered from no interference from other metal ions and could be used to detect trace lead ions in drinking water without sample enrichment. The recovery of the test samples ranged from 96% to 103%. As the detection method could be accomplished within 15 min, this method could be used as a potential tool for preliminary monitoring of lead contamination in drinking water. PMID:23539028

  11. Parameter correction method for dual position-sensitive-detector-based unit.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Pengcheng; Ding, XueMei; Tan, JiuBin

    2016-05-20

    A dual position-sensitive-detector (PSD)-based unit can be used for angular measurements of a multi-degree-of-freedom measurement system and a laser interferometry-based sensing and tracking system. In order to ensure the precision of incident beam direction measurement for a PSD-based unit, model and autoreflection alignment methods for correction of PSD-based unit parameters are proposed. Experimental results demonstrate the deviations between the angular measurements obtained using a dual PSD-based unit and an autocollimator varied by 70″, 20″, and 1″ for three runs of the autoreflection alignment method, respectively, and the model method deviations all varied by 1″ in the 1000″ measurement range for three runs. It is therefore concluded that the model method is more reliable than the autoreflection alignment method for ensuring the accuracy of a dual PSD-based unit. PMID:27411134

  12. Parameter correction method for dual position-sensitive-detector-based unit.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Pengcheng; Ding, XueMei; Tan, JiuBin

    2016-05-20

    A dual position-sensitive-detector (PSD)-based unit can be used for angular measurements of a multi-degree-of-freedom measurement system and a laser interferometry-based sensing and tracking system. In order to ensure the precision of incident beam direction measurement for a PSD-based unit, model and autoreflection alignment methods for correction of PSD-based unit parameters are proposed. Experimental results demonstrate the deviations between the angular measurements obtained using a dual PSD-based unit and an autocollimator varied by 70″, 20″, and 1″ for three runs of the autoreflection alignment method, respectively, and the model method deviations all varied by 1″ in the 1000″ measurement range for three runs. It is therefore concluded that the model method is more reliable than the autoreflection alignment method for ensuring the accuracy of a dual PSD-based unit.

  13. A Beta-Particle Hodoscope Constructed Using Scintillating Optical Fibers and Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fast, Jim; Hossbach, Todd W.; Lidey, Lance S.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2006-09-19

    A hodoscopic detector was constructed using a position-sensitive plastic scintillator active area to determine the location of beta-active micron-sized particulates on air filters. The ability to locate beta active particulates on airsample filters is a tool for environmental monitoring of anthropogenic production of radioactive material. A robust, field-deployable instrument can provide localization of radioactive particulate with position resolution of a few millimeters. The detector employs a novel configuration of scintillating plastic elements usually employed at much higher charged particle energies. A filter is placed on this element for assay. The detector is intended to be sensitive to activity greater than 1 Bq. The physical design, position reconstruction method, and expected detector sensitivity are reported.

  14. Position sensitive detectors for the proposed AXAF imaging optical/UV monitor (AXIOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allington-Smith, J. R.; Mason, I. M.; Schwarz, H. E.; Culhane, J. L.

    1985-02-01

    A description is given of the imaging detectors of the AXIOM instrument proposed for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The instrument is aligned with the X-ray telescope and consists of a diffraction limited, 30-cm aperture, telescope with redundant position sensitive detectors at the focus. This allows simultaneous imaging at optical and near UV wavelengths of the X-ray target objects. The proposed detectors cover a field of view of 8.5 x 8.5 sq arcmin with a resolution of 1 arcsec (= 50 microns FWHM). The quantum efficiency peaks at 30 percent and exceeds 10 percent over the wavelength range 125 to 540 nm. The detector design consists of a bi-alkali photocathode on a UV-transmitting window, proximity focussed onto a microchannel plate intensifier with a wedge and strip readout system, and is optimized for high count rates both from point sources and from the sky background.

  15. Imaging of β particle sources used in medical applications with position sensitive Silicon sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccia, M.; Alemi, M.; Bianchi, C.; Bulgheroni, A.; Cappellini, C.; Conte, L.; Kucewicz, W.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Sampietro, C.

    2004-06-01

    Real-time dosimetry is a critical issue in most radiotherapy applications. Silicon Ultra fast Cameras for electron and gamma sources In Medical Applications (Nucl. Phys. B 125 (2003) 133) is an EC project addressing the development of an imaging device for extended radioactive sources based on monolithic and hybrid-position-sensitive silicon sensors. Large-area Silicon strip detectors read out by low noise charge integrating chips were used to characterize a 90Sr intravascular brachytherapy source in terms of dose-depth curves in a tissue equivalent material and homogeneity of the activity. The results obtained with the Silicon sensor were compared to measurements with standard certified systems and are reported in the paper.

  16. Resonant inelastic hard x-ray scattering with diced analyzer crystals and position-sensitive detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Huotari, S.; Albergamo, F.; Vanko, Gy.; Verbeni, R.; Monaco, G.

    2006-05-15

    A novel design of a high-resolution spectrometer is proposed for emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic hard x-ray scattering applications. The spectrometer is based on a Rowland circle geometry with a diced analyzer crystal and a position-sensitive detector. The individual flat crystallites of the diced analyzer introduce a well-defined linear position-energy relationship within the analyzer focus. This effect can be exploited to measure emission spectra with an unprecedented resolution. For demonstration, a spectrometer was constructed using a diced Si(553) analyzer working at the Cu K edge with an intrinsic resolution of 60 meV. With the proposed design, spectrometers operating at the K edges of 3d transition metals can have intrinsic resolutions below 100 meV even with analyzer crystals not working in Bragg-backscattering conditions.

  17. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  18. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation. PMID:27153003

  19. Detection of DNA damage induced by heavy ion irradiation in the individual cells with comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, S.; Natsuhori, M.; Ito, N.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2003-05-01

    Investigating the biological effects of high-LET heavy ion irradiation at low fluence is important to evaluate the risk of charged particles. Especially it is important to detect radiation damage induced by the precise number of heavy ions in the individual cells. Thus we studied the relationship between the number of ions traversing the cell and DNA damage produced by the ion irradiation. We applied comet assay to measure the DNA damage in the individual cells. Cells attached on the ion track detector CR-39 were irradiated with ion beams at TIARA, JAERI-Takasaki. After irradiation, the cells were stained with ethidium bromide and the opposite side of the CR-39 was etched. We observed that the heavy ions with higher LET values induced the heavier DNA damage. The result indicated that the amount of DNA damage induced by one particle increased with the LET values of the heavy ions.

  20. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  1. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  2. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  3. Intermediate Energies for Nuclear Astrophysics and the Development of a Position Sensitive Microstrip Detector System

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, Lee G.; Blackmon, J.; Bertulani, C.

    2015-12-30

    The chemical elements are made at astrophysical sites through a sequence of nuclear reactions often involving unstable nuclei. The overarching aim of this project is to construct a system that allows for the inverse process of nucleosynthesis (i.e. breakup of heavier nuclei into lighter ones) to be studied in high efficiency. The specific problem to be overcome with this grant is inadequate dynamic range and (triggering) threshold to detect the products of the breakup which include both heavy ions (with large energy and large deposited energy in a detector system) and protons (with little energy and deposited energy.) Early on in the grant we provided both TAMU and RIKEN (the site of the eventual experiments) with working systems based on the existing technology. This technology could be used with either an external preamplifier that was to be designed and fabricated by our RIKEN collaborators or upgraded by replacing the existing chip with one we designed. The RIKEN external preamplifier project never can to completion but our revised chip was designed, fabricated, used in a test experiment and performs as required.

  4. A CdTe position sensitive detector for a hard X- and gamma-ray wide field camera

    SciTech Connect

    Caroli, E.; Cesare, G. de; Donati, A.; Dusi, W.; Landini, G.; Stephen, J.B.; Perotti, F.

    1998-12-31

    An important region of the electromagnetic spectrum for astrophysics is the hard X- and gamma ray band between 10 keV and a few MeV, where several processes occur in a wide variety of objects and with different spatial distribution and time scales. In order to fulfill the observational requirements in this energy range and taking into account the opportunities given by small/medium size missions (e.g., on the ISS), the authors have proposed a compact, wide field camera based on a thick (1 cm) position sensitive CdTe detector (PSD). The detector is made of an array of 128x96 CdTe microspectrometers with a pixel size of 2x2 mm{sup 2}. The basic element of the PSD is the linear module that is an independent detection unit with 32 CdTe crystals and monolithic front-electronics (ASIC) supported by a thin (300 {micro}m) ceramic layer. The expected performance of the PSD over the operative energy range and some of the required ASIC functionality are presented and discussed.

  5. A simple technique to increase the linearity and field-of-view in position sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, R.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Robar, J.L.; Bergman, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    Crossed anode wire position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMTs) detect the location of a light source and provide the X and Y axis coordinates of the event. These coordinates are typically generated using Anger logic, where a resistor chain divides the current flow into two signals for each coordinate (X{sup +}, X{sup -} & Y{sup +}, Y{sup -}). In the standard readout, identical resistor values are used across the entire resistor chain. While this arrangement provides a linear readout in the central portion of the photomultiplier face, the readout is non-linear and sometimes even double valued near the edges of the PS-PMT due to the truncation of the charge beyond the last anode wire. To counter this effect, we have increased the value of the resistance near the ends of each resistor chain in order to compensate for the charge lost beyond the anode wires. Measurements were made using a Hamamatsu R-3941 PS-PMT coupled to a pixellated BGO matrix of cut crystals with a 2mm pitch in each direction. After changing the end resistors, the usable field-of-view increased by 39%. This simple modification should enhance the operation of PS-PMTs in applications such as positron emission mammography, and small animal PET imaging.

  6. Charge integrating type position-sensitive proportional chamber for time-resolved measurements using intense X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochiki, Koh-ichi; Hasegawa, Ken-ichi

    1985-02-01

    A position-sensitive detecting system for time-resolved diffraction measurements with very intensive X-ray sources has been developed. It consists of a charge integrating type gas-filled detector, multichannel analog multiplexers, a signal processor and a memory (120 ch.×128 phases×24 bits). The detector is 120 mm long in effective length by 10 mm×10 mm in cross section with a single anode of 20 μm diameter. One of the cathode planes consists of 120 cathode strips with a pitch of 1 mm. The spatial resolution is equal to the pitch under a certain detector current limit. The gas gain is adjustable to an appropriate value according to the X-ray intensity range of interest. For experiments with 8 keV X-ray sources, maximum absorption rates of 9×10 7 photons/s·mm with low applied voltage and minimum absorption rates of about 3 photons/s·mm with high applied voltage can be achieved. This system was applied to a time-resolved X-ray diffraction study on frog muscle using a synchrotron radiation source at the Photon Factory and we could collect diffraction patterns with a time resolution of 10 ms and only 10 stimulations.

  7. Superthermal ions detected in Venus' dayside ionosheath, ionopause, and magnetic barrier regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Hartle, R. E.; Mahajan, K. K.; Wagner, T. C. G.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive morphological analysis of the dayside superthermal ion presence in the dayside ionopause region of Venus made using the Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer measurements are presented. There is a strong inbound-outbound difference in both the number and intensity of the superthermal ions with most events detected on the inbound crossing of the ionopause. The ambient energy of the detected ions is comparable to the ram energy of cold ions relative to the moving spacecraft. A comparison of the locations of the superthermal O(+) ion occurrences with respect to other parameters shows that the superthermals are a characteristic of the ionopause transition separating the essentially stationary ionosphere plasma from the flowing ionosheath plasma as deduced by Taylor et al. (1980) from individual examples.

  8. Electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for selective reversible ion detection.

    PubMed

    Schmoltner, Kerstin; Kofler, Johannes; Klug, Andreas; List-Kratochvil, Emil J W

    2013-12-17

    An ion-sensitive electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for selective and reversible detection of sodium (Na(+) ) down to 10(-6) M is presented. The inherent low voltage - high current operation of these transistors in combination with a state-of-the-art ion-selective membrane proves to be a novel, versatile modular sensor platform.

  9. Ion-pair reversed phase liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection for analysis of ultraviolet transparent cations.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Cook, Kenneth S; Littlepage, Eric; Cundy, John; Mangalathillam, Ratish; Jones, Michael T

    2015-08-21

    This paper describes the use of an anionic ion-pair reagent (IPR) to impove the ultraviolet (UV) detection and hydrophobic retention of polar and UV transparent cations. Anionic IPR added to the mobile phase forms an ion-pair with cations. Formation of the ion-pair causes a redshift in the absorption wavength, making it possible for direct UV detection of UV-inactive cations. The ion-pairs with increased hydrophobicity were separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). Different perfluorinated caboxylic acids (trifluoroacetic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid, nonafluoropentanoic acid) were evaluted as IPR in the separation and detection of the common cations sodium, ammonium and Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris). The effects of the IPR type and concentration on separation and detection have been investigated to understand the separation and detection mechanisms. The optimal separation and detection condtions were attained with mobile phase containing 0.1% nonafluoropentanoic acid and with the UV detection at 210nm. UV detection and charged aerosol detection (CAD) were compared in the quantitation of the cations. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) of sodium and Tris with UV detection is comparable to that by CAD. The LOQ of ammonium with UV detection (1ppm or 3ng) is about 20-fold lower than that (20ppm or 60ng) by CAD. The RPLC-UV method was used to monitor ammonium clearance during ultrafiltration and diafiltration in the manfucaturing of biopharmceutical drug substance.

  10. Detection of artificially created negative ion clouds with incoherent scatter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultan, Peter J.; Mendillo, Michael; Oliver, William L.; Holt, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The physical mechanisms by which negative ions change the shape of the incoherent scatter spectrum, and the way in which shape changes may be used to detect the presence of heavy positive and negative ions in an ambient ionosphere are investigated. In order to detect heavy negative ions, the temperature structure of the ionosphere is fixed to a prevent average measurement, and any changes in spectral shape during the experiment are interpreted as being caused by changes in composition, and not by changes in the temperature ratio Te/Ti. The spatial and temporal development of heavy negative ion plasma clouds created during four active chemical release experiments was observed. Concentrations of 10-40-percent SF6(-) were detected in SPINEX 1, SPINEX 2, and IMS data sets. An average uncertainty of +/-10-percent SF6(-) is present in all three experiments. Concentrations of 30-percent Br(-) were detected in the NICARE 1 release, with uncertainties of +/-4 percent.

  11. Ion Channel Mimetic Chronopotentiometric Polymeric Membrane Ion Sensor for Surface Confined Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yida

    2008-01-01

    The operation of ion channel sensors is mimicked with functionalized polymeric membrane electrodes, using a surface confined affinity reaction to impede the electrochemically imposed ion transfer kinetics of a marker ion. A membrane surface biotinylated by covalent attachment to the polymeric backbone is used here to bind to the protein avidin as a model system. The results indicate that the protein accumulates on the ion-selective membrane surface, partially blocking the current induced ion transfer across the membrane/aqueous sample interface, and subsequently decreases the potential jump in the so-called super-Nernstian step that is characteristic of a surface depletion of the marker ion. The findings suggest that such a potential drop could be utilized to measure the concentration of protein in the sample. Because the sensitivity of protein sensing is dependent on the effective blocking of the active surface area, it can be improved with a hydrophilic nanopore membrane applied on top of the biotinylated ion-selective membrane surface. Based on cyclic voltammetry characterization, the nanoporous membrane electrodes can indeed be understood as a recessed nanoelectrode array. The results show that the measuring range for protein sensing on nanopore electrodes is shifted to lower concentrations by more than one order of magnitude, which is explained with the reduction of surface area by the nanopore membrane and the related more effective hemispherical diffusion pattern. PMID:19067579

  12. Large ions: Their vaporization, detection and structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.; Ng, C.Y.; Powis, I.

    1997-12-31

    This book focuses on some of the fundamental chemistry and physics associated with the behavior of large ions, with the contributors addressing the issues in a quantitative fashion, in order to elucidate clearly some of the key recent advances which have taken place. As such, Large Ions provides an excellent snapshot of current research in this fascinating and important area. The six chapters are written by some of the leading experts in the field, and together they will be of great interest to experts and newcomers, both of whom will benefit from the in-depth discussion of the latest methods and results.

  13. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds.

  14. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds. PMID:26855427

  15. Determination of bromate ion in drinking water by capillary zone electrophoresis with direct photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshio; Ishida, Makoto; Mbuna, Julius; Driouich, Rim; Motomizu, Shoji

    2006-09-22

    Bromate ion in drinking water was determined by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with direct photometric detection. Bromate ion in the sample solution was introduced and concentrated into the capillary by electrokinetic injection for 50s at -10 kV. Electrophoretic separation was made at an applied voltage of -25 kV and bromate ion was detected at wavelength 193 nm, at which the baseline was stabilized with less UV-absorbing acidic phosphate buffer. Bromate ion was detected within 5 min in the electropherogram. By increasing the electric conductivity in the migrating solution with 10 mM Na2SO4, a limit of detection (LOD) of 9 x 10(-10)M (0.1 microg/L BrO3-) was achieved. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of tap water and river water samples, but bromate ion was not detected. Because the practical samples contain relatively large amount of foreign ionic substances, the tap water sample was diluted to avoid the matrix ions. Bromate ion added in a tap water at the concentration of 8 x 10(-8)M was quantitatively recovered by diluting it 1/10.

  16. Tuning the chemical selectivity of SWNT-FETs for detection of heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Forzani, Erica S; Li, Xiulan; Zhang, Peiming; Tao, Nongjian; Zhang, Ruth; Amlani, Islamshah; Tsui, Raymond; Nagahara, Larry A

    2006-11-01

    A method to functionalize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a field-effect transistor (FET) device for the selective detection of heavy-metal ions is presented. In this method, peptide-modified polymers were electrochemically deposited onto SWNTs and the selective detection of metal ions was demonstrated by choosing appropriate peptide sequences. The signal transduction mechanism of the peptide-modified SWNT-FETs has also been studied. PMID:17192975

  17. Chitosan-hydrogel-based fiber optic sensor for heavy metal ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Raghunandhan; Chen, Li Han; Chan, Chi Chiu; So, Ping Lam; Tou, Zhi Qiang; Peng, Zu

    2015-09-01

    A no-core fiber (NCF) based intermodal sensor for nickel ion (Ni2+) detection is proposed. Bilayers of chitosan and Poly Acrylic acid (PAA) functionalized on the sensor surface serve as adsorption sites for nickel ions thereby causing change in refractive index (RI) along the cladding bilayer boundary. Nickel adsorption at different concentrations was monitored continuously through measurement of wavelength shifts. As observed, the proposed sensor exhibits Ni2+ detection sensitivity of 0.0237 nm/μM.

  18. A multiplex readout method for position sensitive boron coated straw neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Gong, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xuewu; Li, Yuanjing; Kang, Kejun

    2015-10-01

    A 1 m×1 m boron coated straw neutron detector is expected to be used to build the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument of the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) in Tsinghua University. A multiplex readout method based on summing circuits in columns and rows is studied for this large area position sensitive detector. In this method, the outputs of charge sensitive preamplifiers are combined by columns and rows at two ends of the detector, and then the shaped signals are sampled by flash ADCs. With the position reconstructed algorithm implemented in FPGA which analyzes the charge division and column and row number of signals, the 3-D position information of neutron events can be obtained. The position resolution and counting rate performance of this method are analyzed, and the comparison to the delay-line readout method is also given. With the multiplex readout method, the scale of readout electronics can be greatly reduced and a good position resolution can be reached. A readout electronics system for a detector module which consists 4 × 10 straw tubes is designed based on this method, and the test with neutron beam shows an average 3-D spatial resolution of 4 × 4 × 6.8mm3.

  19. New Developments in the Position Sensitive Detectors Based on Microchannel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Siegmund, O. H. W.

    2002-11-01

    We report on the latest developments in position sensitive photon counting detectors based on microchannel plates. Substantial improvement of the spatial resolution was achieved with introduction of new readout technology, namely crossed strip (XS) anode, and corresponding processing electronics. The spatial resolution of XS readout appeared to be as small as ~3-4 μm FWHM. Reduction of the total detector gain (down to 106 and potentially lower) without compromising the spatial accuracy allows detector operation at much higher local and global counting rates since the microchannel recharge time becomes smaller. Recent developments of novel microchannel plate technologies provide basis for substantial increase of the spectral sensitivity and quantum efficiency of MCP detectors. We have tested a number of new Silicon micromachined MCPs The new MCP technologies should allow deposition of completely new photocathode materials directly on the front surface of microchannel plates (opaque photocathodes). Opposite to standard glass MCPs new Silicon MCPs can sustain high temperatures (-800 C°) required for the photocathode deposition and activation processes.

  20. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeters for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, SImon; Stevenson, Thomas; Hsieh, Wen-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMC) are one of the most promising devices to provide very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray spectroscopy. MMC detectors can be built to large detector arrays having thousands of pixels. Position-sensitive magnetic (PoSM) microcalorimeters consist of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic micro calorimeter. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the MMC, resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enabling position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs therefore achieve the large focal plane area with fewer number of readout channels without compromising spatial sampling. Excellent performance of PoSMs was achieved by optimizing the designs of key parameters such as the thermal conductance among the absorbers, magnetic sensor, and heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. Micro fab ri - cation techniques were developed to construct four-absorber PoSMs, in which each absorber consists of a two-layer composite of bismuth and gold. The energy resolution (FWHM full width at half maximum) was measured to be better than 5 eV at 6 keV x-rays for all four absorbers. Position determination was demonstrated with pulse-shape discrimination, as well as with pulse rise time. X-ray microcalorimeters are usually designed to thermalize as quickly as possible to avoid degradation in energy resolution from position dependence to the pulse shapes. Each pixel consists of an absorber and a temperature sensor, both decoupled from the cold bath through a weak thermal link. Each pixel requires a separate readout channel; for instance, with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device). For future astronomy missions where thousands to millions of resolution elements are required, having an individual SQUID readout channel for each pixel becomes difficult. One route to attaining these goals is a position-sensitive detector in which a large continuous or

  1. Fourier synthesis image reconstruction by use of one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Okada, Yuu; Negoro, Hitoshi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oda, Minoru

    2003-07-10

    An improvement of Fourier synthesis optics for hard x-ray imaging is described, and the basic performance of the new optics is confirmed through numerical simulations. The original concept of the Fourier synthesis imager utilizes nonposition-sensitive hard x-ray detectors coupled to individual bigrid modulation collimators. The improved concept employs a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (such as a CdTe strip detector) instead of the second grid layer of each bigrid modulation collimator. This improves the imaging performance in several respects over the original design. One performance improvement is a two-fold increase in the average transmission, from 1/4 to 1/2. The second merit is that both the sine and cosine components can be derived from a single grid-detector module, and hence the number of imaging modules can be halved. Furthermore, it provides information along the depth direction simultaneously. This in turn enables a three-dimensional imaging hard x-ray microscope for medical diagnostics, incorporating radioactive tracers. A conceptual design of such a microscope is presented, designed to provide a field of view of 4 mm and a spatial resolution of 400 microm.

  2. Mathematical modelling and study of the encoding readout scheme for position sensitive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiaoguang; Zeng, Ming; Zeng, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xuewu; Zhao, Ziran; Cheng, Jianping; Kang, Kejun

    2016-04-01

    Encoding readout methods based on different schemes have been successfully developed and tested with different types of position-sensitive detectors with strip-readout structures. However, how to construct an encoding scheme in a more general and systematic way is still under study. In this paper, we present a graph model for the encoding scheme. With this model, encoding schemes can be studied in a more systematic way. It is shown that by using an encoding readout method, a maximum of n (n - 1)/2 + 1 strips can be processed with n channels if n is odd, while a maximum of n (n - 2)/2 + 2 strips can be processed with n channels if n is even. Furthermore, based on the model, the encoding scheme construction problem can be translated into a problem in graph theory, the aim of which is to construct an Eulerian trail such that the length of the shortest subcycle is as long as possible. A more general approach to constructing the encoding scheme is found by solving the associated mathematical problem. In addition, an encoding scheme prototype has been constructed, and verified with MRPC detectors.

  3. ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter spectra of six Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; George, I. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter observations of six Seyfert 1 galaxies in the soft (0.1-2.0 keV) X-ray band. The sources (Mrk 335, ESO 198-G24, ESO 141-G55, Mrk 509, NGC 7469, and MCG-2-58-22) were chosen to have low absorbing column densities along the line of sight. As expected, it is found that all the sources possess significantly steeper spectra below about 1 keV than observed at higher X-ray energies. Assuming a simple absorbed power-law spectral model, the mean (photon) spectral index for the sample is Gamma = 2.38 +/- 0.25, compared to the canonical 1.7 typically observed in the 2-10 keV band. Furthermore, we find strong evidence for soft X-ray spectral features in half the sources. In NGC 7469 and ESO 198-G24, we find that the addition of a narrow emission line or an absorption edge to the underlying continuum is a significant improvement to the parameterization of the spectra. Mrk 335 also shows evidence for spectral complexity, but from these data it is not possible to unambiguously distinguish between an absorption edge and a steepening of the spectrum at low energies. We examine these results in the light of the accuracy of the PSPC spectral calibration.

  4. Position-sensitive change in the transition metal L-edge fine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gulec, Ahmet; Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2015-10-05

    Studying the structure and composition of solid-state materials on the atomic scale has become nearly routine in transmission electron microscopy with the development of novel electron optics and electron sources. In particular, with spatial resolutions better than 0.1 nm and energy resolution smaller than 100 meV, the stoichiometry, bonding, and coordination can now be examined on similar scales. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have played a crucial role in identifying charge ordering, valence, and as spin state transitions in transition metal perovskite oxides. In this letter, we investigate the effects of ever-decreasing electron-probe sizes on the measured near-edge fine-structure of the transition metal core-loss edge using EELS. We find that for certain transition metal perovskites, the position of the electron probe with respect to the atomic column is crucial in determining the correct valence state. Several reasons for the observed position-sensitive EELS fine-structure are discussed.

  5. High-resolution and high-intensity neutron diffractometer with linear position-sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Moon, Myung-Kook; Em, V. T.; Choi, Young-Nam; Oh, Hwa-Suk; Nam, Uk-Won

    2003-08-01

    The characteristics of a neutron diffractometer using a 3He one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (PSD) with delay line readout, a 200 (length) × 100 (height) mm 2 active window and 2.5 mm spatial resolution have been studied and compared with those of the High-Resolution Powder Diffractometer (HRPD) of KAERI with 32 3He conventional tube (∅50 mm) detectors and Soller collimators (10') before detectors. For the sample to PSD distance R=1200 mm, the PSD subtends 8° angle of 2 θ and provides the resolution and the peak-to-background ratio close to that for HRPD. Time for scanning (with the same statistics) of a 0-160° interval is about 1.6 times longer and the multi-PSD system providing efficiency about 10 times higher than HRPD is proposed. Because of the small angle subtended by the PSD, the parasitic peaks from the sample environment are eliminated and operation without an oscillating radial collimator is possible. Additionally, the proposed diffractometer has an advantage for small samples.

  6. Analysis of high-altitude planetary ion velocity space distributions detected by the Ion Mass Analyzer aboard Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fraenz, M.; Curry, S.; Mitchell, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    We present observations of planetary ion velocity space distributions from the Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) onboard Mars Express (MEX). The magnetometer data from Mars Global Surveyor is used to obtain a rough estimate of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Characteristic features of the velocity space distributions will be examined and discussed for orbits aligned with the convective electric field and those in the Mars terminator plane. This study will focus on the high (keV) energy ions, as well as the relative importance of a high-altitude magnetosheath source of escaping planetary ions. Furthermore, this paper will examine various methods for converting the IMA detector counts to species-specific fluxes. After mimicking the methods previously used by researchers, we apply each of these methods of species extraction to data collected during the same time intervals. We discuss the implications for planetary ion motion around Mars, using the details of the velocity space observations to better understand the solar wind interaction with Mars. Comparisons to virtual detections using a test particle simulation will also provide insight into ion origins and trajectories.

  7. Reactant ion chemistry for detection of TNT, RDX, and PETN using an ion mobility spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, S.E.; Rodacy, P.; Silva, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the responses of three energetic materials (TNT, RDX, and PETN) to varying reactant ion chemistries and IMS cell temperatures. The following reactant ion chemistries were evaluated; air-dry; air-wet; methylene chloride-dry; methylene chloride-wet; methylene bromide-dry; nitrogen dioxide-wet; sulfur dioxide-wet. The temperature was varied between 160 - 220{degrees}C.

  8. Mass determination of light ions in a Penning trap by time-of-flight detection of ion resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, J.; Engel, T.; Hagena, D.; Werth, G.

    1992-12-01

    We describe an experimental setup to determine the cyclotron frequencies of ions confined in a Penning trap by resonant excitation of the ions eigenfrequencies and a time-of-flight detection of the resonances. Systematic shifts from trap- and B-field imperfections are discussed and methods to minimize those effects in our experiment are presented. Results on the mass ratio for 4He/D2 and 3He/H2 demonstrate the experimentally obtained precision in the ppb range, which might be further improved by modification of our apparatus.

  9. New high-efficiency ion-trap mobility detection system for narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.

    1997-02-01

    A new patented Ion Trap Mobility Spectrometer design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1 percent efficiency. This is due primarily to electric field driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9 percent of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost int his discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an 'ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a 'field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. One application for this new detector is now being developed, a portable, hand-held system with switching capability for the detection of drugs and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra and sensitivity data are presented for cocaine and heroin using a hand sniffer configuration.

  10. New, high-efficiency ion trap mobility detection system for narcotics and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.; Bradley, V.; Borsody, A.; Lepine, S.

    1994-10-01

    A new patented Ion Trap Mobility Spectrometer (ITMS) design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1% efficiency. This is due primarily to electric field driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9% of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost in this discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an `ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a `field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. Many applications for this new detector are now being considered including the detection of narcotics and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra, reduced mobility data and sensitivity data are presented for fifteen narcotics, including cocaine, THC and LSD are reported.

  11. New high-efficiency ion trap mobility detection system for narcotics and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.; Jenkins, Anthony; Ribiero, K.; Napoli, J.

    1994-03-01

    A new patented ion trap mobility spectrometer design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1% efficiency. This is due primarily to electrical-field-driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9% of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost in this discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an `ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a `field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. Many applications for this new detector are now being considered including the detection of narcotics and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra, reduced mobility data and sensitivity data are presented for fifteen narcotics, including cocaine, THC, and LSD are reported.

  12. Nanoporous gold based optical sensor for sub-ppt detection of mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chang, Haixin; Hirata, Akihiko; Wu, Hongkai; Xue, Qi-Kun; Chen, Mingwei

    2013-05-28

    Precisely probing heavy metal ions in water is important for molecular biology, environmental protection, and healthy monitoring. Although many methods have been reported in the past decade, developing a quantitative approach capable of detecting sub-ppt level heavy metal ions with high selectivity is still challenging. Here we report an extremely sensitive and highly selective nanoporous gold/aptamer based surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor. The optical sensor has an unprecedented detection sensitivity of 1 pM (0.2 ppt) for Hg(2+) ions, the most sensitive Hg(2+) optical sensor known so far. The sensor also exhibits excellent selectivity. Dilute Hg(2+) ions can be identified in an aqueous solution containing 12 metal ions as well as in river water and underground water. Moreover, the SERRS sensor can be reused without an obvious loss of the sensitivity and selectivity even after 10 cycles.

  13. Nanoporous gold based optical sensor for sub-ppt detection of mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chang, Haixin; Hirata, Akihiko; Wu, Hongkai; Xue, Qi-Kun; Chen, Mingwei

    2013-05-28

    Precisely probing heavy metal ions in water is important for molecular biology, environmental protection, and healthy monitoring. Although many methods have been reported in the past decade, developing a quantitative approach capable of detecting sub-ppt level heavy metal ions with high selectivity is still challenging. Here we report an extremely sensitive and highly selective nanoporous gold/aptamer based surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor. The optical sensor has an unprecedented detection sensitivity of 1 pM (0.2 ppt) for Hg(2+) ions, the most sensitive Hg(2+) optical sensor known so far. The sensor also exhibits excellent selectivity. Dilute Hg(2+) ions can be identified in an aqueous solution containing 12 metal ions as well as in river water and underground water. Moreover, the SERRS sensor can be reused without an obvious loss of the sensitivity and selectivity even after 10 cycles. PMID:23590120

  14. Detections of lunar exospheric ions by the LADEE neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Poppe, A. R.; Delory, G. T.

    2015-07-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS), operating in ion mode, provides sensitive detections of ions from the lunar exosphere. By analyzing ion-mode data from the entire mission, utilizing Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) plasma and magnetic field measurements to organize NMS data and eliminate background sources, we identify highly significant detections of lunar ions at mass per charge of 2, 4, 12, 20, 28, 39, and 40, moderately significant detections at 14 and 23, and weak detections at 24, 25, and 36. Unlike many previous observations of Moon-derived ions, an outward pointing viewing geometry ensures that these ions originate from the exosphere, rather than directly from the surface. For species with known neutral distributions, inferred ion production rates appear consistent with expectations for both magnitude and spatial distribution, assuming photoionization as the predominant source mechanism. Unexpected signals at mass per charge 12 and 28 suggest the presence of a significant exospheric population of carbon-bearing molecules.

  15. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.

    1985-01-16

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  16. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Young, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  17. Recent developments in ion detection techniques for Penning trap mass spectrometry at TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaer, J.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Ferrer, R.; George, S.; Herfurth, F.; Ketter, J.; Nagy, Sz.; Repp, J.; Schweikhard, L.; Smorra, C.; Sturm, S.; Ulmer, S.

    2009-12-01

    The highest precision in the determination of nuclear and atomic masses can be achieved by Penning trap mass spectrometry. The mass value is obtained through a measurement of the cyclotron frequency of the stored charged particle. Two different approaches are used at the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP for the mass determination: the destructive Time-Of-Flight Ion Cyclotron Resonance (TOF-ICR) technique and the non-destructive Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) method. New developments for both techniques are described, which will improve the detection efficiency and the suppression of contaminations in the case of TOF-ICR. The FT-ICR detection systems will allow for the investigation of an incoming ion bunch from a radioactive-beam facility on the one hand, and for the detection of a single singly charged ion in the Penning trap on the other hand.

  18. Theory and Development of Position-Sensitive Quantum Calorimeters. Degree awarded by Stanford Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Quantum calorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for future X-ray astrophysics observatories. Much of the science to be done by these instruments could benefit greatly from larger focal-plane coverage of the detector (without increasing pixel size). An order of magnitude more area will greatly increase the science throughput of these future instruments. One of the main deterrents to achieving this goal is the complexity of the readout schemes involved. We have devised a way to increase the number of pixels from the current baseline designs by an order of magnitude without increasing the number of channels required for readout. The instrument is a high energy resolution, distributed-readout imaging spectrometer called a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (POST). A POST is a quantum calorimeter consisting of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESS) on the ends of a long absorber capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. Comparing rise time and energy information from the two TESS, the position of the event in the POST is determined. The energy of the event is inferred from the sum of the two pulses. We have developed a generalized theoretical formalism for distributed-readout calorimeters and apply it to our devices. We derive the noise theory and calculate the theoretical energy resolution of a POST. Our calculations show that a 7-pixel POST with 6 keV saturation energy can achieve 2.3 eV resolution, making this a competitive design for future quantum calorimeter instruments. For this thesis we fabricated 7- and 15-pixel POSTS using Mo/Au TESs and gold absorbers, and moved from concept drawings on scraps of napkins to a 32 eV energy resolution at 1.5 keV, 7-pixel POST calorimeter.

  19. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin. PMID:23217311

  20. Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-07-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples.

  1. Ultrasensitive quantum dot fluorescence quenching assay for selective detection of mercury ions in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg(2+) ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples. PMID:25005836

  2. Ultrasensitive quantum dot fluorescence quenching assay for selective detection of mercury ions in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-07-09

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg(2+) ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples.

  3. Development of dithizone based fibre optic evanescent wave sensor for heavy metal ion detection in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavsar, K.; Prabhu, R.; Pollard, P.

    2013-06-01

    Detection of highly toxic heavy metal ions requires rapid, simple, sensitive and selective detection methods in the environment. Optical fibre based sensing facilitates the remote, continuous and in-situ detection approaches in the environment. Herein, we report the development of a dithizone based fibre optic sensor with a simple procedure to detect heavy metal ions in the aqueous environment using an evanescent wave sensing approach. The chromogenic ligand dithizone and its spectral specificity with metal ions has been elaborated in this work.

  4. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  5. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm3 LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  6. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties.

    PubMed

    Schmall, Jeffrey P; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-06-12

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm(3) LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  7. A Simple Capacitive Charge-Division Readout for Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Du, Junwei; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    A capacitive charge-division readout method for reading out a 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm position-sensitive solid-state photomultipliers (PS-SSPM) was designed and evaluated. Using this analog multiplexing method, the 20 signals (16 position, 4 timing) from the PS-SSPM array are reduced to 5 signals (4 position, 1 timing), allowing the PS-SSPM array to be treated as an individual large-area PS-SSPM module. A global positioning approach can now be used, instead of individual positioning for each PS-SSPM in the array, ensuring that the entire light signal is utilized. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and flood histogram quality at different bias voltages (27.5 V to 32.0 V at 0.5 V intervals) and a fixed temperature of 0 °C were evaluated by coupling a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 mm × 1.3 mm × 20 mm polished LSO crystals to the center of the PS-SSPM array. The timing resolution was measured at a fixed bias voltage of 31.0 V and a fixed temperature of 0 °C. All the measurements were evaluated and compared using capacitors with different values and tolerances. Capacitor values ranged from 0.051 nf to 10 nf, and the capacitance tolerance ranged from 1% to 20%. The results show that better performance was achieved using capacitors with smaller values and better capacitance tolerance. Using 0.2 nf capacitors, the SNR, energy resolution and timing resolution were 24.3, 18.2% and 8.8 ns at a bias voltage 31.0 V, respectively. The flood histogram quality was also evaluated by using a 10 × 10 array of 1 mm × 1 mm × 10 mm polished LSO crystals and a 10 × 10 array of 0.7 mm × 0.7 mm × 20 mm unpolished LSO crystals to determine the smallest crystal size resolvable. These studies showed that the high spatial resolution of the PS-SSPM was preserved allowing for 0.7 mm crystals to be identified. These results show that the capacitive charge-division analog signal processing method can significantly reduce the number of electronic channels, from 20 to 5, while retaining the

  8. Nitrate ion detection in aerosols using morphology-dependent stimulated Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.; Zhang, J.; Nichols, W.

    1999-01-01

    A nitrate ion concentration of 5{times}10{sup {minus}5}M has been detected in {approximately}180 {mu}m diam aqueous aerosols using morphology-dependent stimulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). This low concentration was detected by allowing the droplet size to be tuned during an experiment. Comparison of the experimental results with the MDSRS gain equation shows that it may be possible to detect concentrations a factor of ten lower. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Ionoluminescence analysis of glass scintillators and application to single-ion-hit real-time detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Akihito; Kada, Wataru; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Shimada, Keisuke; Yokoata, Yuya; Miura, Kenta; Hanaizumi, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose and test a real-time detection system for single-ion hits using mega-electronvolt (MeV)-heavy ions. The system was constructed using G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, as well as an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera combined with an inverted microscope with a 10× objective lens. Commercially available G2000 and G9 glass scintillators, which have been reported to exhibit strong photoluminescence at 489, 543, 585, and 622 nm as a result of the Tb3+ f-f transition, were employed for highly accurate ionized particle detection. The EMCCD camera had a resolution of 512 × 512 pixels, each with a size of 16 μm × 16 μm, and a maximum linear gain of 8 × 105 electrons. For 260-MeV Ne, 3 ion hits/s were detected by our system. The intensity of the ionoluminescence (IL) peak induced by the heavy ions was 140 times the noise intensity. In contrast, the luminous diameter at the full width at half maximum (FWHM) in both the horizontal and vertical directions was calculated to be approximately 4.5 μm. These results suggest that our detection system can accurately detect single-ion hits with a diameter of the order of 1 μm.

  10. Applications of metal ions and liquid crystals for multiplex detection of DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanyang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Many cations such as sodium ions have strong influence on anchoring behaviors of liquid crystals (LC). Since DNA is negatively charged and forms complex with metal ions, it is possible to form DNA/metal ions complex on surfaces to disrupt orientations of LC. This phenomenon is used to establish a principle for detecting surface immobilized DNA by using LC. In contrast, peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is electroneutral. It does not complex with metal ions or affect the orientations of LC. Therefore, PNA can be used as a probe to hybridize with specific DNA with a unique sequence, and the principle mentioned above can be used to detect the DNA target by using metal ions and LC. Based on this method, a 600bp DNA target in buffer can be detected with a limit of detection at 10fM. Unlike other fluorescence-based DNA assays, this LC-based detection method does not require labeling of DNA, and the test result can be viewed with the naked eye under a polarized microscope.

  11. Ion channels in artificial bolaamphiphile membranes deposited on sensor chips: optical detection in an ion-channel-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalkhammer, Thomas G. M.; Weiss-Wichert, Christof; Smetazko, Michaela M.; Valina-Saba, Miriam

    1997-06-01

    Signal amplification using labels should be replaced by a technique monitoring the biochemical binding event directly. The use of a ligand coupled to an artificial gated membrane ion channel is a new promising strategy. Binding of protein- or DNA/RNA-analytes at ligand modified peptide channels results in an on/off-response of the channel current due to channel closure or distortion. The sensor consists of stable transmembrane channels with a ligand bound covalently at the peptide channel entrance, a sensor chip with a photostructurized hydrophobic polymer frame, a hydrophilic ion conducting membrane support, a lipid membrane incorporating the engineered ion channels, and a current amplifier or a sensitive fluorescence monitor. Detection of channel opening or closure can ether be obtained by directly monitoring membrane conductivity or a transient change of pH or ion concentration within the membrane compartment. This change can be induced by electrochemical or optical means and its decay is directly correlated to the permeability of the membrane. The ion concentration in the sub membrane compartment was monitored by incorporation of fluorescent indicator dyes. To obtain the stable sensor membrane the lipid layer had to be attached on a support and the floating of the second lipid membrane on top of the first one had to be prevented. Both problems do not occur using our new circular C44-C76 bolaamphiphilic lipids consisting of a long hydrophobic core region and two hydrophilic heads. Use of maleic ester-head groups enabled us to easily modify the lipids with amines, thioles, alcohols, phosphates, boronic acid as well as fluorescent dyes. The properties of these membranes were studied using LB and fluorescence techniques. Based on this detection principle miniaturized sensor chips with significantly enhanced sensitivity and large multi analyte arrays are under construction.

  12. Evaluation of Pulse Counting for the Mars Organic Mass Analyzer (MOMA) Ion Trap Detection Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Amerom, Friso H.; Short, Tim; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Kleyner, Igor; Cotter, Robert J.; Pinnick, Veronica; Hoffman, Lars; Danell, Ryan M.; Lyness, Eric I.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Organic Mass Analyzer is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to identify organics and possible biological compounds on Mars. In the process of characterizing mass spectrometer size, weight, and power consumption, the use of pulse counting was considered for ion detection. Pulse counting has advantages over analog-mode amplification of the electron multiplier signal. Some advantages are reduced size of electronic components, low power consumption, ability to remotely characterize detector performance, and avoidance of analog circuit noise. The use of pulse counting as a detection method with ion trap instruments is relatively rare. However, with the recent development of high performance electrical components, this detection method is quite suitable and can demonstrate significant advantages over analog methods. Methods A prototype quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer with an internal electron ionization source was used as a test setup to develop and evaluate the pulse-counting method. The anode signal from the electron multiplier was preamplified. The an1plified signal was fed into a fast comparator for pulse-level discrimination. The output of the comparator was fed directly into a Xilinx FPGA development board. Verilog HDL software was written to bin the counts at user-selectable intervals. This system was able to count pulses at rates in the GHz range. The stored ion count nun1ber per bin was transferred to custom ion trap control software. Pulse-counting mass spectra were compared with mass spectra obtained using the standard analog-mode ion detection. Prelin1inary Data Preliminary mass spectra have been obtained for both analog mode and pulse-counting mode under several sets of instrument operating conditions. Comparison of the spectra revealed better peak shapes for pulse-counting mode. Noise levels are as good as, or better than, analog-mode detection noise levels. To artificially force ion pile-up conditions, the ion trap was overfilled

  13. [Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Detection of Cobalt Ions by Silver Triangular Nanoplates and Rhodamine 6G].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-qing; Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Liu, Chao-juan; Cao, Qiu-e; Ding, Zhong-tao

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, the authors studied fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomenon between silver triangular nanoplates and bovine serum albumin (BSA)/Rhodamine 6G fluorescence complex, and established a fluorescence method for the detection of cobalt ions. We found that when increasing the silver triangular nanoplates added to certain concentrations of fluorescent bovine serum albumin (BSA)/Rhodamine 6G complex, the fluorescence of Rhodamine 6G would be quenched up to 80% due to the FRET between the quencher and donor. However, in the presence of cobalt ions, the disassociation of the fluorescent complex from silver triangular nanoplates occurred and the fluorescence of the Rhodamine 6G recovered. The recovery of fluorescence intensity rate (I/I0) has a good relationship with the cobalt ion concentration (cCO2+) added. Thus, the authors developed a fluorescence method for the detection of cobalt ions based on the FRET of silver triangular nanoplates and Rhodamine 6G.

