Science.gov

Sample records for position-sensitive ion detection

  1. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  2. Position sensitive radioactivity detection for gas and liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Joseph L.; McCarthy, John F.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the position sensitive detection of radioactivity in a fluid stream, particularly in the effluent fluid stream from a gas or liquid chromatographic instrument. The invention represents a significant advance in efficiency and cost reduction compared with current efforts.

  3. Time of flight elastic recoil detection analysis with a position sensitive detector

    SciTech Connect

    Siketic, Zdravko; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Jaksic, Milko; Skukan, Natko

    2010-03-15

    A position sensitive detection system based on the microchannel plate detector has been constructed and installed at the existing time of flight (TOF) spectrometer in order to perform a kinematic correction and improve the surface time/depth resolution of elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) system. The position resolution of the detector has been tested for different types of ions and anode voltages. TOF spectra of recoiled O ions from SiO{sub 2} and F from CaF{sub 2} were collected in coincidence with position sensitive detector signal. Kinematic correction of TOF spectra improved surface time/depth resolution by {approx}20% for our system; however even higher improvements could be obtained in larger solid angle TOF-ERDA systems.

  4. Michrochannel plate for position sensitive alpha particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Hurley and James Tinsley

    2007-08-31

    This paper will describe the use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as the associated particle detector on a sealed tube neutron generator. The generator produces neutrons and associated alpha particles for use as a probe to locate and identify hidden explosives in associated particle imaging (API). The MCP measures the position in two dimensions and precise timing of the incident alpha particle, information which is then used to calculate the emission time and direction of the corresponding neutron. The MCP replaces the position-sensitive photomultipler tube (PSPMT) which, until recently, had been the only detector available for measuring position and timing for alpha particles in neutron generator applications. Where the PSPMT uses charge division for generating position information, a process that requires a first order correction to each pulse, the MCP uses delay-line timing, which requires no correction. The result is a device with an order of magnitude improvement in both position resolution and timing compared to the PSPMT. Hardware and software development and the measurements made to characterize the MCP for API applications are described.

  5. Three-dimensional, position-sensitive radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    He, Zhong; Zhang, Feng

    2010-04-06

    Disclosed herein is a method of determining a characteristic of radiation detected by a radiation detector via a multiple-pixel event having a plurality of radiation interactions. The method includes determining a cathode-to-anode signal ratio for a selected interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions based on electron drift time data for the selected interaction, and determining the radiation characteristic for the multiple-pixel event based on both the cathode-to-anode signal ratio and the electron drift time data. In some embodiments, the method further includes determining a correction factor for the radiation characteristic based on an interaction depth of the plurality of radiation interactions, a lateral distance between the selected interaction and a further interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions, and the lateral positioning of the plurality of radiation interactions.

  6. Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to convert'' the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

  7. Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1992-07-01

    This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to ``convert`` the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

  8. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, L. J.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Makela, M.; Morris, C. L.; Tang, Z.; Adamek, E. R.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Ding, X.; Geltenbort, P.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Ito, T. M.; Leung, K. K.; Liu, C.-Y.; Morley, D. J.; Ortiz, Jose D.; Pattie, R. W.; Ramsey, J. C.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, S. K.; Wexler, J.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-09-01

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15 μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE =m0 gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. This method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.

  9. Continuous lateral gradients in film morphology for position sensitive detection and organic solar cell optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoy-Quiles, M.; Randon, V.; Mróz, M. M.; Jarzaguet, M.; Garriga, M.; Cabanillas-González, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a method to fabricate binary organic donor and acceptor blends exhibiting a controlled lateral gradient in morphology. Upon combining photometry, ellipsometry and Xray maps together with photoinduced absorption measurements, we show how the gradual exposure to solvent vapor results in a varying degree of polymer crystallinity for the polythiophene/soluble fullerene system along one direction. These morphologically graded samples are characterized by a spectral photoresponse that depends on the specific location in the area of the device where the light beam impinges, a property that stands as proof-of-concept for position sensitive detection. Moreover, we demonstrate that the development of graded morphologies is an effective one-step method which allows for fast performance optimization of organic solar cells. Finally, the appropriateness of eight different solvents for morphology control via vapor annealing is evaluated in a time-effective way using the advanced method, which helps to identify boiling point and solubility as the key processing parameters.

  10. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, Leah J.; Hoffbauer, Mark Arles; Makela, Mark F.; Morris, Christopher L.; Tang, Zhaowen; Adamek, Evan Robert; Callahan, Nathen Brannan; Clayton, Steven M.; Cude-Woods, Chris B.; Currie, Scott Allister; Dees, E. B.; Ding, Xinjian; Geltenbort, Peter W.; Hickerson, Kevin Peter; Holley, Adam Tarte; Ito, Takeyasu M.; Leung, Kent Kwan Ho; Liu, Chen -Yu; Morley, Deborah Jean; Ortiz, Jose D.; Pattie, Jr., Robert Wayne; Ramsey, John Clinton; Saunders, Alexander; Seestrom, Susan Joyce; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, Sky K.; Wexler, Jonathan William; Womack, Todd Lane; Young, Albert Raymond; Zeck, Bryan Alexander; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-05-16

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE=m0gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. As a result, this method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.

  11. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, Leah J.; Hoffbauer, Mark Arles; ...

    2016-05-16

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE=m0gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. As a result,more » this method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.« less

  12. New beam line for time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering with large area position sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.; Åström, J.; Primetzhofer, D.; Legendre, S.; Possnert, G.

    2012-09-01

    A new beam line for medium energy ion mass scattering (MEIS) has been designed and set up at the Ångström laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden. This MEIS system is based on a time-of-flight (ToF) concept and the electronics for beam chopping relies on a 4 MHz function generator. Repetition rates can be varied between 1 MHz and 63 kHz and pulse widths below 1 ns are typically obtained by including beam bunching. A 6-axis goniometer is used at the target station. Scattering angle and energy of backscattered ions are extracted from a time-resolved and position-sensitive detector. Examples of the performance are given for three kinds of probing ions, 1H+, 4He+, and 11B+. Depth resolution is in the nanometer range and 1 and 2 nm thick Pt layers can easily be resolved. Mass resolution between nearby isotopes can be obtained as illustrated by Ga isotopes in GaAs. Taking advantage of the large size detector, a direct imaging (blocking pattern) of crystal channels are shown for hexagonal, 4H-SiC. The ToF-MEIS system described in this paper is intended for use in semiconductor and thin film areas. For example, depth profiling in the sub nanometer range for device development of contacts and dielectric interfaces. In addition to applied projects, fundamental studies of stopping cross sections in this medium energy range will also be conducted.

  13. Reciprocal space mapping of epitaxial materials using position-sensitive x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Doyle, B.L.; Drummond, T.J.; Medernach, J.W.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Reciprocal space mapping can be efficiently carried out using a position-sensitive x-ray detector (PSD) coupled to a traditional double-axis diffractometer. The PSD offers parallel measurement of the total scattering angle of all diffracted x-rays during a single rocking-curve scan. As a result, a two-dimensional reciprocal space map can be made in a very short time similar to that of a one-dimensional rocking-curve scan. Fast, efficient reciprocal space mapping offers numerous routine advantages to the x-ray diffraction analyst. Some of these advantages are the explicit differentiation of lattice strain from crystal orientation effects in strain-relaxed heteroepitaxial layers; the nondestructive characterization of the size, shape and orientation of nanocrystalline domains in ordered-alloy epilayers; and the ability to measure the average size and shape of voids in porous epilayers. Here, the PSD-based diffractometer is described, and specific examples clearly illustrating the advantages of complete reciprocal space analysis are presented.

  14. Direct high-resolution ion beam-profile imaging using a position-sensitive Faraday cup array

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2009-11-15

    Ion sources have wide-spread use in a multitude of applications. For many, an accurate knowledge, or better, an accurate imaging, of the beam profile and intensity is an important criterion. We are developing an ion source to calibrate instruments for space-based measurements of solar wind and suprathermal particles in the energy range from below 1 keV/nuc to above 200 keV/nuc. In order to establish accurate beam profiles for calibration purposes, we have developed a new method based on an array of very small (diameter = 0.3 mm) Faraday cups. Here, we describe the experimental setup and discuss how to achieve several requirements such as a large thermal load due to the {approx}40W of beam power.

  15. Detection of thermal-induced prompt fission neutrons of highly-enriched uranium: A position sensitive technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglione, A.; Di Lorenzo, F.; Mayer, R. E.

    2009-07-01

    Cargo interrogation in search for special nuclear materials like highly-enriched uranium or 239Pu is a first priority issue of international borders security. In this work we present a thermal-pulsed neutron-based approach to a technique which combines the time-of-flight method and demonstrates a capability to detect small quantities of highly-enriched uranium shielded with high or low Z materials providing, in addition, a manner to know the approximate position of the searched material.

  16. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  17. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lemasson, A.; Rejmund, M.; Fremont, G.; Pancin, J.; Navin, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Goupil, J.; Spitaels, C.; Jacquot, B.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, the interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) μm for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the γ-rays, detected in the γ-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  18. Relating to ion detection

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  19. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  20. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-02-22

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wavelength shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event. 6 figures.

  1. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wave length shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event.

  2. Exploring the spatial resolution of position-sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    High amplification and excellent timing make microchannel plate (MCP) detectors excellent devices for detection of photons, electrons, and ions. In addition to providing sub-nanosecond time resolution MCP detectors can also provide spatial resolution, thus making them useful in imaging applications. Use of a resistive anode (RA) is a routinely used approach to make an MCP position-sensitive. The spatial resolution of the RA associated with detection of a single incident electron was determined. Factors impacting the spatial resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved spatial resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Recently, a novel approach has been developed to provide position-sensitivity for an MCP detector. In this approach, namely the induced signal approach, the position of the incident particle is determined by sensing the electron cloud emanating from a MCP stack. By utilizing the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a spatial resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Work to improve the spatial resolution of the induced signal approach further will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  3. Position-sensitive scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Joseph P; Chen, Yan; Müller, Joachim D

    2005-08-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) uses a stationary laser beam to illuminate a small sample volume and analyze the temporal behavior of the fluorescence fluctuations within the stationary observation volume. In contrast, scanning FCS (SFCS) collects the fluorescence signal from a moving observation volume by scanning the laser beam. The fluctuations now contain both temporal and spatial information about the sample. To access the spatial information we synchronize scanning and data acquisition. Synchronization allows us to evaluate correlations for every position along the scanned trajectory. We use a circular scan trajectory in this study. Because the scan radius is constant, the phase angle is sufficient to characterize the position of the beam. We introduce position-sensitive SFCS (PSFCS), where correlations are calculated as a function of lag time and phase. We present the theory of PSFCS and derive expressions for diffusion, diffusion in the presence of flow, and for immobilization. To test PSFCS we compare experimental data with theory. We determine the direction and speed of a flowing dye solution and the position of an immobilized particle. To demonstrate the feasibility of the technique for applications in living cells we present data of enhanced green fluorescent protein measured in the nucleus of COS cells.

  4. Spectroscopy of Actinide Nuclei - Perspectives with Position Sensitive HPGe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Kotthaus, T.

    Recent advances in in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of actinide nuclei are based on highly efficient arrays of escape-suppressed spectrometers. The sensitivity of these detector arrays is greatly enhanced by the combination with powerful mass separators or particle detector systems. This technique is demonstrated by an experiment to investigate excited states in 234U after the one-neutron-transfer reaction 235U(d,t). In coincidence with the outgoing tritons, γ-rays were detected with the highly efficient MINIBALL spectrometer. In the near future an even enhanced sensitivity will be achieved by utilizing position sensitive HPGe detectors which will exploit the novel detection method of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented germanium detectors. An example for this novel approach is the investigation neutron-rich actinide Th and U nuclei after multi nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL, Italy. A primary 136Xe beam hitting a 238U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest. Beam-like reaction products after neutron transfer were selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. Coincident γ-rays from excited states in beam and target like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved Doppler correction and quality of the γ-spectra is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique, which was successfully exploited in this region.

  5. Practical Considerations for Optimizing Position Sensitivity in Arrays of Position-sensitive TES's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.; Bandler, Simon R.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Encetali; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porder, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing Position-Sensitive Transitions-Edge Sensors (PoST's) for future X-ray astronomy missions such as NASA's Constellation-X. The PoST consists of one or more Transitions Edge Sensors (TES's) thermally connected to a large X-ray absorber, which through heat diffusion, gives rise to position dependence. The development of PoST's is motivated by the desire to achieve the largest the focal-plan coverage with the fewest number of readout channels. In order to develop a practical array, consisting of an inner pixellated core with an outer array of large absorber PoST's, we must be able to simultaneously read out all (-1800) channels in the array. This is achievable using time division multiplexing (TDM), but does set stringent slew rate requirements on the array. Typically, we must damp the pulses to reduce the slew rate of the input signal to the TDM. This is achieved by applying a low-pass analog filter with large inductance to the signal. This attenuates the high frequency components of the signal, essential for position discrimination in PoST's, relative to the white noise of the readout chain and degrades the position sensitivity. Using numerically simulated data, we investigate the position sensing ability of typical PoST designs under such high inductance conditions. We investigate signal-processing techniques for optimal determination of the event position and discuss the practical considerations for real-time implementation.

  6. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L.; Margato, L. M. S.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transfer models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed show good agreement with simulations.

  7. Silicon position sensitive detectors for the HELIOS (NA34) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beuttenmuller, R.; Bisi, V.; Chesi, E.; Di Nardo, R.P.; Esten, M.J.; Giubellino, P.; Kraner, H.W.; Ludlam, T.W.; Meddi, F.; Piuz, F.

    1986-03-01

    Silicon detectors having both ''pad'' and strip position sensitive configurations have been fabricated for the HELIOS experiment which requires an elaborate pulse height-dependent trigger as well as one dimensional silicon strip position sensing. The trigger detector is a 400 element, 30 mm diameter detector with readout connections from a ceramic overlay board. Tests with full prototype detectors have shown essentially 100% detection efficiency and excellent pulse height resolution well capable of delineating 0, 1 or 2 hits per pad. Strip detectors with 25 ..mu..m pitch and a varying readout pitch have been tested, which utilize both capacitive and resistive charge division. Techniques for realization of required interstrip resistors will be discussed and results which may compare these readout methods will be reported. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Position sensitive counter development at the linac

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.A.

    1981-05-20

    In a novel application of the multiwire proportional counter we have imaged a collimated neutron beam. Although preliminary, the results are of sufficient import to be described here because of the potential wide application of the multiwire proportional counter to Laboratory problems. The counter was operated with a counting gas pressure of 20 Torr; the counting gas was pure C/sub 4/H/sub 10/. The radiator was a /sup 235/U foil. Under these conditions, the counter is (1) relatively insensitive to charged particles (other than fission fragments), (2) insensitive to ..gamma..-radiation, and (3) has an efficiency for the detection of fission fragments independent of incident neutron energy over a wide range of neutron energies.

  9. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  10. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  11. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  12. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  13. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  14. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis set up for electronic sputtering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Tripathi, A.; Kabiraj, D.; Sugathan, P.; Chaudhary, G. K.; Barua, P.

    2006-04-01

    Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) set up with a large solid angle (greater than or similar to 4.8 msr) Delta E - E position-sensitive telescope detector is developed at Inter University Accelerator Centre as a dedicated facility for the study of electronic sputtering of thin films under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The detector consists of a gas ionization chamber (Delta E ) and a solid-state surface barrier detector ( E ) housed in a same assembly. The electronic sputtering yield (atoms/ion) is determined by analyzing on-line fluence-dependent ERDA data obtained from a variety of thin films. Large erosion (> 10 5 atoms/ion) of carbon from a-C:H by 150 MeV Ag 13+ ions, evolution of nitrogen (greater than or similar to 880 atoms/ion) from copper nitride and depletion of oxygen (greater than or similar to 1000 atoms/ion) from copper oxide film under 200 MeV Au 15+ ion impact are studied and reported in this work. The electronic sputtering of these materials is discussed on the basis of the thermal spike model of SHI and solid interaction.

  15. READOUT ASIC FOR 3D POSITION-SENSITIVE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; VERNON, E.; ACKLEY, K.; DRAGONE, A.; FRIED, J.; OCONNOR, P.; HE, Z.; HERMAN, C.; ZHANG, F.

    2007-10-27

    We describe an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position-sensitive detectors. It was optimized for pixelated CZT sensors, and it measures, corresponding to an ionizing event, the energy and timing of signals from 121 anodes and one cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping, along with peak- and timing-detection. The cathode's timing can be measured in three different ways: the first is based on multiple thresholds on the charge amplifier's voltage output; the second uses the threshold crossing of a fast-shaped signal; and the third measures the peak amplitude and timing from a bipolar shaper. With its power of 2 mW per channel the ASIC measures, on a CZT sensor Connected and biased, charges up to 100 fC with an electronic resolution better than 200 e{sup -} rms. Our preliminary spectral measurements applying a simple cathode/mode ratio correction demonstrated a single-pixel resolution of 4.8 keV (0.72 %) at 662 keV, with the electronics and leakage current contributing in total with 2.1 keV.

  16. Position sensitivity of MAMA detectors. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. S.; Timothy, J. G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1988-01-01

    The results of laboratory and telescopic measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible MAMA detector utilizing a 'coarse-fine' array are presented. The photometric accuracy of this detector was determined under point source illumination. It was found that computed centroid positions are accurate across the entire array to within 0.04 pixels.

  17. High Mass Ion Detection with Charge Detector Coupled to Rectilinear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Avinash A.; Chou, Szu-Wei; Chang, Pei-Yu; Lee, Chen-Wei; Cheng, Chun-Yen; Chu, Ming-Lee; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2016-12-01

    Conventional linear ion trap mass analyzers (LIT-MS) provide high ion capacity and show their MS n ability; however, the detection of high mass ions is still challenging because LIT-MS with secondary electron detectors (SED) cannot detect high mass ions. To detect high mass ions, we coupled a charge detector (CD) to a rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer (RIT-MS). Immunoglobulin G ions (m/z 150,000) are measured successfully with controlled ion kinetic energy. In addition, when mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios of singly charged ions exceed 10 kTh, the detection efficiency of CD is found to be greater than that of SED. The CD can be coupled to LIT-MS to extend the detection mass range and provide the potential to perform MS n of high mass ions inside the ion trap.

  18. Chemical tools for detecting Fe ions

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Tasuku; Nagasawa, Hideko

    2017-01-01

    Owing to its distinctive electrochemical properties with interconvertible multiple oxidation states, iron plays a significant role in various physiologically important functions such as respiration, oxygen transport, energy production, and enzymatic reactions. This redox activity can also potentially produce cellular damage and death, and numerous diseases are related to iron overload resulting from the dysfunction of the iron regulatory system. In this case, “free iron” or “labile iron,” which refers to iron ion weakly bound or not bound to proteins, causes aberrant production of reactive oxygen species. With the aim of elucidating the variation of labile iron involved in pathological processes, some chemical tools that can qualitatively and/or quantitatively monitor iron have been utilized to investigate the distribution, accumulation, and flux of biological iron species. Since iron ions show unique reactivity depending on its redox state, i.e., Fe2+ or Fe3+ (or transiently higher oxidative states), methods for the separate detection of iron species with different redox states are preferred to understand its physiological and pathological roles more in detail. The scope of this review article covers from classical chromogenic to newly emerging chemical tools for the detection of Fe ions. In particular, chemical tools applicable to biological studies will be presented. PMID:28163381

  19. Position-Sensitive Nuclear Spectroscopy with Pixel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Granja, Carlos; Vykydal, Zdenek; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2007-10-26

    State-of-the-art hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors such as Medipix2 are suitable for energy- and position-sensitive nuclear spectroscopy. In addition to excellent energy- and spatial-resolution, these devices can operate in spectroscopic, single-quantum counting and/or on-line tracking mode. A devoted compact USB-readout interface provides functionality and ease of operation. The compact and versatile Medipix2/USB radiation camera provides visualization, vacuum and room-temperature operation as a real-time portable active nuclear emulsion.

  20. A position sensitive microchannel photomultiplier for ultraviolet space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1986-01-01

    The 25-mm microchannel-plate, position-sensitive UV astronomy photomultiplier tube presented is intended for the EOM-1 Spacelab Mission's FAUST payload and conducts wide-field imaging surveys in the VUV over the 1400-1800-A range. The sealed detector encompasses a CsI photocathode deposited on the inner surface of a MgF2 window, a stack of microchannel plates, and a wedge-and-strip two-dimensional position-sensing anode. Since the wedge-and-strip principle requires only three anode signals, flight electronics can be reduced to three charge amplifiers and three analog-to-digital converters.

  1. Detection method for dissociation of multiple-charged ions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.; Rockwood, Alan L.

    1991-01-01

    Dissociations of multiple-charged ions are detected and analyzed by charge-separation tandem mass spectrometry. Analyte molecules are ionized to form multiple-charged parent ions. A particular charge parent ion state is selected in a first-stage mass spectrometer and its mass-to-charge ratio (M/Z) is detected to determine its mass and charge. The selected parent ions are then dissociated, each into a plurality of fragments including a set of daughter ions each having a mass of at least one molecular weight and a charge of at least one. Sets of daughter ions resulting from the dissociation of one parent ion (sibling ions) vary in number but typically include two to four ions, one or more multiply-charged. A second stage mass spectrometer detects mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of the daughter ions and a temporal or temporo-spatial relationship among them. This relationship is used to correlate the daughter ions to determine which (m/z) ratios belong to a set of sibling ions. Values of mass and charge of each of the sibling ions are determined simultaneously from their respective (m/z) ratios such that the sibling ion charges are integers and sum to the parent ion charge.

  2. Ion creation, ion focusing, ion/molecule reactions, ion separation, and ion detection in the open air in a small plastic device.

    PubMed

    Baird, Zane; Wei, Pu; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-07

    A method is presented in which ions are generated and manipulated in the ambient environment using polymeric electrodes produced with a consumer-grade 3D printer. The ability to focus, separate, react, and detect ions in the ambient environment is demonstrated and the data agree well with simulated ion behaviour.

  3. Optical methods for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. N.; Bessmertnykh-Lemeune, A.; Guilard, R.; Averin, A. D.; Beletskaya, I. P.

    2014-03-01

    The review covers an important area of the modern chemistry, namely, the detection of heavy metal ions using optical molecular detectors. The role of this method in metal ion detection and the physicochemical grounds of operation of chemosensors are discussed, and examples of detection of most abundant heavy metal ions and synthetic approaches to molecular detectors are presented. The immobilization of molecular detectors on solid substrates for the design of analytical sensor devices is described. The bibliography includes 178 references.

  4. Functionalised hexagonal-domain graphene for position-sensitive photodetectors.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Adolfo; Barnes, Matthew D; Amit, Iddo; Craciun, Monica F; Russo, Saverio

    2017-03-24

    Graphene's unique photoresponse has been largely used in a multitude of optoelectronics applications ranging from broadband photodetectors to wave-guide modulators. In this work we extend the range of applications to position-sensitive photodetectors (PSDs) using FeCl3-intercalated hexagonal domains of graphene grown by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD). The FeCl3-based chemical functionalisation of APCVD graphene crystals is affected by the presence of wrinkles and results in a non-uniform doping of the graphene layers. This doping profile creates multiple p-p(+) photoactive junctions which show a linear and bipolar photoresponse with respect to the position of a focused light spot, which is ideal for the realization of a PSD. Our study paves the way towards the fabrication of flexible and transparent PSDs that could be embedded in smart textile and wearable electronics.

  5. Functionalised hexagonal-domain graphene for position-sensitive photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sanctis, Adolfo; Barnes, Matthew D.; Amit, Iddo; Craciun, Monica F.; Russo, Saverio

    2017-03-01

    Graphene’s unique photoresponse has been largely used in a multitude of optoelectronics applications ranging from broadband photodetectors to wave-guide modulators. In this work we extend the range of applications to position-sensitive photodetectors (PSDs) using FeCl3-intercalated hexagonal domains of graphene grown by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD). The FeCl3-based chemical functionalisation of APCVD graphene crystals is affected by the presence of wrinkles and results in a non-uniform doping of the graphene layers. This doping profile creates multiple p–p+ photoactive junctions which show a linear and bipolar photoresponse with respect to the position of a focused light spot, which is ideal for the realization of a PSD. Our study paves the way towards the fabrication of flexible and transparent PSDs that could be embedded in smart textile and wearable electronics.

  6. Phonon-Mediated Detection of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, David; Rosenband, Till; Wineland, David

    2008-03-01

    Both quantum information processing and quantum-limited metrology require sensitive detection of quantum states. Using trapped atomic ions, we investigate quantum non-demolition measurements in a two-species ion chain composed of Al^+ and Be^+. By mapping information from Al^+ to a shared phonon-mode then to Be^+ and detecting repetitively we have experimentally demonstrated a fidelity for state initialization and detection of 0.9994. We have also shown an increase in measurement efficiency through an adaptive procedure. Here we apply these ideas to the detection of states of multiple Al^+ using a single Be^+ ion, and describe the preparation of entangled states through measurement.

  7. Trapped-Ion State Detection through Coherent Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, D. B.; Chou, C. W.; Leibrandt, D. R.; Thorpe, M. J.; Wineland, D. J.; Rosenband, T.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate a general method for state detection of trapped ions that can be applied to a large class of atomic and molecular species. We couple a spectroscopy ion (Al+27) to a control ion (Mg+25) in the same trap and perform state detection through off-resonant laser excitation of the spectroscopy ion that induces coherent motion. The motional amplitude, dependent on the spectroscopy ion state, is measured either by time-resolved photon counting or by resolved sideband excitations on the control ion. The first method provides a simplified way to distinguish clock states in Al+27, which avoids ground-state cooling and sideband transitions. The second method reduces spontaneous emission and optical pumping on the spectroscopy ion, which we demonstrate by nondestructively distinguishing Zeeman sublevels in the S01 ground state of Al+27.

  8. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for the fluorescent detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Shushen; Yang, Yan; Chen, Xihan; Zhang, Mingchao

    2015-01-15

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (F-CNPs) as a new kind of fluorescent nanoparticles, have recently attracted considerable research interest in a wide range of applications due to their low-cost and good biocompatibility. The fluorescent detection of metal ions is one of the most important applications. In this review, we first present the general detection mechanism of F-CNPs for the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including fluorescence turn-off, fluorescence turn-on, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and ratiometric response. We then focus on the recent advances of F-CNPs in the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and other metal ions. Further, we discuss the research trends and future prospects of F-CNPs. We envision that more novel F-CNPs-based nanosensors with more accuracy and robustness will be widely used to assay and remove various metal ions, and there will be more practical applications in coming years.

  9. Canadian Penning Trap Mass Measurements using a Position Sensitive MCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuta, Trenton; Aprahamian, Ani; Marley, Scott; Nystrom, Andrew; Clark, Jason; Perez Galvan, Adrian; Hirsh, Tsviki; Savard, Guy; Orford, Rodney; Morgan, Graeme

    2015-10-01

    The primary focus of the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) located at Argonne National Lab is to determine the masses of various isotopes produced in the spontaneous fission of Californium. Currently, the CPT is operating in conjunction with CARIBU at the ATLAS facility in an attempt to measure neutron-rich nuclei produced by a 1.5 Curie source of Californium 252. The masses of nuclei produced in fission is accomplished by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the isotopes circling within the trap. This frequency is determined by a position sensitive MCP, which records the relative position of the isotope in the trap at different times. Using these position changes over time in connection with a center spot, angles between these positions are calculated and used to determine the frequency. Most of the work currently being conducted on the CPT is focused on the precision of these frequency measurements. The use of traps has revolutionized the measurements of nuclear masses to very high precision. The optimization methods employed here include focusing the beam in order to reduce the spread on the position of the isotope as well as the tuning of the MR-ToF, a mass separator that is intended on removing contaminants in the beam. This work was supported by the nuclear Grant PHY-1419765 for the University of Notre Dame.

  10. Method of detecting luminescent target ions with modified magnetic microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Kaminski, Michael D

    2014-05-13

    This invention provides methods of using modified magnetic microspheres to extract target ions from a sample in order to detect their presence in a microfluidic environment. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules on the surface that allow the target ions in the sample to form complexes with specific ligand molecules on the microsphere surface. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules that sequester the target ions from the sample, but specific ligand molecules in solution subsequently re-extract the target ions from the microspheres into the solution, where the complexes form independent of the microsphere surface. Once the complexes form, they are exposed to an excitation wavelength light source suitable for exciting the target ion to emit a luminescent signal pattern. Detection of the luminescent signal pattern allows for determination of the presence of the target ions in the sample.

  11. Nanopore detection of copper ions using a polyhistidine probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guihua; Wang, Liang; Han, Yujing; Zhou, Shuo; Guan, Xiyun

    2014-03-15

    We report a stochastic nanopore sensing method for the detection of Cu(2+) ions. By employing a polyhistidine molecule as a chelating agent, and based on the different signatures of the events produced by the translocation of the chelating agent through an α-hemolysin pore in the absence and presence of target analytes, trace amounts of copper ions could be detected with a detection limit of 40 nM. Importantly, although Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+) also interacts with the polyhistidine molecule, since the event residence times and/or blockage amplitudes for these metal chelates are significantly different from those of copper chelates, these metal ions do not interfere with Cu(2+) detection. This chelating reaction approach should find useful application in the development of nanopore sensors for other metal ions.

  12. Ion detection device and method with compressing ion-beam shutter

    DOEpatents

    Sperline, Roger P [Tucson, AZ

    2009-05-26

    An ion detection device, method and computer readable medium storing instructions for applying voltages to shutter elements of the detection device to compress ions in a volume defined by the shutter elements and to output the compressed ions to a collector. The ion detection device has a chamber having an inlet and receives ions through the inlet, a shutter provided in the chamber opposite the inlet and configured to allow or prevent the ions to pass the shutter, the shutter having first and second shutter elements, a collector provided in the chamber opposite the shutter and configured to collect ions passed through the shutter, and a processing unit electrically connected to the first and second shutter elements. The processing unit applies, during a first predetermined time interval, a first voltage to the first shutter element and a second voltage to the second shutter element, the second voltage being lower than the first voltage such that ions from the inlet enter a volume defined by the first and second shutter elements, and during a second predetermined time interval, a third voltage to the first shutter element, higher than the first voltage, and a fourth voltage to the second shutter element, the third voltage being higher than the fourth voltage such that ions that entered the volume are compressed as the ions exit the volume and new ions coming from the inlet are prevented from entering the volume. The processing unit is electrically connected to the collector and configured to detect the compressed ions based at least on a current received from the collector and produced by the ions collected by the collector.

  13. Highly sensitive determination of hydrazine ion by ion-exclusion chromatography with ion-exchange enhancement of conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Xu, Qun; Ikedo, Mikaru; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi

    2004-06-11

    An ion-exclusion chromatography method with ion-exchange enhancement of conductivity was developed for the selective separation and sensitive determination of hydrazine ion from alkali/alkaline earth metal cations and ammonium ion. Hydrazine ion was separated by ion-exclusion/penetration effect from other cations on a weakly basic anion-exchange column in the OH- form (TSKgel DEAE-5PW). Moreover, two different ion-exchange resin columns were inserted between the separating column and conductimetric detector in order to improve the sensitivity of hydrazine ion. The first enhancement column packed with a strongly basic anion-exchange resin in the SO4(2-) form (TSKgel SAX) for hydrazine ion can convert from N2H5OH to (N2H5)2SO4. Moreover, the second enhancement column packed with a strongly acidic cation-change resin in the H+ form (TSKgel SCX) can convert to H2SO4. As a result, the sensitivity of hydrazine ion using two conductivity enhancement columns could be 26.8-times greater than using the separating column alone. This method was effectiveness also for the enhancement of ammonium ion (6.1-times) and sodium ion (1.2-times). The calibration graph of hydrazine ion detected as H2SO4 was linear over the concentration range of 0.001-100 ppm (r2 = 0.9988). The detection limit of hydrazine ion in this system was 0.64 ppb. Therefore, hydrazine ion in real boiler water sample could be accurately determined, avoiding the interference of other cations.

  14. Ion Source Development for Ultratrace Detection of Uranium and Thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Batchelder, Jon Charles; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Stracener, Daniel W

    2015-01-01

    A hot-cavity surface ionization source and a hot-cavity laser ion source are evaluated in terms of ionization efficiencies for generating ion beams of U and Th. The work is motivated by the need for more efficient ion sources for detecting ultratrace U and Th impurities in a copper matrix by mass spectrometry techniques such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The performances of the ion sources are characterized using uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate sample materials and sample sizes of 20 - 40 g of U or Th. For the surface source, the dominant ion beams observed are UO+ or ThO+ and ionization efficiencies of 2-4% have been obtained with W and Re cavities. Three-step resonant photoionization of U atoms is studied and an ionization efficiency of 8.7% has been obtained with the laser ion source. The positive ion sources promise more than an order of magnitude more efficient than conventional Cs-sputter negative ion sources used for AMS. In addition, the laser ion source is highly selective and effective in suppressing interfering and ions. Work is in progress to improve the efficiencies of both positive ion sources.

  15. Mass-dependent channel electron multiplier operation. [for ion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. A.; Burch, J. L.; Oran, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute counting efficiency and pulse height distributions of a continuous-channel electron multiplier used in the detection of hydrogen, argon and xenon ions are assessed. The assessment technique, which involves the post-acceleration of 8-eV ion beams to energies from 100 to 4000 eV, provides information on counting efficiency versus post-acceleration voltage characteristics over a wide range of ion mass. The charge pulse height distributions for H2 (+), A (+) and Xe (+) were measured by operating the experimental apparatus in a marginally gain-saturated mode. It was found that gain saturation occurs at lower channel multiplier operating voltages for light ions such as H2 (+) than for the heavier ions A (+) and Xe (+), suggesting that the technique may be used to discriminate between these two classes of ions in electrostatic analyzers.

  16. Ion source development for ultratrace detection of uranium and thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Batchelder, J. C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Chu, R.; Fan, S.; Romero-Romero, E.; Stracener, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Efficient ion sources are needed for detecting ultratrace U and Th impurities in a copper matrix by mass spectrometry techniques such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Two positive ion sources, a hot-cavity surface ionization source and a resonant ionization laser ion source, are evaluated in terms of ionization efficiencies for generating ion beams of U and Th. The performances of the ion sources are characterized using uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate sample materials with sample sizes between 20 and 40 μg of U or Th. For the surface ion source, the dominant ion beams observed are UO+ or ThO+ and ionization efficiencies of 2-4% have been obtained with W and Re cavities. With the laser ion source, three-step resonant photoionization of U atoms has been studied and only atomic U ions are observed. An ionization efficiency of about 9% has been demonstrated. The performances of both ion sources are expected to be further improved.

  17. Spectroscopic detection of metals ions using a novel selective sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Domínguez, D.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Maldonado, J. L.; Rodriguez, M.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Santillan, R.; Farfan, N.

    2011-09-01

    Colorimetric chemosensors are simple, economical and practical optical approach for detecting toxic metal ions (Hg2+, Pb2+, Ni2+, etc.) in the environment. In this work, we present a simple but highly specific organic compound 4-chloro-2-((E)-((E)-3-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)allylidene)amino)phenol (L1) that acts as a colorimetric sensor for divalent metal ions in H2O. The mechanism of the interaction between L1 and various metal-ions has been established by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopic experiments that indicate favorable coordination of metal ions with L1 in different solvents. Experimental results indicate that the shape of the electronic transition band of L1 (receptor compound) changed after the interaction with divalent metal-ions, such as Hg2+, Pb2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, and Ni2+ in aqueous solution. We found that L1 have a considerable selectivity for Ni2+ ions, even in presence of other metals ions when mixtures of DMSO/H2O as are used as solvents. L1, which has been targeted for sensing transition metal ions, exhibits binding-induced color changes from yellow to pink observed even by the naked eye in presence of Ni2+ ions.

  18. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  19. Elastic recoil detection analysis on the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, R.; Orlic, I.; Cohen, David D.

    2002-05-01

    The heavy ion microprobe at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is capable of focussing heavy ions with an ME/ q2 of up to 100 amu MeV. This makes the microprobe ideally suited for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). However, beam currents on a microprobe are usually very small, which requires a detection system with a large solid angle. We apply microbeam heavy ion ERDA using a large solid angle ΔE- E telescope with a gas ΔE detector to layered structures. We demonstrate the capability to measure oxygen and carbon with a lateral resolution of 20 μm, together with determination of the depth of the contamination in thin deposited layers.

  20. Ion/molecule reactions for detecting ammonia using miniature cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonell N; Keil, Adam D; Noll, Robert J; Cooks, R Graham

    2011-01-07

    Gaseous ammonia, a common toxic industrial compound, is not detected readily in ion trap mass spectrometers because its molecular ion falls below the low-mass cutoff (~m/z 40) normally used when examining organic compounds. Instead, reactions of ammonia with halobenzene radical cations were used with internal electron ionization in two cylindrical ion trap miniature mass spectrometers to create a characteristic product ion by which to identify and quantify ammonia. Ammonia showed a linear response over the concentration range studied (parts per million [ppm] to parts per billion [ppb]) with limits of detection of 17 ppm and 220 ppb for experiments involving direct introduction and thermal desorption after pre-concentration, respectively. These values are comparable to ammonia's permissible exposure limit (50 ppm) and odor threshold (5 ppm). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to describe the method sensitivity, the probability of true positives, and the false positive rate for ammonia. A customized reaction scan function was created to select the species available for the ion/molecule reaction and set the amount of time the product ion could be accumulated in the trap. Product ion identity was verified using tandem mass spectrometry. Similar reactions with methylamine, ethylamine and the two nitriles, acetonitrile and benzonitrile, were explored.

  1. LABORATORY DETECTION OF PLASTICS IN SEEDCOTTON WITH ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  2. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Laptev, A.; Rusev, G.; Shields, D. W.; White, M.; Blakeley, R. E.; Mader, D. M.; Hecht, A. A.

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flight times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.

  3. High spatial resolution two-dimensional position sensitive detector for the performance of coincidence experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ceolin, D.; Chaplier, G.; Lemonnier, M.; Garcia, G.A.; Miron, C.; Nahon, L.; Simon, M.; Leclercq, N.; Morin, P.

    2005-04-01

    A position sensitive detector (PSD) adapted to the technical and mechanical specifications of our angle and energy resolved electron-ion(s) coincidence experiments is described in this article. The device, whose principle is very similar to the one detailed by J. H. D. Eland [Meas. Sci. Technol. 5, 1501 (1994)], is composed by a set of microchannel plates and a delay line anode. The originality comes from the addition in front of the encoding surface of a ceramic disk covered by a resistive surface. The capacitive coupling between the anode and the resistive plane has the double advantage of eliminating the spatial modulations due to the lattice of the anode and also of sensitizing a greater number of electrodes, increasing thus considerably the accuracy of the position measurements. The tests carried out with a time to digital conversion module of 250 ps resolution showed that a spatial resolution better than 50 {mu}m and a dead time of 160 ns can be achieved. Typical images obtained with the help of the EPICEA and DELICIOUS coincidence setups are also shown.

  4. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    DOE PAGES

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; ...

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flightmore » times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.« less

  5. Position sensitivity of graphene field effect transistors to X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalas, Edward Moore, Michael E.; Jovanovic, Igor; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-06-01

    Device architectures that incorporate graphene to realize detection of electromagnetic radiation typically utilize the direct absorbance of radiation by graphene. This limits their effective area to the size of the graphene and their applicability to lower-energy, less penetrating forms of radiation. In contrast, graphene-based transistor architectures that utilize the field effect as the detection mechanism can be sensitive to interactions of radiation not only with graphene but also with the surrounding substrate. Here, we report the study of the position sensitivity and response of a graphene-based field effect transistor (GFET) to penetrating, well-collimated radiation (micro-beam X-rays), producing ionization in the substrate primarily away from graphene. It is found that responsivity and response speed are strongly dependent on the X-ray beam distance from graphene and the gate voltage applied to the GFET. To develop an understanding of the spatially dependent response, a model is developed that incorporates the volumetric charge generation, transport, and recombination. The model is in good agreement with the observed spatial response characteristics of the GFET and predicts a greater response potential of the GFET to radiation interacting near its surface. The study undertaken provides the necessary insight into the volumetric nature of the GFET response, essential for development of GFET-based detectors for more penetrating forms of ionizing radiation.

  6. Position-sensitive proportional counter with low-resistance metal-wire anode

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.

    1980-01-01

    A position-sensitive proportional counter circuit is provided which allows the use of a conventional (low-resistance, metal-wire anode) proportional counter for spatial resolution of an ionizing event along the anode of the counter. A pair of specially designed active-capacitance preamplifiers are used to terminate the anode ends wherein the anode is treated as an RC line. The preamplifiers act as stabilized active capacitance loads and each is composed of a series-feedback, low-noise amplifier, a unity-gain, shunt-feedback amplifier whose output is connected through a feedback capacitor to the series-feedback amplifier input. The stabilized capacitance loading of the anode allows distributed RC-line position encoding and subsequent time difference decoding by sensing the difference in rise times of pulses at the anode ends where the difference is primarily in response to the distributed capacitance along the anode. This allows the use of lower resistance wire anodes for spatial radiation detection which simplifies the counter construction and handling of the anodes, and stabilizes the anode resistivity at high count rates (>10.sup.6 counts/sec).

  7. Detection of Biological Materials Using Ion Mobility Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodacy, P.J.; Sterling, J.P.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-03-01

    Traditionally, Ion Mobility Spectroscopy has been used to examine ions of relatively low molecular weight and high ion mobility. In recent years, however, biomolecules such as bradykinin, cytochrome c, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), apomyoglobin, and lysozyme, have been successfully analyzed, but studies of whole bio-organisms have not been performed. In this study an attempt was made to detect and measure the mobility of two bacteriophages, {lambda}-phage and MS2 using electrospray methods to inject the viruses into the ion mobility spectrometer. Using data from Yeh, et al., which makes a comparison between the diameter of non-biologic particles and the specific particle mobility, the particle mobility for the MS2 virus was estimated to be 10{sup {minus}2} cm{sup 2}/volt-sec. From this mobility the drift time of these particles in our spectrometer was calculated to be approximately 65 msec. The particle mobility for the {lambda}-phage virus was estimated to be 10{sup {minus}3} cm{sup 2}/volt-sec. which would result in a drift time of 0.7 sec. Spectra showing the presence of a viral peak at the expected drift time were not observed. However, changes in the reactant ion peak that could be directly attributed to the presence of the viruses were observed. Virus clustering, excessive collisions, and the electrospray injection method limited the performance of this IMS. However, we believe that an instrument specifically designed to analyze such bioagents and utilizing other injection and ionization methods will succeed in directly detecting viruses and bacteria.

  8. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  9. Fine Structural Detection of Calcium Ions by Photoconversion

    PubMed Central

    Poletto, V.; Galimberti, V.; Guerra, G.; Rosti, V.; Moccia, F.; Biggiogera, M.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a tool for a rapid high-resolution detection of calcium ions which can be used in parallel with other techniques. We have applied a new approach by photo-oxidation of diaminobenzidine in presence of the emission of an excited fluorochrome specific for calcium detection. This method combines the selectivity of available fluorophores to the high spatial resolution offered by transmission electron microscopy to detect fluorescing molecules even when present in low amounts in membrane-bounded organelles. We show in this paper that Mag-Fura 2 photoconversion via diaminobenzidine oxidation is an efficient way for localizing Ca2+ ions at electron microscopy level, is easily carried out and reproducible, and can be obtained on a good amount of cells, since the exposure in our conditions is not limited to the direct irradiation of the sample via an objective but obtained with a germicide lamp. The end product is sufficiently electron dense to be detected clearly when present in sufficient amount within a membrane boundary. PMID:27734989

  10. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Sabrina S.; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F.; Etcheberry, Arnaud A.; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl- N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  11. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection.

    PubMed

    Sam, Sabrina S; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F; Etcheberry, Arnaud A; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N

    2011-06-06

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization.The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  12. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution. PMID:21711937

  13. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Cavoto, G; Cirillo, E N M; Cocina, F; Ferretti, J; Polosa, A D

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs ([Formula: see text] GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  14. Nanoscale detection of bacteriophage triggered ion cascade (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobozi-King, Maria; Seo, Sungkyu; Kim, Jong U.; Cheng, Mosong; Kish, Laszlo B.; Young, Ryland

    2005-05-01

    In an era of potential bioterrorism and pandemics of antibiotic-resistant microbes, bacterial contaminations of food and water supplies is a major concern. There is an urgent need for the rapid, inexpensive and specific identification of bacteria under field conditions. Here we describe a method that combines the specificity and avidity of bacteriophages with fluctuation analysis of electrical noise. The method is based on the massive, transitory ion leakage that occurs at the moment of phage DNA injection into the host cell. The ion fluxes require only that the cells be physiologically viable (i.e., have energized membranes) and can occur within seconds after mixing the cells with sufficient concentrations of phage particles. To detect these fluxes, we have constructed a nano-well, a lateral, micron-size capacitor of titanium electrodes with gap size of 150 nm, and used it to measure the electrical field fluctuations in microliter (mm3) samples containing phage and bacteria. In mixtures where the analyte bacteria were sensitive to the phage, large stochastic waves with various time and amplitude scales were observed, with power spectra of approximately 1/f2 shape over at 1 - 10 Hz. Development of this SEPTIC (SEnsing of Phage-Triggered Ion Cascades) technology could provide rapid detection and identification of live, pathogenic bacteria on the scale of minutes, with unparalleled specificity. The method has a potential ultimate sensitivity of 1 bacterium/microliter (1 bacterium/mm3).

  15. Detection of negative pickup ions at Saturn's moon Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Hand, K. P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Negative ions may be formed in both tenuous and dense planetary atmospheres and have been observed in-situ at Earth, Titan [Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Wellbrock et al., 2013] and Enceladus [Coates et al., 2010] as well as at comet Halley [Chaizy et al., 1991]. In the case of Titan, heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile based ions with masses reaching almost 14,000 amu/q have been observed using the CAPS Electron Spectrometer (ELS) onboard Cassini. These are believed to form even more massive organic aerosols termed tholins which fall to lower altitudes where they make up the distinct haze layers, and eventually rain down onto Titan's surface perhaps forming the organic-rich dunes. Very tenuous atmospheres were predicted at the smaller icy moons of Saturn [Sittler et al., 2004; Saur and Strobel, 2005], and subsequently detected [Teolis et al., 2010; Tokar et al., 2012]. These are produced when charged particles from Saturn's magnetosphere interact with moon surfaces, ejecting neutral species. Some portion of these atmospheric neutrals will in turn become ionized and 'picked up' by Saturn's corotating magnetosphere. These pickup ions will then move in cycloidal trajectories that we may intercept using the Cassini spacecraft, even at considerable distance from the moon itself. In this fashion, negative and positive pickup ions have been used to infer a tenuous CO2-O2 atmosphere at Saturn's moon Rhea [Teolis et al., 2010], and positive pickup ions at Dione [Tokar et al., 2012]. Here we report on the detection of negative pickup ions during a close flyby of Dione by the Cassini CAPS ELS instrument, and the implications that these observations may have for the Dionian atmosphere. Chaizy, P., et al. (1991), Nature, 349(6308), 393-396 Coates, A. J., et al. (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett., 34(22), 6-11 Coates, A. J., et al. (2009), Planet. Space Sci., 57(14-15), 1866-1871 Coates, A. J., et al. (2010), Icarus, 206(2), 618-622 Saur, J., and D. F. Strobel (2005), Astrophys. J. Lett., 620

  16. CVD-diamond-based position sensitive photoconductive detector for high-flux x-rays and gamma rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.

    1999-04-19

    A position-sensitive photoconductive detector (PSPCD) using insulating-type CVD diamond as its substrate material has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Several different configurations, including a quadrant pattern for a x-ray-transmitting beam position monitor (TBPM) and 1-D and 2-D arrays for PSPCD beam profilers, have been developed. Tests on different PSPCD devices with high-heat-flux undulator white x-ray beam, as well as with gamma-ray beams from {sup 60}Co sources have been done at the APS and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). It was proven that the insulating-type CVD diamond can be used to make a hard x-ray and gamma-ray position-sensitive detector that acts as a solid-state ion chamber. These detectors are based on the photoconductivity principle. A total of eleven of these TBPMs have been installed on the APS front ends for commissioning use. The linear array PSPCD beam profiler has been routinely used for direct measurements of the undulator white beam profile. More tests with hard x-rays and gamma rays are planned for the CVD-diamond 2-D imaging PSPCD. Potential applications include a high-dose-rate beam profiler for fourth-generation synchrotrons radiation facilities, such as free-electron lasers.

  17. Theoretical Noise Analysis on a Position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the theoretical noise analysis for a position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter (MMC), consisting of MMC read-out at both ends of a large X-ray absorber. Such devices are under consideration as alternatives to other cryogenic technologies for future X-ray astronomy missions. We use a finite-element model (FEM) to numerically calculate the signal and noise response at the detector outputs and investigate the correlations between the noise measured at each MMC coupled by the absorber. We then calculate, using the optimal filter concept, the theoretical energy and position resolution across the detector and discuss the trade-offs involved in optimizing the detector design for energy resolution, position resolution and count rate. The results show, theoretically, the position-sensitive MMC concept offers impressive spectral and spatial resolving capabilities compared to pixel arrays and similar position-sensitive cryogenic technologies using Transition Edge Sensor (TES) read-out.

  18. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    PubMed Central

    Dooraghi, AA; Vu, NT; Silverman, RW; Farrell, R; Shah, KS; Wang, J; Heath, JR; Chatziioannou, AF

    2013-01-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm−2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm−2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ~180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ~200 µm of additional LDPE film

  19. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems.

  20. Complex microcalorimeter models and their application to position-sensitive detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2006-06-01

    We present a general formalism for calculating the linear response, noise spectrum, and energy resolution of complex calorimeters. Using this formalism calorimeters with arbitrary numbers of distinct linked heat capacity systems and/or coupled thermometers can be analyzed. We use this formalism to derive the theoretical resolution of an imaging microcalorimeter called a position- sensitive transition-edge sensor.

  1. Integrating 2-D position sensitive X-ray detectors with low-density alkali halide storage targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H.-G.; Hoheisel, W.; Hiller, P.

    1986-05-01

    For the use in scattering experiments with synchrotron radiation, integrating position sensitive X-ray detectors are discussed. These detectors store the photon number equivalent charge (PNEC) in low-density alkali halide targets. Performance tests are given for a detector which uses a Gd 2O 2S fluorescence screen for X-ray detection and the low-density KCl storage target of a television SEC vidicon tube for photon integration. Rather than directly by X-rays, this target is charged by 6 keV electrons from the image intensifier section of the vidicon. Its excellent storage capability allows measurements of extremely high-contrast, high-flux X-ray patterns with the same accuracy as achieved with any single photon detection system if the discussed readout techniques are applied.

  2. Sealed position sensitive hard X-ray detector having large drift region for all sky camera with high angular resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Perlman, D.; Parsignault, D.; Burns, R.

    1979-01-01

    A sealed position sensitive proportional counter filled with two atmospheres of 95% xenon and 5% methane, and containing a drift region of 24 atm cm, has operated in a stable manner for many months. The detector contains G-10 frames to support the anode and cathode wires. The detector was sealed successfully by a combination of vacuum baking the G-10 frames at 150 C for two weeks followed by assembly into the detector in an environment of dry nitrogen, and the use of passive internal getters. The counter is intended for use with a circumferential cylindrical collimator. Together they provide a very broad field of view detection system with the ability to locate cosmic hard X-ray and soft gamma ray sources to an angular precision of a minute of arc. A set of instruments based on this principle have been proposed for satellites to detect and precisely locate cosmic gamma ray bursts.

  3. Detectability of strange matter in heavy ion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffner, J., ||; Diener, A.; Stocker, H.,; Greiner, C.,

    1997-06-01

    We discuss the properties of two distinct forms of hypothetical strange matter, small lumps of strange quark matter (strangelets) and of hyperon matter [metastable exotic multihypernuclear objects (MEMO{close_quote}s)], with special emphasis on their relevance for present and future heavy ion experiments. The masses of small strangelets up to A{sub B}=40 are calculated using the MIT bag model with shell mode filling for various bag parameters. The strangelets are checked for possible strong and weak hadronic decays, also taking into account multiple hadron decays. It is found that strangelets which are stable against strong decay are most likely highly negatively charged, contrary to previous findings. Strangelets can be stable against weak hadronic decay but their masses and charges are still rather high. This has serious impact on the present high sensitivity searches in heavy ion experiments at the AGS and CERN facilities. On the other hand, highly charged MEMO{close_quote}s are predicted on the basis of an extended relativistic mean-field model. Those objects could be detected in future experiments searching for short-lived, rare composites. It is demonstrated that future experiments can be sensitive to a much wider variety of strangelets. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Detection and characterization of smokeless powders with ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Neiza M.; Rosario, Santa V.; Hernandez, Samuel P.; Mina, Nairmen

    2005-05-01

    Smokeless Powders are a class of propellants that were developed in the late 19th century to replace black powder; it has been used as an explosive in shotguns, rifles, firearms and many other larger caliber weapons. These propellants can be placed into one of three different classes according to the chemical composition of their primary energetic ingredients. Advance equipment have been designed and used for the detection of explosives devices and compounds potentially energetic. In this research we are developing an analytical methodology to detect different formulation of smokeless powders: Alliant-American Select, Alliant-Bullseye, and Alliant-Red Dot using the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) technique. We used different surfaces like computer diskettes, CD"s, book covers and plastics to study their adsorption/desorption process. Using micropipettes, we delivered solutions with different amounts of Smokeless Powders from a 1000 ppm solution and deposit it on various types of filters to make a calibration curve. Several amounts of Smokeless Powder were deposited to the different surfaces and collected with filter paper. The samples were desorbed directly from the filter to the instrument inlet port. Subsequently, the percentage of explosive recovered was calculated.

  5. Enzyme catalyzed optofluidic biolaser for sensitive ion concentration detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chaoyang; Gong, Yuan; Oo, Maung Kyaw Khaing; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yunjiang; Fan, Xudong

    2016-12-01

    The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been extensively used in biochemistry for its ability to amplify a weak signal. By using HRP catalyzed substrate as the gain medium, we demonstrate sensitive ion concentration detection based on the optofluidic laser. The enzyme catalyzed reaction occurs in bulk solution inside a Fabry-Perot laser cavity, where the colorless, non-fluorescent 10-Acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine (ADHP) substrate is oxidized to produce highly fluorescent resorufin. Laser emission is achieved when pumped with the second harmonic wave of a Q-switched YAG laser. Further, we use sulfide anion (S2-) as an example to investigate the sensing performance of enzyme catalyzed optofluidic laser. The laser onset time difference between the sample to be tested and the reference is set to be the sensing output. Thanks to the amplification effects of both the enzymatic reaction and laser emission, we achieve a detection limit of 10 nM and a dynamic range of 3 orders of magnitude.

  6. Position sensitivity in large spectroscopic LaBr3:Ce crystals for Doppler broadening correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, N.; Giaz, A.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2016-12-01

    The position sensitivity of a large LaBr3:Ce crystal was investigated with the aim of correcting for the Doppler broadening in nuclear physics experiments. The crystal was cylindrical, 3 in×3 in (7.62 cm x 7.62 cm) and with diffusive surfaces as typically used in nuclear physics basic research to measure medium or high energy gamma rays (0.5 MeVPosition Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT). The signals from the 256 segments of the four PSPMTs were acquired grouping them into 16 elements. An event by event analysis was performed and a positon resolution of the order of 2 cm was found. It was verified that this allows an important reduction of the Doppler broadening induced by relativistic beams in Nuclear Physics experiments.

  7. Powder diffraction by fixed incident angle reflection using a curved position-sensitive detector

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, Ryan P.; Sarin, Pankaj; Bérar, Jean-Francois; Apostolov, Zlatomir D.; Kriven, Waltraud M.

    2010-05-25

    As curved position-sensitive detectors improve in angular resolution, the effects that fixed incident angle reflection have on X-ray diffraction peaks become more apparent. In this study the effects of sample transparency, incident beam height, detector resolution and sample displacement on the intensity, location, width and shape of powder diffraction peaks were examined. The functions describing each of these phenomena are presented and were successfully used to quantitatively model the diffraction peaks collected in this geometry. Three distinct regimes of diffraction peak resolution were identified from the phenomena that limit the peak variance. Pertinent criteria based on experimental parameters have been outlined to classify fixed incident angle reflection experiments into each regime. Guidelines for improvement of experimental resolution and for conducting analysis of data acquired using fixed incident angle reflection geometry and curved position-sensitive detectors are also provided.

  8. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: New test and analysis of position-sensitive-silicon-detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Ge, Yu-Cheng; Wang, He; Fan, Feng-Ying; Qiao, Rui; Lu, Fei; Song, Yu-Shou; Zheng, Tao; Ye, Yan-Lin

    2009-01-01

    We have tested and analyzed the properties of two-dimensional Position-Sensitive-silicon-Detector (PSD) with new integrated preamplifiers. The test demonstrates that the best position resolution for 5.5 MeV α particles is 1.7 mm (FWHM), and the best energy resolution is 2.1%, which are notably better than the previously reported results. A scaling formula is introduced to make the absolute position calibration.

  9. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Urbain, X; Bech, D; Van Roy, J-P; Géléoc, M; Weber, S J; Huetz, A; Picard, Y J

    2015-02-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  10. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Urbain, X. Bech, D.; Van Roy, J.-P.; Géléoc, M.; Weber, S. J.

    2015-02-15

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H{sub 3} into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  11. Implementation of Complex Signal Processing Algorithms for Position-Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported on a theoretical digital signal-processing algorithm for improved energy and position resolution in position-sensitive, transition-edge sensor (POST) X-ray detectors [Smith et al., Nucl, lnstr and Meth. A 556 (2006) 2371. PoST's consists of one or more transition-edge sensors (TES's) on a large continuous or pixellated X-ray absorber and are under development as an alternative to arrays of single pixel TES's. PoST's provide a means to increase the field-of-view for the fewest number of read-out channels. In this contribution we extend the theoretical correlated energy position optimal filter (CEPOF) algorithm (originally developed for 2-TES continuous absorber PoST's) to investigate the practical implementation on multi-pixel single TES PoST's or Hydras. We use numerically simulated data for a nine absorber device, which includes realistic detector noise, to demonstrate an iterative scheme that enables convergence on the correct photon absorption position and energy without any a priori assumptions. The position sensitivity of the CEPOF implemented on simulated data agrees very well with the theoretically predicted resolution. We discuss practical issues such as the impact of random arrival phase of the measured data on the performance of the CEPOF. The CEPOF algorithm demonstrates that full-width-at- half-maximum energy resolution of < 8 eV coupled with position-sensitivity down to a few 100 eV should be achievable for a fully optimized device.

  12. Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for the Detection and Identification of Organisms

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Stephenson, James L., Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Current electrospray ion trap methodology for rapid mixture analysis of proteins used for the identification of microorganisms is described. Development of ion/ion reaction techniques (e.g. reactions of multiply-charged protein cations with singly-charged anions) from both a fundamental and practical approach are presented, detailing the necessary steps and considerations involved in complex mixture analysis. Data describing the reduction of the initial charge states of electrospray ions to arbitrarily low values, the utility of ion/ion reactions for mixture separation on the millisecond time scale, and effects of excess singly-charged reactants on detection and storage efficiency are illustrated.

  13. Sensitive detection of copper ions via ion-responsive fluorescence quenching of engineered porous silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Hwang, Mintai P.; Choi, Moonhyun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Hong, Jinkee; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-10-01

    Heavy metal pollution has been a problem since the advent of modern transportation, which despite efforts to curb emissions, continues to play a critical role in environmental pollution. Copper ions (Cu2+), in particular, are one of the more prevalent metals that have widespread detrimental ramifications. From this perspective, a simple and inexpensive method of detecting Cu2+ at the micromolar level would be highly desirable. In this study, we use porous silicon nanoparticles (NPs), obtained via anodic etching of Si wafers, as a basis for undecylenic acid (UDA)- or acrylic acid (AA)-mediated hydrosilylation. The resulting alkyl-terminated porous silicon nanoparticles (APS NPs) have enhanced fluorescence stability and intensity, and importantly, exhibit [Cu2+]-dependent quenching of fluorescence. After determining various aqueous sensing conditions for Cu2+, we demonstrate the use of APS NPs in two separate applications – a standard well-based paper kit and a portable layer-by-layer stick kit. Collectively, we demonstrate the potential of APS NPs in sensors for the effective detection of Cu2+.

  14. Sensitive detection of copper ions via ion-responsive fluorescence quenching of engineered porous silicon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jangsun; Hwang, Mintai P.; Choi, Moonhyun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Hong, Jinkee; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution has been a problem since the advent of modern transportation, which despite efforts to curb emissions, continues to play a critical role in environmental pollution. Copper ions (Cu2+), in particular, are one of the more prevalent metals that have widespread detrimental ramifications. From this perspective, a simple and inexpensive method of detecting Cu2+ at the micromolar level would be highly desirable. In this study, we use porous silicon nanoparticles (NPs), obtained via anodic etching of Si wafers, as a basis for undecylenic acid (UDA)- or acrylic acid (AA)-mediated hydrosilylation. The resulting alkyl-terminated porous silicon nanoparticles (APS NPs) have enhanced fluorescence stability and intensity, and importantly, exhibit [Cu2+]-dependent quenching of fluorescence. After determining various aqueous sensing conditions for Cu2+, we demonstrate the use of APS NPs in two separate applications – a standard well-based paper kit and a portable layer-by-layer stick kit. Collectively, we demonstrate the potential of APS NPs in sensors for the effective detection of Cu2+. PMID:27752120

  15. An acid-sensing ion channel that detects ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    Naves, L A; McCleskey, E W

    2005-11-01

    Ischemic pain occurs when there is insufficient blood flow for the metabolic needs of an organ. The pain of a heart attack is the prototypical example. Multiple compounds released from ischemic muscle likely contribute to this pain by acting on sensory neurons that innervate muscle. One such compound is lactic acid. Here, we show that ASIC3 (acid-sensing ion channel #3) has the appropriate expression pattern and physical properties to be the detector of this lactic acid. In rats, it is expressed only in sensory neurons and then only on a minority (approximately 40%) of these. Nevertheless, it is expressed at extremely high levels on virtually all dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons that innervate the heart. It is extraordinarily sensitive to protons (Hill slope 4, half-activating pH 6.7), allowing it to readily respond to the small changes in extracellular pH (from 7.4 to 7.0) that occur during muscle ischemia. Moreover, both extracellular lactate and extracellular ATP increase the sensitivity of ASIC3 to protons. This final property makes ASIC3 a "coincidence detector" of three molecules that appear during ischemia, thereby allowing it to better detect acidosis caused by ischemia than other forms of systemic acidosis such as hypercapnia.

  16. Ultrasensitive detection of potassium ions based on target induced DNA conformational switch enhanced fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kun; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin; Tian, Jianniao; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Guohai; Jiang, Jing

    2012-06-21

    We have developed a simple, highly sensitive and selective fluorescence polarization assay for the detection of potassium ions based on target induced DNA conformational switch from hairpin to G-quadruplex enhanced fluorescence polarization. The assay was applied in the detection of low nM concentrations of potassium ions and was highly selective over other cations.

  17. Triboelectrification-Enabled Self-Powered Detection and Removal of Heavy Metal Ions in Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoling; Chen, Jun; Guo, Hengyu; Fan, Xing; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Yu, Chongwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-20

    A fundamentally new working principle into the field of self-powered heavy-metal-ion detection and removal using the triboelectrification effect is introduced. The as-developed tribo-nanosensors can selectively detect common heavy metal ions. The water-driven triboelectric nanogenerator is taken as a sustainable power source for heavy-metal-ion removal by recycling the kinetic energy from flowing wastewater.

  18. The role of fiber optics in mass spectrometer electro-optical ion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, D. D.; Giffin, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an electro-optical ion detector combining the best features of photographic and electrical ion detection (i.e., wide mass range coverage and low ion detection threshold respectively). A nineteen fold fiber optic image dissector is discussed which reformats the 1 mm x 361 mm mass spectrometer focal plane format to a 19 mm x 19 mm format suitable for vidicon imaging and electronic display of the data.

  19. CdZnTe position-sensitive drift detectors with thicknesses up to 5 cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Chen, E.; Cheng, S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Gallagher, R.; Dedic, V.; De Geronimo, G.; Ocampo Giraldo, L.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Sellin, P.; Taherion, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; El-hanany, U.; James, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of long-drift-time CdZnTe (CZT) gamma-ray detectors, fabricated from CZT material produced by Redlen Technologies. CZT crystals with cross-section areas of 5 × 5 mm2 and 6 × 6 mm2 and thicknesses of 20-, 30-, 40-, and 50-mm were configured as 3D position-sensitive drift detectors and were read out using a front-end ASIC. By correcting the electron charge losses caused by defects in the crystals, we demonstrated high performance for relatively thick detectors fabricated from unselected CZT material.

  20. Fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry using a spherical moderator with position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Taosheng; Yang, Lianzhen; Ma, Jizeng; Fang, Dong

    2007-01-01

    A neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurement system has been developed based on a different design of the divided regions for a sphere, with three position-sensitive counters. The characteristics of the measurement system have been investigated in the reference radiation fields of Am-Be and (252)Cf sources. When realistic input spectra are used for the unfolding, the overall deviations of the calculated results for four dosimetric quantities are less than +/-10%. The results of other input spectra are also discussed in this report.

  1. Using Metal Complex Ion-Molecule Reactions in a Miniature Rectilinear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer to Detect Chemical Warfare Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graichen, Adam M.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n]y+ complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n]2+ complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  2. Using metal complex ion-molecule reactions in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer to detect chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Graichen, Adam M; Vachet, Richard W

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n](y+) complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n](2+) complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  3. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  4. Rapid and highly sensitive detection of lead ions in drinking water based on a strip immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Hua; Xing, Changrui; Hao, Changlong; Liu, Liqiang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-03-28

    In this study, we have first developed a rapid and sensitive strip immunosensor based on two heterogeneously-sized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) probes for the detection of trace lead ions in drinking water. The sensitivity was 4-fold higher than that of the conventional LFA under the optimized conditions. The visual limit of detection (LOD) of the amplified method for qualitative detection lead ions was 2 ng/mL and the LOD for semi-quantitative detection could go down to 0.19 ng/mL using a scanning reader. The method suffered from no interference from other metal ions and could be used to detect trace lead ions in drinking water without sample enrichment. The recovery of the test samples ranged from 96% to 103%. As the detection method could be accomplished within 15 min, this method could be used as a potential tool for preliminary monitoring of lead contamination in drinking water.

  5. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  6. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  7. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  8. Position sensitivity in 3"×3" Spectroscopic LaBr3:Ce Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, N.; Giaz, A.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2015-06-01

    The position sensitivity of a thick, cylindrical and continuous 3" × 3" (7.62 cm × 7.62 cm) LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces was investigated. Nuclear physics basic research uses thick LaBr3:Ce crystals (> 3cm) to measure medium or high energy gamma rays (0.5 MeV < Eγ< 20 MeV). In the first measurement the PMT photocathode entrance window was covered by black absorber except for a small window 1 cm × 1cm wide. A complete scan of the detector over a 0.5 cm step grid was performed. The data show that even in a 3" thick LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces the position of the full energy peak centroid depends on the source position. The position of the full energy peak centroids are sufficient to identify the collimated gamma source position. The crystal was then coupled to four Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT). We acquired the signals from the 256 segments of the four PSPMTs grouping them into 16 elements. An event by event analysis shows a positon resolution of the order of 2 cm.

  9. Development of Three-Dimensional Position-Sensitive Room Temperature Semiconductor Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; Wen Li; Glenn F. Knoll; D. K. Wehe

    2000-06-04

    Semiconductor detectors can provide better spectroscopic performance than scintillation or gas-filled detectors because of the small ionization energy required to generate each electron-hole pair. Indeed, cryogenically cooled high-purity germanium detectors have played the dominant role whenever the best gamma-ray spectroscopy is required. A decades-long search for other semiconductor detectors that could provide higher stopping power and could operate at room temperature has been ongoing. Wide-bandgap semiconductors, such as CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}, have captured the most attention. However, the use of these semiconductors in detectors has been hindered primarily by problems of charge trapping and material nonuniformity. Introduced in 1994, single-polarity charge sensing on semiconductor detectors has shown great promise in avoiding the hole-trapping problem, and the newly demonstrated three-dimensional position-sensing technique can significantly mitigate the degradation of energy resolution due to nonuniformity of detector material. In addition, three-dimensional position sensitivity will provide unique imaging capabilities of these gamma-ray spectrometers. These devices are of interest for nuclear nonproliferation, medical imaging, gamma-ray astronomy, and high-energy physics applications. This paper describes the three-dimensional position-sensing method and reports our latest results using second-generation three-dimensional position-sensitive semiconductor spectrometers.

  10. Development of Position-sensitive Transition-edge Sensor X-ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckard, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. s.; Sad (eor. K/ E/); Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of position-sensitive transition-edge sensors (PoST's) for future x-ray astronomy missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), currently under study by NASA and ESA. PoST's consist of multiple absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). This differential thermal coupling between absorbers and TES's results in different characteristic pulse shapes and allows position discrimination between the different pixels. The development of PoST's is motivated by a desire to achieve maximum focal-plane area with the least number of readout channels and as such. PoST's are ideally suited to provide a focal-plane extension to the Constellation-X microcalorimeter array. We report the first experimental results of our latest one and two channel PoST's, which utilize fast thermalizing electroplated Au/Bi absorbers coupled to low noise Mo/Au TES's - a technology already successfully implemented in our arrays of single pixel TES's. We demonstrate 6 eV energy resolution coupled with spatial sensitivity in the keV energy range. We also report on the development of signal processing algorithms to optimize energy and position sensitivity of our detectors.

  11. An improved method of energy calibration for position-sensitive silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Huang, Tian-Heng; Liu, Zhong; Ding, Bing; Yang, Hua-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ma, Long; Yu, Lin; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Gan, Zai-Guo; Xiao-Hong, Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors is achieved by parabolic fitting in the traditional method, where the systematic variations of vertex and curvature of the parabola with energy must be considered. In this paper we extend the traditional method in order to correct the fitting function, simplify the procedure of calibration and improve the experimental data quality. Instead of a parabolic function as used in the traditional method, a new function describing the relation of position and energy is introduced. The energy resolution of the 8.088 MeV α decay of 213Rn is determined to be about 87 keV (FWHM), which is better than the result of the traditional method, 104 keV (FWHM). The improved method can be applied to the energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors with various performances. Supported by ‘100 Person Project’ of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405224 and 11435014)

  12. Indirect UV detection-ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography of common inorganic ions with sulfosalicylic acid eluent.

    PubMed

    Kozaki, Daisuke; Mori, Masanobu; Nakatani, Nobutake; Arai, Kaori; Masuno, Tomoe; Koseki, Masakazu; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe indirect UV detection-ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography (IEC/CEC) on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) using sulfosalicylic acid as the eluent. The goal of the study was to characterize the peaks detected by UV detector. The peak directions of analyte ions in UV at 315 nm were negative because the molar absorbance coefficients of analyte anions and cations were lower than that of the sulfosalicylic acid eluent. Good chromatographic resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios of analyte ions were obtained for the separations performed using 1.1 mM sulfosalicylic acid and 1.5 mM 18-crown-6 as the eluent. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the peak areas ranged from 0.6 to 4.9%. Lower detection limits of the analytes were achieved using indirect UV detection at 315 nm (0.23 - 0.98 μM) than those obtained with conductometric detection (CD) (0.61 - 2.1 μM) under the optimized elution conditions. The calibration curves were linear in the range from 0.01 to 1.0 mM except for Cl(-), which was from 0.02 to 2.0 mM. The present method was successfully applied to determine common inorganic ions in a pond water sample.

  13. Instrumentation and methodology for simultaneous excitation/detection of ions in an FTICR mass spectrometer

    PubMed

    Schmidt; Fiorentino; Arkin; Laude

    2000-08-01

    A method for direct and continuous detection of ion motion during different perturbation events of the fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) experiment is demonstrated. The modifications necessary to convert an ordinary FTICR cell into one capable of performing simultaneous excitation/detection (SED) using a capacitive network are outlined. With these modifications, a 200-fold reduction in the detection of the coupled excitation signal is achieved. This allows the unique ability not only to observe the response to the perturbation but to observe the perturbation event itself. SED is used successfully to monitor the ion cyclotron transient during single-frequency excitation, remeasurement and exciter-excite experiments.

  14. Superthermal ions detected in Venus' dayside ionosheath, ionopause, and magnetic barrier regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Hartle, R. E.; Mahajan, K. K.; Wagner, T. C. G.

    1993-05-01

    Results of a comprehensive morphological analysis of the dayside superthermal ion presence in the dayside ionopause region of Venus made using the Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer measurements are presented. There is a strong inbound-outbound difference in both the number and intensity of the superthermal ions with most events detected on the inbound crossing of the ionopause. The ambient energy of the detected ions is comparable to the ram energy of cold ions relative to the moving spacecraft. A comparison of the locations of the superthermal O(+) ion occurrences with respect to other parameters shows that the superthermals are a characteristic of the ionopause transition separating the essentially stationary ionosphere plasma from the flowing ionosheath plasma as deduced by Taylor et al. (1980) from individual examples.

  15. Integrated ion imprinted polymers-paper composites for selective and sensitive detection of Cd(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Chen, Ying; Zhou, Feng; Zhao, Xiaoya; Liu, Jiafa; Mei, Surong; Zhou, Yikai; Jing, Tao

    2017-03-18

    Paper-based sensor is a new alternative technology to develop a portable, low-cost, and rapid analysis system in environmental chemistry. In this study, ion imprinted polymers (IIPs) using cadmium ions as the template were directly grafted on the surface of low-cost print paper based on the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. It can be applied as a recognition element to selectively capture the target ions in the complex samples. The maximum adsorption capacity of IIPs composites was 155.2mgg(-1) and the imprinted factor was more than 3.0. Then, IIPs-paper platform could be also applied as a detection element for highly selective and sensitive detection of Cd(II) ions without complex sample pretreatment and expensive instrument, due to the selective recognition, formation of dithizone-cadmium complexes and light transmission ability. Under the optimized condition, the linear range was changed from 1 to 100ngmL(-1) and the limit of detection was 0.4ngmL(-1). The results were in good agreement with the classic ICP-MS method. Furthermore, the proposed method can also be developed for detection of other heavy metals by designing of new IIPs.

  16. Position-sensitive CdTe detector using improved crystal growth method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a position-sensitive CdTe detector array for astronomical observations in the hard X-ray, soft gamma ray region is demonstrated. In principle, it was possible to improve the resolution capability for imaging measurements in this region by orders of magnitude over what is now possible through the use of CdTe detector arrays. The objective was to show that CdTe crystals of the quality, size and uniformity required for this application can be obtained with a new high pressure growth technique. The approach was to fabricate, characterize and analyze a 100 element square array and several single-element detectors using crystals from the new growth process. Results show that detectors fabricated from transversely sliced, 7 cm diameter wafers of CdTe exhibit efficient counting capability and a high degree of uniformity over their entire areas. A 100 element square array of 1 sq mm detectors was fabricated and operated.

  17. Development of an optical lens based alpha-particle imaging system using position sensitive photomultiplier tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Koki; Oka, Miki; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2017-02-01

    We developed an optical lens based alpha-particle imaging system using position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The alpha-particle imaging system consists of an optical lens, an extension tube and a 1 in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) type PSPMT. After a ZnS(Ag) is attached to subject, the scintillation image of ZnS(Ag) is focused on the photocathode of the PSPMT by the use of the optical lens. With this configuration we could image the alpha particle distribution with energy information without contacting to the subject. The spatial resolution and energy resolution were 0.8 mm FWHM and 50% FWHM at 5 mm from the optical lens, respectively. We could successfully image the alpha particle distribution in uranium ore. The developed alpha-particle imaging system will be a new tool for imaging alpha emitters with energy information without contacting the subject.

  18. A two-dimensional position sensitive gas chamber with scanned charge transfer readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pardo, J.; Pena, J.; Pazos, A.; Pombar, M.; Rodríguez, A.

    2003-10-01

    We have constructed and tested a two-dimensional position sensitive parallel-plate gas ionization chamber with scanned charge transfer readout. The scan readout method described here is based on the development of a new position-dependent charge transfer technique. It has been implemented by using gate strips perpendicularly oriented to the collector strips. This solution reduces considerably the number of electronic readout channels needed to cover large detector areas. The use of a 25 μm thick kapton etched circuit allows high charge transfer efficiency with a low gating voltage, consequently needing a very simple commutating circuit. The present prototype covers 8×8 cm2 with a pixel size of 1.27×1.27 mm2. Depending on the intended use and beam characteristics a smaller effective pixel is feasible and larger active areas are possible. This detector can be used for X-ray or other continuous beam intensity profile monitoring.

  19. Electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for selective reversible ion detection.

    PubMed

    Schmoltner, Kerstin; Kofler, Johannes; Klug, Andreas; List-Kratochvil, Emil J W

    2013-12-17

    An ion-sensitive electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for selective and reversible detection of sodium (Na(+) ) down to 10(-6) M is presented. The inherent low voltage - high current operation of these transistors in combination with a state-of-the-art ion-selective membrane proves to be a novel, versatile modular sensor platform.

  20. Experience with position sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Haumann, J.R.; Schultz, A.J.; Felcher, G.P.; Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Montague, D.G.; Dejus, R.J.

    1990-05-07

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm {times} 30 cm, {approximately}3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm dia, {approximately}0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm {times} 20 cm, {approximately}5 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a 40 cm {times} 40 cm, {approximately}4 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, {approximately}1.6 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in dia 60 cm long and has {approximately}14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with {approximately}1 {mu}s precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Experience with position-sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, R. K.; Haumann, J. R.; Epperson, J. E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Schultz, A. J.; Felcher, G. P.; Montague, D. G.; Dejus, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory, pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron-scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron-scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm × 30 cm, ˜3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm diameter, ˜0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm × 20 cm, ˜5 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a 40 cm × 40 cm, ˜4 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, ˜1.6 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical 3He proportional-counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in diameter and 60 cm long and has ˜14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with ˜1 μs precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs.

  2. Development of three-dimensional position-sensitive room temperature semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Li, W.; Knoll, G.F.; Wehe, D.K.

    2000-07-01

    Semiconductor detectors can provide better spectroscopic performance than scintillation or gas-filled detectors because of the small ionization energy required to generate each electron-hole pair. Indeed, cryogenically cooled high-purity germanium detectors have played the dominant role whenever the best gamma-ray spectroscopy is required. A decades-long search for other semiconductor detectors that could provide higher stopping power and could operate at room temperature has been ongoing. Wide-band-gap semiconductors, such as CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}, have captured the most attention. However, the use of these semiconductors in detectors has been hindered primarily by problems of charge trapping and material nonuniformity. Introduced in 1994, single-polarity charge sensing on semiconductor detectors has shown great promise in avoiding the hole-trapping problem, and the newly demonstrated three-dimensional position-sensing technique can significantly mitigate the degradation of energy resolution due to the nonuniformity of detector material. In addition, three-dimensional position sensitivity will provide unique imaging capabilities of these gamma-ray spectrometers. These devices are of interest for nuclear nonproliferation, medical imaging, gamma-ray astronomy, and high-energy physics applications. This paper reports the latest results using second-generation three-dimensional position-sensitive semiconductor spectrometers. The improvements over the first generation devices include: (1) Larger volume; (2) Improved anode design; (3) More reliable connections; (4) Enhanced electronic capability; and (5) Measurement of electron drift times. The new detectors and readout electronics (from IDE AS) are being assembled and tested.

  3. Ultra-sensitive direct detection of silver ions via Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinsung; Lee, Sangmyung; Jang, Kuewhan; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-10-15

    Nanotoxicity is receiving great importance due to its potential impact on human health and environment and due to rapid development in the field of nanoscale research and industry. Herein, we report the Kelvin probe force microscope (KPPM)-based nanotoxicity material detection using surface potential difference. In general, it is difficult to measure the size of ion (Ag(+)) using a conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) because of the limited resolution. In this study, we have demonstrated that KPFM is capable of ultra-sensitive detection of silver ion with silver specific DNA by a single droplet. Furthermore, the measured surface potentials for Ag+ and DNA binding enable the detection performance for a practical sample that is general drinking water. Remarkably, the KPFM based silver ion detection enables an insight into the coordination chemistry, which plays an important role in early detection of toxicity. This implies that KPFM based detection system opens a new avenue for water testing sensor.

  4. Detection of artificially created negative ion clouds with incoherent scatter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultan, Peter J.; Mendillo, Michael; Oliver, William L.; Holt, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The physical mechanisms by which negative ions change the shape of the incoherent scatter spectrum, and the way in which shape changes may be used to detect the presence of heavy positive and negative ions in an ambient ionosphere are investigated. In order to detect heavy negative ions, the temperature structure of the ionosphere is fixed to a prevent average measurement, and any changes in spectral shape during the experiment are interpreted as being caused by changes in composition, and not by changes in the temperature ratio Te/Ti. The spatial and temporal development of heavy negative ion plasma clouds created during four active chemical release experiments was observed. Concentrations of 10-40-percent SF6(-) were detected in SPINEX 1, SPINEX 2, and IMS data sets. An average uncertainty of +/-10-percent SF6(-) is present in all three experiments. Concentrations of 30-percent Br(-) were detected in the NICARE 1 release, with uncertainties of +/-4 percent.

  5. Radical ions and excited states in radiolysis. Optically detected time resolved EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.; Smith, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Excited-state production and radical-ion recombination kinetics in pulse-irradiated solutions of aromatic solutes in cyclohexane are studied by a new method of optical detection of time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra. 7 figures.

  6. Mass spectrometric detection of trace anions: The evolution of paired-ion electrospray ionization (PIESI).

    PubMed

    Breitbach, Zachary S; Berthod, Alain; Huang, Ke; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    The negative-ion mode of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is intrinsically less sensitive than the positive-ion mode. The detection and quantitation of anions can be performed in positive-ion mode by forming specific ion-pairs during the electrospray process. The paired-ion electrospray ionization (PIESI) method uses specially synthesized multifunctional cations to form positively charged adducts with the anions to be analyzed. The adducts are detected in the positive-ion mode and at higher m/z ratios to produce excellent signal-to-noise ratios and limits of detection that often are orders of magnitude better than those obtained with native anions in the negative-ion mode. This review briefly summarizes the different analytical approaches to detect and separate anions. It focuses on the recently introduced PIESI method to present the most effective dicationic, tricationic, and tetracationic reagents for the detection of singly and multiply charged anions and some zwitterions. The mechanism by which specific structural molecular architectures can have profound effects on signal intensities is also addressed.

  7. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds.

  8. Chitosan-hydrogel-based fiber optic sensor for heavy metal ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Raghunandhan; Chen, Li Han; Chan, Chi Chiu; So, Ping Lam; Tou, Zhi Qiang; Peng, Zu

    2015-09-01

    A no-core fiber (NCF) based intermodal sensor for nickel ion (Ni2+) detection is proposed. Bilayers of chitosan and Poly Acrylic acid (PAA) functionalized on the sensor surface serve as adsorption sites for nickel ions thereby causing change in refractive index (RI) along the cladding bilayer boundary. Nickel adsorption at different concentrations was monitored continuously through measurement of wavelength shifts. As observed, the proposed sensor exhibits Ni2+ detection sensitivity of 0.0237 nm/μM.

  9. Tuning the chemical selectivity of SWNT-FETs for detection of heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Forzani, Erica S; Li, Xiulan; Zhang, Peiming; Tao, Nongjian; Zhang, Ruth; Amlani, Islamshah; Tsui, Raymond; Nagahara, Larry A

    2006-11-01

    A method to functionalize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a field-effect transistor (FET) device for the selective detection of heavy-metal ions is presented. In this method, peptide-modified polymers were electrochemically deposited onto SWNTs and the selective detection of metal ions was demonstrated by choosing appropriate peptide sequences. The signal transduction mechanism of the peptide-modified SWNT-FETs has also been studied.

  10. Detection and classification of explosive compounds utilizing laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmeier, A.; Heep, W.; Oberhuettinger, C.; Oberpriller, H.; Kessler, M.; Goebel, J.; Mueller, G.

    2009-05-01

    Detection of explosives by ion mobility spectroscopy has become common in recent years. We demonstrate explosive detection with a novel Laser Ion Mobility Spectrometer (LIMS) developed at EADS Innovation Works. A Laser operating at 266nm was used for the two-photon ionisation of dopant and calibrant substances. Quantitative measurements of trace residues of explosives have been performed to quantify the sensitivity of the LIMS system. Findings demonstrate the suitability of this technique as a screening tool for explosive compounds.

  11. Analysis of high-altitude planetary ion velocity space distributions detected by the Ion Mass Analyzer aboard Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fraenz, M.; Curry, S.; Mitchell, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    We present observations of planetary ion velocity space distributions from the Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) onboard Mars Express (MEX). The magnetometer data from Mars Global Surveyor is used to obtain a rough estimate of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Characteristic features of the velocity space distributions will be examined and discussed for orbits aligned with the convective electric field and those in the Mars terminator plane. This study will focus on the high (keV) energy ions, as well as the relative importance of a high-altitude magnetosheath source of escaping planetary ions. Furthermore, this paper will examine various methods for converting the IMA detector counts to species-specific fluxes. After mimicking the methods previously used by researchers, we apply each of these methods of species extraction to data collected during the same time intervals. We discuss the implications for planetary ion motion around Mars, using the details of the velocity space observations to better understand the solar wind interaction with Mars. Comparisons to virtual detections using a test particle simulation will also provide insight into ion origins and trajectories.

  12. Comparison of various stopping gases for 3He-based position sensitive neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumas, A.; Smith, G. C.

    2012-05-01

    A range of solid state, scintillator and gas based detectors are being developed for use at the next generation of high flux neutron facilities. Since gas detectors are expected to continue to play a key role in future specific thermal neutron experiments, a comparison of the performance characteristics of prospective stopping gases is beneficial. Gas detectors typically utilize the reaction 3He(n,p)t to detect thermal neutrons; the 3He gas is used in a mixture containing a particular stopping gas in order to maintain relatively short ranges for the proton and triton pair emitted from the n-3He reaction. Common stopping gases include hydrocarbons (e.g. propane), carbon tetrafluoride, and noble gases such as argon and xenon. For this study, we utilized the Monte Carlo simulation code "Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter" to analyze the expected behavior of argon, xenon, carbon dioxide, difluoroethane and octafluoropropane as stopping gases for thermal neutron detectors. We also compare these findings to our previously analyzed performance of propane, butane and carbon tetrafluoride. A discussion of these gases includes their behavior in terms of proton and triton range, ionization distribution and straggle.

  13. Intermediate Energies for Nuclear Astrophysics and the Development of a Position Sensitive Microstrip Detector System

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, Lee G.; Blackmon, J.; Bertulani, C.

    2015-12-30

    The chemical elements are made at astrophysical sites through a sequence of nuclear reactions often involving unstable nuclei. The overarching aim of this project is to construct a system that allows for the inverse process of nucleosynthesis (i.e. breakup of heavier nuclei into lighter ones) to be studied in high efficiency. The specific problem to be overcome with this grant is inadequate dynamic range and (triggering) threshold to detect the products of the breakup which include both heavy ions (with large energy and large deposited energy in a detector system) and protons (with little energy and deposited energy.) Early on in the grant we provided both TAMU and RIKEN (the site of the eventual experiments) with working systems based on the existing technology. This technology could be used with either an external preamplifier that was to be designed and fabricated by our RIKEN collaborators or upgraded by replacing the existing chip with one we designed. The RIKEN external preamplifier project never can to completion but our revised chip was designed, fabricated, used in a test experiment and performs as required.

  14. Ion Trapping with Fast-Response Ion-Selective Microelectrodes Enhances Detection of Extracellular Ion Channel Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Messerli, Mark A.; Collis, Leon P.; Smith, Peter J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, functional mapping of channels has been achieved by measuring the passage of net charge and of specific ions with electrophysiological and intracellular fluorescence imaging techniques. However, functional mapping of ion channels using extracellular ion-selective microelectrodes has distinct advantages over the former methods. We have developed this method through measurement of extracellular K+ gradients caused by efflux through Ca2+-activated K+ channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We report that electrodes constructed with short columns of a mechanically stable K+-selective liquid membrane respond quickly and measure changes in local [K+] consistent with a diffusion model. When used in close proximity to the plasma membrane (<4 μm), the ISMs pose a barrier to simple diffusion, creating an ion trap. The ion trap amplifies the local change in [K+] without dramatically changing the rise or fall time of the [K+] profile. Measurement of extracellular K+ gradients from activated rSlo channels shows that rapid events, 10–55 ms, can be characterized. This method provides a noninvasive means for functional mapping of channel location and density as well as for characterizing the properties of ion channels in the plasma membrane. PMID:19217875

  15. Reactant ion chemistry for detection of TNT, RDX, and PETN using an ion mobility spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, S.E.; Rodacy, P.; Silva, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the responses of three energetic materials (TNT, RDX, and PETN) to varying reactant ion chemistries and IMS cell temperatures. The following reactant ion chemistries were evaluated; air-dry; air-wet; methylene chloride-dry; methylene chloride-wet; methylene bromide-dry; nitrogen dioxide-wet; sulfur dioxide-wet. The temperature was varied between 160 - 220{degrees}C.

  16. An in situ trap capacitance measurement and ion-trapping detection scheme for a Penning ion trap facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, Ashif; Banerjee, Kumardeb; Das, Parnika; Ray, Kalyankumar; Bandyopadhyay, Subhankar; Dam, Bivas

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an in situ measurement setup for the capacitance of a five electrode Penning ion trap (PIT) facility at room temperature. For implementing a high Q resonant circuit for the detection of trapped electrons/ions in a PIT, the value of the capacitance of the trap assembly is of prime importance. A tunable Colpitts oscillator followed by a unity gain buffer and a low pass filter is designed and successfully implemented for a two-fold purpose: in situ measurement of the trap capacitance when the electric and magnetic fields are turned off and also providing RF power at the desired frequency to the PIT for exciting the trapped ions and subsequent detection. The setup is tested for the in situ measurement of trap capacitance at room temperature and the results are found to comply with those obtained from measurements using a high Q parallel resonant circuit setup driven by a standard RF signal generator. The Colpitts oscillator is also tested successfully for supplying RF power to the high Q resonant circuit, which is required for the detection of trapped electrons/ions.

  17. New, high-efficiency ion trap mobility detection system for narcotics and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.; Bradley, V.; Borsody, A.; Lepine, S.

    1994-10-01

    A new patented Ion Trap Mobility Spectrometer (ITMS) design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1% efficiency. This is due primarily to electric field driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9% of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost in this discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an `ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a `field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. Many applications for this new detector are now being considered including the detection of narcotics and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra, reduced mobility data and sensitivity data are presented for fifteen narcotics, including cocaine, THC and LSD are reported.

  18. New high-efficiency ion-trap mobility detection system for narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.

    1997-02-01

    A new patented Ion Trap Mobility Spectrometer design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1 percent efficiency. This is due primarily to electric field driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9 percent of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost int his discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an 'ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a 'field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. One application for this new detector is now being developed, a portable, hand-held system with switching capability for the detection of drugs and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra and sensitivity data are presented for cocaine and heroin using a hand sniffer configuration.

  19. Nanoporous gold based optical sensor for sub-ppt detection of mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chang, Haixin; Hirata, Akihiko; Wu, Hongkai; Xue, Qi-Kun; Chen, Mingwei

    2013-05-28

    Precisely probing heavy metal ions in water is important for molecular biology, environmental protection, and healthy monitoring. Although many methods have been reported in the past decade, developing a quantitative approach capable of detecting sub-ppt level heavy metal ions with high selectivity is still challenging. Here we report an extremely sensitive and highly selective nanoporous gold/aptamer based surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor. The optical sensor has an unprecedented detection sensitivity of 1 pM (0.2 ppt) for Hg(2+) ions, the most sensitive Hg(2+) optical sensor known so far. The sensor also exhibits excellent selectivity. Dilute Hg(2+) ions can be identified in an aqueous solution containing 12 metal ions as well as in river water and underground water. Moreover, the SERRS sensor can be reused without an obvious loss of the sensitivity and selectivity even after 10 cycles.

  20. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Young, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  1. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.

    1985-01-16

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  2. Indirect voltammetric detection of fluoride ions in toothpaste on a comb-shaped interdigitated microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Cernanská, Monika; Tomcík, Peter; Jánosíková, Zuzana; Rievaj, Miroslav; Bustin, Dusan

    2011-02-15

    A novel technique based on dynamic electrochemistry for the detection of fluoride ions was developed. It is based on its strong complexation with ferric ion. Formed fluoroferric complex is cathodically inactive at the potential of the reduction of free ferric aquo ion. The voltammetric and amperometric response of platinum comb-shaped interdigitated microelectrode array is decreased after fluoride addition. This decrease serves for the quantification of fluoride ions added to the solution. The detection limit of 4.5×10(-5) mol dm(-3) was achieved when one of the segments of interdigitated microelectrode array (IDA) was used as an indicating electrode. The detection limit is about one order of magnitude lower than in the case of conventional platinum macroelectrode. In comparison with ISE electrodes this method is faster and also avoiding large error resulting from the antilogarithmization of ISE Nerstian response. The method was applied to the analysis of toothpaste.

  3. Ion chemistry of VX surrogates and ion energetics properties of VX: new suggestions for VX chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Midey, Anthony J; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A A; Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    Room temperature rate constants and product ion branching ratios have been measured for the reactions of numerous positive and negative ions with VX chemical warfare agent surrogates representing the amine (triethylamine) and organophosphonate (diethyl methythiomethylphosphonate (DEMTMP)) portions of VX. The measurements have been supplemented by theoretical calculations of the proton affinity, fluoride affinity, and ionization potential of VX and the simulants. The results show that many proton transfer reactions are rapid and that the proton affinity of VX is near the top of the scale. Many proton transfer agents should detect VX selectively and sensitively in chemical ionization mass spectrometers. Charge transfer with NO(+) should also be sensitive and selective since the ionization potential of VX is small. The surrogate studies confirm these trends. Limits of detection for commercial and research grade CIMS instruments are estimated at 80 pptv and 5 ppqv, respectively.

  4. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  5. Performance characteristics of a compact position-sensitive LSO detector module.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J J; Seidel, J; Siegel, S; Gandler, W R; Green, M V

    1998-12-01

    We assembled a compact detector module comprised of an array of small, individual crystals of lutetium oxyorthosilicate:Ce (LSO) coupled directly to a miniature, metal-can, position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). We exposed this module to sources of 511-keV annihilation radiation and beams of 30- and 140-keV photons and measured spatial linearity; spatial variations in module gain, energy resolution, and event positioning; coincidence timing; the accuracy and sensitivity of identifying the crystal-of-first-interaction at 511 keV; and the effects of intercrystal scatter and LSO background radioactivity. The results suggest that this scintillator/phototube combination should be highly effective in the coincidence mode and can be used, with some limitations, to image relatively low-energy single photon emitters. Photons that are completely absorbed on their first interaction at 511 keV are positioned by the module at the center of a crystal. Intercrystal scatter events, even those that lead to total absorption of the incident photon, are placed by the module in a regular "connect-the-dot" pattern that joins crystal centers. As a result, the accuracy of event positioning can be made to exceed 90%, though at significantly reduced sensitivity, by retaining only events that occur within small regions-of-interest around each crystal center and rejecting events that occur outside these regions in the connect-the-dot pattern.

  6. ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter spectra of six Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; George, I. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter observations of six Seyfert 1 galaxies in the soft (0.1-2.0 keV) X-ray band. The sources (Mrk 335, ESO 198-G24, ESO 141-G55, Mrk 509, NGC 7469, and MCG-2-58-22) were chosen to have low absorbing column densities along the line of sight. As expected, it is found that all the sources possess significantly steeper spectra below about 1 keV than observed at higher X-ray energies. Assuming a simple absorbed power-law spectral model, the mean (photon) spectral index for the sample is Gamma = 2.38 +/- 0.25, compared to the canonical 1.7 typically observed in the 2-10 keV band. Furthermore, we find strong evidence for soft X-ray spectral features in half the sources. In NGC 7469 and ESO 198-G24, we find that the addition of a narrow emission line or an absorption edge to the underlying continuum is a significant improvement to the parameterization of the spectra. Mrk 335 also shows evidence for spectral complexity, but from these data it is not possible to unambiguously distinguish between an absorption edge and a steepening of the spectrum at low energies. We examine these results in the light of the accuracy of the PSPC spectral calibration.

  7. A multiplexed TOF and DOI capable PET detector using a binary position sensitive network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, M. F.; Cates, J. W.; Levin, C. S.

    2016-11-01

    Time of flight (TOF) and depth of interaction (DOI) capabilities can significantly enhance the quality and uniformity of positron emission tomography (PET) images. Many proposed TOF/DOI PET detectors require complex readout systems using additional photosensors, active cooling, or waveform sampling. This work describes a high performance, low complexity, room temperature TOF/DOI PET module. The module uses multiplexed timing channels to significantly reduce the electronic readout complexity of the PET detector while maintaining excellent timing, energy, and position resolution. DOI was determined using a two layer light sharing scintillation crystal array with a novel binary position sensitive network. A 20 mm effective thickness LYSO crystal array with four 3 mm  ×  3 mm silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) read out by a single timing channel, one energy channel and two position channels achieved a full width half maximum (FWHM) coincidence time resolution of 180  ±  2 ps with 10 mm of DOI resolution and 11% energy resolution. With sixteen 3 mm  ×  3 mm SiPMs read out by a single timing channel, one energy channel and four position channels a coincidence time resolution 204  ±  1 ps was achieved with 10 mm of DOI resolution and 15% energy resolution. The methods presented here could significantly simplify the construction of high performance TOF/DOI PET detectors.

  8. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeters for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, SImon; Stevenson, Thomas; Hsieh, Wen-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMC) are one of the most promising devices to provide very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray spectroscopy. MMC detectors can be built to large detector arrays having thousands of pixels. Position-sensitive magnetic (PoSM) microcalorimeters consist of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic micro calorimeter. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the MMC, resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enabling position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs therefore achieve the large focal plane area with fewer number of readout channels without compromising spatial sampling. Excellent performance of PoSMs was achieved by optimizing the designs of key parameters such as the thermal conductance among the absorbers, magnetic sensor, and heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. Micro fab ri - cation techniques were developed to construct four-absorber PoSMs, in which each absorber consists of a two-layer composite of bismuth and gold. The energy resolution (FWHM full width at half maximum) was measured to be better than 5 eV at 6 keV x-rays for all four absorbers. Position determination was demonstrated with pulse-shape discrimination, as well as with pulse rise time. X-ray microcalorimeters are usually designed to thermalize as quickly as possible to avoid degradation in energy resolution from position dependence to the pulse shapes. Each pixel consists of an absorber and a temperature sensor, both decoupled from the cold bath through a weak thermal link. Each pixel requires a separate readout channel; for instance, with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device). For future astronomy missions where thousands to millions of resolution elements are required, having an individual SQUID readout channel for each pixel becomes difficult. One route to attaining these goals is a position-sensitive detector in which a large continuous or

  9. Position-sensitive change in the transition metal L-edge fine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gulec, Ahmet; Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2015-10-05

    Studying the structure and composition of solid-state materials on the atomic scale has become nearly routine in transmission electron microscopy with the development of novel electron optics and electron sources. In particular, with spatial resolutions better than 0.1 nm and energy resolution smaller than 100 meV, the stoichiometry, bonding, and coordination can now be examined on similar scales. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have played a crucial role in identifying charge ordering, valence, and as spin state transitions in transition metal perovskite oxides. In this letter, we investigate the effects of ever-decreasing electron-probe sizes on the measured near-edge fine-structure of the transition metal core-loss edge using EELS. We find that for certain transition metal perovskites, the position of the electron probe with respect to the atomic column is crucial in determining the correct valence state. Several reasons for the observed position-sensitive EELS fine-structure are discussed.

  10. Improvement of the position linearity in a comb-type one-dimensional position sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiuyao; Huang, Meizhen; Kim, Hoseob

    2002-09-01

    In a conventional, strip-type one-dimensional (1-D) position sensitive detector (PSD) the sensitive area and the position resistance area are combined together, the contact structure of the device is handicapped, so its accuracy and linearity is affected adversely. The sensitive area and the position resistance area in a new, comb-type 1-D PSD are separated to become the comb teeth and the comb ridge area respectively, moreover the position resistance area is made very narrow, thus the doping uniformity of that area is greatly improved. On the other hand, its position resistance can be largely increased owing to its narrower shape, if doping level is kept the same, so the restriction that is imposed on the contact structure previously can be lifted. Our measurements made on a strip-type 1-D PSD and a comb type 1-D PSD confirmed this difference, and showed that the accuracy and linearity of the comb type 1-D PSD has been increased markedly, especially the RMS nonlinearity of the comb type 1-D PSD is reduced to 0.090% from that of the strip-type 1-D PSD, 0.94%.

  11. Fourier synthesis image reconstruction by use of one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Okada, Yuu; Negoro, Hitoshi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oda, Minoru

    2003-07-10

    An improvement of Fourier synthesis optics for hard x-ray imaging is described, and the basic performance of the new optics is confirmed through numerical simulations. The original concept of the Fourier synthesis imager utilizes nonposition-sensitive hard x-ray detectors coupled to individual bigrid modulation collimators. The improved concept employs a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (such as a CdTe strip detector) instead of the second grid layer of each bigrid modulation collimator. This improves the imaging performance in several respects over the original design. One performance improvement is a two-fold increase in the average transmission, from 1/4 to 1/2. The second merit is that both the sine and cosine components can be derived from a single grid-detector module, and hence the number of imaging modules can be halved. Furthermore, it provides information along the depth direction simultaneously. This in turn enables a three-dimensional imaging hard x-ray microscope for medical diagnostics, incorporating radioactive tracers. A conceptual design of such a microscope is presented, designed to provide a field of view of 4 mm and a spatial resolution of 400 microm.

  12. A multiplexed TOF and DOI capable PET detector using a binary position sensitive network.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, M F; Cates, J W; Levin, C S

    2016-11-07

    Time of flight (TOF) and depth of interaction (DOI) capabilities can significantly enhance the quality and uniformity of positron emission tomography (PET) images. Many proposed TOF/DOI PET detectors require complex readout systems using additional photosensors, active cooling, or waveform sampling. This work describes a high performance, low complexity, room temperature TOF/DOI PET module. The module uses multiplexed timing channels to significantly reduce the electronic readout complexity of the PET detector while maintaining excellent timing, energy, and position resolution. DOI was determined using a two layer light sharing scintillation crystal array with a novel binary position sensitive network. A 20 mm effective thickness LYSO crystal array with four 3 mm  ×  3 mm silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) read out by a single timing channel, one energy channel and two position channels achieved a full width half maximum (FWHM) coincidence time resolution of 180  ±  2 ps with 10 mm of DOI resolution and 11% energy resolution. With sixteen 3 mm  ×  3 mm SiPMs read out by a single timing channel, one energy channel and four position channels a coincidence time resolution 204  ±  1 ps was achieved with 10 mm of DOI resolution and 15% energy resolution. The methods presented here could significantly simplify the construction of high performance TOF/DOI PET detectors.

  13. Compton imaging with a highly-segmented, position-sensitive HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, T.; Hirsch, R.; Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Eberth, J.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Lewandowski, L.; Maier, L.; Schlarb, M.; Weiler, B.; Winkel, M.

    2017-02-01

    A Compton camera based on a highly-segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and a double-sided silicon-strip detector (DSSD) was developed, tested, and put into operation; the origin of γ radiation was determined successfully. The Compton camera is operated in two different modes. Coincidences from Compton-scattered γ-ray events between DSSD and HPGe detector allow for best angular resolution; while the high-efficiency mode takes advantage of the position sensitivity of the highly-segmented HPGe detector. In this mode the setup is sensitive to the whole 4π solid angle. The interaction-point positions in the 36-fold segmented large-volume HPGe detector are determined by pulse-shape analysis (PSA) of all HPGe detector signals. Imaging algorithms were developed for each mode and successfully implemented. The angular resolution sensitively depends on parameters such as geometry, selected multiplicity and interaction-point distances. Best results were obtained taking into account the crosstalk properties, the time alignment of the signals and the distance metric for the PSA for both operation modes. An angular resolution between 13.8° and 19.1°, depending on the minimal interaction-point distance for the high-efficiency mode at an energy of 1275 keV, was achieved. In the coincidence mode, an increased angular resolution of 4.6° was determined for the same γ-ray energy.

  14. Position sensitive and energy dispersive x-ray detector based on silicon strip detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.; Fink, J.; Fiutowski, T.; Krane, H.-G.; Loyer, F.; Schwamberger, A.; Świentek, K.; Venanzi, C.

    2015-04-01

    A new position sensitive detector with a global energy resolution for the entire detector of about 380 eV FWHM for 8.04 keV line at ambient temperature is presented. The measured global energy resolution is defined by the energy spectra summed over all strips of the detector, and thus it includes electronic noise of the front-end electronics, charge sharing effects, matching of parameters across the channels and other system noise sources. The target energy resolution has been achieved by segmentation of the strips to reduce their capacitance and by careful optimization of the front-end electronics. The key design aspects and parameters of the detector are discussed briefly in the paper. Excellent noise and matching performance of the readout ASIC and negligible system noise allow us to operate the detector with a discrimination threshold as low as 1 keV and to measure fluorescence radiation lines of light elements, down to Al Kα of 1.49 keV, simultaneously with measurements of the diffraction patterns. The measurement results that demonstrate the spectrometric and count rate performance of the developed detector are presented and discussed in the paper.

  15. Position-sensitive ``movie'' in situ neutron detector for the UCN τ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Hannah; UCNTau Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Precision measurements of neutron β-decay parameters provide tests of fundamental theories in elementary particle physics and cosmology such as the Standard Model and Big Bang nucleosynthesis. In particular, the UCN τ experiment aims to measure the mean lifetime of ultracold neutrons confined in an asymmetric magneto-gravitational trap using an in situ neutron detector. This detector consists of a 20 nm film of 10B on top of a ZnS:Ag scintillating screen. The screen is readout using two photomultipliers which view an array of wavelength shifting fibers optically coupled to the scintillator. When the detector is lowered into the loaded trap, light is emitted due to the charged particles recoiling into the ZnS:Ag when neutrons absorb on the 10B. Phase space evolution in the stored neutron population can lead to apparent shifts in the measured neutron lifetime with the detector height. In order to quantify this systematic uncertainty, we are implementing a supplemental 64-channel position-sensitive PMT module with high quantum efficiency and fast time response to image the entire detector in situ during measurements. We have characterized a prototype using a ZnS screen and an α-particle source along with a prototype lens system and will report the results and future plans.

  16. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin. PMID:23217311

  17. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles.

    PubMed

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-12-12

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin.

  18. Ultrasensitive quantum dot fluorescence quenching assay for selective detection of mercury ions in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-07-09

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg(2+) ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples.