  14. Ion-induced gamma-ray detection of fast ions escaping from fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Mushiake, T.; Doi, K.; Wada, M.; Taniike, A.; Matsuki, T.; Shimazoe, K.; Yoshino, M.; Nagasaka, T.; Tanaka, T.; Kisaki, M.; Fujimoto, Y.; Fujioka, K.; Yamaoka, H.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2014-11-15

    A 12 × 12 pixel detector has been developed and used in a laboratory experiment for lost fast-ion diagnostics. With gamma rays in the MeV range originating from nuclear reactions {sup 9}Be(α, nγ){sup 12}C, {sup 9}Be(d, nγ){sup 12}C, and {sup 12}C(d, pγ){sup 13}C, a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector measured a fine-energy-resolved spectrum of gamma rays. The HPGe detector enables the survey of background-gamma rays and Doppler-shifted photo peak shapes. In the experiments, the pixel detector produces a gamma-ray image reconstructed from the energy spectrum obtained from total photon counts of irradiation passing through the detector's lead collimator. From gamma-ray image, diagnostics are able to produce an analysis of the fast ion loss onto the first wall in principle.

  15. Modified graphene oxide sensors for ultra-sensitive detection of nitrate ions in water.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen; Mura, Stefania; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-10-01

    Nitrate ions is a very common contaminant in drinking water and has a significant impact on the environment, necessitating routine monitoring. Due to its chemical and physical properties, it is hard to directly detect nitrate ions with high sensitivity in a simple and inexpensive manner. Herein with amino group modified graphene oxide (GO) as a sensing element, we show a direct and ultra-sensitive method to detect nitrate ions, at a lowest detected concentration of 5 nM in river water samples, much lower than the reported methods based on absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, unlike the reported strategies based on absorption spectroscopy wherein the nitrate concentration is determined by monitoring an increase in aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), our method evaluates the concentration of nitrate ions based on reduction in aggregation of GNPs for monitoring in real samples. To improve sensitivity, several optimizations were performed, including the assessment of the amount of modified GO required, concentration of GNPs and incubation time. The detection methodology was characterized by zeta potential, TEM and SEM. Our results indicate that an enrichment of modified GO with nitrate ions contributed to excellent sensitivity and the entire detection procedure could be completed within 75 min with only 20 μl of sample. This simple and rapid methodology was applied to monitor nitrate ions in real samples with excellent sensitivity and minimum pretreatment. The proposed approach paves the way for a novel means to detect anions in real samples and highlights the potential of GO based detection strategy for water quality monitoring. PMID:26078154

  16. Modified graphene oxide sensors for ultra-sensitive detection of nitrate ions in water.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen; Mura, Stefania; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-10-01

    Nitrate ions is a very common contaminant in drinking water and has a significant impact on the environment, necessitating routine monitoring. Due to its chemical and physical properties, it is hard to directly detect nitrate ions with high sensitivity in a simple and inexpensive manner. Herein with amino group modified graphene oxide (GO) as a sensing element, we show a direct and ultra-sensitive method to detect nitrate ions, at a lowest detected concentration of 5 nM in river water samples, much lower than the reported methods based on absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, unlike the reported strategies based on absorption spectroscopy wherein the nitrate concentration is determined by monitoring an increase in aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), our method evaluates the concentration of nitrate ions based on reduction in aggregation of GNPs for monitoring in real samples. To improve sensitivity, several optimizations were performed, including the assessment of the amount of modified GO required, concentration of GNPs and incubation time. The detection methodology was characterized by zeta potential, TEM and SEM. Our results indicate that an enrichment of modified GO with nitrate ions contributed to excellent sensitivity and the entire detection procedure could be completed within 75 min with only 20 μl of sample. This simple and rapid methodology was applied to monitor nitrate ions in real samples with excellent sensitivity and minimum pretreatment. The proposed approach paves the way for a novel means to detect anions in real samples and highlights the potential of GO based detection strategy for water quality monitoring.

  17. Use of fluorescent DNA-templated gold/silver nanoclusters for the detection of sulfide ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Lan, Guo-Yu; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2011-12-15

    We have developed a one-pot approach to prepare fluorescent DNA-templated gold/silver nanoclusters (DNA-Au/Ag NCs) from Au(3+), Ag(+), and DNA (5'-CCCTTAATCCCC-3') in the presence of NaBH(4) in order to detect sulfide (S(2-)) ions on the basis of fluorescence quenching. The as-prepared DNA-Au/Ag NCs have been characterized by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry measurements. Relative to DNA-Ag NCs, DNA-Au/Ag NCs are much more stable in high ionic strength media (e.g., 200 mM NaCl). The quantum yield of the as-prepared DNA-Au/Ag NCs is 4.5%. We have demonstrated that the fluorescence of DNA-Au/Ag NCs is quenched by S(2-) ions through the interaction between sulfide ions and gold/silver atoms/ions, a result which leads to changes in the conformation of the templated DNA from packed hairpin to random coil structures. These changes in fluorescence intensity allow sensitive detection of S(2-) ions at concentrations as low as 0.83 nM. To minimize interference from I(-) ions for the detection of S(2-) ions using the DNA-Au/Ag NCs, the addition of sodium peroxydisulfate to the solution is essential. We have validated the practicality of this probe for the detection of S(2-) ions in hot spring and seawater samples, demonstrating its advantages of simplicity, sensitivity, selectivity, and low cost.

  18. Nondestructive photon detection using a single rare-earth ion coupled to a photonic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Chris; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei; Simon, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    We study the possibility of using single rare-earth ions coupled to a photonic cavity with high cooperativity for performing nondestructive measurements of photons, which would be useful for global quantum networks and photonic quantum computing. We calculate the achievable fidelity as a function of the parameters of the rare-earth ion and photonic cavity, which include the ion's optical and spin dephasing rates, the cavity linewidth, the single-photon coupling to the cavity, and the detection efficiency. We suggest a promising experimental realization using current state-of-the-art technology in Nd:YVO4.

  19. Gold nanoflowers based colorimetric detection of Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalawade, Pradnya; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2013-12-01

    An optical detection method based on the interaction of gold nanoflowers with Hg2+ and Pb2+ has been described. After interaction, gold nanoflowers change the color from violet to wine red. The nanoflowers are capable of determining Hg2+ and Pb2+ over a dynamic range of 1.0 × 10-6 and 1.0 × 10-5 M, respectively. The response time of nanoflowers depends on the concentration of ions. The presence of both Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions in the mixture having Au nanoflowers induced color changes of the solution within several seconds even at 1.0 × 10-6 M. Common metal ions were chosen to investigate their interference in Hg2+ and Pb2+ detection, and the concentration of each metal ion studied was 1.0 × 10-5 M. Other metallic ions could not induce color change even at 1.0 × 10-5 M. The feasibility of our method to detect Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions at high concentration in real water samples was verified. Water samples were from our own laboratory and no pretreatment was made. As the particles are stable they can be used for more than 3 months without observing any major deviation.

  20. Determination of aspartame by ion chromatography with electrochemical integrated amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Qu, F; Qi, Z H; Liu, K N; Mou, S F

    1999-07-30

    In this paper, the separation and determination of the sweetener aspartame by ion chromatography coupled with electrochemical amperometric detection is reported. Sodium saccharin, acesulfame-K and aspartame were separated using 27.5 mmol/l NaOH isocratic elution on a Dionex IonPac AS4A-SC separation column. Aspartame can be determined by integrated amperometric detection without interference from the other two sweeteners. The method can be applied to the determination of aspartame in powered tabletop, fruit juice and carbonated beverage samples, and the results obtained by integrated amperometry were in agreement with those obtained using a UV detection method. A method for determining analytes with an NH2 group by ion chromatography with integrated amperometry was developed.

  1. Anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Sun, Jianchao; Fan, Hai; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel approach for facile and rapid detection of heavy metal ions using anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) modified test strips is demonstrated. By intercalating Fe(CN)6(4-) or S(2-) anions into the interlayers of LDHs on the filter paper, various heavy metal ions can be easily detected based on the color change before and after reaction between the anions and the heavy metal ions. Upon the dropping of heavy metal ions solutions to the test strips, the colors of the test strips changed instantly, which can be easily observed by naked eyes. With the decrease of the concentration, the color depth changed obviously. The lowest detection concentration can be up to 1×10(-6) mol L(-1). Due to the easily intercalation of anions into the interlayer of the LDHs on test trips, this procedure provides a general method for the construction of LDHs modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions. The stability of the prepared test strips is investigated. Furthermore, all the results were highly reproducible. The test strips may have potential applications in environmental monitoring fields.

  2. Development of an ion attachment mass spectrometer for direct detection of intermediates in combustion flames.

    PubMed

    Torii, Takahiro; Nishimura, Takashi; Nakamura, Megumi; Shiokawa, Yoshiro; Matsumoto, Kozo; Kitagawa, Kuniyuki

    2008-11-01

    A system with Li+ ion attachment (IA) ionization has been developed for the direct detection of intermediates formed in burning flames by mass spectrometry. Dimethyl ether (DME) among alternative fuels was selected as a test substance to examine the capability of the system. As a result, intermediates generated in a premixed DME-air flame were directly detectable as Li+ adduct ions. By moving the burner on an X-Y stage, spatial distribution profiles of different species, including unburned DME and formaldehyde, were obtained for three types of flames: diffusion, partially premixed, and premixed.

  3. HPLC Determination Of Transition Metal Ions By Chemiluminescence Detected With A Charge-Coupled Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalkian, Rafi D.; Ratzlaff, Kenneth L.; Denton, M. Bonner

    1989-07-01

    A solid-state two-dimensional charge-coupled device (CCD) is found to offer several advantages to the detection of chemiluminescence from luminol. To study these benefits, measurements of luminol emission with hydrogen peroxide and transition-metal ions were made in a continuous flow mode. A mixture of metal ions separated by cation-exchange chromatography was also observed with chemiluminescence. A new technique, simultaneous variable binning, applied to the transient light emission leads to outstanding dynamic range. Excellent linearity and detection limits are obtained for Co2+, Cu2+, Cr3+, and H202.

  4. Dopant-assisted negative photoionization ion mobility spectrometry for sensitive detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shasha; Dou, Jian; Wang, Weiguo; Chen, Chuang; Hua, Lei; Zhou, Qinghua; Hou, Keyong; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2013-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a key trace detection technique for explosives and the development of a simple, stable, and efficient nonradioactive ionization source is highly demanded. A dopant-assisted negative photoionization (DANP) source has been developed for IMS, which uses a commercial VUV krypton lamp to ionize acetone as the source of electrons to produce negative reactant ions in air. With 20 ppm of acetone as the dopant, a stable current of reactant ions of 1.35 nA was achieved. The reactant ions were identified to be CO(3)(-)(H(2)O)(n) (K(0) = 2.44 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) by atmospheric pressure time-of-flight mass spectrometry, while the reactant ions in (63)Ni source were O(2)(-)(H(2)O)(n) (K(0) = 2.30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). Finally, its capabilities for detection of common explosives including ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), N-nitrobis(2-hydroxyethyl)amine dinitrate (DINA), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were evaluated, and the limits of detection of 10 pg (ANFO), 80 pg (TNT), and 100 pg (DINA) with a linear range of 2 orders of magnitude were achieved. The time-of-flight mass spectra obtained with use of DANP source clearly indicated that PETN and DINA can be directly ionized by the ion-association reaction of CO(3)(-) to form PETN·CO(3)(-) and DINA·CO(3)(-) adduct ions, which result in good sensitivity for the DANP source. The excellent stability, good sensitivity, and especially the better separation between the reactant and product ion peaks make the DANP a potential nonradioactive ionization source for IMS.

  5. Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets based on encoding metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lichun; Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Panpan; Wu, Guofan; Lu, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiuhui

    2014-02-15

    We present a novel strategy for simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple DNA targets based on the use of different encoding metal ions as tags. The principle of this scheme is that metal ions bound to metallothionein (MT) molecules can be released down after hybridization with DNA targets and then be detected by stripping voltammetry. The novel detection probes, ssDNA/MT conjugates, covered with different metal ions were synthesized for the first time, then three encoding metal ions (Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+)) were used to differentiate the signals of three virus DNA due to their well-defined anodic stripping peaks at -1.13 V (Zn), -0.78 V (Cd), and -0.52 V (Pb) at BiFE, respectively. The anodic peak currents increased linearly with the concentrations of DNA targets in the range from 0.1 nM to 10nM with a detection limit of 33 pM. In addition, the one-base mismatched target was effectively discriminated from the complementary target. The described results demonstrated that this method possesses high sensitivity and selectivity for multi-target DNA assay and has great potential in applications for detection of even more targets in biological assays, particularly immunoassays.

  6. Position sensitive photon detectors for nuclear physics, particle physics and healthcare applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, B.

    2012-01-01

    Modern experiments in hadronic physics require detector systems capable of identifying and reconstructing all final-state particles and their momentum vectors. Imaging Cherenkov counters (RICH and DIRC) are frequently employed in nuclear and particle physics experiments. These detectors require high-rate, single-photon capable light detection system with sufficient granularity and position resolution. Several candidate systems are available, ranging from multi-anode photomultiplier tubes to micro-channel plate systems to silicon photomultipliers. Each of these detection solutions has particular advantages and disadvantages. Detailed studies of rate dependence, cross-talk, time-resolution and position resolution for a range of available photon detection solutions are presented. These properties make these photon detection systems ideal for radionuclide imaging applications. Cherenkov radiation can also be used for medical imaging applications. Two different applications using the Cherenkov effect for radionuclide imaging will be reviewed.

  7. Protein-Modified-Paramagnetic-Particles as a Tool for Detection of Silver(I) Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizek, R.; Krizkova, S.; Adam, V.; Huska, D.; Hubalek, J.; Trnkova, L.

    2009-04-01

    In a number of published articles the toxic effect of silver(I) ions on aquatic organisms is described. Silver(I) ions in aquatic environment are stable in a wide range of pH. Under alkali pH AgOH and Ag(OH)2- can be formed. However, in water environment there are many compounds to interact with silver(I) ions. The most important ones are chloride anions, which forms insoluble precipitate with silver(I) ions (AgCl). The insoluble silver containing compounds do not pose any threat to aquatic organisms. Toxicity of silver ions is probably caused by their very good affinity to nucleic acids and also proteins. The binding into active enzyme site leads to the expressive enzyme reaction inhibition. Silver(I) ions are into living environment introduced thanks to anthropogenic activities. They easily contaminate atmosphere as well as aquatic environment or soils. Several authors described using of carbon electrode as working electrode for determination of silver. Recently, we have suggested heavy metal biosensor based on interaction of metal ions with low molecular mass protein called metallothionein (MT), which was adsorbed on the surface of hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The biosensor was successfully used for detection of cadmium(II) and zinc(II) ions, cisplatin, cisplatin-DNA adducts and palladium(II) ions. Due to the convincing results with MT as biological component we report on suggesting of heavy metal biosensor based on immobilization of metallothionein (MT) on the surface of carbon paste electrode (CPE) via MT-antibodies. Primarily we studied of basic electrochemical behaviour of MT at surface of carbon paste electrode by using of square wave voltammetry (SWV). Detection limit (3 S/N) for MT was evaluated as 0.1 μg/ml. After that we have evaluated the electroactivity of MT at surface of SWV, we aimed our attention on the way of capturing of MT on the surface of CPE. We choose antibody against MT obtained from chicken eggs for these purposes. Antibodies

  8. Detection of Volatile Vapors Emitted from Explosives with a Hand-held Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert Gordon; Miller, Carla Jean

    2001-11-01

    Vapor detection of plastic explosives is difficult because of the low vapor pressures of explosive components (i.e. RDX and PETN) present in the complex elastomeric matrix. To facilitate vapor detection of plastic explosives, detection agents (taggants) with higher vapor pressures can be added to bulk explosives during manufacture. This paper investigates the detection of two of these taggants, ethyleneglycol dinitrate (EGDN) and 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane (DMNB), using a handheld ion mobility spectrometer. These two taggants were detected both from neat vapor sources as well as from bulk explosives (nitroglycerin (NG)-dynamite and C-4 tagged with DMNB). EGDN was detected from NG-dynamite as EGDN·NO3- at a reduced mobility value of 1.45 cm2 V-1 s-1 with detection limits estimated to be about 10 ppbv. DMNB was identified from tagged C-4 as both negative and positive ions with reduced mobility values of 1.33 cm2 V-1 s-1 for DMNB·NO2- and 1.44 cm2 V-1s-1 for DMNB·NH4+. Positive ions for cyclohexanone were also apparent in the spectra from tagged C-4 producing three additional peaks.

  9. Femtomolar detection of mercuric ions using polypyrrole, pectin and graphene nanocomposites modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2016-12-01

    Several nanomaterials and techniques for the detection of mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) have been developed in the past decade. However, simple, low-cost and rapid sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions yet remains an important task. Herein, we present a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the femtomolar detection of Hg(2+) based on polypyrrole, pectin, and graphene (PPy/Pct/GR) which was prepared by one step electrochemical potentiodyanamic method. The effect of concentration of pectin, polypyrrole and graphene were studied for the detection of Hg(2+). The influence of experimental parameters including effect of pH, accumulation time and accumulation potential were also studied. Different pulse anodic stripping voltammetry was chosen to detect Hg(2+) at PPy/Pct/GR/GCE modified electrode. The fabricated sensor achieved an excellent performance towards Hg(2+) detection such as higher sensitivity of 28.64μAμM(-1) and very low detection limit (LOD) of 4 fM at the signal to noise ratio of 3. The LOD of our sensor offered nearly 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of recommended concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water by United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. Compared to all previously reported electrochemical sensors towards Hg(2+) detection, our newly fabricated sensor attained a very LOD in the detection of Hg(2+). The practicality of our proposed sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) was successfully demonstrated in untreated tap water.

  10. Femtomolar detection of mercuric ions using polypyrrole, pectin and graphene nanocomposites modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2016-12-01

    Several nanomaterials and techniques for the detection of mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) have been developed in the past decade. However, simple, low-cost and rapid sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions yet remains an important task. Herein, we present a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the femtomolar detection of Hg(2+) based on polypyrrole, pectin, and graphene (PPy/Pct/GR) which was prepared by one step electrochemical potentiodyanamic method. The effect of concentration of pectin, polypyrrole and graphene were studied for the detection of Hg(2+). The influence of experimental parameters including effect of pH, accumulation time and accumulation potential were also studied. Different pulse anodic stripping voltammetry was chosen to detect Hg(2+) at PPy/Pct/GR/GCE modified electrode. The fabricated sensor achieved an excellent performance towards Hg(2+) detection such as higher sensitivity of 28.64μAμM(-1) and very low detection limit (LOD) of 4 fM at the signal to noise ratio of 3. The LOD of our sensor offered nearly 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of recommended concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water by United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. Compared to all previously reported electrochemical sensors towards Hg(2+) detection, our newly fabricated sensor attained a very LOD in the detection of Hg(2+). The practicality of our proposed sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) was successfully demonstrated in untreated tap water. PMID:27565958

  11. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  12. Zinc finger peptide based optic sensor for detection of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Verma, Neelam; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-12-15

    In the present work, polyacrylamide gel has been used as a matrix for the immobilization of zinc finger peptide and fluorescent dye acrydine orange on the micro well plate to fabricate the fluorescence based biosensor for the detection of zinc ions in milk samples. The fluorescent dye moves in the hydrophobic groove formed after folding of the peptide in the presence of zinc ions. Under optimized conditions, linear range was observed between 0.001µg/l to 10µg/l of Zinc ions, with a lowest detection limit of 0.001µg/l and response time of 5min. Presented biosensor has shown 20% decrease in fluorescent intensity values after 5 regenerations and stable for more than one month, stored at 4°C. Interference study with other metal ions like lead, cadmium and copper showed a negligible change in fluorescence intensity in comparison to zinc ions. Developed bio sensing system was found to be novel, quick, reliable, miniaturized, stable, reproducible and repeatable and specific for zinc ion, which has been applied to various milk samples.

  13. Zinc finger peptide based optic sensor for detection of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Verma, Neelam; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-12-15

    In the present work, polyacrylamide gel has been used as a matrix for the immobilization of zinc finger peptide and fluorescent dye acrydine orange on the micro well plate to fabricate the fluorescence based biosensor for the detection of zinc ions in milk samples. The fluorescent dye moves in the hydrophobic groove formed after folding of the peptide in the presence of zinc ions. Under optimized conditions, linear range was observed between 0.001µg/l to 10µg/l of Zinc ions, with a lowest detection limit of 0.001µg/l and response time of 5min. Presented biosensor has shown 20% decrease in fluorescent intensity values after 5 regenerations and stable for more than one month, stored at 4°C. Interference study with other metal ions like lead, cadmium and copper showed a negligible change in fluorescence intensity in comparison to zinc ions. Developed bio sensing system was found to be novel, quick, reliable, miniaturized, stable, reproducible and repeatable and specific for zinc ion, which has been applied to various milk samples. PMID:27424265

  14. Fluorescence switch for silver ion detection utilizing dimerization of DNA-Ag nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyun; Park, Juhee; Hee Lee, Hong; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Hugh I; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-06-15

    A fluorescence switch that consists of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) triggered by silver ion (Ag(+)) is developed to detect Ag(+). The mechanism of the fluorescence switching of DNA-AgNCs is investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, DNA hybridization assay and mass spectrometry. Ag(+) induces a dimeric structure of Cyt12-AgNCs by forming a bridge between two Cyt12-AgNCs, where Cyt12 is cytosine 12-mer; this dimer formation causes the fluorescence change of Cyt12-AgNCs from red to green. Using this Ag(+)-triggered fluorescence switch, we successfully detected Ag(+) at concentrations as low as 10nM. Furthermore, we quantitatively detected the Ag(+) in the Silmazin(®), which is dermatological burn ointment having silver sulfadiazine. Ag(+) detection using this fluorescence switch has high selectivity and sensitivity, and short response time, and can be used successfully even in the presence of other metal ions.

  15. Sub-surface single ion detection in diamond: A path for deterministic color center creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, John; Aguirre, Brandon; Pacheco, Jose; Camacho, Ryan; Bielejec, Edward; Sandia National Laboratories Team

    Deterministic single color center creation remains a critical milestone for the integrated use of diamond color centers. It depends on three components: focused ion beam implantation to control the location, yield improvement to control the activation, and single ion implantation to control the number of implanted ions. A surface electrode detector has been fabricated on diamond where the electron hole pairs generated during ion implantation are used as the detection signal. Results will be presented demonstrating single ion detection. The detection efficiency of the device will be described as a function of implant energy and device geometry. It is anticipated that the controlled introduction of single dopant atoms in diamond will provide a basis for deterministic single localized color centers. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Detection of large ions in time-of-flight mass spectrometry: effects of ion mass and acceleration voltage on microchannel plate detector response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv(3.1) (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  17. Tetrabutylammonium-modified clay film electrodes: characterization and application to the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Maghear, Adela; Tertiş, Mihaela; Fritea, Luminţa; Marian, Iuliu O; Indrea, Emil; Walcarius, Alain; Săndulescu, Robert

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of smectite clay partially exchanged with tetrabutylammonium ions (TBA(+)) and its subsequent deposition onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for application to the preconcentration electroanalysis of metal ions (Cd, Pb, and Cu). Such partial exchange of TBA(+) induces the expansion of the interlayer region between the clay sheets (as ascertained by XRD) while maintaining its ion exchange capacity, which resulted in enhanced mass transport rates (as pointed out by electrochemical monitoring of permeability properties of these thin (organo)clay films on GCE). This principle was applied here to the anodic stripping square wave voltammetric analysis of metal ions after accumulation at open circuit. Among others, detection limits as low as 3.6×10(-8)M for copper and 7.2×10(-8)M for cadmium have been achieved.

  18. Tetrabutylammonium-modified clay film electrodes: characterization and application to the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Maghear, Adela; Tertiş, Mihaela; Fritea, Luminţa; Marian, Iuliu O; Indrea, Emil; Walcarius, Alain; Săndulescu, Robert

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of smectite clay partially exchanged with tetrabutylammonium ions (TBA(+)) and its subsequent deposition onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for application to the preconcentration electroanalysis of metal ions (Cd, Pb, and Cu). Such partial exchange of TBA(+) induces the expansion of the interlayer region between the clay sheets (as ascertained by XRD) while maintaining its ion exchange capacity, which resulted in enhanced mass transport rates (as pointed out by electrochemical monitoring of permeability properties of these thin (organo)clay films on GCE). This principle was applied here to the anodic stripping square wave voltammetric analysis of metal ions after accumulation at open circuit. Among others, detection limits as low as 3.6×10(-8)M for copper and 7.2×10(-8)M for cadmium have been achieved. PMID:24840412

  19. Method of detecting defects in ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells by chemochromic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Brooker, Robert Paul; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2016-01-05

    A method of detecting defects in membranes such as ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells. The electrochemical cell includes an assembly having an anode side and a cathode side with the ion exchange membrane in between. In a configuration step a chemochromic sensor is placed above the cathode and flow isolation hardware lateral to the ion exchange membrane which prevents a flow of hydrogen (H.sub.2) between the cathode and anode side. The anode side is exposed to a first reactant fluid including hydrogen. The chemochromic sensor is examined after the exposing for a color change. A color change evidences the ion exchange membrane has at least one defect that permits H.sub.2 transmission therethrough.

  20. Characterization of the explosive triacetone triperoxide and detection by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buttigieg, Gavin A; Knight, Andrew K; Denson, Stephen; Pommier, Carolyn; Denton, M Bonner

    2003-07-29

    The improvised explosive triacetone triperoxide (TATP) was synthesized and characterized by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C-NMR, Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Triacetone triperoxide was subsequently analyzed by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) in positive ion mode, and detected as a cluster of three peaks with a drift time of the most intense peak at 13.06 ms. Triacetone triperoxide was then analyzed after dissolution in toluene, where a dramatic increase in peak intensity was observed, at a flight time of 12.56 ms (K0=2.71 cm2V(-1)s(-1)). Triacetone triperoxide was subsequently analyzed by coupling the ion mobility spectrometer to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, where a single peak at m/z of 223 atomic mass units identified the species present in the ion mobility spectra as being triacetone triperoxide.

  1. Colorimetric detection of mercury ions based on plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianjun; Jiang, Lin; Shao, Qi; Liu, Xiaogang; Marks, Robert S; Ma, Jan; Chen, Xiaodong

    2013-05-27

    The development of rapid, specific, cost-effective, and robust tools in monitoring Hg(2+) levels in both environmental and biological samples is of utmost importance due to the severe mercury toxicity to humans. A number of techniques exist, but the colorimetric assay, which is reviewed herein, is shown to be a possible tool in monitoring the level of mercury. These assays allow transforming target sensing events into color changes, which have applicable potential for in-the-field application through naked-eye detection. Specifically, plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assay exhibits a much better propensity for identifying various targets in terms of sensitivity, solubility, and stability compared to commonly used organic chromophores. In this review, recent progress in the development of gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays for Hg(2+) is summarized, with a particular emphasis on examples of functionalized gold nanoparticle systems with oligonucleotides, oligopeptides, and functional molecules. Besides highlighting the current design principle for plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric probes, the discussions on challenges and the prospect of next-generation probes for in-the-field applications are also presented.

  2. Detecting single graphene layer by using fluorescence from high-speed Ar^7+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong

    2008-03-01

    A highly-charged-ion interacting with graphite causes structural change in nano-scales [1]. While when the ion's kinetic energy reaches few MeVs, the induced is not the structural change but electronic excitation. An experiment [2] showed fluorescence from Ar^7+ ions penetrating through carbon foil with kinetic energy of 2 MeV. Motivated by this experiment, we tested interaction between an Ar^7+ ion and a graphene sheet by the time-dependent density functional approach, and found that the electronic excitation in the Ar^ 7+ ion is also the case even when the incident kinetic energy is 500 KeV and the target thickness is only mono-atomic layer. This simulation suggests the possibility of detecting a suspended mono-atomic layer of graphene [3] by monitoring fluorescence from the penetrated Ar^7+ ions. We will discuss its importance for analyzing bombardment of solids by highly charged, high-speed ions and possible experiments according to the present result. References: [1] T. Meguro, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett 79, 3866 (2001). [2] S. Bashkin, H. Oona, E. Veje, Phys, Rev. A25, 417 (1982). [3] J. Mayer et al., Nature (London), 446, 60 (2007).

  3. The potential application of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films for heavy ion irradiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huang-Chin; Chen, Shih-Show; Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, I-Nan; Chang, Ching-Lin; Lee, Chi-Young; Guo, Jinghua

    2013-06-15

    The potential of utilizing the ultra-nanocrystalline (UNCD) films for detecting the Au-ion irradiation was investigated. When the fluence for Au-ion irradiation is lower than the critical value (f{sub c}= 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) the turn-on field for electron field emission (EFE) process of the UNCD films decreased systematically with the increase in fluence that is correlated with the increase in sp{sup 2}-bonded phase ({pi}{sup *}-band in EELS) due to the Au-ion irradiation. The EFE properties changed irregularly, when the fluence for Au-ion irradiation exceeds this critical value. The transmission electron microscopic microstructural examinations, in conjunction with EELS spectroscopic studies, reveal that the structural change preferentially occurred in the diamond-to-Si interface for the samples experienced over critical fluence of Au-ion irradiation, viz. the crystalline SiC phase was induced in the interfacial region and the thickness of the interface decreased. These observations implied that the UNCD films could be used as irradiation detectors when the fluence for Au-ion irradiation does not exceed such a critical value.

  4. Highly sensitive detection of chromium (III) ions by resonance Rayleigh scattering enhanced by gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Cai, Huai-Hong; Yang, Fen; Lin, Dewen; Yang, Pei-Hui; Cai, Jiye

    2014-01-01

    Simple and sensitive determination of chromium (III) ions (Cr3+) has potential applications for detecting trace contamination in environment. Here, the assay is based on the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) by Cr3+-induced aggregation of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy were employed to characterize the nanostructures and spectroscopic properties of the Cr3+-AuNP system. The experiment conditions, such as reaction time, pH value, salt concentration and interfering ions, were investigated. The combination of signal amplification of Cr3+-citrate chelation with high sensitivity of RRS technique allow a selective assay of Cr3+ ions with a detection limit of up to 1.0 pM. The overall assay can be carried out at room temperature within only twenty minutes, making it suitable for high-throughput routine applications in environment and food samples.

  5. Proportional counter for X-ray analysis of lunar and planetary surfaces. [a position sensitive scintillating imaging proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A position sensitive proportional scintillation detector was developed and evaluated for use in applications involving X-ray imaging as well as spectroscopy. Topics covered include limitations of the proportional scintillation counter for use in space; purification of the xenon gas in the detector, and the operation of the detector system. Results show that the light signal in a proportional scintillation detector remains well localized. With modest electric fields in xenon, the primary electrons from a photoelectric absorption of an X-ray can be brought a distance of a few millimeters to a higher field region without spreading more than a millimeter or so. Therefore, it is possible to make a proportional scintillation detector with good position sensitivity that could be used to calibrate out the difference in light collection over its sensitive volume.

  6. Bucky-gel coated glassy carbon electrodes, for voltammetric detection of femtomolar leveled lead ions.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qijin; Yu, Fen; Zhu, Lina; Wang, Xiaoxia; Yang, Nianjun

    2010-10-15

    Femtomolar (fM) leveled lead ions were electrochemically detected using a bucky-gel coated glassy carbon electrode and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. The bucky-gel was composed of dithizone, ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The fabrication of the bucky-gel coated electrode was optimized. The modified electrode was characterized with voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and chronoamperometry. After the accumulation of lead ions into the bucky-gel modified electrode at -1.2V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) for 5 min in a pH 4.4 sodium acetate-acetate acid buffer solution, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammograms of the accumulated lead show an anodic wave at -0.58 V. The anodic peak current is detectable for lead ions in the concentration range from 1.0 μM down to 500 fM. The detection limit is calculated to be 100 fM. The proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of lead ions in lake water. PMID:20875583

  7. Potentiometry at trace levels in confined samples: ion-selective electrodes with subfemtomole detection limits.

    PubMed

    Malon, Adam; Vigassy, Tamas; Bakker, Eric; Pretsch, Ernö

    2006-06-28

    We explore here for the first time the direct potentiometric detectability of calcium, lead, and silver ions in amounts on the order of 300 attomoles at 100 picomolar concentrations without any preconcentration, analyte recycling, or electrocatalytic signal enhancement. The results presented here place zero-current potentiometry among the most sensitive electrochemical methods available.

  8. Synthesis and properties of a twistophane ion sensor: a new conjugated macrocyclic ligand for the spectroscopic detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Baxter, P N

    2001-06-15

    The synthesis of a structurally new type of conjugated macrocyclic ligand (1) is reported that comprises a dehydroannulene framework incorporating two 2,2'-bipyridine units. Modeling studies showed the ligand to possess an unusual chirally twisted and relatively rigid architecture capable of binding metal ions in an enforced tetrahedral coordination geometry. The macrocycle was prepared in seven steps from (2-bromophenylethynyl)-trimethylsilane (2) and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. The pyridine H3 protons in the 1H NMR spectrum of 1 showed a marked temperature dependencey that may be related to conformational opening and closing motions of the macrocyclic ring. Ligand 1 was found to spectroscopically detect the presence of Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ and, in particular, to function as a multiple readout sensor, giving different sequences of signal output depending upon the type of metal ion analyte with which the system was addressed. Macrocycle 1 also gave a highly characteristic and specific visual output response in the presence of Zn2+ consisting of a bright turquoise fluorescence and in this respect may find applications in the sensing of this biologically important metal ion.

  9. Position sensitive detectors for synchrotron radiation studies: the tortoise and the hare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Rob

    2003-11-01

    The huge gulf between the high photon fluxes available from synchrotrons and the capabilities of detectors to measure the resulting photon, electron or ion signals is well known. Whilst accelerator technology continues to advance at a rapid pace, it is detector performance which represents the limiting factor for many synchrotron experiments. In some cases there are still single channel counting detectors based on 40-year-old designs operational on synchrotron beamlines. The dream of many researchers is a detector which is able to simultaneously image and perform spectroscopy at the required data rates. A solution is the massive integration of parallel electronics into detectors on a pixel by pixel basis. These ideas have been in gestation for very many years awaiting sufficient funding, nevertheless, several prototypes are now at the testing stage. The current status of these and other detector developments targeted at synchrotron science are briefly reviewed.

  10. Carbon dots rooted agarose hydrogel hybrid platform for optical detection and separation of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Neelam; Barooah, Mayuri; Majumdar, Gitanjali; Chowdhury, Devasish

    2015-02-11

    A robust solid sensing platform for an on-site operational and accurate detection of heavy metal is still a challenge. We introduce chitosan based carbon dots rooted agarose hydrogel film as a hybrid solid sensing platform for detection of heavy metal ions. The fabrication of the solid sensing platform is centered on simple electrostatic interaction between the NH3+ group present in the carbon dots and the OH- groups present in agarose. Simply on dipping the hydrogel film strip into the heavy metal ion solution, in particular Cr6+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Pb2+, Mn2+, the strip displays a color change, viz., Cr6+→yellow, Cu2+→blue, Fe3+→brown, Pb2+→white, Mn2+→tan brown. The optical detection limit of the respective metal ion is found to be 1 pM for Cr6+, 0.5 μM for Cu2+, and 0.5 nM for Fe3+, Pb2+, and Mn2+ by studying the changes in UV-visible reflectance spectrum of the hydrogel film. Moreover, the hydrogel film finds applicability as an efficient filtration membrane for separation of these quintet heavy metal ions. The strategic fundamental feature of this sensing platform is the successful capability of chitosan to form colored chelates with transition metals. This proficient hybrid hydrogel solid sensing platform is thus the most suitable to employ as an on-site operational, portable, cheap colorimetric-optical detector of heavy metal ion with potential skill in their separation. Details of the possible mechanistic insight into the colorimetric detection and ion separation are also discussed.

  11. Count rate studies of a box-shaped PET breast imaging system comprised of position sensitive avalanche photodiodes utilizing monte carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Foudray, Angela M K; Habte, Frezghi; Chinn, Garry; Zhang, Jin; Levin, Craig S

    2006-01-01

    We are investigating a high-sensitivity, high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) system for clinical use in the detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Using conventional figures of merit, design parameters were evaluated for count rate performance, module dead time, and construction complexity. The detector system modeled comprises extremely thin position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes coupled to lutetium oxy-orthosilicate scintillation crystals. Previous investigations of detector geometries with Monte Carlo indicated that one of the largest impacts on sensitivity is local scintillation crystal density when considering systems having the same average scintillation crystal densities (same crystal packing fraction and system solid-angle coverage). Our results show the system has very good scatter and randoms rejection at clinical activity ranges ( approximately 200 muCi). PMID:17645997

  12. Position sensitive anodes for MCP read-out using induced charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagutzki, O.; Lapington, J. S.; Worth, L. B. C.; Spillman, U.; Mergel, V.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the method of an indirect detection of a MCP charge avalanche projected onto a resistive layer (G. Battistoni, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth., 202 (1982) 459). If the sheet resistance is favourable one can detect the charge cloud by the capacitive coupling to an anode structure a few millimetres behind the layer. The anode structure can be, for example, a wedge-and-strip electrode pattern (M. Unverzagt, Diplomarbeit, Universität Frankfurt 1992, private communication) as it is used for directly collecting the electron avalanche from a MCP. Detection of the induced charge is beneficial in several respects. Firstly, image distortions produced by secondary electron mediated charge redistribution are eliminated. Secondly, the noise component due to quantized charge collection, commonly referred to as partition noise, is not present. In addition, the dielectric substrate can function both as an element of the vacuum enclosure and HV insulator, making the electrical connections easily accessible and the pattern operable at ground potential, independently of detector operating voltages. This technique can be used to simplify the electronic design requirements where varying high voltages are required at the detector input face such as plasma analysers, etc. It also has application in the manufacture of intensifier tubes (J. Barnstedt, M. Grewing, Nucl. Instr. and Meth., these proceedings) where the inclusion of a readout pattern inside the intensifier body with associated electrical feed-throughs can prove problematic. We will present data on the performance of such detection geometries using several types of charge division anode, and discuss the advantages compared with the "traditional" charge collecting method.

  13. Lateral photovoltaic effect in flexible free-standing reduced graphene oxide film for self-powered position-sensitive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, In Kyu; Ki, Bugeun; Yoon, Seonno; Oh, Jungwoo

    2016-09-01

    Lightweight, simple and flexible self-powered photodetectors are urgently required for the development and application of advanced optical systems for the future of wearable electronic technology. Here, using a low-temperature reduction process, we report a chemical approach for producing freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide papers with different gradients of the carbon/oxygen concentration ratio. We also demonstrate a novel type of freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide self-powered photodetector based on a symmetrical metal–semiconductor–metal structure. Upon illumination by a 633-nm continuous wave laser, the lateral photovoltage is observed to vary linfearly with the laser position between two electrodes on the reduced graphene oxide surface. This result may suggest that the lateral photovoltaic effect in the reduced graphene oxide film originates from the built-in electric field by the combination of both the photothermal electric effect and the gradient of the oxygen-to-carbon composition. These results represent substantial progress toward novel, chemically synthesized graphene-based photosensors and suggest one-step integration of graphene-based optoelectronics in the future.

  14. Lateral photovoltaic effect in flexible free-standing reduced graphene oxide film for self-powered position-sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Moon, In Kyu; Ki, Bugeun; Yoon, Seonno; Oh, Jungwoo

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight, simple and flexible self-powered photodetectors are urgently required for the development and application of advanced optical systems for the future of wearable electronic technology. Here, using a low-temperature reduction process, we report a chemical approach for producing freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide papers with different gradients of the carbon/oxygen concentration ratio. We also demonstrate a novel type of freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide self-powered photodetector based on a symmetrical metal-semiconductor-metal structure. Upon illumination by a 633-nm continuous wave laser, the lateral photovoltage is observed to vary linfearly with the laser position between two electrodes on the reduced graphene oxide surface. This result may suggest that the lateral photovoltaic effect in the reduced graphene oxide film originates from the built-in electric field by the combination of both the photothermal electric effect and the gradient of the oxygen-to-carbon composition. These results represent substantial progress toward novel, chemically synthesized graphene-based photosensors and suggest one-step integration of graphene-based optoelectronics in the future. PMID:27634110

  15. Lateral photovoltaic effect in flexible free-standing reduced graphene oxide film for self-powered position-sensitive detection

    PubMed Central

    Moon, In Kyu; Ki, Bugeun; Yoon, Seonno; Oh, Jungwoo

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight, simple and flexible self-powered photodetectors are urgently required for the development and application of advanced optical systems for the future of wearable electronic technology. Here, using a low-temperature reduction process, we report a chemical approach for producing freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide papers with different gradients of the carbon/oxygen concentration ratio. We also demonstrate a novel type of freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide self-powered photodetector based on a symmetrical metal–semiconductor–metal structure. Upon illumination by a 633-nm continuous wave laser, the lateral photovoltage is observed to vary linfearly with the laser position between two electrodes on the reduced graphene oxide surface. This result may suggest that the lateral photovoltaic effect in the reduced graphene oxide film originates from the built-in electric field by the combination of both the photothermal electric effect and the gradient of the oxygen-to-carbon composition. These results represent substantial progress toward novel, chemically synthesized graphene-based photosensors and suggest one-step integration of graphene-based optoelectronics in the future. PMID:27634110

  16. Lateral photovoltaic effect in flexible free-standing reduced graphene oxide film for self-powered position-sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Moon, In Kyu; Ki, Bugeun; Yoon, Seonno; Oh, Jungwoo

    2016-09-16

    Lightweight, simple and flexible self-powered photodetectors are urgently required for the development and application of advanced optical systems for the future of wearable electronic technology. Here, using a low-temperature reduction process, we report a chemical approach for producing freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide papers with different gradients of the carbon/oxygen concentration ratio. We also demonstrate a novel type of freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide self-powered photodetector based on a symmetrical metal-semiconductor-metal structure. Upon illumination by a 633-nm continuous wave laser, the lateral photovoltage is observed to vary linfearly with the laser position between two electrodes on the reduced graphene oxide surface. This result may suggest that the lateral photovoltaic effect in the reduced graphene oxide film originates from the built-in electric field by the combination of both the photothermal electric effect and the gradient of the oxygen-to-carbon composition. These results represent substantial progress toward novel, chemically synthesized graphene-based photosensors and suggest one-step integration of graphene-based optoelectronics in the future.