  19. Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples. PMID:25005836

  20. Ultrasensitive Quantum Dot Fluorescence quenching Assay for Selective Detection of Mercury Ions in Drinking Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jun; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang; Chen, Junhong

    2014-07-01

    Mercury is one of the most acutely toxic substances at trace level to human health and living thing. Developing a rapid, cheap and water soluble metal sensor for detecting mercury ions at ppb level remains a challenge. Herein, a metal sensor consisting of MPA coated Mn doped ZnSe/ZnS colloidal nanoparticles was utilized to ultrasensitively and selectively detect Hg2+ ions with a low detection limit (0.1 nM) over a dynamic range from 0 to 20 nM. According to strong interaction between thiol(s) and mercury ions, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used as a highly unique acceptor for mercury ions in the as-obtained ultrasensitive sensor. In the presence of mercury ions, colloidal nanoparticles rapidly agglomerated due to changes of surface chemical properties, which results in severe quenching of fluorescent intensity. Meanwhile, we find that the original ligands are separated from the surface of colloidal nanoparticles involving strongly chelation between mercury ion and thiol(s) proved by controlled IR analysis. The result shows that the QD-based metal ions sensor possesses satisfactory precision, high sensitivity and selectivity, and could be applied for the quantification analysis of real samples.

  1. Calcium ion fluorescence detection using liposomes containing Alexa-labeled calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuvan; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2002-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation and characterization of calcium ion sensitive fluorescent liposomes and their application for the determination of calcium ions in aqueous samples. Calmodulin (CaM), a calcium ion-binding protein labeled with the fluorophore Alexa-488 is embedded in the membrane of unilamellar liposomes. Upon calcium ion binding, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change that exposes its hydrophobic core and affects the fluorescence intensity of the attached fluorophore. Characterization studies of Alexa-CaM-containing liposomes reveal that embedding calmodulin molecules in the bilayer membrane of liposomes extends the lifetime of the calcium ion binding activity of calmodulin by about fourfold compared to the lifetime of its calcium-binding activity in free solution. Moreover, the calcium ion response of Alexa-CaM-containing liposomes is about threefold higher than the calcium ion response of Alexa-CaM in solution. The improvement in the calcium ion detection properties is attributed to the interaction between calmodulin, a membranal protein, and the hydrophobic phospholipids of the liposomes. The analytical properties of the calcium ion sensitive fluorescent liposomes are discussed.

  2. Ion-induced gamma-ray detection of fast ions escaping from fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Mushiake, T.; Doi, K.; Wada, M.; Taniike, A.; Matsuki, T.; Shimazoe, K.; Yoshino, M.; Nagasaka, T.; Tanaka, T.; Kisaki, M.; Fujimoto, Y.; Fujioka, K.; Yamaoka, H.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2014-11-15

    A 12 × 12 pixel detector has been developed and used in a laboratory experiment for lost fast-ion diagnostics. With gamma rays in the MeV range originating from nuclear reactions {sup 9}Be(α, nγ){sup 12}C, {sup 9}Be(d, nγ){sup 12}C, and {sup 12}C(d, pγ){sup 13}C, a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector measured a fine-energy-resolved spectrum of gamma rays. The HPGe detector enables the survey of background-gamma rays and Doppler-shifted photo peak shapes. In the experiments, the pixel detector produces a gamma-ray image reconstructed from the energy spectrum obtained from total photon counts of irradiation passing through the detector's lead collimator. From gamma-ray image, diagnostics are able to produce an analysis of the fast ion loss onto the first wall in principle.

  3. Applications of metal ions and liquid crystals for multiplex detection of DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanyang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Many cations such as sodium ions have strong influence on anchoring behaviors of liquid crystals (LC). Since DNA is negatively charged and forms complex with metal ions, it is possible to form DNA/metal ions complex on surfaces to disrupt orientations of LC. This phenomenon is used to establish a principle for detecting surface immobilized DNA by using LC. In contrast, peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is electroneutral. It does not complex with metal ions or affect the orientations of LC. Therefore, PNA can be used as a probe to hybridize with specific DNA with a unique sequence, and the principle mentioned above can be used to detect the DNA target by using metal ions and LC. Based on this method, a 600bp DNA target in buffer can be detected with a limit of detection at 10fM. Unlike other fluorescence-based DNA assays, this LC-based detection method does not require labeling of DNA, and the test result can be viewed with the naked eye under a polarized microscope.

  4. Ion-sensitive field effect transistors for pH and potassium ion concentration sensing: towards detection of myocardial ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Pratyush; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2008-03-01

    Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) for sensing change in ionic concentration in biological systems can be used for detecting critical conditions like Myocardial Ischemia. Having the ability to yield steady signal characteristics can be used to observe the ionic concentration gradients which mark the onset of ischemia. Two ionic concentrations, pH and [K +], have been considered as the indicator for Myocardial Ischemia in this study. The ISFETs in this study have an organic semi-conductor film as the electronically active component. Poly-3 hexylthiophene was chosen for its compatibility to the solution processing, which is a simple and economical method of thin film fabrication. The gate electrode, which regulates the current in the active layer, has been employed as the sensor element. The devices under study here were fabricated on a flexible substrate PEN. The pH sensor was designed with the Tantalum Oxide gate dielectric as the ion selective component. The charge accumulated on the surface of the metal oxide acts as the source of the effecter electric field. The device was tested for pH values between 6.5 and 7.5, which comprises the variation observed during ischemic attack. The potassium ion sensor has got a floating gate electrode which is functionalized to be selective to potassium ion. The device was tested for potassium ion concentration between 5 and 25 mM, which constitutes the variation in extra cellular potassium ion concentration during ischemic attack. The device incorporated a monolayer of Valinomycin, a potassium specific ionophore, on top of the gate electrode.

  5. Evaluation of Pulse Counting for the Mars Organic Mass Analyzer (MOMA) Ion Trap Detection Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Amerom, Friso H.; Short, Tim; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Kleyner, Igor; Cotter, Robert J.; Pinnick, Veronica; Hoffman, Lars; Danell, Ryan M.; Lyness, Eric I.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Organic Mass Analyzer is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to identify organics and possible biological compounds on Mars. In the process of characterizing mass spectrometer size, weight, and power consumption, the use of pulse counting was considered for ion detection. Pulse counting has advantages over analog-mode amplification of the electron multiplier signal. Some advantages are reduced size of electronic components, low power consumption, ability to remotely characterize detector performance, and avoidance of analog circuit noise. The use of pulse counting as a detection method with ion trap instruments is relatively rare. However, with the recent development of high performance electrical components, this detection method is quite suitable and can demonstrate significant advantages over analog methods. Methods A prototype quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer with an internal electron ionization source was used as a test setup to develop and evaluate the pulse-counting method. The anode signal from the electron multiplier was preamplified. The an1plified signal was fed into a fast comparator for pulse-level discrimination. The output of the comparator was fed directly into a Xilinx FPGA development board. Verilog HDL software was written to bin the counts at user-selectable intervals. This system was able to count pulses at rates in the GHz range. The stored ion count nun1ber per bin was transferred to custom ion trap control software. Pulse-counting mass spectra were compared with mass spectra obtained using the standard analog-mode ion detection. Prelin1inary Data Preliminary mass spectra have been obtained for both analog mode and pulse-counting mode under several sets of instrument operating conditions. Comparison of the spectra revealed better peak shapes for pulse-counting mode. Noise levels are as good as, or better than, analog-mode detection noise levels. To artificially force ion pile-up conditions, the ion trap was overfilled

  6. Detection of singly ionized energetic lunar pick-up ions upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Moebius, E.

    1992-01-01

    Singly ionized suprathermal ions upstream of the earth's bow shock have been detected by using the time-of-flight spectrometer SULEICA on the AMPTE/IRM satellite. The data were collected between August and December 1985. The flux of the ions in the mass range between 23 and 37 amu is highly anisotropic towards the earth. The ions are observed with a period of about 29 days around new moon (+/- 3 days). The correlation of the energy of the ions with the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field orientation indicates the relation to the pick-up process. We conclude that the source of these pick-up ions is the moon. We argue that due to the impinging solar wind, atoms are sputtered off the lunar surface, ionized in the sputtering process or by ensuing photoionization and picked up by the solar wind.

  7. Label-free histamine detection with nanofluidic diodes through metal ion displacement mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mubarak; Ramirez, Patricio; Duznovic, Ivana; Nasir, Saima; Mafe, Salvador; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    We design and characterize a nanofluidic device for the label-free specific detection of histamine neurotransmitter based on a metal ion displacement mechanism. The sensor consists of an asymmetric polymer nanopore fabricated via ion track-etching technique. The nanopore sensor surface having metal-nitrilotriacetic (NTA-Ni(2+)) chelates is obtained by covalent coupling of native carboxylic acid groups with Nα,Nα-bis(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine (BCML), followed by exposure to Ni(2+) ion solution. The BCML immobilization and subsequent Ni(2+) ion complexation with NTA moieties change the surface charge concentration, which has a significant impact on the current-voltage (I-V) curve after chemical modification of the nanopore. The sensing mechanism is based on the displacement of the metal ion from the NTA-Ni(2+) chelates. When the modified pore is exposed to histamine solution, the Ni(2+) ion in NTA-Ni(2+) chelate recognizes histamine through a metal ion coordination displacement process and formation of stable Ni-histamine complexes, leading to the regeneration of metal-free NTA groups on the pore surface, as shown in the current-voltage characteristics. Nanomolar concentrations of the histamine in the working electrolyte can be detected. On the contrary, other neurotransmitters such as glycine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and dopamine do not provoke significant changes in the nanopore electronic signal due to their inability to displace the metal ion and form a stable complex with Ni(2+) ion. The nanofluidic sensor exhibits high sensitivity, specificity and reusability towards histamine detection and can then be used to monitor the concentration of biological important neurotransmitters.

  8. Theory and Development of Position-Sensitive Quantum Calorimeters. Degree awarded by Stanford Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Quantum calorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for future X-ray astrophysics observatories. Much of the science to be done by these instruments could benefit greatly from larger focal-plane coverage of the detector (without increasing pixel size). An order of magnitude more area will greatly increase the science throughput of these future instruments. One of the main deterrents to achieving this goal is the complexity of the readout schemes involved. We have devised a way to increase the number of pixels from the current baseline designs by an order of magnitude without increasing the number of channels required for readout. The instrument is a high energy resolution, distributed-readout imaging spectrometer called a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (POST). A POST is a quantum calorimeter consisting of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESS) on the ends of a long absorber capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. Comparing rise time and energy information from the two TESS, the position of the event in the POST is determined. The energy of the event is inferred from the sum of the two pulses. We have developed a generalized theoretical formalism for distributed-readout calorimeters and apply it to our devices. We derive the noise theory and calculate the theoretical energy resolution of a POST. Our calculations show that a 7-pixel POST with 6 keV saturation energy can achieve 2.3 eV resolution, making this a competitive design for future quantum calorimeter instruments. For this thesis we fabricated 7- and 15-pixel POSTS using Mo/Au TESs and gold absorbers, and moved from concept drawings on scraps of napkins to a 32 eV energy resolution at 1.5 keV, 7-pixel POST calorimeter.

  9. Modified graphene oxide sensors for ultra-sensitive detection of nitrate ions in water.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen; Mura, Stefania; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-10-01

    Nitrate ions is a very common contaminant in drinking water and has a significant impact on the environment, necessitating routine monitoring. Due to its chemical and physical properties, it is hard to directly detect nitrate ions with high sensitivity in a simple and inexpensive manner. Herein with amino group modified graphene oxide (GO) as a sensing element, we show a direct and ultra-sensitive method to detect nitrate ions, at a lowest detected concentration of 5 nM in river water samples, much lower than the reported methods based on absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, unlike the reported strategies based on absorption spectroscopy wherein the nitrate concentration is determined by monitoring an increase in aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), our method evaluates the concentration of nitrate ions based on reduction in aggregation of GNPs for monitoring in real samples. To improve sensitivity, several optimizations were performed, including the assessment of the amount of modified GO required, concentration of GNPs and incubation time. The detection methodology was characterized by zeta potential, TEM and SEM. Our results indicate that an enrichment of modified GO with nitrate ions contributed to excellent sensitivity and the entire detection procedure could be completed within 75 min with only 20 μl of sample. This simple and rapid methodology was applied to monitor nitrate ions in real samples with excellent sensitivity and minimum pretreatment. The proposed approach paves the way for a novel means to detect anions in real samples and highlights the potential of GO based detection strategy for water quality monitoring.

  10. Detection of alkylmethylphosphonic acids on leaf surfaces by static secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1995-01-01

    Detection of environmental degradation products of nerve agents directly from the surface of plant leaves using static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is demonstrated. Pinacolylmethylphosphonic acid (PMPA), isopropylmethylphosphonic acid (IMPA), and ethylmethylphosphonic acid (EMPA) were spiked from aqueous solutions onto philodendron leaves prior to analysis by static SIMS. Fragment ions were observed in the anion SIMS spectra from all three compounds at m/z 63, 77, 79, and 95, which are attributed to PO[sub 2][sup [minus

  11. Analytical expression for position sensitivity of linear response beam position monitor having inter-electrode cross talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Ojha, A.; Garg, A. D.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Senecha, V. K.

    2017-02-01

    According to the quasi electrostatic model of linear response capacitive beam position monitor (BPM), the position sensitivity of the device depends only on the aperture of the device and it is independent of processing frequency and load impedance. In practice, however, due to the inter-electrode capacitive coupling (cross talk), the actual position sensitivity of the device decreases with increasing frequency and load impedance. We have taken into account the inter-electrode capacitance to derive and propose a new analytical expression for the position sensitivity as a function of frequency and load impedance. The sensitivity of a linear response shoe-box type BPM has been obtained through simulation using CST Studio Suite to verify and confirm the validity of the new analytical equation. Good agreement between the simulation results and the new analytical expression suggest that this method can be exploited for proper designing of BPM.

  12. Nondestructive photon detection using a single rare-earth ion coupled to a photonic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Chris; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei; Simon, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    We study the possibility of using single rare-earth ions coupled to a photonic cavity with high cooperativity for performing nondestructive measurements of photons, which would be useful for global quantum networks and photonic quantum computing. We calculate the achievable fidelity as a function of the parameters of the rare-earth ion and photonic cavity, which include the ion's optical and spin dephasing rates, the cavity linewidth, the single-photon coupling to the cavity, and the detection efficiency. We suggest a promising experimental realization using current state-of-the-art technology in Nd:YVO4.

  13. Detection of AU(III) ions using a poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)-coated QCM sensor.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, Hideaki; Kitamura, Eri; Seida, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    A polymer-coated quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor has been developed for the detection of Au(III) ions in a HCl aqueous solution. Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (poly(DMAA)) gel was used as a sensing material. The poly(DMAA) gel adsorbs Au(III) ions in the HCl aqueous solution, whereas it is inactive toward most other metal ions. The equilibrium adsorption of Au(III) ions onto the poly(DMAA) gel can be expressed by the Henry-type isotherm. The oscillation behavior of the poly(DMAA)-coated QCM sensor was investigated, and linear relationships between the resonance frequency shift and the concentration of Au(III) ions were obtained for concentrations of less than 0.032 mol/m(3) (6.3 mg/m(3)) in the single and multicomponent metal systems. The poly(DMAA)-coated QCM sensor detects Au(III) ions successfully with high selectivity and sensitivity even in the presence of other metal ions and organic compounds.

  14. Sympathetic cooling and detection of a hot trapped ion by a cold one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggemos, M.; Heinrich, D.; Herrera-Sancho, O. A.; Blatt, R.; Roos, C. F.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an ion sympathetically cooled by another laser-cooled ion or small ion crystal. To this end, we develop simple models of the cooling dynamics in the limit of weak Coulomb interactions. Experimentally, we create a two-ion crystal of Ca+ and Al+ by photo-ionization of neutral atoms produced by laser ablation. We characterize the velocity distribution of the laser-ablated atoms crossing the trap by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We observe neutral atom velocities much higher than the ones of thermally heated samples and find as a consequence long sympathethic cooling times before crystallization occurs. Our key result is a new technique for detecting the loading of an initially hot ion with energy in the eV range by monitoring the motional state of a Doppler-cooled ion already present in the trap. This technique not only detects the ion but also provides information about the dynamics of the sympathetic cooling process.

  15. Gold nanoflowers based colorimetric detection of Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalawade, Pradnya; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2013-12-01

    An optical detection method based on the interaction of gold nanoflowers with Hg2+ and Pb2+ has been described. After interaction, gold nanoflowers change the color from violet to wine red. The nanoflowers are capable of determining Hg2+ and Pb2+ over a dynamic range of 1.0 × 10-6 and 1.0 × 10-5 M, respectively. The response time of nanoflowers depends on the concentration of ions. The presence of both Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions in the mixture having Au nanoflowers induced color changes of the solution within several seconds even at 1.0 × 10-6 M. Common metal ions were chosen to investigate their interference in Hg2+ and Pb2+ detection, and the concentration of each metal ion studied was 1.0 × 10-5 M. Other metallic ions could not induce color change even at 1.0 × 10-5 M. The feasibility of our method to detect Hg2+ and Pb2+ ions at high concentration in real water samples was verified. Water samples were from our own laboratory and no pretreatment was made. As the particles are stable they can be used for more than 3 months without observing any major deviation.

  16. A novel cyanide ion sensing approach based on Raman scattering for the detection of environmental cyanides.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Gopal Reddy, C V; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a direct optical approach based on Raman scattering for selective and sensitive detection of cyanide ions in aqueous environment without requiring time-consuming sample pretreatment and the formation of hydrogen cyanide. Due to the strong affinity between copper (I) and cyanide ion, evaporated copper (I) iodide (CuI) thin films are shown to be excellent substrates for selective recognition of free cyanide ions in aqueous matrices. The amount of cyanide ion retained by the copper (I) in the CuI thin films reflects its actual concentration in tested samples, and the subsequent Raman measurements of the substrate are shown to be capable of detecting toxic cyanide content at levels under international drinking water standard and environmental regulatory concentrations. Measurements obtained from the same batch of evaporated CuI thin films (approximately 100-nm thickness) show excellent linearity over a variety of cyanide concentrations ranging from 1.5 microM to 0.15 mM. This detection method offers the advantage of selectively detecting cyanides causing a health hazard while avoiding detection of other common interfering anions such as Cl-, Br-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), NO2-, S2- and SCN-. Coupled with portable Raman systems that are commercially available, our detection approach will provide on-site monitoring capability with little sample preparation or instrument supervision, which will greatly expedite the assessment of potential environmental cyanide risks.

  17. Scintillator diagnostics for the detection of laser accelerated ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, N.; Tresca, O.; Lefferts, R.

    2014-09-01

    Laser plasma interaction with ultraintense pulses present exciting schemes for accelerating ions. One of the advantages conferred by using a gaseous laser and target is the potential for a fast (several Hz) repetition rate. This requires diagnostics which are not only suited for a single shot configuration, but also for repeated use. We consider several scintillators as candidates for an imaging diagnostic for protons accelerated to MeV energies by a CO2 laser focused on a gas jet target. We have measured the response of chromium-doped alumina (chromox) and polyvinyl toluene (PVT) screens to protons in the 2-8 MeV range. We have calibrated the luminescent yield in terms of photons emitted per incident proton for each scintillator. We also discuss how light scattering and material properties affect detector resolution. Furthermore, we consider material damage and the presence of an afterglow under intense exposures. Our analysis reveals a near order of magnitude greater yield from chromox in response to proton beams at > 8 MeV energies, while scattering effects favor PVT-based scintillators at lower energies.

  18. Anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Sun, Jianchao; Fan, Hai; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel approach for facile and rapid detection of heavy metal ions using anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) modified test strips is demonstrated. By intercalating Fe(CN)6(4-) or S(2-) anions into the interlayers of LDHs on the filter paper, various heavy metal ions can be easily detected based on the color change before and after reaction between the anions and the heavy metal ions. Upon the dropping of heavy metal ions solutions to the test strips, the colors of the test strips changed instantly, which can be easily observed by naked eyes. With the decrease of the concentration, the color depth changed obviously. The lowest detection concentration can be up to 1×10(-6) mol L(-1). Due to the easily intercalation of anions into the interlayer of the LDHs on test trips, this procedure provides a general method for the construction of LDHs modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions. The stability of the prepared test strips is investigated. Furthermore, all the results were highly reproducible. The test strips may have potential applications in environmental monitoring fields.

  19. Cooling the Collective Motion of Trapped Ions to Initialize a Quantum Register

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-13

    electronic states. We find that heating of the modes of relative ion motion is substantially suppressed relative to that of the center-of-mass modes...MHz. Figure 1 shows two ions confined in the trap and imaged with an fy3 lens system onto a position-sensitive photo- multiplier tube. The ions are...tion, which allows us to detect the ion’s electronic state (j #l or j "l) with nearly unit detection efficiency . Beams R1 (s1ys2 polarized) and R2 (p

  20. Dopant-assisted negative photoionization ion mobility spectrometry for sensitive detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shasha; Dou, Jian; Wang, Weiguo; Chen, Chuang; Hua, Lei; Zhou, Qinghua; Hou, Keyong; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2013-01-02

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a key trace detection technique for explosives and the development of a simple, stable, and efficient nonradioactive ionization source is highly demanded. A dopant-assisted negative photoionization (DANP) source has been developed for IMS, which uses a commercial VUV krypton lamp to ionize acetone as the source of electrons to produce negative reactant ions in air. With 20 ppm of acetone as the dopant, a stable current of reactant ions of 1.35 nA was achieved. The reactant ions were identified to be CO(3)(-)(H(2)O)(n) (K(0) = 2.44 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) by atmospheric pressure time-of-flight mass spectrometry, while the reactant ions in (63)Ni source were O(2)(-)(H(2)O)(n) (K(0) = 2.30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). Finally, its capabilities for detection of common explosives including ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), N-nitrobis(2-hydroxyethyl)amine dinitrate (DINA), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were evaluated, and the limits of detection of 10 pg (ANFO), 80 pg (TNT), and 100 pg (DINA) with a linear range of 2 orders of magnitude were achieved. The time-of-flight mass spectra obtained with use of DANP source clearly indicated that PETN and DINA can be directly ionized by the ion-association reaction of CO(3)(-) to form PETN·CO(3)(-) and DINA·CO(3)(-) adduct ions, which result in good sensitivity for the DANP source. The excellent stability, good sensitivity, and especially the better separation between the reactant and product ion peaks make the DANP a potential nonradioactive ionization source for IMS.

  1. A semi-synthetic ion channel platform for detection of phosphatase and protease activity.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Michael X; Blake, Steven; Jiang, Xiayun; Capone, Ricardo; Estes, Daniel J; Mayer, Michael; Yang, Jerry

    2009-11-24

    Sensitive methods to probe the activity of enzymes are important for clinical assays and for elucidating the role of these proteins in complex biochemical networks. This paper describes a semi-synthetic ion channel platform for detecting the activity of two different classes of enzymes with high sensitivity. In the first case, this method uses single ion channel conductance measurements to follow the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of a phosphate group attached to the C-terminus of gramicidin A (gA, an ion channel-forming peptide) in the presence of alkaline phosphatase (AP). Enzymatic hydrolysis of this phosphate group removes negative charges from the entrance of the gA pore, resulting in a product with measurably reduced single ion channel conductance compared to the original gA-phosphate substrate. This technique employs a standard, commercial bilayer setup and takes advantage of the catalytic turnover of enzymes and the amplification characteristics of ion flux through individual gA pores to detect picomolar concentrations of active AP in solution. Furthermore, this technique makes it possible to study the kinetics of an enzyme and provides an estimate for the observed rate constant (k(cat)) and the Michaelis constant (K(M)) by following the conversion of the gA-phosphate substrate to product over time in the presence of different concentrations of AP. In the second case, modification of gA with a substrate for proteolytic cleavage by anthrax lethal factor (LF) afforded a sensitive method for detection of LF activity, illustrating the utility of ion channel-based sensing for detection of a potential biowarfare agent. This ion channel-based platform represents a powerful, novel approach to monitor the activity of femtomoles to picomoles of two different classes of enzymes in solution. Furthermore, this platform has the potential for realizing miniaturized, cost-effective bioanalytical assays that complement currently established assays.

  2. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm3 LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  3. Indirect ultraviolet detection of alkaline earth metal ions using an imidazolium ionic liquid as an ultraviolet absorption reagent in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2017-02-20

    A convenient and versatile method was developed for the separation and detection of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The chromatographic separation of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Sr(2+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid as the mobile phase, in which the imidazolium ionic liquid acted as an UV-absorption reagent. The effects of imidazolium ionic liquids, detection wavelength, acids in the mobile phase, and column temperature on the retention of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Sr(2+) were investigated. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background UV absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The successful separation and detection of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Sr(2+) within 14 min were achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.06, 0.12, and 0.23 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and detection method of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection was developed, and the application range of ionic liquids was expanded.

  4. Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets based on encoding metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lichun; Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Panpan; Wu, Guofan; Lu, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiuhui

    2014-02-15

    We present a novel strategy for simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple DNA targets based on the use of different encoding metal ions as tags. The principle of this scheme is that metal ions bound to metallothionein (MT) molecules can be released down after hybridization with DNA targets and then be detected by stripping voltammetry. The novel detection probes, ssDNA/MT conjugates, covered with different metal ions were synthesized for the first time, then three encoding metal ions (Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+)) were used to differentiate the signals of three virus DNA due to their well-defined anodic stripping peaks at -1.13 V (Zn), -0.78 V (Cd), and -0.52 V (Pb) at BiFE, respectively. The anodic peak currents increased linearly with the concentrations of DNA targets in the range from 0.1 nM to 10nM with a detection limit of 33 pM. In addition, the one-base mismatched target was effectively discriminated from the complementary target. The described results demonstrated that this method possesses high sensitivity and selectivity for multi-target DNA assay and has great potential in applications for detection of even more targets in biological assays, particularly immunoassays.

  5. Protein-Modified-Paramagnetic-Particles as a Tool for Detection of Silver(I) Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizek, R.; Krizkova, S.; Adam, V.; Huska, D.; Hubalek, J.; Trnkova, L.

    2009-04-01

    In a number of published articles the toxic effect of silver(I) ions on aquatic organisms is described. Silver(I) ions in aquatic environment are stable in a wide range of pH. Under alkali pH AgOH and Ag(OH)2- can be formed. However, in water environment there are many compounds to interact with silver(I) ions. The most important ones are chloride anions, which forms insoluble precipitate with silver(I) ions (AgCl). The insoluble silver containing compounds do not pose any threat to aquatic organisms. Toxicity of silver ions is probably caused by their very good affinity to nucleic acids and also proteins. The binding into active enzyme site leads to the expressive enzyme reaction inhibition. Silver(I) ions are into living environment introduced thanks to anthropogenic activities. They easily contaminate atmosphere as well as aquatic environment or soils. Several authors described using of carbon electrode as working electrode for determination of silver. Recently, we have suggested heavy metal biosensor based on interaction of metal ions with low molecular mass protein called metallothionein (MT), which was adsorbed on the surface of hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The biosensor was successfully used for detection of cadmium(II) and zinc(II) ions, cisplatin, cisplatin-DNA adducts and palladium(II) ions. Due to the convincing results with MT as biological component we report on suggesting of heavy metal biosensor based on immobilization of metallothionein (MT) on the surface of carbon paste electrode (CPE) via MT-antibodies. Primarily we studied of basic electrochemical behaviour of MT at surface of carbon paste electrode by using of square wave voltammetry (SWV). Detection limit (3 S/N) for MT was evaluated as 0.1 μg/ml. After that we have evaluated the electroactivity of MT at surface of SWV, we aimed our attention on the way of capturing of MT on the surface of CPE. We choose antibody against MT obtained from chicken eggs for these purposes. Antibodies

  6. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  7. Femtomolar detection of mercuric ions using polypyrrole, pectin and graphene nanocomposites modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2016-12-01

    Several nanomaterials and techniques for the detection of mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) have been developed in the past decade. However, simple, low-cost and rapid sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions yet remains an important task. Herein, we present a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the femtomolar detection of Hg(2+) based on polypyrrole, pectin, and graphene (PPy/Pct/GR) which was prepared by one step electrochemical potentiodyanamic method. The effect of concentration of pectin, polypyrrole and graphene were studied for the detection of Hg(2+). The influence of experimental parameters including effect of pH, accumulation time and accumulation potential were also studied. Different pulse anodic stripping voltammetry was chosen to detect Hg(2+) at PPy/Pct/GR/GCE modified electrode. The fabricated sensor achieved an excellent performance towards Hg(2+) detection such as higher sensitivity of 28.64μAμM(-1) and very low detection limit (LOD) of 4 fM at the signal to noise ratio of 3. The LOD of our sensor offered nearly 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of recommended concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water by United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. Compared to all previously reported electrochemical sensors towards Hg(2+) detection, our newly fabricated sensor attained a very LOD in the detection of Hg(2+). The practicality of our proposed sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) was successfully demonstrated in untreated tap water.

  8. Zinc finger peptide based optic sensor for detection of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Verma, Neelam; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-12-15

    In the present work, polyacrylamide gel has been used as a matrix for the immobilization of zinc finger peptide and fluorescent dye acrydine orange on the micro well plate to fabricate the fluorescence based biosensor for the detection of zinc ions in milk samples. The fluorescent dye moves in the hydrophobic groove formed after folding of the peptide in the presence of zinc ions. Under optimized conditions, linear range was observed between 0.001µg/l to 10µg/l of Zinc ions, with a lowest detection limit of 0.001µg/l and response time of 5min. Presented biosensor has shown 20% decrease in fluorescent intensity values after 5 regenerations and stable for more than one month, stored at 4°C. Interference study with other metal ions like lead, cadmium and copper showed a negligible change in fluorescence intensity in comparison to zinc ions. Developed bio sensing system was found to be novel, quick, reliable, miniaturized, stable, reproducible and repeatable and specific for zinc ion, which has been applied to various milk samples.

  9. Detection of Large Ions in Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: Effects of Ion Mass and Acceleration Voltage on Microchannel Plate Detector Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv3.1 (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  10. Detection of large ions in time-of-flight mass spectrometry: effects of ion mass and acceleration voltage on microchannel plate detector response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv(3.1) (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  11. New mechanism that accounts for position sensitivity of saccades evoked in response to stimulation of superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Moschovakis, A K; Dalezios, Y; Petit, J; Grantyn, A A

    1998-12-01

    New mechanism that accounts for position sensitivity of saccades evoked in response to stimulation of superior colliculus. J. Neurophysiol. 80: 3373-3379, 1998. Electrical stimulation of the feline superior colliculus (SC) is known to evoke saccades whose size depends on the site stimulated (the "characteristic vector" of evoked saccades) and the initial position of the eyes. Similar stimuli were recently shown to produce slow drifts that are presumably caused by relatively direct projections of the SC onto extraocular motoneurons. Both slow and fast evoked eye movements are similarly affected by the initial position of the eyes, despite their dissimilar metrics, kinematics, and anatomic substrates. We tested the hypothesis that the position sensitivity of evoked saccades is due to the superposition of largely position-invariant saccades and position-dependent slow drifts. We show that such a mechanism can account for the fact that the position sensitivity of evoked saccades increases together with the size of their characteristic vector. Consistent with it, the position sensitivity of saccades drops considerably when the contribution of slow drifts is minimal as, for example, when there is no overlap between evoked saccades and short-duration trains of high-frequency stimuli.

  12. Sub-surface single ion detection in diamond: A path for deterministic color center creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, John; Aguirre, Brandon; Pacheco, Jose; Camacho, Ryan; Bielejec, Edward; Sandia National Laboratories Team

    Deterministic single color center creation remains a critical milestone for the integrated use of diamond color centers. It depends on three components: focused ion beam implantation to control the location, yield improvement to control the activation, and single ion implantation to control the number of implanted ions. A surface electrode detector has been fabricated on diamond where the electron hole pairs generated during ion implantation are used as the detection signal. Results will be presented demonstrating single ion detection. The detection efficiency of the device will be described as a function of implant energy and device geometry. It is anticipated that the controlled introduction of single dopant atoms in diamond will provide a basis for deterministic single localized color centers. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Thickness dependence of surface plasmon resonance sensor response for metal ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seung-A.; Lee, Taek-Sung; Kim, Won Mok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Wook Seong; Kim, Inho

    2013-08-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is one of the most viable technologies for portable and highly sensitive sensing in clinical and environmental applications. A lot of research on SPR sensors based on plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sensing layers for detection of various metal ions has been well reported, but a study on their correlation between sensing layer thickness and sensor response has been rarely done. The purpose of this study is to investigate thickness dependence of sensing layers on the response time and the sensitivity of SPR sensors based on plasticized PVC. Calcium ionophore was incorporated in the sensing layers for calcium ion detection. Our experimental results showed that thicker sensing layers exhibited higher sensitivity and wider detection range but longer response time. We discussed metal ion diffusion in plasticized sensing layers by correlating numerical calculations with experimental ones in order to understand temporal response of our SPR sensor. The response time also relied on the flow rate of calcium ion solutions, indicating that metal ion diffusion in bulk media is one of the limiting factors.

  14. Fluorescence switch for silver ion detection utilizing dimerization of DNA-Ag nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyun; Park, Juhee; Hee Lee, Hong; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Hugh I; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-06-15

    A fluorescence switch that consists of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) triggered by silver ion (Ag(+)) is developed to detect Ag(+). The mechanism of the fluorescence switching of DNA-AgNCs is investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, DNA hybridization assay and mass spectrometry. Ag(+) induces a dimeric structure of Cyt12-AgNCs by forming a bridge between two Cyt12-AgNCs, where Cyt12 is cytosine 12-mer; this dimer formation causes the fluorescence change of Cyt12-AgNCs from red to green. Using this Ag(+)-triggered fluorescence switch, we successfully detected Ag(+) at concentrations as low as 10nM. Furthermore, we quantitatively detected the Ag(+) in the Silmazin(®), which is dermatological burn ointment having silver sulfadiazine. Ag(+) detection using this fluorescence switch has high selectivity and sensitivity, and short response time, and can be used successfully even in the presence of other metal ions.

  15. Method of detecting defects in ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells by chemochromic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Brooker, Robert Paul; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2016-01-05

    A method of detecting defects in membranes such as ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells. The electrochemical cell includes an assembly having an anode side and a cathode side with the ion exchange membrane in between. In a configuration step a chemochromic sensor is placed above the cathode and flow isolation hardware lateral to the ion exchange membrane which prevents a flow of hydrogen (H.sub.2) between the cathode and anode side. The anode side is exposed to a first reactant fluid including hydrogen. The chemochromic sensor is examined after the exposing for a color change. A color change evidences the ion exchange membrane has at least one defect that permits H.sub.2 transmission therethrough.

  16. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by self assembled chemical field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Hang; Kang, Yuhong; Gladwin, Elizabeth; Claus, Richard O.

    2015-04-01

    Multiple layer-by-layer sensor material modifications were designed and implemented to achieve selectivity of semiconductor based chemical field effect transistors (ChemFETs) to particular heavy metal ions. The ChemFET sensors were fabricated and modified in three ways, with the intent to initially target first mercury and lead ions and then chromium ions, respectively. Sensor characterization was performed with the gate regions of the sensor elements exposed to different concentrations of target heavy metal ion solutions. A minimum detection level in the range of 0.1 ppm and a 10%-90% response time of less than 10 s were demonstrated. By combining layer-by-layer gold nanoparticles and lead ionophores, a sensor is produced that is sensitive and selective not only to chromium but also to Cr3+ and Cr6+. This result supports the claim that high selectivity can be achieved by designing self-assembled bonding for lead, arsenic, chromium, cesium, mercury, and cadmium.

  17. Tetrabutylammonium-modified clay film electrodes: characterization and application to the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Maghear, Adela; Tertiş, Mihaela; Fritea, Luminţa; Marian, Iuliu O; Indrea, Emil; Walcarius, Alain; Săndulescu, Robert

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of smectite clay partially exchanged with tetrabutylammonium ions (TBA(+)) and its subsequent deposition onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for application to the preconcentration electroanalysis of metal ions (Cd, Pb, and Cu). Such partial exchange of TBA(+) induces the expansion of the interlayer region between the clay sheets (as ascertained by XRD) while maintaining its ion exchange capacity, which resulted in enhanced mass transport rates (as pointed out by electrochemical monitoring of permeability properties of these thin (organo)clay films on GCE). This principle was applied here to the anodic stripping square wave voltammetric analysis of metal ions after accumulation at open circuit. Among others, detection limits as low as 3.6×10(-8)M for copper and 7.2×10(-8)M for cadmium have been achieved.

  18. Colorimetric chemosensor for multi-signaling detection of metal ions using pyrrole based Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Udhayakumari, Duraisamy; Velmathi, Sivan

    2014-03-25

    Pyrrole based Schiff bases act as a highly sensitive probe for metal ions in aqueous medium. Both receptors R1 and R2 are sensitive towards Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Hg(2+) and Cr(3+) among the other metal ions. The sensing ability of the receptors are investigated via colorimetric, optical and emission spectroscopic studies. The binding stoichiometries of R1 and R2 with metal ions have been determined as 2:1 by using Job's plot. The colorimetric receptors exhibited high sensitivity with a low detection limit of μM levels. In the presence of metal ions both receptors shows fluorescence quenching. This might be due to the photo induced electron transfer mechanism. The quenching constant was further determined using Stern-Volmer plot.

  19. Colorimetric detection of manganese(II) ions using gold/dopa nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-10-01

    We report here a one-pot, greener, eco-friendly strategy for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using L-dopa. The as-prepared dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/dopa) can detect low concentrations of manganese(II) metal ions in aqueous solution. The binding forces between dopa and Mn2+ ions cause dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles to come closer together, decreasing the interparticle distance and aggregating it with a change in color of colloidal solution from red to purplish-blue. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed a decreased surface charge on the surface of gold nanoparticles when exposed to Mn2+ ions, which caused cross-linking aggregation. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images also revealed the aggregation of gold nanoparticles with the addition of Mn2+ ions. The extinction ratio of absorbance at 700-550 nm (A700/A550) was linear against the concentration of [Mn2+] ions. Thus, the optical absorption spectra of gold colloidal solution before and after the addition of Mn2+ ions reveal the concentration of Mn2+ ions in solution.

  20. Colorimetric detection of manganese(II) ions using gold/dopa nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-10-15

    We report here a one-pot, greener, eco-friendly strategy for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using L-dopa. The as-prepared dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/dopa) can detect low concentrations of manganese(II) metal ions in aqueous solution. The binding forces between dopa and Mn(2+) ions cause dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles to come closer together, decreasing the interparticle distance and aggregating it with a change in color of colloidal solution from red to purplish-blue. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed a decreased surface charge on the surface of gold nanoparticles when exposed to Mn(2+) ions, which caused cross-linking aggregation. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images also revealed the aggregation of gold nanoparticles with the addition of Mn(2+) ions. The extinction ratio of absorbance at 700-550nm (A700/A550) was linear against the concentration of [Mn(2+)] ions. Thus, the optical absorption spectra of gold colloidal solution before and after the addition of Mn(2+) ions reveal the concentration of Mn(2+) ions in solution.

  1. Approaches to Improving the Lower Detection Limit of Polymeric Membrane Ion-Selective Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Szigeti, Zsófia; Vigassy, Tamás; Bakker, Eric; Pretsch, Ernö

    2010-01-01

    More than ten different approaches for improving the lower detection limit of polymeric membrane ion-selective electrodes have been suggested during the recent years. In this contribution, their principles are briefly summarized with a focus to their general practical applicability. The methods that are the most rugged and the easiest to implement in a routine laboratory will be highlighted. PMID:20336172

  2. A novel DNA-templated click chemistry strategy for fluorescent detection of copper(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qinpeng; Tang, Shiyun; Li, Wenhua; Nie, Zhou; Liu, Zhuoliang; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2012-01-07

    A novel fluorescent strategy has been developed for sensitive turn-on detection of Cu(2+) based on high efficiency of DNA-templated organic synthesis, great specificity of alkyne-azide click reaction to the catalysis of copper ions and the sequential strand displacement for signal transduction.

  3. Fast detection of toxic industrial compounds by laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhuettinger, Carola; Langmeier, Andreas; Oberpriller, Helmut; Kessler, Matthias; Goebel, Johann; Mueller, Gerhard

    2009-05-01

    Trace detection of toxic industrial compounds has been investigated with the help of a laser ion mobility spectrometer (LIMS). The LIMS was equipped with a tuneable UV laser source for enabling two-photon ionization of the analyte gases and an ion drift tube for the measurement of the ion mobility. Different aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons as well as amines were investigated. We find that the first class of molecules can be well ionized due to the delocalization of their valence electron shells and the second due to the presence of non-bonding electrons in lone-pair orbitals. Selectivity of detection is attained on the basis of molecule-specific photo-ionization and drift time spectra. Ion currents were found to scale linearly with the substance concentration over several orders of magnitude down to the detection limits in the ppt range. As besides toxic industrial compounds, similar electron configurations also occur in illicit drugs, toxins and pharmaceutical substances, LIMS can be applied in a variety of fields ranging from environmental analysis, air pollution monitoring, drug detection and chemical process monitoring.

  4. Carbon dots rooted agarose hydrogel hybrid platform for optical detection and separation of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Neelam; Barooah, Mayuri; Majumdar, Gitanjali; Chowdhury, Devasish

    2015-02-11

    A robust solid sensing platform for an on-site operational and accurate detection of heavy metal is still a challenge. We introduce chitosan based carbon dots rooted agarose hydrogel film as a hybrid solid sensing platform for detection of heavy metal ions. The fabrication of the solid sensing platform is centered on simple electrostatic interaction between the NH3+ group present in the carbon dots and the OH- groups present in agarose. Simply on dipping the hydrogel film strip into the heavy metal ion solution, in particular Cr6+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Pb2+, Mn2+, the strip displays a color change, viz., Cr6+→yellow, Cu2+→blue, Fe3+→brown, Pb2+→white, Mn2+→tan brown. The optical detection limit of the respective metal ion is found to be 1 pM for Cr6+, 0.5 μM for Cu2+, and 0.5 nM for Fe3+, Pb2+, and Mn2+ by studying the changes in UV-visible reflectance spectrum of the hydrogel film. Moreover, the hydrogel film finds applicability as an efficient filtration membrane for separation of these quintet heavy metal ions. The strategic fundamental feature of this sensing platform is the successful capability of chitosan to form colored chelates with transition metals. This proficient hybrid hydrogel solid sensing platform is thus the most suitable to employ as an on-site operational, portable, cheap colorimetric-optical detector of heavy metal ion with potential skill in their separation. Details of the possible mechanistic insight into the colorimetric detection and ion separation are also discussed.

  5. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana.

  6. Label free and high specific detection of mercury ions based on silver nano-liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Eepsita; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Pradhan, Arun K.; Pradhan, Pallavi

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we report an eco-friendly, mild and one-pot approach for synthesis of silver nanoparticles via a lipopeptide biosurfactant - CHBS. The biosurfactant forms liposome vesicles when dispersed in an aqueous medium. The amino acid groups of the biosurfactant assists in the reduction of Ag+ ions leading to the production of homogeneous silver nanoparticles, encapsulated within the liposome vesicle, as confirmed from TEM analysis. Rate of synthesis and size of particle were greatly dependent on pH and reaction temperature. Kinetic analysis suggests the involvement of an autocatalytic reaction and the observed rate constant (kobs) was found to decrease with temperature, suggesting faster reaction with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the silver nanoparticles served as excellent probes for highly selective and sensitive recognition of Hg2 + ions. Interaction with Hg2 + ions results in an immediate change in colour of nanoparticle solution form brownish red to milky white. With increasing Hg2 + ions concentration, a gradual disappearance of SPR peak was observed. A linear relationship (A420/660) with an R2 value of 0.97 was observed in the range of 20 to 100 ppm Hg2 + concentration. Hg2 + ions are reduced to their elemental forms which thereby interact with the vesicles, leading to aggregation and precipitation of particles. The detection method avoids the need of functionalizing ligands and favours Hg2 + detection in aqueous samples by visible range spectrophotometry and hence can be used for simple and rapid analysis.

  7. Label free and high specific detection of mercury ions based on silver nano-liposome.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, Eepsita; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Pradhan, Arun K; Pradhan, Pallavi

    2016-06-15

    Herein, we report an eco-friendly, mild and one-pot approach for synthesis of silver nanoparticles via a lipopeptide biosurfactant - CHBS. The biosurfactant forms liposome vesicles when dispersed in an aqueous medium. The amino acid groups of the biosurfactant assists in the reduction of Ag(+) ions leading to the production of homogeneous silver nanoparticles, encapsulated within the liposome vesicle, as confirmed from TEM analysis. Rate of synthesis and size of particle were greatly dependent on pH and reaction temperature. Kinetic analysis suggests the involvement of an autocatalytic reaction and the observed rate constant (kobs) was found to decrease with temperature, suggesting faster reaction with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the silver nanoparticles served as excellent probes for highly selective and sensitive recognition of Hg(2+) ions. Interaction with Hg(2+) ions results in an immediate change in colour of nanoparticle solution form brownish red to milky white. With increasing Hg(2+) ions concentration, a gradual disappearance of SPR peak was observed. A linear relationship (A420/660) with an R(2) value of 0.97 was observed in the range of 20 to 100ppm Hg(2+) concentration. Hg(2+) ions are reduced to their elemental forms which thereby interact with the vesicles, leading to aggregation and precipitation of particles. The detection method avoids the need of functionalizing ligands and favours Hg(2+) detection in aqueous samples by visible range spectrophotometry and hence can be used for simple and rapid analysis.

  8. Visual sensor for the detection of trace Cu(II) ions using an immunochromatographic strip.

    PubMed

    Xing, Changrui; Feng, Min; Hao, Changlong; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and simple immunochromatography method based on a gold nanoparticle-labeled monoclonal antibody was developed for the on-site detection of copper (Cu) in water samples. This monoclonal antibody, obtained by a cell fusion technique, recognized the Cu-ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) complex, but not metal-free EDTA, with high sensitivity and specificity. In optimized conditions, the visual limit of detection for qualitative detection of Cu(II) ions was 10 ng/mL and the LOD for semi-quantitative detection decreased to 0.45 ng/mL with the help of a scanning reader system. The detection process was achieved within 10 min with no cross-reactivity from other heavy metal ions. The recovery of the test samples ranged from 98% to 109%. To our knowledge, this antibody-based test strip for Cu(II) ions has not been previously reported. Based on the above results, this strip sensor could be used as an alternative tool for screening heavy metal pollution in the environment.

  9. Detection of Heavy-metal Ions Based on Evaporative Concentration Using a Super-hydrophobic Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagimachi, Isao; Nashida, Norihiro; Iwasa, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    A concentrator chip which could detect a variety of heavy-metal ions was fabricated. To improve the detection sensitivity, a droplet of a sample solution was concentrated evaporatively using a super-hydrophobic surface formed with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) beads. The system consists of a working electrode at the center, surrounded by an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry was conducted using concentrator chips with different working electrode materials. A significant increase in peak height was observed as the sensitive area decreased and the volume of the droplet increased. When a 5-μl droplet was used, the detection limit for lead, cadmium, and arsenic ions was 1 ppb.

  10. Development of a portable preconcentrator/ion mobility spectrometer system for the trace detection of narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Parmeter, J.E.; Custer, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This project was supported by LDRD funding for the development and preliminary testing of a portable narcotics detection system. The system developed combines a commercial trace detector known as an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator originally designed by Department 5848 for the collection of explosives molecules. The detector and preconcentrator were combined along with all necessary accessories onto a push cart, thus yielding a fully portable detection unit. Preliminary testing with both explosives and narcotics molecules shown that the system is operational, and that it can successfully detect drugs as marijuana, methamphetamine (speed), and cocaine based on their characteristics IMS signatures.

  11. Ion funnel augmented Mars atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry for in situ detection of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul V; Hodyss, Robert; Beauchamp, J L

    2014-11-01

    Laser desorption is an attractive technique for in situ sampling of organics on Mars given its relative simplicity. We demonstrate that under simulated Martian conditions (~2.5 Torr CO(2)) laser desorption of neutral species (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), followed by ionization with a simple ultraviolet light source such as a discharge lamp, offers an effective means of sampling organics for detection and identification with a mass spectrometer. An electrodynamic ion funnel is employed to provide efficient ion collection in the ambient Martian environment. This experimental methodology enables in situ sampling of Martian organics with minimal complexity and maximum flexibility.

  12. Highly sensitive heavy metal ion detection using AlQ3 microwire functionalized QCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, Nursel; Aǧar, Meltem; Altındal, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) microwires was successfully synthesized for the fabrication of Alq3 microwires-coated QCM sensors to detect the heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. AT-cut quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) of 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency having gold electrodes were used as transducers. Typical measuring cycle consisted of repeated flow of target measurands through the flow cell and subsequent washing to return the baseline. The QCM results indicated that the Alq3 microwires exhibit excellent sensitivity, stability and short response-recovery time, which are much attractive for the development of portable and highly sensitive heavy metal ion sensors in water samples.

  13. Detection of nitro-based and peroxide-based explosives by fast polarity-switchable ion mobility spectrometer with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haiyang

    2015-05-29

    Ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been widely deployed for on-site detection of explosives. The common nitro-based explosives are usually detected by negative IMS while the emerging peroxide-based explosives are better detected by positive IMS. In this study, a fast polarity-switchable IMS was constructed to detect these two explosive species in a single measurement. As the large traditional Faraday detector would cause a trailing reactant ion peak (RIP), a Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity was developed by reducing the detector radius to 3.3 mm and increasing the voltage difference between aperture grid and its front guard ring to 591 V, which could remove trailing peaks from RIP without loss of signal intensity. This fast polarity-switchable IMS with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector was employed to detect a mixture of 10 ng 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 50 ng hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) by polarity-switching, and the result suggested that [TNT-H](-) and [HMTD+H](+) could be detected in a single measurement. Furthermore, the removal of trailing peaks from RIP by the Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity also promised the accurate identification of KClO4, KNO3 and S in common inorganic explosives, whose product ion peaks were fairly adjacent to RIP.

  14. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  15. Position sensitive detectors for synchrotron radiation studies: the tortoise and the hare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Rob

    2003-11-01

    The huge gulf between the high photon fluxes available from synchrotrons and the capabilities of detectors to measure the resulting photon, electron or ion signals is well known. Whilst accelerator technology continues to advance at a rapid pace, it is detector performance which represents the limiting factor for many synchrotron experiments. In some cases there are still single channel counting detectors based on 40-year-old designs operational on synchrotron beamlines. The dream of many researchers is a detector which is able to simultaneously image and perform spectroscopy at the required data rates. A solution is the massive integration of parallel electronics into detectors on a pixel by pixel basis. These ideas have been in gestation for very many years awaiting sufficient funding, nevertheless, several prototypes are now at the testing stage. The current status of these and other detector developments targeted at synchrotron science are briefly reviewed.

  16. Proportional counter for X-ray analysis of lunar and planetary surfaces. [a position sensitive scintillating imaging proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A position sensitive proportional scintillation detector was developed and evaluated for use in applications involving X-ray imaging as well as spectroscopy. Topics covered include limitations of the proportional scintillation counter for use in space; purification of the xenon gas in the detector, and the operation of the detector system. Results show that the light signal in a proportional scintillation detector remains well localized. With modest electric fields in xenon, the primary electrons from a photoelectric absorption of an X-ray can be brought a distance of a few millimeters to a higher field region without spreading more than a millimeter or so. Therefore, it is possible to make a proportional scintillation detector with good position sensitivity that could be used to calibrate out the difference in light collection over its sensitive volume.

  17. "Evaluation of ion mobility spectrometry for the detection of mitragynine in kratom products".

    PubMed

    Fuenffinger, Nathan; Ritchie, Melissa; Ruth, Ashley; Gryniewicz-Ruzicka, Connie

    2017-02-05

    An ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) method was developed for the rapid detection of mitragynine, the most abundant alkaloid in Mitragyna speciosa also known as kratom. The peak corresponding to the mitragynine protonated ion exhibited a reduced ion mobility of 0.95±0.00014cm(2)/(Vs), and the mitragynine limit of detection using IMS was 0.5ng. The IMS method was applied to the analysis of 15 commercial samples suspected of containing kratom. IMS results were compared to those obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of the same samples. Mitragynine was conclusively detected in 14 of 15 samples using LC-MS/MS and 13 of 15 samples using IMS. The discrepancy between methods reflected the fact that one sample contained mitragynine at a concentration below the IMS detection limit. This study demonstrates the utility of IMS for the rapid screening of products containing kratom as well as the scientific reliability of the IMS screening method, which was demonstrated by comparing the IMS results to the confirmatory results obtained using LC-MS/MS.

  18. Dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructures for multiplexed detection of intracellular metal ions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjiao; Liang, Wenbing; Li, Daxiu; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-11-15

    The detection of intracellular metal ions is of great importance in understanding metal homeostasis in cells and related diseases, and yet it remains a significant challenge to achieve this goal. Based on a new self-assembled and dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructure, we describe here an approach for multiplexed sensing of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) in living cells. The fluorescently quenched nanoprobes can be prepared by simple thermal annealing of four ssDNAs containing the metal ion-dependent enzymatic and substrate sequences. The self-assembly formation of the nanostructures are verified by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The target metal ions can cleave the substrate sequences in the DNAzyme nanostructures to recover fluorescent emissions at different wavelengths for sensitive and selective in vitro multiplexed detection of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) with the detection limits of 0.6nM and 3.9nM, respectively. Importantly, we demonstrate that these nanoprobes are stable in cell lysates and can enter cells without the aid of any transfection agents for simultaneous imaging intracellular UO2(2+) and Pb(2+). Moreover, the nanoprobes offer excellent biocompatibility and non-cytotoxicity. With these unique features, the dual-color encoded nanostructures presented here can thus offer new opportunities for multiplexed detection of specific intracellular species.

  19. Nitrogen oxides as dopants for the detection of aromatic compounds with ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gaik, Urszula; Sillanpää, Mika; Witkiewicz, Zygfryd; Puton, Jarosław

    2017-03-03

    Limits of detection (LODs) in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) strictly depend on ionization of the analyte. Especially challenging is ionization of compounds with relatively low proton affinity (PA) such as aromatic compounds. To change the course of ion-molecule reactions and enhance the performance of the IMS spectrometer, substances called dopants are introduced into the carrier gas. In this work, we present the results of studies of detection using nitrogen oxides (NOx) dopants. Three aromatic compounds, benzene, toluene, toluene diisocyanate and, for comparison, two compounds with high PA, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and triethyl phosphate (TEP), were selected as analytes. The influence of water vapour on these analyses was also studied. Experiments were carried out with a generator of gas mixtures that allowed for the simultaneous introduction of three substances into the carrier gas. The experiments showed that the use of NOx dopants significantly decreases LODs for aromatic compounds and does not affect the detection of compounds with high PA. The water vapour significantly disturbs the detection of aromatic compounds; however, doping with NOx allows to reduce the effect of humidity. Graphical Abstract Two possible ionization mechanisms of aromatic compounds in ion mobility spectrometry: proton transfer reaction and adduct formation.

  20. Miniaturized low-cost ion mobility spectrometer for fast detection of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Stefan; Barth, Sebastian; Baether, Wolfgang K M; Ringer, Joachim

    2008-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a well-known method for detecting hazardous compounds in air. Typical applications are the detection of chemical warfare agents, highly toxic industrial compounds, explosives, and drugs of abuse. Detection limits in the low part per billion range, fast response times, and simple instrumentation make this technique more and more popular. In particular, there is an increasing demand for miniaturized low-cost IMS for hand-held devices and air monitoring of public areas by sensor networks. In this paper, we present a miniaturized aspiration condenser type ion mobility spectrometer for fast detection of chemical warfare agents. The device is easy to manufacture and allows single substance identification down to low part per billion-level concentrations within seconds. The improved separation power results from ion focusing by means of geometric constraints and fluid dynamics. A simple pattern recognition algorithm is used for the identification of trained substances in air. The device was tested at the German Armed Forces Scientific Institute for Protection Technologies-NBC-Protection. Different chemical warfare agents, such as sarin, tabun, soman, US-VX, sulfur mustard, nitrogen mustard, and lewisite were tested. The results are presented here.

  1. Oligonucleotide-based fluorogenic sensor for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Hao, Changlong; Xua, Liguang; Xing, Changrui; Kuang, Hua; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report a new fluorogenic sensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for detection of heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. The method showed the advantage of being simple, highly sensitive and selective, and rapid. The donor (CdTe QDs) and acceptor (TAMRA or Cy5) are brought into close proximity to one another due to Hg(2+) and Ag(+) form strong and stable T-Hg(2+)-T complexes and C-Ag(+)-C complexes, which quenches the fluorescent intensity of CdTe QDs and enables the energy transfer from donor to acceptor. This sensor showed high sensitivity and selectivity when only one kind of ion (Ag(+) or Hg(2+)) exists. Furthermore, the assay can also simultaneously detect Ag(+) and Hg(2+) in water media with the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.5 and 1.8 nM, separately, which satisfactorily meets the sensitivity demands of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and World Health Organization (WHO). This assay also exhibits excellent selectivity toward Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Therefore, this method is of great practical and theoretical importance for detecting heavy metal ions in aqueous solution.

  2. Detection of Fatty Acids from Intact Microorganisms by Molecular Beam Static Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Jani Cheri; Lehman, Richard Michael; Bauer, William Francis; O'Connell, Sean Patrick; Colwell, Frederick Scott; Shaw, Andrew D.

    2003-06-01

    We report the use of a surface analysis approach, static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) equipped with a molecular (ReO4-) ion primary beam, to analyze the surface of intact microbial cells. SIMS spectra of 28 microorganisms were compared to fatty acid profiles determined by gas chromatographic analysis of transesterfied fatty acids extracted from the same organisms. The results indicate that surface bombardment using the molecular primary beam cleaved the ester linkage characteristic of bacteria at the glycerophosphate backbone of the phospholipid components of the cell membrane. This cleavage enables direct detection of the fatty acid conjugate base of intact microorganisms by static SIMS. The limit of detection for this approach is approximately 107 bacterial cells/cm2. Multivariate statistical methods were applied in a graded approach to the SIMS microbial data. The results showed that the full data set could initially be statistically grouped based upon major differences in biochemical composition of the cell wall. The gram-positive bacteria were further statistically analyzed, followed by final analysis of a specific bacterial genus that was successfully grouped by species. Additionally, the use of SIMS to detect microbes on mineral surfaces is demonstrated by an analysis of Shewanella oneidensis on crushed hematite. The results of this study provide evidence for the potential of static SIMS to rapidly detect bacterial species based on ion fragments originating from cell membrane lipids directly from sample surfaces.

  3. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  4. A novel Schiff base: Synthesis, structural characterisation and comparative sensor studies for metal ion detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köse, Muhammet; Purtas, Savas; Güngör, Seyit Ali; Ceyhan, Gökhan; Akgün, Eyup; McKee, Vickie

    2015-02-01

    A novel Schiff base ligand was synthesized by the condensation reaction of 2,6-diformylpyridine and 4-aminoantipyrine in MeOH and characterised by its melting point, elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectroscopic studies. Molecular structure of the ligand was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The electrochemical properties of the Schiff base ligand were studied in different solvents at various scan rates. Sensor ability of the Schiff base ligand was investigated by colorimetric and fluorometric methods. Visual colour change of the ligand was investigated in MeOH solvent in presence of various metal ions Na+, Mg2+, Al3+, K+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+. Upon addition of Al3+ ion into a MeOH solution of the ligand, an orange colour developed which is detectable by naked eye. Fluorescence emission studies showed that the ligand showed single emission band at 630-665 nm upon excitation at 560 nm. Addition of metal ions Na+, Mg2+, K+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ (1:1 M ratio) cause fluorescence quenching, however addition of Al+3 resulted in an increase in fluorescence intensity. No significant variation was observed in the fluorescence intensity caused by Al3+ in presence of other metal ions. Therefore, the Schiff base ligand can be used for selective detection of Al3+ ions in the presence of the other metal ions studied.

  5. Lateral photovoltaic effect in flexible free-standing reduced graphene oxide film for self-powered position-sensitive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, In Kyu; Ki, Bugeun; Yoon, Seonno; Oh, Jungwoo

    2016-09-01

    Lightweight, simple and flexible self-powered photodetectors are urgently required for the development and application of advanced optical systems for the future of wearable electronic technology. Here, using a low-temperature reduction process, we report a chemical approach for producing freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide papers with different gradients of the carbon/oxygen concentration ratio. We also demonstrate a novel type of freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide self-powered photodetector based on a symmetrical metal–semiconductor–metal structure. Upon illumination by a 633-nm continuous wave laser, the lateral photovoltage is observed to vary linfearly with the laser position between two electrodes on the reduced graphene oxide surface. This result may suggest that the lateral photovoltaic effect in the reduced graphene oxide film originates from the built-in electric field by the combination of both the photothermal electric effect and the gradient of the oxygen-to-carbon composition. These results represent substantial progress toward novel, chemically synthesized graphene-based photosensors and suggest one-step integration of graphene-based optoelectronics in the future.

  6. Lateral photovoltaic effect in flexible free-standing reduced graphene oxide film for self-powered position-sensitive detection

    PubMed Central

    Moon, In Kyu; Ki, Bugeun; Yoon, Seonno; Oh, Jungwoo

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight, simple and flexible self-powered photodetectors are urgently required for the development and application of advanced optical systems for the future of wearable electronic technology. Here, using a low-temperature reduction process, we report a chemical approach for producing freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide papers with different gradients of the carbon/oxygen concentration ratio. We also demonstrate a novel type of freestanding monolithic reduced graphene oxide self-powered photodetector based on a symmetrical metal–semiconductor–metal structure. Upon illumination by a 633-nm continuous wave laser, the lateral photovoltage is observed to vary linfearly with the laser position between two electrodes on the reduced graphene oxide surface. This result may suggest that the lateral photovoltaic effect in the reduced graphene oxide film originates from the built-in electric field by the combination of both the photothermal electric effect and the gradient of the oxygen-to-carbon composition. These results represent substantial progress toward novel, chemically synthesized graphene-based photosensors and suggest one-step integration of graphene-based optoelectronics in the future. PMID:27634110

  7. Old tree with new shoots: silver nanoparticles for label-free and colorimetric mercury ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shuyan; Jia, Xiaoxia; Chen, Yanli

    2013-01-01

    Mercury in the environment from global mercury emissions as well as various forms of contamination poses severe threats to both human health and the environment. Long-term exposure to high levels of Hg-based toxins results in serious and irreversible damage of the central nervous system and other organs. Therefore, the development of effective sensing systems for mercury detection becomes an increasing demand. In this article, a yogurt-mediated silver nanostructure is reported to be unprecedentedly used in the naked-eye and label-free detection of mercury. The method relies on the redox reaction resulting from the electrode potential difference between Ag+/Ag (0.7996 V) and Hg2+/Hg2 2+ (0.920 V) that makes colorless Hg2+ ions which oxidize colored silver nanoparticle (AgNP) to colorless Ag+. The labor-intensive modification of AgNPs and expensive labeling are avoided, and the traditional AuNPs are substituted by AgNPs in this Hg2+ ions sensing platform, which makes it facile, low-cost, and particularly useful for home, clinic, or field applications as well as resource-limited conditions. This sensing system achieves a detection limit as low as 10 nM, lower than the toxicity level of Hg2+ ions in drinking water (30 nM) defined by World Health Organization, and exhibits excellent selectivity, largely free from the matrix effect of the real water samples. This visual label-free Hg2+ ions sensing motif shows great promise for sensing Hg2+ ions in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, cost, and maneuverability. It is also a good example for the organic combination of green chemistry and functional materials, which may trigger interest in furthering biosystems for environmental science applications.

  8. Implementing Silicon Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors as Arrays for Multiple Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ralph L; Wipf, Mathias; Müller, Steffen; Bedner, Kristine; Wright, Iain A; Martin, Colin J; Constable, Edwin C; Fanget, Axel; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2016-05-06

    Ionic gradients play a crucial role in the physiology of the human body, ranging from metabolism in cells to muscle contractions or brain activities. To monitor these ions, inexpensive, label-free chemical sensing devices are needed. Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on silicon (Si) nanowires or nanoribbons (NRs) have a great potential as future biochemical sensors as they allow for the integration in microscopic devices at low production costs. Integrating NRs in dense arrays on a single chip expands the field of applications to implantable electrodes or multifunctional chemical sensing platforms. Ideally, such a platform is capable of detecting numerous species in a complex analyte. Here, we demonstrate the basis for simultaneous sodium and fluoride ion detection with a single sensor chip consisting of arrays of gold-coated SiNR FETs. A microfluidic system with individual channels allows modifying the NR surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of two types of ion receptors sensitive to sodium and fluoride ions. The functionalization procedure results in a differential setup having active fluoride- and sodium-sensitive NRs together with bare gold control NRs on the same chip. Comparing functionalized NRs with control NRs allows the compensation of non-specific contributions from changes in the background electrolyte concentration and reveals the response to the targeted species.

  9. Real-time detection of metal ions using conjugated polymer composite papers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Eun; Shim, Hyeon Woo; Kwon, Oh Seok; Huh, Yang-Il; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2014-09-21

    Cellulose, a natural polymeric material, has widespread technical applications because of its inherent structural rigidity and high surface area. As a conjugated polymer, polypyrrole shows practical potential for a diverse and promising range of future technologies. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the real-time detection and removal of metal ions with polypyrrole/cellulose (PPCL) composite papers in solution. Simply, the conjugated polymer papers had different chemical/physical properties by applying different potentials to them, which resulted in differentiable response patterns and adsorption efficiencies for individual metal ions. First, large-area PPCL papers with a diameter of 5 cm were readily obtained via vapor deposition polymerization. The papers exhibited both mechanical flexibility and robustness, in which polypyrrole retained its redox property perfectly. The ability of the PPCL papers to recognize metal ions was examined in static and flow cells, in which real-time current change was monitored at five different applied potentials (+1, +0.5, 0, -0.5, and -1 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Distinguishable signals in the PPCL paper responses were observed for individual metal ions through principal component analysis. Particularly, the PPCL papers yielded unique signatures for three metal ions, Hg(ii), Ag(i), and Cr(iii), even in a real sample, groundwater. The sorption of metal ions by PPCL papers was examined in the flow system. The PPCL papers had a greatly superior adsorption efficiency for Hg(ii) compared to that of the other metal ions. With the strong demand for the development of inexpensive, flexible, light-weight, and environmentally friendly devices, the fascinating characteristics of these PPCL papers are likely to provide good opportunities for low-cost paper-based flexible or wearable devices.

  10. Mass determination of megadalton-DNA Electrospray Ions usingCharge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Jocelyn C.; Hack, Christopher; Benner, Henry W.

    1997-10-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CD-MS) has been used to determine the mass of double-stranded, circular DNA and single-stranded, circular DNA in the range of 2500 to 8000 base pairs (1.5-5.0 MDa). Simultaneous measurement of the charge and velocity of an electrostatically accelerated ion allows a mass determination of the ion, with instrument calibration determined independently of samples. Positive ion mass spectra of electrosprayed commercial DNA samples supplied in tris(hydroxymethyl)ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid buffer, diluted in 50 vol. percent acetonitrile, were obtained without cleanup of the sample. ACD mass spectrum constructed from 3000 ion measurements takes 10 min to acquire and yields the DNA molecular mass directly (mass resolution = 6). The data collected represent progress toward a more automatable alternative to sizing of DNA by gel electrophoresis. In addition to the mass spectra, CD-MS generates charge versus mass plots, which provide another means to investigate the creation and fate of large electrospray ions.

  11. Controlled fabrication of nanopores using a direct focused ion beam approach with back face particle detection.

    PubMed

    Patterson, N; Adams, D P; Hodges, V C; Vasile, M J; Michael, J R; Kotula, P G

    2008-06-11

    We report a direct, ion drilling technique that enables the reproducible fabrication and placement of nanopores in membranes of different thickness. Using a 30 keV focused Ga ion beam column combined with an in situ, back face, multi-channelplate particle detector, nanopores are sputtered in Si(3)N(4) and W/Si(3)N(4) to have diameters as small as 12 nm. Transmission electron microscopy shows that focused ion beam-drilled holes are near-conical with the diameter decreasing from entry to exit side. By monitoring the detector signal during ion exposure, the drilled hole width can be minimized such that the exit-side diameter is smaller than the full width at half-maximum of the nominally Gaussian-shaped incident beam. Judicious choice of the beam defining aperture combined with back face particle detection allows for reproducible exit-side hole diameters between 18 and 100 nm. The nanopore direct drilling technique does not require potentially damaging broad area exposure to tailor hole sizes. Moreover, this technique successfully achieves breakthrough despite the effects of varying membrane thickness, redeposition, polycrystalline grain structure, and slight ion beam current fluctuations.

  12. Enzymatic cascade based fluorescent DNAzyme machines for the ultrasensitive detection of Cu(II) ions.

    PubMed

    He, Jing-Lin; Zhu, Shuang-Li; Wu, Ping; Li, Pan-Pan; Li, Ting; Cao, Zhong

    2014-10-15

    A novel enzymatic cascade based fluorescent DNAzyme machine has been developed for the amplified detection of copper (Cu(2+)) ions. This is the first attempt to carry out the combination of the self-cleaving DNAzyme and the polymerase/endonuclease reaction cycles involving cleaved substrate extension. In the presence of Cu(2+) ions, the enzyme strand carries out catalytic reactions to hydrolytic cleavage of the substrate strand. The cleaved DNAzyme substrates act as primers and trigger the Klenow Fragment polymerization. Nb.BbvCI endonuclease cuts the double-stranded niking site and thus opens a new site for a new replication. The replication regenerates the complete dsDNA to initiate another cycle of nicking, polymerization and displacement. Finally the fluorescence dye, SG, inserts into the DNA double helix to generate a distinguishable fluorescence enhancement. The Cu(2+) ions act as the activator for enzymatic cascade amplification generating multiple duplex structures in the nascent product. An increasing fluorescence is observed with increasing Cu(2+) ions concentration. A good nonlinear correlation (R=0.9997) was obtained between fluorescence intensity and the cubic logarithm of the Cu(2+) ions concentration over the range 0.50-200 nM. This nonlinear response phenomenon results in an efficient improvement of the sensitivity of our current proposed assay. The activation of such enzymatic cascades through analyte-DNAzyme interactions is not only valuable to activate the cooperation of enzyme networks, but also has a substantial impact on the development of amplified DNAzyme sensors.

  13. Selective detection of mercury (II) ion using nonlinear optical properties of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Darbha, Gopala Krishna; Singh, Anant Kumar; Rai, Uma Shanker; Yu, Eugene; Yu, Hongtao; Chandra Ray, Paresh

    2008-06-25

    Contamination of the environment with heavy metal ions has been an important concern throughout the world for decades. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of mercury in environmental samples, this article demonstrates for the first time that nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of MPA-HCys-PDCA-modified gold nanoparticles can be used for rapid, easy and reliable screening of Hg(II) ions in aqueous solution, with high sensitivity (5 ppb) and selectivity over competing analytes. The hyper Rayleigh scattering (HRS) intensity increases 10 times after the addition of 20 ppm Hg(2+) ions to modified gold nanoparticle solution. The mechanism for HRS intensity change has been discussed in detail using particle size-dependent NLO properties as well as a two-state model. Our results show that the HRS assay for monitoring Hg(II) ions using MPA-HCys-PDCA-modified gold nanoparticles has excellent selectivity over alkali, alkaline earth (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+)), and transition heavy metal ions (Pb(2+), Pb(+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+)).

  14. Millimeter-wave Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy as a Technique to Selectively Detect Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfen, Dewayne; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-05-01

    Molecular ions are usually very unstable and reactive species. As a result, their spectroscopic features can be difficult to identify and distinguish from those of neutral species, which tend to be more stable and thus have stronger signals. The technique of velocity modulation allows this disadvantage to be removed. This method uses the alternating plus and minus polarity of an electric field created by an AC discharge, which also produces the molecular ions, to selectively detect the molecular ions, while eliminating the neutral features. This technique has been applied at infrared and optical wavelengths for many years with much success. Recently, we designed and built a millimeter-wave velocity modulation spectrometer, the first ever constructed. This instrument has been used to create and study multiple molecular ions, including metal-bearing molecular ions. The rotational spectrum of these species, such as TiCl^+, VCl^+, TiF^+, FeO^+, FeCO^+, and SiCl^+, has been investigated with this new machine in our laboratory. Results of these studies along with a description of the velocity modulation technique and instrument will be presented.

  15. A mini-review on functional nucleic acids-based heavy metal ion detection.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shenshan; Wu, Yuangen; Wang, Lumei; Zhan, Xuejia; Zhou, Pei

    2016-12-15

    Recent years have witnessed great progress in developing functional nucleic acids (FNAs)-based sensors for the detection of heavy metal ion. In this review, four types of the FNAs that most widely-used in heavy metal ions detection were briefly introduced and a dozen of recently published review articles which summarized those FNAs-based sensors were introduced. Particularly, according to the degree of automation and system integration, those FNAs-based sensors which belong to the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) category were reviewed in more detail by classifying them into six types such as microfluidic LOC system, microchip, lateral flow dipstick, personal glucose meter, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) and disc-based analytical platform. After gave a brief description of the sensing strategies, properties, advantages or disadvantages of these FNAs-based sensors, existing problems and future perspectives were also discussed.

  16. A novel approach to increasing cocaine detection confidence utilizing ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadamec, J. Richard; Su, Chih-Wu; Rigdon, Stephen; Norwood, Lavan

    1995-01-01

    When a positive detection of a narcotic occurs during the search of a vessel, a decision has to be made whether further intensive search is warranted. In terms of unwarranted delays of vessels and possible property damage, the accuracy of the analytical determination is very important. Analytical accuracy becomes critical when the data may be used in court actions as evidence. For this purpose, the U.S. Coast Guard has been investigating several confirmatory ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) field methods for the detection and identification of cocaine. This paper presents the findings of our investigations on the use of catalytic pyrolysis and base hydrolysis as confirmatory methods. The catalytic effects of various metals on the pyrolysis reaction are reported. In addition, the effects of several different ion mobility spectrometer sample transfer mediums and varying laboratory conditions on the base hydrolysis of the cocaine molecule are also be reported.

  17. Wash-free magnetic oligonucleotide probes-based NMR sensor for detecting the Hg ion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenwei; Hao, Changlong; Ma, Wei; Xing, Changrui; Yan, Wenjing; Kuang, Hua; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2011-12-14

    An easily applied and sensitive sensor for the detection of heavy metal ion residues based entirely on magnetic nanoparticle and oligonucleotide was developed. The tool is established on the relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles with different dispersion states. The target analyte, Hg ions, induce the aggregation of the MNP oligonucleotide probes. Accordingly, the light produced by the magnetic relaxation image and the transverse relaxation time (T(2)) all change due to the effect of the aggregation. The limit of qualitative detection of the sensor is 0.15 ppt. The recoveries from test samples range between 97.1-101.8%. Using the nuclear resonance instrument, the method is a high throughput and sensitive sensor.

  18. Detecting the Enceladus Neutral Torus via Water Group Pick Up Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, R. L.; Wilson, R. J.; Henderson, M. G.; Thomsen, M. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    One of the major discoveries1 of Cassini to date is the south polar icy plume at Enceladus (R ~ 4 RS). Models2 predict that this plume may be a source of both the extended (2-8 RS) OH neutral cloud observed by the Hubble space telescope3, and a new feature, a narrow (~0.5 to 1.0 RS) neutral water group torus centered on the Enceladus orbit. As the corotating and magnetically confined thermal plasma (mostly water group ions) streams through the gravitationally bound water group neutrals, charge exchange between the ions and neutrals is expected4 to occur yielding slower ions subsequently "picked up" by Saturn's magnetic field. The phase space density of these ions should show characteristics of a ring velocity distribution within the source, combined with subsequent scattering into a shell and possible adiabatic cooling at larger radial distances. Therefore, via analysis of Cassini in situ ion counting data, it may be possible to indirectly detect the neutral Enceladus torus, confirming the predictions in (2). In this study, Cassini plasma spectrometer (CAPS) data for equatorial orbits with favorable viewing5 are analyzed. The radial distance range of about 3.5 to 6.5 RS is considered covering data across the Enceladus orbit. Assuming flow speeds near co-rotation as reported in (6) yields a modeled water group ion core that is subtracted from the measured data. The resulting residual ion counting data has velocity space signatures resembling pick up ions. The strongest source region is identified about the Enceladus orbit with radial extent at least 1 RS, in qualitative agreement with predictions. Peak phase space density of these ions is perpendicular to the magnetic field, resembling a ring, as expected within the source region. At larger radial distances (e.g. R = 6 RS), the ring signature has evolved to a shell and the expected adiabatic cooling due to transport from the source outward is observed. Similarly strong pick up ion sources are not observed near the

  19. Ion chromatography with the indirect ultraviolet detection of alkali metal ions and ammonium using imidazolium ionic liquid as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Indirect ultraviolet detection was conducted in ultraviolet-absorption-agent-added mobile phase to complete the detection of the absence of ultraviolet absorption functional group in analytes. Compared with precolumn derivatization or postcolumn derivatization, this method can be widely used, has the advantages of simple operation and good linear relationship. Chromatographic separation of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid/organic solvent as the mobile phase, in which imidazolium ionic liquids acted as ultraviolet absorption reagent and eluting agent. The retention behaviors of four kinds of cations are discussed, and the mechanism of separation and detection are described. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background ultraviolet absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in the ion chromatography-indirect ultraviolet detection. The successful separation and detection of Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , and NH4 (+) within 13 min was achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.02, 0.11, 0.30, and 0.06 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and analysis method of alkali metal ions and ammonium by ion chromatography with indirect ultraviolet detection method was developed, and the application range of ionic liquid was expanded.

  20. Precision X-ray Measurement of the Position Sensitivity of Graphene Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalas, Edward; Sarker, Biddut K.; Moore, Michael; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-07-01

    We have been exploring the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) as a platform for detection of ionizing radiation, whereby the detection is achieved indirectly by use of the field effect in graphene, which is induced by the generation and transport of ionized charge carriers in the underlying undoped semiconductor substrate. An important characteristic of such a detector is scalability to large areas. Previous experimental studies suggest that the effective area significantly exceeds the size of graphene for field effect-based architectures, and this is also predicted from the operational principle of these devices. We describe the results of the experimental studies of GFETs on silicon carbide (SiC) substrates by use a microbeam Xray facility, provided by the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The results confirm that the effective area of the GFET is significantly larger than that of graphene with response measured at distances as large as 1000 μm from 10-μm size graphene. A simple transport model has been developed and is used to explain the spatial dependence of the GFET response. (authors)

  1. Development of a Position Sensitive Liquid Scintillator Bar-type Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atencio, Ariella; Cizewski, Jolie; Walter, David; Chipps, Kelly; Febbraro, Michael; Pain, Steven; Smith, Karl; Thornsberry, Cory

    2016-09-01

    The ability to detect neutrons is important for both nuclear reactions and beta decay. Liquid scintillators have the useful property of Pulse Shape Discrimination(PSD), which can be used to separate gamma-ray-induced events when the scintillators are used as neutron detectors. Because of their ability to apply PSD, these liquid scintillators will have many applications in neutron detection, such as a recent experiment conducted at the University of Notre Dame. The liquid scintillators use a xylene based liquid made in-house at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Naphthalene in the liquid scintillator improves the light output properties of the scintillator. An optimized method for the purification of naphthalene will be discussed as well as the first implementation of an array of these detectors. This work is supported in part by the NSF and the U.S. DOE. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. Synthesis of fluorescent BSA-Au NCs for the detection of Hg2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a simple heating approach for preparation of gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a template. At 70 °C, the reaction for the preparation of BSA-Au NCs is completed within 20 min. By conducting matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), we have found that the main product is BSA-Au20 NCs that emit at 660 nm when excited at 330 nm due to "molecular-like" behavior. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal that there are Au+ ions and Au atoms coexisting in the BSA-Au NCs. The as-prepared Au NCs show excellent stability over a wide pH range (2.0-10.0). The fluorescence and MALDI-MS data reveal that the changes in their fluorescence properties are due to the formation of various sizes of BSA-Au NCs for different periods of reaction time. The as-prepared BSA-Au NCs are selective and sensitive (limit of detection of 4 nM at a signal-to noise ratio 3) for the detection of Hg2+ ions through the d10-d10 metallophilic interaction of Au+ and Hg2+ that leads to a decrease in fluorescence. The present assay has been validated for the detection of Hg2+ ions in real water samples, with a result being in good agreement with that from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  3. Recent advances in DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for heavy metal ion detection: A review.

    PubMed

    Saidur, M R; Aziz, A R Abdul; Basirun, W J

    2017-04-15

    The presence of heavy metal in food chains due to the rapid industrialization poses a serious threat on the environment. Therefore, detection and monitoring of heavy metals contamination are gaining more attention nowadays. However, the current analytical methods (based on spectroscopy) for the detection of heavy metal contamination are often very expensive, tedious and can only be handled by trained personnel. DNA biosensors, which are based on electrochemical transduction, is a sensitive but inexpensive method of detection. The principles, sensitivity, selectivity and challenges of electrochemical biosensors are discussed in this review. This review also highlights the major advances of DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for the detection of heavy metal ions such as Hg(2+), Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Pb(2+).

  4. Ion mobility spectrometry fingerprints: A rapid detection technology for adulteration of sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Shuai, Qian; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia

    2016-02-01

    A simple and rapid detection technology was proposed based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) fingerprints to determine potential adulteration of sesame oil. Oil samples were diluted by n-hexane and analyzed by IMS for 20s. Then, chemometric methods were employed to establish discriminant models for sesame oils and four other edible oils, pure and adulterated sesame oils, and pure and counterfeit sesame oils, respectively. Finally, Random Forests (RF) classification model could correctly classify all five types of edible oils. The detection results indicated that the discriminant models built by recursive support vector machine (R-SVM) method could identify adulterated sesame oil samples (⩾ 10%) with an accuracy value of 94.2%. Therefore, IMS was shown to be an effective method to detect the adulterated sesame oils. Meanwhile, IMS fingerprints work well to detect the counterfeit sesame oils produced by adding sesame oil essence into cheaper edible oils.

  5. Detection of heavy metal ions in water by high-resolution surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy combined with anodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaopeng; Forzani, Erica S; Tao, Nongjian

    2007-06-15

    High-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) capability has been demonstrated for detecting heavy metal ions in water. Metal ions are electroplated onto the gold SPR sensing surface and are quantitatively detected by stripping voltammetry. Both the SPR angular shift and electrochemical current signal are recorded to identify the type and amount of the metal ions in water. The performance of the combined approach is further enhanced by a differential detection approach. The gold sensor surface is divided into a reference and a sensing area, and the difference in the SPR angles from the two areas is detected with a quadrant cell photodetector as a differential signal. Our system demonstrated quantitative detection of copper, lead, and mercury ions in water from part-per-million to sub-part-per-billion levels with good linearity.

  6. Enhanced analyte detection using in-source fragmentation of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-selected ions in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lauren J; Smith, Robert W; Toutoungi, Danielle E; Reynolds, James C; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew; Sage, Ashley; Wilson, Ian D; Weston, Daniel J; Boyle, Billy; Creaser, Colin S

    2012-05-01

    Miniaturized ultra high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is used for the selective transmission of differential mobility-selected ions prior to in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) analysis. The FAIMS-in-source collision induced dissociation-TOFMS (FISCID-MS) method requires only minor modification of the ion source region of the mass spectrometer and is shown to significantly enhance analyte detection in complex mixtures. Improved mass measurement accuracy and simplified product ion mass spectra were observed following FAIMS preselection and subsequent in-source CID of ions derived from pharmaceutical excipients, sufficiently close in m/z (17.7 ppm mass difference) that they could not be resolved by TOFMS alone. The FISCID-MS approach is also demonstrated for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of peptides with FAIMS used to filter out unrelated precursor ions thereby simplifying the resulting product ion mass spectra. Liquid chromatography combined with FISCID-MS was applied to the analysis of coeluting model peptides and tryptic peptides derived from human plasma proteins, allowing precursor ion selection and CID to yield product ion data suitable for peptide identification via database searching. The potential of FISCID-MS for the quantitative determination of a model peptide spiked into human plasma in the range of 0.45-9.0 μg/mL is demonstrated, showing good reproducibility (%RSD < 14.6%) and linearity (R(2) > 0.99).

  7. Detection of lead ions in picomolar concentration range using underpotential deposition on silver nanoparticles-deposited glassy carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, R; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2011-09-30

    The efficacy of silver-deposited glassy carbon electrode for the determination of lead ions at the sub-nanomolar concentration ranges is investigated. The silver nanoparticles are electrodeposited on glassy carbon electrode using chronoamperometry and the electrode surface is characterized using SEM. Lead ions are detected in the region of underpotential deposition. The analysis is performed in square wave mode in the stripping voltammetry without the removal of oxygen. The detection limit of 10 pM has been obtained with a constant potential of -0.7 V during the electrodeposition step for a period of 50s. The interference of surfactants in the detection of lead ions is also studied.

  8. Characterization and Detection of Uranyl Ion Sorption on Silver Surfaces using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Wells, Sabrina M; Sepaniak, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The study of the chemical behavior of uranyl species and its rapid detection is of primary environmental and non-proliferation concern. Herein we report on a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of uranyl ion (UO22+) sorption onto the thermally vapor deposited silver particle surface. The ability of vibrational spectroscopy to characterize surface phenomenon and the remarkable sensitivity of the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have been introduced as an appropriate combination for the surface characterization and detection of UO22+ onto the silver surface. The appearance of symmetric stretching frequency of UO22+ around 700 cm-1 and the disappearance of the 854 cm-1 band is attributed to the development of a chemical bond between silver surface and uranyl species. The effects of temperature, solute-surface interaction time, and pH have been studied using silver modified polypropylene filter (PPF) substrates. Results show that under appropriate conditions, the concentration of uranyl ion as low as 20 ng/mL can be easily detected using the discussed SERS approach without any surface modification of silver nanoparticles. Moreover, an alteranative SERS approach of uranyl detection is demonstrated using nano-lithographically fabricated SERS substrates.

  9. Simple technique for measuring the Goos-Hänchen effect with polarization modulation and a position-sensitive detector.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Hervé; Girard, Sylvain; Hamel, Joseph

    2002-08-15

    An original approach to directly measuring the Goos-Hänchen longitudinal shift between TE and TM polarization states during a total internal reflection is introduced. The technique is based on the modulation of the polarization state of a laser by an electro-optic modulator combined with a precise measurement of the resulting spatial displacement with a position-sensitive detector. This method presents many advantages over other techniques and allows measurements at different wavelengths over a broad range for the incident angle.

  10. The investigation of ionization conditions in the trace amounts detection of heterocyclic compounds by ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltaeva, Y. R.; Sysoev, A. A.; Poteshin, S. S.; Negru, K. I.; Grishin, S. S.; Trefilova, V. V.; Zuev, M. I.; Baberkina, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    The first part of paper is devoted to the detection of New Psychoactive Substances by ion mobility mass spectrometry study. In the second part of the paper presents a promising approach to prevent the spread of narcotic substances, consisting in the use of field-portable ion mobility spectrometers and finding the correlation between the peaks of the spectrograms of ion mobility and the chemical structure of the compound.

  11. Highly photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals for rapid, label-free and recyclable detection of mercuric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the thiol group, the fluorescence can be fully recovered by biothiols such as cysteine and glutathione, therefore, a regenerative strategy has been proposed and successfully applied to detect Hg2+ by the same sensor for at least five cycles. Endowed with relatively high sensitivity and selectivity, the present sensor holds the potential to be applied for mercuric assay in water.Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the

  12. A highly selective bicyclic fluoroionophore for the detection of lithium ions.

    PubMed

    Wanichacheva, Nantanit; Wanichecheva, Nantanit; Benco, John S; Lambert, Christopher R; McGimpsey, W Grant

    2006-01-01

    The macrobicyclic molecule, 21-(9-anthrylmethyl)-4,17,13,16-tetraoxa-1,10,21-triazabicyclo [8.8.5]tricosane-19,23-dione, I, was designed, synthesized and characterized as a fluoroionophore for the selective, optical detection of lithium ions. Compound I is based on a bridged diazacrown structure, which provides a semirigid binding framework. Binding takes place by electrostatic interactions between the oxygen atoms of the crown and the cation and is transduced to fluorescence emission from an attached anthracene fluorophore. In a 75:25 dichloromethane/tetrahydrofuran solvent mixture, I acts as an intramolecular electron transfer "off-on" fluorescence switch, exhibiting a greater than 190-fold enhancement in fluorescence emission intensity in the presence of lithium ions. The relative selectivity of I for lithium ions over sodium, potassium and ammonium ions was found to be log K(Li+,Na+) approximately -3.36, log K(Li+,K+) approximately -1.77 and log K(Li+,NH4+) approximately -2.78.

  13. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by self assembled chemical field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Hang Kang, Yuhong; Gladwin, Elizabeth; Claus, Richard O.

    2015-04-20

    Multiple layer-by-layer sensor material modifications were designed and implemented to achieve selectivity of semiconductor based chemical field effect transistors (ChemFETs) to particular heavy metal ions. The ChemFET sensors were fabricated and modified in three ways, with the intent to initially target first mercury and lead ions and then chromium ions, respectively. Sensor characterization was performed with the gate regions of the sensor elements exposed to different concentrations of target heavy metal ion solutions. A minimum detection level in the range of 0.1 ppm and a 10%–90% response time of less than 10 s were demonstrated. By combining layer-by-layer gold nanoparticles and lead ionophores, a sensor is produced that is sensitive and selective not only to chromium but also to Cr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6+}. This result supports the claim that high selectivity can be achieved by designing self-assembled bonding for lead, arsenic, chromium, cesium, mercury, and cadmium.

  14. Detection efficiency and spatial resolution of the SIRAD ion electron emission microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisello, D.; Giubilato, P.; Kaminsky, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Nigro, M.; Pantano, D.; Silvestrin, L.; Tessaro, M.; Wyss, J.; Bertazzoni, S.; Mongiardo, L.; Salmeri, M.; Salsano, A.

    2009-06-01

    An axial ion electron emission microscope (IEEM) has been built at the SIRAD irradiation facility at the 15 MV Tandem accelerator of INFN Legnaro National Laboratory (Padova, Italy) to obtain a micrometric sensitivity map to single event effects (SEE) of electronic devices. In this contribution we report on two experiments performed with the IEEM. Si 3N 4 ultra-thin membranes with a gold deposition were placed on the device under test (DUT) to ensure a uniform and abundant secondary electron emission In the first experiment we measured an IEEM ion detection efficiency of 83% with a 58Ni (220 MeV) beam, in good agreement with the expected value. The second experiment allowed us to estimate the lateral resolution of the IEEM. The positions of ion induced single event upsets (SEU) in a synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM), used as a reference target, were compared with the corresponding ion impact points reconstructed by the IEEM. The result (FWHM ˜4.4 μm with a 79Br beam of 214 MeV) is encouraging because of the residual presence of distortions of the image and mechanical vibrations.

  15. Sensitive ion detection device and method for analysis of compounds as vapors in gases

    DOEpatents

    Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P

    2014-02-18

    An ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for the detection of trace gaseous molecular compounds dissolved or suspended in a carrier gas, particularly in ambient air, without preconcentration or the trapping of analyte particles. The IMS of the invention comprises an ionization volume of greater than 5 cm.sup.3 and preferably greater than 100 cm.sup.3. The larger size ionizers of this invention enable analysis of trace (<1 ppb) of sample compounds in the gas phase. To facilitate efficient ion motion through the large volume ionization and reaction regions of the IMS, an electric field gradient can be provided in the ionization region or in both the ionization and reaction regions. The systems can be implemented with radioactive ionization sources, corona discharge ion sources or ions can be formed by photoionization. In specific embodiments, particularly when the sample gas is ambient air, the sample gas is heater prior to entry into the instrument, the instrument is run at temperatures above ambient, and the instrument can be heated by contact with heated sample gas exiting the instrument.

  16. Sensitive ion detection device and method for analysis of compounds as vapors in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P.

    2015-09-15

    An ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for the detection of trace gaseous molecular compounds dissolved or suspended in a carrier gas, particularly in ambient air, without preconcentration or the trapping of analyte particles. The IMS of the invention comprises an ionization volume of greater than 5 cm.sup.3 and preferably greater than 100 cm.sup.3. The larger size ionizers of this invention enable analysis of trace (<1 ppb) of sample compounds in the gas phase. To facilitate efficient ion motion through the large volume ionization and reaction regions of the IMS, an electric field gradient can be provided in the ionization region or in both the ionization and reaction regions. The systems can be implemented with radioactive ionization sources, corona discharge ion sources or ions can be formed by photoionization. In specific embodiments, particularly when the sample gas is ambient air, the sample gas is heater prior to entry into the instrument, the instrument is run at temperatures above ambient, and the instrument can be heated by contact with heated sample gas exiting the instrument.

  17. Polymeric ion sensors with multiple detection modes achieved by a new type of click chemistry reaction.

    PubMed

    Michinobu, Tsuyoshi; Li, Yongrong; Hyakutake, Tsuyoshi

    2013-02-28

    The rapid growth of the click chemistry concept enables the production of a wide variety of functional polymers. Among the new generation of click chemistry reactions, the highly efficient addition reactions between electron-rich alkynes and cyano-based acceptors, referred to as alkyne-acceptor click chemistry, have found promising application possibilities as polymeric chemosensors. The donor-acceptor chromophores, formed by this click chemistry reaction, feature intense charge-transfer (CT) bands in the visible region, but they are hardly fluorescent. Importantly, the chromophores possess two different nitrogen atoms, namely the aniline nitrogen and cyano nitrogen. The recognition of some specific metal cations by different nitrogen atoms in the polymers led to different modes of changes in the absorption spectra. For example, the hard acid of Fe(3+) ion was recognized by the aniline nitrogen, resulting in a decrease in the CT bands. On the other hand, the soft acid of the Ag(+) ion was captured by the cyano nitrogen, leading to a bathochromic shift in the CT bands. Some specific anions, such as CN(-), F(-), and I(-) ions, were also recognized by a chemodocimetric detection mode, discoloring the original solutions. When the CT bands decreased upon the addition of analytes, the polymers were found to serve as turn-on fluorescent sensors. In this perspective, the detailed detection modes of the new polymeric chemosensors are fully described.

  18. Gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry as a hyphenated technique for improved explosives detection and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercado, AL; Marsden, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is currently being successfully applied to the problem of on-line trace detection of plastic and other explosives in airports and other facilities. The methods of sample retrieval primarily consist of batch sampling for particulate residue on a filter card for introduction into the IMS. The sample is desorbed into the IMS using air as the carrier and negative ions of the explosives are detected, some as an adduct with a reagent ion such as Cl(-). Based on studies and tests conducted by different airport authorities, this method seems to work well for low vapor pressure explosives such as RDX and PETN, as well as TNT that are highly adsorptive and can be found in nanogram quantities on contaminated surfaces. Recently, the changing terrorist threat and the adoption of new marking agents for plastic explosives has meant that the sample introduction and analysis capabilities of the IMS must be enhanced in order to keep up with other detector developments. The IMS has sufficient analytical resolution for a few threat compounds but the IMS Plasmogram becomes increasingly more difficult to interpret when the sample mixture gets more complex.

  19. Voltammetric detection of cadmium ions at glutathione-modified gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chow, Edith; Hibbert, D Brynn; Gooding, J Justin

    2005-06-01

    An electrochemical sensor for the detection of cadmium ions is described using immobilized glutathione as a selective ligand. First, a self-assembled monolayer of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was formed on a gold electrode. The carboxyl terminus then allowed attachment of glutathione (GSH)via carbodiimide coupling to give the MPA-GSH modified electrode. A cadmium ion forms a complex with glutathione via the free sulfhydryl group and also to the carboxyl groups. The complexed ion is reduced by linear and Osteryoung square wave voltammetry with a detection limit of 5 nM. The effect of the kinetics of accumulation of cadmium on the measured current was investigated and modeled. Increasing the temperature of accumulation and electrochemical analysis caused an increase in the voltammetric peak of approximately 4% per degrees C around room temperature. The modified electrode could be regenerated, being stable for more than 16 repeated uses and more than two weeks if used once a day. Some interference from Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) was observed but the effects of Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Cr(3+) and Ba(2+) were insignificant.

  20. Ion mobility spectrometer, spectrometer analyte detection and identification verification system, and method

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry and analyte detection and identification verification system are disclosed. The apparatus is configured to be used in an ion mobility spectrometer and includes a plurality of reactant reservoirs configured to contain a plurality of reactants which can be reacted with the sample to form adducts having varying ion mobilities. A carrier fluid, such as air or nitrogen, is used to carry the sample into the spectrometer. The plurality of reactants are configured to be selectively added to the carrier stream by use inlet and outlet manifolds in communication with the reagent reservoirs, the reservoirs being selectively isolatable by valves. The invention further includes a spectrometer having the reagent system described. In the method, a first reactant is used with the sample. Following a positive result, a second reactant is used to determine whether a predicted response occurs. The occurrence of the second predicted response tends to verify the existence of a component of interest within the sample. A third reactant can also be used to provide further verification of the existence of a component of interest. A library can be established of known responses of compounds of interest with various reactants and the results of a specific multi-reactant survey of a sample can be compared against the library to determine whether a component detected in the sample is likely to be a specific component of interest.

  1. Detection of copper ions in drinking water using the competitive adsorption of proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Wang, Wei; Ren, Hao; Chae, Junseok

    2014-07-15

    Heavy metal ions, i.e., Cu(2+), are harmful to the environment and our health. In order to detect them, and circumvent or alleviate the weaknesses of existing detecting technologies, we contrive a unique Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor combined with competitive adsorption of proteins, termed the Vroman effect. This approach adopts native proteins (albumin) as bio-receptors that interact with Cu(2+) to be denatured. Denaturation disrupts the conformation of albumin so that it weakens its affinity to adsorb on the sensing surface. Through the competitive adsorption between the denatured albumins and the native ones, the displacement occurs adjacent to the sensing surface, and this process is real-time monitored by SPR, a surface-sensitive label-free biosensor. The affinities of native albumin is significantly higher than that of denatured albumin, demonstrated by measured KD of native and denatured albumin to gold surafce, 5.8±0.2×10(-5) M and 5.4±0.1×10(-4) M, respectively. Using our biosensor, Cu(2+) with concentration down to 0.1mg/L is detected in PBS, tap water, deionized water, and bottled water. The SPR biosensor is characterized for 5 different heavy metal ions, Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+), most common heavy metal ions found in tap water. At the maximum contaminant level (MCL) suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the SPR biosensor produces 13.5±0.4, 1.5±0.4, 0, 0, and 0 mDeg, respectively, suggesting the biosensor may be used to detect Cu(2+) in tap water samples.

  2. Improved Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions in the Mid-Infrared with Up-Conversion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus, Charles R.; Perry, Adam J.; Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    Heterodyne detection, velocity modulation, and cavity enhancement are useful tools for observing rovibrational transitions of important molecular ions. We have utilized these methods to investigate a number of molecular ions, such as H_3^+, CH_5^+, HeH^+, and OH^+. In the past, parasitic etalons and the lack of fast and sensitive detectors in the mid-infrared have limited the number of transitions we could measure with MHz-level precision. Recently, we have significantly reduced the amplitude of unwanted interference fringes with a Brewster-plate spoiler. We have also developed a detection scheme which up-converts the mid-infrared light with difference frequency generation which allows the use of a faster and more sensitive avalanche photodetector. The higher detection bandwidth allows for optimized heterodyne detection at higher modulation frequencies. The overall gain in signal-to-noise from both improvements will enable extensive high-precision line lists of molecular ions and searches for previously unobserved transitions. K.N. Crabtree, J.N. Hodges, B.M. Siller, A.J. Perry, J.E. Kelly, P.A. Jenkins II, and B.J. McCall, Chem. Phys. Lett. 551 (2012) 1-6. A.J. Perry, J.N. Hodges, C.R. Markus, G.S. Kocheril, and B.J. McCall, J. Mol. Spec. 317 (2015) 71-73. J.N. Hodges, A.J. Perry, P.A. Jenkins II, B.M. Siller, and B.J. McCall, J. Chem. Phys. 139 (2013) 164291. A.J. Perry, J.N. Hodges, C.R. Markus, G.S. Kocheril, and B.J. McCall. 2014, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 101101 C.R. Markus, J.N. Hodges, A.J. Perry, G.S. Kocheril, H.S.P. Muller, and B.J. McCall, Astrophys. J. 817 (2016) 138.

  3. High-sensitivity detection of silver ions using oligonucleotide-immobilized oscillator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinsung; Choi, Wook; Jang, Kuewhan; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-03-15

    With the remarkable developments in the fields of nanoscale research and industry, nanotoxicity is gaining importance from the viewpoint of its potential impact on human health and the environment. Herein, we report on the label-free, high-sensitivity detection of Ag(+), a representative nanotoxic material, by using a silver-specific nucleotide-coated oscillator. The detection is based on the measurement of the resonant frequency shift arising from constitution of the cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine bonding. We amplify the resonant frequency shift by using single cytosine molecules. It is shown that a silver-specific DNA-immobilized oscillator enables the capture of silver ions at concentrations below 1 nM. Remarkably, the nucleotide-based oscillator enables an insight into the coordination chemistry, which plays an important role in the early detection of toxicity. This implies that the bio-conjugated sensor could be used to set the reference point for water quality.

  4. Sensitive detection of drug vapors using an ion funnel interface for secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meier, Lukas; Berchtold, Christian; Schmid, Stefan; Zenobi, Renato

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we use an ion funnel (IF) at ambient pressure to enhance the sensitivity of secondary electrospray ionization (SESI). Atenolol, salbutamol and cocaine as test compounds are delivered to the SESI interface in the gas phase and are charged with three nano electrosprays. In our experiments, we show that the compounds can be detected at concentrations in the low pptv range, which is an increase of two orders of magnitude compared with the results without the IF. With a standard SESI interface, the compounds could not be detected at all. With the use of the SESI IF interface for the headspace analysis of bananas and limes, we can detect many more compounds and at higher intensities than with a standard SESI interface.

  5. Silver(I) Ions Ultrasensitive Detection at Carbon Electrodes—Analysis of Waters, Tobacco Cells and Fish Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Krizkova, Sona; Krystofova, Olga; Trnkova, Libuse; Hubalek, Jaromir; Adam, Vojtech; Beklova, Miroslava; Horna, Ales; Havel, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2009-01-01

    We used carbon paste electrodes and a standard potentiostat to detect silver ions. The detection limit (3 Signal/Noise ratio) was estimated as 0.5 μM. A standard electrochemical instrument microanalysis of silver(I) ions was suggested. As a working electrode a carbon tip (1 mL) or carbon pencil was used. Limits of detection estimated by dilution of a standard were 1 (carbon tip) or 10 nM (carbon pencil). Further we employed flow injection analysis coupled with carbon tip to detect silver(I) ions released in various beverages and mineral waters. During first, second and third week the amount of silver(I) ions releasing into water samples was under the detection limit of the technique used for their quantification. At the end of a thirteen weeks long experiment the content of silver(I) ions was several times higher compared to the beginning of release detected in the third week and was on the order of tens of nanomoles. In subsequent experiments the influence of silver(I) ions (0, 5 and 10 μM) on a plant model system (tobacco BY-2 cells) during a four-day exposition was investigated. Silver(I) ions were highly toxic to the cells, which was revealed by a double staining viability assay. Moreover we investigated the effect of silver(I) ions (0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 and 2.5 μM) on guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Content of Ag(I) increased with increasing time of the treatment and applied concentrations in fish tissues. It can be concluded that a carbon tip or carbon pencil coupled with a miniaturized potentiostat can be used for detection of silver(I) ions in environmental samples and thus represents a small, portable, low cost and easy-to-use instrument for such purposes. PMID:22399980

  6. A Photochromic Sensor Microchip for High-performance Multiplex Metal Ions Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Li, Fengyu; Ye, Changqing; Qin, Meng; Ran, Wei; Song, Yanlin

    2015-01-01

    Current multi-analytes chips are limited with requiring numbers of sensors, complex synthesis and compounds screen. It is expected to develop new principles and techniques to achieve high-performance multi-analytes testing with facile sensors. Here, we investigated the correlative multi-states properties of a photochromic sensor (spirooxazine), which is capable of a selective and cross-reactive sensor array for discriminated multi-analytes (11 metal ions) detection by just one sensing compound. The multi-testing sensor array performed in dark, ultraviolet or visual stimulation, corresponding to different molecular states of spirooxazine metal ions coordination. The facile photochromic microchip contributes a multi-states array sensing method, and will open new opportunities for the development of advanced discriminant analysis for complex analytes. PMID:25853794

  7. Detection of copper ions from aqueous solutions using layered double hydroxides thin films deposited by PLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, A.; Birjega, R.; Matei, A.; Luculescu, C.; Nedelcea, A.; Dinescu, M.; Zavoianu, R.; Pavel, O. D.

    2015-10-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) thin films with Mg-Al were deposited using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. We studied the ability of our films to detect copper ions in aqueous solutions. Copper is known to be a common pollutant in water, originating from urban and industrial waste. Clay minerals, including layered double hydroxides (LDHs), can reduce the toxicity of such wastes by adsorbing copper. We report on the uptake of copper ions from aqueous solution on LDH thin films obtained via PLD. The obtained thin films were characterized using X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis. The results in this study indicate that LDHs thin films obtained by PLD have potential as an efficient adsorbent for removing copper from aqueous solution.

  8. Ion chemistry for the detection of isoprene and other volatile organic compounds in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibrock, Edeltraud; Huey, L. Gregory

    2000-06-01

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) and a flowing afterglow apparatus were used to study reactions of benzene cations (C6H6+ and (C6H6)2+) with a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Both cations react at the collision rate with compounds of lower ionization potential than benzene, such as isoprene (C5H8), other conjugated dienes, and aromatics. These ions are generally unreactive with substances of higher ionization potential such as alkanes, simple alcohols, simple carbonyls, etc. The results demonstrate that C6H6+ and (C6H6)2+ are excellent reagent ions for the sensitive detection of isoprene in air with a CIMS. However, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and C5H8 conjugated dienes were identified as potential interferences to this technique. This indicates that the selectivity of the CIMS isoprene measurement must be tested by intercomparison with well-established methods, e.g. gas chromatography techniques.

  9. A Photochromic Sensor Microchip for High-performance Multiplex Metal Ions Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Li, Fengyu; Ye, Changqing; Qin, Meng; Ran, Wei; Song, Yanlin

    2015-04-01

    Current multi-analytes chips are limited with requiring numbers of sensors, complex synthesis and compounds screen. It is expected to develop new principles and techniques to achieve high-performance multi-analytes testing with facile sensors. Here, we investigated the correlative multi-states properties of a photochromic sensor (spirooxazine), which is capable of a selective and cross-reactive sensor array for discriminated multi-analytes (11 metal ions) detection by just one sensing compound. The multi-testing sensor array performed in dark, ultraviolet or visual stimulation, corresponding to different molecular states of spirooxazine metal ions coordination. The facile photochromic microchip contributes a multi-states array sensing method, and will open new opportunities for the development of advanced discriminant analysis for complex analytes.

  10. Benzophenone based fluorophore for selective detection of Sn2 + ion: Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, Amol G.; Shinde, Suvidha S.; Lanke, Sandip K.; Sekar, Nagaiyan

    2017-03-01

    Synthesis of novel benzophenone-based chemosensor is presented for the selective sensing of Sn2 + ion. Screening of competitive metal ions was performed by competitive experiments. The specific cation recognition ability of chemosensor towards Sn2 + was investigated by experimental (UV-visible, fluorescence spectroscopy, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR and HRMS) methods and further supported by Density Functional Theory study. The stoichiometric binding ratio and binding constant (Ka) for complex is found to be 1:1 and 1.50 × 104, respectively. The detection limit of Sn2 + towards chemosensor was found to be 0.3898 ppb. Specific selectivity and superiority of chemosensor over another recently reported chemosensor is presented.