  17. Visual sensor for the detection of trace Cu(II) ions using an immunochromatographic strip.

    PubMed

    Xing, Changrui; Feng, Min; Hao, Changlong; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and simple immunochromatography method based on a gold nanoparticle-labeled monoclonal antibody was developed for the on-site detection of copper (Cu) in water samples. This monoclonal antibody, obtained by a cell fusion technique, recognized the Cu-ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) complex, but not metal-free EDTA, with high sensitivity and specificity. In optimized conditions, the visual limit of detection for qualitative detection of Cu(II) ions was 10 ng/mL and the LOD for semi-quantitative detection decreased to 0.45 ng/mL with the help of a scanning reader system. The detection process was achieved within 10 min with no cross-reactivity from other heavy metal ions. The recovery of the test samples ranged from 98% to 109%. To our knowledge, this antibody-based test strip for Cu(II) ions has not been previously reported. Based on the above results, this strip sensor could be used as an alternative tool for screening heavy metal pollution in the environment.

  18. Visual sensor for the detection of trace Cu(II) ions using an immunochromatographic strip.

    PubMed

    Xing, Changrui; Feng, Min; Hao, Changlong; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and simple immunochromatography method based on a gold nanoparticle-labeled monoclonal antibody was developed for the on-site detection of copper (Cu) in water samples. This monoclonal antibody, obtained by a cell fusion technique, recognized the Cu-ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) complex, but not metal-free EDTA, with high sensitivity and specificity. In optimized conditions, the visual limit of detection for qualitative detection of Cu(II) ions was 10 ng/mL and the LOD for semi-quantitative detection decreased to 0.45 ng/mL with the help of a scanning reader system. The detection process was achieved within 10 min with no cross-reactivity from other heavy metal ions. The recovery of the test samples ranged from 98% to 109%. To our knowledge, this antibody-based test strip for Cu(II) ions has not been previously reported. Based on the above results, this strip sensor could be used as an alternative tool for screening heavy metal pollution in the environment. PMID:23461614

  19. Label free and high specific detection of mercury ions based on silver nano-liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Eepsita; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Pradhan, Arun K.; Pradhan, Pallavi

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we report an eco-friendly, mild and one-pot approach for synthesis of silver nanoparticles via a lipopeptide biosurfactant - CHBS. The biosurfactant forms liposome vesicles when dispersed in an aqueous medium. The amino acid groups of the biosurfactant assists in the reduction of Ag+ ions leading to the production of homogeneous silver nanoparticles, encapsulated within the liposome vesicle, as confirmed from TEM analysis. Rate of synthesis and size of particle were greatly dependent on pH and reaction temperature. Kinetic analysis suggests the involvement of an autocatalytic reaction and the observed rate constant (kobs) was found to decrease with temperature, suggesting faster reaction with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the silver nanoparticles served as excellent probes for highly selective and sensitive recognition of Hg2 + ions. Interaction with Hg2 + ions results in an immediate change in colour of nanoparticle solution form brownish red to milky white. With increasing Hg2 + ions concentration, a gradual disappearance of SPR peak was observed. A linear relationship (A420/660) with an R2 value of 0.97 was observed in the range of 20 to 100 ppm Hg2 + concentration. Hg2 + ions are reduced to their elemental forms which thereby interact with the vesicles, leading to aggregation and precipitation of particles. The detection method avoids the need of functionalizing ligands and favours Hg2 + detection in aqueous samples by visible range spectrophotometry and hence can be used for simple and rapid analysis.

  20. Colorimetric Detection of Cadmium Ions Using DL-Mercaptosuccinic Acid-Modified Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Chen, Jun; Yang, Jing-Hua; Bai, Lian-Yang; Zhang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    A colorimetric assay has been developed for detection of Cd²⁺ utilizing DL-mercaptosuccinic acid-modified gold nanoparticles (MSA-AuNPs). The method showed good selectivity for Cd²⁺ over other metal ions. As a result, the linear relationships (r > 0.9606) between concentration 0.07 mM and 0.20 mM for cadmium ion were obtained. The detection limit was as low as 0.07 mM by the naked eye. The effect of pH on the aggregation was optimized. The MSA-AuNPs probe could be used to detect Cd²⁺ in an aqueous solution based on the aggregation-induced color change of MSA-AuNPs. PMID:27398533

  1. Development of a portable preconcentrator/ion mobility spectrometer system for the trace detection of narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Parmeter, J.E.; Custer, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This project was supported by LDRD funding for the development and preliminary testing of a portable narcotics detection system. The system developed combines a commercial trace detector known as an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator originally designed by Department 5848 for the collection of explosives molecules. The detector and preconcentrator were combined along with all necessary accessories onto a push cart, thus yielding a fully portable detection unit. Preliminary testing with both explosives and narcotics molecules shown that the system is operational, and that it can successfully detect drugs as marijuana, methamphetamine (speed), and cocaine based on their characteristics IMS signatures.

  2. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27291826

  3. Palladium Nanoparticle Incorporated Porous Activated Carbon: Electrochemical Detection of Toxic Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Veeramani, Vediyappan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Madhu, Rajesh; Liu, Shang-Bin

    2016-01-20

    A facile method has been developed for fabricating selective and sensitive electrochemical sensors for the detection of toxic metal ions, which invokes incorporation of palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) on porous activated carbons (PACs). The PACs, which were derived from waste biomass feedstock (fruit peels), possess desirable textural properties and porosities favorable for dispersion of Pd NPs (ca. 3-4 nm) on the graphitic PAC substrate. The Pd/PAC composite materials so fabricated were characterized by a variety of different techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, gas physisorption/chemisorption, thermogravimetric analysis, and Raman, Fourier-transform infrared, and X-ray photon spectroscopies. The Pd/PAC-modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) were exploited as electrochemical sensors for the detection of toxic heavy metal ions, viz., Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Hg(2+), which showed superior performances for both individual as well as simultaneous detections. For simultaneous detection of Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Hg(2+), a linear response in the ion concentration range of 0.5-5.5, 0.5-8.9, 0.5-5.0, and 0.24-7.5 μM, with sensitivity of 66.7, 53.8, 41.1, and 50.3 μA μM(-1) cm(-2), and detection limit of 41, 50, 66, and 54 nM, respectively, was observed. Moreover, the Pd/PAC-modified GCEs also show perspective applications in detection of metal ions in real samples, as illustrated in this study for a milk sample.

  4. Ion funnel augmented Mars atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry for in situ detection of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul V; Hodyss, Robert; Beauchamp, J L

    2014-11-01

    Laser desorption is an attractive technique for in situ sampling of organics on Mars given its relative simplicity. We demonstrate that under simulated Martian conditions (~2.5 Torr CO(2)) laser desorption of neutral species (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), followed by ionization with a simple ultraviolet light source such as a discharge lamp, offers an effective means of sampling organics for detection and identification with a mass spectrometer. An electrodynamic ion funnel is employed to provide efficient ion collection in the ambient Martian environment. This experimental methodology enables in situ sampling of Martian organics with minimal complexity and maximum flexibility.

  5. Highly sensitive heavy metal ion detection using AlQ3 microwire functionalized QCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, Nursel; Aǧar, Meltem; Altındal, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) microwires was successfully synthesized for the fabrication of Alq3 microwires-coated QCM sensors to detect the heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. AT-cut quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) of 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency having gold electrodes were used as transducers. Typical measuring cycle consisted of repeated flow of target measurands through the flow cell and subsequent washing to return the baseline. The QCM results indicated that the Alq3 microwires exhibit excellent sensitivity, stability and short response-recovery time, which are much attractive for the development of portable and highly sensitive heavy metal ion sensors in water samples.

  6. Assessment of ion transfer amperometry at liquid-liquid interfaces for detection in CE.

    PubMed

    Sisk, Garry D; Herzog, Grégoire; Glennon, Jeremy D; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2009-10-01

    In this research, ion transfer across the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES) was used as a method of detection in a CE separation system. This method allows for the electrochemical detection of ionic analytes that cannot be easily oxidized or reduced. Method development revealed that the optimal separation conditions for three model ions (tetraethylammonium, tetrabutylammonium, and benzensulfonate) were found to be 5 mM sodium tetraborate buffer pH 9.2 with a separation voltage of 20 kV using a 40 cm, 50 microm id fused silica capillary. Constant potential amperometry and pulsed amperometric detection were applied at the ITIES in which the organic phase was gelled. A miniaturized ITIES within a pipette tip was investigated, which resulted in improved separation efficiency and LOD. To demonstrate the ability of the system to detect substances of bioanalytical interest, the beta-adrenergic receptor blockers timolol and propranolol were detected. The simplicity of the detection platform means that it may be useful for analytical situations not requiring trace or ultratrace detection capabilities.

  7. IonCCD detector for miniature sector-field mass spectrometer: investigation of peak shape and detector surface artifacts induced by keV ion detection.

    PubMed

    Hadjar, Omar; Schlathölter, Thomas; Davila, Stephen; Catledge, Shane A; Kuhn, Ken; Kassan, Scott; Kibelka, Gottfried; Cameron, Chad; Verbeck, Guido F

    2011-10-01

    A recently described ion charge coupled device detector IonCCD (Sinha and Wadsworth, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76(2), 2005; Hadjar, J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22(4), 612-624, 2011) is implemented in a miniature mass spectrometer of sector-field instrument type and Mattauch-Herzog (MH)-geometry (Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62(11), 2618-2620, 1991; Burgoyne, Hieftje and Hites J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 8(4), 307-318, 1997; Nishiguchi, Eur. J. Mass Spectrom. 14(1), 7-15, 2008) for simultaneous ion detection. In this article, we present first experimental evidence for the signature of energy loss the detected ion experiences in the detector material. The two energy loss processes involved at keV ion kinetic energies are electronic and nuclear stopping. Nuclear stopping is related to surface modification and thus damage of the IonCCD detector material. By application of the surface characterization techniques atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectrons spectroscopy (XPS), we could show that the detector performance remains unaffected by ion impact for the parameter range observed in this study. Secondary electron emission from the (detector) surface is a feature typically related to electronic stopping. We show experimentally that the properties of the MH-mass spectrometer used in the experiments, in combination with the IonCCD, are ideally suited for observation of these stopping related secondary electrons, which manifest in reproducible artifacts in the mass spectra. The magnitude of the artifacts is found to increase linearly as a function of detected ion velocity. The experimental findings are in agreement with detailed modeling of the ion trajectories in the mass spectrometer. By comparison of experiment and simulation, we show that a detector bias retarding the ions or an increase of the B-field of the IonCCD can efficiently suppress the artifact, which is necessary for quantitative mass spectrometry.

  8. Detection of Nitro-Based and Peroxide-Based Explosives by Fast Polarity-Switchable Ion Mobility Spectrometer with Ion Focusing in Vicinity of Faraday Detector

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qinghua; Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haiyang

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been widely deployed for on-site detection of explosives. The common nitro-based explosives are usually detected by negative IMS while the emerging peroxide-based explosives are better detected by positive IMS. In this study, a fast polarity-switchable IMS was constructed to detect these two explosive species in a single measurement. As the large traditional Faraday detector would cause a trailing reactant ion peak (RIP), a Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity was developed by reducing the detector radius to 3.3 mm and increasing the voltage difference between aperture grid and its front guard ring to 591 V, which could remove trailing peaks from RIP without loss of signal intensity. This fast polarity-switchable IMS with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector was employed to detect a mixture of 10 ng 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 50 ng hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) by polarity-switching, and the result suggested that [TNT-H]− and [HMTD+H]+ could be detected in a single measurement. Furthermore, the removal of trailing peaks from RIP by the Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity also promised the accurate identification of KClO4, KNO3 and S in common inorganic explosives, whose product ion peaks were fairly adjacent to RIP. PMID:26021282

  9. Analytical utility of mass spectral binning in proteomic experiments by SPectral Immonium Ion Detection (SPIID).

    PubMed

    Kelstrup, Christian D; Frese, Christian; Heck, Albert J R; Olsen, Jesper V; Nielsen, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    Unambiguous identification of tandem mass spectra is a cornerstone in mass-spectrometry-based proteomics. As the study of post-translational modifications (PTMs) by means of shotgun proteomics progresses in depth and coverage, the ability to correctly identify PTM-bearing peptides is essential, increasing the demand for advanced data interpretation. Several PTMs are known to generate unique fragment ions during tandem mass spectrometry, the so-called diagnostic ions, which unequivocally identify a given mass spectrum as related to a specific PTM. Although such ions offer tremendous analytical advantages, algorithms to decipher MS/MS spectra for the presence of diagnostic ions in an unbiased manner are currently lacking. Here, we present a systematic spectral-pattern-based approach for the discovery of diagnostic ions and new fragmentation mechanisms in shotgun proteomics datasets. The developed software tool is designed to analyze large sets of high-resolution peptide fragmentation spectra independent of the fragmentation method, instrument type, or protease employed. To benchmark the software tool, we analyzed large higher-energy collisional activation dissociation datasets of samples containing phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, SUMOylation, formylation, and lysine acetylation. Using the developed software tool, we were able to identify known diagnostic ions by comparing histograms of modified and unmodified peptide spectra. Because the investigated tandem mass spectra data were acquired with high mass accuracy, unambiguous interpretation and determination of the chemical composition for the majority of detected fragment ions was feasible. Collectively we present a freely available software tool that allows for comprehensive and automatic analysis of analogous product ions in tandem mass spectra and systematic mapping of fragmentation mechanisms related to common amino acids.

  10. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  11. Wedge-and-strip anodes for centroid-finding position-sensitive photon and particle detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C.; Jelinsky, P.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    The paper examines geometries employing position-dependent charge partitioning to obtain a two-dimensional position signal from each detected photon or particle. Requiring three or four anode electrodes and signal paths, images have little distortion and resolution is not limited by thermal noise. An analysis of the geometrical image nonlinearity between event centroid location and the charge partition ratios is presented. In addition, fabrication and testing of two wedge-and-strip anode systems are discussed. Images obtained with EUV radiation and microchannel plates verify the predicted performance, with further resolution improvements achieved by adopting low noise signal circuitry. Also discussed are the designs of practical X-ray, EUV, and charged particle image systems.

  12. Copper ion detection using novel silver nanoclusters stabilized with amido black 10B.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fangfang; Liang, Sheng; Peng, Yibo; Kuang, Yangfang; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Shu; Long, Yunfei; Zeng, Rongjin

    2016-05-01

    Novel fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) were synthesized using amido black 10B (AB) as a stabilizing agent and then employed for the detection of copper ions (Cu(2+)). The AB-stabilized AgNCs (AB-AgNCs) were well dispersed in aqueous solution with an average diameter of around 1.3 nm and exhibited illustrious blue fluorescence emission. Moreover, the fluorescence of AB-AgNCs could be quenched efficiently by Cu(2+), which might be a result of the coordination between Cu(2+) and the free recognition group of AB on surfaces of AB-AgNCs, inducing the aggregation of AB-AgNCs. Based on the linear decrease of fluorescence intensity, the Cu(2+) concentration was determined in the range of 0.01-1.1 μmol L(-1) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 4.0 nΜ. In addition, the detection of Cu(2+) could be performed with AB-AgNCs in the presence of other ions, including 13 kinds of conventional metal ions and 11 kinds of anions. Based on the above experiment, the developed AB-AgNC probe was successfully further applied to detect Cu(2+) in three electroplating effluents, which showed high accuracy. PMID:26873219

  13. Oligonucleotide-based fluorogenic sensor for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Hao, Changlong; Xua, Liguang; Xing, Changrui; Kuang, Hua; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report a new fluorogenic sensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for detection of heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. The method showed the advantage of being simple, highly sensitive and selective, and rapid. The donor (CdTe QDs) and acceptor (TAMRA or Cy5) are brought into close proximity to one another due to Hg(2+) and Ag(+) form strong and stable T-Hg(2+)-T complexes and C-Ag(+)-C complexes, which quenches the fluorescent intensity of CdTe QDs and enables the energy transfer from donor to acceptor. This sensor showed high sensitivity and selectivity when only one kind of ion (Ag(+) or Hg(2+)) exists. Furthermore, the assay can also simultaneously detect Ag(+) and Hg(2+) in water media with the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.5 and 1.8 nM, separately, which satisfactorily meets the sensitivity demands of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and World Health Organization (WHO). This assay also exhibits excellent selectivity toward Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Therefore, this method is of great practical and theoretical importance for detecting heavy metal ions in aqueous solution.

  14. Oligonucleotide-based fluorogenic sensor for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Hao, Changlong; Xua, Liguang; Xing, Changrui; Kuang, Hua; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report a new fluorogenic sensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for detection of heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. The method showed the advantage of being simple, highly sensitive and selective, and rapid. The donor (CdTe QDs) and acceptor (TAMRA or Cy5) are brought into close proximity to one another due to Hg(2+) and Ag(+) form strong and stable T-Hg(2+)-T complexes and C-Ag(+)-C complexes, which quenches the fluorescent intensity of CdTe QDs and enables the energy transfer from donor to acceptor. This sensor showed high sensitivity and selectivity when only one kind of ion (Ag(+) or Hg(2+)) exists. Furthermore, the assay can also simultaneously detect Ag(+) and Hg(2+) in water media with the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.5 and 1.8 nM, separately, which satisfactorily meets the sensitivity demands of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and World Health Organization (WHO). This assay also exhibits excellent selectivity toward Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Therefore, this method is of great practical and theoretical importance for detecting heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. PMID:22560162

  15. Dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructures for multiplexed detection of intracellular metal ions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjiao; Liang, Wenbing; Li, Daxiu; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-11-15

    The detection of intracellular metal ions is of great importance in understanding metal homeostasis in cells and related diseases, and yet it remains a significant challenge to achieve this goal. Based on a new self-assembled and dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructure, we describe here an approach for multiplexed sensing of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) in living cells. The fluorescently quenched nanoprobes can be prepared by simple thermal annealing of four ssDNAs containing the metal ion-dependent enzymatic and substrate sequences. The self-assembly formation of the nanostructures are verified by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The target metal ions can cleave the substrate sequences in the DNAzyme nanostructures to recover fluorescent emissions at different wavelengths for sensitive and selective in vitro multiplexed detection of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) with the detection limits of 0.6nM and 3.9nM, respectively. Importantly, we demonstrate that these nanoprobes are stable in cell lysates and can enter cells without the aid of any transfection agents for simultaneous imaging intracellular UO2(2+) and Pb(2+). Moreover, the nanoprobes offer excellent biocompatibility and non-cytotoxicity. With these unique features, the dual-color encoded nanostructures presented here can thus offer new opportunities for multiplexed detection of specific intracellular species.

  16. Cu nanoclusters-based ratiometric fluorescence probe for ratiometric and visualization detection of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Chao; Qi, Jian-Wen; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Li; Song, Wei; Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2015-10-01

    Copper is a highly toxic environmental pollutant with bioaccumulative properties. Therefore, sensitive detection of Cu(2+) is very important to prevent over-ingestion, and visual detection is preferred for practical applications. In this work, we developed a simple and environmental friendly approach to synthesize hyperbranched polyethyleneimine-protected copper nanoclusters (hPEI-Cu NCs) with great stability against extreme pH, high ionic strength, thiols etching and light illumination, which were then conjugated to the surface of silica coated CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to design a ratiometric fluorescence probe. In the presence of different amounts of Cu(2+) ions, the fluorescence of Cu NCs can be drastically quenched, while the emission from QDs stayed constant to serve as a reference signal and the color of the probe changed from yellow-green to red, resulting in ratiometric and visualization detection of Cu(2+) ion with high accuracy. The detection limit for Cu(2+) was estimated to be 8.9 nM, much lower than the allowable level of Cu(2+) in drinking water (∼20 μM) set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Additionally, this probe can be also applied for the determination of Cu(2+) ion in complex real water samples. PMID:26454464

  17. Ultra-sensitive detection of Ag+ ions based on Ag+-assisted isothermal exponential degradation reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Fan, Qi; Zhu, Sha; Duan, Aiping; Yin, Yongmei; Li, Genxi

    2013-01-15

    Ag(+) ions are greatly toxic to a lot of algae, fungi, viruses and bacteria, which can also induce harmful side-effects to environments and human health. Herein we report an ultra-sensitive method for the selective detection of Ag(+) ions with electrochemical technique based on Ag(+)-assisted isothermal exponential degradation reaction. In the presence of Ag(+), mismatched trigger DNA can transiently bind to template DNA immobilized on an electrode surface through the formation of C-Ag(+)-C base pair, which then initiates the isothermal exponential degradation reaction. As a result, the mismatched trigger DNA may melt off the cleaved template DNA to trigger rounds of elongation and cutting. After the cyclic degradation reactions, removal of the template DNA immobilized on the electrode surface can be efficiently monitored by using electrochemical technique to show the status of the electrode surface, which can be then used to determine the presence of Ag(+). Further studies reveal that the proposed method can be ultra-sensitive to detect Ag(+) at a picomolar level. The selectivity of the detection can also be satisfactory, thus the proposed method for the Ag(+) ions detection may be potentially useful in the future. PMID:22921090

  18. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  19. The ATR noninvasive detection of transported medicinal ions and the performance of newly designed iontophoresis instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Toyotoshi; Watanabe, Yukio; Suzuki, Harue

    2005-02-01

    The attenuated total reflection and near-infrared diffusive-reflection methods are proposed as safe and powerful ways to detect and measure the quantity of medication transported by iontophoresis. Especially, the former method can evaluate the quantity of such negative ions as L-ascorbyl-2-phosphate in the top (horny) layer of epidermis (about 1 μm under the skin surface) using, respectively, characteristic ion's bands. Factors making iontophoresis more effective are discussed from the points of electric currents, duty ratio, frequency of superposing intermittent current, simultaneous supersonic perforation, etc. The use of intermittent direct current superposed by 40 kHz pulsed current and pulse irradiation of supersonic waves accelerated drastically the disappearing rate of transported ions from the horny layer with a life of 10 h to 1 min. This technique may be applied to a new and powerful drug delivery system into topical deep tissues.

  20. A position-sensitive germanium detector for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L. S.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.; Pehl, R. H.; Goulding, F. S.; Landis, D. A.; Luke, P. N.; Madden, N. W.

    1984-01-01

    The critical problem in high-resolution cosmic gamma-ray spectroscopy in the energy range from 0.02 to 10 MeV is the limited spectral sensitivity of the detectors used. This results from the small effective area of the detectors and the high background noise due to induced radioactivity and scattering in the detectors' high-energy particle environment. The effective area can be increased by increasing the number of detectors, but this becomes prohibitive because of the size and expense of the resulting instrument. We have taken a new approach: a segmented large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector which can effectively discriminate against internal background yet maintain the high spectral resolution and efficiency of conventional coaxial Ge detectors. To verify this concept, a planar detector divided into two segments has been fabricated and laboratory measurements agree well with Monte Carlo calculations. A large coaxial detector which will be divided into five segments is being built using the techniques developed for the planar detector. Monte Carlo calculations show that the sensitivity (minimum detectable flux) of the segmented coaxial detector is a factor of 2-3 better than conventional detectors because of the reduction in the internal background.

  1. Application of a One-Dimensional Position Sensitive Chamber on Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huirong; Liu, Mei

    2014-02-01

    In the last few years, wire chambers have been frequently used for X-ray detection because of their low cost, large area and reliability. X-ray diffraction is an irreplaceable method for powder crystal lattice measurements. A one-dimensional single-wire chamber has been developed in our lab to provide high position resolution for powder diffraction experiments using synchrotron radiation. There are 200 readout strips of 0.5 mm width with a pitch of 1.0 mm in the X direction, and the working gas is a mixture of Ar and CO2 (90/10). The one-dimensional position of the original ionization point is determined by the adjacent strip's distribution information using the center of gravity method. Recently, a study of the detector's performance and diffraction image was completed at the 1W1B laboratory of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) using a sample of SiO2. Most of the relative errors between the measured values of diffraction angles and existing data were less than 1%. The best position resolution achieved for the detector in the test was 71 μm (σ value) with a 20 μm slit collimator. Finally, by changing the detector height in incremental distances from the center of the sample, the one-dimensional detector achieved a two-dimensional diffraction imaging function, and the results are in good agreement with standard data.

  2. A novel Schiff base: Synthesis, structural characterisation and comparative sensor studies for metal ion detections.

    PubMed

    Köse, Muhammet; Purtas, Savas; Güngör, Seyit Ali; Ceyhan, Gökhan; Akgün, Eyup; McKee, Vickie

    2015-02-01

    A novel Schiff base ligand was synthesized by the condensation reaction of 2,6-diformylpyridine and 4-aminoantipyrine in MeOH and characterised by its melting point, elemental analysis, FT-IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR and mass spectroscopic studies. Molecular structure of the ligand was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The electrochemical properties of the Schiff base ligand were studied in different solvents at various scan rates. Sensor ability of the Schiff base ligand was investigated by colorimetric and fluorometric methods. Visual colour change of the ligand was investigated in MeOH solvent in presence of various metal ions Na(+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), K(+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+). Upon addition of Al(3+) ion into a MeOH solution of the ligand, an orange colour developed which is detectable by naked eye. Fluorescence emission studies showed that the ligand showed single emission band at 630-665nm upon excitation at 560nm. Addition of metal ions Na(+), Mg(2+), K(+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) (1:1M ratio) cause fluorescence quenching, however addition of Al(+3) resulted in an increase in fluorescence intensity. No significant variation was observed in the fluorescence intensity caused by Al(3+) in presence of other metal ions. Therefore, the Schiff base ligand can be used for selective detection of Al(3+) ions in the presence of the other metal ions studied.

  3. A novel Schiff base: Synthesis, structural characterisation and comparative sensor studies for metal ion detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köse, Muhammet; Purtas, Savas; Güngör, Seyit Ali; Ceyhan, Gökhan; Akgün, Eyup; McKee, Vickie

    2015-02-01

    A novel Schiff base ligand was synthesized by the condensation reaction of 2,6-diformylpyridine and 4-aminoantipyrine in MeOH and characterised by its melting point, elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectroscopic studies. Molecular structure of the ligand was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The electrochemical properties of the Schiff base ligand were studied in different solvents at various scan rates. Sensor ability of the Schiff base ligand was investigated by colorimetric and fluorometric methods. Visual colour change of the ligand was investigated in MeOH solvent in presence of various metal ions Na+, Mg2+, Al3+, K+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+. Upon addition of Al3+ ion into a MeOH solution of the ligand, an orange colour developed which is detectable by naked eye. Fluorescence emission studies showed that the ligand showed single emission band at 630-665 nm upon excitation at 560 nm. Addition of metal ions Na+, Mg2+, K+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ (1:1 M ratio) cause fluorescence quenching, however addition of Al+3 resulted in an increase in fluorescence intensity. No significant variation was observed in the fluorescence intensity caused by Al3+ in presence of other metal ions. Therefore, the Schiff base ligand can be used for selective detection of Al3+ ions in the presence of the other metal ions studied.

  4. Rotating disk potentiometry for inner solution optimization of low-detection-limit ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Radu, Aleksandar; Telting-Diaz, Martin; Bakker, Eric

    2003-12-15

    The extent of optimization of the lower detection limit of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) can be assessed with an elegant new method. At the detection limit (i.e., in the absence of primary ions in the sample), one can observe a reproducible change in the membrane potential upon alteration of the aqueous diffusion layer thickness. This stir effect is predicted to depend on the composition of the inner solution, which is known to influence the lower detection limit of the potentiometric sensor dramatically. For an optimized electrode, the stir effect is calculated to be exactly one-half the value of the case when substantial coextraction occurs at the inner membrane side. In contrast, there is no stir effect when substantial ion exchange occurs at the inner membrane side. Consequently, this experimental method can be used to determine how well the inner filling solution has been optimized. A rotating disk electrode was used in this study because it provides adequate control of the aqueous diffusion layer thickness. Various ion-selective membranes with a variety of inner solutions that gave different calculated concentrations of the complex at the inner membrane side were studied to evaluate this principle. They contained the well-examined silver ionophore O,O' '-bis[2-(methylthio)ethyl]-tert-butylcalix[4]arene, the potassium ionophore valinomycin, or the iodide carrier [9]mercuracarborand-3. Stir effects were determined in different background solutions and compared to theoretical expectations. Correlations were good, and the results encourage the use of such stir-effect measurements to optimize ISE compositions for real-world applications. The technique was also found to be useful in estimating the level of primary ion impurities in the sample. For an iodide-selective electrode measured in phosphoric acid, for example, apparent iodide impurity levels were calculated as 5 x 10(-10) M.

  5. BSA activated CdTe quantum dot nanosensor for antimony ion detection.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shenguang; Zhang, Congcong; Zhu, Yuanna; Yu, Jinghua; Zhang, Shuangshuang

    2010-01-01

    A novel fluorescent nanosensor for Sb(3+) determination was reported based on thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. It was the first antimony ion sensor using QD nanoparticles in a receptor-fluorophore system. The water-soluable TGA-capped CdTe QDs were prepared through a hydrothermal route, NaHTe was used as the Te precursor for CdTe QDs synthesis. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugated to TGA-capped CdTe via an amide link interacting with carboxyl of the TGA-capped CdTe. When antimony ion enters the BSA, the lone pair electrons of the nitrogen and oxygen atom become involved in the coordination, switching off the QD emission and a dramatic quenching of the fluorescence intensity results, allowing the detection of low concentrations of antimony ions. Using the operating principle, the antimony ion sensor based on QD nanoparticles showed a very good linearity in the range 0.10-22.0 microg L(-1), with the detection limit lower than 2.94 x 10(-8) g L(-1) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) 2.54% (n = 6). In a study of interferences, the antimony-sensitive TGA-QD-BSA sensor showed good selectivity. Therefore, a simple, fast, sensitive, and highly selective assay for antimony has been built. The presented method has been applied successfully to the determination of antimony in real water samples (n = 6) with satisfactory results.

  6. Implementing Silicon Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors as Arrays for Multiple Ion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, Ralph L.; Wipf, Mathias; Müller, Steffen; Bedner, Kristine; Wright, Iain A.; Martin, Colin J.; Constable, Edwin C.; Fanget, Axel; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ionic gradients play a crucial role in the physiology of the human body, ranging from metabolism in cells to muscle contractions or brain activities. To monitor these ions, inexpensive, label-free chemical sensing devices are needed. Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on silicon (Si) nanowires or nanoribbons (NRs) have a great potential as future biochemical sensors as they allow for the integration in microscopic devices at low production costs. Integrating NRs in dense arrays on a single chip expands the field of applications to implantable electrodes or multifunctional chemical sensing platforms. Ideally, such a platform is capable of detecting numerous species in a complex analyte. Here, we demonstrate the basis for simultaneous sodium and fluoride ion detection with a single sensor chip consisting of arrays of gold-coated SiNR FETs. A microfluidic system with individual channels allows modifying the NR surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of two types of ion receptors sensitive to sodium and fluoride ions. The functionalization procedure results in a differential setup having active fluoride- and sodium-sensitive NRs together with bare gold control NRs on the same chip. Comparing functionalized NRs with control NRs allows the compensation of non-specific contributions from changes in the background electrolyte concentration and reveals the response to the targeted species. PMID:27164151

  7. Implementing Silicon Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors as Arrays for Multiple Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ralph L; Wipf, Mathias; Müller, Steffen; Bedner, Kristine; Wright, Iain A; Martin, Colin J; Constable, Edwin C; Fanget, Axel; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ionic gradients play a crucial role in the physiology of the human body, ranging from metabolism in cells to muscle contractions or brain activities. To monitor these ions, inexpensive, label-free chemical sensing devices are needed. Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on silicon (Si) nanowires or nanoribbons (NRs) have a great potential as future biochemical sensors as they allow for the integration in microscopic devices at low production costs. Integrating NRs in dense arrays on a single chip expands the field of applications to implantable electrodes or multifunctional chemical sensing platforms. Ideally, such a platform is capable of detecting numerous species in a complex analyte. Here, we demonstrate the basis for simultaneous sodium and fluoride ion detection with a single sensor chip consisting of arrays of gold-coated SiNR FETs. A microfluidic system with individual channels allows modifying the NR surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of two types of ion receptors sensitive to sodium and fluoride ions. The functionalization procedure results in a differential setup having active fluoride- and sodium-sensitive NRs together with bare gold control NRs on the same chip. Comparing functionalized NRs with control NRs allows the compensation of non-specific contributions from changes in the background electrolyte concentration and reveals the response to the targeted species. PMID:27164151

  8. Evaluation of a Compton scattering camera using 3D position-sensitive CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yanfeng; He, Zhong; Knoll, Glenn F.; Wehe, David K.; Li, Weiqi

    1999-10-01

    A CZT Compton Camera (CCC) is being built using two 3D position sensitive CZT detectors. Expected system performance was analyzed by analytical and Monte Carlo approaches. Based on the measurement of detector energy and position resolution, the expected angular resolution is approximately 3 degree and approximately 2 degrees for a +/- 30 degrees FOV for 511 keV and 1 MeV (gamma) -rays, respectively. The intrinsic efficiency for a point source 10 cm from the first detector surface ranges from 1.5 X 10-4 to 8.8 X 10-6 for 500 keV to 3 MeV.

  9. A novel approach to increasing cocaine detection confidence utilizing ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadamec, J. Richard; Su, Chih-Wu; Rigdon, Stephen; Norwood, Lavan

    1995-01-01

    When a positive detection of a narcotic occurs during the search of a vessel, a decision has to be made whether further intensive search is warranted. In terms of unwarranted delays of vessels and possible property damage, the accuracy of the analytical determination is very important. Analytical accuracy becomes critical when the data may be used in court actions as evidence. For this purpose, the U.S. Coast Guard has been investigating several confirmatory ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) field methods for the detection and identification of cocaine. This paper presents the findings of our investigations on the use of catalytic pyrolysis and base hydrolysis as confirmatory methods. The catalytic effects of various metals on the pyrolysis reaction are reported. In addition, the effects of several different ion mobility spectrometer sample transfer mediums and varying laboratory conditions on the base hydrolysis of the cocaine molecule are also be reported.

  10. A mini-review on functional nucleic acids-based heavy metal ion detection.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shenshan; Wu, Yuangen; Wang, Lumei; Zhan, Xuejia; Zhou, Pei

    2016-12-15

    Recent years have witnessed great progress in developing functional nucleic acids (FNAs)-based sensors for the detection of heavy metal ion. In this review, four types of the FNAs that most widely-used in heavy metal ions detection were briefly introduced and a dozen of recently published review articles which summarized those FNAs-based sensors were introduced. Particularly, according to the degree of automation and system integration, those FNAs-based sensors which belong to the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) category were reviewed in more detail by classifying them into six types such as microfluidic LOC system, microchip, lateral flow dipstick, personal glucose meter, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) and disc-based analytical platform. After gave a brief description of the sensing strategies, properties, advantages or disadvantages of these FNAs-based sensors, existing problems and future perspectives were also discussed. PMID:27395020

  11. Wash-free magnetic oligonucleotide probes-based NMR sensor for detecting the Hg ion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenwei; Hao, Changlong; Ma, Wei; Xing, Changrui; Yan, Wenjing; Kuang, Hua; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2011-12-14

    An easily applied and sensitive sensor for the detection of heavy metal ion residues based entirely on magnetic nanoparticle and oligonucleotide was developed. The tool is established on the relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles with different dispersion states. The target analyte, Hg ions, induce the aggregation of the MNP oligonucleotide probes. Accordingly, the light produced by the magnetic relaxation image and the transverse relaxation time (T(2)) all change due to the effect of the aggregation. The limit of qualitative detection of the sensor is 0.15 ppt. The recoveries from test samples range between 97.1-101.8%. Using the nuclear resonance instrument, the method is a high throughput and sensitive sensor.

  12. A mini-review on functional nucleic acids-based heavy metal ion detection.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shenshan; Wu, Yuangen; Wang, Lumei; Zhan, Xuejia; Zhou, Pei

    2016-12-15

    Recent years have witnessed great progress in developing functional nucleic acids (FNAs)-based sensors for the detection of heavy metal ion. In this review, four types of the FNAs that most widely-used in heavy metal ions detection were briefly introduced and a dozen of recently published review articles which summarized those FNAs-based sensors were introduced. Particularly, according to the degree of automation and system integration, those FNAs-based sensors which belong to the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) category were reviewed in more detail by classifying them into six types such as microfluidic LOC system, microchip, lateral flow dipstick, personal glucose meter, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) and disc-based analytical platform. After gave a brief description of the sensing strategies, properties, advantages or disadvantages of these FNAs-based sensors, existing problems and future perspectives were also discussed.

  13. Sensing muscle ischemia: coincident detection of acid and ATP via interplay of two ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Fierro, Leonardo; Williams, Frank G.; Spelta, Valeria; Naves, Ligia A.; Knowles, Michelle; Marsh-Haffner, Josephine; Adelman, John P.; Almers, Wolfhard; Elde, Robert P.; McCleskey, Edwin W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Ischemic pain – examples include the chest pain of a heart attack and the leg pain of a 30 second sprint – occurs when muscle gets too little oxygen for its metabolic need. Lactic acid cannot act alone to trigger ischemic pain because the pH change is so small. Here we show that another compound released from ischemic muscle, ATP (adenosine tri-phosphate), works together with acid by increasing the pH sensitivity of ASIC3 (acid sensing ion channel #3), the molecule used by sensory neurons to detect lactic acidosis. Our data argue that ATP acts by binding to P2X receptors that form a molecular complex with ASICs; the receptor on sensory neurons appears to be P2X5, an electrically quiet ion channel. Coincident detection of acid and ATP should confer sensory selectivity for ischemia over other conditions of acidosis. PMID:21092862

  14. Detection of Silver Nanoparticles inside Marine Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana by Electron Microscopy and Focused Ion Beam

    PubMed Central

    Pascual García, César; Burchardt, Alina D.; Carvalho, Raquel N.; Gilliland, Douglas; C. António, Diana; Rossi, François; Lettieri, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    In the following article an electron/ion microscopy study will be presented which investigates the uptake of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, a primary producer aquatic species. This organism has a characteristic silica exoskeleton that may represent a barrier for the uptake of some chemical pollutants, including nanoparticles (NPs), but that presents a technical challenge when attempting to use electron-microscopy (EM) methods to study NP uptake. Here we present a convenient method to detect the NPs interacting with the diatom cell. It is based on a fixation procedure involving critical point drying which, without prior slicing of the cell, allows its inspection using transmission electron microscopy. Employing a combination of electron and ion microscopy techniques to selectively cut the cell where the NPs were detected, we are able to demonstrate and visualize for the first time the presence of AgNPs inside the cell membrane. PMID:24797958

  15. Real-time detection of metal ions using conjugated polymer composite papers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Eun; Shim, Hyeon Woo; Kwon, Oh Seok; Huh, Yang-Il; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2014-09-21

    Cellulose, a natural polymeric material, has widespread technical applications because of its inherent structural rigidity and high surface area. As a conjugated polymer, polypyrrole shows practical potential for a diverse and promising range of future technologies. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the real-time detection and removal of metal ions with polypyrrole/cellulose (PPCL) composite papers in solution. Simply, the conjugated polymer papers had different chemical/physical properties by applying different potentials to them, which resulted in differentiable response patterns and adsorption efficiencies for individual metal ions. First, large-area PPCL papers with a diameter of 5 cm were readily obtained via vapor deposition polymerization. The papers exhibited both mechanical flexibility and robustness, in which polypyrrole retained its redox property perfectly. The ability of the PPCL papers to recognize metal ions was examined in static and flow cells, in which real-time current change was monitored at five different applied potentials (+1, +0.5, 0, -0.5, and -1 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Distinguishable signals in the PPCL paper responses were observed for individual metal ions through principal component analysis. Particularly, the PPCL papers yielded unique signatures for three metal ions, Hg(ii), Ag(i), and Cr(iii), even in a real sample, groundwater. The sorption of metal ions by PPCL papers was examined in the flow system. The PPCL papers had a greatly superior adsorption efficiency for Hg(ii) compared to that of the other metal ions. With the strong demand for the development of inexpensive, flexible, light-weight, and environmentally friendly devices, the fascinating characteristics of these PPCL papers are likely to provide good opportunities for low-cost paper-based flexible or wearable devices.

  16. Mass determination of megadalton-DNA electrospray ions using charge detection mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J C; Hack, C A; Benner, W H

    1998-04-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CD-MS) has been used to determine the mass of double-stranded, circular DNA and single-stranded, circular DNA in the range of 2500 to 8000 base pairs (1.5-5.0 MDa). Simultaneous measurement of the charge and velocity of an electrostatically accelerated ion allows a mass determination of the ion, with instrument calibration determined independently of samples. Positive ion mass spectra of electrosprayed commercial DNA samples supplied in tris(hydroxymethyl)ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid buffer, diluted in 50 vol. % acetonitrile, were obtained without cleanup of the sample. A CD mass spectrum constructed from 3000 ion measurements takes 10 min to acquire and yields the DNA molecular mass directly (mass resolution = 6). The data collected represent progress toward a more automatable alternative to sizing of DNA by gel electrophoresis. In addition to the mass spectra, CD-MS generates charge versus mass plots, which provide another means to investigate the creation and fate of large electrospray ions.

  17. Surface plasmon resonance sensing detection of mercury and lead ions based on conducting polymer composite.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Mahnaz M; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Sadrolhosseini, Amir R; Mat Yunus, Wan Mahmood; Moksin, Mohd Maarof; Tahir, Paridah Md

    2011-01-01

    A new sensing area for a sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury and lead ions. The gold surface used for SPR measurements were modified with polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI) conducting polymer composite. The polymer layer was deposited on the gold surface by electrodeposition. This optical sensor was used for monitoring toxic metal ions with and without sensitivity enhancement by chitosan in water samples. The higher amounts of resonance angle unit (ΔRU) were obtained for PPy-CHI film due to a specific binding of chitosan with Pb(2+) and Hg(2+) ions. The Pb(2+) ion bind to the polymer films most strongly, and the sensor was more sensitive to Pb(2+) compared to Hg(2+). The concentrations of ions in the parts per million range produced the changes in the SPR angle minimum in the region of 0.03 to 0.07. Data analysis was done by Matlab software using Fresnel formula for multilayer system.

  18. Controlled fabrication of nanopores using a direct focused ion beam approach with back face particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, N.; Adams, D. P.; Hodges, V. C.; Vasile, M. J.; Michael, J. R.; Kotula, P. G.

    2008-06-01

    We report a direct, ion drilling technique that enables the reproducible fabrication and placement of nanopores in membranes of different thickness. Using a 30 keV focused Ga ion beam column combined with an in situ, back face, multi-channelplate particle detector, nanopores are sputtered in Si3N4 and W/Si3N4 to have diameters as small as 12 nm. Transmission electron microscopy shows that focused ion beam-drilled holes are near-conical with the diameter decreasing from entry to exit side. By monitoring the detector signal during ion exposure, the drilled hole width can be minimized such that the exit-side diameter is smaller than the full width at half-maximum of the nominally Gaussian-shaped incident beam. Judicious choice of the beam defining aperture combined with back face particle detection allows for reproducible exit-side hole diameters between 18 and 100 nm. The nanopore direct drilling technique does not require potentially damaging broad area exposure to tailor hole sizes. Moreover, this technique successfully achieves breakthrough despite the effects of varying membrane thickness, redeposition, polycrystalline grain structure, and slight ion beam current fluctuations.

  19. Controlled fabrication of nanopores using a direct focused ion beam approach with back face particle detection.

    PubMed

    Patterson, N; Adams, D P; Hodges, V C; Vasile, M J; Michael, J R; Kotula, P G

    2008-06-11

    We report a direct, ion drilling technique that enables the reproducible fabrication and placement of nanopores in membranes of different thickness. Using a 30 keV focused Ga ion beam column combined with an in situ, back face, multi-channelplate particle detector, nanopores are sputtered in Si(3)N(4) and W/Si(3)N(4) to have diameters as small as 12 nm. Transmission electron microscopy shows that focused ion beam-drilled holes are near-conical with the diameter decreasing from entry to exit side. By monitoring the detector signal during ion exposure, the drilled hole width can be minimized such that the exit-side diameter is smaller than the full width at half-maximum of the nominally Gaussian-shaped incident beam. Judicious choice of the beam defining aperture combined with back face particle detection allows for reproducible exit-side hole diameters between 18 and 100 nm. The nanopore direct drilling technique does not require potentially damaging broad area exposure to tailor hole sizes. Moreover, this technique successfully achieves breakthrough despite the effects of varying membrane thickness, redeposition, polycrystalline grain structure, and slight ion beam current fluctuations. PMID:21825787

  20. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing Detection of Mercury and Lead Ions Based on Conducting Polymer Composite

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Mahnaz M.; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Sadrolhosseini, Amir R.; Mat Yunus, Wan Mahmood; Moksin, Mohd Maarof; Tahir, Paridah Md.

    2011-01-01

    A new sensing area for a sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury and lead ions. The gold surface used for SPR measurements were modified with polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI) conducting polymer composite. The polymer layer was deposited on the gold surface by electrodeposition. This optical sensor was used for monitoring toxic metal ions with and without sensitivity enhancement by chitosan in water samples. The higher amounts of resonance angle unit (ΔRU) were obtained for PPy-CHI film due to a specific binding of chitosan with Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions. The Pb2+ ion bind to the polymer films most strongly, and the sensor was more sensitive to Pb2+ compared to Hg2+. The concentrations of ions in the parts per million range produced the changes in the SPR angle minimum in the region of 0.03 to 0.07. Data analysis was done by Matlab software using Fresnel formula for multilayer system. PMID:21931763

  1. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) with atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry for drug detection.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, Kristyn M; Tufariello, Jessica A; Zhang, Xing; Li, Shelly X; Goetz, Gilles H; Cheng, Guilong; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2014-04-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was coupled to an ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IM-TOFMS) for the direct analysis of active ingredients in pharmaceutical samples. The DESI source was also coupled with a standalone IMS demonstrating potential of portable and inexpensive drug-quality testing platforms. The DESI-IMS required no sample pretreatment as ions were generated directly from tablets and cream formulations. The analysis of a range of over-the-counter and prescription tablet formations was demonstrated for amphetamine (methylphenidate), antidepressant (venlafaxine), barbiturate (Barbituric acid), depressant (alprazolam), narcotic (3-methylmorphine) and sympatholytic (propranolol) drugs. Active ingredients from soft and liquid formulations, such as Icy Hot cream (methyl salicylate) and Nyquil cold medicine (acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, doxylamine) were also detected. Increased sensitivity for selective drug responses was demonstrated through the formation of sodiated adduct ions by introducing small quantities of NaCl into the DESI solvent. Of the drugs and pharmaceuticals tested in this study, 68% (22 total samples) provided a clear ion mobility response at characteristic mobilities either as (M + H)(+), (M - H)(-), or (M + Na)(+) ions.

  2. Mass determination of megadalton-DNA Electrospray Ions usingCharge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Jocelyn C.; Hack, Christopher; Benner, Henry W.

    1997-10-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CD-MS) has been used to determine the mass of double-stranded, circular DNA and single-stranded, circular DNA in the range of 2500 to 8000 base pairs (1.5-5.0 MDa). Simultaneous measurement of the charge and velocity of an electrostatically accelerated ion allows a mass determination of the ion, with instrument calibration determined independently of samples. Positive ion mass spectra of electrosprayed commercial DNA samples supplied in tris(hydroxymethyl)ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid buffer, diluted in 50 vol. percent acetonitrile, were obtained without cleanup of the sample. ACD mass spectrum constructed from 3000 ion measurements takes 10 min to acquire and yields the DNA molecular mass directly (mass resolution = 6). The data collected represent progress toward a more automatable alternative to sizing of DNA by gel electrophoresis. In addition to the mass spectra, CD-MS generates charge versus mass plots, which provide another means to investigate the creation and fate of large electrospray ions.

  3. Resolution of Ion Mobility Spectra for the Detection of Hazardous Substances in Real Sampling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Montoliu, I.; Kalms, A.; Pardo, A.; Pomareda, V.; Marco, S.; Goebel, J.; Kessler, M.; Mueller, G.

    2009-05-23

    This work presents the possibilities offered by a blind source separation method such Multivariate Curve Resolution- Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) in the analysis of Ion Mobility Spectra (IMS). Two security applications are analyzed in this context: the detection of TNT both in synthetic and real samples. Results obtained show the possibilities offered by the direct analysis of the drift time spectra when an appropriate resolution method is used.

  4. A novel donor-acceptor receptor for selective detection of Pb2+ and Fe3+ ions.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Kamlakar P; Puyad, Avinash L; Bhosale, Sheshanath V; Bhosale, Sidhanath V

    2014-12-01

    An efficient and highly selective colorimetric and fluorescent receptor DTPDA has been synthesized for sensitive detection of Pb(2+) and Fe(3+) cations. The sensor DTPDA produces a facile, cost-effective and naked eye sensing platform to determine trace amounts of Pb(2+) and Fe(3+) metal ions by complexation with pendent S-termini of thiophenes, which commonly coordinates to central N-termini of pyridine. PMID:25159385

  5. Functional layers for Zn(II) ion detection: from molecular design to optical fiber sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihong; Tonnelé, Claire; Battagliarin, Glauco; Li, Chen; Gropeanu, Radu A; Weil, Tanja; Surin, Mathieu; Beljonne, David; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Debliquy, Marc; Renoirt, Jean-Michel; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of a novel perylene monoimide derivative that shows high response and selectivity for zinc ion detection. The complexation of Zn(2+) by the dye is followed by FD-MS, (1)H NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Quantum chemical calculations are performed to gain further insight into the electronic processes responsible for the spectroscopic changes observed upon complexation. Finally, the perylene dye is incorporated in a sol-gel silica layer coated on optical fibers that are then used for Zn(2+) detection in aqueous solution.

  6. Ion chromatography with the indirect ultraviolet detection of alkali metal ions and ammonium using imidazolium ionic liquid as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Indirect ultraviolet detection was conducted in ultraviolet-absorption-agent-added mobile phase to complete the detection of the absence of ultraviolet absorption functional group in analytes. Compared with precolumn derivatization or postcolumn derivatization, this method can be widely used, has the advantages of simple operation and good linear relationship. Chromatographic separation of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid/organic solvent as the mobile phase, in which imidazolium ionic liquids acted as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluting agent. The retention behaviors of four kinds of cations are discussed, and the mechanism of separation and detection are described. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background ultraviolet absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in the ion chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection. The successful separation and detection of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) within 13 min was achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.02, 0.11, 0.30, and 0.06 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and analysis method of alkali metal ions and ammonium by ion chromatography with indirect ultraviolet detection method was developed, and the application range of ionic liquid was expanded. PMID:27377245

  7. Ion chromatography with the indirect ultraviolet detection of alkali metal ions and ammonium using imidazolium ionic liquid as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Indirect ultraviolet detection was conducted in ultraviolet-absorption-agent-added mobile phase to complete the detection of the absence of ultraviolet absorption functional group in analytes. Compared with precolumn derivatization or postcolumn derivatization, this method can be widely used, has the advantages of simple operation and good linear relationship. Chromatographic separation of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid/organic solvent as the mobile phase, in which imidazolium ionic liquids acted as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluting agent. The retention behaviors of four kinds of cations are discussed, and the mechanism of separation and detection are described. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background ultraviolet absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in the ion chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection. The successful separation and detection of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) within 13 min was achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.02, 0.11, 0.30, and 0.06 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and analysis method of alkali metal ions and ammonium by ion chromatography with indirect ultraviolet detection method was developed, and the application range of ionic liquid was expanded.

  8. Detection of explosive related nitroaromatic compounds (ERNC) by laser-based ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudien, Robert; Riebe, Daniel; Beitz, Toralf; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2008-10-01

    In this study two issues are addressed, namely laser ionisation of selected nitroaromatic compounds (NAC) and the characterisation of their anions by photodetachment (PD) spectroscopy. Laser ionisation of the NAC at λ = 226.75 nm is investigated by ion mobility (IM) spectrometry at atmospheric pressure. The main product after laser ionisation is the reactive NO+ ion formed in a sequence of photofragmentation and multiphoton ionisation processes. NO+ is trapped by specific ion molecule reactions (IMR). Alternatively, NO, added as laser dopant, can directly be ionised. The formed NO+ reacts with the NAC under complex formation. This allows fragmentless NAC detection. The combination of IM spectrometry and PD spectroscopy provides real-time characterisation of the anions in the IM spectrum. This is useful to differentiate between NAC and interfering substances and, thus, to reduce false-positive detections of NAC. The electrons detached by the PD laser at λ = 532 nm are detected in the same spectrum as the anions. The potential of PD-IM spectrometry in terms of cross section determination, analytical improvements, tomographic mapping, spatial hole burning etc., is outlined.

  9. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keselman, A.; Glickman, Y.; Akerman, N.; Kotler, S.; Ozeri, R.

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped 88Sr+ ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  10. Detection of heavy metal ions in water by high-resolution surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy combined with anodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaopeng; Forzani, Erica S; Tao, Nongjian

    2007-06-15

    High-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) capability has been demonstrated for detecting heavy metal ions in water. Metal ions are electroplated onto the gold SPR sensing surface and are quantitatively detected by stripping voltammetry. Both the SPR angular shift and electrochemical current signal are recorded to identify the type and amount of the metal ions in water. The performance of the combined approach is further enhanced by a differential detection approach. The gold sensor surface is divided into a reference and a sensing area, and the difference in the SPR angles from the two areas is detected with a quadrant cell photodetector as a differential signal. Our system demonstrated quantitative detection of copper, lead, and mercury ions in water from part-per-million to sub-part-per-billion levels with good linearity.

  11. Enhanced analyte detection using in-source fragmentation of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-selected ions in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lauren J; Smith, Robert W; Toutoungi, Danielle E; Reynolds, James C; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew; Sage, Ashley; Wilson, Ian D; Weston, Daniel J; Boyle, Billy; Creaser, Colin S

    2012-05-01

    Miniaturized ultra high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is used for the selective transmission of differential mobility-selected ions prior to in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) analysis. The FAIMS-in-source collision induced dissociation-TOFMS (FISCID-MS) method requires only minor modification of the ion source region of the mass spectrometer and is shown to significantly enhance analyte detection in complex mixtures. Improved mass measurement accuracy and simplified product ion mass spectra were observed following FAIMS preselection and subsequent in-source CID of ions derived from pharmaceutical excipients, sufficiently close in m/z (17.7 ppm mass difference) that they could not be resolved by TOFMS alone. The FISCID-MS approach is also demonstrated for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of peptides with FAIMS used to filter out unrelated precursor ions thereby simplifying the resulting product ion mass spectra. Liquid chromatography combined with FISCID-MS was applied to the analysis of coeluting model peptides and tryptic peptides derived from human plasma proteins, allowing precursor ion selection and CID to yield product ion data suitable for peptide identification via database searching. The potential of FISCID-MS for the quantitative determination of a model peptide spiked into human plasma in the range of 0.45-9.0 μg/mL is demonstrated, showing good reproducibility (%RSD < 14.6%) and linearity (R(2) > 0.99).

  12. Highly photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals for rapid, label-free and recyclable detection of mercuric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the thiol group, the fluorescence can be fully recovered by biothiols such as cysteine and glutathione, therefore, a regenerative strategy has been proposed and successfully applied to detect Hg2+ by the same sensor for at least five cycles. Endowed with relatively high sensitivity and selectivity, the present sensor holds the potential to be applied for mercuric assay in water.Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the

  13. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by self assembled chemical field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Hang Kang, Yuhong; Gladwin, Elizabeth; Claus, Richard O.

    2015-04-20

    Multiple layer-by-layer sensor material modifications were designed and implemented to achieve selectivity of semiconductor based chemical field effect transistors (ChemFETs) to particular heavy metal ions. The ChemFET sensors were fabricated and modified in three ways, with the intent to initially target first mercury and lead ions and then chromium ions, respectively. Sensor characterization was performed with the gate regions of the sensor elements exposed to different concentrations of target heavy metal ion solutions. A minimum detection level in the range of 0.1 ppm and a 10%–90% response time of less than 10 s were demonstrated. By combining layer-by-layer gold nanoparticles and lead ionophores, a sensor is produced that is sensitive and selective not only to chromium but also to Cr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6+}. This result supports the claim that high selectivity can be achieved by designing self-assembled bonding for lead, arsenic, chromium, cesium, mercury, and cadmium.

  14. Sensitive ion detection device and method for analysis of compounds as vapors in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P.

    2015-09-15

    An ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for the detection of trace gaseous molecular compounds dissolved or suspended in a carrier gas, particularly in ambient air, without preconcentration or the trapping of analyte particles. The IMS of the invention comprises an ionization volume of greater than 5 cm.sup.3 and preferably greater than 100 cm.sup.3. The larger size ionizers of this invention enable analysis of trace (<1 ppb) of sample compounds in the gas phase. To facilitate efficient ion motion through the large volume ionization and reaction regions of the IMS, an electric field gradient can be provided in the ionization region or in both the ionization and reaction regions. The systems can be implemented with radioactive ionization sources, corona discharge ion sources or ions can be formed by photoionization. In specific embodiments, particularly when the sample gas is ambient air, the sample gas is heater prior to entry into the instrument, the instrument is run at temperatures above ambient, and the instrument can be heated by contact with heated sample gas exiting the instrument.

  15. Sensitive ion detection device and method for analysis of compounds as vapors in gases

    DOEpatents

    Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P

    2014-02-18

    An ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for the detection of trace gaseous molecular compounds dissolved or suspended in a carrier gas, particularly in ambient air, without preconcentration or the trapping of analyte particles. The IMS of the invention comprises an ionization volume of greater than 5 cm.sup.3 and preferably greater than 100 cm.sup.3. The larger size ionizers of this invention enable analysis of trace (<1 ppb) of sample compounds in the gas phase. To facilitate efficient ion motion through the large volume ionization and reaction regions of the IMS, an electric field gradient can be provided in the ionization region or in both the ionization and reaction regions. The systems can be implemented with radioactive ionization sources, corona discharge ion sources or ions can be formed by photoionization. In specific embodiments, particularly when the sample gas is ambient air, the sample gas is heater prior to entry into the instrument, the instrument is run at temperatures above ambient, and the instrument can be heated by contact with heated sample gas exiting the instrument.

  16. Gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry as a hyphenated technique for improved explosives detection and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercado, AL; Marsden, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is currently being successfully applied to the problem of on-line trace detection of plastic and other explosives in airports and other facilities. The methods of sample retrieval primarily consist of batch sampling for particulate residue on a filter card for introduction into the IMS. The sample is desorbed into the IMS using air as the carrier and negative ions of the explosives are detected, some as an adduct with a reagent ion such as Cl(-). Based on studies and tests conducted by different airport authorities, this method seems to work well for low vapor pressure explosives such as RDX and PETN, as well as TNT that are highly adsorptive and can be found in nanogram quantities on contaminated surfaces. Recently, the changing terrorist threat and the adoption of new marking agents for plastic explosives has meant that the sample introduction and analysis capabilities of the IMS must be enhanced in order to keep up with other detector developments. The IMS has sufficient analytical resolution for a few threat compounds but the IMS Plasmogram becomes increasingly more difficult to interpret when the sample mixture gets more complex.

  17. Optical detection of a single rare-earth ion in a crystal

    PubMed Central

    Kolesov, R.; Xia, K.; Reuter, R.; Stöhr, R.; Zappe, A.; Meijer, J.; Hemmer, P.R.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2012-01-01

    Rare-earth-doped laser materials show strong prospects for quantum information storage and processing, as well as for biological imaging, due to their high-Q 4f↔4f optical transitions. However, the inability to optically detect single rare-earth dopants has prevented these materials from reaching their full potential. Here we detect a single photostable Pr3+ ion in yttrium aluminium garnet nanocrystals with high contrast photon antibunching by using optical upconversion of the excited state population of the 4f↔4f optical transition into ultraviolet fluorescence. We also demonstrate on-demand creation of Pr3+ ions in a bulk yttrium aluminium garnet crystal by patterned ion implantation. Finally, we show generation of local nanophotonic structures and cell death due to photochemical effects caused by upconverted ultraviolet fluorescence of praseodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet in the surrounding environment. Our study demonstrates versatile use of rare-earth atomic-size ultraviolet emitters for nanoengineering and biotechnological applications. PMID:22929786

  18. Detection of nitrite and nitrate ions in water by graphene oxide as a potential fluorescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ing Hua; Sundari, Rita; Lintang, Hendrik O.; Yuliati, Leny

    2016-02-01

    In this study, graphene oxide (GO) was used as a new fluorescence sensor for detection of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) ions. The GO was synthesized via an improved Hummers’ method, and the properties of GO were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The XRD pattern showed the presence of (002) plane at 2θ of 9.5o while the FTIR spectrum showed the presence of C-OH, C=O, C=C, C-O chemical bonds in the GO. The layer structure of the GO was confirmed from the TEM image. The sensing performance of the GO for NO2- and NO3- was evaluated by monitoring the emission sites of the GO at 567 nm, which was corresponded to the oxygen functional groups. Fluorescence quenching was observed, suggesting that the GO interacted well with both NO2- and NO3- ions. The linear Stern-Volmer plots were obtained in the concentration range of 1-10 mM, indicating the potential ability of the GO as the fluorescence sensor. The quenching constants for the detections of NO2- and NO3- were 4.8 × 10-2 and 1.2 × 10-2 mM-1, respectively, suggesting that the GO has greater sensitivity towards the NO2- than the NO3- ion.

  19. Ion mobility spectrometer, spectrometer analyte detection and identification verification system, and method

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry and analyte detection and identification verification system are disclosed. The apparatus is configured to be used in an ion mobility spectrometer and includes a plurality of reactant reservoirs configured to contain a plurality of reactants which can be reacted with the sample to form adducts having varying ion mobilities. A carrier fluid, such as air or nitrogen, is used to carry the sample into the spectrometer. The plurality of reactants are configured to be selectively added to the carrier stream by use inlet and outlet manifolds in communication with the reagent reservoirs, the reservoirs being selectively isolatable by valves. The invention further includes a spectrometer having the reagent system described. In the method, a first reactant is used with the sample. Following a positive result, a second reactant is used to determine whether a predicted response occurs. The occurrence of the second predicted response tends to verify the existence of a component of interest within the sample. A third reactant can also be used to provide further verification of the existence of a component of interest. A library can be established of known responses of compounds of interest with various reactants and the results of a specific multi-reactant survey of a sample can be compared against the library to determine whether a component detected in the sample is likely to be a specific component of interest.

  20. Computerized Heavy-Ion Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, W. R.; Tobias, C. A.; Fabrikant, J. I.; Llacer, J.; Chu, W. T.; Benton, E. V.

    1981-07-01

    Several techniques for heavy-ion computerized tomography are being investigated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Using beams of carbon and neon from the Bevalac, we have demonstrated that these methods are feasible and capable of high resolution. We describe in some detail the method of heavy-ion CT imaging using nuclear track detectors, including a discussion of procedures for optical scanning and digitization of data and computerized distortion corrections. Comparisons between a heavy-ion CT image and X-ray CT image of a simple phantom are discussed. Preliminary results from two techniques using active, online detector systems for performing heavy-ion computerized tomography are presented. One method uses a multiplane, multiwire ionization chamber for detecting the heavy ions in a mode allowing true three-dimensional reconstructions. The other technique uses a system of position-sensitive silicon solid-state detectors for spacial information and high-purity germanium detectors to measure accurately the residual energy of the ions.

  1. Improved Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions in the Mid-Infrared with Up-Conversion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus, Charles R.; Perry, Adam J.; Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    Heterodyne detection, velocity modulation, and cavity enhancement are useful tools for observing rovibrational transitions of important molecular ions. We have utilized these methods to investigate a number of molecular ions, such as H_3^+, CH_5^+, HeH^+, and OH^+. In the past, parasitic etalons and the lack of fast and sensitive detectors in the mid-infrared have limited the number of transitions we could measure with MHz-level precision. Recently, we have significantly reduced the amplitude of unwanted interference fringes with a Brewster-plate spoiler. We have also developed a detection scheme which up-converts the mid-infrared light with difference frequency generation which allows the use of a faster and more sensitive avalanche photodetector. The higher detection bandwidth allows for optimized heterodyne detection at higher modulation frequencies. The overall gain in signal-to-noise from both improvements will enable extensive high-precision line lists of molecular ions and searches for previously unobserved transitions. K.N. Crabtree, J.N. Hodges, B.M. Siller, A.J. Perry, J.E. Kelly, P.A. Jenkins II, and B.J. McCall, Chem. Phys. Lett. 551 (2012) 1-6. A.J. Perry, J.N. Hodges, C.R. Markus, G.S. Kocheril, and B.J. McCall, J. Mol. Spec. 317 (2015) 71-73. J.N. Hodges, A.J. Perry, P.A. Jenkins II, B.M. Siller, and B.J. McCall, J. Chem. Phys. 139 (2013) 164291. A.J. Perry, J.N. Hodges, C.R. Markus, G.S. Kocheril, and B.J. McCall. 2014, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 101101 C.R. Markus, J.N. Hodges, A.J. Perry, G.S. Kocheril, H.S.P. Muller, and B.J. McCall, Astrophys. J. 817 (2016) 138.

  2. Detection of copper ions in drinking water using the competitive adsorption of proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Wang, Wei; Ren, Hao; Chae, Junseok

    2014-07-15

    Heavy metal ions, i.e., Cu(2+), are harmful to the environment and our health. In order to detect them, and circumvent or alleviate the weaknesses of existing detecting technologies, we contrive a unique Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor combined with competitive adsorption of proteins, termed the Vroman effect. This approach adopts native proteins (albumin) as bio-receptors that interact with Cu(2+) to be denatured. Denaturation disrupts the conformation of albumin so that it weakens its affinity to adsorb on the sensing surface. Through the competitive adsorption between the denatured albumins and the native ones, the displacement occurs adjacent to the sensing surface, and this process is real-time monitored by SPR, a surface-sensitive label-free biosensor. The affinities of native albumin is significantly higher than that of denatured albumin, demonstrated by measured KD of native and denatured albumin to gold surafce, 5.8±0.2×10(-5) M and 5.4±0.1×10(-4) M, respectively. Using our biosensor, Cu(2+) with concentration down to 0.1mg/L is detected in PBS, tap water, deionized water, and bottled water. The SPR biosensor is characterized for 5 different heavy metal ions, Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+), most common heavy metal ions found in tap water. At the maximum contaminant level (MCL) suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the SPR biosensor produces 13.5±0.4, 1.5±0.4, 0, 0, and 0 mDeg, respectively, suggesting the biosensor may be used to detect Cu(2+) in tap water samples.

  3. Iron oxide nanostructured electrodes for detection of copper(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Santos, J G M; Souza, J R; Letti, C J; Soler, M A G; Morais, P C; Pereira-da-Silva, M A; Paterno, L G

    2014-09-01

    Iron oxide nanostructured (ION) electrodes were assembled layer-by-layer onto ITO-coated glass substrates and their structure, morphology, and electrochemical properties were investigated, the latter aiming at the development of a chemical sensor for Cu2+. The electrodes were built by immersing the substrate alternately into an aqueous colloidal suspension of positively charged magnetite nanoparticles (np-Fe3O4, 8 nm) and an aqueous solution of anionic sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS). The adsorbed amount of both materials was monitored ex-situ by UV-vis spectroscopy and it was found to increase linearly with the number of deposition cycles. The resulting films feature a densely-packed structure of magnetite nanoparticles, as suggested by AFM and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Cyclic voltammograms of electrodes immersed in acetate buffer (pH 4.6) displayed three electrochemical events that were tentatively ascribed to the reduction of Fe(III) oxy-hydroxide to magnetite, reduction of maghemite to magnetite, and finally oxidation of magnetite to maghemite. The effect of np-Fe3O4/PSS bilayers on the ION electrode performance was to increase the anodic and cathodic currents produced during electrochemical oxidation-reduction of the Fe(CN)(3-/4-) redox couple. With more bilayers, the ION electrode provided higher anodic/cathodic currents. Moreover, the redox couple exhibited a quasi-reversible behavior at the ION electrode as already observed with other working electrode systems. Fitting of voltammetry data provided the apparent electron transfer constants, which were found to be higher in ION electrodes for both redox couples (Fe(CN)(3-/4-) and Cu(2+/0)). By means of differential pulsed anodic stripping voltammetry, the ION electrodes were found to respond linearly to the presence of Cu2+ in aqueous samples in the range between 1.0 and 8.0 x 10(-6) mol x L(-1) and displayed a limit of detection of 0.3 x 10(-8) mol x L(-1). The sensitivity was - 0.6μA/μmol x L

  4. A turn-on fluorescent probe based on hydroxylamine oxidation for detecting ferric ion selectively in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Yu, Fabiao; Liu, Ping; Chen, Lingxin

    2012-05-28

    We have described a turn on fluorescent probe BOD-NHOH based on hydroxylamine oxidation for detecting intracellular ferric ions. The probe comprises a signal transducer of BODIPY dye and a Fe(3+)-response modulator of hydroxylamine. It is readily employed for assessing intracellular ferric ion levels, and confocal imaging is achieved successfully.

  5. Determination of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling process by ion pair chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, L. H.; Judkins, J. E.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A direct approach utilizing ion pairing reversed-phase chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detection was developed to monitor biodegradation of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling through hydroponic plant growth systems and fixed-film bioreactors. Samples of hydroponic nutrient solution and bioreactor effluent with high concentrations (up to 120 mS electrical conductance) of inorganic ions can be analyzed without pretreatment or interference. The presence of non-ionic surfactants did not significantly affect the analysis. Dynamic linear ranges for tested surfactants [Igepon TC-42, ammonium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate and sodium alkyl (C10-C16) ether sulfate] were 2 to approximately 500, 1 to approximately 500, 2.5 to approximately 550 and 3.0 to approximately 630 microg/ml, respectively.

  6. A Photochromic Sensor Microchip for High-performance Multiplex Metal Ions Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Li, Fengyu; Ye, Changqing; Qin, Meng; Ran, Wei; Song, Yanlin

    2015-01-01

    Current multi-analytes chips are limited with requiring numbers of sensors, complex synthesis and compounds screen. It is expected to develop new principles and techniques to achieve high-performance multi-analytes testing with facile sensors. Here, we investigated the correlative multi-states properties of a photochromic sensor (spirooxazine), which is capable of a selective and cross-reactive sensor array for discriminated multi-analytes (11 metal ions) detection by just one sensing compound. The multi-testing sensor array performed in dark, ultraviolet or visual stimulation, corresponding to different molecular states of spirooxazine metal ions coordination. The facile photochromic microchip contributes a multi-states array sensing method, and will open new opportunities for the development of advanced discriminant analysis for complex analytes. PMID:25853794

  7. Hydrogels Triggered by Metal Ions as Precursors of Network CuS for DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiqiao; Song, Shasha; Hao, Jingcheng; Song, Aixin

    2015-08-17

    The gelation behavior of lithocholate (LC(-) ) with different metal ions in water was investigated. The microstructures of hydrogels were determined to be three-dimensional (3D) networks of fibrous aggregates. The formation of fibrils was speculated to be mainly driven by the coordination between carboxylate of LC(-) and metal ions, accompanied by the assistance of noncovalent interactions such as electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The hydrogels, which can maintain the mechanical strength at higher temperature, exhibit thermal stability. Their gelation capability was enhanced with the increase in acidity. The hydrogels of LC(-) and Cu(2+) mixtures served as the precursors for producing network nanostructures of CuS nanoparticles. These new CuS networks exhibit high fluorescence quenching ability and can act as an effective fluorescent sensing platform for ssDNA detection.

  8. Metal ion-mediated polymer superquenching for highly sensitive detection of kinase and phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Rininsland, Frauke; Xia, Wensheng; Wittenburg, Shannon; Shi, Xiaobo; Stankewicz, Casey; Achyuthan, Komandoor; McBranch, Duncan; Whitten, David

    2004-10-26

    An assay technology for high-throughput screening of kinase and phosphatase activities is introduced. The format is based upon superquenching of fluorescent-conjugated polymers by dye-labeled kinase/phosphatase peptide substrates. The sensor platform is composed of highly fluorescent-conjugated polyelectrolytes colocated with the phosphate coordinating metal ion gallium on microspheres. Phosphorylated peptide substrates containing a quencher bind specifically to the metal ions by means of phosphate groups, resulting in quench of polymer fluorescence. The modulation of fluorescence signal is proportional to kinase or phosphatase activity and is monitored as a turn-off or turn-on signal, respectively. The assay is homogeneous and simple and can be run either as an endpoint measurement or in a kinetic mode. The assay meets the sensitivity required for high-throughput screening of kinase or phosphatase inhibitors and is a valuable tool for drug discovery. A modified version of the assay allows for the detection of protein phosphorylation.

  9. Detection of copper ions from aqueous solutions using layered double hydroxides thin films deposited by PLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, A.; Birjega, R.; Matei, A.; Luculescu, C.; Nedelcea, A.; Dinescu, M.; Zavoianu, R.; Pavel, O. D.

    2015-10-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) thin films with Mg-Al were deposited using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. We studied the ability of our films to detect copper ions in aqueous solutions. Copper is known to be a common pollutant in water, originating from urban and industrial waste. Clay minerals, including layered double hydroxides (LDHs), can reduce the toxicity of such wastes by adsorbing copper. We report on the uptake of copper ions from aqueous solution on LDH thin films obtained via PLD. The obtained thin films were characterized using X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis. The results in this study indicate that LDHs thin films obtained by PLD have potential as an efficient adsorbent for removing copper from aqueous solution.

  10. Metal-clad optical waveguide fluorescence device for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Zoppi, Angela; Lascialfari, Luisa; Cicchi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    We developed Hg-sensing chips by decorating the external surface of metal-clad optical waveguides with a monolayer of Hg-sensitive fluorescent molecular probes. The emission properties of the original water-soluble form of the molecule were previously found to be selectively quenched in the presence of Hg ions. The fabricated samples were tested with optical waveguide fluorescence spectroscopy by putting them in contact with a 5-μM water solution of Hg ions and recording the emission spectra versus incubation time. The estimate of the limit of detection was 150 nM. A preliminary evaluation of the selectivity of the structure was also performed by using Cd as possible interfering analytes.

  11. Polarization analysis for the 2D position-sensitive detector of the HADAS reflectometer in Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rücker, U.; Bergs, W.; Alefeld, B.; Kentzinger, E.; Brückel, Th.

    2001-03-01

    A neutron reflectometer with polarization analysis is being built on the basis of the HADAS spectrometer in the neutron guide hall at the research reactor FRJ-2 (DIDO) in Jülich. The new instrument is optimized for reflectivity and diffuse scattering measurements under grazing incidence on layered magnetic structures with thicknesses in the nm range. In order to measure diffuse scattering with polarization analysis, the 2D position-sensitive detector has been equipped with a polarization analyser that consists of a stack of supermirrors parallel to the scattering plane. First tests have revealed that the resolution of the instrument is not reduced by the polarization analyser. A flipping ratio of 20 has been achieved already during the first experiment.

  12. Fluorescence and visual detection of fluoride ions using a photoluminescent graphene oxide paper sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaochun; Yu, Shaoming; Yang, Liang; Wang, Jianping; Jiang, Changlong

    2016-07-01

    The instant and on-site detection of trace aqueous fluoride ions is still a challenge for environmental monitoring and protection. This work demonstrates a new analytical method and its utility of a paper sensor for visual detection of F- on the basis of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between photoluminescent graphene oxide (GO) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the formation of cyclic esters between phenylborinic acid and diol. The fluorescence of GO was quenched by the AgNPs, and trace F- can recover the fluorescence of the quenched photoluminescent GO. The increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of F- in the range of 0.05-0.55 nM, along with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 9.07 pM. Following the sensing mechanism, a paper-based sensor for the visual detection of aqueous F- has been successfully developed. The paper sensor showed high sensitivity for aqueous F-, and the LOD could reach as low as 0.1 μM as observed by the naked eye. The very simple and effective strategy reported here could be extended to the visual detection of a wide range of analytes in the environment by the construction of highly efficient FRET nanoprobes.The instant and on-site detection of trace aqueous fluoride ions is still a challenge for environmental monitoring and protection. This work demonstrates a new analytical method and its utility of a paper sensor for visual detection of F- on the basis of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between photoluminescent graphene oxide (GO) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the formation of cyclic esters between phenylborinic acid and diol. The fluorescence of GO was quenched by the AgNPs, and trace F- can recover the fluorescence of the quenched photoluminescent GO. The increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of F- in the range of 0.05-0.55 nM, along with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 9.07 pM. Following the sensing mechanism

  13. New biosensor for detection of copper ions in water based on immobilized genetically modified yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Vopálenská, Irena; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-10-15

    Contamination of water by heavy metals represents a potential risk for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, including humans. Heavy metals in water resources can come from various industrial activities, and drinking water can be ex-post contaminated by heavy metals such as Cu(2+) from house fittings (e.g., water reservoirs) and pipes. Here, we present a new copper biosensor capable of detecting copper ions at concentrations of 1-100 μM. This biosensor is based on cells of a specifically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain immobilized in alginate beads. Depending on the concentration of copper, the biosensor beads change color from white, when copper is present in concentrations below the detection limit, to pink or red based on the increase in copper concentration. The biosensor was successfully tested in the determination of copper concentrations in real samples of water contaminated with copper ions. In contrast to analytical methods or other biosensors based on fluorescent proteins, the newly designed biosensor does not require specific equipment and allows the quick detection of copper in many parallel samples.

  14. Determination of iodide in urine by ion-pair chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Below, H; Kahlert, H

    2001-10-01

    A variety of parameters affecting the determination of iodide in biological materials by ion-pair chromatography and electrochemical detection were examined in detail. It became apparent that the pH value, the ion-pair concentration, the proportion of organic solvent and of organic bases as a component of the buffer solution, as well as the salt concentration in the eluent system could effectively influence the retention characteristics of iodide in the chromatographic system, resulting in the separation of potential interfering substances. The presence of other anions in the sample matrix has to be taken into consideration, particularly thiocyanate because of its long retention time. Investigations of the electrochemical detection mechanism revealed that the reaction hitherto assumed to be responsible for detector signal generation (formation of AgI) is incorrect. In addition, a much more sensitive detection of iodide than that cited in the literature to date is possible if the detector potential is optimally selected and any anticipated interfering substances are removed by chromatography. Use of a gold electrode rather than a silver electrode also considerably enhances the reliability of the procedure.

  15. Negative Ion Detection Using Laser Thomson Scattering Combined with Laser Photodetachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, A.; Ohno, J.; Funahashi, H.

    2001-10-01

    A purely optical technique for detecting negative ions in plasmas has been demonstrated where laser-photodetached electrons are detected via laser Thomson scattering. The technique allows one to obtain high spatial resolution (difficult to obtain using microwave techniques) without using a Langmuir probe. The plasma was irradiated by frequency-quadrupled (266nm) and frequency-doubled (532 nm) Nd:YAG laser beams originating from the same laser oscillator; the 266 nm beam causes photodetachment, while the 532 nm beam serves as the light source for Thomson scattering. It was so arranged that the 266 nm laser pulse irradiates the plasma 10 ns (>laser pulse width) earlier than the 532 nm laser pulse and, in the observation region, the focused thin 532 nm beam forms the coaxial core of the unfocused 266 nm beam. A specially designed triple-grating spectrometer was used, which produces Thomson spectra on the output focal plane with the interfering Rayleigh and stray components highly suppressed; an ICCD camera operated in the photon-counting mode was used for multichannel detection of the spectrum. Measurements for inductively coupled NF_3(5%)/Ar and SF_6(5%)/Ar plasmas at 25 mTorr with electron densities of ~ 10^11 cm-3 indicated that the negative ion density is of comparable magnitude to the electron density.

  16. [Determination of trace bromate in drinking water by ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection].

    PubMed

    Ying, Bo; Li, Shumin; Yue, Yinling; Xueli, E

    2006-05-01

    Bromate is a common disinfection by-product produced from the ozonation of source water containing bromide. An ion exchange chromatographic method with suppressed conductivity detection for the determination of trace bromate in drinking water was developed. The separation of the bromate in drinking water was achieved on a Metrosep A Supp 5 anion exchange column and a Metrosep A Supp 4/5 Guard column with a carbonate eluent. A new dual suppressed system, an MSM II chemical suppressor combined with a CO2 suppressor, was used to suppress the background conductivity, and to improve the detection limit of bromate. Ion chromatographic experiments were carried out by using a Metrosep A Supp 5 anion exchange column with a suppressed conductivity detector and an eluent of 3.2 mmoL/L Na2CO3-1.0 mmol/L NaHCO3 at a flow rate of 0.65 mL/min. This method had good linearity (r = 0.9999) in the range of 5-100 microg/L and high precision (relative standard deviation (RSD) < 4% ) for three concentration levels of bromate. The average recoveries of the spiked samples including tap water, pure water and mineral water were 96.1%-107%, and the detection limit for bromate was 0.50 microg/L. This method has a simple operation procedure, good separation results, high sensitivity and good repeatability. It can be used as a standard method for the determination of bromate in drinking water.

  17. New biosensor for detection of copper ions in water based on immobilized genetically modified yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Vopálenská, Irena; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-10-15

    Contamination of water by heavy metals represents a potential risk for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, including humans. Heavy metals in water resources can come from various industrial activities, and drinking water can be ex-post contaminated by heavy metals such as Cu(2+) from house fittings (e.g., water reservoirs) and pipes. Here, we present a new copper biosensor capable of detecting copper ions at concentrations of 1-100 μM. This biosensor is based on cells of a specifically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain immobilized in alginate beads. Depending on the concentration of copper, the biosensor beads change color from white, when copper is present in concentrations below the detection limit, to pink or red based on the increase in copper concentration. The biosensor was successfully tested in the determination of copper concentrations in real samples of water contaminated with copper ions. In contrast to analytical methods or other biosensors based on fluorescent proteins, the newly designed biosensor does not require specific equipment and allows the quick detection of copper in many parallel samples. PMID:25982723

  18. Metal-ion rescue revisited: biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Li, Nan-Sheng; Das, Rhiju; Herschlag, Daniel; Piccirilli, Joseph A

    2012-06-01

    Within the three-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules to form chelates. These interactions help the RNA adopt and maintain specific conformations and frequently make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains challenging despite the growing database of RNA structures. Metal-ion rescue experiments have provided a powerful approach to identify and distinguish catalytic metal ions within RNA active sites, but the ability of such experiments to identify metal ions that contribute to tertiary structure acquisition and structural stability is less developed and has been challenged. Herein, we use the well-defined P4-P6 RNA domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron to reevaluate prior evidence against the discriminatory power of metal-ion rescue experiments and to advance thermodynamic descriptions necessary for interpreting these experiments. The approach successfully identifies ligands within the RNA that occupy the inner coordination sphere of divalent metal ions and distinguishes them from ligands that occupy the outer coordination sphere. Our results underscore the importance of obtaining complete folding isotherms and establishing and evaluating thermodynamic models in order to draw conclusions from metal-ion rescue experiments. These results establish metal-ion rescue as a rigorous tool for identifying and dissecting energetically important metal-ion interactions in RNAs that are noncatalytic but critical for RNA tertiary structure.

  19. The generation, detection and measurement of laser-induced carbon plasma ions and their implantation effects on brass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Shahbaz; Bashir, Shazia; Shahid Rafique, M.; Yousaf, Daniel; Ahmad, Riaz

    2016-05-01

    The generation, detection and measurement of laser-induced carbon plasma ions and their implantation effects on brass substrate have been investigated. Thomson parabola technique was employed to measure the energy and flux of carbon ions. The magnetic field of strength 80 mT was applied on the graphite plasma plume to provide an appropriate trajectory to the generated ions. The energy of carbon ions is 678 KeV for laser fluence of 5.1 J/cm2 which was kept constant for all exposures. The flux of ions varies from 32 × 1011 to 72 × 1014 ions/cm2 for varying numbers of laser pulses from 3000 to 12,000. In order to explore the ion irradiation effects on brass, four brass substrates were irradiated by carbon ions of different flux. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) are used to analyze the surface morphology and crystallographic structure of ion-implanted brass, respectively. SEM analysis reveals the formation and growth of nano-/micro-sized cavities, pores and pits for the various ion flux for varying numbers of laser pulses from 3000 to 12,000. By increasing ion flux by increasing the number of pulses up to 9000 shots, the dendritic structures initiate to grow along with cavities and pores. At the maximum ion flux for 12,000 shots, the unequiaxed dendritic structures become distinct and the distance between the dendrites is decreased, whereas cavities, pores and pits are completely finished. The XRD analysis reveals that a new phase of ZnC (0012) is formed in the brass substrate after ion implantation. Universal tensile testing machine and Vickers microhardness tester are used to explore the yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and microhardness of ion-implanted brass substrate. The mechanical properties monotonically increase by increasing the ion flux. Variations in mechanical properties are correlated with surface and structural modifications of brass.

  20. Detection limits of thin layer coulometry with ionophore based ion-selective membranes.

    PubMed

    Shvarev, Alexey; Neel, Bastien; Bakker, Eric

    2012-09-18

    We report here on a significant improvement in lowering the low detection limit of thin layer coulometric sensors based on liquid ion-selective membranes, using a potassium-selective system as a model example. Various possible processes that may result in an elevated residual current reading after electrolysis were eliminated. Self-dissolution of AgCl on the Ag/AgCl inner element may result in a residual ion flux that could adversely affect the lower detection limit. It was here replaced with an Ag/AgI inner pseudoreference electrode where the self-dissolution equilibrium is largely suppressed. Possible residual currents originating from a direct contact between inner element and ion-selective membranes were eliminated by introducing an inert PVDF separator of 50 μm diameter that was coiled around the inner element by a custom-made instrument. Finally, the influence of electrolyte fluxes from the outer solution across the membrane into the sample was evaluated by altering its lipophilic nature and reducing its concentration. It was found that this last effect is most likely responsible for the observed residual current for the potassium-selective membranes studied here. For the optimized conditions, the calibration curves demonstrated a near zero intercept, thereby paving the way to the coulometric calibration-free sensing of ionic species. A linear calibration curve for the coulometric cell with valinomycin potassium-selective membrane was obtained in the range of 100 nM to 10 μM potassium in the presence of a 10 μM sodium background. In the presence of a higher (100 μM) concentration of sodium, a reliable detection of 1-100 μM of potassium was achieved.

  1. Detection limits of thin layer coulometry with ionophore based ion-selective membranes.

    PubMed

    Shvarev, Alexey; Neel, Bastien; Bakker, Eric

    2012-09-18

    We report here on a significant improvement in lowering the low detection limit of thin layer coulometric sensors based on liquid ion-selective membranes, using a potassium-selective system as a model example. Various possible processes that may result in an elevated residual current reading after electrolysis were eliminated. Self-dissolution of AgCl on the Ag/AgCl inner element may result in a residual ion flux that could adversely affect the lower detection limit. It was here replaced with an Ag/AgI inner pseudoreference electrode where the self-dissolution equilibrium is largely suppressed. Possible residual currents originating from a direct contact between inner element and ion-selective membranes were eliminated by introducing an inert PVDF separator of 50 μm diameter that was coiled around the inner element by a custom-made instrument. Finally, the influence of electrolyte fluxes from the outer solution across the membrane into the sample was evaluated by altering its lipophilic nature and reducing its concentration. It was found that this last effect is most likely responsible for the observed residual current for the potassium-selective membranes studied here. For the optimized conditions, the calibration curves demonstrated a near zero intercept, thereby paving the way to the coulometric calibration-free sensing of ionic species. A linear calibration curve for the coulometric cell with valinomycin potassium-selective membrane was obtained in the range of 100 nM to 10 μM potassium in the presence of a 10 μM sodium background. In the presence of a higher (100 μM) concentration of sodium, a reliable detection of 1-100 μM of potassium was achieved. PMID:22917023

  2. Study on a colorimetric sensor with color switching: Naked-eye detection for Cu(II) ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Ma, Wenzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we synthesize and report a Cu(II)-sensing probe of N'1,N'2-bis(4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxybenzylidene)oxalohydrazide (BDHO) with two detection channels. Its colorimetric and fluorescence spectrophotometric responses towards Cu(II) ion are fully investigated. It is found that the absorption and emission spectra of BDHO are both sensitive towards Cu(II) ion with high sensitivity as well as excellent selectivity. In addition, the recognition of BDHO towards Cu(II) ion is also very quick and can be accomplished within less than 1 min. The actual sensing performance of BDHO towards Cu(II) ion is also tentatively explored.