  11. Determination of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling process by ion pair chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, L. H.; Judkins, J. E.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A direct approach utilizing ion pairing reversed-phase chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detection was developed to monitor biodegradation of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling through hydroponic plant growth systems and fixed-film bioreactors. Samples of hydroponic nutrient solution and bioreactor effluent with high concentrations (up to 120 mS electrical conductance) of inorganic ions can be analyzed without pretreatment or interference. The presence of non-ionic surfactants did not significantly affect the analysis. Dynamic linear ranges for tested surfactants [Igepon TC-42, ammonium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate and sodium alkyl (C10-C16) ether sulfate] were 2 to approximately 500, 1 to approximately 500, 2.5 to approximately 550 and 3.0 to approximately 630 microg/ml, respectively.

  12. Metal-clad optical waveguide fluorescence device for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Zoppi, Angela; Lascialfari, Luisa; Cicchi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    We developed Hg-sensing chips by decorating the external surface of metal-clad optical waveguides with a monolayer of Hg-sensitive fluorescent molecular probes. The emission properties of the original water-soluble form of the molecule were previously found to be selectively quenched in the presence of Hg ions. The fabricated samples were tested with optical waveguide fluorescence spectroscopy by putting them in contact with a 5-μM water solution of Hg ions and recording the emission spectra versus incubation time. The estimate of the limit of detection was 150 nM. A preliminary evaluation of the selectivity of the structure was also performed by using Cd as possible interfering analytes.

  13. Highly sensitive dual-mode fluorescence detection of lead ion in water using aggregation-induced emissive polymers.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sukanta Kumar; Ghosh, Khama Rani; Gao, Jian Ping; Wang, Zhi Yuan

    2014-09-01

    A series of fluorene-based conjugated polymers containing the aggregation-induced emissive (AIE)-active tetraphenylethene and dicarboxylate pseudocrown as a receptor exhibits a unique dual-mode sensing ability for selective detection of lead ion in water. Fluorescence turn-off and turn-on detections are realized in 80%-90% and 20% water in tetrahydrofuran (THF), respectively, for lead ion with a concentration as low as 10(-8) m.

  14. Metal-ion rescue revisited: biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Li, Nan-Sheng; Das, Rhiju; Herschlag, Daniel; Piccirilli, Joseph A

    2012-06-01

    Within the three-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules to form chelates. These interactions help the RNA adopt and maintain specific conformations and frequently make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains challenging despite the growing database of RNA structures. Metal-ion rescue experiments have provided a powerful approach to identify and distinguish catalytic metal ions within RNA active sites, but the ability of such experiments to identify metal ions that contribute to tertiary structure acquisition and structural stability is less developed and has been challenged. Herein, we use the well-defined P4-P6 RNA domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron to reevaluate prior evidence against the discriminatory power of metal-ion rescue experiments and to advance thermodynamic descriptions necessary for interpreting these experiments. The approach successfully identifies ligands within the RNA that occupy the inner coordination sphere of divalent metal ions and distinguishes them from ligands that occupy the outer coordination sphere. Our results underscore the importance of obtaining complete folding isotherms and establishing and evaluating thermodynamic models in order to draw conclusions from metal-ion rescue experiments. These results establish metal-ion rescue as a rigorous tool for identifying and dissecting energetically important metal-ion interactions in RNAs that are noncatalytic but critical for RNA tertiary structure.

  15. New biosensor for detection of copper ions in water based on immobilized genetically modified yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Vopálenská, Irena; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-10-15

    Contamination of water by heavy metals represents a potential risk for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, including humans. Heavy metals in water resources can come from various industrial activities, and drinking water can be ex-post contaminated by heavy metals such as Cu(2+) from house fittings (e.g., water reservoirs) and pipes. Here, we present a new copper biosensor capable of detecting copper ions at concentrations of 1-100 μM. This biosensor is based on cells of a specifically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain immobilized in alginate beads. Depending on the concentration of copper, the biosensor beads change color from white, when copper is present in concentrations below the detection limit, to pink or red based on the increase in copper concentration. The biosensor was successfully tested in the determination of copper concentrations in real samples of water contaminated with copper ions. In contrast to analytical methods or other biosensors based on fluorescent proteins, the newly designed biosensor does not require specific equipment and allows the quick detection of copper in many parallel samples.

  16. [Determination of trace bromate in drinking water by ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection].

    PubMed

    Ying, Bo; Li, Shumin; Yue, Yinling; Xueli, E

    2006-05-01

    Bromate is a common disinfection by-product produced from the ozonation of source water containing bromide. An ion exchange chromatographic method with suppressed conductivity detection for the determination of trace bromate in drinking water was developed. The separation of the bromate in drinking water was achieved on a Metrosep A Supp 5 anion exchange column and a Metrosep A Supp 4/5 Guard column with a carbonate eluent. A new dual suppressed system, an MSM II chemical suppressor combined with a CO2 suppressor, was used to suppress the background conductivity, and to improve the detection limit of bromate. Ion chromatographic experiments were carried out by using a Metrosep A Supp 5 anion exchange column with a suppressed conductivity detector and an eluent of 3.2 mmoL/L Na2CO3-1.0 mmol/L NaHCO3 at a flow rate of 0.65 mL/min. This method had good linearity (r = 0.9999) in the range of 5-100 microg/L and high precision (relative standard deviation (RSD) < 4% ) for three concentration levels of bromate. The average recoveries of the spiked samples including tap water, pure water and mineral water were 96.1%-107%, and the detection limit for bromate was 0.50 microg/L. This method has a simple operation procedure, good separation results, high sensitivity and good repeatability. It can be used as a standard method for the determination of bromate in drinking water.

  17. The generation, detection and measurement of laser-induced carbon plasma ions and their implantation effects on brass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Shahbaz; Bashir, Shazia; Shahid Rafique, M.; Yousaf, Daniel; Ahmad, Riaz

    2016-05-01

    The generation, detection and measurement of laser-induced carbon plasma ions and their implantation effects on brass substrate have been investigated. Thomson parabola technique was employed to measure the energy and flux of carbon ions. The magnetic field of strength 80 mT was applied on the graphite plasma plume to provide an appropriate trajectory to the generated ions. The energy of carbon ions is 678 KeV for laser fluence of 5.1 J/cm2 which was kept constant for all exposures. The flux of ions varies from 32 × 1011 to 72 × 1014 ions/cm2 for varying numbers of laser pulses from 3000 to 12,000. In order to explore the ion irradiation effects on brass, four brass substrates were irradiated by carbon ions of different flux. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) are used to analyze the surface morphology and crystallographic structure of ion-implanted brass, respectively. SEM analysis reveals the formation and growth of nano-/micro-sized cavities, pores and pits for the various ion flux for varying numbers of laser pulses from 3000 to 12,000. By increasing ion flux by increasing the number of pulses up to 9000 shots, the dendritic structures initiate to grow along with cavities and pores. At the maximum ion flux for 12,000 shots, the unequiaxed dendritic structures become distinct and the distance between the dendrites is decreased, whereas cavities, pores and pits are completely finished. The XRD analysis reveals that a new phase of ZnC (0012) is formed in the brass substrate after ion implantation. Universal tensile testing machine and Vickers microhardness tester are used to explore the yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and microhardness of ion-implanted brass substrate. The mechanical properties monotonically increase by increasing the ion flux. Variations in mechanical properties are correlated with surface and structural modifications of brass.

  18. Plasma pencil atmospheric mass spectrometry detection of positive ions from micronutrients emitted from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Stein, M Jeanette; Lo, Edward; Castner, David G; Ratner, Buddy D

    2012-02-07

    Analysis and detection of micronutrients is important for the reduction of the global burden of malnutrition-related disease. A relatively new technique, plasma pencil atmospheric mass spectrometry (PPAMS) was applied in a comprehensive evaluation for rapid, simultaneous detection of the key micronutrients zinc, iron, folate, vitamin A, and iodine. PPAMS was performed through the coupling of a low-temperature plasma pencil to an atmospheric mass spectrometer. The effectiveness of the PPAMS system was demonstrated through the generation of characteristic mass spectra and tandem mass spectra on neat micronutrient powders suspended on double-sided tape. The analytical performance and ability to qualitatively separate out the nutrients from a complex biological solution and each other was then assessed through the application of PPAMS on a sample matrix of micronutrients in porcine plasma in which nutrient concentration is varied from high blood level concentrations (HBLCs) to low blood level concentrations (LBLCs). A multivariate analysis method, principal component analysis (PCA), was then used to qualitatively separate the fragments obtained by nutrient type. The resulting plots of PCA scores of the positive-ion spectra from each mixed sample showed excellent separation of HBLCs and LBLCs of single nutrients at the 95% confidence level (Wagner et al. Langmuir 2001, 17, 4649-4660). The associated plots of PCA loadings showed that key loadings could be attributed to the expected micronutrient fragments. The PPAMS technique was successfully demonstrated and compared with traditional MS techniques: time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Separation of the nutrients at concentrations relevant for human blood-based nutrient detection was possible by both ESI-MS and PPAMS. However, only PPAMS could detect the nutrients at physiological concentrations from porcine plasma. ToF-SIMS could detect the

  19. Negative ion mass spectrometry and the detection of carbonyls and HCN from clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Thomas G.; Kato, Shuji; Fall, Ray; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2000-12-01

    We have demonstrated that negative ion-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) can be used to distinguish several isomeric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted from wounded plants. Reaction chemistry with HO-, hydrogen/deuterium exchange patterns, and collision-induced dissociation spectra allow identification of the isomers. Laboratory studies of emissions from wounded clover using NI-CIMS show several previously detected VOCs, but also clearly demonstrate the emission of HCN. This compound is presumably formed by the decomposition of cyanogenic glycosides which also form aldehyde and ketone byproducts. These results suggest that NI-CIMS may be a valuable tool for investigating VOCs and HCN release from vegetation.

  20. Preparation of the porphyrin-functionalized cotton fiber for the chromogenic detection and efficient adsorption of Cd(2+) ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changkun; Liang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ji'an; Lei, Xiaobin; Zhao, Xinzhen

    2017-02-15

    In this study, a porphyrin functionalized cotton fiber was prepared and investigated for the visual detection and efficient adsorption of cadmium (Cd(2+)) ions in aqueous solutions. The pristine cotton fiber was first grafted with poly (3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt) (PSMP) via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), and subsequently immobilized with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methy-4-pyridinio)porphyrin tetra(p-toluenesulfonate) (TMPyP), to form the CPT (Cotton-PSMP-TMPyP) material. The CPT was characterized by SEM, FTIR, XPS and elemental analysis, and examined for the detection and adsorption of cadmium ions. The influencing factors such as pH and the initial cadmium ion concentrations on the adsorption performances were investigated. Results showed that the cadmium ion adsorption isotherm was best fitted with the Langmuir isotherm model, with the derived maximum adsorption capacity of 0.8638mmol/g. The thermodynamic study showed the endothermic nature of the adsorption process. In addition, the adsorption kinetics was fast with over 90% of the total cadmium ions adsorbed within 2min. Furthermore, the distinctive color response of the CPT to the cadmium ions in aqueous solutions was clearly displayed. A linear relationship between the light absorbance of CPT-Cd (CPT adsorbed with cadmium ions) and the initial concentrations of cadmium ions was successfully established, which could be used for the fast determination of the cadmium ion concentrations in aqueous solutions.

  1. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kyaw, Htet Htet; Boonruang, Sakoolkan E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th; Mohammed, Waleed S. E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-10-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as “Electric-Field assisted SPR system”. High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd{sup 2+}) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  2. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyaw, Htet Htet; Boonruang, Sakoolkan; Mohammed, Waleed S.; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-10-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as "Electric-Field assisted SPR system". High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd2+) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  3. Detection of microlesions induced by heavy ions using liposomes filled with fluorescent dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koniarek, J. P.; Thomas, J. L.; Vazquez, M.

    2004-01-01

    In cells irradiation by heavy ions has been hypothesized to produce microlesions, regions of local damage. In cell membranes this damage is thought to manifest itself in the form of holes. The primary evidence for microlesions comes from morphological studies of cell membranes, but this evidence is still controversial, especially since holes also have been observed in membranes of normal, nonirradiated, cells. However, it is possible that damage not associated with histologically discernable disruptions may still occur. In order to resolve this issue, we developed a system for detecting microlesions based on liposomes filled with fluorescent dye. We hypothesized that if microlesions form in these liposomes as the result of irradiation, then the entrapped dye will leak out into the surrounding medium in a measurable way. Polypropylene vials containing suspensions of vesicles composed of either dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, or a combination of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol were irradiated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory using 56Fe ions at 1 GeV/amu. In several cases we obtained a significant loss of the entrapped dye above the background level. Our results suggest that holes may form in liposomes as the result of heavy ion irradiation, and that these holes are large enough to allow leakage of cell internal contents that are at least as large as a 1 nm diameter calcein molecule. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitrogen- Doped Graphene Quantum Dots: "Turn-off" Fluorescent Probe for Detection of Ag(+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Tabaraki, Reza; Nateghi, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Highly luminescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) were prepared from glucose and ammonia as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The N-GQDs showed a strong emission at 458 nm with excitation at 360 nm. The N-GQDs exhibited analytical potential as sensing probes for silver ions determination. Factors affecting the fluorescence sensing of Ag(+) ions such as pH, N-GQDs concentration and incubation time were studied using Box-Behnken experimental design. The optimum conditions were determined as pH 7, N-GQDs concentration 1 mg/mL and time 60 min. It suggested that N-GQDs exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity toward Ag(+). The linear range of N-GQDs and the limit of detection (LOD) were 0.2-40 μM and 168 nM, respectively. The N-GQDs-based Ag(+) ions sensor was successfully applied to the determination of Ag(+) in tap water and real river water samples.

  5. Detection of griseofulvin in a marine strain of Penicillium waksmanii by ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petit, K E; Mondeguer, F; Roquebert, M F; Biard, J F; Pouchus, Y F

    2004-07-01

    A marine strain of Penicillium waksmanii Zaleski was isolated from a sample of seawater from shellfish-farming area in the Loire estuary (France). The in vitro marine culture showed an important antifungal activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation was used to purify the crude extract. Dereplication by electrospray-ion trap/mass spectrometry (ESI-IT/MS) afforded the identification of the antifungal compound, after a semi-purification consisting of two stages. A comparison of the ionic composition between the active and the non-active fractions allowed the detection of a monocharged ion at m/z 353 containing a chlorine atom, which could be attributed to the antifungal griseofulvin [C17H17ClO6+H]+. Multi-stage fragmentation (MSn) confirmed the identity of the m/z 353 ion of the antifungal fraction as griseofulvin. It is the first description of griseofulvin production by a strain of P. waksmanii and the first chemical study of a strain of this species isolated from marine temperate cold water.

  6. The sulfonium ion linkage in myeloperoxidase. Direct spectroscopic detection by isotopic labeling and effect of mutation.

    PubMed

    Kooter, I M; Moguilevsky, N; Bollen, A; van der Veen, L A; Otto, C; Dekker, H L; Wever, R

    1999-09-17

    The heme group of myeloperoxidase is covalently linked via two ester bonds to the protein and a unique sulfonium ion linkage involving Met(243). Mutation of Met(243) into Thr, Gln, and Val, which are the corresponding residues of eosinophil peroxidase, lactoperoxidase, and thyroid peroxidase, respectively, and into Cys was performed. The Soret band in the optical absorbance spectrum in the oxidized mutants is now found at approximately 411 nm. Both the pyridine hemochrome spectra and resonance Raman spectra of the mutants are affected by the mutation. In the Met(243) mutants the affinity for chloride has decreased 100-fold. All mutants have lost their chlorination activity, except for the M243T mutant, which still has 15% activity left. By Fourier transform infared difference spectroscopy it was possible to specifically detect the (13)CD(3)-labeled methionyl sulfonium ion linkage. We conclude that the sulfonium ion linkage serves two roles. First, it serves as an electron-withdrawing substituent via its positive charge, and, second, together with its neighboring residue Glu(242), it appears to be responsible for the lower symmetry of the heme group and distortion from the planar conformation normally seen in heme-containing proteins.

  7. Detection of heavy metal ions in drinking water using a high-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    PubMed

    Forzani, Erica S; Zhang, Haiqian; Chen, Wilfred; Tao, Nongjian

    2005-03-01

    We have built a high-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for heavy metal ion detection. The sensor surface is divided into a reference and sensing areas, and the difference in the SPR angles from the two areas is detected with a quadrant cell photodetector as a differential signal. In the presence of metal ions, the differential signal changes due to specific binding of the metal ions onto the sensing area coated with properly selected peptides, which provides an accurate real-time measurement and quantification of the metal ions. Selective detection of Cu2+ and Ni2+ in the ppt-ppb range was achieved by coating the sensing surface with peptides NH2-Gly-Gly-His-COOH and NH2-(His)6-COOH. Cu2+ in drinking water was tested using this sensor.

  8. A new isoindoline-based highly selective "turn-on" fluorescent chemodosimeter for detection of mercury ion.

    PubMed

    Zali-Boeini, Hassan; Zareh Jonaghani, Mohammad; Fadaei, Negar; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri

    2017-05-05

    A new isoindoline-based highly efficient turn-on fluorescent chemodosimeter S with a thioamide functionality as a binding site for selective detection of Hg(2+) ion has been developed. The chemodosimeter S showed an extreme selectivity for detection of Hg(2+) ion among various two and three-valent metal ions in acetonitrile/water (70/30, v/v). It was found that, in the presence of Hg(2+) ion the non-fluorescent chemodosimeter S was efficiently and rapidly desulfurized to the corresponding highly fluorescent amide 1. A good linear relationship was shown between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of Hg(2+) within the range of 0-1μM, with a detection limit of 2.03×10(-8)M.

  9. A novel single-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide probe for silver(I) ion detection in water, drugs, and food.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liujiao; Ji, Xu; Hu, Wei

    2014-05-28

    Due to the high toxicity of silver(I) ions, a method for the rapid, sensitive, and selective detection for silver(I) ions in water, pharmaceutical products, and food is of great importance. Herein, a novel single-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide (OND) probe based on cytosine-Ag(I)-cytosine coordination and the inherent fluorescence quenching ability of the G-quadruplex is designed to detect silver(I) ions. The formation of a hairpin structure in the OND-Ag(I) complex brings the hexachloro fluorescein (HEX) labeled at the 5'-end of the OND probe close to the G-quadruplex located at the 3'-end of the OND probe, leading to a fluorescence quenching due to photoinduced electron transfer between HEX and the G-quadruplex. Through this method, silver(I) ions can be detected quantitatively, the linear response range is from 1 to 100 nmol/L with a detection limit of 50 pmol/L, and no obvious interference occurs with other metal ions with a 10-fold concentration. This assay is simple, sensitive, and selective, and it can be used to detect silver(I) ions in actual water, drug, and food samples.

  10. Rapid, quantitative and sensitive immunochromatographic assay based on stripping voltammetric detection of a metal ion label

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Fang; Wang, Kaihua; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-10-10

    A novel, sensitive immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) which combines an immunochromatographic strip technique with an electrochemical detection technique is demonstrated. The IEB takes advantages of the speed and low-cost of the conventional immunochromatographic test kits and high-sensitivity of stripping voltammetry. Bismuth ions (Bi3+) have been coupled with the antibody through the bifunctional chelating agent diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). After immunoreactions, Bi3+ was released and quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry at a built-in single-use screen-printed electrode. As an example for the applications of such novel device, the detection of human chorionic gonadotronphin (HCG) in a specimen was performed. This biosensor provides a more user-friendly, rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive immunoassay for such analysis in specimens than currently available test kits.

  11. Label-free colorimetric detection of cadmium ions in rice samples using gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Zhang, Yi; Shao, Huawu; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Xuefei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-09-02

    A simple and label-free colorimetric method for cadmium ions (Cd(2+)) detection using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is reported. The unmodified AuNPs easily aggregate in a high concentration of NaCl solution, but the presence of glutathione (GSH) can prevent the salt-induced aggregation of AuNPs. When Cd(2+) is added to the stable mixture of AuNPs, GSH, and NaCl, Cd(2+) can coordinate with 4× GSH as a spherical shaped complex, which decreases the amount of free GSH on the surface of gold nanoparticles to weaken the stability of AuNPs, and AuNPs will easily aggregate in high-salt conditions. On the basis of the mechanism, we design a simple, label-free colorimetric method using AuNPs accompanied by GSH in a high-salt environment to detect Cd(2+) in water and digested rice samples.

  12. Explosive ordnance detection in land and water environments with solid phase extraction/ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, William B.; Phelan, James M.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Steven; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    1999-08-01

    The qualitative and quantitative determination of nitroaromatic compounds such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) in water and soil has applications to environmental remediation and the detection of buried military ordnance. Recent results of laboratory and field test have shown that trace level concentrations of these compounds can be detected in water, soil, and solid gas samples taken from the vicinity of submerged or buried ordnance using specialized sampling and signal enhancement techniques. Solid phase micro-extraction methods have been combined with Ion Mobility Spectroscopy to provide rapid, sub-parts-per-billion analysis of these compounds. In this paper, we will describe the gas. These sampling systems, when combined with field-portable IMS, are being developed as a means of classifying buried or submerged objects as explosive ordnance.

  13. Ion generation and CPC detection efficiency studies in sub 3-nm size range

    SciTech Connect

    Kangasluoma, J.; Junninen, H.; Sipilae, M.; Kulmala, M.; Petaejae, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mikkilae, J.; Vanhanen, J.; Attoui, M.; Worsnop, D.

    2013-05-24

    We studied the chemical composition of commonly used condensation particle counter calibration ions with a mass spectrometer and found that in our calibration setup the negatively charged ammonium sulphate, sodium chloride and tungsten oxide are the least contaminated whereas silver on both positive and negative and the three mentioned earlier in positive mode are contaminated with organics. We report cut-off diameters for Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6 and 1.6-1.8 nm for negative sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate, tungsten oxide, silver and positive organics, respectively. To study the effect of sample relative humidity on detection efficiency of the PSM we used different humidities in the differential mobility analyzer sheath flow and found that with increasing relative humidity also the detection efficiency of the PSM increases.

  14. Use of a YAP:Ce matrix coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier for high resolution positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Del Guerra, A.; Zavattini, G. |; Notaristefani, F. de |; Di Domenico, G. |; Giganti, M.; Piffanelli, A.; Pani, R.; Turra, A.

    1996-06-01

    A new scintillation detector system has been designed for application in high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The detector is a bundle of small YAlO{sub 3}:Ce (YAP) crystals closely packed (0.2 x 0.2 x 3.0 cm{sup 3}), coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The preliminary results obtained for spatial resolution, time resolution, energy resolution and efficiency of two such detectors working in coincidence are presented. These are 1.2 mm for the FWHM spatial resolution, 2.0 ns for the FWHM time resolution and 20% for the FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. The measured efficiency is (44 {+-} 3)% with a 150 keV threshold and (20 {+-} 2)% with a 300 keV threshold.

  15. Evaluation of the x-ray response of a position-sensitive microstrip detector with an integrated readout chip

    SciTech Connect

    Rossington, C.; Jaklevic, J.; Haber, C.; Spieler, H. ); Reid, J. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-08-01

    The performance of an SVX silicon microstrip detector and its compatible integrated readout chip have been evaluated in response to Rh K{alpha} x-rays (average energy 20.5 keV). The energy and spatial discrimination capabilities, efficient data management and fast readout rates make it an attractive alternative to the CCD and PDA detectors now being offered for x-ray position sensitive diffraction and EXAFS work. The SVX system was designed for high energy physics applications and thus further development of the existing system is required to optimize it for use in practical x-ray experiments. For optimum energy resolution the system noise must be decreased to its previously demonstrated low levels of 2 keV FWHM at 60 keV or less, and the data handling rate of the computer must be increased. New readout chips are now available that offer the potential of better performance. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  17. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Birkl, Gerhard; Andelkovic, Zoran; Vogel, Manuel; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan

    2015-11-15

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles’ beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar{sup 13+}) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  18. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar(13+)) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  19. Flow Chronopotentiometry with Ion-Selective Membranes for Cation, Anion, and Polyion Detection.

    PubMed

    Ghahraman Afshar, Majid; Crespo, Gastón A; Bakker, Eric

    2016-04-05

    We report here on the development of a chronopotentiometric readout for ion-selective electrodes that allows one to record transition times in continuous flow conditions without the necessity to stop the flow. A sample plug of 150 μL is injected into the carrier solution (0.5 mM NaCl) and subsequently transported to the detection cell (∼20 μL) at moderate flow rates (∼0.5 mL min(-1)), where a short current pulse (5s) is applied between the ionophore-based working electrode and a biocompatible and nonpolarizable Donnan exclusion anion-exchanger membrane reference/counter electrode. Flow conditions bear an influence on the thickness of the aqueous diffusion layer and result in a shift of the chronopotentiometric transition time with respect to stopped flow. Two models based on rotating disk electrodes and flow chronopotentiometry at metal-based electrodes were used to corroborate the data. The method was successfully applied to the determination of calcium, chloride, alkalinity, acidity, and protamine with a range of ion-selective membranes. Because of the limiting exposure time of ca. 20 s of the membranes with the sample, this approach is demonstrated to be useful for the detection of protamine in the therapeutic range of undiluted human blood.

  20. Facile route to highly photoluminescent carbon nanodots for ion detection, pH sensors and bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chen; Sun, Yupeng; Wang, Jing; Lu, Yun

    2014-07-01

    Carbon nanodots (CDs) of uniform size were prepared simply by the hydrothermal decomposition of folic acid (FA) precursor at various reaction temperatures. The CDs formed via dehydration of FA at 260 °C contributed the strongest photoluminescence (PL) signal and the highest quantum yield at about 68%, without assistance of any passivation agent. The effects of preparation conditions on PL behavior of CDs have been investigated in detail, and the quantum yield of the CDs was found to be associated strongly with sample crystallinity. Moreover, because the obtained CDs also exhibited high luminescence stability, abundant surface functional groups and good biocompatibility, there are many promising applications in printing ink, ion detection, pH sensors and cell imaging.Carbon nanodots (CDs) of uniform size were prepared simply by the hydrothermal decomposition of folic acid (FA) precursor at various reaction temperatures. The CDs formed via dehydration of FA at 260 °C contributed the strongest photoluminescence (PL) signal and the highest quantum yield at about 68%, without assistance of any passivation agent. The effects of preparation conditions on PL behavior of CDs have been investigated in detail, and the quantum yield of the CDs was found to be associated strongly with sample crystallinity. Moreover, because the obtained CDs also exhibited high luminescence stability, abundant surface functional groups and good biocompatibility, there are many promising applications in printing ink, ion detection, pH sensors and cell imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02154a

  1. Improving Indel Detection Specificity of the Ion Torrent PGM Benchtop Sequencer

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Zhen Xuan; Chan, Maurice; Yap, Yoon Sim; Ang, Peter; Rozen, Steve; Lee, Ann Siew Gek

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of benchtop sequencers has made clinical genetic testing using next-generation sequencing more feasible. Ion Torrent's PGMTM is one such benchtop sequencer that shows clinical promise in detecting single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and microindel variations (indels). However, the large number of false positive indels caused by the high frequency of homopolymer sequencing errors has impeded PGMTM's usage for clinical genetic testing. An extensive analysis of PGMTM data from the sequencing reads of the well-characterized genome of the Escherichia coli DH10B strain and sequences of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes from six germline samples was done. Three commonly used variant detection tools, SAMtools, Dindel, and GATK's Unified Genotyper, all had substantial false positive rates for indels. By incorporating filters on two major measures we could dramatically improve false positive rates without sacrificing sensitivity. The two measures were: B-Allele Frequency (BAF) and VARiation of the Width of gaps and inserts (VARW) per indel position. A BAF threshold applied to indels detected by UnifiedGenotyper removed ∼99% of the indel errors detected in both the DH10B and BRCA sequences. The optimum BAF threshold for BRCA sequences was determined by requiring 100% detection sensitivity and minimum false discovery rate, using variants detected from Sanger sequencing as reference. This resulted in 15 indel errors remaining, of which 7 indel errors were removed by selecting a VARW threshold of zero. VARW specific errors increased in frequency with higher read depth in the BRCA datasets, suggesting that homopolymer-associated indel errors cannot be reduced by increasing the depth of coverage. Thus, using a VARW threshold is likely to be important in reducing indel errors from data with higher coverage. In conclusion, BAF and VARW thresholds provide simple and effective filtering criteria that can improve the specificity of indel detection in PGMTM data without

  2. Determination of Inorganic Cations and Anions in Chitooligosaccharides by Ion Chromatography with Conductivity Detection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lidong; Li, Xiuhuan; Fan, Li; Zheng, Li; Wu, Miaomiao; Zhang, Shanxue; Huang, Qiliang

    2017-02-22

    Chitooligosaccharides (COSs) are a promising drug candidate and food ingredient because they are innately biocompatible, non-toxic, and non-allergenic to living tissues. Therefore, the impurities in COSs must be clearly elucidated and precisely determined. As for COSs, most analytical methods focus on the determination of the average degrees of polymerization (DPs) and deacetylation (DD), as well as separation and analysis of the single COSs with different DPs. However, little is known about the concentrations of inorganic cations and anions in COSs. In the present study, an efficient and sensitive ion chromatography coupled with conductivity detection (IC-CD) for the determination of inorganic cations Na⁺, NH₄⁺, K⁺, Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and chloride, acetate and lactate anions was developed. Detection limits were 0.01-0.05 μM for cations and 0.5-0.6 μM for anions. The linear range was 0.001-0.8 mM. The optimized analysis was carried out on IonPac CS12A and IonPac AS12A analytical column for cations and anions, respectively, using isocratic elution with 20 mM methanesulfonic acid and 4 mM sodium hydroxide aqueous solution as the mobile phase at a 1.0 mL/min flow rate. Quality parameters, including precision and accuracy, were fully validated and found to be satisfactory. The fully validated IC-CD method was readily applied for the quantification of various cations and anions in commercial COS technical concentrate.

  3. Determination of Inorganic Cations and Anions in Chitooligosaccharides by Ion Chromatography with Conductivity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lidong; Li, Xiuhuan; Fan, Li; Zheng, Li; Wu, Miaomiao; Zhang, Shanxue; Huang, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Chitooligosaccharides (COSs) are a promising drug candidate and food ingredient because they are innately biocompatible, non-toxic, and non-allergenic to living tissues. Therefore, the impurities in COSs must be clearly elucidated and precisely determined. As for COSs, most analytical methods focus on the determination of the average degrees of polymerization (DPs) and deacetylation (DD), as well as separation and analysis of the single COSs with different DPs. However, little is known about the concentrations of inorganic cations and anions in COSs. In the present study, an efficient and sensitive ion chromatography coupled with conductivity detection (IC-CD) for the determination of inorganic cations Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and chloride, acetate and lactate anions was developed. Detection limits were 0.01–0.05 μM for cations and 0.5–0.6 μM for anions. The linear range was 0.001–0.8 mM. The optimized analysis was carried out on IonPac CS12A and IonPac AS12A analytical column for cations and anions, respectively, using isocratic elution with 20 mM methanesulfonic acid and 4 mM sodium hydroxide aqueous solution as the mobile phase at a 1.0 mL/min flow rate. Quality parameters, including precision and accuracy, were fully validated and found to be satisfactory. The fully validated IC-CD method was readily applied for the quantification of various cations and anions in commercial COS technical concentrate. PMID:28241416

  4. Nonspecific detection of lead ions in water using a simple integrated optical polarimetric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dan-feng; Li, Jinyang; Qi, Zhi-mei

    2013-06-01

    Real-time detection of heavy metal ions in water was implemented by using a composite optical waveguide (COWG) based polarimetric interferometer. The COWG was made by local deposition of a tapered nanometric layer of high-index materials onto a single-mode slab glass waveguide, and it is a low-cost robust waveguide with a locally large modal birefringence. The COWG-based polarimetric interferometer operates with a single incident laser beam and uses the transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes as the sensing and reference beams, respectively, and it can easily detect 0.1 ppm lead(II) ions in water via nonspecific adsorption on the tapered layer of TiO2. The excellent linearity was obtained between the lead(II) concentration and the ratio of concentration to the phase-difference change (Δϕ), suggesting that adsorption of lead(II) ions on the TiO2 film follows the Langmuir isotherm model. The saturation adsorption leads to Δϕmax = 7.485π. By use of the eigenvalue equations for a homogeneous waveguide to fit the measured refractive-index (RI) sensitivity of the interferometer, the equivalent thickness of Teq = 26.05 nm for the tapered TiO2 layer used was achieved. With Teq = 26.05 nm and Δϕmax = 7.485π and the thickness of 0.264 nm for the lead(II) adlayer, the adlayer RI was derived to be nad ≈ 1.945 at the maximum coverage.

  5. Fluorescence detection of Fe(3+) ions in aqueous solution and living cells based on a high selectivity and sensitivity chemosensor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongmin; Gao, Xue; Shi, Yu; Sayyadi, Nima; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Qi; Meng, Qingtao; Zhang, Run

    2015-01-01

    Although ferric ion (Fe(3+)) performs critical roles in diverse biochemical processes in living systems, its physiological and pathophysiological functions have not been fully explored due to the lack of methods for quantification of Fe(3+) ions in biological system. In this work, a highly sensitive and selective fluorescence chemosensor, L, was developed for the detection of Fe(3+) ions in aqueous solution and in living cells. L was facile synthesized by one step reaction and well characterized by NMR, API-ES, FT-IR, and elementary analysis. The prepared chemosensor displayed excellent selectivity for Fe(3+) ions detection over a wide range of tested metal ions. In the present of Fe(3+) ions, the strong green fluorescence of L was substantially quenched. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the complexation was confirmed by a Job's plot. The association constant (Ka) of L with Fe(3+) was evaluated using the Benesi-Hildebrand method and was found to be 1.36×10(4) M(-1). The MTT assay determined that L exhibits low cytotoxicity toward living cells. Confocal imaging and flow cytometry studies showed that L is readily interiorized by MDA-MB-231 cells through an energy-dependent pathway and could be used to detect of Fe(3+) ions in living cells.

  6. A novel and simple fluorescence probe for detecting main group magnesium ion in HeLa cells and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tingting; Sun, Ping; Hu, Yijie; Ji, Yinggang; Zhou, Hongping; Zhang, Baowei; Tian, Yupeng; Wu, Jieying

    2016-12-15

    A simple-molecule fluorescence probe L has been designed, synthesized and characterized, which shows high selectivity and sensitivity for the main group magnesium ion through fluorescence "turn-on" response in ethanol solution, and no interference from calcium ion in particular. Detection limit of probe L is 1.47×10(-6) M and the rapid response could reach about 15-20s. The recognition mechanism has been established by fluorescence spectra, (1)H NMR study. Moreover, probe L presents a great photostability, low toxicity and cellular permeability, then we have carried out fluorescent bio-imaging of the probe L for magnesium ions in HeLa cells, which showed that probe L could be utilized to detect the intracellular magnesium ion. Furthermore, it is successfully used as a magnesium ion developer in plant tissues, which shows that it not only can be well tracking the transport of magnesium ion but also make a corresponding fluorescence response to different concentrations magnesium ion. These results would make this probe a great potential application for detecting Mg(2+) in biological system.

  7. Transmission measurement based on STM observation to detect the penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Sixue; Du, Guanhua; Zhao, Weijiang

    2003-01-01

    The penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples was detected with a new transmission measurement. In the measurement, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) pieces were placed behind the botanic samples with certain thickness. During the irradiation of heavy ions with energy of tens of keV, the energetic particles transmitted from those samples were received by the HOPG pieces. After irradiation, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was applied to observe protrusion-like damage induced by these transmitted ions on the surface of the HOPG. The statistical average number density of protrusions and the minimum transmission rate of the low-energy heavy ions can be obtained. The detection efficiency of the new method for low-energy heavy ions was about 0.1-1 and the background in the measurement can be reduced to as low as 1.0 x 10(8) protrusions/cm2. With this method, the penetration depth of the energetic particles was detected to be no less than 60 micrometers in kidney bean slices when the slices were irradiated by 100 keVAr+ ion at the fluence of 5 x 10(16) ions/cm2. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Highly sensitive and selective detection of beryllium ions using a microcantilever modified with benzo-9-crown-3 doped hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rong-Peng; Chen, Bin; Ji, Hai-Feng; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho

    2012-03-07

    A microcantilever sensor modified by chitosan/gelatin hydrogels that are doped with benzo-9-crown-3 has been developed for the sensitive and selective detection of beryllium ions in an aqueous solution. The microcantilever undergoes bending deflection upon exposure to Be(2+) due to selective absorption of Be(2+) in the hydrogel. The detection limit is 10(-11) M. Other metal ions, such as Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), have a marginal effect on the deflection of the microcantilever. The mechanism of the bending is discussed and the results showed that the microcantilever may be used for in situ detection of beryllium.

  9. Characterization of a sub-assembly of 3D position sensitive cadmium zinc telluride detectors and electronics from a sub-millimeter resolution PET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Gu, Yi; Reynolds, Paul D.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) offers key advantages for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), including high spatial and energy resolution and simple metal deposition for fabrication of very small pixel arrays. Previous studies have investigated the intrinsic spatial, energy, and timing resolution of an individual sub-millimeter resolution CZT detector. In this work we present the first characterization results of a system of these detectors. The 3D position sensitive dual-CZT detector module and readout electronics developed in our lab was scaled up to complete a significant portion of the final PET system. This sub-system was configured as two opposing detection panels containing a total of twelve 40~\\text{mm}× 40~\\text{mm}× 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals for proof of concept. System-level characterization studies, including optimizing the trigger threshold of each channel’s comparators, were performed. 68Ge and 137Cs radioactive isotopes were used to characterize the energy resolution of all 468 anode channels in the sub-system. The mean measured global 511 keV photopeak energy resolution over all anodes was found to be 7.35+/- 1.75 % FWHM after correction for photon interaction depth-dependent signal variation. The measured global time resolution was 37 ns FWHM, a parameter to be further optimized, and the intrinsic spatial resolution was 0.76 mm FWHM.

  10. Design and development of a novel nuclear magnetic resonance detection for the gas phase ions by magnetic resonance acceleration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuke, K.; Tona, M.; Fujihara, A.; Sakurai, M.; Ishikawa, H.

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique is a well-established powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of a wide range of materials. However, presently, NMR applications are essentially limited to materials in the condensed phase. Although magnetic resonance was originally demonstrated in gas phase molecular beam experiments, no application to gas phase molecular ions has yet been demonstrated. Here, we present a novel principle of NMR detection for gas phase ions based on a "magnetic resonance acceleration" technique and describe the design and construction of an apparatus which we are developing. We also present an experimental technique and some results on the formation and manipulation of cold ion packets in a strong magnetic field, which are the key innovations to detect NMR signal using the present method. We expect this novel method to lead new realm for the study of mass-selected gas-phase ions with interesting applications in both fundamental and applied sciences.

  11. Highly sensitive and selective detection of Al(III) ions in aqueous buffered solution with fluorescent peptide-based sensor.

    PubMed

    In, Byunggyu; Hwang, Gi Won; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-09-15

    A fluorescent sensor based on a tripeptide (SerGluGlu) with a dansyl fluorophore detected selectively Al(III) among 16 metal ions in aqueous buffered solutions without any organic cosolvent. The peptide-based sensor showed a highly sensitive turn on response to aluminium ion with high binding affinity (1.84×10(4)M(-1)) in aqueous buffered solutions. The detection limit (230nM, 5.98ppb) of the peptide-based sensor was much lower than the maximum allowable level (7.41μM) of aluminium ions in drinking water demanded by EPA. The binding mode of the peptide sensor with aluminium ions was characterized using ESI mass spectrometry, NMR titration, and pH titration experiments.

  12. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world’s attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg2+ ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species. PMID:27483277

  13. Metal ion-mobilizing additives for comprehensive detection of femtomole amounts of phosphopeptides by reversed phase LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Joerg; Zinn, Nico; Haaf, Erik; Boehm, Martin E; Winter, Dominic; Schlosser, Andreas; Lehmann, Wolf D

    2011-07-01

    It is hypothesized that metal ion-mediated adsorption of phosphorylated peptides on stationary phases of LC-columns is the major cause for their frequently observed poor detection efficiency in LC-MS. To study this phenomenon in more detail, sample solutions spiked with metal ion-mobilizing additives were analyzed by reversed phase μLC-ICP-MS or nanoLC-ESI-MS. Using μLC-ICP-MS, metal ions were analyzed directly as atomic ions. Using electrospray ionization, either metal ion chelates or phosphopeptide standard mixtures injected in subpicomole amounts were analyzed. Deferoxamine, imidazole, ascorbate, citrate, EDTA, and the tetrapeptide pSpSpSpS were tested as sample additives for the interlinked purposes of metal ion-mobilization and improvement of phosphopeptide recovery. Iron probably represents the major metal ion contamination of reversed phase columns. Based on the certified iron level in LC-grade solvents, a daily metal ion load of >10 pmol was estimated for typical nanoLC flow rates. In addition, phosphopeptide fractions from IMAC columns were identified as source for metal ion contamination of the LC column, as demonstrated for Ga(3+)-IMAC. The three metal ion-chelating additives, EDTA, citrate and pSpSpSpS, were found to perform best for improving the LC recovery of multiply phosphorylated peptides injected at subpicomole amounts. The benefits of metal ion-mobilizing LC (mimLC) characterized by metal ion complexing sample additives is demonstrated for three different instrumental setups comprising (a) a nanoUPLC-system with direct injection on the analytical column, (b) a nanoLC system with inclusion of a trapping column, and (c) the use of a HPLC-Chip system with integrated trapping and analytical column.

  14. Development of Voltammetric Double-Polymer-Modified Electrodes for Nanomolar Ion Detection for Environmental and Biological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yushin

    Qualitative and quantitative electrochemical methods for trace ion analysis of organic and inorganic species with environmental and biological attention have been developed and reported during past decades. The development of fast and accurate electrochemical methods is critical for field applications with various blocking contaminants. Voltammetric method is attractive not only to analyze selective ion species due to its characteristic based on ion lipophilicity, but also to lower the limit of detection by combining with stripping analysis. In my PhD work, I have developed and studied a highly selective and sensitive electrochemical method that can be used to characterize fundamental transport dynamics and to develop electrochemical sensors at liquid/liquid interfaces based on electrochemically-controlled ion transfer and recognition. The understanding of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the voltammetric ion transfer through polymer-modified ion-selective electrodes leads to realize the highly selective and sensitive analytical method. The ultrathin polymer membrane is used to maximize a current response by complete exhaustion of preconcentrated ions. Therefore, nanomolar detection is achieved and confirmed by a thermodynamic mechanism that controls the detection limit. It was also demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that more lipophilic ionic species gives a significantly lower detection limit. The voltammetric method was expanded into inexpensive and disposable applications based on pencil lead modified with the thin polymer membrane. In the other hand, micropipet/nanopipet voltammetry as an artificial cell membrane was used to study the interface between two immiscible solutions for environmental and biomedical applications. It is very useful to get quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic information by studying numerical simulations of ion transfer and diffusion. Molecular recognition and transport of heparin and low

  15. Proton-sensing transistor systems for detecting ion leakage from plasma membranes under chemical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Goda, Tatsuro; Schaffhauser, Daniel F; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Matsumoto, Akira; Miyahara, Yuji

    2017-03-01

    The membrane integrity of live cells is routinely evaluated for cytotoxicity induced by chemical or physical stimuli. Recent progress in bioengineering means that high-quality toxicity validation is required. Here, we report a pH-sensitive transistor system developed for the continuous monitoring of ion leakage from cell membranes upon challenge by toxic compounds. Temporal changes in pH were generated with high reproducibility via periodic flushing of HepG2 cells on a gate insulator of a proton-sensitive field-effect transistor with isotonic buffer solutions with/without NH4Cl. The pH transients at the point of NH4Cl addition/withdrawal originated from the free permeation of NH3 across the semi-permeable plasma membranes, and the proton sponge effect produced by the ammonia equilibrium. Irreversible attenuation of the pH transient was observed when the cells were subjected to a membrane-toxic reagent. Experiments and simulations proved that the decrease in the pH transient was proportional to the area of the ion-permeable pores on the damaged plasma membranes. The pH signal was correlated with the degree of hemolysis produced by the model reagents. The pH assay was sensitive to the formation of molecularly sized pores that were otherwise not measurable via detection of the leakage of hemoglobin, because the hydrodynamic radius of hemoglobin was greater than 3.1nm in the hemolysis assay. The pH transient was not disturbed by inherent ion-transporter activity. The ISFET assay was applied to a wide variety of cell types. The system presented here is fast, sensitive, practical and scalable, and will be useful for validating cytotoxins and nanomaterials.

  16. Co-localization of the Ganglioside GM1 and Cholesterol Detected by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Mónica M.; Liu, Zhao; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas; Kumar, Krishna; Boxer, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of the lateral organization of components in biological membranes and the evolution of this arrangement in response to external triggers remains a major challenge. The concept of lipid rafts is widely invoked, however, direct evidence of the existence of these ephemeral entities remains elusive. We report here the use of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) to image the cholesterol-dependent cohesive phase separation of the ganglioside GM1 into nano and micro-scale assemblies in a canonical lipid raft composition of lipids. This assembly of domains was interrogated in a model membrane system composed of palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), cholesterol, and an unsaturated lipid (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, DOPC). Orthogonal isotopic labeling of every lipid bilayer component and monofluorination of GM1 allowed generation of molecule specific images using a NanoSIMS. Simultaneous detection of six different ion species in SIMS, including secondary electrons, was used to generate ion ratio images whose signal intensity values could be correlated to composition through the use of calibration curves from standard samples. Images of this system provide the first direct, molecule specific, visual evidence for the co-localization of cholesterol and GM1 in supported lipid bilayers and further indicate the presence of three compositionally distinct phases: (1) the interdomain region; (2) micrometer-scale domains (d>3 μm); and, (3) nanometer-scale domains (d=100 nm − 1 μm) localized within the micrometer-scale domains and the interdomain region. PSM-rich, nanometer-scale domains prefer to partition within the more ordered, cholesterol-rich/DOPC-poor/GM1-rich micrometer-scale phase, while GM1-rich, nanometer-scale domains prefer to partition within the surrounding, disordered, cholesterol-poor/PSM-rich/DOPC-rich interdomain phase. PMID:23514537

  17. Nanomaterial-based optical sensors for sensitive detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shasha; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-07-01

    Nanometerial-based optical nanoprobes have been extensively developed because of their high sensitivity, good specificity, and potential for easy quantification of species in chemical and biological analysis. With the development of nanotechnology, various kinds of nanomaterials with novel optical properties have heen generated, laying the foundation of optical nanoprobes. By further integrating receptors (chemical ligand, aptamer, molecular imprinting polymer, etc.), the information of binding specific targets will transform into analytically optical signals by employing different detection techniques including colorimetry/UV-Vis spectra, fluorometry and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this presentation, firstly, we introduced a simple, rapid and ultrasensitive SERS nanosensor for mercury ion (Hg2+) detection based on the 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPY) functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the presence of spermine; then, a novel colorimetric nanosensor for mercury species was developed for the first time due to the analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the assistance of a thiol-containing ligand of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC); finally, the sensitive and selective recognition and detection of trypsin was realized in a SERS strategy by using anti-aggregation of 4-MPY-functionalized AgNPs on the basis of the interaction between protamine and trypsin.

  18. A plasmonic ELISA for the naked-eye detection of chromium ions in water samples.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cuize; Yu, Shiting; Li, Xiuqing; Wu, Ze; Liang, Jiajie; Fu, Qiangqiang; Xiao, Wei; Jiang, Tianjiu; Tang, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Here, we describe the development of a triangular silver nanoprism (AgNPR) etching-based plasmonic ELISA for the colorimetric determination of Cr(III) levels in environmental water samples. This involved the creation of a novel signal generation system (substrate reaction solution) for a competitive ELISA in which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is used to etch triangular AgNPRs, inducing a change in color. This is achieved by controlling the H2O2 concentration that remains after degradation by catalase, which is conjugated to the secondary antibody of the ELISA. Because the degree of color change and the shift in the absorption spectrum of the substrate reaction solution are closely correlated with the Cr(III) concentration, this plasmonic ELISA can be used not only for the quantification of Cr(III) concentrations ranging from 3.13 to 50 ng/mL, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 3.13 ng/mL, but also for the visual detection (indicated by a color change from blue to mauve) of Cr(III) with a sensitivity of 6.25 ng/mL by the naked eye. Therefore, the plasmonic ELISA developed in this work represents a new strategy for heavy metal ion detection and has high potential applicability in resource-constrained areas. Graphical Abstract Schematic diagram of triangular silver nanoprism etching-based signal generation system.

  19. Detection and identification of sugar alcohol sweeteners by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Browne, Christopher A; Forbes, Thomas P; Sisco, Edward

    2016-07-28

    The rapid and sensitive detection of sugar alcohol sweeteners was demonstrated using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). IMS provides a valuable alternative in sensitivity, cost, and analysis speed between the lengthy gold-standard liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique and rapid point-of-measurement disposable colorimetric sensors, for the Food and Nutrition industry's quality control and other "foodomics" area needs. The IMS response, characteristic signatures, and limits of detection for erythritol, pentaerythritol, xylitol, inositol, sorbitol, mannitol, and maltitol were evaluated using precise inkjet printed samples. IMS system parameters including desorption temperature, scan time, and swipe substrate material were examined and optimized, demonstrating a strong dependence on the physicochemical properties of the respective sugar alcohol. The desorption characteristics of each compound were found to dominate the system response and overall sensitivity. Sugar alcohol components of commercial products - chewing gum and a sweetener packet - were detected and identified using IMS. IMS is demonstrated to be an advantageous field deployable instrument, easily operated by non-technical personnel, and enabling sensitive point-of-measurement quality assurance for sugar alcohols.

  20. Direct determination of hydrogen cyanide in cigarette mainstream smoke by ion chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Wei; Xu, Ying-Bo; Wang, Cheng-Hui; Chen, Kai-Bo; Tong, Hong-Wu; Liu, Shao-Min

    2011-02-18

    The determination of hydrogen cyanide in cigarette mainstream smoke has been achieved by ion chromatography (IC) with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD). The proposed method of totally trapping whole cigarette mainstream smoke by Cambridge filters, which are treated with sodium hydroxide/ethanol solution, possesses the advantage of fast analysis time over the widespread used solution absorption method. The possible co-existing interferents are evaluated under the optimized detection conditions and excellent recoveries of cyanide are obtained. The cyanide content of absorption solution can be directly determined by the optimized IC-PAD method without any pretreatments. The linear range is 0.0147-2.45 μg/mL with R² value of 0.9997. The limit of the detection is 3 μg/L for a 25 μL injection loop. The overall relative standard deviation of the method is less than 5.20% and the recovery range from 94.3% to 101.0%. The results obtained from the developed method are in good agreement with that of continuous flow analyzer (CFA) method.

  1. Ion chromatography of azide in pharmaceutical protein samples with high chloride concentration using suppressed conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Vinković, Kristinka; Drevenkar, Vlasta

    2008-03-15

    Methods based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection of 4-nitrobenzoyl- or 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl azide derivatives lack in accuracy and stability of derivatives to be applied for azide determination in pharmaceutical protein samples with high sodium chloride concentrations. This paper describes a sensitive and selective ion chromatographic method, with simple sample preparation and suppressed conductivity detection, developed for trace determination of azide in protein samples containing sodium chloride in concentrations as high as 11.6 g L(-1). Anion exchange stationary phase with quaternary alkyl amine functional groups and gradient elution with sodium hydroxide enabled good resolution of anions with similar retention times: azide, bromide and nitrate, as well as chloride whose retention time was shorter than azide's. Anions with high affinity to stationary phase (phosphate and citrate) were also eluted within acceptable analysis time of 32 min. The stability of sample solutions and the method selectivity, accuracy, precision and sensitivity satisfied the validation criteria of international organizations competent for pharmaceutical industry. The detection and quantitation limit ranges of sodium azide in protein samples were 0.007-0.02 mg L(-1) and 0.02-0.06 mg L(-1), respectively. Both limits increased with the concentration of sodium chloride.

  2. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder. Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Lamarche, Brian L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-09-05

    We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

  3. Tuning Piezo ion channels to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Kate; Herget, Regina; Lapatsina, Liudmila; Ngo, Ha-Duong; Lewin, Gary R.

    2014-03-01

    In sensory neurons, mechanotransduction is sensitive, fast and requires mechanosensitive ion channels. Here we develop a new method to directly monitor mechanotransduction at defined regions of the cell-substrate interface. We show that molecular-scale (~13 nm) displacements are sufficient to gate mechanosensitive currents in mouse touch receptors. Using neurons from knockout mice, we show that displacement thresholds increase by one order of magnitude in the absence of stomatin-like protein 3 (STOML3). Piezo1 is the founding member of a class of mammalian stretch-activated ion channels, and we show that STOML3, but not other stomatin-domain proteins, brings the activation threshold for Piezo1 and Piezo2 currents down to ~10 nm. Structure-function experiments localize the Piezo modulatory activity of STOML3 to the stomatin domain, and higher-order scaffolds are a prerequisite for function. STOML3 is the first potent modulator of Piezo channels that tunes the sensitivity of mechanically gated channels to detect molecular-scale stimuli relevant for fine touch.

  4. Self-assembly of core-satellite gold nanoparticles for colorimetric detection of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ziqing; Wang, Hongbin; Vongsvivut, Jitraporn; Li, Runqing; Glushenkov, Alexey M; He, Jin; Chen, Ying; Barrow, Colin J; Yang, Wenrong

    2013-11-25

    Molecule-coated nanoparticles are hybrid materials which can be engineered with novel properties. The molecular coating of metal nanoparticles can provide chemical functionality, enabling assembly of the nanoparticles that are important for applications, such as biosensing devices. Herein, we report a new self-assembly of core-satellite gold nanoparticles linked by a simple amino acid l-Cysteine for biosensing of Cu(2+). The plasmonic properties of core-satellite nano-assemblies were investigated, a new red shifted absorbance peak from about 600 to 800 nm was found, with specific wavelength depending on ratios with assembly of large and small gold nanoparticles. The spectral features obtained using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) provided strong evidence for the assembly of the Cu(2+) ions to the L-Cysteine molecules leading to the successful formation of the core-satellite Cu(l-Cysteine) complex on the gold surfaces. In addition, a linear relationship between the concentration of mediating Cu(2+) and absorbance of self-assembled gold nanoparticles (GNPs) at 680 nm was obtained. These results strongly address the potential strategy for applying the functionalized GNPs as novel biosensing tools in trace detections of certain metal ions.