  3. Demonstrated Potential of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Detection of Adulterated Perfumes and Plant Speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Jared Matthew; Daum, Keith Alvin; Kalival, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    This initial study evaluates the use of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a rapid test procedure for potential detection of adulterated perfumes and speciation of plant life. Sample types measured consist of five genuine perfumes, two species of sagebrush, and four species of flowers. Each sample type is treated as a separate classification problem. It is shown that discrimination using principal component analysis with K-nearest neighbors can distinguish one class from another. Discriminatory models generated using principal component regressions are not as effective. Results from this examination are encouraging and represent an initial phase demonstrating that perfumes and plants possess characteristic chemical signatures that can be used for reliable identification.

  4. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyaw, Htet Htet; Boonruang, Sakoolkan; Mohammed, Waleed S.; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-10-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as "Electric-Field assisted SPR system". High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd2+) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  5. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kyaw, Htet Htet; Boonruang, Sakoolkan E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th; Mohammed, Waleed S. E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-10-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as “Electric-Field assisted SPR system”. High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd{sup 2+}) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  6. Fluorescence and visual detection of fluoride ions using a photoluminescent graphene oxide paper sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochun; Yu, Shaoming; Yang, Liang; Wang, Jianping; Jiang, Changlong

    2016-07-14

    The instant and on-site detection of trace aqueous fluoride ions is still a challenge for environmental monitoring and protection. This work demonstrates a new analytical method and its utility of a paper sensor for visual detection of F(-) on the basis of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between photoluminescent graphene oxide (GO) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the formation of cyclic esters between phenylborinic acid and diol. The fluorescence of GO was quenched by the AgNPs, and trace F(-) can recover the fluorescence of the quenched photoluminescent GO. The increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of F(-) in the range of 0.05-0.55 nM, along with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 9.07 pM. Following the sensing mechanism, a paper-based sensor for the visual detection of aqueous F(-) has been successfully developed. The paper sensor showed high sensitivity for aqueous F(-), and the LOD could reach as low as 0.1 μM as observed by the naked eye. The very simple and effective strategy reported here could be extended to the visual detection of a wide range of analytes in the environment by the construction of highly efficient FRET nanoprobes. PMID:27376510

  7. Ambient pressure laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption ion mobility spectrometry detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Sven; Walte, Andreas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-11-19

    The development of fast, mobile, and sensitive detection systems for security-relevant substances is of enormous importance. Because of the low vapor pressures of explosives and improvised explosive devices, adequate sampling procedures are crucial. Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) are fast and sensitive instruments that are used as detection systems for explosives. Ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD) and ambient pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption (AP-LIAD) are new tools suitable to evaporate explosives in order to detect them in the vapor phase. Indeed, the most important advantage of APLD or AP-LIAD is the capability to sample directly from the surface of interest without any transfer of the analyte to other surfaces such as wipe pads. A much more gentle desorption, compared to classical thermal-based desorption, is possible with laser-based desorption using very short laser pulses. With this approach the analyte molecules are evaporated in a very fast process, comparable to a shock wave. The thermal intake is reduced considerably. The functionality of APLD and AP-LIAD techniques combined with a hand-held IMS system is shown for a wide range of common explosives such as EGDN (ethylene glycol dinitrate), urea nitrate, PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine), RDX (hexogen), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), and TNT (trinitrotoluene). Detection limits down to the low nanogram range are obtained. The successful combination of IMS detection and APLD/AP-LIAD sampling is shown.

  8. Characterization of a sub-assembly of 3D position sensitive cadmium zinc telluride detectors and electronics from a sub-millimeter resolution PET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Gu, Yi; Reynolds, Paul D.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) offers key advantages for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), including high spatial and energy resolution and simple metal deposition for fabrication of very small pixel arrays. Previous studies have investigated the intrinsic spatial, energy, and timing resolution of an individual sub-millimeter resolution CZT detector. In this work we present the first characterization results of a system of these detectors. The 3D position sensitive dual-CZT detector module and readout electronics developed in our lab was scaled up to complete a significant portion of the final PET system. This sub-system was configured as two opposing detection panels containing a total of twelve 40~\\text{mm}× 40~\\text{mm}× 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals for proof of concept. System-level characterization studies, including optimizing the trigger threshold of each channel’s comparators, were performed. 68Ge and 137Cs radioactive isotopes were used to characterize the energy resolution of all 468 anode channels in the sub-system. The mean measured global 511 keV photopeak energy resolution over all anodes was found to be 7.35+/- 1.75 % FWHM after correction for photon interaction depth-dependent signal variation. The measured global time resolution was 37 ns FWHM, a parameter to be further optimized, and the intrinsic spatial resolution was 0.76 mm FWHM.

  9. Detection of heavy metal ions in drinking water using a high-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    PubMed

    Forzani, Erica S; Zhang, Haiqian; Chen, Wilfred; Tao, Nongjian

    2005-03-01

    We have built a high-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for heavy metal ion detection. The sensor surface is divided into a reference and sensing areas, and the difference in the SPR angles from the two areas is detected with a quadrant cell photodetector as a differential signal. In the presence of metal ions, the differential signal changes due to specific binding of the metal ions onto the sensing area coated with properly selected peptides, which provides an accurate real-time measurement and quantification of the metal ions. Selective detection of Cu2+ and Ni2+ in the ppt-ppb range was achieved by coating the sensing surface with peptides NH2-Gly-Gly-His-COOH and NH2-(His)6-COOH. Cu2+ in drinking water was tested using this sensor.

  10. Detection of microlesions induced by heavy ions using liposomes filled with fluorescent dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koniarek, J. P.; Thomas, J. L.; Vazquez, M.

    2004-01-01

    In cells irradiation by heavy ions has been hypothesized to produce microlesions, regions of local damage. In cell membranes this damage is thought to manifest itself in the form of holes. The primary evidence for microlesions comes from morphological studies of cell membranes, but this evidence is still controversial, especially since holes also have been observed in membranes of normal, nonirradiated, cells. However, it is possible that damage not associated with histologically discernable disruptions may still occur. In order to resolve this issue, we developed a system for detecting microlesions based on liposomes filled with fluorescent dye. We hypothesized that if microlesions form in these liposomes as the result of irradiation, then the entrapped dye will leak out into the surrounding medium in a measurable way. Polypropylene vials containing suspensions of vesicles composed of either dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, or a combination of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol were irradiated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory using 56Fe ions at 1 GeV/amu. In several cases we obtained a significant loss of the entrapped dye above the background level. Our results suggest that holes may form in liposomes as the result of heavy ion irradiation, and that these holes are large enough to allow leakage of cell internal contents that are at least as large as a 1 nm diameter calcein molecule. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitrogen- Doped Graphene Quantum Dots: "Turn-off" Fluorescent Probe for Detection of Ag(+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Tabaraki, Reza; Nateghi, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Highly luminescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) were prepared from glucose and ammonia as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The N-GQDs showed a strong emission at 458 nm with excitation at 360 nm. The N-GQDs exhibited analytical potential as sensing probes for silver ions determination. Factors affecting the fluorescence sensing of Ag(+) ions such as pH, N-GQDs concentration and incubation time were studied using Box-Behnken experimental design. The optimum conditions were determined as pH 7, N-GQDs concentration 1 mg/mL and time 60 min. It suggested that N-GQDs exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity toward Ag(+). The linear range of N-GQDs and the limit of detection (LOD) were 0.2-40 μM and 168 nM, respectively. The N-GQDs-based Ag(+) ions sensor was successfully applied to the determination of Ag(+) in tap water and real river water samples.

  12. Development of Linear Mode Detection for Top-down Ion Implantation of Low Energy Sb Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Jose; Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of donor spin qubits for quantum computing applications requires deterministic control over the number of implanted donors and the spatial accuracy to within which these can be placed. We present an ion implantation and detection technique that allows us to deterministically implant a single Sb ion (donor) with a resulting volumetric distribution of <10 nm. This donor distribution is accomplished by implanting 30keV Sb into Si which yields a longitudinal straggle of <10 nm and combined with a <50 nm spot size using the Sandia NanoImplanter (nI). The ion beam induced charge signal is collected using a MOS detector that is integrated with a Si quantum dot for transport measurments. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Single-step multiplex detection of toxic metal ions by Au nanowires-on-chip sensor using reporter elimination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taejoon; Yoo, Seung Min; Kang, Mijeong; Lee, Hyoban; Kim, Hongki; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Bongsoo

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a Au nanowires (NWs)-on-chip surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) multiplex sensor that can sensitively detect multiple toxic metal ions. Most importantly, the reporter elimination method simplified the detection procedure to a single step, which has been much desired for remote environmental monitoring. This sensor has several notable features. First, it shows high reproducibility based on well-defined single-crystalline Au NWs. Second, single-NW-sensors that can detect a specific metal ion are combined for multiplex sensing of metal ions. Third, when a sample solution is put onto the NWs-on-chip sensor, a decrease in the SERS signal of a specific NW-sensor identifies the target metal ion. Simple, rapid, sensitive and quantitative detection of metal ions becomes possible through the measurement of the SERS signals. We successfully detected ions of mercury (Hg(2+)), silver (Ag(+)), and lead (Pb(2+)) coexisting in the same solution by using this sensor. PMID:22728926

  14. Rapid measurement of free cyanide in liquor by ion chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenlin; Xiao, Quanwei; Zhang, Ping; Ye, Mei; Wan, Yuping; Liang, Hengxing

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the measurement of free cyanide in liquor by ion chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (IC-PAD). Eluent concentration, interferent evaluation and method performance were discussed. Results show that free cyanide in liquor can be rapidly determined by the optimised IC-PAD method. A sample requires only 1:100 dilution and simple filtration before being subjected to IC-PAD. The linear range is 1-5000 μg/L with an R value of 0.9998. The detection limit is 1 μg/L for a 25 μL injection loop. The overall relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method is less than 5%, and the recovery range is from 98.1% to 105.0%. This study has been proven significant and may have potential applications in liquors analysis.

  15. Rapid, quantitative and sensitive immunochromatographic assay based on stripping voltammetric detection of a metal ion label

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Fang; Wang, Kaihua; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-10-10

    A novel, sensitive immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) which combines an immunochromatographic strip technique with an electrochemical detection technique is demonstrated. The IEB takes advantages of the speed and low-cost of the conventional immunochromatographic test kits and high-sensitivity of stripping voltammetry. Bismuth ions (Bi3+) have been coupled with the antibody through the bifunctional chelating agent diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). After immunoreactions, Bi3+ was released and quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry at a built-in single-use screen-printed electrode. As an example for the applications of such novel device, the detection of human chorionic gonadotronphin (HCG) in a specimen was performed. This biosensor provides a more user-friendly, rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive immunoassay for such analysis in specimens than currently available test kits.

  16. Ion generation and CPC detection efficiency studies in sub 3-nm size range

    SciTech Connect

    Kangasluoma, J.; Junninen, H.; Sipilae, M.; Kulmala, M.; Petaejae, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mikkilae, J.; Vanhanen, J.; Attoui, M.; Worsnop, D.

    2013-05-24

    We studied the chemical composition of commonly used condensation particle counter calibration ions with a mass spectrometer and found that in our calibration setup the negatively charged ammonium sulphate, sodium chloride and tungsten oxide are the least contaminated whereas silver on both positive and negative and the three mentioned earlier in positive mode are contaminated with organics. We report cut-off diameters for Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6 and 1.6-1.8 nm for negative sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate, tungsten oxide, silver and positive organics, respectively. To study the effect of sample relative humidity on detection efficiency of the PSM we used different humidities in the differential mobility analyzer sheath flow and found that with increasing relative humidity also the detection efficiency of the PSM increases.

  17. Optical detection of lead and potassium ions using a quantum-dot-based aptamer nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Meshik, Xenia; Xu, Ke; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Quantum-dot (QD) based nanosensors can be used to detect a wide range of molecules. This study examined a nanosensor comprised of thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) with 700NC InGaP QD on the 5 (') terminus and an Au nanoparticle quencher on the 3 (') terminus. Both K(+) and Pb(2+) bind to TBA, resulting in a conformational change that brings the Au quencher closer to the QD. Photoluminescence measurements indicated a decrease in fluorescence corresponding to an increase in either K(+) or Pb(2+) concentration. For healthy blood serum K(+) concentrations (3.5-5 mM), the beacon exhibited 15-17% quenching efficiency. Pb(2+) concentration of 0.48 μM, the threshold for toxicity in serum, yielded 14% quenching. The beacon's ability to detect changes in ion levels in a critical range of concentrations can make it an effective diagnostic tool.

  18. A Luminescent Hypercrosslinked Conjugated Microporous Polymer for Efficient Removal and Detection of Mercury Ions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Lu; Zhu, Yunlong; Gu, Shuai; Chen, Dongyang; Fu, Xian; Zhang, Yindong; Yu, Guipeng; Pan, Chunyue; Hu, Yuehua

    2015-09-01

    A hypercrosslinked conjugated microporous polymer (HCMP-1) with a robustly efficient absorption and highly specific sensitivity to mercury ions (Hg(2+)) is synthesized in a one-step Friedel-Crafts alkylation of cost-effective 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine and dibenzofuran in 1,2-dichloroethane. HCMP-1 has a moderate Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface (432 m(2) g(-1)), but it displays a high adsorption affinity (604 mg g(-1)) and excellent trace efficiency for Hg(2+). The π-π* electronic transition among the aromatic heterocyclic rings endows HCMP-1 a strong fluorescent property and the fluorescence is obviously weakened after Hg(2+) uptake, which makes the hypercrosslinked conjugated microporous polymer a promising fluorescent probe for Hg(2+) detection, owning a super-high sensitivity (detection limit 5 × 10(-8) mol L(-1)). PMID:26088466

  19. Explosive ordnance detection in land and water environments with solid phase extraction/ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, William B.; Phelan, James M.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Steven; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    1999-08-01

    The qualitative and quantitative determination of nitroaromatic compounds such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) in water and soil has applications to environmental remediation and the detection of buried military ordnance. Recent results of laboratory and field test have shown that trace level concentrations of these compounds can be detected in water, soil, and solid gas samples taken from the vicinity of submerged or buried ordnance using specialized sampling and signal enhancement techniques. Solid phase micro-extraction methods have been combined with Ion Mobility Spectroscopy to provide rapid, sub-parts-per-billion analysis of these compounds. In this paper, we will describe the gas. These sampling systems, when combined with field-portable IMS, are being developed as a means of classifying buried or submerged objects as explosive ordnance.

  20. Ultra-Sensitive Collinear Fast Ion Beam Trace Detection of {sup 85}Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Lioubimov, V.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.; Belic, M.; Lassen, J.; Iimura, H.; Li, X.

    2009-03-17

    A novel scheme of collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy for the detection of the long lived rare isotope {sup 85}Kr by observing the optical hyperfine structure spectrum is presented. The technique utilizes cascade two-step excitation to pump metastable krypton atoms to a high-lying Rydberg level. The present work on krypton was motivated by the fact that {sup 85}Kr is a major tracer gas for exploring the reservoir structure of large oil fields. {sup 85}Kr detection in ambient air is also of importance for monitoring nuclear activities on a world wide scale. The technique has been successfully applied to stable krypton isotopes and to {sup 85}Kr. The selectivity is at the one part in 10{sup 10} level and the sensitivity at a few hundred ions/s.

  1. Facile route to highly photoluminescent carbon nanodots for ion detection, pH sensors and bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chen; Sun, Yupeng; Wang, Jing; Lu, Yun

    2014-07-01

    Carbon nanodots (CDs) of uniform size were prepared simply by the hydrothermal decomposition of folic acid (FA) precursor at various reaction temperatures. The CDs formed via dehydration of FA at 260 °C contributed the strongest photoluminescence (PL) signal and the highest quantum yield at about 68%, without assistance of any passivation agent. The effects of preparation conditions on PL behavior of CDs have been investigated in detail, and the quantum yield of the CDs was found to be associated strongly with sample crystallinity. Moreover, because the obtained CDs also exhibited high luminescence stability, abundant surface functional groups and good biocompatibility, there are many promising applications in printing ink, ion detection, pH sensors and cell imaging.Carbon nanodots (CDs) of uniform size were prepared simply by the hydrothermal decomposition of folic acid (FA) precursor at various reaction temperatures. The CDs formed via dehydration of FA at 260 °C contributed the strongest photoluminescence (PL) signal and the highest quantum yield at about 68%, without assistance of any passivation agent. The effects of preparation conditions on PL behavior of CDs have been investigated in detail, and the quantum yield of the CDs was found to be associated strongly with sample crystallinity. Moreover, because the obtained CDs also exhibited high luminescence stability, abundant surface functional groups and good biocompatibility, there are many promising applications in printing ink, ion detection, pH sensors and cell imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02154a

  2. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  3. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Birkl, Gerhard; Andelkovic, Zoran; Vogel, Manuel; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan

    2015-11-15

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles’ beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar{sup 13+}) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  4. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar13+) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  5. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar(13+)) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections. PMID:26628124

  6. Fluorescence Turn-on Sensory Compounds and Polymers for the Detection of Lead Ion in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sukanta Kumar

    The goal of this thesis work is to synthesize a new type of fluorescence turn off-on sensory compounds and polymers for the detection of Pb2+ in aqueous medium. A sensory molecule was designed to have fluorene as a fluorophore and also as the building block for making a polymer. A new type of fluorescence turn-on sensory compound was successfully synthesized and characterized by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and mass spectrometry. The sensory polymer was synthesized by the Yamamoto coupling reaction and characterized. The water-soluble sensory compound shows a high sensitivity and selectivity towards Pb2+ in aqueous medium. The fluorescence turns on when the Pb2+ ion binds with the sensory compound. The bromo-containing sensory compound shows the quenching effect of the bromine on fluorescence. The sensory polymer is soluble in water when it exits in the salt form and shows a high sensitivity towards Pb2+. In its acid form the polymer is soluble in DMF and displays a relatively low sensitivity towards Pb2+. With further modification of polymer structures, such as by copolymerization with other fluorescent or non-fluorescent monomers, the resulting sensory polymers could be used in fibre-optic sensor for detection of lead ion in water.

  7. Catalytic and molecular beacons for amplified detection of metal ions and organic molecules with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Zidong; Xing, Hang; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Yi

    2010-06-15

    The catalytic beacon has emerged as a general platform for sensing metal ions and organic molecules. However, few reports have taken advantage of the true potential of catalytic beacons in signal amplification through multiple enzymatic turnovers, as existing designs require either equal concentrations of substrate and DNAzyme or an excess of DNAzyme in order to maintain efficient quenching, eliminating the excess of substrate necessary for multiple turnovers. On the basis of the large difference in the melting temperatures between the intramolecular molecular beacon stem and intermolecular products of identical sequences, we here report a general strategy of catalytic and molecular beacon (CAMB) that combines the advantages of the molecular beacon for highly efficient quenching with the catalytic beacon for amplified sensing through enzymatic turnovers. Such a CAMB design allows detection of metal ions such as Pb(2+) with a high sensitivity (LOD = 600 pM). Furthermore, the aptamer sequence has been introduced into DNAzyme to use the modified CAMB for amplified sensing of adenosine with similar high sensitivity. These results together demonstrate that CAMB provides a general platform for amplified detection of a wide range of targets.

  8. Amperometric detection of heavy metal ions in ion pair chromatography at an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wilke, S; Wang, H; Muraczewska, M; Müller, H

    1996-09-01

    A novel amperometric detector for heavy metal ions has been developed and successfully applied for ion pair chromatography. The detector is based on the electrochemical transfer of the metal ions across an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces. The ion transfer is facilitated by the neutral ionophores methylenebis(diphenylphosphineoxide) and methylenebis(di- phenylphosphinesulfide). More than eight metals are separated in less than 15 min on an RP18 column using octyl sulfonate as ion pair reagent. For the heavy metals, the limits of decision are 19(Pb(2+)), 9(Zn(2+)), 9l (Co(2+)), 8(Cd(2+)) and 1.6(Mn(2+)) microg/L. The applicability of the new method for water samples is demonstrated. PMID:15048359

  9. Nonspecific detection of lead ions in water using a simple integrated optical polarimetric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dan-feng; Li, Jinyang; Qi, Zhi-mei

    2013-06-01

    Real-time detection of heavy metal ions in water was implemented by using a composite optical waveguide (COWG) based polarimetric interferometer. The COWG was made by local deposition of a tapered nanometric layer of high-index materials onto a single-mode slab glass waveguide, and it is a low-cost robust waveguide with a locally large modal birefringence. The COWG-based polarimetric interferometer operates with a single incident laser beam and uses the transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes as the sensing and reference beams, respectively, and it can easily detect 0.1 ppm lead(II) ions in water via nonspecific adsorption on the tapered layer of TiO2. The excellent linearity was obtained between the lead(II) concentration and the ratio of concentration to the phase-difference change (Δϕ), suggesting that adsorption of lead(II) ions on the TiO2 film follows the Langmuir isotherm model. The saturation adsorption leads to Δϕmax = 7.485π. By use of the eigenvalue equations for a homogeneous waveguide to fit the measured refractive-index (RI) sensitivity of the interferometer, the equivalent thickness of Teq = 26.05 nm for the tapered TiO2 layer used was achieved. With Teq = 26.05 nm and Δϕmax = 7.485π and the thickness of 0.264 nm for the lead(II) adlayer, the adlayer RI was derived to be nad ≈ 1.945 at the maximum coverage.

  10. Transmission measurement based on STM observation to detect the penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Sixue; Du, Guanhua; Zhao, Weijiang

    2003-01-01

    The penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples was detected with a new transmission measurement. In the measurement, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) pieces were placed behind the botanic samples with certain thickness. During the irradiation of heavy ions with energy of tens of keV, the energetic particles transmitted from those samples were received by the HOPG pieces. After irradiation, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was applied to observe protrusion-like damage induced by these transmitted ions on the surface of the HOPG. The statistical average number density of protrusions and the minimum transmission rate of the low-energy heavy ions can be obtained. The detection efficiency of the new method for low-energy heavy ions was about 0.1-1 and the background in the measurement can be reduced to as low as 1.0 x 10(8) protrusions/cm2. With this method, the penetration depth of the energetic particles was detected to be no less than 60 micrometers in kidney bean slices when the slices were irradiated by 100 keVAr+ ion at the fluence of 5 x 10(16) ions/cm2. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Human telomeric G-quadruplex formation and highly selective fluorescence detection of toxic strontium ions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Konggang; Zhao, Chuanqi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2012-03-01

    Strontium ions play important roles in biological systems. The inhalation of strontium can cause severe respiratory difficulties, anaphylactic reaction and extreme tachycardia. Strontium can replace calcium in organisms, inhibit normal calcium absorption and induce strontium "rickets" in childhood. Thus, the development of sensitive and selective methods for the determination of trace amounts of Sr(2+) in aqueous media is of considerable importance for environmental and human health protection. A number of methodologies, such as X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry, inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and instrumental thermal neutron activation analysis, have been reported. However, these methods are somewhat complex, costly, time consuming and, especially, need special instruments. Thus, the design of convenient and inexpensive approaches for the sensitive and selective detection of Sr(2+) with rapid, easy manipulation is in ever-increasing demand. To the best of our knowledge, using DNA conformational change to detect Sr(2+) has not yet been reported. Herein we utilized thiazole orange (TO) as a signal reporter to devise a simple Sr(2+) detection assay based on Sr(2+) induced human telomeric DNA conformational change in the presence of SWNTs. The limit of detection is 10 nM Sr(2+) (0.87 μg L(-1)), far below 4 mg L(-1), the U.S. Federal threshold in drinking water defined by the U.S. EPA.

  12. Virgin silver nanoparticles as colorimetric nanoprobe for simultaneous detection of iodide and bromide ion in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Bothra, Shilpa; Kumar, Rajender; Pati, Ranjan K; Kuwar, Anil; Choi, Heung-Jin; Sahoo, Suban K

    2015-01-01

    A simple colorimetric nanoprobe based on virgin silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed for the selective detection of iodide and bromide ions via aggregation and anti-aggregation mechanism. With addition of I(-) ions, virgin AgNPs, in presence of Fe(3+), showed perceptible color change from yellow to colorless along with disappearance of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of AgNPs at 400 nm. But in presence of Cr(3+), AgNPs turned yellow upon addition of I(-)and Br(-) anions. The developed virgin AgNPs probe showed high specificity and selectivity with the detection limits down to 0.32 μM and 1.32 μM for I(-) ions via two different mechanistic routes. Also, the designed probe detects Br(-) with a detection limit down to 1.67 μM. PMID:25950637

  13. Cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes-triggered conformational change of molecular beacon aptamer for highly sensitive and selective potassium ion detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boram; Jung, In Hwan; Kang, Mijeong; Shim, Hong-Ku; Woo, Han Young

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate highly sensitive and selective potassium ion detection against excess sodium ions in water, by modulating the interaction between the G-quadruplex-forming molecular beacon aptamer (MBA) and cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE). The K(+)-specific aptamer sequence in MBA is used as the molecular recognition element, and the high binding specificity of MBA for potassium ions offers selectivity against a range of metal ions. The hairpin-type MBA labeled with a fluorophore and quencher at both termini undergoes a conformational change (by complexation with CPEs) to either an open-chain form or a G-quadruplex in the absence or presence of K(+) ions. Conformational changes of MBA as well as fluorescence (of the fluorophore in MBA) quenching or amplification via fluorescence resonance energy transfer from CPEs provide clear signal turn-off and -on in the presence or absence of K(+). The detection limit of the K(+) assays is determined to be ~1.5 nM in the presence of 100 mM Na(+) ions, which is ~3 orders of magnitude lower than those reported previously. The successful detection of 5'-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) with the MBA containing an ATP-specific aptamer sequence is also demonstrated using the same sensor scheme. The scheme reported herein is applicable to the detection of other kinds of G-rich aptamer-binding chemicals and biomolecules.

  14. Comprehensive simulation of the response of a silicon strip detector for position-sensitive measurements of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2005-10-01

    The paper describes a comprehensive simulation method to evaluate X-ray imaging response of a silicon strip detector with particular emphasis on the charge-sharing effects. The simulation steps include: generation of the initial charge distribution in the detector volume, transport of generated charge in the detector volume, calculation of charges induced in the readout strips, discrimination of noisy electronic signals, and finally determination of the count efficiency vs. photon position as a function of the discrimination threshold. The developed simulation tools are useful for optimising the designs and operating parameters of silicon strip detectors used as 1-D position sensitive devices in experimental techniques like X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray high-resolution diffraction and small angle X-ray scattering, using laboratory X-ray sources. The response of the detector as a function of the detector bias and discrimination threshold has been investigated for two measurement configurations: irradiation from the strip-side and from the back-side.

  15. High-Efficiency CdZnTe Position-Sensitive VFG Gamma-Ray Detectors for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; James, Ralph B.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Vernon, E.; Camarda, G. S.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Indusi, J.; Boyer, Brian

    2015-09-30

    The goal of this project is to incorporate a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detector (with 1% or better resolution) into a bench-top prototype for isotope identification and related safeguards applications. The bench-top system is based on a 2x2 array of 6x6x20 mm3 position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid (VFG) CZT detectors. The key features of the array are that it allows for the use of average-grade CZT material with a moderate content of defects, and yet it provides high-energy resolution, 1% FWHM at 662 keV, large effective area, and low-power consumption. The development of this type of 3D detector and new instruments incorporating them is motivated by the high cost and low availability of large, > 1 cm3, CZT crystals suitable for making multi-pixel detectors with acceptable energy resolution and efficiency.

  16. The residual stress instrument with optimized Si(2 2 0) monochromator and position-sensitive detector at HANARO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Moon, Myung-Kook; Em, Vyacheslav T.; Choi, Young-Hyun; Cheon, Jong-Kyu; Nam, Uk-Won; Kong, Kyung-Nam

    2005-06-01

    An upgraded residual stress instrument at the HANARO reactor of the KAERI is described. A horizontally focusing bent perfect crystal Si(2 2 0) monochromator (instead of a mosaic vertical focusing Ge monochromator) is installed in a drum with a tunable (2 θM=0-60°) take-off angle/wavelength. A specially designed position-sensitive detector (60% efficiency for λ=1.8 A) with 200 mm (instead of 100 mm) high-active area is used. There are no Soller type collimators in the instrument. The minimum possible monochromator to sample distance, L=2 m, and sample to detector distance, L=1.2 m, were found to be optimal. The new PSD and bent Si(2 2 0) monochromator combined with the possibility of selecting an appropriate wavelength resulted in about a ten-fold gain in data collection rate. The optimal reflections of austenitic and ferritic steels, aluminum and nickel for stress measurements with a Si(2 2 0) monochromator were chosen experimentally. The ability of the instrument to make strain measurements deep inside the austenitic and ferritic steels has been tested. For the chosen reflections and wavelengths, no shift of peak position (apparent strain) was observed up to 56 mm length of path.

  17. Platinum porous nanoparticles hybrid with metal ions as probes for simultaneous detection of multiplex cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zifeng; Liu, Na; Ma, Zhanfang

    2014-03-15

    In this work, platinum porous nanoparticles (PtPNPs) absorbed metal ions as electrochemical signals were fabricated. Clean-surface PtPNPs were prepared by a surfactant-free method and decorated with amino groups via 2-aminoethanethiol. Amino capped PtPNPs complexation with Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) to form PtPNPs-Cd(2+) and PtPNPs-Cu(2+) hybrids, respectively. Anti-CEA and Anti-AFP separately labeled with PtPNPs-Cd(2+) and PtPNPs-Cu(2+) were used as distinguishable signal tags for capturing antigens. The metal ions were detected in a single run through differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) without acid dissolution, electric potentials and peak heights of which reflected the identity and concentrations of the corresponding antigen. Ionic liquid reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used as a substrate, which was rich in amino groups to immobilize antibodies by glutaraldehyde through cross-link between aldehyde groups and amino groups. Using the proposed probes and platform, a novel sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for simultaneous detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was successfully developed. This immunoassay possessed good linearity from 0.05 ng mL(-1) to 200 ng mL(-1) for both CEA and AFP. The detection limit of CEA was 0.002 ng mL(-1) and that of AFP was 0.05 ng mL(-1) (S/N=3). Furthermore, analysis of clinical serum samples using this immunosensor was well consistent with the data determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It suggested that the proposed electrochemical immunoassay provided a potential application of clinical screening for early-stage cancers.

  18. Platinum porous nanoparticles hybrid with metal ions as probes for simultaneous detection of multiplex cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zifeng; Liu, Na; Ma, Zhanfang

    2014-03-15

    In this work, platinum porous nanoparticles (PtPNPs) absorbed metal ions as electrochemical signals were fabricated. Clean-surface PtPNPs were prepared by a surfactant-free method and decorated with amino groups via 2-aminoethanethiol. Amino capped PtPNPs complexation with Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) to form PtPNPs-Cd(2+) and PtPNPs-Cu(2+) hybrids, respectively. Anti-CEA and Anti-AFP separately labeled with PtPNPs-Cd(2+) and PtPNPs-Cu(2+) were used as distinguishable signal tags for capturing antigens. The metal ions were detected in a single run through differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) without acid dissolution, electric potentials and peak heights of which reflected the identity and concentrations of the corresponding antigen. Ionic liquid reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used as a substrate, which was rich in amino groups to immobilize antibodies by glutaraldehyde through cross-link between aldehyde groups and amino groups. Using the proposed probes and platform, a novel sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for simultaneous detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was successfully developed. This immunoassay possessed good linearity from 0.05 ng mL(-1) to 200 ng mL(-1) for both CEA and AFP. The detection limit of CEA was 0.002 ng mL(-1) and that of AFP was 0.05 ng mL(-1) (S/N=3). Furthermore, analysis of clinical serum samples using this immunosensor was well consistent with the data determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It suggested that the proposed electrochemical immunoassay provided a potential application of clinical screening for early-stage cancers. PMID:24176967

  19. A novel upconversion, fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor (FRET) for sensitive detection of lead ions in human serum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sai; Xu, Shihan; Zhu, Yongsheng; Xu, Wen; Zhou, Pingwei; Zhou, Chunyang; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2014-11-01

    There has been great progress in the development of fluorescence biosensors based on quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of lead ions. However, most methods are detecting lead ions in aqueous solution rather than in human serum due to the influence of protein autofluorescence in serum excited by visible light. Thus, we developed a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor by choosing the upconversion NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) nanoparticles as the energy donor and the CdTe QDs as the energy acceptor for lead ion detection. It is the first near infrared (NIR)-excited fluorescent probe for determination of lead ions in serum that is capable of overcoming self-luminescence from serum excitation with visible light. The sensor also shows high selectivity, a low detection limit (80 nm) and good linear Stern-Volmer characteristics (R = 0.996), both in the buffer and serum. This biosensor has great potential for versatile applications in lead ion detection in biological and analytical fields. PMID:25184968

  20. Highly sensitive luminescent sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution based on PEG-coated ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Surinder K; Salaria, Khushboo; Umar, Ahmad

    2013-03-15

    Using polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated ZnS nanoparticles (NPs), a novel and highly sensitive luminescent sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution has been presented. ZnS NPs have been used to develop efficient luminescence sensor which exhibits high reproducibility and stability with the lowest limit of detection of 1.29×10(-6) mol L(-1). The observed limit of detection of the fabricated sensor is ~6 times lower than maximum value of cyanide permitted by United States Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water (7.69×10(-6) mol L(-1)). The interfering studies show that the developed sensor possesses good selectivity for cyanide ion even in presence of other coexisting ions. Importantly, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which demonstrates the utilization of PEG- coated ZnS NPs for efficient luminescence sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution. This work demonstrates that rapidly synthesized ZnS NPs can be used to fabricate efficient luminescence sensor for cyanide ion detection.

  1. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world’s attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg2+ ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species. PMID:27483277

  2. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-07-29

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world's attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg(2+) ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species.

  3. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world's attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg(2+) ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species. PMID:27483277

  4. Highly sensitive and selective detection of Al(III) ions in aqueous buffered solution with fluorescent peptide-based sensor.

    PubMed

    In, Byunggyu; Hwang, Gi Won; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-09-15

    A fluorescent sensor based on a tripeptide (SerGluGlu) with a dansyl fluorophore detected selectively Al(III) among 16 metal ions in aqueous buffered solutions without any organic cosolvent. The peptide-based sensor showed a highly sensitive turn on response to aluminium ion with high binding affinity (1.84×10(4)M(-1)) in aqueous buffered solutions. The detection limit (230nM, 5.98ppb) of the peptide-based sensor was much lower than the maximum allowable level (7.41μM) of aluminium ions in drinking water demanded by EPA. The binding mode of the peptide sensor with aluminium ions was characterized using ESI mass spectrometry, NMR titration, and pH titration experiments. PMID:27503680

  5. Development of Voltammetric Double-Polymer-Modified Electrodes for Nanomolar Ion Detection for Environmental and Biological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yushin

    Qualitative and quantitative electrochemical methods for trace ion analysis of organic and inorganic species with environmental and biological attention have been developed and reported during past decades. The development of fast and accurate electrochemical methods is critical for field applications with various blocking contaminants. Voltammetric method is attractive not only to analyze selective ion species due to its characteristic based on ion lipophilicity, but also to lower the limit of detection by combining with stripping analysis. In my PhD work, I have developed and studied a highly selective and sensitive electrochemical method that can be used to characterize fundamental transport dynamics and to develop electrochemical sensors at liquid/liquid interfaces based on electrochemically-controlled ion transfer and recognition. The understanding of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the voltammetric ion transfer through polymer-modified ion-selective electrodes leads to realize the highly selective and sensitive analytical method. The ultrathin polymer membrane is used to maximize a current response by complete exhaustion of preconcentrated ions. Therefore, nanomolar detection is achieved and confirmed by a thermodynamic mechanism that controls the detection limit. It was also demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that more lipophilic ionic species gives a significantly lower detection limit. The voltammetric method was expanded into inexpensive and disposable applications based on pencil lead modified with the thin polymer membrane. In the other hand, micropipet/nanopipet voltammetry as an artificial cell membrane was used to study the interface between two immiscible solutions for environmental and biomedical applications. It is very useful to get quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic information by studying numerical simulations of ion transfer and diffusion. Molecular recognition and transport of heparin and low

  6. Detection of a new interstellar molecular ion, H2COH+ (protonated formaldehyde).

    PubMed

    Ohishi, M; Ishikawa, S I; Amano, T; Oka, H; Irvine, W M; Dickens, J E; Ziurys, L M; Apponi, A J

    1996-11-01

    A new interstellar molecular ion, H2COH+ (protonated formaldehyde), has been detected toward Sgr B2, Orion KL, W51, and possibly in NGC 7538 and DR21(OH). Six transitions were detected in Sgr B2(M). The 1(1,0)-1(0,1) transition was detected in all sources listed above. Searches were also made toward the cold, dark clouds TMC-1 and L134N, Orion (3N, 1E), and a red giant, IRC + 10216, without success. The excitation temperatures of H2COH+ are calculated to be 60-110 K, and the column densities are on the order of 10(12)-10(14) cm-2 in Sgr B2, Orion KL, and W51. The fractional abundance of H2COH+ is on the order of 10(-11) to 10-(9), and the ratio of H2COH+ to H2CO is in the range 0.001-0.5 in these objects. The values in Orion KL seem to be consistent with the "early time" values of recent model calculations by Lee, Bettens, & Herbst, but they appear to be higher than the model values in Sgr B2 and W51 even if we take the large uncertainties of column densities of H2CO into account. We suggest production routes starting from CH3OH may play an important role in the formation of H2COH+.

  7. Nanomaterial-based optical sensors for sensitive detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shasha; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-07-01

    Nanometerial-based optical nanoprobes have been extensively developed because of their high sensitivity, good specificity, and potential for easy quantification of species in chemical and biological analysis. With the development of nanotechnology, various kinds of nanomaterials with novel optical properties have heen generated, laying the foundation of optical nanoprobes. By further integrating receptors (chemical ligand, aptamer, molecular imprinting polymer, etc.), the information of binding specific targets will transform into analytically optical signals by employing different detection techniques including colorimetry/UV-Vis spectra, fluorometry and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this presentation, firstly, we introduced a simple, rapid and ultrasensitive SERS nanosensor for mercury ion (Hg2+) detection based on the 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPY) functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the presence of spermine; then, a novel colorimetric nanosensor for mercury species was developed for the first time due to the analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the assistance of a thiol-containing ligand of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC); finally, the sensitive and selective recognition and detection of trypsin was realized in a SERS strategy by using anti-aggregation of 4-MPY-functionalized AgNPs on the basis of the interaction between protamine and trypsin.

  8. MoS2-based nanoprobes for detection of silver ions in aqueous solutions and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Liu, Teng; Cheng, Liang; Song, Guosheng; Liu, Zhuang; Chen, Meiwan

    2015-04-15

    Silver as an extensively used antibacterial agent also poses potential threats to the environment and human health. Hence, in this work, we design a fluorescent nanoprobe by using rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RhoBS) adsorbed MoS2 nanosheets to realize sensitive and selective detection of Ag(+). On the surface of RhoBS-loaded MoS2 nanosheets, Ag(+) can be reduced to Ag nanoparticles, which afterward could not only lead to the detachment of RhoBS molecules and thus their recovered fluorescence but also the surface-enhanced fluorescence from RhoBS remaining adsorbed on MoS2. Such an interesting mechanism allows highly sensitive detection of Ag(+) (down to 10 nM) with great selectivity among other metal ions. Moreover, we further demonstrate that our MoS2-RhoBS complex could act as a nontoxic nanoprobe to detect Ag(+) in live bacteria samples. Our work resulted from an unexpected finding and suggests the promise of two-dimensional transition-metal sulfide nanosheets as a novel platform for chemical and biological sensing.

  9. Improved electron ionization ion source for the detection of supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirav, Aviv; Fialkov, Alexander; Gordin, Alexander

    2002-08-01

    An improved electron ionization (EI) ion source is described, based on the modification of a Brink-type EI ion source through the addition of a second cage with a fine mesh outside the ion chamber. The added outer cage shields the inner ion cage (ionization zone) against the penetration of the filament and electron repeller potentials, and thus results in the provision of ions with narrower ion energy distribution, hence improved ion-beam quality. The closer to zero electrical field inside the ion cage enables improved filtration (rejection) of ions that are produced from vacuum background compounds, based on difference in ion energies of beam and background species. The improved background ion filtration and ion-beam quality resulted in 2.6 times higher mass spectrometric ion signal, combined with 6.4 times better signal to noise ratio, in comparison with the same ion source having a single cage. The dual cage ion source further provides a smaller or no reduction of the electron emission current upon lowering the electron energy for achieving softer EI and/or electron attachment ionization. It also improves the long-term mass spectral and signal reproducibility and enables fast, automated change of the electron energy. Consequently, the dual cage EI ion source is especially effective for use with gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with SMB, ion guns with SMB, and any other experimental systems with SMB or nonthermal molecular beams.

  10. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder. Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Lamarche, Brian L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-09-05

    We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

  11. Application of an M13 bacteriophage displaying tyrosine on the surface for detection of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) ions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaohua; Niu, Chuncheng; Wu, Yunhua; Liang, Xiaosheng

    2015-12-01

    Ferric and ferrous ion plays critical roles in bioprocesses, their influences in many fields have not been fully explored due to the lack of methods for quantification of ferric and ferrous ions in biological system or complex matrix. In this study, an M13 bacteriophage (phage) was engineered for use as a sensor for ferric and ferrous ions via the display of a tyrosine residue on the P8 coat protein. The interaction between the specific phenol group of tyrosine and Fe(3+) / Fe(2+) was used as the sensor. Transmission electron microscopy showed aggregation of the tyrosine-displaying phages after incubation with Fe(3+) and Fe(2+). The aggregated phages infected the host bacterium inefficiently. This phenomenon could be utilized for detection of ferric and ferrous ions. For ferric ions, a calibration curve ranging from 200 nmol/L to 8 μmol/L with a detection limit of 58 nmol/L was acquired. For ferrous ions, a calibration curve ranging from 800 nmol/L to 8 μmol/L with a detection limit of 641.7 nmol/L was acquired. The assay was specific for Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) when tested against Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Ba(2+), and K(+). The tyrosine displaying phage to Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) interaction would have plenty of room in application to biomaterials and bionanotechnology.

  12. Ultrafast state detection and 2D ion crystals in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Michael; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2016-05-01

    Projective readout of quantum information stored in atomic qubits typically uses state-dependent CW laser-induced fluorescence. This method requires an often sophisticated imaging system to spatially filter out the background CW laser light. We present an alternative approach that instead uses simple pulse sequences from a mode-locked laser to affect the same state-dependent excitations in less than 1 ns. The resulting atomic fluorescence occurs in the dark, allowing the placement of non-imaging detectors right next to the atom to improve the qubit state detection efficiency and speed. We also study 2D Coulomb crystals of atomic ions in an oblate Paul trap. We find that crystals with hundreds of ions can be held in the trap, potentially offering an alternative to the use of Penning traps for the quantum simulation of 2D lattice spin models. We discuss the classical physics of these crystals and the metastable states that are supported in 2D. This work is supported by the US Army Research Office.

  13. Tuning Piezo ion channels to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Kate; Herget, Regina; Lapatsina, Liudmila; Ngo, Ha-Duong; Lewin, Gary R.

    2014-03-01

    In sensory neurons, mechanotransduction is sensitive, fast and requires mechanosensitive ion channels. Here we develop a new method to directly monitor mechanotransduction at defined regions of the cell-substrate interface. We show that molecular-scale (~13 nm) displacements are sufficient to gate mechanosensitive currents in mouse touch receptors. Using neurons from knockout mice, we show that displacement thresholds increase by one order of magnitude in the absence of stomatin-like protein 3 (STOML3). Piezo1 is the founding member of a class of mammalian stretch-activated ion channels, and we show that STOML3, but not other stomatin-domain proteins, brings the activation threshold for Piezo1 and Piezo2 currents down to ~10 nm. Structure-function experiments localize the Piezo modulatory activity of STOML3 to the stomatin domain, and higher-order scaffolds are a prerequisite for function. STOML3 is the first potent modulator of Piezo channels that tunes the sensitivity of mechanically gated channels to detect molecular-scale stimuli relevant for fine touch.