  5. A new peptidyl fluorescent chemosensors for the selective detection of mercury ions based on tetrapeptide.

    PubMed

    Thirupathi, Ponnaboina; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2013-12-15

    A novel peptidyl chemosensor (PySO2-His-Gly-Gly-Lys(PySO2)-NH2, 1) was synthesized by incorporation of two pyrene (Py) fluorophores into the tetrapeptide using sulfonamide group. Compound 1 exhibited selective fluorescence response towards Hg(II) over the other metal ions in aqueous buffered solutions. Furthermore, 1 with the potent binding affinity (Kd=120 nM) for Hg(II) detected Hg(II) without interference of other metal ions such as Ag(I), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II). The binding mode of 1 with Hg(II) was investigated by UV absorbance spectroscopy, (1)H NMR titration experiment, and pH titration experiment. The addition of Hg(II) induced a significant decrease in both excimer and monomer emissions of the pyrene fluorescence. Hg(II) interacted with the sulfonamide groups and the imidazole group of His in the peptidyl chemosensor and then two pyrene fluorophores were close to each other in the peptide. The decrease of both excimer and monomer emission was mainly due to the excimer/monomer emission change by dimerization of two pyrene fluorophores and a quenching effect of Hg(II).

  6. Rational design of aminoanthraquinones for colorimetric detection of heavy metal ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ranyuk, Elena; Uglov, Alexei; Meyer, Michel; Bessmertnykh Lemeune, Alla; Denat, Franck; Averin, Alexei; Beletskaya, Irina; Guilard, Roger

    2011-10-28

    A family of water-soluble colorimetric chemosensors incorporating an anthraquinone signalling subunit functionalized with a polyamine chain that bears hydrophilic diethoxyphosphoryl moieties was prepared with the aim of assaying metal cations. The outstanding UV-Vis absorption properties of the 1-aminoanthraquinone chromophore allowed the efficient visual detection and quantification of copper(II) ions by chelators L(1)-L(3) in buffered aqueous solution. Moreover, the visible response of L(2) is not interfered by addition of large excesses of 13 common metal ions, whereas chemosensor L(3) produces also a color change in the presence of equimolar amounts of lead(II). Considering the 134 nm gap between both absorption maxima, simultaneous colorimetric quantification of lead and copper can be envisaged. Detailed potentiometric and spectrophotometric analysis of Cu(2+) complexation by L(2) and L(3), as well as Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) by L(3) was undertaken in order to gain a deeper insight into the pH-dependent speciation and understanding the color changing process. Furthermore, the inner coordination sphere of the [PbL(3)](2+) complex was probed by NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Fabrication of an electrochemical sensor based on spiropyran for sensitive and selective detection of fluoride ion.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jia; Zhao, Peng; Li, Yinhui; Zhao, Wenjie; Xiao, Yue; Yang, Ronghua

    2016-04-28

    In the past decades, numerous electrochemical sensors based on exogenous electroactive substance have been reported. Due to non-specific interaction between the redox mediator and the target, the instability caused by false signal may not be avoided. To address this issue, in this paper, a new electrochemical sensor based on spiropyran skeleton, namely SPOSi, was designed for specific electrochemical response to fluoride ions (F(-)). The breakage of Si-O induced by F(-) based on the specific nucleophilic substitution reaction between F(-) and silica would directly produce a hydroquinone structure for electrochemical signal generation. To improve the sensitivity, SPOSi probe was assembled on the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) through the π-π conjugating interaction. This electrode was successfully applied to monitor F(-) with a detection limit of 8.3 × 10(-8) M. Compared with the conventional F(-) ion selected electrode (ISE) which utilized noncovalent interaction, this method displays higher stability and a comparable sensitivity in the urine samples.

  8. Sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions by fluorescent Ag nanoclusters synthesized via a hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Ren, Xiangling; Meng, Xianwei; Fang, Zheng; Tang, Fangqiong

    2013-09-01

    An easily prepared fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions was developed here. The Ag NCs were synthesized by using polymethacrylic acid sodium salt as a template via a convenient hydrothermal process. The as-prepared fluorescent Ag NCs were monodispersed, uniform and less than 2 nm in diameter, and can be quenched in the presence of mercury (Hg2+) or copper (Cu2+) ions. Excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the Ag NCs and the concentrations of Hg2+ or Cu2+ ions in the range of 10 nM to 20 μM or 10 nM to 30 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) as the masking agent of Cu2+, Hg2+ was exclusively detected in coexistence with Cu2+ with high sensitivity (LOD = 10 nM), which also provided a reusable detection method for Cu2+. Furthermore, the different quenching phenomena caused by the two metals ions such as changes in visible colour, shifts of UV absorbance peaks and changes in size of Ag NCs make it easy to distinguish between them. Therefore the easily synthesized fluorescent Ag NCs may have great potential as Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions sensors.An easily prepared fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions was developed here. The Ag NCs were synthesized by using polymethacrylic acid sodium salt as a template via a convenient hydrothermal process. The as-prepared fluorescent Ag NCs were monodispersed, uniform and less than 2 nm in diameter, and can be quenched in the presence of mercury (Hg2+) or copper (Cu2+) ions. Excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the Ag NCs and the concentrations of Hg2+ or Cu2+ ions in the range of 10 nM to 20 μM or 10 nM to 30 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) as the masking agent of Cu2+, Hg2+ was exclusively detected in coexistence with Cu2+ with high sensitivity (LOD = 10 nM), which also provided a

  9. Novel indole based dual responsive 'turn-on' chemosensor for fluoride ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyanthi, Dharmaraj; Iniya, Murugan; Krishnaveni, Karuppiah; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2015-02-01

    An efficient new dual channel chemosensor 2,3-bis((E)-(1H-indole-3-yl)methyleneamino)maleonitrile (DN) which exhibits selective sensing of F- ions in DMSO, was synthesized by a facile one step condensation reaction of indole-3-carboxaldehyde with diaminomaleonitrile. The probe DN was characterized by elemental analysis, 1H, 13C-NMR, ESI-MS and IR spectral techniques. Upon addition of F-, DN induces remarkable changes in both absorption and fluorescence spectra on the basis of charge transfer mechanism. The receptor DN serves for highly selective, sensitive detection of F- without the interference of other relevant anions. The Job's plot analysis indicates the binding stoichiometry to be 1:1 (host/guest).

  10. Rapid detection of CW residues on soil using an ion trap SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Ingram, J.C.; Dahl, D.A.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    Technology for the rapid detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) residues on soil samples is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The development effort is being undertaken because of a need for rapid and specific characterization for possibly contaminated soils samples, preferably in the field. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is being pursued for these applications because SIMS combines rapid, specific and sensitive surface analyses with the potential for small instrument size. This latter attribute suggests that field characterization using SIMS is possible, and this avenue is being supported by the Army at the INEEL. This paper describes ongoing development efforts focused on the development of small-scale, transportable SIMS instrumentation, and on the application of the technology to likely contamination scenarios.

  11. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-06-14

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets [I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas [2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study [3] has been

  12. Photochromic Terbium Phosphonates with Photomodulated Luminescence and Metal Ion Sensitive Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiting; Tian, Hong-Rui; Li, Jian-Ping; Hui, Yuan-Feng; He, Xiang; Li, Jiyang; Dang, Song; Xie, Zhigang; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2016-10-17

    Rational selection and modification of rare earth metal centers and photoactive organic linkers enables designable multiphotofunctionality to come to fruition in new hybrid coordination polymer materials. By using a viologen-functionalized diphosphonate linker, two terbium phosphonate compounds (Tb-1 and Tb-2) have been constructed, which display reversible photochromic reactions in response to UV light and soft X-ray irradiation. In addition, the photo-induced electron-transfer reaction can modulate the luminescent emission to thus realize photoluminescence switching behavior. Furthermore, both terbium phosphonates can serve as highly sensitive sensors to probe Cu(2+) in solution through their luminescence. Thus, they represent the first photochromic examples of lanthanide phosphonate-based materials with photomodulated luminescence and sensitive detection of metal ions.

  13. Boosting the Detection Potential of Liquid Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using a Ceramic Coated Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Termopoli, Veronica; Cappiello, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Detection of target and non-target substances and their characterization in complex samples is a challenging task. Here we demonstrate that coating the electron ionization (EI) ion source of an LC-MS system with a sol-gel ceramic film can drastically improve the detection of high-molecular weight and high-boiling analytes. A new ion source coated with a ceramic material was developed and tested with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with an increasing number of rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those for an uncoated stainless steel (SS) ion source shows a dramatic improvement in the MS signals, with a nearly 40-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also demonstrate the ability of the new system to produce excellent chromatographic profiles for hard-to-detect hormones.

  14. New method for comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents using an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kishi, Shintaro; Makita, Mika; Nagamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Toda, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a detection technology for vapor forms of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) with an element analysis system using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. After the vapor sample was introduced directly into the ion source, the molecular material was decomposed into elements using electron cyclotron resonance plasma and ionized. The following CWAs and stimulants were examined: diisopropyl fluorophosphonate (DFP), 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (2CEES), cyanogen chloride (CNCl), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The type of chemical warfare agents, specifically, whether it was a nerve agent, blister agent, blood agent, or choking agent, could be determined by measuring the quantities of the monatomic ions or CN(+) using mass spectrometry. It was possible to detect gaseous CWAs that could not be detected by a conventional mass spectrometer. The distribution of electron temperature in the plasma could be closely controlled by adjusting the input power of the microwaves used to generate the electron cyclotron resonance plasma, and the target compounds could be detected as molecular ions or fragment ions, enabling identification of the target agents.

  15. New method for comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents using an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kishi, Shintaro; Makita, Mika; Nagamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Toda, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a detection technology for vapor forms of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) with an element analysis system using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. After the vapor sample was introduced directly into the ion source, the molecular material was decomposed into elements using electron cyclotron resonance plasma and ionized. The following CWAs and stimulants were examined: diisopropyl fluorophosphonate (DFP), 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (2CEES), cyanogen chloride (CNCl), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The type of chemical warfare agents, specifically, whether it was a nerve agent, blister agent, blood agent, or choking agent, could be determined by measuring the quantities of the monatomic ions or CN + using mass spectrometry. It was possible to detect gaseous CWAs that could not be detected by a conventional mass spectrometer. The distribution of electron temperature in the plasma could be closely controlled by adjusting the input power of the microwaves used to generate the electron cyclotron resonance plasma, and the target compounds could be detected as molecular ions or fragment ions, enabling identification of the target agents.

  16. Fast x-ray scattering measurements on molten alumina using a 120° curved position sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennet, Louis; Thiaudière, Dominique; Gailhanou, Marc; Landron, Claude; Coutures, Jean-Pierre; Price, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Fast x-ray scattering measurements on molten alumina were performed on the H10 beam line at the DCI Synchrotron of LURE (Orsay, France). A high-temperature chamber with a levitation device was coupled with the four-circle goniometer of the beam line. A 100 W CO2 laser was used to melt the sample and the temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer operating at 0.85 μm. Usually, measurements of the total structure factor S(Q) on molten materials are performed using a fixed detector scanned over an angular range. In this work, in order to reduce the total scan duration, x-ray scattered intensities were measured with a 120° position sensitive detector (INEL CPS120). We performed several measurements with different acquisition times varying from 10 s to 5 min. In 5 min it was possible to obtain a good determination of S(Q) with a usable signal up to the Q range limit (13 Å-1). The intensity was comparable with a 1 h measurement with a NaI (Tl) scintillator scanned over the 120° 2θ range. On reducing the counting time the statistics are degraded and the data are noisier, especially in the high Q region. Nevertheless, even with 10 s, the S(Q) data remain usable and give good results. Performing the Fourier transformation of S(Q), we obtain similar reliable pair-correlation functions with both 5 min and 10 s acquisition times.

  17. High-Efficiency CdZnTe Position-Sensitive VFG Gamma-Ray Detectors for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; James, Ralph B.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Vernon, E.; Camarda, G. S.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Indusi, J.; Boyer, Brian

    2015-09-30

    The goal of this project is to incorporate a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detector (with 1% or better resolution) into a bench-top prototype for isotope identification and related safeguards applications. The bench-top system is based on a 2x2 array of 6x6x20 mm3 position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid (VFG) CZT detectors. The key features of the array are that it allows for the use of average-grade CZT material with a moderate content of defects, and yet it provides high energy resolution, 1% FWHM at 662 keV, large effective area, and low-power consumption. The development of this type of 3D detector and new instruments incorporating them is motivated by the high cost and low availability of large, > 1 cm3, CZT crystals suitable for making multi-pixel detectors with acceptable energy resolution and efficiency.

  18. Index-ion Triggered MS2 Ion Quantification: A Novel Proteomics Approach for Reproducible Detection and Quantification of Targeted Proteins in Complex Mixtures*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Luo, Jie; Robinson, Max; Eng, Jimmy; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ranish, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical research requires protein detection technology that is not only sensitive and quantitative, but that can reproducibly measure any set of proteins in a biological system in a high throughput manner. Here we report the development and application of a targeted proteomics platform termed index-ion triggered MS2 ion quantification (iMSTIQ) that allows reproducible and accurate peptide quantification in complex mixtures. The key feature of iMSTIQ is an approach called index-ion triggered analysis (ITA) that permits the reproducible acquisition of full MS2 spectra of targeted peptides independent of their ion intensities. Accurate quantification is achieved by comparing the relative intensities of multiple pairs of fragment ions derived from isobaric targeted peptides during MS2 analysis. Importantly, the method takes advantage of the favorable performance characteristics of the LTQ-Orbitrap, which include high mass accuracy, resolution, and throughput. As such it provides an attractive targeted proteomics tool to meet the demands of systems biology research and biomarker studies. PMID:21169564

  19. [Simultaneous determination of alendronate, pamidronate, ibandronate and risedronate using ion chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Liu, Yuxiu; Chen, Zhidong; Chen, Meilan; Zhu, Yan

    2012-04-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of alendronate, pamidronate, ibandronate and risedronate using ion chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection (IPAD) has been developed. The electrochemical behavior showed the catalytic currents of these bisphosphonates are based on the oxidation of amines in their structures. Because the bisphosphonates are polar compounds and present as anions under alkaline condition, therefore, they can be separated by anion exchange chromatography. A Dionex AS18 column (250 mm x 2 mm) and an AG18 column (50 mm x 2 mm) and 24 mmol/L NaOH solution were used for the separation. Multi-step potential waveform parameters were optimized to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), which exhibited adsorption/desorption catalytic features at the gold electrode surface in alkaline solution. Utilizing the optimized waveform, the method showed good linearity (r2 = 0.9972 - 0.9995), satisfactory repeatability (relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the peak areas in the range of 0.84% - 1.37%) and sufficient sensitivity (limits of detection of 0.061 - 0.18 microg/mL) for the identification of the four bisphosphonates. The recoveries were 80.81% - 97.32% with the RSDs of 1.46% - 3.02%. It is demonstrated that this method is a rapid and simple one for the determination of the four bisphosphonates in human plasma.

  20. Ion-chromatographic determination of carbocisteine in pharmaceuticals based on non-suppressed conductimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Megoulas, Nikolaos C; Koupparis, Michael A

    2004-02-13

    A novel method for the determination of carbocisteine (S-CMC), a mucolytic and expectorant drug with an acidic amino acid structure, was developed and validated, using non-suppressed ion-chromatographic system with conductimetric detection, and anion or cation exchange columns. Among the various combinations of column type and eluent composition tested, a cation exchange column with a 0.25 mM tri-fluoroacetic acid (TFA) as eluent in isocratic mode at 1.2 ml/min gave the best results. S-CMC was very well separated from all common amino acids (resolution > 2.6). The retention time was 3.5 min and the asymmetry factor 1.1. A linear calibration curve from 17 to 400 microg/ml (r = 0.99994), with a detection limit of 0.14 microg (5.6 microg/ml-25 microl injection volume) and a precision of 1.5% R.S.D. (100 microg/ml, n = 3) was achieved. The proposed method was applied for the determination of S-CMC content in intensely colored commercial formulations (syrups). No interference from excipients was found and the only pretreatment step was the appropriate dilution with the mobile phase. Recovery from standard additions was ranged from 96.0 to 104.9% and precision (R.S.D., n = 3) 1.8-3.6%.

  1. Precise fabrication of a 5 nm graphene nanopore with a helium ion microscope for biomolecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunsheng; Huang, Qimeng; Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Daming; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-01-01

    We report a scalable method to fabricate high-quality graphene nanopores for biomolecule detection using a helium ion microscope (HIM). HIM milling shows promising capabilities for precisely controlling the size and shape, and may allow for the potential production of nanopores at wafer scale. Nanopores could be fabricated at different sizes ranging from 5 to 30 nm in diameter in few minutes. Compared with the current solid-state nanopore fabrication techniques, e.g. transmission electron microscopy, HIM is fast. Furthermore, we investigated the exposure-time dependence of graphene nanopore formation: the rate of pore expansion did not follow a simple linear relationship with exposure time, but a fast expansion rate at short exposure time and a slow rate at long exposure time. In addition, we performed biomolecule detection with our patterned graphene nanopore. The ionic current signals induced by 20-base single-stranded DNA homopolymers could be used as a basis for homopolymer differentiation. However, the charge interaction of homopolymer chains with graphene nanopores, and the conformations of homopolymer chains need to be further considered to improve the accuracy of discrimination.

  2. Electrochemical Microsensors for the Detection of Cadmium(II) and Lead(II) Ions in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Krystofova, Olga; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Zehnalek, Josef; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Routine determination of trace metals in complex media is still a difficult task for many analytical instruments. The aim of this work was to compare three electro-chemical instruments [a standard potentiostat (Autolab), a commercially available miniaturized potentiostat (PalmSens) and a homemade micropotentiostat] for easy-to-use and sensitive determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) ions. The lowest detection limits (hundreds of pM) for both metals was achieved by using of the standard potentiostat, followed by the miniaturized potentiostat (tens of nM) and the homemade instrument (hundreds of nM). Nevertheless, all potentiostats were sensitive enough to evaluate contamination of the environment, because the environmental limits for both metals are higher than detection limits of the instruments. Further, we tested all used potentiostats and working electrodes on analysis of environmental samples (rainwater, flour and plant extract) with artificially added cadmium(II) and lead(II). Based on the similar results obtained for all potentiostats we choose a homemade instrument with a carbon tip working electrode for our subsequent environmental experiments, in which we analyzed maize and sunflower seedlings and rainwater obtained from various sites in the Czech Republic. PMID:22219663

  3. Paper-based scanometric assay for lead ion detection using DNAzyme.

    PubMed

    Vijitvarasan, Pasara; Oaew, Sukunya; Surareungchai, Werasak

    2015-10-08

    A facile and simple paper-based scanometric assay was developed to detect Pb(2+) using GR5-DNAzyme. Magnetic beads (MBs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used as a signal collector and a signal indicator, respectively. They were linked together by GR5-DNAzyme, comprising an enzyme and a substrate strand pairing up with each other. In the presence of Pb(2+), the substrate strand is cut into two pieces, resulting in the disassembly of AuNPs from the MBs. These AuNPs were spotted on predefined areas on a chromatography paper, where signal is amplified through silver reduction. This sensing platform exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity toward Pb(2+), giving a detection limit of 0.3 nM and a linear fitting range from 0.1 to 1000 nM. Testing of this biosensor in river water and synthetic urine samples also showed satisfying results. Besides offering simultaneous and multi-sample analysis, this paper-based sensing platform presented here could be potentially applied and served as a general platform for on-site, naked eyes, and low-cost monitoring of other heavy metal ions in environmental and body fluid samples.

  4. Precise fabrication of a 5 nm graphene nanopore with a helium ion microscope for biomolecule detection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunsheng; Huang, Qimeng; Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Daming; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-01-27

    We report a scalable method to fabricate high-quality graphene nanopores for biomolecule detection using a helium ion microscope (HIM). HIM milling shows promising capabilities for precisely controlling the size and shape, and may allow for the potential production of nanopores at wafer scale. Nanopores could be fabricated at different sizes ranging from 5 to 30 nm in diameter in few minutes. Compared with the current solid-state nanopore fabrication techniques, e.g. transmission electron microscopy, HIM is fast. Furthermore, we investigated the exposure-time dependence of graphene nanopore formation: the rate of pore expansion did not follow a simple linear relationship with exposure time, but a fast expansion rate at short exposure time and a slow rate at long exposure time. In addition, we performed biomolecule detection with our patterned graphene nanopore. The ionic current signals induced by 20-base single-stranded DNA homopolymers could be used as a basis for homopolymer differentiation. However, the charge interaction of homopolymer chains with graphene nanopores, and the conformations of homopolymer chains need to be further considered to improve the accuracy of discrimination.

  5. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future.

  6. Hairpin oligonucleotides anchored terbium ion: a fluorescent probe to specifically detect lead(II) at sub-nM levels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yueteng; Liu, Ru; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Yuliang; Cai, Zhifang; Gao, Xueyun

    2013-04-21

    A terbium based fluorescent probe was synthesized by coordinating terbium ions with a designed oligonucleotides (5'-ATATGGGGGATAT-3', termed GH5). GH5 improved the fluorescence of terbium ions by four orders of magnitude. The fluorescence enhancement of terbium ions by different oligonucleotides sequences indicated that the polyguanine loop of the hairpin GH5 is key to enhance terbium ion emission. The quantum yield of Tb-GH5 probe was 10.5% and the probe was photo-stable. The result of conductivity titration indicated that the stoichiometry of the probe is 3.5 Tb: 1 GH5, which is confirmed by fluorescence titration. This probe had high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of lead ions. The fluorescence intensity of this probe was linear with respect to lead concentration over a range 0.3-2.1 nM (R(2) = 0.99). The limit of detection for lead ions was 0.1 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

  7. A nano-graphite-DNA hybrid sensor for magnified fluorescent detection of mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yin; Li, Bianmiao; Wang, Xu; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-04-07

    In this communication, we present a nano-graphite-DNA hybrid sensor for fluorescent detection of mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution for the first time. Furthermore, an amplification strategy based on nano-graphite for Hg(2+) detection by using DNase I was demonstrated. The proposed amplified assay was simple and cost-effective with a limit of detection (LOD) for Hg(2+) of 0.5 nM, which was about 20-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assays. We further demonstrated its practical application to detect Hg(2+) in a real sample.

  8. Breakthrough in 4π ion emission mechanism understanding in plasma focus devices

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Zarinshad, Arefe; Habibi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Ion emission angular distribution mechanisms in plasma focus devices (PFD) have not yet been well developed and understood being due to the lack of an efficient wide-angle ion distribution image detection system to characterize a PFD space in detail. Present belief is that the acceleration of ions points from “anode top” upwards in forward direction within a small solid angle. A breakthrough is reported in this study, by mega-size position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detection systems invented, on discovery of 4π ion emission from the “anode top” in a PFD space after plasma pinch instability and radial run-away of ions from the “anode cathodes array” during axial acceleration of plasma sheaths before the radial phase. These two ion emission source mechanisms behave respectively as a “Point Ion Source” and a “Line Ion Source” forming “Ion Cathode Shadows” on mega-size detectors. We believe that the inventions and discoveries made here will open new horizons for advanced ion emission studies towards better mechanisms understanding and in particular will promote efficient applications of PFDs in medicine, science and technology. PMID:27941832

  9. Breakthrough in 4π ion emission mechanism understanding in plasma focus devices.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Zarinshad, Arefe; Habibi, Morteza

    2016-12-12

    Ion emission angular distribution mechanisms in plasma focus devices (PFD) have not yet been well developed and understood being due to the lack of an efficient wide-angle ion distribution image detection system to characterize a PFD space in detail. Present belief is that the acceleration of ions points from "anode top" upwards in forward direction within a small solid angle. A breakthrough is reported in this study, by mega-size position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detection systems invented, on discovery of 4π ion emission from the "anode top" in a PFD space after plasma pinch instability and radial run-away of ions from the "anode cathodes array" during axial acceleration of plasma sheaths before the radial phase. These two ion emission source mechanisms behave respectively as a "Point Ion Source" and a "Line Ion Source" forming "Ion Cathode Shadows" on mega-size detectors. We believe that the inventions and discoveries made here will open new horizons for advanced ion emission studies towards better mechanisms understanding and in particular will promote efficient applications of PFDs in medicine, science and technology.

  10. Breakthrough in 4π ion emission mechanism understanding in plasma focus devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Zarinshad, Arefe; Habibi, Morteza

    2016-12-01

    Ion emission angular distribution mechanisms in plasma focus devices (PFD) have not yet been well developed and understood being due to the lack of an efficient wide-angle ion distribution image detection system to characterize a PFD space in detail. Present belief is that the acceleration of ions points from “anode top” upwards in forward direction within a small solid angle. A breakthrough is reported in this study, by mega-size position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detection systems invented, on discovery of 4π ion emission from the “anode top” in a PFD space after plasma pinch instability and radial run-away of ions from the “anode cathodes array” during axial acceleration of plasma sheaths before the radial phase. These two ion emission source mechanisms behave respectively as a “Point Ion Source” and a “Line Ion Source” forming “Ion Cathode Shadows” on mega-size detectors. We believe that the inventions and discoveries made here will open new horizons for advanced ion emission studies towards better mechanisms understanding and in particular will promote efficient applications of PFDs in medicine, science and technology.

  11. A new approach for detection of explosives based on ion mobility spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzishchin, Yury; Kotkovskii, Gennadii; Martynov, Igor; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Chistyakov, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new way for detection ultralow concentration of explosives in this study. It combines an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and a promising method of laser desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The DIOS is widely used in mass spectrometry due to the possibility of small molecule detection and high sensitivity. It is known that IMS based on laser ion source is a power method for the fast detection of ultralow concentration of organic molecules. However requirement of using high energy pulse ultraviolet laser increases weight and size of the device. The use of DIOS in an ion source of IMS could decrease energy pulse requirements and allows one to construct both compact and high sensitive device for analyzing gas and liquid probes. On the other hand mechanisms of DIOS in gas media is poorly studied, especially in case of nitroaromatic compounds. The investigation of the desorption/ionization on porous silicon (pSi) surface of nitroaromatic compounds has been carried out for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) using IMS and mass spectrometry (MS). It has been demonstrated that TNT ion formation in a gas medium is a complicated process and includes both an electron emission from the pSi surface with subsequent ion-molecular reactions in a gas phase and a proton transfer between pSi surface and TNT molecule.

  12. A Post-Synthetically Modified MOF for Selective and Sensitive Aqueous-Phase Detection of Highly Toxic Cyanide Ions.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Avishek; Kumar, Naveen; Samanta, Partha; Desai, Aamod V; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2016-01-18

    Selective and sensitive detection of toxic cyanide (CN(-) ) by a post-synthetically altered metal-organic framework (MOF) has been achieved. A post-synthetic modification was employed in the MOF to incorporate the specific recognition site with the CN(-) ion over all other anions, such as Cl(-) , Br(-) , and SCN(-) . The aqueous-phase sensing and very low detection limit, the essential prerequisites for an effective sensory material, have been fulfilled by the MOF. Moreover, the present detection level meets the standard set by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the permissible limit of cyanide concentration in drinking water. The utilization of MOF-based materials as the fluorometric probes for selective and sensitive detection of CN(-) ions has not been explored till now.

  13. A data acquisition system for two-dimensional position sensitive micropattern gas detectors with delay-line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanu, A. R.; Prestwich, W. V.; Byun, S. H.

    2015-04-01

    We present a data acquisition (DAQ) system for two-dimensional position sensitive micropattern gas detectors using the delay-line method for readout. The DAQ system consists of a field programmable gate array (FPGA) as the main data processor and our time-to-digital (TDC) mezzanine card for making time measurements. We developed the TDC mezzanine card around the Acam TDC-GPX ASIC and it features four independent stop channels referenced to a common start, a typical timing resolution of ~81 ps, and a 17-bit measurement range, and is compliant with the VITA 57.1 standard. For our DAQ system, we have chosen the Xilinx SP601 development kit which features a single Spartan 6 FPGA, 128 MB of DDR2 memory, and a serial USB interface for communication. Output images consist of 1024×1024 square pixels, where each pixel has a 32-bit depth and corresponds to a time difference of 162 ps relative to its neighbours. When configured for a 250 ns acquisition window, the DAQ can resolve periodic event rates up to 1.8×106 Hz without any loses and will report a maximum event rate of 6.11×105 Hz for events whose arrival times follow Poisson statistics. The integral and differential non-linearities have also been measured and are better than 0.1% and 1.5%, respectively. Unlike commercial units, our DAQ system implements the delay-line image reconstruction algorithm entirely in hardware and is particularly attractive for its modularity, low cost, ease of integration, excellent linearity, and high throughput rate.

  14. A sensitive whole-cell biosensor for the simultaneous detection of a broad-spectrum of toxic heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cerminati, S; Soncini, F C; Checa, S K

    2015-04-07

    Bacterial biosensors are simple, cost-effective and efficient analytical tools for detecting bioavailable heavy metals in the environment. This work presents the design, construction and calibration of a novel whole-cell fluorescent biosensory device that, simultaneously and with high sensitivity, reports the presence of toxic mercury, lead, cadmium and/or gold ions in aqueous samples. This bio-reporter can be easily applied as an immediate alerting tool for detecting the presence of harmful pollutants in drinking water.

  15. The minimum detection limits of RDX and TNT deposited on various surfaces as determined by ion mobility spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodacy, P.

    1993-08-01

    An Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) was used to determine the detection limits of RDX and TNT on six different substrates. The preparation of the explosive deposits on the surfaces is examined as well as effects due to the size, uniformity, method of application, and time that a deposit has been on a surface. Sampling methods are discussed along with effects of the surface topology. The transfer of explosives from a hand to a surface, and methods to reduce the detection limits are presented.

  16. Detection of methamphetamine in the presence of nicotine using in situ chemical derivatization and ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Mariela L; Harrington, Peter B

    2004-02-15

    The detection of methamphetamine in the presence of nicotine has been successfully accomplished using in situ chemical derivatization with propyl chloroformate as the derivatization reagent and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The rapid detection of methamphetamine is important for forensic scientists in order to establish a chain of evidence and link criminals to the crime scene. Nicotine is pervasive in clandestine drug laboratories from cigarette smoke residue. It has been demonstrated that nicotine obscures the methamphetamine peaks in ion mobility spectrometers due to their similar charge affinities and ion mobilities, which makes their detection a challenging task. As a consequence, false positive or negative responses may arise. In situ chemical derivatization poses as a sensitive, accurate, and reproducible alternative to remove the nicotine background when detecting nanogram amounts of methamphetamine. The derivatization agent was coated onto the sample disk, and the derivatization product corresponding to propyl methamphetamine carbamate was detected. In the present study, in situ chemical derivatization was demonstrated to be a feasible method to detect methamphetamine hydrochloride as the carbamate derivative, which was baseline-resolved from the nicotine peak. Alternating least squares (ALS) was used to model the datasets. A mixture containing both compounds revealed reduced mobilities of 1.61 cm(2)/V.s and 1.54 cm(2)/V.s for methamphetamine and nicotine, respectively. The reduced mobility of propyl methamphetamine carbamate was found at 1.35 cm(2)/V.s.

  17. A high count rate one-dimensional position sensitive detector and a data acquisition system for time resolved X-ray scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernot, P.; Kahn, R.; Fourme, R.; Leboucher, P.; Million, G.; Santiard, J. C.; Charpak, G.

    1982-10-01

    A curved multiwire proportional drift chamber has been built as a general purpose instrument for X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction experiments with synchrotron radiation. This parallax-free one-dimensional linear position sensitive detector has a parallel readout with a double hit logic. The data acquisition system, installed as a part of the D11 camera at LURE-DCI, is designed to perform time slicing and cyclic experiments; it has been used with either the fast multiwire chamber or a standard position sensitive detector with delay line readout.

  18. Ion-selective electrodes using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as ion-to-electron transducers for the detection of perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Parra, Enrique J; Crespo, Gastón A; Riu, Jordi; Ruiz, Aurora; Rius, F Xavier

    2009-09-01

    A solid contact ion-selective electrode using for the first time multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for the transducer material was developed for detecting perchlorate in water. To demonstrate the excellent ion-to electron transducer ability of the MWCNTs, a 15 microm thick layer of carboxylated MWCNT was deposited between an acrylic membrane selective to perchlorate ions and a glassy carbon rod used as the substrate and electrical conductor. The electrodes showed a Nernstian response of 57 mV decade(-1) (standard deviation of 3 mV decade(-1) over time and different electrodes) across a wide linear range of 10(-6) to 10(-2) M. The limit of detection was 10(-7.4) M of perchlorate. The response time was less than 10 s for activities higher than 10(-6) M and the intermediate-term potential stability shows a small drift of 0.22 mV h(-1) recorded over 5 hours. The electrode displays a selectivity comparable to liquid-contacted ISEs containing the same membrane.

  19. Generic detection of basic taxoids in wood of European Yew (Taxus baccata) by liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kite, Geoffrey C; Rowe, Emily R; Veitch, Nigel C; Turner, Jill E; Dauncey, Elizabeth A

    2013-02-01

    The occurrence of the cardiotoxin taxine (comprising taxine B and several other basic taxoids) in leaves of Taxus baccata L. (European yew) is well known and has led to public concerns about the safety of eating or drinking from utensils crafted from the wood of this poisonous species. The occurrence of basic taxoids in the heartwood of T. baccata had not been examined in detail, although the bark is known to contain 2'β-deacetoxyaustrospicatine. Initial examination of heartwood extracts for 2'β-deacetoxyaustrospicatine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) revealed the presence of this basic taxoid at about 0.0007% dry weight, using a standard isolated from bark. Analyses for taxine B, however, proved negative at the extract concentration analysed. Observing other basic taxoids within the heartwood extracts was facilitated by developing generic LC-MS methods that utilised a fragment arising from the N-containing acyl group of basic taxoids as a reporter ion. Of the various MS strategies available on a hybrid ion trap-orbitrap instrument that allowed observation of this reporter ion, combining all-ion collisions with high resolution ion filtering by the orbitrap was most effective, both in terms of the number of basic taxoids detected and sensitivity. Numerous basic taxoids, in addition to 2'β-deacetoxyaustrospicatine, were revealed by this method in heartwood extracts of T. baccata. Red wine readily extracted the basic taxoids from heartwood while coffee extracted them less efficiently. Contamination with basic taxoids could also be detected in soft cheese that had been spread onto wood. The generic LC-MS method for detecting basic taxoids complements specific methods for detecting taxine B when investigating yew poisoning cases in which the analysis of complex extracts may be required or taxine B has not been detected.

  20. Detection of heavy metal ions in contaminated water by surface plasmon resonance based optical fibre sensor using conducting polymer and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Verma, Roli; Gupta, Banshi D

    2015-01-01

    Optical fibre surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions in the drinking water is designed. Silver (Ag) metal and indium tin oxide (ITO) are used for the fabrication of the SPR probe which is further modified with the coating of pyrrole and chitosan composite. The sensor works on the wavelength interrogation technique and is capable of detecting trace amounts of Cd(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+) heavy metal ions in contaminated water. Four types of sensing probes are fabricated and characterised for heavy metal ions out of these pyrrole/chitosan/ITO/Ag coated probe is found to be highly sensitive among all other probes. Further, the cadmium ions bind strongly to the sensing surface than other ions and due to this the sensor is highly sensitive for Cd(2+) ions. The sensor's performance is best for the low concentrations of heavy metal ions and its sensitivity decreases with the increasing concentration of heavy metal ions.

  1. Acid-sensing ion channels detect moderate acidifications to induce ocular pain.

    PubMed

    Callejo, Gerard; Castellanos, Aida; Castany, Marta; Gual, Arcadi; Luna, Carolina; Acosta, M Carmen; Gallar, Juana; Giblin, Jonathan P; Gasull, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    Sensory nerve fibers innervating the ocular anterior surface detect external stimuli producing innocuous and painful sensations. Protons are among the first mediators released by damaged cells during inflammation, tissue injury, or other chronic ophthalmic conditions. We studied whether acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are expressed in corneal sensory neurons and their roles in the response to moderate acidifications of the ocular surface and in pathologies producing ocular surface inflammation. Moderate acidic pH (6.6) activated ASIC-like currents in corneal sensory neurons, which were blocked by ASIC1- or ASIC3-specific toxins. Acidic pH depolarizes corneal sensory neurons to fire action potentials, an effect blocked by the ASIC3 inhibitor APETx2. 2-Guanidino-4-methylquinazoline, an ASIC3 agonist, activated a population of corneal polymodal sensory nerve fibers and significantly increased the blinking and tearing rate. The nocifensive behaviors produced by application of either a moderate acidic stimulus or ophthalmic drugs formulated in acidic solution were abolished by ASIC blockers. In a model of allergic keratoconjunctivitis, nocifensive behavior was greatly reduced by ASIC3 blockade, presumably by reducing nociceptor sensitization during the inflammatory process. Our results show that, in addition to the established role of TRPV1, ASICs play a significant role in the detection of acidic insults at the ocular surface. The identification of ASICs in corneal neurons and their alterations during different diseases is critical for the understanding of sensory ocular pathophysiology. They are likely to mediate some of the discomfort sensations accompanying several ophthalmic formulations and may represent novel targets for the development of new therapeutics for ocular pathologies.

  2. Application of Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Detection and Identification of Oxidized Organic Species during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Krechmer, J.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results obtained with a chemical ionization ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) that was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Supersite in Centreville, AL. This two dimensional technique, which separates ions on the basis of their interactions with buffer gases before analysis by high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry, allows for detailed separation and identification of isomeric and isobaric species. During SOAS the IMS-TOF was coupled to a chemical ionization source that utilized NO3- as the reagent ion. The NO3- reagent ion clusters with highly oxidized species and allows for a unique means of directly detecting particle phase precursors in the gas phase. Gas phase molecules corresponding to oxidized products of isoprene and terpenes were detected throughout the campaign with a time resolution of 5 minutes. Ion mobility separation and trends observed for several of these key species are discussed. In addition to ambient sampling, the CI-IMS-TOF was also operated behind a potential aerosol mass (PAM) flow reactor which exposed ambient air to high levels of OH radical. Ambient CI-IMS-TOF spectra obtained with and without the flow reactor are presented and compared with laboratory flow reactor spectra generated from isoprene and terpene precursors.

  3. Sensitive detection for coralyne and mercury ions based on homo-A/T DNA by exonuclease signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hailiang; Shi, Shuo; Zheng, Xuyue; Yao, Tianming

    2015-09-15

    Based on specific homo-A/T DNA binding properties, a strategy for coralyne and mercury ions detection was realised by exonuclease-aided signal amplification. Coralyne could specifically bind homo-A DNA and protect it from the hydrolysis of exonuclease I. The coralyne-protected DNA was subsequently used as a trigger strand to hydrolyze DNA2 in exonuclease-aided signal amplification process. Thiazole orange was used to quantify the remainder DNA2. Under the optimal condition, the fluorescence intensity was linearly proportional to the concentration of coralyne in the range of 0.2-100 nM with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.31 nM, which presented the lowest LOD for coralyne among all reported. With homo-T and Hg(2+) taking the place of homo-A DNA and coralyne, respectively, the system could also be used for Hg(2+) detection. The experiments in real samples also showed good results. This method was label-free, low-cost, easy-operating and highly repeatable for the detection of coralyne and mercury ions. It could also be extended to detect various analytes, such as other metal ions, proteins and small molecules by using appropriate aptamers.

  4. Selective fluorescence sensors for detection of nitroaniline and metal Ions based on ligand-based luminescent metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zongchao; Wang, Fengqin; Lin, Xiangyi; Wang, Chengmiao; Fu, Yiyuan; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Yongnan; Li, Guodong

    2015-12-15

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous crystalline materials with high potential for applications in fluorescence sensors. In this work, two solvent-induced Zn(II)–based metal-organic frameworks, Zn{sub 3}L{sub 3}(DMF){sub 2} (1) and Zn{sub 3}L{sub 3}(DMA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2) (L=4,4′-stilbenedicarboxylic acid), were investigated as selective sensing materials for detection of nitroaromatic compounds and metal ions. The sensing experiments show that 1 and 2 both exhibit selective fluorescence quenching toward nitroaniline with a low detection limit. In addition, 1 exhibits high selectivity for detection of Fe{sup 3+} and Al{sup 3+} by significant fluorescence quenching or enhancement effect. While for 2, it only exhibits significant fluorescence quenching effect for Fe{sup 3+}. The results indicate that 1 and 2 are both promising fluorescence sensors for detecting and recognizing nitroaniline and metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. - Graphical abstract: Two MOFs have been selected as the fluorescence sensing materials for selectively sensing mitroaromatic compounds and metal ions. The high selectivity makes them promising fluorescence sensors for detecting and recognizing nitroaniline and Fe{sup 3+} or Al{sup 3+}.

  5. Spatial distortion correction and crystal identification for MRI-compatible position-sensitive avalanche photodiode-based PET scanners

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Joshi, Anand A.; Wu, Yibao; Leahy, Richard M.; Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2009-01-01

    Position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) are gaining widespread acceptance in modern PET scanner designs, and owing to their relative insensitivity to magnetic fields, especially in those that are MRI-compatible. Flood histograms in PET scanners are used to determine the crystal of annihilation photon interaction and hence, for detector characterization and routine quality control. For PET detectors that use PSAPDs, flood histograms show a characteristic pincushion distortion when Anger logic is used for event positioning. A small rotation in the flood histogram is also observed when the detectors are placed in a magnetic field. We first present a general purpose automatic method for spatial distortion correction for flood histograms of PSAPD-based PET detectors when placed both inside and outside a MRI scanner. Analytical formulae derived for this scheme are based on a hybrid approach that combines desirable properties from two existing event positioning schemes. The rotation of the flood histogram due to the magnetic field is determined iteratively and is accounted for in the scheme. We then provide implementation details of a method for crystal identification we have previously proposed and evaluate it for cases when the PET detectors are both outside and in a magnetic field. In this scheme, Fourier analysis is used to generate a lower-order spatial approximation of the distortion-corrected PSAPD flood histogram, which we call the ‘template’. The template is then registered to the flood histogram using a diffeomorphic iterative intensity-based warping scheme. The calculated deformation field is then applied to the segmentation of the template to obtain a segmentation of the flood histogram. A manual correction tool is also developed for exceptional cases. We present a quantitative assessment of the proposed distortion correction scheme and crystal identification method against conventional methods. Our results indicate that our proposed methods lead

  6. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation metal ions release detection in the human mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueerova, Hana; Dostalova, Tatjana; Prochazkova, J.

    2002-06-01

    Presence of more dental alloys in oral cavity often causes pathological symptoms. Due to various and multi-faced symptomatology, they tend to be a source of significant problems not only for the patient but also for the dentist. Metal ions released from alloys can cause subjective and objective symptoms in mouth. The aim of this study was detection of metal elements presence in saliva. There were 4 groups of examined persons: with intact teeth (15 individuals) with metallic restorations, pathological currents 5-30 (mu) A, multi-faced subjective symptomatology and uncharacteristic objective diagnosis (32 patients), with metallic restorations and no subjective symptoms (14 persons) and with metallic restorations, without pathological currents and with problems related to galvanism (13 patients). Presence of 14 metal elements was checked by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation. Nd:YAG laser detector was used. There were significant differences in content of silver, gold and mercury between persons with intact teeth and other three groups. There were no differences found between subjects with and without galvanic currents, and presence of subjective and objective symptoms.

  7. Graphene ultrathin film electrode for detection of lead ions in acetate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Liu, Erjia

    2013-01-15

    Few-layer graphene ultrathin films were synthesized via solid-state carbon diffusion from amorphous carbon (a-C) thin layers sputtering coated on Si substrates with or without a SiO(2) layer, which an a-C layer was covered by a nickel (Ni) layer as a catalyst. When the Ni/a-C bilayer coated samples were heated at 1000°C the carbon (C) atoms from the a-C layers diffused into the top Ni layers to form a C rich surface. Upon rapid cooling, the C atoms accumulated on the surface of the Ni layers and formed graphene ultrathin films through nucleation and growth processes. The formation of graphene ultrathin films was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), electron diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and 4-point probe. The synthesized graphene ultrathin films were used as working electrodes for detection of trace heavy metal ions (Pb(2+), as low as 7 nM) in acetate buffer solutions (pH 5.3) using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). The effects of substrate surface condition and Ni layer thickness on the structure and electrochemical properties of graphene ultrathin film electrodes were investigated in detail. Compared to conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) electrodes, the graphene electrodes developed in this study had better repeatability, higher sensitivity and higher resistance to passivation caused by surface active species.

  8. Detection of lead ions with AlGaAs/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiqiang, Niu; Yang, Zhang; Min, Guan; Chengyan, Wang; Lijie, Cui; Qiumin, Yang; Yiyang, Li; Yiping, Zeng

    2016-11-01

    Lead poisoning is a serious environmental concern, which is a health threat. Existing technologies always have some drawbacks, which restrict their application ranges, such as real time monitoring. To solve this problem, glutathione was functionalized on the Au-coated gate area of the pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (pHEMT) to detect trace amounts of Pb2+. The positive charge of lead ions will cause a positive potential on the Au gate of the pHEMT sensor, which will increase the current between the source and the drain. The response range for Pb2+ detection has been determined in the concentrations from 0.1 pmol/L to 10 pmol/L. To our knowledge, this is currently the best result for detecting lead ions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61204012, 61274049, 61376058), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 4142053, 4132070), and the Beijing Nova Program (Nos. 2010B056, xxhz201503).

  9. Quantitative detection of benzene in toluene- and xylene-rich atmospheres using high-kinetic-energy ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).

    PubMed

    Langejuergen, Jens; Allers, Maria; Oermann, Jens; Kirk, Ansgar; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2014-12-02

    One major drawback of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the dependence of the response to a certain analyte on the concentration of water or the presence of other compounds in the sample gas. Especially for low proton affine analytes, e.g., benzene, which often exists in mixtures with other volatile organic compounds, such as toluene and xylene (BTX), a time-consuming preseparation is necessary. In this work, we investigate BTX mixtures using a compact IMS operated at decreased pressure (20 mbar) and high kinetic ion energies (HiKE-IMS). The reduced electric field in both the reaction tube and the drift tube can be independently increased up to 120 Td. Under these conditions, the water cluster distribution of reactant ions is shifted toward smaller clusters independent of the water content in the sample gas. Thus, benzene can be ionized via proton transfer from H3O(+) reactant ions. Also, a formation of benzene ions via charge transfer from NO(+) is possible. Furthermore, the time for interaction between ions and neutrals of different analytes is limited to such an extent that a simultaneous quantification of benzene, toluene, and xylene is possible from low ppbv up to several ppmv concentrations. The mobility resolution of the presented HiKE-IMS varies from R = 65 at high field (90 Td) to R = 73 at lower field (40 Td) in the drift tube, which is sufficient to separate the analyzed compounds. The detection limit for benzene is 29 ppbv (2 s of averaging) with 3700 ppmv water, 12.4 ppmv toluene, and 9 ppmv xylene present in the sample gas. Furthermore, a less-moisture-dependent benzene measurement with a detection limit of 32 ppbv with ca. 21 000 ppmv (90% relative humidity (RH) at 20 °C) water present in the sample gas is possible evaluating the signal from benzene ions formed via charge transfer.

  10. Selective detection of divalent nickel ions based on wet-chemically prepared Cs-doped ZnO nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mohammed M.; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Marwani, Hadi M.; Asiri, Abdullah M.

    2014-07-01

    The current study depicts a selective detection of divalent metal ions based on Cs-doped ZnO nanosheets (NSs) materials. A large-scale synthesis of NSs by wet-chemical technique is executed using alkaline reducing agents at higher pH medium. The prepared doped NSs are characterized in terms of their morphological, structural and optical properties, and efficiently applied for the divalent metal ions detection. The detailed structural, elemental, and optical characterization of NSs are evaluated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform Infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), XEDS, and UV-visible spectroscopy, which confirmed that the obtained NSs are well-crystalline Cs-doped ZnO and possessed good optical behaviours. The Cs-ZnO NS morphology is investigated by FE-SEM, which confirmed that the NS possesses microstructure shape and growth in large-quantity. The analytical potential of the Cs-ZnO NSs phase was evaluated for a selective extraction of divalent nickel ions prior to its determination by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The selectivity of Cs-ZnO NSs was investigated toward different metal ions, including Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Zn(II), and Zr(IV). Data obtained from the selectivity study showed that the selectivity of Cs-ZnO NSs phase was the most toward divalent nickel ions [Ni(II)]. The uptake capacity for divalent nickel ions was experimentally calculated to be ˜88.85 mg g-1. Moreover, adsorption isotherm data of divalent nickel ions on Cs-ZnO NSs phase were well fit with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, strongly supporting that the adsorption process was mainly monolayer on homogeneous adsorbent surfaces.

  11. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T.

  12. Detection of changes in DNA methylation induced by low-energy ion implantation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haichan; Zhao, Jin; Xu, Jing; Li, Xiaoqu; Zhang, Fengshou; Wang, Yugang; Carr, Christopher; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Genfa

    2011-05-01

    This study evaluated changes in DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown from seeds implanted with low-energy N(+) and Ar(+) ions. Methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) testing revealed altered DNA methylation patterns after ion implantation at doses of 1 × 10(14) to 1 × 10(16) ions/cm(2). Comparison of the MSAP electrophoretic profiles revealed nine types of polymorphisms in ion-implanted seedlings relative to control seedlings, among which four represented methylation events, three represented demethylation events, and the methylation status of two was uncertain. The diversity of plant DNA methylation was increased by low-energy ion implantation. At the same time, total genomic DNA methylation levels at CCGG sites were unchanged by ion implantation. Moreover, a comparison of polymorphisms seen in N(+) ion-implanted, Ar(+) ion-implanted, and control DNA demonstrated that the species of incident ion influenced the resulting DNA methylation pattern. Sequencing of eight isolated fragments that showed different changing patterns in implanted plants allowed their mapping onto variable regions on one or more of the five Arabidopsis chromosomes; these segments included protein-coding genes, transposon and repeat DNA sequence. A further sodium bisulfite sequencing of three fragments also displayed alterations in methylation among either different types or doses of incident ions. Possible causes for the changes in methylation are discussed.

  13. Detection and clearing of trapped ions in the high current Cornell photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Full, S.; Bartnik, A.; Bazarov, I. V.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Hoffstaetter, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    We have recently performed experiments to test the effectiveness of three ion-clearing strategies in the Cornell high intensity photoinjector: DC clearing electrodes, bunch gaps, and beam shaking. The photoinjector reaches a new regime of linac beam parameters where high continuous wave beam currents lead to ion trapping. Therefore ion mitigation strategies must be evaluated for this machine and other similar future high current linacs. We have developed several techniques to directly measure the residual trapped ions. Our two primary indicators of successful clearing are the amount of ion current removed by a DC clearing electrode, and the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation generated by beam-ion interactions. Measurements were taken for an electron beam with an energy of 5 MeV and continuous wave beam currents in the range of 1-20 mA. Several theoretical models have been developed to explain our data. Using them, we are able to estimate the clearing electrode voltage required for maximum ion clearing, the creation and clearing rates of the ions while employing bunch gaps, and the sinusoidal shaking frequency necessary for clearing via beam shaking. In all cases, we achieve a maximum ion clearing of at least 70% or higher, and in some cases our data is consistent with full ion clearing.

  14. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering From Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach To C-14 Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. W.; Galutschek, E.; Hotchkis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical 14C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. 12CH2 and 13CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance (˜15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO2 from ANSTO will be described.

  15. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering from Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach to C-14 Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Galutschek, Ernst; Hotchkis, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical 14C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. 12CH2 and 13CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance ({approx}15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO2 from ANSTO will be described.

  16. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering From Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach To C-14 Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F. W.; Galutschek, E.; Hotchkis, M.

    2009-03-10

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical {sup 14}C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. {sup 12}CH{sub 2} and {sup 13}CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance ({approx}15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO{sub 2} from ANSTO will be described.

  17. Highly selective and quantitative colorimetric detection of mercury(II) ions by carrageenan-functionalized Ag/AgCl nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Han, Sung Soo

    2017-03-15

    The natural algal polysaccharide carrageenan was used for the greener synthesis of silver/silver chloride nanoparticles (Carr-Ag/AgCl NPs) without any toxic chemicals. We report the robust, highly selective, and sensitive colorimetric sensing of Hg(2+) ions using Carr-Ag/AgCl NPs without any further surface modification. The dark-brown color of a solution of Carr-Ag/AgCl NPs turned to white in a concentration-dependent manner with the addition of Hg(2+) ions, confirming the interaction of Carr-Ag/AgCl NPs with Hg(2+) ions. The plot of the extinction ratio of absorbance at 350nm to 450nm (A350/A450) for Carr-Ag/AgCl NPs against the concentration of [Hg(2+)] ions was linear, and the calibration curve was A350/A450=1.05254+0.00318×CHg with a lower detection limit of 1μM. This portable and cost-effective method for mercury(II) ion sensing is widely applicable in on-field qualitative and quantitative measurements of [Hg(2+)] ions in environmental or biological samples.

  18. Detection of Copper(II) Ions Using Glycine on Hydrazine-Adsorbed Gold Nanoparticles via Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Nguyễn Hoàng; Seo, Chulhun; Joo, Sang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    A facile, selective, and sensitive detection method for the Cu2+ ions in environmental and biological solutions has been newly developed by observing the unique CN stretching peaks at ~2108 cm−1 upon the dissociative adsorption of glycine (GLY) in hydrazine buffer on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The relative abundance of Cu species on AuNPs was identified from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. UV-Vis spectra also indicated that the Au particles aggregated to result in the color change owing to the destabilization induced by the GLY-Cu2+ complex. The CN stretching band at ~2108 cm−1 could be observed to indicate the formation of the CN species from GLY on the hydrazine-covered AuNP surfaces. The other ions of Fe3+, Fe2+, Hg2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cr3+, Co2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Ca2+, NH4+, Na+, and K+ at high concentrations of 50 µM did not produce such spectral changes. The detection limit based on the CN band for the determination of the Cu2+ ion could be estimated to be as low as 500 nM in distilled water and 1 µM in river water, respectively. We attempted to apply our method to estimate intracellular ion detection in cancer cells for more practical purposes. PMID:27792178

  19. Trace explosive detection in aqueous samples by solid-phase extraction ion mobility spectrometry (SPE-IMS).

    PubMed

    Buxton, Tricia L; Harrington, Peter de B

    2003-02-01

    Law enforcement agencies use ion mobility spectrometers for the detection of explosives, drugs of abuse, and chemical warfare agents. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has the advantages of short analysis times, detections in the parts per billion concentrations, and high sensitivity. On-site environmental analysis of explosives or explosive residues in water is possible with ion mobility spectrometers. Unfortunately, the direct analysis of low levels of explosives in water is difficult. Extraction provides a method for pre-concentrating the analytes and removing interferents. Coupling solid-phase extraction (SPE) with IMS is useful for the identification of trace amounts of explosives in water. Commercially available SPE disks were used. After extraction, the sample disk is inserted into the ion mobility spectrometer, where the analytes are thermally desorbed from the disk. Concentrations as low as one part per trillion were detected with a Barringer Ionscan 350. An external computer and acquisition software (LabVIEW, National Instruments) were used to collect data. SIMPLISMA (SIMPLe-to-use-Interactive Self-modeling Mixture Analysis) was applied to the data to resolve features that vary with respect to time.

  20. Ruthenium-based metallacrown complexes for the selective detection of lithium ions in water and in serum by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Sébastien; Grote, Zacharias; Severin, Kay

    2009-03-21

    Fluorescent dihydroxypyridine ligands were prepared by attaching pyrene-, dansyl-, and methoxycoumarin-fluorophores via dimethyleneamine linkers. The reaction of these ligands with [(p-cymene)RuCl(2)](2) or [(C(6)H(5)CH(2)NMe(2)H)RuCl(2)](2)Cl(2) resulted in the formation of 12-metallacrown-3 complexes, which possess strong affinity for lithium ions. By a judicious choice of the fluorophore and the arene pi-ligand, a macrocycle was obtained that could be used in aqueous solution to selectively and quantitatively detect lithium ions by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  1. Feasibility investigation on deep ocean compact autonomous Raman spectrometer developed for in-situ detection of acid radical ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zengfeng; Li, Ying; Chen, Jing; Guo, Jinjia; Zheng, Rong'er

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed Deep Ocean Compact Autonomous Raman Spectrometer (DOCARS) system is introduced and used for in-situ detection of acid radical ions in this paper. To evaluate the feasibility and capability of DOCARS for quantitative analysis of the acid radical ions in the deep ocean, extensive investigations have been carried out both in laboratory and sea trials during the development phase. In the laboratory investigations, Raman spectra of the prepared samples (acid radical ions solutions) were obtained, and analyzed using the method of internal standard normalization in data processing. The Raman signal of acid radical ions was normalized by that of water molecules. The calibration curve showed that the normalized Raman signal intensity of SO{4/2-}, NO{3/-}, and HCO{2/-} increases linearly as the concentration rises with correlation coefficient R 2 of 0.99, 0.99, and 0.98 respectively. The linear function obtained from the calibration curve was then used for the analysis of the spectra data acquired in the sea trial under a simulating chemical field in the deep-sea environment. It was found that the detected concentration of NO{3/-} according to the linear function can reflect the concentration changes of NO{3/-} after the sample was released, and the detection accuracy of the DOCARS system for SO{4/2-} is 8%. All the results showed that the DOCARS system has great potential in quantitative detection of acid radical ions under the deep-sea environment, while the sensitivity of the DOCARS system is expected to be improved.

  2. High-throughput walkthrough detection portal for counter terrorism: detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor by atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Nakajima, Eri; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sakairi, Minoru

    2011-09-15

    With the aim of improving security, a high-throughput portal system for detecting triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor emitted from passengers and luggage was developed. The portal system consists of a push-pull air sampler, an atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source, and an explosives detector based on mass spectrometry. To improve the sensitivity of the explosives detector, a novel linear ion trap mass spectrometer with wire electrodes (wire-LIT) is installed in the portal system. TATP signals were clearly obtained 2 s after the subject under detection passed through the portal system. Preliminary results on sensitivity and throughput show that the portal system is a useful tool for preventing the use of TATP-based improvised explosive devices by screening persons in places where many people are coming and going.

  3. Development of a Position Sensitive Microstrip Detector System and its Readout Electronics Using ASICs Technologies for SAMURAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saastamoinen, A.; Baba, H.; Blackmon, J. C.; Elson, J.; Kurokawa, M.; McCleskey, M.; Otsu, H.; Rasco, B. C.; Roeder, B. T.; Sobotka, L. G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Yoneda, K.; Zenihiro, J.

    We are building a Si detector tracker system for the SAMURAI spectrometer. Characterizing the behavior of the detectors and associated electronics is essential for properly analyzing the future experimental results. We have performed test experiments to study the detector system response to heavy ion and proton beams of various energies. In this contribution we present some of the results and give an outlook of the future plans.

  4. Ionization mechanism of the ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) and its applications to chemical nerve agent detection.

    PubMed

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2009-11-01

    We present studies of the ionization mechanism operative in the ambient pressure pyroelectric ionization source (APPIS), along with applications that include detection of simulants for chemical nerve agents. It is found that ionization by APPIS occurs in the gas-phase. As the crystal is thermally cycled over a narrow temperature range, electrical discharges near the surface of the crystal produce energetic species which, through reactions with atmospheric molecules, result in reactant ions such as protonated water clusters or clusters of hydroxide and water. Reactant ions can be observed directly in the mass spectrometer. These go on to react with trace neutrals via proton transfer reactions to produce the ions observed in mass spectra, which are usually singly protonated or deprotonated species. Further implicating gas-phase ionization, observed product distributions are highly dependent on the composition of ambient gases, especially the concentration of water vapor and oxygen surrounding the source. For example, basic species such as triethylamine are observed as singly protonated cations at a water partial pressure of 10 torr. At a water pressure of 4 torr, reactive oxygen species are formed and lead to observation of protonated amine oxides. The ability of the APPIS source to detect basic molecules with high proton affinities makes it highly suited for the detection of chemical nerve agents. We demonstrate this application using simulants corresponding to VX and GA (Tabun). With the present source configuration pyridine is detected readily at a concentration of 4 ppm, indicating ultimate sensitivity in the high ppb range.

  5. Negative-ion formation in the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT by using the reversal electron attachment detection technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boumsellek, S.; Alajajian, S. H.; Chutjian, A.

    1992-01-01

    First results of a beam-beam, single-collision study of negative-ion mass spectra produced by attachment of zero-energy electrons to the molecules of the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT are presented. The technique used is reversal electron attachment detection (READ) wherein the zero-energy electrons are produced by focusing an intense electron beam into a shaped electrostatic field which reverses the trajectory of electrons. The target beam is introduced at the reversal point, and attachment occurs because the electrons have essentially zero longitudinal and radial velocity. The READ technique is used to obtain the 'signature' of molecular ion formation and/or fragmentation for each explosive. Present data are compared with results from atmospheric-pressure ionization and negative-ion chemical ionization methods.

  6. Charge exchange ionization in collision cells as a method to detect the presence of long-lived excited electronic states of polyatomic ions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, C H; Kim, M S; Choe, J C

    2001-10-01

    Charge exchange ionization in collision cells installed in a double focusing mass spectrometer with reversed geometry has been used to detect the presence of a long-lived excited electronic state of benzene ion. In particular, the first collision cell located between the ion source and the magnetic sector was modified to serve as an ion source for the reagent ion generated by charge exchange with the primary ion. Strong reagent ion signals were observed when the ionization energies of the reagents (1,3-C4H6, CS2, CH3Cl) were lower than the recombination energy (approximately 11.5 eV) of the excited state benzene ion, while the signals were negligible for reagents (CH3F,CH4) with higher ionization energy. The fact that a strong signal is observable only for electronically exoergic charge exchange is useful for detecting the presence of a long-lived electronically excited state.

  7. A novel voltammetric sensor for sensitive detection of mercury(II) ions using glassy carbon electrode modified with graphene-based ion imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Heydari, Abolfazl; Ghanei-Motlagh, Reza; Gupta, Vinod K

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a novel strategy was proposed to prepare ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) on the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Polymerization was performed using methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,2'-((9E,10E)-1,4-dihydroxyanthracene-9,10-diylidene) bis(hydrazine-1-carbothioamide) (DDBHCT) as the chelating agent and ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator, via surface imprinted technique. The RGO-IIP was characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrochemical procedure was based on the accumulation of Hg(II) ions at the surface of a modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with RGO-IIP. The prepared RGO-IIP sensor has higher voltammetric response compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP), traditional IIP and RGO. The RGO-IIP modified electrode exhibited a linear relationship toward Hg(II) concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 80 μg L(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.02 μg L(-1) (S/N=3), below the guideline value from the World Health Organization (WHO). The applicability of the proposed electrochemical sensor to determination of mercury(II) ions in different water samples was reported.

  8. Colloidal gold nanoparticle probe-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of chromium ions in water and serum samples

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xi; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Fu, Qiang-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Hui; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-09-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using gold nanoparticles coated with monoclonal antibody (McAb) for the detection of chromium ions (Cr) in water and serum samples was developed, optimized, and validated. Gold nanoparticles coated with affinity- purified monoclonal antibodies against isothiocyanobenzyl-EDTA (iEDTA)-chelated Cr3+ were used as the detecting reagent in this completive immunoassay-based one- step test strip. The ICA was investigated to measure chromium speciation in water samples. Chromium standard samples of 0-80 ng/mL in water were determined by the test strips. The results showed that the visual lowest detection limit (LDL) of the test strip was 50.0 ng/mL. A portable colorimetric lateral flow reader was used for the quantification of Cr. The results indicated that the linear range of the ICA with colorimetric detection was 5-80 ng/mL. The ICA was also validated for the detection of chromium ions in serum samples. The test trips showed high stability in that they could be stored at at 37 C for at least 12 weeks without significant loss of activity. The test strip also showed good selectivity for Cr detection with negligible interference from other heavy metals. Because of its low cost and short testing time (within 5 min), the test strip is especially suitable for on-site large- scale screening of Cr-polluted water samples, biomonitoring of Cr exposure, and many other field applications.

  9. Electrochemiluminescence of graphitic carbon nitride and its application in ultrasensitive detection of lead(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Lina; Kong, Qingkun; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) materials with a layered structure have unusual physicochemical properties. Herein it was shown that g-C3N4 quantum dots (QDs) obtained through a thermal-chemical etching route exhibited attractive upconversion and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) properties. After modification on nanoporous gold (NPG) with a sponge-like porous structure, g-C3N4 QDs were employed to fabricate an ECL sensor for the determination of Pb(2+) using target - dependent DNAzyme as the recognition unit. Moreover, magnetic reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (rGO) attached with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (rGO-Fe3O4) were obtained via a one-pot in situ reduction approach, and used as carriers of DNAzyme. To make full use of the unique magnetic property the prepared rGO-Fe3O4, a flow injection ECL detecting cell was designed using indium tin oxide (ITO) glass as working electrode. Due to the unique separation and enrichment properties of magnetic Fe3O4-rGO materials as well as wire-like conductivity of NPG, high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Pb(2+) in real water samples were achieved. This indicates that g-C3N4 has excellent anodic ECL performance in the presence of triethanolamine, and could be applied in real environmental samples analyses. Graphical Abstract Graphitic carbon nitride based electrochemiluminescence sensor for the sensitive monitor of lead(II) ions in real samples was constructed.

  10. Direct analysis in real time coupled to multiplexed drift tube ion mobility spectrometry for detecting toxic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Harris, Glenn A; Kwasnik, Mark; Fernández, Facundo M

    2011-03-15

    Current and future chemical threats to homeland security motivate the need for new chemical detection systems to provide border, transportation, and workplace security. We present the first successful coupling of a commercial direct analysis in real time (DART) ion source to a resistive glass monolithic drift tube ion mobility spectrometer (DTIMS) as the basis for a low maintenance, versatile, and robust chemical monitoring system. in situ ionization within the electric field gradient of the instrument enhances sensitivity and provides a safe sampling strategy. The instrument uses nitrogen as both the DART discharge and DTIMS drift gases, allowing for a high electric field to be used for ion separation while keeping cost-of-use low. With the use of a traditional signal averaging acquisition mode, the 95% probability of detection (POD) for analytes sampled from melting point capillary tubes was 11.81% v/v for DMMP, 1.13% v/v for 2-CEES, and 10.61 mM for methamidophos. Sensitivity was improved via a prototype transmission-mode geometry interface, resulting in an almost 2 orders of magnitude decrease in the POD level for DMMP (0.28% v/v). As an alternative to transmission mode operation, digital multiplexing of the DTIMS ion injection step was also implemented, finding a 3-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratios for 200 μs gate injections and a 4.5-fold for 400 μs gate injections.

  11. A library-screening approach for developing a fluorescence sensing array for the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Smith, David G; Sajid, Naveed; Rehn, Simone; Chandramohan, Ramya; Carney, Isaac J; Khan, Misbahul A; New, Elizabeth J

    2016-08-07

    Detection of individual metal ions is of importance across a range of fields of chemistry including environmental monitoring, and health and disease. Fluorescence is a highly sensitive technique and small fluorescent molecules are widely used for the detection and quantification of metal ions in various applications. Achieving specificity for a single metal from a single sensor is always a challenge. An alternative to selective sensing is the use of a number of non-specific sensors, in an array, which together respond in a unique pattern to each analyte. Here we show that screening a library of compounds can give a small sensor set that can be used to identify a range of metal ions following PCA and LDA. We explore a method for screening the initial compounds to identify the best performing sensors. We then present our method for reducing the size of the sensor array, resulting in a four-membered system, which is capable of identifying nine distinct metal ion species in lake water.

  12. Spontaneous Mass and Charge Losses from Single Multi-Megadalton Ions Studied by Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keifer, David Z.; Alexander, Andrew W.; Jarrold, Martin F.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous mass and charge losses from individual multi-megadalton ions have been observed with charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) by trapping single hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids for 3 s. Gradual increases in the oscillation frequency of single ions in the ion trap are attributed mainly to mass loss (probably solvent, water, and/or salt). The total mass lost during the 3 s trapping period peaks at around 20 kDa for 4 MDa HBV T = 4 capsids. Discrete frequency drops punctuate the gradual increases in the oscillation frequencies. The drops are attributed to a sudden loss of charge. In most cases a single positive charge is lost along with some mass (on average around 1000 Da). Charge loss occurs for over 40% of the trapped ions. It usually occurs near the beginning of the trapping event, and it occurs preferentially in regions of the trap with strong electric fields, indicating that external electric fields promote charge loss. This process may contribute to the decrease in m/z resolution that often occurs with megadalton ions.

  13. A highly sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for selective detection of zinc (II) ion based on the oxadiazole derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lu; Wang, Dan; Chen, Si-Hong; Wang, Dun-Jia; Yin, Guo-Dong

    2017-03-01

    A novel fluorescent chemosensor based on the oxadiazole, 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole, was designed and synthesized. The interaction of the oxadiazole with different metal ions had been investigated through UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra in 9:1 (v/v) ethanol-water (pH = 7.0) solution. The oxadiazole showed a pronounced fluorescence enhancement at 430 nm upon addition of Zn2 + in aqueous solution, whereas it had no apparent interference from other metal ions. The results indicated that the oxadiazole possessed high selectivity and sensitivity to Zn2 + ion. The stoichiometric ratio between the oxadiazole and Zn2 + ion was calculated to be 2:1 by Job plot experiment, meanwhile their binding modes was confirmed by 1H NMR and mass spectrometry. Their association constant was determined to be 1.95 × 105 M- 1 and the detection limit for Zn2 + ion was 6.14 × 10- 7 mol/L.

  14. Spontaneous Mass and Charge Losses from Single Multi-Megadalton Ions Studied by Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keifer, David Z.; Alexander, Andrew W.; Jarrold, Martin F.

    2017-03-01

    Spontaneous mass and charge losses from individual multi-megadalton ions have been observed with charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) by trapping single hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids for 3 s. Gradual increases in the oscillation frequency of single ions in the ion trap are attributed mainly to mass loss (probably solvent, water, and/or salt). The total mass lost during the 3 s trapping period peaks at around 20 kDa for 4 MDa HBV T = 4 capsids. Discrete frequency drops punctuate the gradual increases in the oscillation frequencies. The drops are attributed to a sudden loss of charge. In most cases a single positive charge is lost along with some mass (on average around 1000 Da). Charge loss occurs for over 40% of the trapped ions. It usually occurs near the beginning of the trapping event, and it occurs preferentially in regions of the trap with strong electric fields, indicating that external electric fields promote charge loss. This process may contribute to the decrease in m/ z resolution that often occurs with megadalton ions.

  15. The FIDIAS project: Development of a Micromegas TPC for the detection of low-energy heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguaz, Francisco José; Panebianco, Stefano; Axiotis, Michael; Druillole, Frédéric; Fanourakis, George; Geralis, Theodoros; Giomataris, Ioannis; Harissopulos, Sotirios; Lagoyannis, Anastasios; Papaevangelou, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Time Projection Chambers are widely used since many years for tracking and identification of charged particles in high energy physics. We present here a new R&D project, called FIDIAS, meant to investigate the feasibility of a Micromegas TPC for low energy heavy ions detection. In this framework, a TPC prototype based on Micromegas bulk technique has been extensively tested with spontaneous fission source. A deep analysis of the experimental results has been realized leading to a full characterization of the prototype in terms of gain, energy resolution and track reconstruction as a function of three working gas: helium, neon and argon. The encouraging results have also been compared to simulations, showing the Micromegas TPC is a very well suited detector for the detection of heavy ions in nuclear reactions at low energy.

  16. Generation and detection of metal ions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the pretreatment processes for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    The recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries brings benefits to both economic and environmental terms, but it can also lead to contaminants in a workshop environment. This study focused on metals, non-metals and volatile organic compounds generated by the discharging and dismantling pretreatment processes which are prerequisite for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries. After discharging in NaCl solution, metal contents in supernate and concentrated liquor were detected. Among results of condition #2, #3, #4 and #5, supernate and concentrated liquor contain high levels of Na, Al, Fe; middle levels of Co, Li, Cu, Ca, Zn; and low levels of Mn, Sn, Cr, Zn, Ba, K, Mg, V. The Hg, Ag, Cr and V are not detected in any of the analyzed supernate. 10wt% NaCl solution was a better discharging condition for high discharge efficiency, less possible harm to environment. To collect the gas released from dismantled LIB belts, a set of gas collecting system devices was designed independently. Two predominant organic vapour compounds were dimethyl carbonate (4.298mgh(-1)) and tert-amylbenzene (0.749mgh(-1)) from one dismantled battery cell. To make sure the concentrations of dimethyl carbonate under recommended industrial exposure limit (REL) of 100mgL(-1), for a workshop on dismantling capacity of 1000kg spent LIBs, the minimum flow rate of ventilating pump should be 235.16m(3)h(-1).

  17. Selective and simultaneous determination of phosphate and silicate ions in leaching process waters for ceramics glaze raw materials of narutal origin by ion-exclusion chromatography coupled with UV-detection after postcolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Ikedo, Mikaru; Mori, Masanobu; Kurachi, Kazumasa; Hu, Wenzhi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The selective and simultaneous ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) with UV-detection on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column in the H+ -form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) was developed and applied for the simultaneous determination of phosphate and silicate ions as the water quality parameters required for optimizing the water-leaching process for ceramics glaze raw materials of natural origin including feldspar, woods-ash, and straw-ash. Phosphate and silicate ions in these water-leaching process water samples were separated selectively from the coexisting anions such as sulfate, chloride, nitrate and carbonate ions, based on the ion-exclusion separation mechanism. They were detected selectively and simultaneously by a postcolumn derivatization with molybdenum-yellow using the UV-detector. Under the optimized separation and detection conditions (eluent, 0-1 mM sulfuric acid; reactant, 10 mM sodium molybdate-25 mM sulfuric acid; detector, UV at 370 nm; temperature, 45 degrees C), the linearity of calibration was in the range 0.1 - 10 ppm for both phosphate and silicate ions, and the detection limits at S/N = 3 were 2.58 ppb for silicate ions and 4.75 ppb for phosphate ions. The effectiveness of this method was demonstrated in practical applications to the water-leaching process for some ceramics glaze raw materials.

  18. Detection and quantification of chemical warfare agent precursors and surrogates by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gregory J; Milligan, Daniel B; McEwan, Murray J

    2009-11-01

    The rate coefficients and branching ratios of 15 chemical warfare agent precursor and surrogate compounds reacting with H(3)O(+), NO(+), and O(2)(+) have been measured in the laboratory using the selected ion flow tube (SIFT) technique. Measurement of the relevant kinetic parameters for these agents has enabled quantitative monitoring using the SIFT-MS analytical technique. Thirteen of the 15 compounds studied were found to have real-time detection limits in the parts-per-trillion-by-volume concentration range when measured on a standard commercial Voice100 instrument, with specific compounds having detection limits below 100 parts-per-trillion-by-volume.

  19. DNA Modified Fe3O4@Au Magnetic Nanoparticles as Selective Probes for Simultaneous Detection of Heavy Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Miao, Peng; Tang, Yuguo; Wang, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Driven by the urgent need to detect trace heavy metal ions in various real water samples, this article demonstrates for the first time an electrochemical biosensor based on DNA modified Fe3O4@Au magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). Three DNA probes are designed to contain certain mismatched base pairs. One is thiolated and modified on the surface of Fe3O4@Au NPs (DNA 1). The other two probes (DNA 2 and 3) are labeled with two independent electrochemical species. Stable structures of cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine and thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine formed in the presence of Ag(+) and Hg(2+) can assist the hybridization of DNA 1/DNA 2 and DNA 1/DNA 3, which locate corresponding electrochemical species onto the surface of the magnetic NPs. The achieved nanocomposites are then used as selective electrochemical probes for the detection of heavy metal ions by recording the square wave voltammetry signals. Simultaneous detection of Ag(+) and Hg(2+) is demonstrated without significant interference, and their individual high sensitivities are fundamentally preserved, which meet the requirements of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Furthermore, the proposed method has been challenged by various real water samples. The results confirm the DNA modified magnetic NPs based sensing method may have potential applications for the monitoring of heavy metal ions in real sample analysis.

  20. A core-shell structured nanocomposite material for detection, adsorption and removal of Hg(II) ions in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Tang, Shuangyang; Ding, Dexin; Hu, Nan; Yang, Shengyuan; He, Shuya; Wang, Yongdong; Tan, Yan; Sun, Jing

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, a core-shell structured nanocomposite material was prepared for the detection, adsorption and removal of Hg(ll) ions in aqueous solution. The core was made from Fe3O4 nanoparticles with superparamagnetic behavior and the outer shell was made from amorphous silica modified with pyrene-based sensing-probes. The material could detect and adsorb Hg(II) ions in aqueous solution due to its surface being modified with pyrene-based sensing-probes, and could easily be removed from the solution by magnetic force because of its core being made from magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles. This multifunctional core-shell structure was confirmed and characterized by TEM, IR spectra, TGA, XRD and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms. Experiments were conducted on its functions of detection, adsorption and removal of Hg(II) ions in aqueous solution. The experimental results showed that this composite material had high sensitivity and unique selectivity to Hg(II), and that it could easily be removed from the solution.

  1. A sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions based on anti-aggregation of unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Abbasi-Moayed, Samira

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions, based on anti-aggregation of D-penicillamine (D-PC) induced aggregated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. Copper ions can hinder the aggregation of AuNPs induced by D-PC, through formation of mixed-valence complex with D-PC that is a selective copper chelator. In the presence of a fixed amount of D-PC, the aggregation of AuNPs decreases with increasing concentrations of Cu(2+) along with a color change from blue to red in AuNPs solution and an increase in the absorption ratio (A520/A650). Under the optimum experimental conditions (pH 7, [AuNPs] =3.0 nmol L(-1) and [NaCl]=25 mmol L(-1)), a linear calibration curve for Cu(2+) was obtained within the range of 0.05-1.85 µmol L(-1) with a limit of detection (3Sb) of 30 nmol L(-1). Excellent selectivity toward Cu(2+) was observed among various metal ions due to a specific complex formation between Cu(2+) and D-PC. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the detection of Cu(2+) in various real samples.

  2. DNA derived fluorescent bio-dots for sensitive detection of mercury and silver ions in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Zhu, Xuefeng; Zhou, Shenghai; Yang, Guang; Gan, Wei; Yuan, Qunhui

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the high affinity between heavy metal ions and bio-molecules as well as the low toxicity of carbon-based quantum dots, we demonstrated the first application of a DNA derived carbonaceous quantum dots, namely bio-dots, in metal ion sensing. The present DNA-derived bio-dots contain graphitic carbon layers with 0.242 nm lattice fringes, exhibit excellent fluorescence property and can be obtained via a facile hydrothermal preparation procedure. Hg(II) and Ag(I) are prone to be captured by the bio-dots due to the existence of residual thymine (T) and cytosine (C) groups, resulting in a quenched fluorescence while other heavy metal ions would cause negligible changes on the fluorescent signals of the bio-dots. The bio-dots could be used as highly selective toxic-free biosensors, with two detecting linear ranges of 0-0.5 μM and 0.5-6 μM for Hg(II) and one linear range of 0-10 μM for Ag(I). The detection limits (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were estimated to be 48 nM for Hg(II) and 0.31 μM for Ag(I), respectively. The detection of Hg(II) and Ag(I) could also be realized in the real water sample analyses, with satisfying recoveries ranging from 87% to 100%.

  3. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  4. Negative-ion formation in the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT using the Reversal Electron Attachment Detection (READ) technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutijian, Ara; Boumsellek, S.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the search for high sensitivity and direct atmospheric sampling of trace species, techniques have been developed such as atmospheric-sampling, glow-discharge ionization (ASGDI), corona discharge, atmospheric pressure ionization (API), electron-capture detection (ECD), and negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) that are capable of detecting parts-per-billion to parts-per-trillion concentrations of trace species. These techniques are based on positive- or negative-ion formation via charge-transfer to the target, or electron capture under multiple-collision conditions in a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies at the source temperature. One drawback of the high-pressure, corona- or glow-discharge devices is that they are susceptible to interferences either through indistinguishable product masses, or through undesired ion-molecule reactions. The ASGDI technique is relatively immune from such interferences, since at target concentrations of less than 1 ppm the majority of negative ions arises via electron capture rather than through ion-molecule chemistry. A drawback of the conventional ECD, and possibly of the ASGDI, is that they exhibit vanishingly small densities of electrons with energies in the range 0-10 millielectron volts (meV), as can be seen from a typical Maxwellian electron energy distribution function at T = 300 K. Slowing the electrons to these subthermal (less than 10 meV) energies is crucial, since the cross section for attachment of several large classes of molecules is known to increase to values larger than 10(exp -12) sq cm at near-zero electron energies. In the limit of zero energy these cross sections are predicted to diverge as epsilon(exp -1/2), where epsilon is the electron energy. In order to provide a better 'match' between the electron energy distribution function and attachment cross section, a new concept of attachment in an electrostatic mirror was developed. In this scheme, electrons are brought to a momentary halt by

  5. Label-free fluorescent sensor for lead ion detection based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shenshan; Wu, Yuangen; Luo, Yanfang; Liu, Le; He, Lan; Xing, Haibo; Zhou, Pei

    2014-10-01

    A label-free fluorescent DNA sensor for the detection of lead ions (Pb(2+)) based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation is proposed in this article. A guanine (G)-rich oligonucleotide, T30695, was used as a recognition probe, and a DNA intercalator, SYBR Green I (SG), was used as a signal reporter. In the absence of Pb(2+), the SG intercalated with the single-stranded random-coil T30695 and emitted strong fluorescence. While in the presence of Pb(2+), the random-coil T30695 would fold into a G-quadruplex structure and the SG could barely show weak fluorescence, and the fluorescence intensity was inversely proportional to the involving amount of Pb(2+). Based on this, a selective lead ion sensor with a limit of detection of 3.79 ppb (parts per billion) and a detection range from 0 to 600 ppb was constructed. Because detection for real samples was also demonstrated to be reliable, this simple, low-cost, sensitive, and selective sensor holds good potential for Pb(2+) detection in real environmental samples.

  6. Heterometal-organic frameworks as highly sensitive and highly selective luminescent probes to detect I⁻ ions in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peng-Fei; Hu, Huan-Cheng; Zhang, Zhan-Yun; Xiong, Gang; Zhao, Bin

    2015-03-07

    Two cationic heterometal-organic frameworks (Eu-Zn (1·NO₃⁻) and Tb-Zn (2·NO₃⁻)) with NO3(-) counter-anions in the channels are structurally and luminously characterized. Both of them can serve as highly sensitive and highly selective luminescent probes for detecting I(-) ions in aqueous solutions. In particular, 2·NO₃⁻ can selectively and reversibly detect I(-) with a fast response time of just 10 s and an extremely low detection limit of 0.001 ppm. Mechanism studies reveal that I(-) is quickly oxidized to form I₃⁻with the help of 1·NO₃⁻ or 2·NO₃⁻, leading to luminescence quenching. This represents the first report of MOF-based luminescent probes for the detection of I(-) in aqueous solutions.

  7. Spectroscopic detection and state preparation of a single praseodymium ion in a crystal.

    PubMed

    Utikal, T; Eichhammer, E; Petersen, L; Renn, A; Götzinger, S; Sandoghdar, V

    2014-04-11

    The narrow optical transitions and long spin coherence times of rare earth ions in crystals make them desirable for a number of applications ranging from solid-state spectroscopy and laser physics to quantum information processing. However, investigations of these features have not been possible at the single-ion level. Here we show that the combination of cryogenic high-resolution laser spectroscopy with optical microscopy allows one to spectrally select individual praseodymium ions in yttrium orthosilicate. Furthermore, this spectral selectivity makes it possible to resolve neighbouring ions with a spatial precision of the order of 10 nm. In addition to elaborating on the essential experimental steps for achieving this long-sought goal, we demonstrate state preparation and read out of the three ground-state hyperfine levels, which are known to have lifetimes of the order of hundred seconds.

  8. Single glass nanopore-based regenerable sensing platforms with a non-immobilized polyglutamic acid probe for selective detection of cupric ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lizhen; He, Haili; Xu, Xiaolong; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-08-19

    A single glass capillary nanopore-based sensing platform for rapid and selective detection of cupric ions is demonstrated by utilizing polyglutamic acid (PGA) as a non-immobilized probe. The detection is based on the significant decrease of ionic current through nanopore and the reversal of ion current rectification responses induced by the chelated cupric ions on the probes when in the presence of cupric ions. PGA shows high selectivity for detecting cupric ions rather than other metal ions. The sensitivity of the sensing platform can be improved about 1-2 orders of magnitude by employing asymmetric salt gradients during the measurements. And the PGA-based nanopore sensing platform shows excellent regenerability for Cu(2+) sensing applications. In addition, the method is found effective and reliable for the detection of cupric ions in real samples with small volume down to 20 μL. This nanopore-based sensing platform will find promising practical applications for the detection of cupric ions.

  9. Integrated optic chemical sensor for the simultaneous detection and quantification of multiple ions. Final report, March--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, E.

    1995-09-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by Physical Optics Corporation (POC) on the DOE contract entitled {open_quotes}Integrated Optic Chemical Sensor for the Simultaneous Detection and Quantification of Multiple Metal Ions{close_quotes}. This project successfully demonstrated a multi-element integrated optic chemical sensor (IOCS) system capable of simultaneous detection and quantification of metal ions in a water flow stream. POC`s innovative integrated optic chemical sensor technology uses an array of chemically active optical waveguides integrated in parallel in a single small IOCS chip. The IOCS technique uses commonly available materials and straightforward processing to produce channel waveguides in porous glass, each channel treated with a chemical indicator that responds optically to heavy metal ions in a water flow stream. The porosity of the glass allows metal ions present in the water to diffuse into the glass and interact with the immobilized indicators, producing a measurable optical chance. For the {open_quotes}proof-of-concept{close_quotes} demonstration, POC designed and fabricated two types of IOCS chips. Type I uses an array of four straight channel waveguides, three of which are doped with a metal sensitive indicator, an ionophore. The undoped fourth channel is used as the reference channel. Type II uses a 1 x 4 star coupler structure with three sensing channels and a reference channel. Successful implementation of the IOCS technology is expected to have a broad impact on water quality control as well as in the commercial environmental monitoring market. Because of the self-referenced, multidetection capability of the IOCS technique, POC`s water quality sensors are expected to find markets in environmental monitoring and protection, ground water monitoring, and in-line process control. Specific applications include monitoring of chromium, copper, and iron ions in water discharged by the metal plating industry.

  10. Micro Ion Source Program NA22 Plutonium Detection Portfolio Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Delmore

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the micro ion source program was to enhance the performance of thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) for various actinides and fission products. The proposal hypothesized that when ions are created at the ion optic center of the mass spectrometer, ion transmission is significantly increased and the resulting ion beam is more sharply focused. Computer modeling demonstrated this logic. In order to prove this hypothesis it was first necessary to understand the chemistry and physics governing the particular ion production process that concentrates the emission of ions into a small area. This has been achieved for uranium and technetium, as was shown in the original proposal and the improvement of both the beam transmission and sharpness of focus were proven. Significantly improved analytical methods have been developed for these two elements based upon this research. The iodine portion of the proposal turned out to be impractical due to volatility of iodine and its compounds. We knew this was a possibility prior to research and we proceeded anyway but did not succeed. Plutonium is a potential option, but is not quite up to the performance level of resin beads. Now, we more clearly understand the chemical and physical issues for plutonium, but have not yet translated this knowledge into improved analytical processes. The problems are that plutonium is considerably more difficult to convert to the required intermediate species, plutonium carbide, and the chemical method we developed that works with uranium functions only moderately well with plutonium. We are of the opinion that, with this knowledge, similar progress can be made with plutonium.

  11. Efficient reaction based colorimetric probe for sensitive detection, quantification, and on-site analysis of nitrite ions in natural water resources.

    PubMed

    Adarsh, Nagappanpillai; Shanmugasundaram, Madhesh; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2013-11-05

    We have developed a novel aza-BODIPY probe for the sensitive colorimetric detection of the nitrite ions in the aqueous medium by a simple and direct method. This probe selectively recognizes the nitrite ions through a distinct visual color change from bright blue to intense green with a sensitivity of 20 ppb. Uniquely, this probe can be coated on a glass surface to fabricate a simple solid-state dipstick device that can be used for the visual detection of the nitrite ions in the presence of other competing anions in distilled as well as natural water resources like a sea, lake, and river. Furthermore, this probe can be used for the sensitive detection of the nitrate ions when coupled to a reduction step. Our results demonstrate that this probe not only can be used for the on-site analysis and quantification but also can replace the conventional spot test carried out for the nitrite ions in the laboratory practical experiments.

  12. Polyacrylamide-phytic acid-polydopamine conducting porous hydrogel for rapid detection and removal of copper (II) ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Chen, Hongda; Zhang, Hua; Ma, Lina; Wang, Zhenxin

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a conducting porous polymer hydrogel-based electrochemical sensor has been developed for rapid detection of copper (II) ions (Cu(2+)). The polymer (termed as PAAM/PA/PDA) hydrogel is prepared through multi-interactions of the monomers dopamine (DA), acrylamide (AAM) and phytic acid (PA) under mild ambient conditions: the AAM polymerizes through free-radical polymerization, DA occurs poly coupling reaction, and PA crosslinks polydopamine (PDA) and polyacrylamide (PAAM) by hydrogen bonds. The three dimensional (3D) network nanostructured PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel not only provides a large surface area for increasing the amount of immobilized molecules/ions, but also exhibits a good conductivity. The PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel-based electrochemical sensor exhibits a low detection limit (1nmolL(-)(1), S/N=3) and wide linear range (from 1nmolL(-)(1) to 1µmolL(-1)) for Cu(2+) detection in aqueous samples. Furthermore, the Cu(2+) can be sensitively detected by the electrochemical sensor in different sample matrices, indicating that the electrochemical sensor could be used to monitor Cu(2+) with reasonable assay performance in practical samples. The PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel also exhibits a good capacity to remove Cu(2+)(231.36±4.70mgg(-1)), which is superior to those of other adsorption materials reported in the literature. The facile synthesized PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel provides a novel and regenerable platform for monitoring and removing Cu(2+) in real samples.

  13. Carbon dots preparation as a fluorescent sensing platform for highly efficient detection of Fe(III) ions in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Hamishehkar, Hamed; Ghasemzadeh, Bahar; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Salehi, Roya; Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Water-soluble carbon dots (CDs) were prepared, using a facile hydrothermal oxidation route of cyclic oligosaccharide α-CD, as carbon sources, and alkali as additives. The successful synthesis of CDs was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), FTIR, UV-visible absorption, and emission fluorescence. The characterizations showed that the prepared CDs are spherical and well-dispersed in water with average diameters of approximately 2 nm. These water-soluble CDs have excellent photo stability towards photo bleaching during 30 days. The obtained CDs showed a strong emission at the wavelength of 450 nm, with an optimum excitation of 360 nm. The fluorescence quenching of CDs in the presence of Fe(III) ions was used as fluorescent probes for quantifying Fe(III) ions in aqueous solution. Under optimum condition, the fluorescence intensity versus Fe(III) concentration gave a linear response, according to Stern-Volmer equation. The linearity range of the calibration curve and the limit of detection were 1.60×10(-5) to 16.6×10(-5) mol L(-1), and 6.05×10(-6) mol L(-1), respectively, which was in the range for serum analysis of Fe(III). It was concluded that the prepared CDs had a great potential as fluorescent probes for applications in analysis of Fe(III) ions in the blood serum samples, which is hardly interfered by other ions.

  14. A catalytic chemodosimetric approach for detection of nanomolar cyanide ions in water, blood serum and live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Sandhu, Sana; Hundal, Geeta; Singh, Prabhpreet; Walia, Amandeep; Vanita, Vanita; Kumar, Subodh

    2015-12-07

    Naphthimidazolium based monocationic chemodosimeters CD-1 and CD-2 undergo cyanide mediated catalytic transformation in the presence of cyanide ions (0.01% to 1% of CD-1/CD-2 concentrations) with a turnover number from 70 to 360. These chemodosimeters can detect as low as 0.5 nM and 1 nM cyanide ions under nearly physiological conditions (HEPES buffer-DMSO (5%), pH 7.4). The structures of CD-1 and its cyanide induced hydrolyzed product 4 have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography. CD-1 can also be used for the determination of 2 nM cyanide in the presence of blood serum. CD-1 and CD-2 also find applications in live cell imaging of 10 nM cyanide ions in rat brain C6 glioma cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where high sensitivity towards cyanide ions has been achieved through catalytic hydrolysis of the fluorescent chemodosimeter.

  15. First in-situ detection of the cometary ammonium ion NH_4+ (protonated ammonia NH3) in the coma of 67P/C-G near perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Calmonte, U.; Combi, M. R.; De Keyser, J.; Dhooghe, F.; Fiethe, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galand, M.; Gasc, S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Hässig, M.; Héritier, K. L.; Kopp, E.; Le Roy, L.; Mandt, K. E.; Peroy, S.; Rubin, M.; Sémon, T.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Vigren, E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report the first in-situ detection of the ammonium ion NH_4+ at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/C-G) in a cometary coma, using the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) / Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS). Unlike neutral and ion spectrometers onboard previous cometary missions, the ROSINA/DFMS spectrometer, when operated in ion mode, offers the capability to distinguish NH_4+ from H2O+ in a cometary coma. We present here the ion data analysis of mass-to-charge ratios 18 and 19 at high spectral resolution and compare the results with an ionospheric model to put the these results into context. The model confirms that the ammonium ion NH_4+ is one of the most abundant ion species, as predicted, in the coma near perihelion.

  16. Ion chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate by post-column indirect fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Stalikas, Constantine D; Konidari, Constantina N; Nanos, Christos G

    2003-06-20

    This short paper highlights the suitability of ion chromatography with post-column indirect fluorescence detection to determine simultaneously nitrite and nitrate based on the quenching of tryptophan native fluorescence. The method uses an enhanced fluorescence mobile phase containing tryptophan and detects the suppression of fluorescence of the mobile phase due to the elution of the target ions. The phenomenon of fluorescence quenching of tryptophan is highly induced by the presence of phosphate ions. The quenched fluorescence intensity exhibits concentration dependence in the range 1-25 mg/l and 3-65 mg/l for nitrite and nitrate, respectively. The relative standard deviation for five replicates of a standard solution containing a mixture of 5 mg/l of nitrite and 10 mg/l of nitrate lies around 2.8%. This simple coupling technique results in a relatively sensitive, fast, and accurate method, allowing for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of nitrite and nitrate. The method can easily be implemented to real samples such as foodstuffs, fertilizers and soils and is proven to be precise and accurate when compared with reference methods.

  17. Bioinspired, direct synthesis of aqueous CdSe quantum dots for high-sensitive copper(II) ion detection.

    PubMed

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming; He, Man; Chen, Zhenjie; Zhang, Tao

    2013-11-21

    Luminescent CdSe semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), which are coated with a denatured bovine serum albumin (dBSA) shell, have been directly synthesized via a bioinspired approach. The dBSA coated CdSe QDs are ultrasmall (d < 2.0 nm) with a narrow size distribution and exhibit a strong green fluorescent emission at about 525 nm. They can be stored for months at room temperature and possess excellent stability against ultraviolet irradiation, high salt concentration, and a wide physiological range of pH. Systematic experimental investigations have shown the contribution of dBSA with free cysteine residues for both their effective ion chelating and surface passivating interactions during the formation and stabilization of CdSe QDs. The luminescent QDs are used for copper(II) ion detection due to their highly sensitive and selective fluorescence quenching response to Cu(2+). The concentration dependence of the quenching effect can be best described by the typical Stern-Volmer equation in a linearly proportional concentration of Cu(2+) ranging from 10 nM to 7.5 μM with a detection limit of 5 nM. As confirmed by various characterization results, a possible quenching mechanism is given: Cu(2+) ions are first reduced to Cu(+) by the dBSA shell and then chemical displacement between Cu(+) and Cd(2+) is performed at the surface of the ultrasmall metallic core to impact the fluorescence performance.

  18. Detection of sub-ppm traces of aqueous heavy-metal ions using micro-electro-mechanical beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahafrooz, Amir; Pourkamali, Siavash

    2009-11-01

    Capacitive silicon micro-mechanical resonators have been utilized in this work as ultra-sensitive mass sensors for the detection of trace amounts of copper ions in water samples. The approach is based on the reduction of aqueous metal ions by the silicon in a resonant structure and consequently deposition of a very thin metal layer on the resonator surface changing its resonant frequency. Measurements demonstrate successful detection of sub-ppm concentrations of copper(II) ions in water. Relatively large frequency shifts (hundreds of ppm) have been measured for resonators exposed to copper concentrations as low as 4 µM (0.26 ppm). An analytical model for the resonant frequency of the resulting complex beams has been derived and used to calculate the thickness of the deposited copper layer based on the measured frequency shifts. The model shows that the measured frequency shifts correspond to only a few atomic layers of copper (as thin as ~7 Å) deposited on the resonator surfaces. This corresponds to a mass sensitivity of more than 4000 Hz µg-1 cm-2 which is much larger than the highest mass sensitivities measured for quartz crystal microbalances.

  19. Selective and Quantitative Detection of Trace Amounts of Mercury(II) Ion (Hg²⁺) and Copper(II) Ion (Cu²⁺) Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenqiong; Chase, D Bruce; Sparks, Donald L; Rabolt, John F

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based heavy metal ion sensor targeting the detection of mercury(II) ion (Hg(2+)) and copper(II) ion (Cu(2+)) with high sensitivity and selectivity. To achieve the detection of vibrational-spectroscopically silent heavy metal ions, the SERS substrate composed of gold nanorod (AuNR)-polycaprolactone (PCL) nanocomposite fibers was first functionalized using metal ion-binding ligands. Specifically, 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole dimer (di-DMT) and trimercaptotriazine (TMT) were attached to the SERS substrates serving as bridging molecules to capture Hg(2+) and Cu(2+), respectively, from solution. Upon heavy metal ion coordination, changes in the vibrational spectra of the bridging molecules, including variations in the peak-intensity ratios and peak shifts were observed and taken as indicators of the capture of the target ions. With rigorous spectral analysis, the coordination mechanism between the heavy metal ion and the corresponding bridging molecule was investigated. Mercury(II) ion primarily interacts with di-DMT through the cleavage of the disulfide bond, whereas Cu(2+) preferentially interacts with the heterocyclic N atoms in TMT. The specificity of the coordination chemistry provided both di-DMT and TMT with excellent selectivity for the detection of Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) in the presence of other interfering metal ion species. In addition, quantitative analysis of the concentration of the heavy metal ions was achieved through the construction of internal calibration curves using the peak-intensity ratios of 287/387 cm(-1) for Hg(2+) and 1234/973 cm(-1) for Cu(2+).

  20. Amperometric Detection of Aqueous Silver Ions by Inhibition of Glucose Oxidase Immobilized on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rust, Ian M; Goran, Jacob M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2015-07-21

    An amperometric glucose biosensor based on immobilization of glucose oxidase on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) was successfully developed for the determination of silver ions. Upon exposure to glucose, a steady-state enzymatic turnover rate was detected through amperometric oxidation of the H2O2 byproduct, directly related to the concentration of glucose in solution. Inhibition of the steady-state enzymatic glucose oxidase reaction by heavy metals ions such as Ag(+), produced a quantitative decrease in the steady-state rate, subsequently creating an ultrasensitive metal ion biosensor through enzymatic inhibition. The Ag(+) biosensor displayed a sensitivity of 2.00 × 10(8) ± 0.06 M(-1), a limit of detection (σ = 3) of 0.19 ± 0.04 ppb, a linear range of 20-200 nM, and sample recovery at 101 ± 2%, all acquired at a low-operating potential of 0.05 V (vs Hg/Hg2SO4). Interestingly, the biosensor does not display a loss in sensitivity with continued use due to the % inhibition based detection scheme: loss of enzyme (from continued use) does not influence the % inhibition, only the overall current associated with the activity loss. The heavy metals Cu(2+) and Co(2+) were also detected using the enzyme biosensor but found to be much less inhibitory, with sensitivities of 1.45 × 10(6) ± 0.05 M(-1) and 2.69 × 10(3) ± 0.07 M(-1), respectively. The mode of GOx inhibition was examined for both Ag(+) and Cu(2+) using Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots, where a strong correlation was observed between the inhibition constants and the biosensor sensitivity.

  1. Design and synthesis of a terbium(III) complex-based luminescence probe for time-gated luminescence detection of mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guanfeng; Ye, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Run; Wang, Guilan; Yuan, Jingli

    2012-01-01

    Time-gated luminescence detection technique using lanthanide complexes as luminescent probes is a useful and highly sensitive method. However, the effective application of this technique is limited by the lack of the target-responsive luminescent lanthanide complexes that can specifically recognize various analytes in aqueous solutions. In this work, a dual-functional ligand that can form a stable complex with Tb(3+) and specifically recognize Hg(2+) ions in aqueous solutions, N,N,N(1),N(1)-{[2,6-bis(3'-aminomethyl-1'-pyrazolyl)-4-[N,N-bis(3″,6″-dithiaoctyl)-aminomethyl]- pyridine]} tetrakis(acetic acid) (BBAPTA), has been designed and synthesized. The luminescence of its Tb(3+) complex is weak, but can be effectively enhanced upon reaction with Hg(2+) ions in aqueous solutions. The luminescence response investigations of BBAPTA-Tb(3+) to various metal ions indicate that the complex has a good luminescence sensing selectivity for Hg(2+) ions, but not for other metal ions. Thus a highly sensitive time-gated luminescence detection method for Hg(2+) ions was developed by using BBAPTA-Tb(3+) as a luminescent probe. The dose-dependent luminescence enhancement of the probe shows a good linearity with a detection limit of 17 nM for Hg(2+) ions. These results demonstrated the efficacy and advantages of the new Tb(3+) complex-based luminescence probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg(2+) ions.

  2. High adsorptive γ-AlOOH(boehmite)@SiO2/Fe3O4 porous magnetic microspheres for detection of toxic metal ions in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Yang, Ran; Zhang, Yong-Xing; Wang, Lun; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2011-10-21

    γ-AlOOH(boehmite)@SiO(2)/Fe(3)O(4) porous magnetic microspheres with high adsorption capacity toward heavy metal ions were found to be useful for the simultaneous and selective electrochemical detection of five metal ions, such as ultratrace zinc(II), cadmium(II), lead(II), copper(II), and mercury(II), in drinking water.

  3. Detection of ion micromotion in a linear Paul trap with a high finesse cavity.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Boon Leng; Lewty, Nicholas C; Cazan, Radu; Barrett, Murray D

    2013-05-06

    We demonstrate minimization of ion micromotion in a linear Paul trap with the use of a high finesse cavity. The excess ion micromotion projected along the optical cavity axis or along the laser propagation direction manifests itself as sideband peaks around the carrier in the ion-cavity emission spectrum. By minimizing the sideband height in the emission spectrum, we are able to reduce the micromotion amplitude along two directions to approximately the spread of the ground state wave function. This method is useful for cavity QED experiments as it describes the possibility of efficient 3-D micromotion compensation despite optical access limitations imposed by the cavity mirrors. We also show that, in principle, sub-nanometer micromotion compensation is achievable with our current system.

  4. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts and noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.

  5. Analytical strategies based on quantum dots for heavy metal ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-González, Margarita; Carrillo-Carrion, Carolina

    2014-10-01

    Heavy metal contamination is one of the major concerns to human health because these substances are toxic and retained by the ecological system. Therefore, in recent years, there has been a pressing need for fast and reliable methods for the analysis of heavy metal ions in environmental and biological samples. Quantum dots (QDs) have facilitated the development of sensitive sensors over the past decade, due to their unique photophysical properties, versatile surface chemistry and ligand binding ability, and the possibility of the encapsulation in different materials or attachment to different functional materials, while retaining their native luminescence property. This paper comments on different sensing strategies with QD for the most toxic heavy metal ions (i.e., cadmium, Cd2+; mercury, Hg and lead, Pb2+). Finally, the challenges and outlook for the QD-based sensors for heavy metals ions are discussed.

  6. The role of copper ions in pathophysiology and fluorescent sensors for the detection thereof.

    PubMed

    Verwilst, Peter; Sunwoo, Kyoung; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-04-04

    Copper ions are indispensible to life and maintaining tight control over the homeostasis of copper ions in the body is a prerequisite to sustaining health. Aberrations in normal copper levels, both systemic as well as on a tissue or cellular scale, are implicated in a wide range of diseases, such as Menkes disease, Wilson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (prion diseases). The current understanding of how copper influences these diseases is described. The field of fluorescent copper sensors both functioning via a reaction based mechanism as well as by directly binding copper ions has known an inflation in recent years, and the importance of this field to elucidating the role of copper in cell biology is pointed out. Progress in these tightly interwoven fields has resulted in a better understanding of a number of diseases related to copper imbalances and current developments might open the path for novel and innovating therapies to address these diseases.

  7. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; ...

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts andmore » noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.« less

  8. Detecting weak fluorescence turn-on in the presence of Pb2+ heavy metal ion using coaxial fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianjun; Chiniforooshan, Yasser; Hao, Wenhui; Bock, Wojtek J.; Wang, Zhi Yuan

    2013-10-01

    This paper is devoted to examining the ability of a coaxial fiber-optic sensor (FOS) in detecting weak fluorescent light and weak fluorescence "turn-on" in the presence of trace heavy metal ion Pb2+. The captured fluorescent signal is detected by the Ocean Optics QE65000 spectrometer. The stock solutions include Pb2+ acetate in water (0.01 M) and a small molecule probe in water. The preliminary experiment shows that this FOS offers the Pb2+ detection limit (DL) of 1.26×10-4 mg/mL. The advantages, limitations and further improvements of this coaxial FOS are discussed in comparison with the bench-top instruments in terms of the abilities of signal light capture and stray excitation light suppression.

  9. The detection of piroxicam, tenoxicam and their metabolites in equine urine by electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Andrew R; Suann, Craig J; Stenhouse, Allen M

    2004-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted into the metabolism and urinary excretion of orally administered piroxicam and tenoxicam in the horse. The major component detected in urine after the administration of piroxicam was 5'-hydroxypiroxicam, which was detectable up to 24 h post-administration. Unchanged piroxicam was present only as a minor component. In contrast, unchanged tenoxicam was the major component observed after the administration of tenoxicam, being detectable for 72 h post-administration, while 5'-hydroxytenoxicam was a minor component. Phase II beta-glucuronide conjugation in each case was found to be negligible. The ion trap mass spectral characteristics of piroxicam, tenoxicam, 5'-hydroxypiroxicam and 5'-hydroxytenoxicam under electrospray ionisation conditions were examined in some detail.

  10. Rapid and precise scanning helium ion microscope milling of solid-state nanopores for biomolecule detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jijin; Ferranti, David C; Stern, Lewis A; Sanford, Colin A; Huang, Jason; Ren, Zheng; Qin, Lu-Chang; Hall, Adam R

    2011-06-10

    We report the formation of solid-state nanopores using a scanning helium ion microscope. The fabrication process offers the advantage of high sample throughput along with fine control over nanopore dimensions, producing single pores with diameters below 4 nm. Electronic noise associated with ion transport through the resultant pores is found to be comparable with levels measured on devices made with the established technique of transmission electron microscope milling. We demonstrate the utility of our nanopores for biomolecular analysis by measuring the passage of double-strand DNA.