  14. Tuning Piezo ion channels to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Kate; Herget, Regina; Lapatsina, Liudmila; Ngo, Ha-Duong; Lewin, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    In sensory neurons, mechanotransduction is sensitive, fast and requires mechanosensitive ion channels. Here we develop a new method to directly monitor mechanotransduction at defined regions of the cell-substrate interface. We show that molecular-scale (~13 nm) displacements are sufficient to gate mechanosensitive currents in mouse touch receptors. Using neurons from knockout mice, we show that displacement thresholds increase by one order of magnitude in the absence of stomatin-like protein 3 (STOML3). Piezo1 is the founding member of a class of mammalian stretch-activated ion channels, and we show that STOML3, but not other stomatin-domain proteins, brings the activation threshold for Piezo1 and Piezo2 currents down to ~10 nm. Structure–function experiments localize the Piezo modulatory activity of STOML3 to the stomatin domain, and higher-order scaffolds are a prerequisite for function. STOML3 is the first potent modulator of Piezo channels that tunes the sensitivity of mechanically gated channels to detect molecular-scale stimuli relevant for fine touch. PMID:24662763

  15. Using L-arginine-functionalized gold nanorods for visible detection of mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jiehao; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2015-04-01

    A rapid and simple approach for visible determination of mercury ions (Hg(2+) ) in aqueous solutions was developed based on surface plasmon resonance phenomenon using L-arginine-functionalized gold nanorods (AuNRs). At pH greater than 9, the deprotonated amine group of L-arginine on the AuNRs bound with Hg(2+) leading to the side-by-side assembly of AuNRs, which was verified by transmission electron microscopy images. Thus, when Hg(2+) was present in the test solution, a blue shift of the typical longitudinal plasmon band of the AuNRs was observed in the ultra violet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) spectra, along with a change in the color of the solution, which occurred within 5 min. After carefully optimizing the potential factors affecting the performance, the L-arginine/AuNRs sensing system was found to be highly sensitive to Hg(2+) , with the limit of detection of 5 nM (S/N = 3); it is also very selective and free of interference from 10 other metal ions (Ba(2+) , Ca(2+) , Cd(2+) , Co(2+) , Cs(+) , Cu(2+) , K(+) , Li(+) , Ni(2+) , Pb(2+) ). The result suggests that the L-arginine-functionalized AuNRs can potentially serve as a rapid, sensitive, and easy-to-use colorimetric biosensor useful for determining Hg(2+) in food and environmental samples. PMID:25754066

  16. The Assessment of Cholinesterase from the Liver of Puntius Javanicus as Detection of Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan; Sulaiman, Mohd Rosni; Shukor, Mohd Yunus Abd; Syed, Mohd Arif

    2014-01-01

    Crude extract of ChE from the liver of Puntius javanicus was purified using procainamide-sepharyl 6B. S-Butyrylthiocholine iodide (BTC) was selected as the specific synthetic substrate for this assay with the highest maximal velocity and lowest biomolecular constant at 53.49 µmole/min/mg and 0.23 mM, respectively, with catalytic efficiency ratio of 0.23. The optimum parameter was obtained at pH 7.5 and optimal temperature in the range of 25 to 30°C. The effect of different storage condition was assessed where ChE activity was significantly decreased after 9 days of storage at room temperature. However, ChE activity showed no significant difference when stored at 4.0, 0, and −25°C for 15 days. Screening of heavy metals shows that chromium, copper, and mercury strongly inhibited P. javanicus ChE by lowering the activity below 50%, while several pairwise combination of metal ions exhibited synergistic inhibiting effects on the enzyme which is greater than single exposure especially chromium, copper, and mercury. The results showed that P. javanicus ChE has the potential to be used as a biosensor for the detection of metal ions. PMID:25401148

  17. Tuning Piezo ion channels to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch.

    PubMed

    Poole, Kate; Herget, Regina; Lapatsina, Liudmila; Ngo, Ha-Duong; Lewin, Gary R

    2014-03-24

    In sensory neurons, mechanotransduction is sensitive, fast and requires mechanosensitive ion channels. Here we develop a new method to directly monitor mechanotransduction at defined regions of the cell-substrate interface. We show that molecular-scale (~13 nm) displacements are sufficient to gate mechanosensitive currents in mouse touch receptors. Using neurons from knockout mice, we show that displacement thresholds increase by one order of magnitude in the absence of stomatin-like protein 3 (STOML3). Piezo1 is the founding member of a class of mammalian stretch-activated ion channels, and we show that STOML3, but not other stomatin-domain proteins, brings the activation threshold for Piezo1 and Piezo2 currents down to ~10 nm. Structure-function experiments localize the Piezo modulatory activity of STOML3 to the stomatin domain, and higher-order scaffolds are a prerequisite for function. STOML3 is the first potent modulator of Piezo channels that tunes the sensitivity of mechanically gated channels to detect molecular-scale stimuli relevant for fine touch.

  18. Chemically Modulated Carbon Nitride Nanosheets for Highly Selective Electrochemiluminescent Detection of Multiple Metal-ions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixin; Shang, Qiuwei; Shen, Yanfei; Zhang, Linqun; Zhang, Yuye; Lv, Yanqin; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-06-01

    Chemical structures of two-dimensional (2D) nanosheet can effectively control the properties thus guiding their applications. Herein, we demonstrate that carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) with tunable chemical structures can be obtained by exfoliating facile accessible bulk carbon nitride (CN) of different polymerization degree. Interestingly, the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) properties of as-prepared CNNS were significantly modulated. As a result, unusual changes for different CNNS in quenching of ECL because of inner filter effect/electron transfer and enhancement of ECL owing to catalytic effect were observed by adding different metal ions. On the basis of this, by using various CNNS, highly selective ECL sensors for rapid detecting multiple metal-ions such as Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Cd(2+) were successfully developed without any labeling and masking reagents. Multiple competitive mechanisms were further revealed to account for such enhanced selectivity in the proposed ECL sensors. The strategy of preparing CNNS with tunable chemical structures that facilely modulated the optical properties would open a vista to explore 2D carbon-rich materials for developing a wide range of applications such as sensors with enhanced performances. PMID:27187874

  19. Chemically Modulated Carbon Nitride Nanosheets for Highly Selective Electrochemiluminescent Detection of Multiple Metal-ions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixin; Shang, Qiuwei; Shen, Yanfei; Zhang, Linqun; Zhang, Yuye; Lv, Yanqin; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-06-01

    Chemical structures of two-dimensional (2D) nanosheet can effectively control the properties thus guiding their applications. Herein, we demonstrate that carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) with tunable chemical structures can be obtained by exfoliating facile accessible bulk carbon nitride (CN) of different polymerization degree. Interestingly, the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) properties of as-prepared CNNS were significantly modulated. As a result, unusual changes for different CNNS in quenching of ECL because of inner filter effect/electron transfer and enhancement of ECL owing to catalytic effect were observed by adding different metal ions. On the basis of this, by using various CNNS, highly selective ECL sensors for rapid detecting multiple metal-ions such as Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Cd(2+) were successfully developed without any labeling and masking reagents. Multiple competitive mechanisms were further revealed to account for such enhanced selectivity in the proposed ECL sensors. The strategy of preparing CNNS with tunable chemical structures that facilely modulated the optical properties would open a vista to explore 2D carbon-rich materials for developing a wide range of applications such as sensors with enhanced performances.

  20. Metal ion-mediated polymer superquenching for highly sensitive detection of kinase and phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Rininsland, Frauke; Xia, Wensheng; Wittenburg, Shannon; Shi, Xiaobo; Stankewicz, Casey; Achyuthan, Komandoor; McBranch, Duncan; Whitten, David

    2004-10-26

    An assay technology for high-throughput screening of kinase and phosphatase activities is introduced. The format is based upon superquenching of fluorescent-conjugated polymers by dye-labeled kinase/phosphatase peptide substrates. The sensor platform is composed of highly fluorescent-conjugated polyelectrolytes colocated with the phosphate coordinating metal ion gallium on microspheres. Phosphorylated peptide substrates containing a quencher bind specifically to the metal ions by means of phosphate groups, resulting in quench of polymer fluorescence. The modulation of fluorescence signal is proportional to kinase or phosphatase activity and is monitored as a turn-off or turn-on signal, respectively. The assay is homogeneous and simple and can be run either as an endpoint measurement or in a kinetic mode. The assay meets the sensitivity required for high-throughput screening of kinase or phosphatase inhibitors and is a valuable tool for drug discovery. A modified version of the assay allows for the detection of protein phosphorylation. PMID:15494445

  1. Rapid Short-Read Sequencing and Aneuploidy Detection Using MinION Nanopore Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shan; Williams, Zev

    2016-01-01

    MinION is a memory stick–sized nanopore-based sequencer designed primarily for single-molecule sequencing of long DNA fragments (>6 kb). We developed a library preparation and data-analysis method to enable rapid real-time sequencing of short DNA fragments (<1 kb) that resulted in the sequencing of 500 reads in 3 min and 40,000–80,000 reads in 2–4 hr at a rate of 30 nt/sec. We then demonstrated the clinical applicability of this approach by performing successful aneuploidy detection in prenatal and miscarriage samples with sequencing in <4 hr. This method broadens the application of nanopore-based single-molecule sequencing and makes it a promising and versatile tool for rapid clinical and research applications. PMID:26500254

  2. Rapid detection of CW residues on soil using an ion trap SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Ingram, J.C.; Dahl, D.A.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    Technology for the rapid detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) residues on soil samples is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The development effort is being undertaken because of a need for rapid and specific characterization for possibly contaminated soils samples, preferably in the field. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is being pursued for these applications because SIMS combines rapid, specific and sensitive surface analyses with the potential for small instrument size. This latter attribute suggests that field characterization using SIMS is possible, and this avenue is being supported by the Army at the INEEL. This paper describes ongoing development efforts focused on the development of small-scale, transportable SIMS instrumentation, and on the application of the technology to likely contamination scenarios.

  3. ``Fatal Scream'' Of Bacteria Infected By Phages: Nanoscale Detection Of Bacteriophage Triggered Ion Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Maria D.; Seo, Sungkyu; Kim, Jong; Cheng, Mosong; Young, Ryland; Biard, Robert J.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Granqvist, Claes-Goran; Kish, Laszlo B.

    2005-11-01

    A rapid, inexpensive and specific identification of arbitrary bacteria under field conditions is urgently needed. To this end, we have introduced and tested a new technology, called SEPTIC, SEnsing of Phage-Triggered Ion Cascade. In its prototype form based on a nanowell chip, SEPTIC has already been shown to be capable of unambiguous identification of live bacteria on a time scale of seconds to minutes, many times faster than any other system. The technology is based on using noise analysis to detect the massive ionic fluxes associated with the initial step of bacteriophage infection, the injection of the phage DNA into the cell. Here we show the results and pose a number of unsolved problems of noise. Ultimately, sensors based on this new technology would be able to save many lifes.

  4. Effect of aluminium ions on liposomal membranes as detected by Laurdan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Dousset, N; Ferretti, G; Galeazzi, T; Taus, M; Gouaze, V; Berthon, G; Curatola, G

    1997-09-01

    We report here an investigation of the influence of aluminium on iron-induced peroxidation in brain model membranes. Laurdan fluorescence emission spectra and generalised polarisation measurements have been used to investigate how ferrous and aluminium ions can affect the phase components of phospholipid membranes. An increase in the generalised polarisation of oxidised liposomes with respect to controls has been observed, which reveals the presence of a less polar environment surrounding the probe that changes the properties of the bilayer. Aluminium has been shown to facilitate iron-mediated oxidation as detected from emission fluorescence spectra. However, no quantitative influence has been calculated relative to general polarisation and derived phase state determinations. The structural influence of aluminium on membranes may therefore be less significantly marked than initially expected. PMID:9350433

  5. Novel indole based dual responsive 'turn-on' chemosensor for fluoride ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyanthi, Dharmaraj; Iniya, Murugan; Krishnaveni, Karuppiah; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2015-02-01

    An efficient new dual channel chemosensor 2,3-bis((E)-(1H-indole-3-yl)methyleneamino)maleonitrile (DN) which exhibits selective sensing of F- ions in DMSO, was synthesized by a facile one step condensation reaction of indole-3-carboxaldehyde with diaminomaleonitrile. The probe DN was characterized by elemental analysis, 1H, 13C-NMR, ESI-MS and IR spectral techniques. Upon addition of F-, DN induces remarkable changes in both absorption and fluorescence spectra on the basis of charge transfer mechanism. The receptor DN serves for highly selective, sensitive detection of F- without the interference of other relevant anions. The Job's plot analysis indicates the binding stoichiometry to be 1:1 (host/guest).

  6. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-06-14

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets [I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas [2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study [3] has been

  7. Determination of hippuric acid in human urine by ion chromatography with conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fuyong; Wang, Zonghua; Wang, Hui; Ding, Mingyu

    2011-02-01

    A simple, rapid, precise and eco-friendly ion chromatography (IC) method for the determination of hippuric acid (HA) in human urine was proposed in this paper. The separation was carried out an anion exchange column with 2.0 mmol L⁻¹ Na₂CO₃ + 2.0 mmol L⁻¹ NaHCO₃ as mobile phase at the flow-rate 0.7 mL min⁻¹. A suppressed conductivity detector was used and the detection limit was 1.0 μg L⁻¹ (S/N=3) for hippuric acid. The analysis time for one run was 30 min under the optimized IC condition. The recovery of hippuric acid was 93.2-98.0% while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.4-2.3% by seven measurements.

  8. Boosting the Detection Potential of Liquid Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using a Ceramic Coated Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Termopoli, Veronica; Cappiello, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Detection of target and non-target substances and their characterization in complex samples is a challenging task. Here we demonstrate that coating the electron ionization (EI) ion source of an LC-MS system with a sol-gel ceramic film can drastically improve the detection of high-molecular weight and high-boiling analytes. A new ion source coated with a ceramic material was developed and tested with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with an increasing number of rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those for an uncoated stainless steel (SS) ion source shows a dramatic improvement in the MS signals, with a nearly 40-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also demonstrate the ability of the new system to produce excellent chromatographic profiles for hard-to-detect hormones.

  9. Handy Compton camera using 3D position-sensitive scintillators coupled with large-area monolithic MPPC arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Kato, T.; Nakamori, T.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    The release of radioactive isotopes (mainly 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I) from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant remains a serious problem in Japan. To help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation, we are developing a novel Compton camera weighting only 1 kg and measuring just ∼10 cm2 in size. Despite its compactness, the camera realizes a wide 180° field of vision with a sensitivity about 50 times superior to other cameras being tested in Fukushima. We expect that a hotspot producing a 5 μSv/h dose at a distance of 3 m can be imaged every 10 s, with angular resolution better than 10° (FWHM). The 3D position-sensitive scintillators and thin monolithic MPPC arrays are the key technologies developed here. By measuring the pulse-height ratio of MPPC-arrays coupled at both ends of a Ce:GAGG scintillator block, the depth of interaction (DOI) is obtained for incident gamma rays as well as the usual 2D positions, with accuracy better than 2 mm. By using two identical 10 mm cubic Ce:GAGG scintillators as a scatterer and an absorber, we confirmed that the 3D configuration works well as a high-resolution gamma camera, and also works as spectrometer achieving typical energy resolution of 9.8% (FWHM) for 662 keV gamma rays. We present the current status of the prototype camera (weighting 1.5 kg and measuring 8.5×14×16 cm3 in size) being fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Although the camera still operates in non-DOI mode, angular resolution as high as 14° (FWHM) was achieved with an integration time of 30 s for the assumed hotspot described above.

  10. A data acquisition system for two-dimensional position sensitive micropattern gas detectors with delay-line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanu, A. R.; Prestwich, W. V.; Byun, S. H.

    2015-04-01

    We present a data acquisition (DAQ) system for two-dimensional position sensitive micropattern gas detectors using the delay-line method for readout. The DAQ system consists of a field programmable gate array (FPGA) as the main data processor and our time-to-digital (TDC) mezzanine card for making time measurements. We developed the TDC mezzanine card around the Acam TDC-GPX ASIC and it features four independent stop channels referenced to a common start, a typical timing resolution of ~81 ps, and a 17-bit measurement range, and is compliant with the VITA 57.1 standard. For our DAQ system, we have chosen the Xilinx SP601 development kit which features a single Spartan 6 FPGA, 128 MB of DDR2 memory, and a serial USB interface for communication. Output images consist of 1024×1024 square pixels, where each pixel has a 32-bit depth and corresponds to a time difference of 162 ps relative to its neighbours. When configured for a 250 ns acquisition window, the DAQ can resolve periodic event rates up to 1.8×106 Hz without any loses and will report a maximum event rate of 6.11×105 Hz for events whose arrival times follow Poisson statistics. The integral and differential non-linearities have also been measured and are better than 0.1% and 1.5%, respectively. Unlike commercial units, our DAQ system implements the delay-line image reconstruction algorithm entirely in hardware and is particularly attractive for its modularity, low cost, ease of integration, excellent linearity, and high throughput rate.

  11. Organic Position-Sensitive Detectors Based on ZnO:Al and CuPc:C60.

    PubMed

    Morimune, Taichiro; Kajii, Hirotake; Nishimaru, Hiroki; Ono, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Organic position-sensitive detector (OPSD) based on copper phthalocyanine CuPc:fullerene C60 bulk-heterojunction with an inverted structure have been fabricated using aluminum doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) as a resistive layer, which is prepared by sol-gel method. The resistance length of the one-dimensional PSD is fixed at 5 mm, and the Ag common electrode is fabricated by vacuum evaporation within the 100-µm width. The current density-voltage characteristics with different structures of photodetector, the influence of ZnO:Al resistivity on the thickness and the position characteristics of PSDs are investigated. The experimental results indicate that the architecture, which uses an inverted structure, increases sensitivity under red light illumination compared to the conventional structure. In addition, the thickness of the ZnO:Al has influence on the position characteristics. The resistivity of ZnO:A film with Al doping concentration of 2 mol% prepared in this study is around 150 Ωcm and it increases from less than approximately 400 nm-thickness. These characteristics seem to be correlated with the properties of ZnO:AI resistive layer. For a device with a 620 nm-thick ZnO:Al layer, the measured position values obtained from the output photocurrent agree with the actual position values under red laser light illumination. CuPc:C60 OPSD with an inverted structure exhibits red light sensitivity, high incident-photon-to-current conversion efficiency of above 80% at -3 V and linearity error of 5.9% at -2 V. PMID:27451643

  12. Fast x-ray scattering measurements on molten alumina using a 120{degree} curved position sensitive detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Hennet, L.; Thiaudiere, D.; Gailhanou, M.; Landron, C.; Coutures, J.-P.; Price, D. L.; C.R.M.H.T.; LURE; Univ. de Perpignan

    2002-01-01

    Fast x-ray scattering measurements on molten alumina were performed on the H10 beam line at the DCI Synchrotron of LURE (Orsay, France). A high-temperature chamber with a levitation device was coupled with the four-circle goniometer of the beam line. A 100 W CO{sub 2} laser was used to melt the sample and the temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer operating at 0.85 {mu}m. Usually, measurements of the total structure factor S(Q) on molten materials are performed using a fixed detector scanned over an angular range. In this work, in order to reduce the total scan duration, x-ray scattered intensities were measured with a 120{sup o} position sensitive detector (INEL CPS120). We performed several measurements with different acquisition times varying from 10 s to 5 min. In 5 min it was possible to obtain a good determination of S(Q) with a usable signal up to the Q range limit (13 Angstroms{sup -1}). The intensity was comparable with a 1 h measurement with a NaI (Tl) scintillator scanned over the 120 2{theta} range. On reducing the counting time the statistics are degraded and the data are noisier, especially in the high Q region. Nevertheless, even with 10 s, the S(Q) data remain usable and give good results. Performing the Fourier transformation of S(Q), we obtain similar reliable pair-correlation functions with both 5 min and 10 s acquisition times.

  13. Electrochemical sensor for glutathione detection based on mercury ion triggered hybridization chain reaction signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghong; Jiang, Lun; Leng, Qinggang; Wu, Yaohui; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we design a new simple and highly sensitive strategy for electrochemical detection of glutathione (GSH) via mercury ion (Hg(2+)) triggered hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. It is observed that in the absence of GSH, a specific thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination can fold into hairpin structures. While in the presence of GSH, it thus can be chelated with Hg(2+), resulting in Hg(2+) released from the T-Hg(2+)-T hairpin complex which then forms into ssDNA structure to further hybridize with the surface-immobilized capture DNA probe on the gold electrode with a sticky tail left. The presence of two hairpin helper probes through HCR leads to the formation of extended dsDNA superstructure on the electrode surface, which therefore causes the intercalation of numerous electroactive species ([Ru(NH3)6](3+)) into the dsDNA grooves, followed by a significantly amplified signal output whose intensity is related to the concentration of the GSH. Taking advantage of merits of enzyme-free amplification power of the HCR, the inherent high sensitivity of the electrochemical technique, and label-free detection which utilizes an electroactive species as a signaling molecule that binds to the anionic phosphate backbone of DNA strands via electrostatic force, not only does the proposed strategy enable sensitive detection of GSH, but show high selectivity against other amino acid, making our method a simple and sensitive addition to the amplified GSH detection. PMID:26528805

  14. A highly selective voltammetric sensor for nanomolar detection of mercury ions using a carbon ionic liquid paste electrode impregnated with novel ion imprinted polymeric nanobeads.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Azam; Besharati-Seidani, Abbas; Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2015-03-01

    This work reports the preparation of a voltammetric sensor for selective recognition and sensitive determination of mercury ions using a carbon ionic liquid paste electrode (CILE) impregnated with novel Hg(2+)-ion imprinted polymeric nanobeads (IIP) based on dithizone, as a suitable ligand for complex formation with Hg(2+) ions. The differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric technique was employed to investigate the performance of the prepared IIP-CILE for determination of hazardous mercury ions. The designed modified electrode revealed linear responses in the ranges of 0.5nM-10nM and 0.08μM-2μM with a limit of detection of 0.1nM (S/N=3). It was found that the peak currents of the modified electrode for Hg(2+) ions were at a maximum value in phosphate buffer of pH4.5. The optimized preconcentration potential and accumulation time were to be -0.9V and 35s, respectively. The applicability of the proposed sensor to mercury determination in waste water samples is reported. PMID:25579915

  15. A facile approach for cupric ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine/PMMA core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu; Su, Junhua; Zhao, Jianqing; Tong, Zhen

    2009-09-01

    A facile approach was developed to produce a dye-doped core-shell nanoparticle chemosensor for detecting Cu2+ in aqueous media. The core-shell nanoparticle sensor was prepared by a one-step emulsifier-free polymerization, followed by the doping of the fluorescent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino- 5H-benzo[alpha] phenoxazine-5-one, NR) into the particles. For the nanoparticles, the hydrophilic polyethyleneimine (PEI) chain segments serve as the shell and the hydrophobic polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) constitutes the core of the nanoparticles. The non-toxic and biocompatible PEI chain segments on the nanoparticle surface exhibit a high affinity for Cu2+ ions in aqueous media, and the quenching of the NR fluorescence is observed upon binding of Cu2+ ions. This makes the core-shell nanoparticle system a water-dispersible chemosensor for Cu2+ ion detection. The quenching of fluorescence arises through intraparticle energy transfer (FRET) from the dye in the hydrophobic PMMA core to the Cu2+/PEI complexes on the nanoparticle surface. The energy transfer efficiency for PEI/PMMA particles with different diameters was determined, and it is found that the smaller nanoparticle sample exhibits higher quenching efficiency, and the limit for Cu2+ detection is 1 µM for a nanoparticle sample with a diameter of ~30 nm. The response of the fluorescent nanoparticle towards different metal ions was investigated and the nanoparticle chemosensor displays high selectivity and antidisturbance for the Cu2+ ion among the metal ions examined (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and Pb2+). This emulsifier-free, biocompatible and sensitive fluorescent nanoparticle sensor may find applications in cupric ion detection in the biological and environmental areas.

  16. Electrochemical Microsensors for the Detection of Cadmium(II) and Lead(II) Ions in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Krystofova, Olga; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Zehnalek, Josef; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Routine determination of trace metals in complex media is still a difficult task for many analytical instruments. The aim of this work was to compare three electro-chemical instruments [a standard potentiostat (Autolab), a commercially available miniaturized potentiostat (PalmSens) and a homemade micropotentiostat] for easy-to-use and sensitive determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) ions. The lowest detection limits (hundreds of pM) for both metals was achieved by using of the standard potentiostat, followed by the miniaturized potentiostat (tens of nM) and the homemade instrument (hundreds of nM). Nevertheless, all potentiostats were sensitive enough to evaluate contamination of the environment, because the environmental limits for both metals are higher than detection limits of the instruments. Further, we tested all used potentiostats and working electrodes on analysis of environmental samples (rainwater, flour and plant extract) with artificially added cadmium(II) and lead(II). Based on the similar results obtained for all potentiostats we choose a homemade instrument with a carbon tip working electrode for our subsequent environmental experiments, in which we analyzed maize and sunflower seedlings and rainwater obtained from various sites in the Czech Republic. PMID:22219663

  17. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future. PMID:24211802

  18. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future.

  19. A calixarene-based ion-selective electrode for thallium(I) detection.

    PubMed

    Chester, Ryan; Sohail, Manzar; Ogden, Mark I; Mocerino, Mauro; Pretsch, Ernö; De Marco, Roland

    2014-12-01

    Three new calixarene Tl(+) ionophores have been utilized in Tl(+) ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) yielding Nernstian response in the concentration range of 10(-2)-10(-6)M TlNO3 with a non-optimized filling solution in a conventional liquid contact ISE configuration. The complex formation constants (logβIL) for two of the calixarene derivatives with thallium(I) (i.e. 6.44 and 5.85) were measured using the sandwich membrane technique, with the other ionophore immeasurable due to eventual precipitation of the ionophore during these long-term experiments. Furthermore, the unbiased selectivity coefficients for these ionophores displayed excellent selectivity against Zn(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Al(3+) with moderate selectivity against Pb(2+), Li(+), Na(+), H(+), K(+), NH4(+) and Cs(+), noting that silver was the only significant interferent with these calixarene-based ionophores. When optimizing the filling solution in a liquid contact ISE, it was possible to achieve a lower limit of detection of approximately 8nM according to the IUPAC definition. Last, the new ionophores were also evaluated in four solid-contact (SC) designs leading to Nernstian response, with the best response noted with a SC electrode utilizing a gold substrate, a poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) ion-to-electron transducer and a poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(decyl methacrylate) (PMMA-PDMA) co-polymer membrane. This electrode exhibited a slope of 58.4mVdecade(-1) and a lower detection limit of 30.2nM. Due to the presence of an undesirable water layer and/or leaching of redox mediator from the graphite redox buffered SC, a coated wire electrode on gold and graphite redox buffered SC yielded grossly inferior detection limits against the polypyrrole/PVC SC and POT/PMMA-PDMA SC ISEs that did not display signs of a water layer or leaching of SC ingredients into the membrane.

  20. Hairpin oligonucleotides anchored terbium ion: a fluorescent probe to specifically detect lead(II) at sub-nM levels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yueteng; Liu, Ru; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Yuliang; Cai, Zhifang; Gao, Xueyun

    2013-04-21

    A terbium based fluorescent probe was synthesized by coordinating terbium ions with a designed oligonucleotides (5'-ATATGGGGGATAT-3', termed GH5). GH5 improved the fluorescence of terbium ions by four orders of magnitude. The fluorescence enhancement of terbium ions by different oligonucleotides sequences indicated that the polyguanine loop of the hairpin GH5 is key to enhance terbium ion emission. The quantum yield of Tb-GH5 probe was 10.5% and the probe was photo-stable. The result of conductivity titration indicated that the stoichiometry of the probe is 3.5 Tb: 1 GH5, which is confirmed by fluorescence titration. This probe had high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of lead ions. The fluorescence intensity of this probe was linear with respect to lead concentration over a range 0.3-2.1 nM (R(2) = 0.99). The limit of detection for lead ions was 0.1 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

  1. Selective fluorescence sensors for detection of nitroaniline and metal Ions based on ligand-based luminescent metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zongchao; Wang, Fengqin; Lin, Xiangyi; Wang, Chengmiao; Fu, Yiyuan; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Yongnan; Li, Guodong

    2015-12-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous crystalline materials with high potential for applications in fluorescence sensors. In this work, two solvent-induced Zn(II)-based metal-organic frameworks, Zn3L3(DMF)2 (1) and Zn3L3(DMA)2(H2O)3 (2) (L=4,4‧-stilbenedicarboxylic acid), were investigated as selective sensing materials for detection of nitroaromatic compounds and metal ions. The sensing experiments show that 1 and 2 both exhibit selective fluorescence quenching toward nitroaniline with a low detection limit. In addition, 1 exhibits high selectivity for detection of Fe3+ and Al3+ by significant fluorescence quenching or enhancement effect. While for 2, it only exhibits significant fluorescence quenching effect for Fe3+. The results indicate that 1 and 2 are both promising fluorescence sensors for detecting and recognizing nitroaniline and metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  2. A Post-Synthetically Modified MOF for Selective and Sensitive Aqueous-Phase Detection of Highly Toxic Cyanide Ions.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Avishek; Kumar, Naveen; Samanta, Partha; Desai, Aamod V; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2016-01-18

    Selective and sensitive detection of toxic cyanide (CN(-) ) by a post-synthetically altered metal-organic framework (MOF) has been achieved. A post-synthetic modification was employed in the MOF to incorporate the specific recognition site with the CN(-) ion over all other anions, such as Cl(-) , Br(-) , and SCN(-) . The aqueous-phase sensing and very low detection limit, the essential prerequisites for an effective sensory material, have been fulfilled by the MOF. Moreover, the present detection level meets the standard set by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the permissible limit of cyanide concentration in drinking water. The utilization of MOF-based materials as the fluorometric probes for selective and sensitive detection of CN(-) ions has not been explored till now.

  3. Fluorescent single-stranded DNA-based assay for detecting unchelated Gadolinium(III) ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Edogun, Osafanmwen; Nguyen, Nghia Huu; Halim, Marlin

    2016-06-01

    The main concern pertaining to the safety of Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) is the toxicity caused by the unchelated ion, which may be inadvertently present in the solution due most commonly to excess unreacted starting material or dissociation of the complexes. Detecting the aqueous free ion during the synthesis and preparation of GBCA solutions is therefore instrumental in ensuring the safety of the agents. This paper reports the development of a sensitive fluorogenic sensor for aqueous unchelated Gadolinium(III) (Gd(III)). Our design utilizes single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides with a specific sequence of 44 bases as the targeting moiety. The fluorescence-based assay may be run at ambient pH with very small amounts of samples in 384-well plates. The sensor is able to detect nanomolar concentration of Gd(III), and is relatively unresponsive toward a range of biologically relevant ions and the chelated Gd(III). Although some cross-reactivity with other trivalent lanthanide ions, such as Europium(III) and Terbium(III), is observed, these are not commonly found in biological systems and contrast agents. This convenient and rapid method may be useful in ascertaining a high purity of GBCA solutions. Graphical abstract Fluorescent aptamer-based assay for detecting unchelated Ln(III) ions in aqueous solution. PMID:27071762

  4. A new approach for detection of explosives based on ion mobility spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzishchin, Yury; Kotkovskii, Gennadii; Martynov, Igor; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Chistyakov, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new way for detection ultralow concentration of explosives in this study. It combines an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and a promising method of laser desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The DIOS is widely used in mass spectrometry due to the possibility of small molecule detection and high sensitivity. It is known that IMS based on laser ion source is a power method for the fast detection of ultralow concentration of organic molecules. However requirement of using high energy pulse ultraviolet laser increases weight and size of the device. The use of DIOS in an ion source of IMS could decrease energy pulse requirements and allows one to construct both compact and high sensitive device for analyzing gas and liquid probes. On the other hand mechanisms of DIOS in gas media is poorly studied, especially in case of nitroaromatic compounds. The investigation of the desorption/ionization on porous silicon (pSi) surface of nitroaromatic compounds has been carried out for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) using IMS and mass spectrometry (MS). It has been demonstrated that TNT ion formation in a gas medium is a complicated process and includes both an electron emission from the pSi surface with subsequent ion-molecular reactions in a gas phase and a proton transfer between pSi surface and TNT molecule.

  5. A sensitive whole-cell biosensor for the simultaneous detection of a broad-spectrum of toxic heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cerminati, S; Soncini, F C; Checa, S K

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial biosensors are simple, cost-effective and efficient analytical tools for detecting bioavailable heavy metals in the environment. This work presents the design, construction and calibration of a novel whole-cell fluorescent biosensory device that, simultaneously and with high sensitivity, reports the presence of toxic mercury, lead, cadmium and/or gold ions in aqueous samples. This bio-reporter can be easily applied as an immediate alerting tool for detecting the presence of harmful pollutants in drinking water. PMID:25730473

  6. A sensitive whole-cell biosensor for the simultaneous detection of a broad-spectrum of toxic heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cerminati, S; Soncini, F C; Checa, S K

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial biosensors are simple, cost-effective and efficient analytical tools for detecting bioavailable heavy metals in the environment. This work presents the design, construction and calibration of a novel whole-cell fluorescent biosensory device that, simultaneously and with high sensitivity, reports the presence of toxic mercury, lead, cadmium and/or gold ions in aqueous samples. This bio-reporter can be easily applied as an immediate alerting tool for detecting the presence of harmful pollutants in drinking water.

  7. Molecular Heterogeneity of Ewing Sarcoma as Detected by Ion Torrent Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nana; Liu, Haijing; Yue, Guanjun; Zhang, Yan; You, Jiangfeng; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most common malignant bone and soft tissue tumor in children and adolescents. Despite advances in comprehensive treatment, patients with ES metastases still suffer poor outcomes, thus, emphasizing the need for detailed genetic profiles of ES patients to identify suitable molecular biomarkers for improved prognosis and development of effective and targeted therapies. In this study, the next generation sequencing Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 was used to identify cancer-related gene mutations in the tissue samples from 20 ES patients. This platform targeted 207 amplicons of 2800 loci in 50 cancer-related genes. Among the 20 tissue specimens, 62 nonsynonymous hotspot mutations were identified in 26 cancer-related genes, revealing the molecular heterogeneity of ES. Among these, five novel mutations in cancer-related genes (KDR, STK11, MLH1, KRAS, and PTPN11) were detected in ES, and these mutations were confirmed with traditional Sanger sequencing. ES patients with KDR, STK11, and MLH1 mutations had higher Ki-67 proliferation indices than the ES patients lacking such mutations. Notably, more than half of the ES patients harbored one or two possible ‘druggable’ mutations that have been previously linked to a clinical cancer treatment option. Our results provided the foundation to not only elucidate possible mechanisms involved in ES pathogenesis but also indicated the utility of Ion Torrent sequencing as a sensitive and cost-effective tool to screen key oncogenes and tumor suppressors in order to develop personalized therapy for ES patients. PMID:27077911

  8. A new turn-off fluorescence probe based on graphene quantum dots for detection of Au(III) ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjadi, Mohammad; Shokri, Roghayeh; Hallaj, Tooba

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new turn-off fluorescence probe based on the graphene quantum dots (GQDs) was designed for detection and quantification of Au(III) ion. GQDs were prepared by two simple carbonization methods using glucose (g-GQDs) and citric acid (c-GQDs) as carbon sources. The effect of some metal ions on the fluorescence intensity of the prepared GQDs was studied. It was found that the fluorescence of both GQDs is significantly quenched by Au(III) ions but the sensitivity and analytical performances are different for two prepared GQDs. Using g-GQDs, a new analytical method was developed for the determination of Au(III) in the concentration range of 1.0-80 μM, with a detection limit of 0.5 μM. The developed method was applied to the determination of Au(III) in water and plasma samples with satisfactory results.

  9. Intense-field ionization of atoms and molecules: Spatially resolved ion detection and ultrashort optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohaber, James

    The interaction of light and matter has for many years provided a venue in which scientists have been able to increase their understanding of fundamental quantum mechanics and electromagnetism. The advent of the laser in the early sixties significantly changed the way in which experiments were performed. These coherent sources of radiation played a pivotal role in the investigations of new phenomenon such as multiphoton ionization. As time progressed many significant advances have been made in laser technology. For instance, the development of mode-locking techniques such as Q-switching and the nonlinear Kerr effect have made pulsed lasers possible (now down to ˜ 5 fs), the discovery of Chirped-Pulse-Amplification allowed for these ultrashort pulses to be amplified up to Joules in energy per pulse. As a result of these new advances in laser technology, new and exciting physics have been illuminated. When ultrashort intense laser fields interact with matter, one possible outcome is the ionization of the target into its constituents (atoms, molecules, electrons or photons). Because the constituents are usually ions which may have different masses and charges, time-of-flight (TOF) techniques are often employed in the analysis of the ionization yields. In these experiments, the usual quantity of physical interest is the ionization probability as a function of a well known intensity. However, in reality the impinging laser radiation possesses a distribution of intensities. To further add to this annoyance, it is difficult for a TOF spectrometer to distinguish between ions created at different intensities and the usual course of action is to integrate ions from over the entire focal volume. The inevitable result of this so-called spatial averaging is to limit information about the underlying physical process. Additionally, coherent sources of radiation have captured the attention of researchers whose main interests are in spatially modulating the phase and amplitude of

  10. Detection of Chlorine Ions in the FUSE Spectrum of the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, P. D.; Ake, T. B.; Berman, A. F.; Moos, H. W.; Sahnow, D. J.; Strobel, D. F.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, P. R.; FUSE Solar System Team

    2000-10-01

    The spectrum of the Io plasma torus in the range 995--1087 Å was recorded at ~0.3 Å resolution by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) on January 20, 2000. Five orbits of data were obtained in point-and-shoot mode (no tracking of the moving target) with the East ansa of the torus initially centered in the 30'' x 30'' aperture of the FUSE LiF spectrographs yielding a total observation time of 3405 seconds. The spectral resolution exceeds by a factor of ten that of the data obtained by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) during the Astro-1 mission (Moos et al., ApJ 382, L105, 1991). This region of the spectrum is dominated by resonance multiplets of S 3 at 1018 Å and S 4 at 1070 Å, whose multiplet structure is nearly completely resolved, as well as numerous S 2 multiplets originating on the 2D^o state of the ground configuration. Weak emission from the resonance multiplets of Cl 3 at 1011 Å and Cl 2 at 1071 Å are seen, the former being stronger with two components roughly one-tenth the brightness of the main components of S 3 λ 1018. Although collision strengths for Cl ions are not readily available, the isoelectronic relationship between S and Cl ions suggests an abundance of Cl+2 of a few percent relative to S+, similar to the result found by Küppers and Schneider (GRL 27, 513, 1999) for Cl+ from optical spectra. The ratio of S 4 to S 3 brightness is about twice that observed by HUT, which when the different slit geometries are accounted for supports the analysis by Hall et al. (ApJ 420, L45, 1994) that S 4 emissions originate from a region more extended out of the centrifugal plane than the S 3 emissions. We also note the detection of weak He 2 emission at 1025.3 Å, on the blue wing of geocoronal Lyman-β . The origin of the helium ions is not clear at this time. This work is based on data obtained for the Guaranteed Time Team by the NASA-CNES-CSA FUSE mission operated by the Johns Hopkins University. Financial support to U. S

  11. Detection of heavy metal ions in contaminated water by surface plasmon resonance based optical fibre sensor using conducting polymer and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Verma, Roli; Gupta, Banshi D

    2015-01-01

    Optical fibre surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions in the drinking water is designed. Silver (Ag) metal and indium tin oxide (ITO) are used for the fabrication of the SPR probe which is further modified with the coating of pyrrole and chitosan composite. The sensor works on the wavelength interrogation technique and is capable of detecting trace amounts of Cd(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+) heavy metal ions in contaminated water. Four types of sensing probes are fabricated and characterised for heavy metal ions out of these pyrrole/chitosan/ITO/Ag coated probe is found to be highly sensitive among all other probes. Further, the cadmium ions bind strongly to the sensing surface than other ions and due to this the sensor is highly sensitive for Cd(2+) ions. The sensor's performance is best for the low concentrations of heavy metal ions and its sensitivity decreases with the increasing concentration of heavy metal ions.

  12. Fast ion beta limit measurements by collimated neutron detection in MST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecchi, William; Anderson, Jay; Bonofiglo, Phillip; Kim, Jungha; Sears, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Fast ion orbits in the reversed field pinch (RFP) are well ordered and classically confined despite magnetic field stochasticity generated by multiple tearing modes. Classical TRANSP modeling of a 1MW tangentially injected hydrogen neutral beam in MST deuterium plasmas predicts a core-localized fast ion density that can be up to 25% of the electron density and a fast ion beta of many times the local thermal beta. However, neutral particle analysis of an NBI-driven mode (presumably driven by a fast ion pressure gradient) shows mode-induced transport of core-localized fast ions and a saturated fast ion density. The TRANSP modeling is presumed valid until the onset of the beam-driven mode and gives an initial estimate of the volume-averaged fast ion beta of 1-2% (local core value up to 10%). A collimated neutron detector for fusion product profile measurements will be used to determine the spatial distribution of fast ions, allowing for a first measurement of the critical fast-ion pressure gradient required for mode destabilization. Testing/calibration data and initial fast-ion profiles will be presented. Characterization of both the local and global fast ion beta will be done for deuterium beam injection into deuterium plasmas for comparison to TRANSP predictions. Work supported by US DOE.

  13. Detection of cocaine and its metabolites in urine using solid phase extraction-ion mobility spectrometry with alternating least squares.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; O'Donnell, Ryan M; Harrington, Peter B

    2009-08-10

    A reliable, alternative screening method for detection of cocaine and its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene in urine is demonstrated using solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Data analysis with alternating least squares (ALS) is used to model IMS spectral datasets and separate the reactant ion peak from the product ion peaks. IMS has been used as a screening device for drug and explosive detection for many years. It has the advantages of atmospheric pressure operation, simple sample preparation, portability, fast analysis, and high sensitivity when compared to similar methods. Coupling SPE with IMS decreases the detection limits of drug metabolites in urine while removing salts and other polar compounds that suppress ionization during the measurement. The IMS analysis time in this experiment is 20s, much shorter than traditional chromatographic analysis. The application of ALS further increases the sensitivity and selectivity of this method. The detection limits of benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene are 10 ng/mL and 4 ng/mL, respectively. Commercial adulteration of urine specimens does not influence the ability to detect cocaine metabolites after sampling the urine with SPE. This method provides forensic chemists a viable approach for fast and simple drug screening. PMID:19457629

  14. Application of Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Detection and Identification of Oxidized Organic Species during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Krechmer, J.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results obtained with a chemical ionization ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) that was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Supersite in Centreville, AL. This two dimensional technique, which separates ions on the basis of their interactions with buffer gases before analysis by high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry, allows for detailed separation and identification of isomeric and isobaric species. During SOAS the IMS-TOF was coupled to a chemical ionization source that utilized NO3- as the reagent ion. The NO3- reagent ion clusters with highly oxidized species and allows for a unique means of directly detecting particle phase precursors in the gas phase. Gas phase molecules corresponding to oxidized products of isoprene and terpenes were detected throughout the campaign with a time resolution of 5 minutes. Ion mobility separation and trends observed for several of these key species are discussed. In addition to ambient sampling, the CI-IMS-TOF was also operated behind a potential aerosol mass (PAM) flow reactor which exposed ambient air to high levels of OH radical. Ambient CI-IMS-TOF spectra obtained with and without the flow reactor are presented and compared with laboratory flow reactor spectra generated from isoprene and terpene precursors.

  15. A Metal-Organic Framework/DNA Hybrid System as a Novel Fluorescent Biosensor for Mercury(II) Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan-Lan; Wang, Zhuo; Zhao, Shu-Na; Meng, Xing; Song, Xue-Zhi; Feng, Jing; Song, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-11

    Mercury(II) ions have emerged as a widespread environmental hazard in recent decades. Despite different kinds of detection methods reported to sense Hg(2+) , it still remains a challenging task to develop new sensing molecules to replenish the fluorescence-based apparatus for Hg(2+) detection. This communication demonstrates a novel fluorescent sensor using UiO-66-NH2 and a T-rich FAM-labeled ssDNA as a hybrid system to detect Hg(2+) sensitively and selectively. To the best of our knowledge, it has rarely been reported that a MOF is utilized as the biosensing platform for Hg(2+) assay. PMID:26555340

  16. Computational and Experimental Characterization of a Fluorescent Dye for Detection of Potassium Ion Concentration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The fluorescence of the SKC-513 ((E)-N-(9-(4-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)phenyl)-6-(butyl(3-sulfopropyl)amino)-3H-xanthen-3-ylidene)-N-(3-sulfopropyl)butan-1-aminium) dye is shown experimentally to have high sensitivity to binding of the K+ ion. Computations are used to explore the potential origins of this sensitivity and to make some suggestions regarding structural improvements. In the absence of K+, excitation is to two nearly degenerate states, a neutral (N) excited state with a high oscillator strength, and a charge-transfer (CT) state with a lower oscillator strength. Binding of K+ destabilizes the CT state, raising its energy far above the N state. The increase in fluorescence quantum yield upon binding of K+ is attributed to the increased energy of the CT state suppressing a nonradiative pathway mediated by the CT state. The near degeneracy of the N and CT excited states can be understood by considering SKC-513 as a reduced symmetry version of a parent molecule with 3-fold symmetry. Computations show that acceptor–donor substituents can be used to alter the relative energies of the N and CT state, whereas a methylene spacer between the heterocycle and phenylene groups can be used to increase the coupling between these states. These modifications provide synthetic handles with which to optimize the dye for K+ detection. PMID:25216181

  17. Graphene ultrathin film electrode for detection of lead ions in acetate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Liu, Erjia

    2013-01-15

    Few-layer graphene ultrathin films were synthesized via solid-state carbon diffusion from amorphous carbon (a-C) thin layers sputtering coated on Si substrates with or without a SiO(2) layer, which an a-C layer was covered by a nickel (Ni) layer as a catalyst. When the Ni/a-C bilayer coated samples were heated at 1000°C the carbon (C) atoms from the a-C layers diffused into the top Ni layers to form a C rich surface. Upon rapid cooling, the C atoms accumulated on the surface of the Ni layers and formed graphene ultrathin films through nucleation and growth processes. The formation of graphene ultrathin films was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), electron diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and 4-point probe. The synthesized graphene ultrathin films were used as working electrodes for detection of trace heavy metal ions (Pb(2+), as low as 7 nM) in acetate buffer solutions (pH 5.3) using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). The effects of substrate surface condition and Ni layer thickness on the structure and electrochemical properties of graphene ultrathin film electrodes were investigated in detail. Compared to conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) electrodes, the graphene electrodes developed in this study had better repeatability, higher sensitivity and higher resistance to passivation caused by surface active species.

  18. Optimizing mass spectrometric detection for ion chromatographic analysis. I. Common anions and selected organic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyuan; Schnute, William C

    2009-11-01

    We describe a systematic method of optimizing mass spectrometric (MS) detection for ion chromatographic (IC) analysis of common anions and three selected organic acids using response surface methodology (RSM). RSM was utilized in this study because it minimized the number of experiments required to achieve the optimum MS response and included the interactions between individual parameters for multivariable optimization. Five MS parameters, including probe temperature, nebulizer gas, assistant makeup flow, needle voltage and cone voltage, were screened and systematically optimized by two steps. Central composite design (CCD) was used to design the experiment points and a quadratic model was applied to fit the experimental data. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to evaluate the validity of the statistical model and to determine the most significant parameters for MS response. The optimum MS conditions for each analyte were summarized and the method optimum condition was achieved by applying desirability function. Our observation showed good agreements between statistically predicted optimum response and the responses collected at the predicted optimum condition. Operable range of each parameter (with normalized MS response greater than 0.8 for each analyte) was provided for general anionic IC/MS applications.

  19. Graphene ultrathin film electrode for detection of lead ions in acetate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Liu, Erjia

    2013-01-15

    Few-layer graphene ultrathin films were synthesized via solid-state carbon diffusion from amorphous carbon (a-C) thin layers sputtering coated on Si substrates with or without a SiO(2) layer, which an a-C layer was covered by a nickel (Ni) layer as a catalyst. When the Ni/a-C bilayer coated samples were heated at 1000°C the carbon (C) atoms from the a-C layers diffused into the top Ni layers to form a C rich surface. Upon rapid cooling, the C atoms accumulated on the surface of the Ni layers and formed graphene ultrathin films through nucleation and growth processes. The formation of graphene ultrathin films was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), electron diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and 4-point probe. The synthesized graphene ultrathin films were used as working electrodes for detection of trace heavy metal ions (Pb(2+), as low as 7 nM) in acetate buffer solutions (pH 5.3) using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). The effects of substrate surface condition and Ni layer thickness on the structure and electrochemical properties of graphene ultrathin film electrodes were investigated in detail. Compared to conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) electrodes, the graphene electrodes developed in this study had better repeatability, higher sensitivity and higher resistance to passivation caused by surface active species. PMID:23200357

  20. Quantitative detection of benzene in toluene- and xylene-rich atmospheres using high-kinetic-energy ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).

    PubMed

    Langejuergen, Jens; Allers, Maria; Oermann, Jens; Kirk, Ansgar; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    One major drawback of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the dependence of the response to a certain analyte on the concentration of water or the presence of other compounds in the sample gas. Especially for low proton affine analytes, e.g., benzene, which often exists in mixtures with other volatile organic compounds, such as toluene and xylene (BTX), a time-consuming preseparation is necessary. In this work, we investigate BTX mixtures using a compact IMS operated at decreased pressure (20 mbar) and high kinetic ion energies (HiKE-IMS). The reduced electric field in both the reaction tube and the drift tube can be independently increased up to 120 Td. Under these conditions, the water cluster distribution of reactant ions is shifted toward smaller clusters independent of the water content in the sample gas. Thus, benzene can be ionized via proton transfer from H3O(+) reactant ions. Also, a formation of benzene ions via charge transfer from NO(+) is possible. Furthermore, the time for interaction between ions and neutrals of different analytes is limited to such an extent that a simultaneous quantification of benzene, toluene, and xylene is possible from low ppbv up to several ppmv concentrations. The mobility resolution of the presented HiKE-IMS varies from R = 65 at high field (90 Td) to R = 73 at lower field (40 Td) in the drift tube, which is sufficient to separate the analyzed compounds. The detection limit for benzene is 29 ppbv (2 s of averaging) with 3700 ppmv water, 12.4 ppmv toluene, and 9 ppmv xylene present in the sample gas. Furthermore, a less-moisture-dependent benzene measurement with a detection limit of 32 ppbv with ca. 21 000 ppmv (90% relative humidity (RH) at 20 °C) water present in the sample gas is possible evaluating the signal from benzene ions formed via charge transfer.

  1. A novel electrochemical method to detect theophylline utilizing silver ions captured within abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jun Ki; Park, Ki Soo; Won, Byoung Yeon; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-05-15

    We herein describe a novel and label-free electrochemical system to detect theophylline. The system was constructed by immobilizing duplex DNA containing an abasic site opposite cytosine on the gold electrode surface. In the absence of theophylline in a sample, silver ions freely bind to the empty abasic site in the duplex DNA leading to the highly elevated electrochemical signal by the redox reaction of silver ions. On the other hand, when theophylline is present, it binds to the abasic site by pseudo base pairing with the opposite cytosine nucleobase, which consequently prevents silver ions from binding to the abasic site. As a result, redox reaction of silver ions would be greatly reduced resulting in the accordingly decreased electrochemical signal. By employing this electrochemical strategy, theophylline was reliably detected at a concentration as low as 3.2 μM with the high selectivity over structurally similar substances such as caffeine and theobromine. Finally, the diagnostic capability of this method was also successfully verified by reliably detecting theophylline present in a real human serum sample with an excellent recovery ratio within 100±6%.

  2. New fluorescent metal-ion detection using a paper-based sensor strip containing tethered rhodamine carbon nanodots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yujun; Jang, Geunseok; Lee, Taek Seung

    2015-07-22

    A strip of tethered rhodamine carbon nanodots (C-dots) was designed for selective detection of Al(3+) ion using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based ratiometric sensing mechanism. The probe consisted of rhodamine B moieties immobilized on the surface of water-soluble C-dots. Upon exposure to Al(3+), the rhodamine moieties showed a much enhanced emission intensity via energy transfer from the C-dots under excitation at their absorption wavelength. The detection mechanism was related to the Al(3+)-induced ring-opening of rhodamine on C-dots through the chelation of the rhodamine 6G moiety with Al(3+), leading to a spectral overlap of the absorption of C-dots (donor) and the emission of ring-opened rhodamine (acceptor). In addition, a paper-based sensor strip containing the tethered rhodamine C-dots was prepared for practical, versatile applications of Al(3+) sensing. The paper-based sensor could detect Al(3+) over other metal ions efficiently, even from a mixture of metal ions, with increased emission intensity at long-wavelength emission via FRET. Sensing based on FRET of C-dots is color-tunable, can be recognized with a naked eye, and may provide a new platform for specific metal-ion sensing. PMID:26112227

  3. 4-(2-Pyridylazo)-resorcinol Functionalized Thermosensitive Ionic Microgels for Optical Detection of Heavy Metal Ions at Nanomolar Level.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianjing; Nie, Jingjing; Du, Binyang

    2015-10-01

    4-(2-Pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR) functionalized thermosensitive ionic microgels (PAR-MG) were synthesized by a one-pot quaternization method. The PAR-MG microgels were spherical in shape with radius of ca. 166.0 nm and narrow size distribution and exhibited thermo-sensitivity in aqueous solution. The PAR-MG microgels could optically detect trace heavy metal ions, such as Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+), in aqueous solutions with high selectivity and sensitivity. The PAR-MG microgel suspensions exhibited characteristic color with the presence of various trace heavy metal ions, which could be visually distinguished by naked eyes. The limit of colorimetric detection (DL) was determined to be 38 nM for Cu(2+) at pH 3, 12 nM for Cu(2+) at pH 7, and 14, 79, 20, and 21 nM for Mn(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+), respectively, at pH 11, which was lower than (or close to) the United States Environmental Protection Agency standard for the safety limit of these heavy metal ions in drinking water. The mechanism of detection was attributed to the chelation between the nitrogen atoms and o-hydroxyl groups of PAR within the microgels and heavy metal ions.

  4. Direct Fluorescent Detection of Blood Potassium by Ion-Selective Formation of Intermolecular G-Quadruplex and Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Qing, Zhihe; Liu, Changhui; Tang, Qiao; Li, Jishan; Yang, Sheng; Zheng, Jing; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2016-09-20

    G-quadruplex analogues have been widely used as molecular tools for detection of potassium ion (K(+)). However, interference from a higher concentration of sodium ion (Na(+)), enzymatic degradation of the oligonucleotide, and background absorption and fluorescence of blood samples have all limited the use of G-quadruplex for direct detection of K(+) in blood samples. Here, we reported, for the first time, an intermolecular G-quadruplex-based assay capable of direct fluorescent detection of blood K(+). Increased stringency of intermolecular G-quadruplex formation based on our screened G-rich oligonucleotide (5'-TGAGGGA GGGG-3') provided the necessary selectivity for K(+) against Na(+) at physiological ion level. To increase long-term stability of oligonucleotide in blood, the screened oligonucleotide was modified with an inverted thymine nucleotide whose 3'-terminus was connected to the 3'-terminus of the upstream nucleotide, acting as a blocking group to greatly improve antinuclease stability. Lastly, to avoid interference from background absorption and autofluorescence of blood, a G-quadruplex-binding, two-photon-excited ligand, EBMVC-B, was synthesized and chosen as the fluorescence reporter. Thus, based on selective K(+) ion-induced formation of intermolecular G-quadruplex and EBMVC-B binding, this approach could linearly respond to K(+) from 0.5 to 10 mM, which matches quite well with the physiologically relevant concentration of blood K(+). Moreover, the system was highly selective for K(+) against other metal ions, including Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+) common in blood. The practical application was demonstrated by direct detection of K(+) from real blood samples by two-photon fluorescence technology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to exploit molecular G-quadruplex-based fluorescent sensing for direct assay of blood target. As such, we expect that it will promote the design and practical application of similar DNA-based sensors in

  5. High-throughput walkthrough detection portal for counter terrorism: detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor by atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Nakajima, Eri; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sakairi, Minoru

    2011-09-15

    With the aim of improving security, a high-throughput portal system for detecting triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor emitted from passengers and luggage was developed. The portal system consists of a push-pull air sampler, an atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source, and an explosives detector based on mass spectrometry. To improve the sensitivity of the explosives detector, a novel linear ion trap mass spectrometer with wire electrodes (wire-LIT) is installed in the portal system. TATP signals were clearly obtained 2 s after the subject under detection passed through the portal system. Preliminary results on sensitivity and throughput show that the portal system is a useful tool for preventing the use of TATP-based improvised explosive devices by screening persons in places where many people are coming and going. PMID:21818804

  6. Negative-ion formation in the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT by using the reversal electron attachment detection technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boumsellek, S.; Alajajian, S. H.; Chutjian, A.

    1992-01-01

    First results of a beam-beam, single-collision study of negative-ion mass spectra produced by attachment of zero-energy electrons to the molecules of the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT are presented. The technique used is reversal electron attachment detection (READ) wherein the zero-energy electrons are produced by focusing an intense electron beam into a shaped electrostatic field which reverses the trajectory of electrons. The target beam is introduced at the reversal point, and attachment occurs because the electrons have essentially zero longitudinal and radial velocity. The READ technique is used to obtain the 'signature' of molecular ion formation and/or fragmentation for each explosive. Present data are compared with results from atmospheric-pressure ionization and negative-ion chemical ionization methods.

  7. Electrochemical sample matrix elimination for trace-level potentiometric detection with polymeric membrane ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin Y; Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Wang, Joseph; Bakker, Eric

    2008-08-01

    Potentiometric sensors are today sufficiently well understood and optimized to reach ultratrace level (subnanomolar) detection limits for numerous ions. In many cases of practical relevance, however, a high electrolyte background hampers the attainable detection limits. A particularly difficult sample matrix for potentiometric detection is seawater, where the high saline concentration forms a major interfering background and reduces the activity of most trace metals by complexation. This paper describes for the first time a hyphenated system for the online electrochemically modulated preconcentration and matrix elimination of trace metals, combined with a downstream potentiometric detection with solid contact polymeric membrane ion-selective microelectrodes. Following the preconcentration at the bismuth-coated electrode, the deposited metals are oxidized and released to a medium favorable to potentiometric detection, in this case calcium nitrate. Matrix interferences arising from the saline sample medium are thus circumvented. This concept is successfully evaluated with cadmium as a model trace element and offers potentiometric detection down to low parts per billion levels in samples containing 0.5 M NaCl background electrolyte.

  8. Colloidal gold nanoparticle probe-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of chromium ions in water and serum samples

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xi; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Fu, Qiang-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Hui; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-09-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using gold nanoparticles coated with monoclonal antibody (McAb) for the detection of chromium ions (Cr) in water and serum samples was developed, optimized, and validated. Gold nanoparticles coated with affinity- purified monoclonal antibodies against isothiocyanobenzyl-EDTA (iEDTA)-chelated Cr3+ were used as the detecting reagent in this completive immunoassay-based one- step test strip. The ICA was investigated to measure chromium speciation in water samples. Chromium standard samples of 0-80 ng/mL in water were determined by the test strips. The results showed that the visual lowest detection limit (LDL) of the test strip was 50.0 ng/mL. A portable colorimetric lateral flow reader was used for the quantification of Cr. The results indicated that the linear range of the ICA with colorimetric detection was 5-80 ng/mL. The ICA was also validated for the detection of chromium ions in serum samples. The test trips showed high stability in that they could be stored at at 37 C for at least 12 weeks without significant loss of activity. The test strip also showed good selectivity for Cr detection with negligible interference from other heavy metals. Because of its low cost and short testing time (within 5 min), the test strip is especially suitable for on-site large- scale screening of Cr-polluted water samples, biomonitoring of Cr exposure, and many other field applications.

  9. Colorimetric detection of fluoride ions by anthraimidazoledione based sensors in the presence of Cu(ii) ions.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Amrita; Bhattacharyya, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Arindam

    2016-01-21

    Anthraquinone based anion receptors have gained importance due to their colorimetric response on sensing a specific anion and the possibility of tuning this property by varying the conjugated moiety (the donor) to the diamine. In this work, we have synthesized and characterized four anthraimidazoledione compounds having 2,5-dihydroxy benzene, 4-(bis(2-chloroethyl)amino)benzene, imidazole and 4-methylthiazole moieties respectively (1-4). All of them were probed for their potential as anion sensors to study the effect of changes in the hydrogen bond donor-acceptor. The p-hydroquinone bound anthraimidazoledione (1) and thioimidazole bound anthraimidazoledione (4) were able to detect both F(-) and CN(-) in the presence of other anions Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), H2PO4(-), OAc(-), NO3(-)and ClO4(-). Both 1 and 4 could not differentiate F(-) from CN(-) and provided a similar response to both. The 1H NMR studies of 1 and 4 with F(-) showed the formation of [HF2](-) at 16.3 ppm and the 19F NMR showed a sharp peak at -145 ppm in both cases. However, although there may be NMR evidence of [HF2](-) formation F(-) may not be detected colorimetrically if the CT band remains almost unchanged, as found for 3. The results emphasize that the change of a hetero atom in the donor moiety of an anthraimidazoledione may render a large difference in sensitivity. In the case of 4 selective detection of F(-) was possible in the presence of 0.5 equivalent of Cu2+ with the exhibition of a distinct green colour with a Δλ shift of ca. 50 nm in contrast to CN(-) which showed orange colouration with a Δλ shift of only 15 nm. In the presence of Cu2+ the F(-) detection limit was 0.038(5) ppm (below the WHO specified level) at a receptor concentration of 25 μM. PMID:26659520

  10. Mixing characteristics of mixers in flow analysis. Application to two-dimensional detection in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hongzhu; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Srinivasan, Kannan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Three mixer designs, a back-flow tee mixer (BT), an end-blocked membrane tee mixer (EMT), and a tubular membrane mixer (TM), were fabricated and compared to three commercially available mixers, Visco-Jet Micro mixer (VJM) and HS binary tee mixer with 2 and 10 μL volume (HS-2 and HS-10) mixing cartridges. Internal volumes ranged from 8.3 to 20.3 μL. Performance characteristics were evaluated by the Villermaux-Dushman reaction, noise in baseline conductance upon mixing an electrolyte solution with water, and dispersion/relative dispersion of an injected solute. No single characteristic would uniquely qualify a particular device. In typical postcolumn use when a small reagent flow is added to a principal flow stream using a low-pulsation high-end chromatographic pump, with the worst of these mixers, imperfect mixing accounted for 99.6% of the observed noise. EMT, BT, and TM with asymmetric inlets provided better mixing performances relative to VJM, HS-2, and HS-10 with symmetric inlet ports, especially when the secondary liquid flow rate was much lower than the principal stream-flow rate. Dispersion per unit residence time was singularly large for HS-2. Based on its mixing efficiency and small dispersion, the BT design was found to be the best for practicing postcolumn reaction. As an illustrative application, this was then used to introduce electrogenerated LiOH in a suppressed ion chromatography system to perform sensitive detection of weak acids in a second dimension. PMID:25426864

  11. Optimized thermal desorption for improved sensitivity in trace explosives detection by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Najarro, Marcela; Dávila Morris, Melissa E; Staymates, Matthew E; Fletcher, Robert; Gillen, Greg

    2012-06-01

    In this work we evaluate the influence of thermal desorber temperature on the analytical response of a swipe-based thermal desorption ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for detection of trace explosives. IMS response for several common high explosives ranging from 0.1 ng to 100 ng was measured over a thermal desorber temperature range from 60 °C to 280 °C. Most of the explosives examined demonstrated a well-defined maximum IMS signal response at a temperature slightly below the melting point. Optimal temperatures, giving the highest IMS peak intensity, were 80 °C for trinitrotoluene (TNT), 100 °C for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), 160 °C for cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and 200 °C for cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX). By modifying the desorber temperature, we were able to increase cumulative IMS signal by a factor of 5 for TNT and HMX, and by a factor of 10 for RDX and PETN. Similar signal enhancements were observed for the same compounds formulated as plastic-bonded explosives (Composition 4 (C-4), Detasheet, and Semtex). In addition, mixtures of the explosives exhibited similar enhancements in analyte peak intensities. The increases in sensitivity were obtained at the expense of increased analysis times of up to 20 seconds. A slow sample heating rate as well as slower vapor-phase analyte introduction rate caused by low-temperature desorption enhanced the analytical sensitivity of individual explosives, plastic-bonded explosives, and explosives mixtures by IMS. Several possible mechanisms that can affect IMS signal response were investigated such as thermal degradation of the analytes, ionization efficiency, competitive ionization from background, and aerosol emission. PMID:22498665

  12. Electrochemiluminescence of graphitic carbon nitride and its application in ultrasensitive detection of lead(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Lina; Kong, Qingkun; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) materials with a layered structure have unusual physicochemical properties. Herein it was shown that g-C3N4 quantum dots (QDs) obtained through a thermal-chemical etching route exhibited attractive upconversion and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) properties. After modification on nanoporous gold (NPG) with a sponge-like porous structure, g-C3N4 QDs were employed to fabricate an ECL sensor for the determination of Pb(2+) using target - dependent DNAzyme as the recognition unit. Moreover, magnetic reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (rGO) attached with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (rGO-Fe3O4) were obtained via a one-pot in situ reduction approach, and used as carriers of DNAzyme. To make full use of the unique magnetic property the prepared rGO-Fe3O4, a flow injection ECL detecting cell was designed using indium tin oxide (ITO) glass as working electrode. Due to the unique separation and enrichment properties of magnetic Fe3O4-rGO materials as well as wire-like conductivity of NPG, high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Pb(2+) in real water samples were achieved. This indicates that g-C3N4 has excellent anodic ECL performance in the presence of triethanolamine, and could be applied in real environmental samples analyses. Graphical Abstract Graphitic carbon nitride based electrochemiluminescence sensor for the sensitive monitor of lead(II) ions in real samples was constructed.

  13. Ion chromatographic determination of trace iodate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, bromate and nitrite in drinking water using suppressed conductivity detection and visible detection.

    PubMed

    Binghui, Zhu; Zhixiong, Zhong; Jing, Yao

    2006-06-16

    An ion chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of trace iodate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, bromate and nitrite in drinking water has been developed using an anion-exchange column and the suppressed conductivity detector, followed by post-column addition of reagent to enhance visible absorbance detection of ions. A high capacity anion exchange Ion Pac9-HC column (250 mm x 4 mm I.D.) was used. Eight millimole per liter sodium carbonate was used as eluent, an auto-suppression external water mode was selected, 0.5 g/l o-dianisidine.2HCl (ODA)+4.5 g/l KBr+25% methanel+5.6% nitric acid was used as post-column reagent. The post-column reaction (PCR) temperature was at 60 degrees C, and the visible absorbance detected wavelength at 450 nm. The sample's pH and coexist anions had no influence on determination. The method enjoyed a wide linear range and a good linear correlation coefficient (r>0.999). The method detection limits were between 0.023 and 2.0 microg/l. The average recoveries ranged from 87.5 to 110.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSD) were in the range of 1.1-4.6%. The analytical results by the method of post-column addition of reagent to enhance visible absorbance detection of anions was compared with that of the suppressed conductivity detection, and the former was proved to be better in sensitivity and selectivity. The results showed that this method was accurate, sensitive and might be good for application and suitable for trace analysis at the level of mug/l.

  14. A novel voltammetric sensor for sensitive detection of mercury(II) ions using glassy carbon electrode modified with graphene-based ion imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Heydari, Abolfazl; Ghanei-Motlagh, Reza; Gupta, Vinod K

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a novel strategy was proposed to prepare ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) on the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Polymerization was performed using methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,2'-((9E,10E)-1,4-dihydroxyanthracene-9,10-diylidene) bis(hydrazine-1-carbothioamide) (DDBHCT) as the chelating agent and ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator, via surface imprinted technique. The RGO-IIP was characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrochemical procedure was based on the accumulation of Hg(II) ions at the surface of a modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with RGO-IIP. The prepared RGO-IIP sensor has higher voltammetric response compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP), traditional IIP and RGO. The RGO-IIP modified electrode exhibited a linear relationship toward Hg(II) concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 80 μg L(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.02 μg L(-1) (S/N=3), below the guideline value from the World Health Organization (WHO). The applicability of the proposed electrochemical sensor to determination of mercury(II) ions in different water samples was reported. PMID:27040231

  15. A library-screening approach for developing a fluorescence sensing array for the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Smith, David G; Sajid, Naveed; Rehn, Simone; Chandramohan, Ramya; Carney, Isaac J; Khan, Misbahul A; New, Elizabeth J

    2016-08-01

    Detection of individual metal ions is of importance across a range of fields of chemistry including environmental monitoring, and health and disease. Fluorescence is a highly sensitive technique and small fluorescent molecules are widely used for the detection and quantification of metal ions in various applications. Achieving specificity for a single metal from a single sensor is always a challenge. An alternative to selective sensing is the use of a number of non-specific sensors, in an array, which together respond in a unique pattern to each analyte. Here we show that screening a library of compounds can give a small sensor set that can be used to identify a range of metal ions following PCA and LDA. We explore a method for screening the initial compounds to identify the best performing sensors. We then present our method for reducing the size of the sensor array, resulting in a four-membered system, which is capable of identifying nine distinct metal ion species in lake water. PMID:27291513

  16. Sensitivity and selectivity of switchable reagent ion soft chemical ionization mass spectrometry for the detection of picric acid.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Bishu; González-Méndez, Ramón; Lanza, Matteo; Sulzer, Philipp; Märk, Tilmann D; Thomas, Neil; Mayhew, Chris A

    2014-09-18

    We have investigated the reactions of NO(+), H3O(+), O2(+), and Kr(+) with picric acid (2,4,6 trinitrophenol, C6H3N3O7, PiA) using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a switchable reagent ion source. NO(+) forms a simple adduct ion PiA·NO(+), while H3O(+) reacts with PiA via nondissociative proton transfer to form PiAH(+). In contrast, both O2(+) and Kr(+) react with PiA by nondissociative charge transfer to produce PiA(+). For Kr(+), we also observe dissociation of PiA, producing NO2(+) with a branching percentage of approximately 40%. For the reagent ions H3O(+) and O2(+) (and operating the drift tube with normal laboratory air), we find that the intensities of the PiAH(+) and PiA(+) ions both exhibit a peak at a given drift-tube voltage (which is humidity dependent). This unusual behavior implies a peak in the detection sensitivity of PiA as a function of the drift-tube voltage (and hence E/N). Aided by electronic-structure calculations and our previous studies of trinitrotoluene and trinitrobenzene, we provide a possible explanation for the observed peak in the detection sensitivity of PiA.

  17. Coincidence momentum imaging of the Coulomb explosion of OCS induced by collision of 15keV/q Ar4+ Ar8+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, Benji; Motojima, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Jun; Shiromaru, Haruo; Sanderson, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    Ar4+ and Ar8+ ions of 15keV/q from the TMUECRIS have been used in conjunction with a triple coincidence time and position sensitive detection apparatus to observe the Coulomb explosion of OCS. By varying the projectile ion we can access several ionization channels from (1,1,1) to (2,2,2) (where (a,b,c) represents the production of fragments Oa+ + Cb+ + Sc+). In all cases the kinetic energy release peaks are equal to or greater than equilibrium geometry calculations and the distribution widths increase with increasing energy. The extent to which channels are concerted or stepwise is also determined.

  18. A reversible fluorescence "off-on-off" sensor for sequential detection of aluminum and acetate/fluoride ions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Mergu, Naveen; Kumawat, Lokesh Kumar; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2015-11-01

    A new rhodamine functionalized fluorogenic Schiff base CS was synthesized and its colorimetric and fluorescence responses toward various metal ions were explored. The sensor exhibited highly selective and sensitive colorimetric and "off-on" fluorescence response towards Al(3+) in the presence of other competing metal ions. These spectral changes are large enough in the visible region of the spectrum and thus enable naked-eye detection. Studies proved that the formation of CS-Al(3+) complex is fully reversible and can sense to AcO(-)/F(-) via dissociation. The results revealed that the sensor provides fluorescence "off-on-off" strategy for the sequential detection of Al(3+) and AcO(-)/F(-). PMID:26452794

  19. Generation and detection of metal ions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the pretreatment processes for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    The recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries brings benefits to both economic and environmental terms, but it can also lead to contaminants in a workshop environment. This study focused on metals, non-metals and volatile organic compounds generated by the discharging and dismantling pretreatment processes which are prerequisite for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries. After discharging in NaCl solution, metal contents in supernate and concentrated liquor were detected. Among results of condition #2, #3, #4 and #5, supernate and concentrated liquor contain high levels of Na, Al, Fe; middle levels of Co, Li, Cu, Ca, Zn; and low levels of Mn, Sn, Cr, Zn, Ba, K, Mg, V. The Hg, Ag, Cr and V are not detected in any of the analyzed supernate. 10wt% NaCl solution was a better discharging condition for high discharge efficiency, less possible harm to environment. To collect the gas released from dismantled LIB belts, a set of gas collecting system devices was designed independently. Two predominant organic vapour compounds were dimethyl carbonate (4.298mgh(-1)) and tert-amylbenzene (0.749mgh(-1)) from one dismantled battery cell. To make sure the concentrations of dimethyl carbonate under recommended industrial exposure limit (REL) of 100mgL(-1), for a workshop on dismantling capacity of 1000kg spent LIBs, the minimum flow rate of ventilating pump should be 235.16m(3)h(-1).

  20. Generation and detection of metal ions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the pretreatment processes for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    The recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries brings benefits to both economic and environmental terms, but it can also lead to contaminants in a workshop environment. This study focused on metals, non-metals and volatile organic compounds generated by the discharging and dismantling pretreatment processes which are prerequisite for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries. After discharging in NaCl solution, metal contents in supernate and concentrated liquor were detected. Among results of condition #2, #3, #4 and #5, supernate and concentrated liquor contain high levels of Na, Al, Fe; middle levels of Co, Li, Cu, Ca, Zn; and low levels of Mn, Sn, Cr, Zn, Ba, K, Mg, V. The Hg, Ag, Cr and V are not detected in any of the analyzed supernate. 10wt% NaCl solution was a better discharging condition for high discharge efficiency, less possible harm to environment. To collect the gas released from dismantled LIB belts, a set of gas collecting system devices was designed independently. Two predominant organic vapour compounds were dimethyl carbonate (4.298mgh(-1)) and tert-amylbenzene (0.749mgh(-1)) from one dismantled battery cell. To make sure the concentrations of dimethyl carbonate under recommended industrial exposure limit (REL) of 100mgL(-1), for a workshop on dismantling capacity of 1000kg spent LIBs, the minimum flow rate of ventilating pump should be 235.16m(3)h(-1). PMID:27021697

  1. A Highly Selective and Non-Reaction Based Chemosensor for the Detection of Hg2+ Ions Using a Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Modi; Liu, Li-Juan; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2013-01-01

    We report herein a novel luminescent iridium(III) complex with two hydrophobic carbon chains as a non-reaction based chemosensor for the detection of Hg2+ ions in aqueous solution (<0.002% of organic solvent attributed to the probe solution). Upon the addition of Hg2+ ions, the emission intensity of the complex was significantly enhanced and this change could be monitored by the naked eye under UV irradiation. The iridium(III) complex shows high specificity for Hg2+ ions over eighteen other cations. The system is capable of detecting micromolar levels of Hg2+ ions, which is within the range of many chemical systems. PMID:23533670

  2. A sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions based on anti-aggregation of unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Abbasi-Moayed, Samira

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions, based on anti-aggregation of D-penicillamine (D-PC) induced aggregated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. Copper ions can hinder the aggregation of AuNPs induced by D-PC, through formation of mixed-valence complex with D-PC that is a selective copper chelator. In the presence of a fixed amount of D-PC, the aggregation of AuNPs decreases with increasing concentrations of Cu(2+) along with a color change from blue to red in AuNPs solution and an increase in the absorption ratio (A520/A650). Under the optimum experimental conditions (pH 7, [AuNPs] =3.0 nmol L(-1) and [NaCl]=25 mmol L(-1)), a linear calibration curve for Cu(2+) was obtained within the range of 0.05-1.85 µmol L(-1) with a limit of detection (3Sb) of 30 nmol L(-1). Excellent selectivity toward Cu(2+) was observed among various metal ions due to a specific complex formation between Cu(2+) and D-PC. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the detection of Cu(2+) in various real samples.

  3. DNA derived fluorescent bio-dots for sensitive detection of mercury and silver ions in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Zhu, Xuefeng; Zhou, Shenghai; Yang, Guang; Gan, Wei; Yuan, Qunhui

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the high affinity between heavy metal ions and bio-molecules as well as the low toxicity of carbon-based quantum dots, we demonstrated the first application of a DNA derived carbonaceous quantum dots, namely bio-dots, in metal ion sensing. The present DNA-derived bio-dots contain graphitic carbon layers with 0.242 nm lattice fringes, exhibit excellent fluorescence property and can be obtained via a facile hydrothermal preparation procedure. Hg(II) and Ag(I) are prone to be captured by the bio-dots due to the existence of residual thymine (T) and cytosine (C) groups, resulting in a quenched fluorescence while other heavy metal ions would cause negligible changes on the fluorescent signals of the bio-dots. The bio-dots could be used as highly selective toxic-free biosensors, with two detecting linear ranges of 0-0.5 μM and 0.5-6 μM for Hg(II) and one linear range of 0-10 μM for Ag(I). The detection limits (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were estimated to be 48 nM for Hg(II) and 0.31 μM for Ag(I), respectively. The detection of Hg(II) and Ag(I) could also be realized in the real water sample analyses, with satisfying recoveries ranging from 87% to 100%.

  4. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  5. Label-free fluorescent sensor for lead ion detection based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shenshan; Wu, Yuangen; Luo, Yanfang; Liu, Le; He, Lan; Xing, Haibo; Zhou, Pei

    2014-10-01

    A label-free fluorescent DNA sensor for the detection of lead ions (Pb(2+)) based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation is proposed in this article. A guanine (G)-rich oligonucleotide, T30695, was used as a recognition probe, and a DNA intercalator, SYBR Green I (SG), was used as a signal reporter. In the absence of Pb(2+), the SG intercalated with the single-stranded random-coil T30695 and emitted strong fluorescence. While in the presence of Pb(2+), the random-coil T30695 would fold into a G-quadruplex structure and the SG could barely show weak fluorescence, and the fluorescence intensity was inversely proportional to the involving amount of Pb(2+). Based on this, a selective lead ion sensor with a limit of detection of 3.79 ppb (parts per billion) and a detection range from 0 to 600 ppb was constructed. Because detection for real samples was also demonstrated to be reliable, this simple, low-cost, sensitive, and selective sensor holds good potential for Pb(2+) detection in real environmental samples.

  6. Intracellular detection of Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions through a quinazoline functionalized benzimidazole-based new fluorogenic differential chemosensor.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anup; Anbu, Sellamuthu; Sharma, Gunjan; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Koch, Biplob; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-10-14

    A new quinazoline functionalized benzimidazole-based fluorogenic chemosensor H3L is synthesized and fully characterized by conventional techniques including single crystal X-ray analysis. It acts as a highly selective colorimetric and fluorescence sensor for Cu(2+) ions in DMF/0.02 M HEPES (1 : 1, v/v, pH = 7.4) medium. Reaction of H3L with CuCl2 forms a mononuclear copper(ii) [Cu(Cl)(H2L)(H2O)] (H2L-Cu(2+)) complex which is characterized by conventional techniques and quantum chemical calculations. Electronic absorption and fluorescence titration studies of H3L with different metal cations show a distinctive recognition only towards Cu(2+) ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting ions such as Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+). Moreover, H2L-Cu(2+) acts as a metal based highly selective and sensitive chemosensor for S(2-) ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting anions such as F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), SO4(2-), SCN(-), AcO(-), H2PO4(-), PO4(3-), NO3(-), ClO4(-), NO2(-), HSO4(-), HSO4(2-), S2O3(2-), S2O8(2-), CN(-), CO3(2-) and HCO3(-) in DMF/0.02 M HEPES (1 : 1, v/v, pH = 7.4) medium. Quantification analysis indicates that these receptors, H3L and H2L-Cu(2+), can detect the presence of Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions at very low concentrations of 1.6 × 10(-9) M and 5.2 × 10(-6) M, respectively. The propensity of H3L as a bio-imaging fluorescent probe for detection of Cu(2+) ions and sequential detection of S(2-) ions by H2L-Cu(2+) in Dalton lymphoma (DL) cancer cells is also shown.

  7. Intracellular detection of Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions through a quinazoline functionalized benzimidazole-based new fluorogenic differential chemosensor.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anup; Anbu, Sellamuthu; Sharma, Gunjan; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Koch, Biplob; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-10-14

    A new quinazoline functionalized benzimidazole-based fluorogenic chemosensor H3L is synthesized and fully characterized by conventional techniques including single crystal X-ray analysis. It acts as a highly selective colorimetric and fluorescence sensor for Cu(2+) ions in DMF/0.02 M HEPES (1 : 1, v/v, pH = 7.4) medium. Reaction of H3L with CuCl2 forms a mononuclear copper(ii) [Cu(Cl)(H2L)(H2O)] (H2L-Cu(2+)) complex which is characterized by conventional techniques and quantum chemical calculations. Electronic absorption and fluorescence titration studies of H3L with different metal cations show a distinctive recognition only towards Cu(2+) ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting ions such as Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+). Moreover, H2L-Cu(2+) acts as a metal based highly selective and sensitive chemosensor for S(2-) ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting anions such as F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), SO4(2-), SCN(-), AcO(-), H2PO4(-), PO4(3-), NO3(-), ClO4(-), NO2(-), HSO4(-), HSO4(2-), S2O3(2-), S2O8(2-), CN(-), CO3(2-) and HCO3(-) in DMF/0.02 M HEPES (1 : 1, v/v, pH = 7.4) medium. Quantification analysis indicates that these receptors, H3L and H2L-Cu(2+), can detect the presence of Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions at very low concentrations of 1.6 × 10(-9) M and 5.2 × 10(-6) M, respectively. The propensity of H3L as a bio-imaging fluorescent probe for detection of Cu(2+) ions and sequential detection of S(2-) ions by H2L-Cu(2+) in Dalton lymphoma (DL) cancer cells is also shown. PMID:26370442

  8. Negative-ion formation in the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT using the Reversal Electron Attachment Detection (READ) technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutijian, Ara; Boumsellek, S.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the search for high sensitivity and direct atmospheric sampling of trace species, techniques have been developed such as atmospheric-sampling, glow-discharge ionization (ASGDI), corona discharge, atmospheric pressure ionization (API), electron-capture detection (ECD), and negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) that are capable of detecting parts-per-billion to parts-per-trillion concentrations of trace species. These techniques are based on positive- or negative-ion formation via charge-transfer to the target, or electron capture under multiple-collision conditions in a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies at the source temperature. One drawback of the high-pressure, corona- or glow-discharge devices is that they are susceptible to interferences either through indistinguishable product masses, or through undesired ion-molecule reactions. The ASGDI technique is relatively immune from such interferences, since at target concentrations of less than 1 ppm the majority of negative ions arises via electron capture rather than through ion-molecule chemistry. A drawback of the conventional ECD, and possibly of the ASGDI, is that they exhibit vanishingly small densities of electrons with energies in the range 0-10 millielectron volts (meV), as can be seen from a typical Maxwellian electron energy distribution function at T = 300 K. Slowing the electrons to these subthermal (less than 10 meV) energies is crucial, since the cross section for attachment of several large classes of molecules is known to increase to values larger than 10(exp -12) sq cm at near-zero electron energies. In the limit of zero energy these cross sections are predicted to diverge as epsilon(exp -1/2), where epsilon is the electron energy. In order to provide a better 'match' between the electron energy distribution function and attachment cross section, a new concept of attachment in an electrostatic mirror was developed. In this scheme, electrons are brought to a momentary halt by

  9. Spectroscopic detection and state preparation of a single praseodymium ion in a crystal.

    PubMed

    Utikal, T; Eichhammer, E; Petersen, L; Renn, A; Götzinger, S; Sandoghdar, V

    2014-04-11

    The narrow optical transitions and long spin coherence times of rare earth ions in crystals make them desirable for a number of applications ranging from solid-state spectroscopy and laser physics to quantum information processing. However, investigations of these features have not been possible at the single-ion level. Here we show that the combination of cryogenic high-resolution laser spectroscopy with optical microscopy allows one to spectrally select individual praseodymium ions in yttrium orthosilicate. Furthermore, this spectral selectivity makes it possible to resolve neighbouring ions with a spatial precision of the order of 10 nm. In addition to elaborating on the essential experimental steps for achieving this long-sought goal, we demonstrate state preparation and read out of the three ground-state hyperfine levels, which are known to have lifetimes of the order of hundred seconds.

  10. Spectroscopic detection and state preparation of a single praseodymium ion in a crystal.

    PubMed

    Utikal, T; Eichhammer, E; Petersen, L; Renn, A; Götzinger, S; Sandoghdar, V

    2014-01-01

    The narrow optical transitions and long spin coherence times of rare earth ions in crystals make them desirable for a number of applications ranging from solid-state spectroscopy and laser physics to quantum information processing. However, investigations of these features have not been possible at the single-ion level. Here we show that the combination of cryogenic high-resolution laser spectroscopy with optical microscopy allows one to spectrally select individual praseodymium ions in yttrium orthosilicate. Furthermore, this spectral selectivity makes it possible to resolve neighbouring ions with a spatial precision of the order of 10 nm. In addition to elaborating on the essential experimental steps for achieving this long-sought goal, we demonstrate state preparation and read out of the three ground-state hyperfine levels, which are known to have lifetimes of the order of hundred seconds. PMID:24722142

  11. Spectroscopic detection and state preparation of a single praseodymium ion in a crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utikal, T.; Eichhammer, E.; Petersen, L.; Renn, A.; Götzinger, S.; Sandoghdar, V.

    2014-04-01

    The narrow optical transitions and long spin coherence times of rare earth ions in crystals make them desirable for a number of applications ranging from solid-state spectroscopy and laser physics to quantum information processing. However, investigations of these features have not been possible at the single-ion level. Here we show that the combination of cryogenic high-resolution laser spectroscopy with optical microscopy allows one to spectrally select individual praseodymium ions in yttrium orthosilicate. Furthermore, this spectral selectivity makes it possible to resolve neighbouring ions with a spatial precision of the order of 10 nm. In addition to elaborating on the essential experimental steps for achieving this long-sought goal, we demonstrate state preparation and read out of the three ground-state hyperfine levels, which are known to have lifetimes of the order of hundred seconds.

  12. Integrated optic chemical sensor for the simultaneous detection and quantification of multiple ions. Final report, March--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, E.

    1995-09-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by Physical Optics Corporation (POC) on the DOE contract entitled {open_quotes}Integrated Optic Chemical Sensor for the Simultaneous Detection and Quantification of Multiple Metal Ions{close_quotes}. This project successfully demonstrated a multi-element integrated optic chemical sensor (IOCS) system capable of simultaneous detection and quantification of metal ions in a water flow stream. POC`s innovative integrated optic chemical sensor technology uses an array of chemically active optical waveguides integrated in parallel in a single small IOCS chip. The IOCS technique uses commonly available materials and straightforward processing to produce channel waveguides in porous glass, each channel treated with a chemical indicator that responds optically to heavy metal ions in a water flow stream. The porosity of the glass allows metal ions present in the water to diffuse into the glass and interact with the immobilized indicators, producing a measurable optical chance. For the {open_quotes}proof-of-concept{close_quotes} demonstration, POC designed and fabricated two types of IOCS chips. Type I uses an array of four straight channel waveguides, three of which are doped with a metal sensitive indicator, an ionophore. The undoped fourth channel is used as the reference channel. Type II uses a 1 x 4 star coupler structure with three sensing channels and a reference channel. Successful implementation of the IOCS technology is expected to have a broad impact on water quality control as well as in the commercial environmental monitoring market. Because of the self-referenced, multidetection capability of the IOCS technique, POC`s water quality sensors are expected to find markets in environmental monitoring and protection, ground water monitoring, and in-line process control. Specific applications include monitoring of chromium, copper, and iron ions in water discharged by the metal plating industry.

  13. A sensitive electrochemical sensor using an iron oxide/graphene composite for the simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sohee; Oh, Jiseop; Kim, Dongwon; Piao, Yuanzhe

    2016-11-01

    We report an analytical assessment of an iron oxide (Fe2O3)/graphene (G) nanocomposite electrode used in combination with in situ plated bismuth (Bi) working as an electrochemical sensor for the determination of trace Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+). The as-synthesized nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analyzer, and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical properties of the Fe2O3/G/Bi composite modified electrode were investigated. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry was applied for the detection of metal ions. Due to the synergetic effect between graphene and the Fe2O3 nanoparticles, the modified electrode showed improved electrochemical catalytic activity high sensitivity toward trace heavy metal ions. Several parameters such as the preconcentration potential, bismuth concentration, preconcentration time, and pH were carefully optimized to determine the target metal ions. Under optimized conditions, the linear range of the electrode was 1-100μgL(-1) for Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+), and the detection limits were 0.11μgL(-1), 0.08μgL(-1), and 0.07μgL(-1), respectively (S/N =3). Repeatability (% RSD) was found to be 1.68% for Zn(2+), 0.92% for Cd(2+), and 1.69% for Pb(2+) for single sensor with 10 measurements and 0.89% for Zn(2+), 1.15% for Cd(2+), and 0.91% for Pb(2+) for 5 different electrodes. The Fe2O3/G/Bi composite electrode was successfully applied to the analysis of trace metal ions in real samples. The solventless thermal decomposition method applied to the simple and easy synthesis of nanocomposite electrode materials can be extended to the synthesis of nanocomposites and promising electrode materials for the determination of heavy metal ions. PMID:27591647

  14. Performance of a compact position-sensitive photon counting detector with image charge coupling to an air-side anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagutzki, O.; Czasch, A.; Schössler, S.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss a novel micro-channel plate (MCP) photomultiplier with resistive screen (RS-PMT) as a detection device for space- and time-correlated single photon counting, illustrated by several applications. The photomultiplier tube resembles a standard image intensifier device. However, the rear phosphor screen is replaced by a ceramic "window" with resistive coating. The MCP output is transferred through the ceramic plate to the read-out electrode (on the air side) via capacity-coupling of the image charge. This design allows for an easy reconfiguration of the read-out electrode (e.g. pixel, charge-sharing, cross-strip, delay-line) without breaking the vacuum for optimizing the detector performance towards a certain task. It also eases the design and manufacturing process of such a multi-purpose photomultiplier tube. Temporal and spatial resolutions well below 100 ps and 100 microns, respectively, have been reported at event rates as high as 1 MHz, for up to 40 mm effective detection diameter. In this paper we will discuss several applications like wide-field fluorescence microscopy and dual γ/fast-neutron radiography for air cargo screening and conclude with an outlook on large-area detectors for thermal neutrons based on MCPs.

  15. Application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer for detection of mercury, lead and iron ions using surface plasmon resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A S M; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H N; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°. PMID:24733263

  16. Application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer for detection of mercury, lead and iron ions using surface plasmon resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A S M; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H N; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°.

  17. Sensitive detection of black powder by stand-alone ion mobility spectrometer with chlorinated hydrocarbon modifiers in drift gas.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xixi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Weiguo; Zhou, Qinghua; Chen, Chuang; Peng, Liying; Wen, Meng; Qu, Tuanshuai; Wang, Zhenxin; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2014-04-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for selective and sensitive detection of black powder by adding chlorinated hydrocarbons in the drift gas instead of changing the structure of conventional ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The function of chloride modifiers was to substitute Cl(-)(H₂O)n for [O₂⁻ (H₂O)(n)] in the drift region so as to avoid the overlap between O₂⁻ (H₂O)(n) and sulfur ion peaks. Among CH₂Cl₂, CHCl₃ and CCl₄, CCl₄ was chosen as the modifier due to the best peak-to-peak resolution and stability towards the fluctuation of modifier concentration. With 1.4 ppm CCl₄ as the modifier, the minimum detectable quantity of 0.1 ng for sulfur was achieved. Moreover, this method showed the ability for detection of common explosives at sub-nanogram level, such as black powder (BP), ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). In summary, this method requiring no configuration modification has high sensitivity and selectivity, and consumes trace amount of modifier. And these characteristics make it easy to be adopted in current deployed IMS to detect black powder explosives.

  18. Micro Ion Source Program NA22 Plutonium Detection Portfolio Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Delmore

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the micro ion source program was to enhance the performance of thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) for various actinides and fission products. The proposal hypothesized that when ions are created at the ion optic center of the mass spectrometer, ion transmission is significantly increased and the resulting ion beam is more sharply focused. Computer modeling demonstrated this logic. In order to prove this hypothesis it was first necessary to understand the chemistry and physics governing the particular ion production process that concentrates the emission of ions into a small area. This has been achieved for uranium and technetium, as was shown in the original proposal and the improvement of both the beam transmission and sharpness of focus were proven. Significantly improved analytical methods have been developed for these two elements based upon this research. The iodine portion of the proposal turned out to be impractical due to volatility of iodine and its compounds. We knew this was a possibility prior to research and we proceeded anyway but did not succeed. Plutonium is a potential option, but is not quite up to the performance level of resin beads. Now, we more clearly understand the chemical and physical issues for plutonium, but have not yet translated this knowledge into improved analytical processes. The problems are that plutonium is considerably more difficult to convert to the required intermediate species, plutonium carbide, and the chemical method we developed that works with uranium functions only moderately well with plutonium. We are of the opinion that, with this knowledge, similar progress can be made with plutonium.

  19. A catalytic chemodosimetric approach for detection of nanomolar cyanide ions in water, blood serum and live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Sandhu, Sana; Hundal, Geeta; Singh, Prabhpreet; Walia, Amandeep; Vanita, Vanita; Kumar, Subodh

    2015-12-01

    Naphthimidazolium based monocationic chemodosimeters CD-1 and CD-2 undergo cyanide mediated catalytic transformation in the presence of cyanide ions (0.01% to 1% of CD-1/CD-2 concentrations) with a turnover number from 70 to 360. These chemodosimeters can detect as low as 0.5 nM and 1 nM cyanide ions under nearly physiological conditions (HEPES buffer-DMSO (5%), pH 7.4). The structures of CD-1 and its cyanide induced hydrolyzed product 4 have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography. CD-1 can also be used for the determination of 2 nM cyanide in the presence of blood serum. CD-1 and CD-2 also find applications in live cell imaging of 10 nM cyanide ions in rat brain C6 glioma cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where high sensitivity towards cyanide ions has been achieved through catalytic hydrolysis of the fluorescent chemodosimeter.

  20. Development of a Fourier-Transform Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance detection for short-lived radionuclides at SHIPTRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Ketelaer, J.; Nagy, Sz.; Neidherr, D.; Weber, C.; Shiptrap Collaboration

    2007-11-01

    The Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI is designed to provide clean and cooled beams of singly charged radioactive ions produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and separated in-flight by the velocity filter SHIP. The scientific goals include mass spectrometry, atomic and nuclear spectroscopy, and chemistry of transuranium species which are not available at ISOL- or fragmentation facilities Penning-trap based mass measurements on radionuclides relies up to now on the destructive time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance method. One of the main limitations to the experimental investigations is the low production rate of most of these exotic nuclides, for which the use of this detection scheme is not applicable. A sensitive and non-destructive method, like the narrow-band Fourier Transform ion-cyclotron-resonance technique, is ideally suited for the identification and characterization of these species. A new cryogenic trap setup for SHIPTRAP exploiting this detection technique as well as some results of first preparatory tests are presented.

  1. Detection of sub-ppm traces of aqueous heavy-metal ions using micro-electro-mechanical beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahafrooz, Amir; Pourkamali, Siavash

    2009-11-01

    Capacitive silicon micro-mechanical resonators have been utilized in this work as ultra-sensitive mass sensors for the detection of trace amounts of copper ions in water samples. The approach is based on the reduction of aqueous metal ions by the silicon in a resonant structure and consequently deposition of a very thin metal layer on the resonator surface changing its resonant frequency. Measurements demonstrate successful detection of sub-ppm concentrations of copper(II) ions in water. Relatively large frequency shifts (hundreds of ppm) have been measured for resonators exposed to copper concentrations as low as 4 µM (0.26 ppm). An analytical model for the resonant frequency of the resulting complex beams has been derived and used to calculate the thickness of the deposited copper layer based on the measured frequency shifts. The model shows that the measured frequency shifts correspond to only a few atomic layers of copper (as thin as ~7 Å) deposited on the resonator surfaces. This corresponds to a mass sensitivity of more than 4000 Hz µg-1 cm-2 which is much larger than the highest mass sensitivities measured for quartz crystal microbalances.

  2. Amperometric Detection of Aqueous Silver Ions by Inhibition of Glucose Oxidase Immobilized on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rust, Ian M; Goran, Jacob M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2015-07-21

    An amperometric glucose biosensor based on immobilization of glucose oxidase on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) was successfully developed for the determination of silver ions. Upon exposure to glucose, a steady-state enzymatic turnover rate was detected through amperometric oxidation of the H2O2 byproduct, directly related to the concentration of glucose in solution. Inhibition of the steady-state enzymatic glucose oxidase reaction by heavy metals ions such as Ag(+), produced a quantitative decrease in the steady-state rate, subsequently creating an ultrasensitive metal ion biosensor through enzymatic inhibition. The Ag(+) biosensor displayed a sensitivity of 2.00 × 10(8) ± 0.06 M(-1), a limit of detection (σ = 3) of 0.19 ± 0.04 ppb, a linear range of 20-200 nM, and sample recovery at 101 ± 2%, all acquired at a low-operating potential of 0.05 V (vs Hg/Hg2SO4). Interestingly, the biosensor does not display a loss in sensitivity with continued use due to the % inhibition based detection scheme: loss of enzyme (from continued use) does not influence the % inhibition, only the overall current associated with the activity loss. The heavy metals Cu(2+) and Co(2+) were also detected using the enzyme biosensor but found to be much less inhibitory, with sensitivities of 1.45 × 10(6) ± 0.05 M(-1) and 2.69 × 10(3) ± 0.07 M(-1), respectively. The mode of GOx inhibition was examined for both Ag(+) and Cu(2+) using Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots, where a strong correlation was observed between the inhibition constants and the biosensor sensitivity.

  3. Amperometric Detection of Aqueous Silver Ions by Inhibition of Glucose Oxidase Immobilized on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rust, Ian M; Goran, Jacob M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2015-07-21

    An amperometric glucose biosensor based on immobilization of glucose oxidase on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) was successfully developed for the determination of silver ions. Upon exposure to glucose, a steady-state enzymatic turnover rate was detected through amperometric oxidation of the H2O2 byproduct, directly related to the concentration of glucose in solution. Inhibition of the steady-state enzymatic glucose oxidase reaction by heavy metals ions such as Ag(+), produced a quantitative decrease in the steady-state rate, subsequently creating an ultrasensitive metal ion biosensor through enzymatic inhibition. The Ag(+) biosensor displayed a sensitivity of 2.00 × 10(8) ± 0.06 M(-1), a limit of detection (σ = 3) of 0.19 ± 0.04 ppb, a linear range of 20-200 nM, and sample recovery at 101 ± 2%, all acquired at a low-operating potential of 0.05 V (vs Hg/Hg2SO4). Interestingly, the biosensor does not display a loss in sensitivity with continued use due to the % inhibition based detection scheme: loss of enzyme (from continued use) does not influence the % inhibition, only the overall current associated with the activity loss. The heavy metals Cu(2+) and Co(2+) were also detected using the enzyme biosensor but found to be much less inhibitory, with sensitivities of 1.45 × 10(6) ± 0.05 M(-1) and 2.69 × 10(3) ± 0.07 M(-1), respectively. The mode of GOx inhibition was examined for both Ag(+) and Cu(2+) using Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots, where a strong correlation was observed between the inhibition constants and the biosensor sensitivity. PMID:26079664

  4. Detecting weak fluorescence turn-on in the presence of Pb2+ heavy metal ion using coaxial fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianjun; Chiniforooshan, Yasser; Hao, Wenhui; Bock, Wojtek J.; Wang, Zhi Yuan

    2013-10-01

    This paper is devoted to examining the ability of a coaxial fiber-optic sensor (FOS) in detecting weak fluorescent light and weak fluorescence "turn-on" in the presence of trace heavy metal ion Pb2+. The captured fluorescent signal is detected by the Ocean Optics QE65000 spectrometer. The stock solutions include Pb2+ acetate in water (0.01 M) and a small molecule probe in water. The preliminary experiment shows that this FOS offers the Pb2+ detection limit (DL) of 1.26×10-4 mg/mL. The advantages, limitations and further improvements of this coaxial FOS are discussed in comparison with the bench-top instruments in terms of the abilities of signal light capture and stray excitation light suppression.

  5. High adsorptive γ-AlOOH(boehmite)@SiO2/Fe3O4 porous magnetic microspheres for detection of toxic metal ions in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Yang, Ran; Zhang, Yong-Xing; Wang, Lun; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2011-10-21

    γ-AlOOH(boehmite)@SiO(2)/Fe(3)O(4) porous magnetic microspheres with high adsorption capacity toward heavy metal ions were found to be useful for the simultaneous and selective electrochemical detection of five metal ions, such as ultratrace zinc(II), cadmium(II), lead(II), copper(II), and mercury(II), in drinking water.

  6. The role of copper ions in pathophysiology and fluorescent sensors for the detection thereof.

    PubMed

    Verwilst, Peter; Sunwoo, Kyoung; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-04-01

    Copper ions are indispensible to life and maintaining tight control over the homeostasis of copper ions in the body is a prerequisite to sustaining health. Aberrations in normal copper levels, both systemic as well as on a tissue or cellular scale, are implicated in a wide range of diseases, such as Menkes disease, Wilson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (prion diseases). The current understanding of how copper influences these diseases is described. The field of fluorescent copper sensors both functioning via a reaction based mechanism as well as by directly binding copper ions has known an inflation in recent years, and the importance of this field to elucidating the role of copper in cell biology is pointed out. Progress in these tightly interwoven fields has resulted in a better understanding of a number of diseases related to copper imbalances and current developments might open the path for novel and innovating therapies to address these diseases. PMID:25647245

  7. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts andmore » noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.« less

  8. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin S.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-12-01

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm employs an analytical approach to identify and remove artifacts from the data, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. Following application of the algorithm, IMS-MS measurement sensitivity is greatly increased and artifacts that previously limited the utility of applying the Hadamard transform to IMS are avoided. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts and noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.

  10. The role of copper ions in pathophysiology and fluorescent sensors for the detection thereof.

    PubMed

    Verwilst, Peter; Sunwoo, Kyoung; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-04-01

    Copper ions are indispensible to life and maintaining tight control over the homeostasis of copper ions in the body is a prerequisite to sustaining health. Aberrations in normal copper levels, both systemic as well as on a tissue or cellular scale, are implicated in a wide range of diseases, such as Menkes disease, Wilson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (prion diseases). The current understanding of how copper influences these diseases is described. The field of fluorescent copper sensors both functioning via a reaction based mechanism as well as by directly binding copper ions has known an inflation in recent years, and the importance of this field to elucidating the role of copper in cell biology is pointed out. Progress in these tightly interwoven fields has resulted in a better understanding of a number of diseases related to copper imbalances and current developments might open the path for novel and innovating therapies to address these diseases.

  11. DNA-based Nanoconstructs for the Detection of Ions and Biomolecules with Related Raman/SERS Signature Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Kimber L.

    The utilization of DNA aptamers and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of ions and biomolecules was investigated. In recent years, there have been many studies based on the use of DNA and RNA aptamers, which are single stranded oligonucleotides capable of binding to biomolecules, other molecules, and ions. In many of these cases, the conformational changes of these DNA and RNA aptamers are suitable to use fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) or nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) techniques to detect such analytes. Coupled with this growth in such uses of aptamers, there has been an expanded use of semiconductor quantum dots as brighter, longer-lasting alternatives to fluorescent dyes in labeling and detection techniques of interest in biomedicine and environmental monitoring. Thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) and a zinc aptamer were used to detect mercury, lead, zinc, and cadmium. These probes were tested in a liquid assay as well as on a filter paper coupon. Biomolecules were also studied and detected using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), including DNA aptamers and C-reactive protein (CRP). Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for sensor development, label-free detection, and has the potential for remote sensing. Raman spectra provide information on the vibrational modes or phonons, between and within molecules. Therefore, unique spectral fingerprints for single molecules can be obtained. SERS is accomplished through the use of substrates with nanometer scale geometries made of metals with many free electrons, such as silver, gold, or copper. In this research silver SERS substrates were used to study the SERS signature of biomolecules that typically produce very weak Raman signals.

  12. Highly sensitive and selective detection of Pb2+ ions using a novel and simple DNAzyme-based quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation biosensor.

    PubMed

    Teh, Hui Boon; Li, Haiyan; Yau Li, Sam Fong

    2014-10-21

    A novel, label-free DNAzyme-based quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) biosensor was developed for the highly sensitive and specific detection of Pb(2+) ions. To enhance the performance of the sensor, oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles were used for both frequency and dissipation amplification. This sensor was developed by immobilizing Pb(2+)-specific DNAzymes onto the QCM-D sensor surface and allowing them to hybridize with substrate-functionalized AuNPs. The DNAzyme catalyzed the cleavage of the substrate in the presence of Pb(2+) ions, causing the cleaved substrate-functionalized AuNPs to be removed from the sensor surface. Thus, Pb(2+) ions can be determined on-line by monitoring the change in frequency and dissipation signals. The results revealed that the sensor showed a sensitive response to Pb(2+) ions with detection limits of 14 nM and 20 nM for frequency and dissipation, respectively. This QCM-D biosensor also exhibited excellent selectivity toward Pb(2+) ions in the presence of other divalent metal ions. In addition, the approach was able to detect Pb(2+) in tap water, demonstrating its great potential for monitoring drinking water quality. The proposed sensor system described here represents a new class of lead ion sensor. Its simple detection strategy makes it feasible for 'pollution-free' detection; thus, the approach could have applications in on-line water quality monitoring.

  13. External second-gate Fourier transform ion mobility spectrometry: parametric optimization for detection of weapons of mass destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Edward E.

    2004-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is recognized as one of the most sensitive and robust techniques for the detection of narcotics, explosives and chemical warfare agents. IMS is widely used in forensic, military and security applications. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforst have mandated that equal importance be placed on the time required to obtain results as well as the quality of the analytical data. In this regard IMS is virtually unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity have to be considered. The problem with conventional (signal averaging) IMS systems is the fixed duty cycle of the entrance gate that restricts to less than 1%, the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations that degrade the spectral resolution contributing to misidentifications and false positives.

  14. Water soluble and efficient amino acid Schiff base receptor for reversible fluorescence turn-on detection of Zn2+ ions: Quantum chemical calculations and detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subha, L.; Balakrishnan, C.; Natarajan, Satheesh; Theetharappan, M.; Subramanian, Balanehru; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    An amino acid Schiff base (R) capable of recognizing Zn2+ ions selectively and sensitively in an aqueous medium was prepared and characterized. Upon addition of Zn2+ ions, the receptor exhibits fluorescence intensity enhancements (~ 40 fold) at 460 nm (quantum yield, Φ = 0.05 for R and Φ = 0.18 for R-Zn2+) and can be detected by naked eye under UV light. The receptor can recognize the Zn2+ (1.04 × 10- 8 M) selectively for other metal ions in the pH range of 7.5-11. The Zn2+ chelation with R decreases the loss of energy through non-radiative transition and leads to fluorescence enhancement. The binding mode of the receptor with Zn2+ was investigated by 1H NMR titration and further validated by ESI-MS. The elemental color mapping and SEM/EDS analysis were also used to study the binding of R with Zn2+. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to understand the binding mechanism. The receptor was applied as a microbial sensor for Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  15. Dissociative Recombination of Molecular Ions for Astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Oldrich; Becker, A.; Buhr, H.; Fleischmann, Andreas; Gamer, Lisa; Geppert, W.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Schwalm, D.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2014-06-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions is a key chemical process in the cold interstellar medium (ISM). DR affects the composition, charge state, and energy balance of such environments. Astrochemical models of the ISM require reliable total DR cross sections as well as knowledge of the chemical composition of the neutral DR products. We have systematically measured DR for many astrophysically relevant molecular ions utilizing the TSR storage ring at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, Germany. We used the merged ion-electron beam technique combined with an energy- and position-sensitive imaging detector and are able to study DR down to plasma temperatures as low as 10 K. The DR count rate is used to obtain an absolute merged beams DR rate coefficient from which we can derive a thermal rate coefficient needed for plasma models. Additionally we determine the masses of the DR products by measuring their kinetic energy in the laboratory reference frame. This allows us to assign particular DR fragmentation channels and to obtain their branching ratios. All this information is particularly important for understanding DR of heteronuclear polyatomic ions. We will present DR results for several ions recently investigated at TSR. A new Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) is currently being commissioned at MPIK. With the chamber cooled down to ~10 K and a base pressure better than 10-13 mbar, this setup will allow internal cooling of the stored ions down to their rotational ground states, thus opening a new era in DR experiments. New technological challenges arise due to the ultracold, ultra-high vacuum environment of the CSR and thus the detection techniques used at TSR cannot be easily transferred to CSR. We will present new approaches for DR fragment detection in cryogenic environment. This work is supported in part by NASA and the NSF.

  16. Fast detection of methyl tert-butyl ether from water using solid phase microextraction and ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Marjaana; Holopainen, Sanna; Puton, Jaroslaw; Sillanpää, Mika

    2011-05-15

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is commonly used as chemical additive to increase oxygen content and octane rating of reformulated gasoline. Despite its impact on enhancing cleaner combustion of gasoline, MTBE poses a threat to surface and ground water when gasoline is released into the environment. Methods for onsite analysis of MTBE in water samples are also needed. A less common technique for MTBE detection from water is ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). We describe a method for fast sampling and screening of MTBE from water by solid phase microextraction (SPME) and IMS. MTBE is adsorbed from the head space of a sample to the coating of SPME fiber. The interface containing a heated sample chamber, which couples SPME and IMS, was constructed and the SPME fiber was introduced into the sample chamber for thermal desorption and IMS detection of MTBE vapors. The demonstrated SPME-IMS method proved to be a straightforward method for the detection of trace quantities of MTBE from waters including surface and ground water. We determined the relative standard deviation of 8.3% and detection limit of 5 mg L(-1) for MTBE. Because of short sampling, desorption, and detection times, the described configuration of combined SPME and IMS is a feasible method for the detection of hazardous substances from environmental matrices.

  17. Microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry for the direct detection of copper and molybdenum ions in aqueous liquids.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Runzhi; Wang, Shangxian; Zou, Wei; Zhu, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT) is a simple and low power-consumption ambient ion source. And the MPT Mass spectra of many metal elements usually exhibit some novel features different from their inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectra, which may be helpful for metal element analysis. Here, we presented the results about the MPT mass spectra of copper and molybdenum elements by a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). The generated copper or molybdenum contained ions in plasma were characterized further in collision-induced dissociated (CID) experiments. These researches built a novel, direct and sensitive method for the direct analysis of trace levels of copper and molybdenum in aqueous liquids. Quantitative results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) by using MS(2) procedure was estimated to be 0.265 µg/l (ppb) for copper and 0.497 µg/l for molybdenum. The linear dynamics ranges cover at least 2 orders of magnitude and the analysis of a single aqueous sample can be completed in 5-6 min with a reasonable semi-quantitative sense. Two practical aqueous samples, milk and urine, were also analyzed qualitatively with reasonable recovery rates and RSD. These experimental data demonstrated that the MPT MS is able to turn into a promising and hopeful tool in field analysis of copper and molybdenum ions in water and some aqueous media, and can be applied in many fields, such as environmental controlling, hydrogeology, and water quality inspection. Moreover, MPT MS could also be used as the supplement of ICP-MS for the rapid and in-situ analysis of metal ions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27194522

  18. DETERMINATION OF BROMATE IN DRINKING WATERS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromate is a disinfection by-product in drinking water, formed during the ozonation of source water containing bromide. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer is combined with an ion chromatograph for the analysis of bromate in drinking waters. Three chromatographic colu...

  19. Precision Isotope Shift Measurements in Calcium Ions Using Quantum Logic Detection Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebert, Florian; Wan, Yong; Wolf, Fabian; Angstmann, Christopher N.; Berengut, Julian C.; Schmidt, Piet O.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate an efficient high-precision optical spectroscopy technique for single trapped ions with nonclosed transitions. In a double-shelving technique, the absorption of a single photon is first amplified to several phonons of a normal motional mode shared with a cotrapped cooling ion of a different species, before being further amplified to thousands of fluorescence photons emitted by the cooling ion using the standard electron shelving technique. We employ this extension of the photon recoil spectroscopy technique to perform the first high precision absolute frequency measurement of the 2D3/2 → 2P1/2 transition in calcium, resulting in a transition frequency of f =346 000 234 867 (96 ) kHz . Furthermore, we determine the isotope shift of this transition and the 2S1/2 → 2P1/2 transition for 42Ca+, 44Ca+, and 48Ca+ ions relative to 40Ca+ with an accuracy below 100 kHz. Improved field and mass shift constants of these transitions as well as changes in mean square nuclear charge radii are extracted from this high resolution data.

  20. Precision Isotope Shift Measurements in Calcium Ions Using Quantum Logic Detection Schemes.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Florian; Wan, Yong; Wolf, Fabian; Angstmann, Christopher N; Berengut, Julian C; Schmidt, Piet O

    2015-07-31

    We demonstrate an efficient high-precision optical spectroscopy technique for single trapped ions with nonclosed transitions. In a double-shelving technique, the absorption of a single photon is first amplified to several phonons of a normal motional mode shared with a cotrapped cooling ion of a different species, before being further amplified to thousands of fluorescence photons emitted by the cooling ion using the standard electron shelving technique. We employ this extension of the photon recoil spectroscopy technique to perform the first high precision absolute frequency measurement of the 2D(3/2)→2P(1/2) transition in calcium, resulting in a transition frequency of f=346 000 234 867(96)  kHz. Furthermore, we determine the isotope shift of this transition and the 2S(1/2)→2P(1/2) transition for 42Ca+, 44Ca+, and 48Ca+ ions relative to 40Ca+ with an accuracy below 100 kHz. Improved field and mass shift constants of these transitions as well as changes in mean square nuclear charge radii are extracted from this high resolution data. PMID:26274418

  1. Detection of ions released from S-PRG fillers and their modulation effect.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yoshihiro; Iwasa, Mika; Murayama, Ryosuke; Miyazaki, Masashi; Nagafuji, Akihiro; Nakatsuka, Toshiyuki

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the ions released from a surface pre-reacted glass ionomer (S-PRG) filler in distilled water or lactic acid solution. S-PRG filler was mixed with either solution at 1000:1, 100:1, 10:1, and 1:1 ratios by weight. By means of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and a fluoride electrode, elements released from S-PRG filler were identified to be Al, B, Na, Si, Sr, and F. To investigate the effect of solution pH on ion release, the pH values of the solutions before mixing and after 24 hours' mixing with S-PRG were measured. After 24 hours' mixing, the pH values of solutions at all ratios became more neutral or weakly alkaline regardless of their initial pH levels before mixing. In conclusion, results showed that S-PRG filler released several types of ions, and that ion release was influenced by the mixing ratio of the solution rather than the initial pH of the solution.

  2. An ion-exchange nanomembrane sensor for detection of nucleic acids using a surface charge inversion phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Satyajyoti; Slouka, Zdenek; Shah, Sunny S; Behura, Susanta K; Shi, Zonggao; Stack, M Sharon; Severson, David W; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2014-10-15

    We present a novel low-cost biosensor for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of nucleic acids based on an ionic diode feature of an anion exchange nanoporous membrane under DC bias. The ionic diode feature is associated with external surface charge inversion on the positively charged anion exchange nanomembrane upon hybridization of negatively charged nucleic acid molecules to single-stranded oligoprobes functionalized on the membrane surface resulting in the formation of a cation selective monolayer. The resulting bipolar membrane causes a transition from electroconvection-controlled to water-splitting controlled ion conductance, with a large ion current signature that can be used to accurately quantify the hybridized nucleic acids. The platform is capable of distinguishing two base-pair mismatches in a 22-base pairing segment of microRNAs associated with oral cancer, as well as serotype-specific detection of dengue virus. We also show the sensor' capability to selectively capture target nucleic acids from a heterogeneous mixture. The limit of detection is 1 pM for short 27 base target molecules in a 15-min assay. Similar hybridization results are shown for short DNA molecules as well as RNAs from Brucella and Escherichia coli. The versatility and simplicity of this low-cost biosensor should enable point-of-care diagnostics in food, medical and environmental safety markets.

  3. "Fastening" porphyrin in highly cross-linked polyphosphazene hybrid nanoparticles: powerful red fluorescent probe for detecting mercury ion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Meng, Lingjie; Lu, Qinghua

    2014-04-22

    It is a significant issue to overcome the concentration-quenching effect of the small fluorescent probes and maintain the high fluorescent efficiency at high concentration for sensitive and selective fluorescent mark or detection. We developed a new strategy to "isolate" and "fasten" porphyrin moieties in a highly cross-linked poly(tetraphenylporphyrin-co-cyclotriphosphazene) (TPP-PZS) by the polycondensation of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (TPP-(OH)4) in a suitable solvent. The resulting TPP-PZS particles were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra. Remarkably, TPP-PZS particles obtained in acetone emitted a bright red fluorescence both in powder state and in solution because the aggregation of porphyrin moieties in "H-type" (face-to-face) and "J-type" (edge-to-edge) was effectively blocked. The fluorescent TPP-PZS particles also showed superior resistance to photobleaching, and had a high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of Hg(2+) ions. The TPP-PZS particles were therefore used as an ideal material for preparing test strips to quickly detect/monitor the Hg(2+) ions in a facile way.

  4. Experimentation and theoretic calculation of a BODIPY sensor based on photoinduced electron transfer for ions detection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Zhang, ShuShu; Liu, HanZhuang; Wang, YanWei; Shen, Zhen; Liu, ChunGen; You, XiaoZeng

    2009-12-24

    A boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based fluorescence probe with a N,N'-(pyridine-2, 6-diylbis(methylene))-dianiline substituent (1) has been prepared by condensation of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehyde with 8-(4-amino)-4,4-difluoro-1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene and reduction by NaBH(4). The sensing properties of compound 1 toward various metal ions are investigated via fluorometric titration in methanol, which show highly selective fluorescent turn-on response in the presence of Hg(2+) over the other metal ions, such as Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Pb(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ag(+), and Mn(2+). Computational approach has been carried out to investigate the mechanism why compound 1 provides different fluorescent signal for Hg(2+) and other ions. Theoretic calculations of the energy levels show that the quenching of the bright green fluorescence of boradiazaindacene fluorophore is due to the reductive photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from the aniline subunit to the excited state of BODIPY fluorophore. In metal complexes, the frontier molecular orbital energy levels changes greatly. Binding Zn(2+) or Cd(2+) ion leads to significant decreasing of both the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the receptor, thus inhibit the reductive PET process, whereas an oxidative PET from the excited state fluorophore to the receptor occurs, vice versa, which also quenches the fluorescence. However, for 1-Hg(2+) complex, both the reductive and oxidative PETs are prohibited; therefore, strong fluorescence emission from the fluorophore can be observed experimentally. The agreement of the experimental results and theoretic calculations suggests that our calculation method can be applicable as guidance for the design of new chemosensors for other metal ions. PMID:19950967

  5. Experimentation and Theoretic Calculation of a BODIPY Sensor Based on Photoinduced Electron Transfer for Ions Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hua; Zhang, Shushu; Liu, Hanzhuang; Wang, Yanwei; Shen, Zhen; Liu, Chungen; You, Xiaozeng

    2009-12-01

    A boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based fluorescence probe with a N,N'-(pyridine-2, 6-diylbis(methylene))-dianiline substituent (1) has been prepared by condensation of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehyde with 8-(4-amino)-4,4-difluoro-1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene and reduction by NaBH4. The sensing properties of compound 1 toward various metal ions are investigated via fluorometric titration in methanol, which show highly selective fluorescent turn-on response in the presence of Hg2+ over the other metal ions, such as Li+, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Pb2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Ag+, and Mn2+. Computational approach has been carried out to investigate the mechanism why compound 1 provides different fluorescent signal for Hg2+ and other ions. Theoretic calculations of the energy levels show that the quenching of the bright green fluorescence of boradiazaindacene fluorophore is due to the reductive photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from the aniline subunit to the excited state of BODIPY fluorophore. In metal complexes, the frontier molecular orbital energy levels changes greatly. Binding Zn2+ or Cd2+ ion leads to significant decreasing of both the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the receptor, thus inhibit the reductive PET process, whereas an oxidative PET from the excited state fluorophore to the receptor occurs, vice versa, which also quenches the fluorescence. However, for 1-Hg2+ complex, both the reductive and oxidative PETs are prohibited; therefore, strong fluorescence emission from the fluorophore can be observed experimentally. The agreement of the experimental results and theoretic calculations suggests that our calculation method can be applicable as guidance for the design of new chemosensors for other metal ions.

  6. Atomic structure of highly-charged ions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A. Eugene

    2002-05-23

    Atomic properties of multiply charged ions have been investigated using excitation of energetic heavy ion beams. Spectroscopy of excited atomic transitions has been applied from the visible to the extreme ultraviolet wavelength regions to provide accurate atomic structure and transition rate data in selected highly ionized atoms. High-resolution position-sensitive photon detection has been introduced for measurements in the ultraviolet region. The detailed structures of Rydberg states in highly charged beryllium-like ions have been measured as a test of long-range electron-ion interactions. The measurements are supported by multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations and by many-body perturbation theory. The high-angular-momentum Rydberg transitions may be used to establish reference wavelengths and improve the accuracy of ionization energies in highly charged systems. Precision wavelength measurements in highly charged few-electron ions have been performed to test the most accurate relativistic atomic structure calculations for prominent low-lying excited states. Lifetime measurements for allowed and forbidden transitions in highly charged few-electron ions have been made to test theoretical transition matrix elements for simple atomic systems. Precision lifetime measurements in laser-excited alkali atoms have been initiated to establish the accuracy of relativistic atomic many-body theory in many-electron systems.

  7. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  8. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI.

    PubMed

    Steven, Rory T; Race, Alan M; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m(2) higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, Robert E.; Sobotka, Lee G.; Blackmon, Jeff C.; Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2015-12-29

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested and the performance characterized in a series of tests using particle beams with a variety of atomic numbers at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba facility (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required

  10. Synthesis of C-glycosyl triazolyl quinoline-based fluorescent sensors for the detection of mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linfang; Jin, Jianzhong; Zhao, Linwei; Shen, Hongyun; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Pengfei

    2016-10-01

    A series of novel C-glycosyl triazolyl quinoline-based fluorescent sensors have been synthesized via click chemistry. It was found that novel sensors exhibited good selectivity for Hg(2+) over many other metal ions. The glucose framework was introduced to increase the water-solubility of the fluorescent sensors and broaden its application for the detection of Hg(II) in the water-solubility biological systems. The mechanism of the chemodosimetric behavior of the sensors has been attributed to a binding mode of triazolyl quinoline with Hg(2+) which has been characterized by a number of spectroscopic techniques.

  11. A telescope with microstrip gas chambers for the detection of charged products in heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramegna, F.; Abbondanno, U.; Andreano, A.; Bassini, R.; Bonutti, F.; Bruno, M.; Casini, G.; D'Agostino, M.; Manzin, G.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Mastinu, P. F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moroni, A.; Squarcini, M.; Tonetto, F.; Vannini, G.; Vannucci, L.

    1997-02-01

    Prototypes of a ΔE-E telescope, designed to detect and identify with low-energy threshold both light charged particles and heavy fragments, are described. They are based on a gas drift chamber which conveys primary ionization electrons on gas microstrip devices where multiplication occurs and the energy loss signals are generated. Silicon detectors or CsI(T1) crystals operate as residual energy detectors. The prototypes were tested both with a source and heavy ion beams. Performances, mainly related to energy resolution, charge identification and angle resolution, are reported.

  12. Generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation by intracavity high-harmonic generation toward state detection of single trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakui, Kentaro; Hayasaka, Kazuhiro; Ido, Tetsuya

    2014-12-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation around 159 nm is obtained toward direct excitation of a single trapped ion. An efficient fluoride-based VUV output coupler is employed for intracavity high-harmonic generation of a Ti:S oscillator. Using this coupler, where we measured its reflectance to be about 90 %, an average power reaching 6.4 W is coupled out from a modest fundamental power of 650 mW. When a single comb component out of 1.9 10 teeth is resonant to the atomic transition, 100s of fluorescence photons per second will be detectable under a realistic condition.

  13. Determination of coumarin anticoagulant rodenticide residues in animal tissue by high-performance liquid chromatography. II. fluorescence detection using ion-pair chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hunter, K

    1983-11-18

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of warfarin, coumatetralyl, bromadiolone, difenacoum and brodifacoum in animal tissues using fluorescence detection. Ion-pair chromatography, with the tetrabutylammmonium ion as counter-ion, was used to take full advantage of their native fluorescence. Detection limits in liver tissue after gel permeation clean-up were 0.002 mg kg-1 for coumatetralyl, difenacoum and bromdifacoum, 0.008 mg kg-1 for bromadiolone, and 0.01 mg kg-1 for warfarin. PMID:6655020

  14. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  15. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  16. Selective and sensitive optical chemosensor for detection of Ag(I) ions based on 2(4-hydroxy pent-3-en-2-ylideneamine) phenol in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad; Saeed, Jaber

    2011-11-01

    A selective and sensitive chemosensor, based on the 2(4-hydroxy pent-3-en-2-ylideneamine) phenol (HPYAP) as chromophore, has been developed for colorimetric and visual detection of Ag(I) ions. HPYAP shows a considerable chromogenic behavior toward Ag(I) ions by changing the color of the solution from pale-yellow to very chromatic-yellow, which can be easily detected with the naked-eye. The chemosensor exhibited selective absorbance enhancement to Ag(I) ions in water samples over other metal ions at 438 nm, with a linear range of 0.4-500 μM (r(2)=0.999) and a limit of detection 0.07 μM of Ag(I) ions with UV-vis spectrophotometer detection. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 100 μM Ag(I) ions was 2.05% (n=7). The proposed method was applied for the determination Ag(I) ions in water and waste water samples.

  17. Selective and sensitive optical chemosensor for detection of Ag(I) ions based on 2(4-hydroxy pent-3-en-2-ylideneamine) phenol in aqueous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Mohammad; Saeed, Jaber

    2011-11-01

    A selective and sensitive chemosensor, based on the 2(4-hydroxy pent-3-en-2-ylideneamine) phenol (HPYAP) as chromophore, has been developed for colorimetric and visual detection of Ag(I) ions. HPYAP shows a considerable chromogenic behavior toward Ag(I) ions by changing the color of the solution from pale-yellow to very chromatic-yellow, which can be easily detected with the naked-eye. The chemosensor exhibited selective absorbance enhancement to Ag(I) ions in water samples over other metal ions at 438 nm, with a linear range of 0.4-500 μM ( r2 = 0.999) and a limit of detection 0.07 μM of Ag(I) ions with UV-vis spectrophotometer detection. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 100 μM Ag(I) ions was 2.05% ( n = 7). The proposed method was applied for the determination Ag(I) ions in water and waste water samples.

  18. CdS quantum dots as fluorescence probes for the sensitive and selective detection of highly reactive HSe- ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuan-Liu; Zhao, Yi-Bing

    2007-06-01

    Water-soluble cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) capped by mercaptoacetic acid were synthesized by aqueous-phase arrested precipitation, and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, spectrofluorometry, and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The prepared luminescent water-soluble CdS QDs were evaluated as fluorescence probes for the detection of highly reactive hydrogen selenide ions (HSe(-) ions). The quenching of the fluorescence emission of CdS QDs with the addition of HSe(-) ions is due to the elimination of the S(2-) vacancies which are luminescence centers. Quantitative analysis based on chemical interaction between HSe(-) ions and the surface of CdS QDs is very simple, easy to develop, and has demonstrated very high sensitivity and selectivity features. The effect of foreign ions (common anions and biologically relevant cations) on the fluorescence of the CdS QDs was examined to evaluate the selectivity. Only Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions exhibit significant effects on the fluorescence of CdS QDs. With the developed method, we are able to determine the concentration of HSe(-) ions in the range from 0.10 to 4.80 micromol L(-1), and the limit of detection is 0.087 micromol L(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to monitor the obtained HSe(-) ions from the reaction of glutathione with selenite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on fluorescence analysis of HSe(-) ions in aqueous solution.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and application of poly(acrylamide-co-methylenbisacrylamide) nanocomposite as a colorimetric chemosensor for visual detection of trace levels of Hg and Pb ions.

    PubMed

    Sedghi, Roya; Heidari, Bahareh; Behbahani, Mohammad

    2015-03-21

    In this study, a new colorimetric chemosensor based on TiO2/poly(acrylamide-co-methylenbisacrylamide) nanocomposites was designed for determination of mercury and lead ions at trace levels in environmental samples. The removal and preconcentration of lead and mercury ions on the sorbent was achieved due to sharing an electron pair of N and O groups of polymer chains with the mentioned heavy metal ions. The hydrogel sensor was designed by surface modification of a synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles using methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilan (MAPTMS), which provided a reactive C=C bond that polymerized the acrylamide and methylenbisacrylamide. The sorbent was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS analysis and Fourier transform in frared (FT-IR) spectrometer. This nanostructured composite with polymer shell was developed as a sensitive and selective sorbent for adsorption of mercury and lead ions from aqueous solution at optimized condition. This method involves two-steps: (1) preconcentration of mercury and lead ions by the synthesized sorbent and (2) its selective monitoring of the target ions by complexation with dithizone (DZ). The color of the sorbent in the absence and presence of mercury and lead ions shifts from white to violet and red, respectively. The detection limit of the synthesized nanochemosensor for mercury and lead ions was 1 and 10 μg L(-1), respectively. The method was successfully applied for trace detection of mercury and lead ions in tap, river, and sea water samples. PMID:25497023

  20. Selective detection of silver ions using mushroom-like polyaniline and gold nanoparticle nanocomposite-based electrochemical DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqin; Zhang, Shuai; Kang, Mengmeng; He, Linghao; Zhao, Jihong; Zhang, Hongzhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-12-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor made of polyaniline (PANI) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposite (AuNPs@PANI) has been used for the detection of trace concentration of Ag(+). In the presence of Ag(+), with the interaction of cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine (C-Ag(+)-C), cytosine-rich DNA sequence immobilized onto the surface of AuNPs@PANI has a self-hybridization and then forms a duplex-like structure. The whole detection procedure of Ag(+) based on the developed biosensor was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. On semi-logarithmic plots of the log Ag(+) concentration versus peak current, the results show that the prepared biosensor can detect silver ions at a wide linear range of 0.01-100 nM (R = 0.9828) with a detection limit of 10 pM (signal/noise = 3). Moreover, the fabricated sensor exhibits good selectivity and repeatability. The detection of Ag(+) was determined by Ag(+) self-induced conformational change of DNA scaffold that involved only one oligonucleotide, showing its convenience and availability. PMID:26292168