  11. Detection of high-energy heavy ions using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Takechi, Seiji; Morinaga, Shin-ya; Kurozumi, Atsuma; Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Hiromi; Murakami, Takeshi; Uchihori, Yukio; Okada, Nagaya

    2009-04-15

    The characteristics of a radiation detector fabricated with stacks of piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) elements were studied by irradiating it with a 400 MeV/n xenon (Xe) beam for various beam pulse durations. This detector is referred to as the multilayered detector (MD). To understand the production mechanism behind the output voltage obtained from the MD, measurement of the spatial distribution of the output signals generated in the MD was attempted. It was found that the amplitude observed was dependent on the number of Xe ions per unit time and the amount of ionization loss energy of Xe ions in PZT.

  12. DNA-based Nanoconstructs for the Detection of Ions and Biomolecules with Related Raman/SERS Signature Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Kimber L.

    The utilization of DNA aptamers and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of ions and biomolecules was investigated. In recent years, there have been many studies based on the use of DNA and RNA aptamers, which are single stranded oligonucleotides capable of binding to biomolecules, other molecules, and ions. In many of these cases, the conformational changes of these DNA and RNA aptamers are suitable to use fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) or nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) techniques to detect such analytes. Coupled with this growth in such uses of aptamers, there has been an expanded use of semiconductor quantum dots as brighter, longer-lasting alternatives to fluorescent dyes in labeling and detection techniques of interest in biomedicine and environmental monitoring. Thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) and a zinc aptamer were used to detect mercury, lead, zinc, and cadmium. These probes were tested in a liquid assay as well as on a filter paper coupon. Biomolecules were also studied and detected using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), including DNA aptamers and C-reactive protein (CRP). Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for sensor development, label-free detection, and has the potential for remote sensing. Raman spectra provide information on the vibrational modes or phonons, between and within molecules. Therefore, unique spectral fingerprints for single molecules can be obtained. SERS is accomplished through the use of substrates with nanometer scale geometries made of metals with many free electrons, such as silver, gold, or copper. In this research silver SERS substrates were used to study the SERS signature of biomolecules that typically produce very weak Raman signals.

  13. Highly sensitive and selective detection of Pb2+ ions using a novel and simple DNAzyme-based quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation biosensor.

    PubMed

    Teh, Hui Boon; Li, Haiyan; Yau Li, Sam Fong

    2014-10-21

    A novel, label-free DNAzyme-based quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) biosensor was developed for the highly sensitive and specific detection of Pb(2+) ions. To enhance the performance of the sensor, oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles were used for both frequency and dissipation amplification. This sensor was developed by immobilizing Pb(2+)-specific DNAzymes onto the QCM-D sensor surface and allowing them to hybridize with substrate-functionalized AuNPs. The DNAzyme catalyzed the cleavage of the substrate in the presence of Pb(2+) ions, causing the cleaved substrate-functionalized AuNPs to be removed from the sensor surface. Thus, Pb(2+) ions can be determined on-line by monitoring the change in frequency and dissipation signals. The results revealed that the sensor showed a sensitive response to Pb(2+) ions with detection limits of 14 nM and 20 nM for frequency and dissipation, respectively. This QCM-D biosensor also exhibited excellent selectivity toward Pb(2+) ions in the presence of other divalent metal ions. In addition, the approach was able to detect Pb(2+) in tap water, demonstrating its great potential for monitoring drinking water quality. The proposed sensor system described here represents a new class of lead ion sensor. Its simple detection strategy makes it feasible for 'pollution-free' detection; thus, the approach could have applications in on-line water quality monitoring.

  14. The Use of Neutron Analysis Techniques for Detecting The Concentration And Distribution of Chloride Ions in Archaeological Iron.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, D; Rimmer, M; Kasztovszky, Z; Kis, Z; Maróti, B; Szentmiklósi, L

    2014-10-01

    Chloride (Cl) ions diffuse into iron objects during burial and drive corrosion after excavation. Located under corrosion layers, Cl is inaccessible to many analytical techniques. Neutron analysis offers non-destructive avenues for determining Cl content and distribution in objects. A pilot study used prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and prompt gamma activation imaging (PGAI) to analyse the bulk concentration and longitudinal distribution of Cl in archaeological iron objects. This correlated with the object corrosion rate measured by oxygen consumption, and compared well with Cl measurement using a specific ion meter. High-Cl areas were linked with visible damage to the corrosion layers and attack of the iron core. Neutron techniques have significant advantages in the analysis of archaeological metals, including penetration depth and low detection limits.

  15. External second-gate Fourier transform ion mobility spectrometry: parametric optimization for detection of weapons of mass destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Edward E.

    2004-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is recognized as one of the most sensitive and robust techniques for the detection of narcotics, explosives and chemical warfare agents. IMS is widely used in forensic, military and security applications. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforst have mandated that equal importance be placed on the time required to obtain results as well as the quality of the analytical data. In this regard IMS is virtually unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity have to be considered. The problem with conventional (signal averaging) IMS systems is the fixed duty cycle of the entrance gate that restricts to less than 1%, the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations that degrade the spectral resolution contributing to misidentifications and false positives.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of bis-appended 1,2,3-triazole probe for the detection of Cu(II) ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Rhodes, Shannon; Winder, Domonique; Atkinson, Austin; Gibson, Jaclyn; Ming, Weihua; Padgett, Clifford; Landge, Shainaz; Aiken, Karelle

    2017-04-01

    A novel bis-1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazole chemosensor, accessed with "Click Chemistry", was probed for its recognition of metal ions. The interaction of the sensor with various cation analytes was investigated by 1H-NMR, UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The bis-triazole is selective for Cu(II) with a detection limit in the micromolar concentration range and a clear to yellow colorimetric response that is exclusive to that ion is observed. The stoichiometry of probe to Cu(II), 2:1, was determined with Job's plots based on titration studies using UV-absorption and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Computational and spectroscopic investigations revealed that the sensor binds to Cu(II) via its triazole units.

  17. Synthesis of a novel fluorescent sensor bearing dansyl fluorophores for the highly selective detection of mercury (II) ions.

    PubMed

    Wanichacheva, Nantanit; Watpathomsub, Supranee; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Grudpan, Kate

    2010-03-12

    A new macromolecule possessing two dansyl moieties and based on 2-[4-(2-aminoethylthio)butylthio]ethanamine was prepared as a fluorescent sensor and its mercury sensing properties toward various transition metal, alkali, and alkali earth ions were investigated. The designed compound exhibited pronounced Hg2+-selective ON-OFF type fluorescence switching upon binding. The new compound provided highly selective sensing to Hg2+ in acetonitrile-water solvent mixtures with a detection limit of 2.49 x 10(-7) M or 50 ppb. The molecular modeling results indicated that ions-recognition of the sensor originated from a self assembly process of the reagent and Hg2+ to form a helical wrapping structure with the favorable electrostatic interactions of Hg2+coordinated with sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen atoms and aromatic moieties.

  18. The Use of Neutron Analysis Techniques for Detecting The Concentration And Distribution of Chloride Ions in Archaeological Iron

    PubMed Central

    Watkinson, D; Rimmer, M; Kasztovszky, Z; Kis, Z; Maróti, B; Szentmiklósi, L

    2014-01-01

    Chloride (Cl) ions diffuse into iron objects during burial and drive corrosion after excavation. Located under corrosion layers, Cl is inaccessible to many analytical techniques. Neutron analysis offers non-destructive avenues for determining Cl content and distribution in objects. A pilot study used prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and prompt gamma activation imaging (PGAI) to analyse the bulk concentration and longitudinal distribution of Cl in archaeological iron objects. This correlated with the object corrosion rate measured by oxygen consumption, and compared well with Cl measurement using a specific ion meter. High-Cl areas were linked with visible damage to the corrosion layers and attack of the iron core. Neutron techniques have significant advantages in the analysis of archaeological metals, including penetration depth and low detection limits. PMID:26028670

  19. The 10B based Jalousie neutron detector - An alternative for 3He filled position sensitive counter tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henske, M.; Klein, M.; Köhli, M.; Lennert, P.; Modzel, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, U.

    2012-09-01

    Over the last decades 3He filled proportional counter tubes were the working horse employed to serve as neutron counters especially in cases where large area coverage was required. Today the lack of 3He demands the development of an alternative technology. Here we present a prototype neutron detector that is based on a concept with solid 10B as neutron converter and aims for large area neutron detection applications. We report on first experimental results obtained with this prototype to demonstrate the feasibility and operational readiness of our concept.

  20. Dissociative Recombination of Molecular Ions for Astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Oldrich; Becker, A.; Buhr, H.; Fleischmann, Andreas; Gamer, Lisa; Geppert, W.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Schwalm, D.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2014-06-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions is a key chemical process in the cold interstellar medium (ISM). DR affects the composition, charge state, and energy balance of such environments. Astrochemical models of the ISM require reliable total DR cross sections as well as knowledge of the chemical composition of the neutral DR products. We have systematically measured DR for many astrophysically relevant molecular ions utilizing the TSR storage ring at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, Germany. We used the merged ion-electron beam technique combined with an energy- and position-sensitive imaging detector and are able to study DR down to plasma temperatures as low as 10 K. The DR count rate is used to obtain an absolute merged beams DR rate coefficient from which we can derive a thermal rate coefficient needed for plasma models. Additionally we determine the masses of the DR products by measuring their kinetic energy in the laboratory reference frame. This allows us to assign particular DR fragmentation channels and to obtain their branching ratios. All this information is particularly important for understanding DR of heteronuclear polyatomic ions. We will present DR results for several ions recently investigated at TSR. A new Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) is currently being commissioned at MPIK. With the chamber cooled down to ~10 K and a base pressure better than 10-13 mbar, this setup will allow internal cooling of the stored ions down to their rotational ground states, thus opening a new era in DR experiments. New technological challenges arise due to the ultracold, ultra-high vacuum environment of the CSR and thus the detection techniques used at TSR cannot be easily transferred to CSR. We will present new approaches for DR fragment detection in cryogenic environment. This work is supported in part by NASA and the NSF.

  1. Microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry for the direct detection of copper and molybdenum ions in aqueous liquids.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Runzhi; Wang, Shangxian; Zou, Wei; Zhu, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT) is a simple and low power-consumption ambient ion source. And the MPT Mass spectra of many metal elements usually exhibit some novel features different from their inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectra, which may be helpful for metal element analysis. Here, we presented the results about the MPT mass spectra of copper and molybdenum elements by a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). The generated copper or molybdenum contained ions in plasma were characterized further in collision-induced dissociated (CID) experiments. These researches built a novel, direct and sensitive method for the direct analysis of trace levels of copper and molybdenum in aqueous liquids. Quantitative results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) by using MS(2) procedure was estimated to be 0.265 µg/l (ppb) for copper and 0.497 µg/l for molybdenum. The linear dynamics ranges cover at least 2 orders of magnitude and the analysis of a single aqueous sample can be completed in 5-6 min with a reasonable semi-quantitative sense. Two practical aqueous samples, milk and urine, were also analyzed qualitatively with reasonable recovery rates and RSD. These experimental data demonstrated that the MPT MS is able to turn into a promising and hopeful tool in field analysis of copper and molybdenum ions in water and some aqueous media, and can be applied in many fields, such as environmental controlling, hydrogeology, and water quality inspection. Moreover, MPT MS could also be used as the supplement of ICP-MS for the rapid and in-situ analysis of metal ions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Water soluble and efficient amino acid Schiff base receptor for reversible fluorescence turn-on detection of Zn2+ ions: Quantum chemical calculations and detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subha, L.; Balakrishnan, C.; Natarajan, Satheesh; Theetharappan, M.; Subramanian, Balanehru; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    An amino acid Schiff base (R) capable of recognizing Zn2+ ions selectively and sensitively in an aqueous medium was prepared and characterized. Upon addition of Zn2+ ions, the receptor exhibits fluorescence intensity enhancements ( 40 fold) at 460 nm (quantum yield, Φ = 0.05 for R and Φ = 0.18 for R-Zn2+) and can be detected by naked eye under UV light. The receptor can recognize the Zn2+ (1.04 × 10- 8 M) selectively for other metal ions in the pH range of 7.5-11. The Zn2+ chelation with R decreases the loss of energy through non-radiative transition and leads to fluorescence enhancement. The binding mode of the receptor with Zn2+ was investigated by 1H NMR titration and further validated by ESI-MS. The elemental color mapping and SEM/EDS analysis were also used to study the binding of R with Zn2+. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to understand the binding mechanism. The receptor was applied as a microbial sensor for Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  3. DETERMINATION OF BROMATE IN DRINKING WATERS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromate is a disinfection by-product in drinking water, formed during the ozonation of source water containing bromide. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer is combined with an ion chromatograph for the analysis of bromate in drinking waters. Three chromatographic colu...

  4. Synthesis of aluminum oxide supported fluorescent gold nanodots for the detection of silver ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Yeh, Ting-Yin; Ou, Chung-Mao; Shih, Chung-Chien; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-06-07

    Photoluminescent gold nanodots (Au NDs) on aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) with the emission wavelengths ranging from 510 to 630 nm are unveiled. Orange Al2O3 NP@AuNDs show high selectivity and sensitivity towards Ag(+) ions by metallophilic Ag(+)-Au(+) interactions and induced fluorescence quenching of Au NDs.

  5. A competitive immunochromatographic assay based on a novel probe for the detection of mercury (II) ions in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Pan, Fengguang; Li, Yansong; Lu, Shiying; Ren, Honglin; Shen, Qingfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Zhang, Junhui; Chen, Qijun; Liu, Zengshan

    2010-07-15

    Mercury ions (Hg(2+)) are one of the most dangerous pollutants. Even at low concentration, it causes serious environmental and health problems. Current methods for the detection of Hg(2+) in environmental samples are tedious and time consuming because they require sophisticated instrumentation and complicated sample pre-treatment processes. In this work, a novel probe with high selectivity towards Hg(2+) was synthesized and a one step competitive immunochromatographic assay based on the probe for the detection of Hg(2+) was developed and applied for water samples. The detection conjugate was immobilized on one end of the nitrocellulose membrane (detection line) and anti-BSA polyclonal antibody was immobilized on the other end of the membrane (control line). Hg(2+) in samples competed with the probe to bind with immobilized detection conjugate. The visual detection limit of Hg(2+) in spiked water samples was found to be about 1 ppb. The qualitative assay can be performed within 15 min. The advantages of the technique are rapidity, low cost and without the need of any equipment and complicated sample preparation.

  6. An ion-exchange nanomembrane sensor for detection of nucleic acids using a surface charge inversion phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Satyajyoti; Slouka, Zdenek; Shah, Sunny S; Behura, Susanta K; Shi, Zonggao; Stack, M Sharon; Severson, David W; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2014-10-15

    We present a novel low-cost biosensor for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of nucleic acids based on an ionic diode feature of an anion exchange nanoporous membrane under DC bias. The ionic diode feature is associated with external surface charge inversion on the positively charged anion exchange nanomembrane upon hybridization of negatively charged nucleic acid molecules to single-stranded oligoprobes functionalized on the membrane surface resulting in the formation of a cation selective monolayer. The resulting bipolar membrane causes a transition from electroconvection-controlled to water-splitting controlled ion conductance, with a large ion current signature that can be used to accurately quantify the hybridized nucleic acids. The platform is capable of distinguishing two base-pair mismatches in a 22-base pairing segment of microRNAs associated with oral cancer, as well as serotype-specific detection of dengue virus. We also show the sensor' capability to selectively capture target nucleic acids from a heterogeneous mixture. The limit of detection is 1 pM for short 27 base target molecules in a 15-min assay. Similar hybridization results are shown for short DNA molecules as well as RNAs from Brucella and Escherichia coli. The versatility and simplicity of this low-cost biosensor should enable point-of-care diagnostics in food, medical and environmental safety markets.

  7. Carbon nanoparticle-based ratiometric fluorescent sensor for detecting mercury ions in aqueous media and living cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Minhuan; Zhang, Jinfeng; Chui, Ying-San; Wang, Pengfei; Chen, Xianfeng; Lee, Chun-Sing; Kwong, Hoi-Lun; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-12-10

    A novel nanohybrid ratiometric fluorescence sensor is developed for selective detection of mercuric ions (Hg(2+)), and the application has been successfully demonstrated in HEPES buffer solution, lake water, and living cells. The sensor comprises water-soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) and Rhodamine B (RhB) and exhibits their corresponding dual emissions peaked at 437 and 575 nm, respectively, under a single excitation wavelength (350 nm). The photoluminescence of the CNPs in the nanohybrid system can be completely quenched by Hg(2+) through effective electron or energy transfer process due to synergetic strong electrostatic interaction and metal-ligand coordination between the surface functional group of CNPs and Hg(2+), while that of the RhB remains constant. This results in an obviously distinguishable fluorescence color variation (from violet to orange) of the nanohybrid solution. This novel sensor can effectively identify Hg(2+) from other metal ions with relatively low background interference even in a complex system such as lake water. The detection limit of this method is as low as 42 nM. Furthermore, the sensing technique is applicable to detect Hg(2+) in living cells.

  8. Highly sensitive and selective detection of nitrite ions using Fe3O4@SiO2/Au magnetic nanoparticles by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juhong; Pang, Shintaro; He, Lili; Nugen, Sam R

    2016-11-15

    A novel and pragmatic method was developed to detect the concentration of nitrite ions using Fe3O4@SiO2/Au magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The as-prepared bifunctional nanocomposites can be used to simultaneously purify target molecules using external magnetic field and produce Raman fingerprint spectrum with trace level of target molecules. In acidic media, 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) molecules conjugated on Fe3O4@SiO2/Au MNPs were triggered by nitrite ions to form azo bonds, resulting in three new marker peaks on the SERS spectrum. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit based on the three marker peaks were 15.63, 13.69, and 17.77μM, which was much lower than the maximum NO2(-) concentration of 1.0mgL(-1) (71.4μM) allowed in drinking water as defined by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The specificity of this proposed method to detect nitrite ions was demonstrated using common ions as competitors. In addition, the SERS-based technique was successfully employed to detect nitrite ions in pond water, a synthetic urine solution, and pickle brine. Considering its good sensitivity and selectivity, the detection method is well suited for the detection of nitrite ions in real samples without pretreatment steps.

  9. Electrospray mass spectrometry of some proteins and the aqueous solution acid/base equilibrium model in the negative ion detection mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Blanc, J. C. Y.; Guevremont, R.; Siu, K. W. M.

    1993-06-01

    Basic solutions of myoglobin, [beta]-lactoglobulin, pepsin and ubiquitin have been examined by means of electrospray mass spectrometry in the negative ion detection mode. The distribution of protein ions in the mass spectra was found to correlate well with the distribution of protein species in solution calculated from published titration data. These results lend further credibility to an earlier proposed aqueous solution acid/base equilibrium model, which relates the "bellshape" ion distribution observed in the electrospray mass spectrometry of proteins to the distribution of protein ions in solution.

  10. Highly sensitive determination of iodide by ion chromatography with amperometric detection at a silver-based carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Malongo, Trésor Kimbeni; Patris, Stéphanie; Macours, Pascale; Cotton, Frédéric; Nsangu, Jean; Kauffmann, Jean-Michel

    2008-07-30

    A silver-based solid carbon paste electrode was developed for use as a detector in ion chromatography (IC) for the sensitive determination of iodide in real samples. Micro- and nano-particles of silver were investigated for the fabrication of different electrodes. The iodide assay was based on IC with amperometric detection (IC-AD) at a silver composite electrode polarized at +0.080 V versus Ag/AgCl. Free iodide and organoiodide compounds were studied. The detection process was characterized by studying the redox behavior of iodide ions at both silver and silver composite electrodes by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The presence of iodide ions in solution was found to considerably facilitate metallic silver oxidation, with response currents directly related to iodide concentration. The calibration curve at the selected silver carbon paste electrode was linear in the concentration range comprised between 0.635 microg/L and 63.5 microg/L iodide. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for successive injections was below 3% for all iodide standard solutions investigated. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.47 microg/L (3.7 nmol/L) for an injection volume of 20 microL, i.e. 74 fmol injected. The IC-AD method was successfully applied to the determination of iodide in complex real samples such as table salts, sea products and iodide bound drug compounds. The analytical accuracy was verified by the assay of iodide in milk powder from an iodide certified reference material (CRM) Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) 150.

  11. A simple "clickable" biosensor for colorimetric detection of copper(II) ions based on unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qinpeng; Li, Wenhua; Tang, Shiyun; Hu, Yufang; Nie, Zhou; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-03-15

    A novel colorimetric copper(II) biosensor has been developed based on the high specificity of alkyne-azide click reaction to the catalysis of copper ions and unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the signal reporter. The clickable DNA probe consists of two parts: an azide group-modified double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) hybrid with an elongated tail and a short alkyne-modified single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Because of low melting temperature of the short ssDNA, these two parts are separated in the absence of Cu(2+). Copper ion-induced azide-alkyne click ligation caused a structural change of probe from the separated form to entire dsDNA form. This structural change of probe can be monitored by the unmodified AuNPs via mediating their aggregation with a red-to-blue colorimetric read-out because of the differential ability of ssDNA and dsDNA to protect AuNPs against salt-induced aggregation. Under the optimum conditions, this biosensor can sensitively and specifically detect Cu(2+) with a low detection limit of 250 nM and a linear range of 0.5-10 μM. The method is simple and economic without dual-labeling DNA and AuNPs modification. It is also highly selective for Cu(2+) in the presence of high concentrations of other environmentally relevant metal ions because of the great specificity of the copper-caused alkyne-azide click reaction, which potentially meets the requirement of the detection in real samples.

  12. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  13. Direct detection of trace haloacetates in drinking water using microbore ion chromatography. Improved detector sensitivity using a hydroxide gradient and a monolithic ion-exchange type suppressor.

    PubMed

    Barron, Leon; Paull, Brett

    2004-08-27

    A highly sensitive gradient microbore ion chromatographic method was developed with electrolytically generated hydroxide eluents for the determination of low microg/L levels of chloroacetate, bromoacetate, trifluoroacetate, dichloroacetate, chlorodifluoroacetate, dibromoacetate, trichloroacetate, bromodichloroacetate and dibromochloroacetate disinfectant by-products formed as a result of chlorination of drinking waters. The possibility of using a packed bed Dionex Atlas suppressor with a hydroxide gradient at microbore flow rates was investigated in order to reduce baseline noise levels. The Atlas suppressor displayed a very significant reduction in noise levels compared to the standard alternative ASRS Ultra suppressor, reducing noise by a factor of 15-20 in some cases, allowing trace haloacetic acids (HAs) to be seen with the direct injection of 100 microL of treated water, with prior chloride and sulfate removal. To lower detection limits even further, a solid phase extraction was employed to preconcentrate HAs, resulting in detection limits of between 0.09 and 21.5 microg/L. The method was applied to the determination of HAs in environmental samples and standard addition curves for three drinking water samples were carried out for both direct injection and preconcentration methods. R2 values in both cases were > or =0.98. Combined content for US Environmental Protection Agency regulated HAs in the three drinking water samples from Dublin City University; New Ross, Co. Wexford and Drogheda, Co. Louth were 46.5, 58.3 and 12.6 microg/L, respectively.

  14. Efficient fluorescence energy transfer system between fluorescein isothiocyanate and CdTe quantum dots for the detection of silver ions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yueshu; Liu, Liwei; Hu, Siyi; Zou, Peng; Zhang, Jiaqi; Huang, Chen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Sihan; Zhang, Xihe

    2016-03-01

    We report a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system in which the fluorescent donor is fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dye and the fluorescent acceptor is CdTe quantum dot (QDs). Based on FRET quenching theory, we designed a method to detect the concentration of silver ions (Ag(+)). The results revealed a good linear trend over Ag(+) concentrations in the range 0.01-8.96 nmol/L, a range that was larger than with other methods; the quenching coefficient is 0.442. The FRET mechanism and physical mechanisms responsible for dynamic quenching are also discussed.

  15. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-06

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  16. Extraction and detection of arsenicals in seaweed via accelerated solvent extraction with ion chromatographic separation and ICP-MS detection.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, P A; Shoemaker, J A; Wei, X; Brockhoff-Schwegel, C A; Creed, J T

    2001-01-01

    An accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) device was evaluated as a semi-automated means of extracting arsenicals from ribbon kelp. The effect of the experimentally controllable ASE parameters (pressure, temperature, static time, and solvent composition) on the extraction efficiencies of arsenicals from seaweed was investigated. The extraction efficiencies for ribbon kelp (approximately 72.6%) using the ASE were fairly independent (< 7%) of pressure, static time and particle size after 3 ASE extraction cycles. The optimum extraction conditions for the ribbon kelp were obtained by using a 3 mL ASE cell, 30/70 (w/w) MeOH/H2O, 500 psi (1 psi = 7 KPa), ambient temperature, 1 min heat step, 1 min static step, 90% vol. flush, and a 120 s purge. Using these conditions, two other seaweed products produced extraction efficiencies of 25.6% and 50.5%. The inorganic species present in the extract represented 62.5% and 27.8% of the extracted arsenic. The speciation results indicated that both seaweed products contained 4 different arsenosugars, DMA (dimethylarsinic acid), and As(V). One seaweed product also contained As(III). Both of these seaweed products contained an arsenosugar whose molecular weight was determined to be 408 and its structure was tentatively identified using ion chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS/MS).

  17. Synthesis, characterization and application of poly(acrylamide-co-methylenbisacrylamide) nanocomposite as a colorimetric chemosensor for visual detection of trace levels of Hg and Pb ions.

    PubMed

    Sedghi, Roya; Heidari, Bahareh; Behbahani, Mohammad

    2015-03-21

    In this study, a new colorimetric chemosensor based on TiO2/poly(acrylamide-co-methylenbisacrylamide) nanocomposites was designed for determination of mercury and lead ions at trace levels in environmental samples. The removal and preconcentration of lead and mercury ions on the sorbent was achieved due to sharing an electron pair of N and O groups of polymer chains with the mentioned heavy metal ions. The hydrogel sensor was designed by surface modification of a synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles using methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilan (MAPTMS), which provided a reactive C=C bond that polymerized the acrylamide and methylenbisacrylamide. The sorbent was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS analysis and Fourier transform in frared (FT-IR) spectrometer. This nanostructured composite with polymer shell was developed as a sensitive and selective sorbent for adsorption of mercury and lead ions from aqueous solution at optimized condition. This method involves two-steps: (1) preconcentration of mercury and lead ions by the synthesized sorbent and (2) its selective monitoring of the target ions by complexation with dithizone (DZ). The color of the sorbent in the absence and presence of mercury and lead ions shifts from white to violet and red, respectively. The detection limit of the synthesized nanochemosensor for mercury and lead ions was 1 and 10 μg L(-1), respectively. The method was successfully applied for trace detection of mercury and lead ions in tap, river, and sea water samples.

  18. Selective and sensitive optical chemosensor for detection of Ag(I) ions based on 2(4-hydroxy pent-3-en-2-ylideneamine) phenol in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad; Saeed, Jaber

    2011-11-01

    A selective and sensitive chemosensor, based on the 2(4-hydroxy pent-3-en-2-ylideneamine) phenol (HPYAP) as chromophore, has been developed for colorimetric and visual detection of Ag(I) ions. HPYAP shows a considerable chromogenic behavior toward Ag(I) ions by changing the color of the solution from pale-yellow to very chromatic-yellow, which can be easily detected with the naked-eye. The chemosensor exhibited selective absorbance enhancement to Ag(I) ions in water samples over other metal ions at 438 nm, with a linear range of 0.4-500 μM (r(2)=0.999) and a limit of detection 0.07 μM of Ag(I) ions with UV-vis spectrophotometer detection. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 100 μM Ag(I) ions was 2.05% (n=7). The proposed method was applied for the determination Ag(I) ions in water and waste water samples.

  19. Improved contrast in histochemical detection of cytochrome oxidase: metallic ions protocol.

    PubMed

    Divac, I; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, J; López-Figueroa, M O; Petrovic-Minic, B; Møller, M

    1995-02-01

    The standard current technique for demonstration of cytochrome oxidase (CyOx) provides low-contrast diaminobenzidine (DAB) polymer. In order to enhance the contrast with divalent metalic ions, we have screened a number of buffers and found that Hepes, Mops and cacodylate neither precipitate these ions nor inactivate CyOx in a concentration of 0.1 M. Staining thus obtained shows a broad range of gradations between black and white. With fresh tissue the resulting image is superior to that obtained with the brown DAB product, even if a recommended blue filter or printing on very hard paper are used. The technique is as simple as the one which is currently standard. Fixed tissue, cut either in a cryostat or vibratome, can be stained well when floating but not when mounted on slides. The stained floating tissue can be used for electron microscopy, but has no advantage over the standard method.

  20. Detection of decontamination solution chelating agents using ion selective coated-wire electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    This thesis explores feasibility of using coated-wire electrodes to measure chelating agent concentration. Chelating agents are often found in radioactive decontamination solutions because they aid in the removal of radionuclides from contaminated surfaces by increasing their solubility. However, this characteristic will also enhance the mobility of the radionuclide and thus its transport out of a waste disposal site. Coated-wire ion selective electrodes, based on a polyvinylchloride membrane using dioctylphthalate as a plasticizer and dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid as a counterion, were constructed for five commonly utilized chelating agents (ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric add). The EDTA and NTA electrodes` calibration characteristics exhibited acceptable behavior in pure standard solutions. From data obtained while using the EDTA and NTA electrodes in a cement environment, further research needs to be done in the area of ion interference.

  1. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  2. Distributed drift chamber design for rare particle detection in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bellwied, R.; Bennett, M.J.; Bernardo, V.; Caines, H.; Christie, W.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Debbe, R.; Dinnwiddie, R.; Engelage, J.; Flores, I.; Fuzesy, R.; Greiner, L.; Hallman, T.; Hoffmann, G.; Huang, H.Z.; Jensen, P.; Judd, E.G.; Kainz, K.; Kaplan, M.; Kelly, S.; Lindstrom, P.J; Llope, W.J.; LoCurto, G.; Longacre, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Mitchell, J.T.; Mitchell, J.W.; Mogavero, E.; Mutchler, G.; Paganis, S.; Platner, E.; Potenza, R.; Rotondo, F.; Russ, D.; Sakrejda, I.; Saulys, A.; Schambach, J.; Sheen, J.; Smirnoff, N.; Stokeley, C.; Tang, J.; Trattner, A.L.; Trentalange, S.; Visser, G.; Whitfield, J.P.; Witharm, F.; Witharm, R.; Wright, M.

    2001-10-02

    This report describes a multi-plane drift chamber that was designed and constructed to function as a topological detector for the BNL AGSE896 rare particle experiment. The chamber was optimized for good spatial resolution, two track separation, and a high uniform efficiency while operating in a 1.6 Tesla magnetic field and subjected to long term exposure from a 11.6 GeV/nucleon beam of 10**6 Au ions per second.

  3. Applications of ion chromatography with electrospray mass spectrometric detection to the determination of environmental contaminants in water.

    PubMed

    Roehl, R; Slingsby, R; Avdalovic, N; Jackson, P E

    2002-05-17

    Ion chromatography (IC) is widely used for the compliance monitoring of common inorganic anions in drinking water. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the development of IC methods to meet regulatory requirements for analytes other than common inorganic anions, including disinfection byproduct anions, perchlorate, and haloacetic acids. Many of these new methods require the use of large injection volumes, high capacity columns and analyte specific detection schemes, such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or postcolumn reaction with UV-Vis detection, in order to meet current regulatory objectives. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a detection technique that is particularly suitable for the analysis of permanently ionized or polar, ionizable compounds. The combination of IC with MS detection is emerging as an important tool for the analysis of ionic compounds in drinking water, as it provides increased specificity and sensitivity compared to conductivity detection. This paper reports on the application of IC-ESI-MS for the confirmation and quantitation of environmentally significant contaminants, i.e. compounds with adverse health effects which are either regulated or being considered for regulation, such as bromate, perchlorate, haloacetic acids, and selenium species, in various water samples.

  4. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2016-01-12

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required to extract the information from the experiments that is needed to determine the stellar reaction rates. The tools developed through this part of the work will be made freely available for general use.

  5. Detection of tyrosine phosphorylated peptides via skimmer collision-induced dissociation/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zolodz, Melissa D; Wood, Karl V

    2003-03-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins is an important post-translational protein modification in cellular response to environmental change and occurs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Identification of the amino acid on individual proteins that become phosphorylated in response to extracellular stimulus is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in the intracellular signals that these modifications facilitate. Most protein kinases catalyze the phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine or tyrosine. Although tyrosine phosphorylation is often the least abundant of the three major phosphorylation sites, it is important owing to its role in signal pathways. Currently available methods for the identification of phosphorylation sites can often miss low levels of tyrosine phosphorylations. This paper describes a method for the identification of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides using electrospray ionization on an ion trap mass spectrometer. Skimmer-activated collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to generate the phosphotyrosine immonium ion at m/z 216. This method is gentle enough that the protonated molecule of the intact peptide is still observed. In-trap CID was employed for the verification of the phosphotyrosine immonium ion. Using this technique, low levels of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides can be identified from peptide mixtures separated by nanoflow micro liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  6. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  7. External Second Gate, Fourier Transform Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Parametric Optimization for Detection of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Tarver, Edward E.

    2004-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is recognized as one of the most sensitive and robust techniques for the detection of narcotics, explosives and chemical warfare agents. IMS is widely used in forensic, military and security applications. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforts have mandated that equal importance be placed on the time required to obtain results as well as the quality of the analytical data. [1] In this regard IMS is virtually unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity have to be considered. [2] The problem with conventional (signal averaging) IMS systems is the fixed duty cycle of the entrance gate that restricts to less than 1%, the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations that degrade the spectral resolution contributing to misidentifications and false positives. With external second gate, Fourier Transform ion mobility spectrometry (FT-IMS) the entrance gate frequency is variable and can be altered in conjunction with other data acquisition parameters (scan time and sampling rate) to increase the spectral resolution to reduce false alarms and improve the sensitivity for early warning and contamination avoidance. In addition, with FT-IMS the entrance gate operates with a 50% duty cycle and so affords a seven-fold increase in sensitivity. Recent data on high explosives are presented to demonstrate the parametric optimization in sensitivity and resolution of our system.

  8. Flow-Injection Coulometric Detection Based on Ion Transfer and Its Application to the Determination of Chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Ortuño, Joaquín A.; Gil, Antonio; Sánchez-Pedreño, Concepción

    2008-01-01

    A flow-injection coulometric method for the determination of chlorpromazine based on ion transfer into a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane, was developed. The detector used consists of a flow-through cell that incorporates a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane which contains tetrabutylammonium tetraphenylborate as electrolyte. The membrane is located between the flowing solution and an inner aqueous electrolyte solution. Two pairs of electrodes, each pair formed by a reference electrode and a working electrode, are used, one pair in each solution. The potential between the reference electrodes was controlled by a four-electrode potentiostat with ohmic drop compensation. A potential step capable of producing the transfer of the chlorpromazine ion into the membrane was applied during the passage of a wide portion of sample plug through the cell and the corresponding quantity of the electricity was measured. In the selected conditions, a linear relationship was observed between the quantity of electricity and chlorpromazine concentrations over a range of 1×10-6 −1×10-4 M. The detection limit was 2 × 10-7 M. Good repeatability and between-day reproducibility was obtained. No interference was observed on the part of some common ions and pharmaceutical excipients. The method proposed was applied satisfactorily to the determination of chlorpromazine in pharmaceuticals and human urine. PMID:27879901

  9. Probing gunshot residue, sweat and latent human fingerprints with capillary-scale ion chromatography and suppressed conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Elizabeth; Smith, Norman; Barron, Leon

    2012-04-07

    An investigation into capillary-scale ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection is presented for the identification of low molecular weight anions in samples of limited size. Both particle-packed and polymer monolith capillary ion exchange resins were compared with respect to their chromatographic efficiencies, operating back-pressures and thermal selectivities. Using a multistep hydroxide gradient, it was possible to separate a large selection of inorganic and organic anions in <23 mins using both phases with an injection volume of only 0.4 μL. Method performance was tested with respect to linearity, range, reproducibility and sensitivity and compared to a micro-bore (2 mm) IC method. Limits of mass sensitivity improved by factors up to 1,800-fold using the capillary IC system and lay in the range 0.3-26.2 pg. The finalised analytical method was applied to the determination of both endogenous and exogenous species in sweat and fingermark deposits. It was possible to determine presence of elevated levels of thiocyanate and benzoate in the sweat of three moderate smokers (5-10 cigarettes/day) in comparison to non-smokers. A controlled firing experiment was also conducted to assess the transfer of gunshot residue into fingerprints of a firer. Similarly, identification of direct contact with a black powder substitute is presented via analysis of latent fingermarks. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first study of sweat and fingerprints using capillary-scale suppressed ion chromatography.

  10. Novel 15-crown-5 ether or beta-diketone incorporated gadolinium complexes for the detection of potassium ions or magnesium and calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Hifumi, Hiroki; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Citterio, Daniel; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Koji

    2007-11-01

    Novel gadolinium complexes (KMR-series: KMR-K and KMR-Mg), which have a bis-15-crown-5 ether or a charged beta-diketone structure as a recognition site, have been designed, synthesized and applied for the detection of K(+) or of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) using MRI or NMR techniques. The measurements are based on the modulation of the longitudinal relaxation time (T(1)) of water protons in proximity of the gadolinium complexes. Relaxivity measurements of KMR-K1 in aqueous solution showed that the initial longitudinal relaxivity value (r(1)) of 5.05 mM(-1) s(-1) is monotonously decreasing with increasing K(+) concentrations, reaching a final value of 4.78 mM(-1) s(-1). This decrease is attributed to a change in the second sphere of hydration of the gadolinium (Gd(3+)) complex (KMR-K), resulting in a K(+) concentration-dependent contrast in MR images. From stoichiometric analysis using mass spectrometry and UV/VIS spectrometry, a 1 : 1 complex formation between KMR-K1 and K(+) in a sandwich-type manner with a log K of 3.20 was confirmed. In the case of KMR-Mg, the initial r(1) value of 4.98 mM(-1) s(-1) is monotonously decreasing with increasing Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) concentrations, reaching a final value of 3.95 or 4.16 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively, resulting in Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) concentration-dependent contrast in MR images. The formation of a 1:1 complex with a log K of 2.33 for Mg(2+) and 1.91 for Ca(2+) was confirmed. KMR-K1 and KMR-Mg are the first ion-selective or ion-sensitive gadolinium complexes for K(+) or Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), respectively.

  11. A two-dimensional position sensitive charged-particle detector for the magnetic spectrograph ``Big Karl'' of the Jülich Cyclotron ``Jülich''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, M.; Müller, K. D.; Stoff, H.; Teske, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Hardt, A.; Martin, S.; Mayer-Böricke, C.; Meißburger, J.

    1980-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive detector with an area of 300 mm × 40 mm and a charged-particle spatial resolution of ΔX = ΔY ⩽ 0.5 mm is described. Some test results point out the detector properties. Results of the experiments 102Ru(d,p) 103Ru and 208Pb(p,p') 208Pb done at 45 MeV incident particle energy using the magnetic spectrograph BIG KARL are shown with sections of the proton spectra.

  12. Chemically modified cellulose strips with pyridoxal conjugated red fluorescent gold nanoclusters for nanomolar detection of mercuric ions.

    PubMed

    Bothra, Shilpa; Upadhyay, Yachana; Kumar, Rajender; Ashok Kumar, S K; Sahoo, Suban K

    2017-04-15

    One-pot approach was adopted for the synthesis of highly luminescent near-infrared (NIR)-emitting gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a protecting agent. The vitamin B6 cofactor pyridoxal was conjugated with the luminescent BSA-AuNCs through the free amines of BSA and then employed for the nanomolar detection of Hg(2+) in aqueous medium via selective fluorescence quenching of AuNCs. This nano-assembly was successfully applied for the real sample analysis of Hg(2+) in fish, tap water and river water. The study also presents chemically-modified cellulosic paper strips with the pyridoxal conjugated BSA-AuNCs for detecting Hg(2+) ion up to 1nM.

  13. [Rapid detection of residual cyclohexanone in disposable medical devices by ultraviolet photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (UV-IMS)].

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Han, Hai-yan; Niu, Wen-qi; Wang, Hong-mei; Huang, Chao-qun; Jiang, Hai-he; Chu, Yan-nan

    2012-01-01

    In the manufacture of disposable PVC medical devices, cyclohexanone is frequently used as an adhesive reagent, which can be released into the tube airspace or stored solution and thus may cause some adverse effects on patients in therapy. In this paper, an ultraviolet photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (UV-IMS) technique has been developed to detect cyclohexanone through monitoring the gas composition within a package of infusion sets. The concentrations of cyclohexanone were prepared by means of exponential dilution method, and the experiments show that the UV-IMS has a limit of detection at 15 ppb and its measurable linear dynamics range is over three orders of magnitude. The concentrations of cyclohexanone in three brands of infusion sets packages were determined to be 16.78, 17.59 and 46.69 ppm respectively. The UV-IMS is proposed as a tool for the quality control of medical devices to monitor illegal uses of chemical solvents like cyclohexanone.

  14. Detection of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in urine by gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sklerov, J H; Kalasinsky, K S; Ehorn, C A

    1999-10-01

    A confirmatory method for the detection and quantitation of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is presented. The method employs gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) using an internal ionization ion trap detector for sensitive MS-MS-in-time measurements of LSD extracted from urine. Following a single-step solid-phase extraction of 5 mL of urine, underivatized LSD can be measured with limits of quantitation and detection of 80 and 20 pg/mL, respectively. Temperature-programmed on-column injections of urine extracts were linear over the concentration range 20-2000 pg/mL (r2 = 0.999). Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were < 6% and < 13%, respectively. This procedure has been applied to quality-control specimens and LSD-positive samples in this laboratory. Comparisons with alternate GC-MS methods and extraction procedures are discussed.

  15. The analysis of high explosives by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: multiplexed detection of negative ion adducts.

    PubMed

    Mathis, John A; McCord, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    The negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection of adducts of high explosives with chloride, formate, acetate, and nitrate was used to demonstrate the gas-phase interaction of neutral explosives with these anions. The relative intensities of the adduct species were determined to compare the competitive formation of the selected high explosives and anions. The relative stability of the adduct species varies, yielding preferential formation of certain anionic adducts with different high explosives. To exploit this effect, an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/ESI-MS method was developed and used for the simultaneous analysis of high explosives using two different techniques for the addition of the anionic additives; pre- and post-column. The results show that the pre-column approach provides similar results with improved selectivity for specific explosives. By detecting characteristic adduct species for each explosive, this method provides a qualitative and quantitative approach for the analysis and identification of high explosives.

  16. Rational designed bipolar, conjugated polymer-DNA composite beacon for the sensitive detection of proteins and ions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yongmei; Zuo, Xiaolei; Lou, Xiaoding; Miao, Mao; Cheng, Yong; Min, Xuehong; Li, Xinchun; Xia, Fan

    2015-04-07

    Nature owns remarkable capabilities in sensing target molecules, while the artificial biosensor lags far behind nature. Inspired by nature, we devise a new sensing platform that can specifically bind the molecules and synchronously initiate a specific signal response. We rationally designed a type of bipolar probe that is comprised of a hydrophilic DNA part and a hydrophobic conjugated polymer (CP) unit. In aqueous solution, they can form micelles with a hydrophobic CP core and a hydrophilic DNA shell. The aggregation-caused quenching suppresses the fluorescence of CP. Adding telomerase, the hydropathical profile of the bipolar probes is drastically regulated that results in the collapse of micelles and liberates fluorescence simultaneously. The probe has been used in both mimic systems and real urine samples (38 samples). We achieve sensitive and specific detection of telomerase and obtain clearly classification for normal people and cancer patients. It can also be used in a signal off sensor that is used to detect mercury ions.

  17. Green synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots from lotus root for Hg(II) ions detection and cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dan; Shang, Shaoming; Yu, Qin; Shen, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Herein, a facile, green, and fast method was developed in the synthesis of fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (CDs) with nitrogen content of 5.23%, using one-pot microwave treatment of lotus root (LR), without using any other surface passivation agents. The results show that these LR-CDs (with an average diameter of 9.41 nm) possess many outstanding features and have a high quantum yield of 19.0%. We further demonstrated applications of LR-CDs as probes for heavy metal ion detection. The LR-CDs exhibit captivating sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg2+ with a linear range from 0.1 to 60.0 μM and a detection limit of 18.7 nM. Eventually, the LR-CDs were applied for multicolor cell imaging, demonstrating their potential toward diverse applications.

  18. Structurally colored biopolymer thin films for detection of dissolved metal ions in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathell, Matthew David

    Natural polymers, such as the polysaccharides alginate and chitosan, are noted sorbents of heavy metals. Their polymer backbone structures are rich in ligands that can interact with metal ions through chelation, electrostatics, ion exchange and nonspecific mechanisms. These water-soluble biopolymer materials can be processed into hydrogel thin films, creating high surface area interfaces ideal for binding and sequestering metal ions from solution. By virtue of their uniform nanoscale dimensions (with thicknesses smaller than wavelengths of visible light) polymer thin films exhibit structure-based coloration. This phenomenon, frequently observed in nature, causes the transparent and essentially colorless films to reflect light in a wide array of colors. The lamellar film structures act as one-dimensional photonic crystals, allowing selective reflection of certain wavelengths of light while minimizing other wavelengths by out-of-phase interference. The combination of metal-binding and reflective properties make alginate and chitosan thin films attractive candidates for analyte sensing. Interactions with metal ions can induce changes in film thicknesses and refractive indices, thus altering the path of light reflected through the film. Small changes in dimensional or optical properties can lead to shifts in film color that are perceivable by the unaided eye. These thin films offer the potential for optical sensing of toxic dissolved materials without the need for instrumentation, external power or scientific expertise. With the use of a spectroscopic ellipsometer and a fiber optic reflectance spectrometer, the physical and optical characteristics of biopolymer thin films have been characterized in response to 50 ppm metal ion solutions. It has been determined that metal interactions can lead to measurable changes in both film thicknesses and effective refractive indices. The intrinsic response behaviors of alginate and chitosan, as well as the responses of modified

  19. Boron carbide coatings for neutron detection probed by x-rays, ions, and neutrons to determine thin film quality

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, G. Störmer, M.; Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Höche, D.; Lorenz, U.; Müller, M.; Schreyer, A.; Becker, H.-W.; Haese-Seiller, M.; Moulin, J.-F.; Pomm, M.; Randau, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.

    2015-01-21

    Due to the present shortage of {sup 3}He and the associated tremendous increase of its price, the supply of large neutron detection systems with {sup 3}He becomes unaffordable. Alternative neutron detection concepts, therefore, have been invented based on solid {sup 10}B converters. These concepts require development in thin film deposition technique regarding high adhesion, thickness uniformity and chemical purity of the converter coating on large area substrates. We report on the sputter deposition of highly uniform large-area {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings of up to 2 μm thickness with a thickness deviation below 4% using the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht large area sputtering system. The {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings are x-ray amorphous and highly adhesive to the substrate. Material analysis by means of X-ray-Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, and Rutherford-Back-Scattering (RBS) revealed low impurities concentration in the coatings. The isotope composition determined by Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, RBS, and inelastic nuclear reaction analysis of the converter coatings evidences almost identical {sup 10}B isotope contents in the sputter target and in the deposited coating. Neutron conversion and detection test measurements with variable irradiation geometry of the converter coating demonstrate an average relative quantum efficiency ranging from 65% to 90% for cold neutrons as compared to a black {sup 3}He-monitor. Thus, these converter coatings contribute to the development of {sup 3}He-free prototype detectors based on neutron grazing incidence. Transferring the developed coating process to an industrial scale sputtering system can make alternative {sup 3}He-free converter elements available for large area neutron detection systems.

  20. Boron carbide coatings for neutron detection probed by x-rays, ions, and neutrons to determine thin film quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, G.; Störmer, M.; Becker, H.-W.; Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Höche, D.; Haese-Seiller, M.; Moulin, J.-F.; Pomm, M.; Randau, C.; Lorenz, U.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Müller, M.; Schreyer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the present shortage of 3He and the associated tremendous increase of its price, the supply of large neutron detection systems with 3He becomes unaffordable. Alternative neutron detection concepts, therefore, have been invented based on solid 10B converters. These concepts require development in thin film deposition technique regarding high adhesion, thickness uniformity and chemical purity of the converter coating on large area substrates. We report on the sputter deposition of highly uniform large-area 10B4C coatings of up to 2 μm thickness with a thickness deviation below 4% using the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht large area sputtering system. The 10B4C coatings are x-ray amorphous and highly adhesive to the substrate. Material analysis by means of X-ray-Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, and Rutherford-Back-Scattering (RBS) revealed low impurities concentration in the coatings. The isotope composition determined by Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, RBS, and inelastic nuclear reaction analysis of the converter coatings evidences almost identical 10B isotope contents in the sputter target and in the deposited coating. Neutron conversion and detection test measurements with variable irradiation geometry of the converter coating demonstrate an average relative quantum efficiency ranging from 65% to 90% for cold neutrons as compared to a black 3He-monitor. Thus, these converter coatings contribute to the development of 3He-free prototype detectors based on neutron grazing incidence. Transferring the developed coating process to an industrial scale sputtering system can make alternative 3He-free converter elements available for large area neutron detection systems.

  1. SU-E-T-392: Evaluation of Ion Chamber/film and Log File Based QA to Detect Delivery Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C; Mason, B; Kirsner, S; Ohrt, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ion chamber and film (ICAF) is a method used to verify patient dose prior to treatment. More recently, log file based QA has been shown as an alternative for measurement based QA. In this study, we delivered VMAT plans with and without errors to determine if ICAF and/or log file based QA was able to detect the errors. Methods: Using two VMAT patients, the original treatment plan plus 7 additional plans with delivery errors introduced were generated and delivered. The erroneous plans had gantry, collimator, MLC, gantry and collimator, collimator and MLC, MLC and gantry, and gantry, collimator, and MLC errors. The gantry and collimator errors were off by 4{sup 0} for one of the two arcs. The MLC error introduced was one in which the opening aperture didn’t move throughout the delivery of the field. For each delivery, an ICAF measurement was made as well as a dose comparison based upon log files. Passing criteria to evaluate the plans were ion chamber less and 5% and film 90% of pixels pass the 3mm/3% gamma analysis(GA). For log file analysis 90% of voxels pass the 3mm/3% 3D GA and beam parameters match what was in the plan. Results: Two original plans were delivered and passed both ICAF and log file base QA. Both ICAF and log file QA met the dosimetry criteria on 4 of the 12 erroneous cases analyzed (2 cases were not analyzed). For the log file analysis, all 12 erroneous plans alerted a mismatch in delivery versus what was planned. The 8 plans that didn’t meet criteria all had MLC errors. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that log file based pre-treatment QA was able to detect small errors that may not be detected using an ICAF and both methods of were able to detect larger delivery errors.

  2. Simultaneous detection of trace metal ions in water by solid phase extraction spectroscopy combined with multivariate calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Cao, Peng; Li, Wei; Tong, Peijin; Zhang, Xiaofang; Du, Yiping

    2016-04-01

    Solid Phase Extraction Spectroscopy (SPES) developed in this paper is a technique to measure spectrum directly on the solid phase material where the analytes are concentrated in SPE process. Membrane enrichment and UV-Visible spectroscopy were utilized to fulfill SPES, and multivariate calibration method of partial least squares (PLS) was used to simultaneously detect the concentrations of trace cobalt (II) and zinc (II) in water samples. The proposed method is simple, sensitive and selective. The complexes of analyte ions were collected on the cellulose acetate membranes via membrane filtration after the complexation reaction with 1-2-pyridylazo 2-naphthol (PAN). The spectra of the membranes which contained the complexes of metal ions and PAN were measured directly without eluting. The analytical conditions including pH, reaction time, sample volume, the amount of PAN, and flow rates were optimized. Nonionic surfactant Brij-30 was absorbed on the membranes prior to SPES to modify the membranes for improving the enrichment and spectrum measurement. The interference from other ions to the determination was investigated. Under the optimal condition, the absorbance was linearly related to the concentration at the range of 0.1-3.0 μg/L and 0.1-2.0 μg/L, with the correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.9977 and 0.9951 for Co (II) and Zn (II), respectively. The limits of detection were 0.066 μg/L for cobalt (II) and 0.104 μg/L for zinc (II). PLS regression with leave-one-out cross-validation was utilized to build models to detect cobalt (II) and zinc (II) in drinking water samples simultaneously. The correlation coefficient between ion concentration and spectrum of calibration set and independent prediction set were 1.0000 and 0.9974 for cobalt (II) and 1.0000 and 0.9956 for zinc (II). For cobalt (II) and zinc (II), the errors of the prediction set were in the range 0.0406-0.1353 μg/L and 0.0025-0.1884 μg/L.

  3. Screening of Carotenoids in Tomato Fruits by Using Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array-Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Detection.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Alessandra; Caretti, Fulvia; Ventura, Salvatore; Pérez-Fernández, Virginia; Venditti, Alessandro; Curini, Roberta

    2015-08-26

    This paper presents an analytical strategy for a large-scale screening of carotenoids in tomato fruits by exploiting the potentialities of the triple quadrupole-linear ion trap hybrid mass spectrometer (QqQLIT). The method involves separation on C30 reversed-phase column and identification by means of diode array detection (DAD) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). The authentic standards of six model compounds were used to optimize the separative conditions and to predict the chromatographic behavior of untargeted carotenoids. An information dependent acquisition (IDA) was performed with (i) enhanced-mass scan (EMS) as the survey scan, (ii) enhanced-resolution (ER) scan to obtain the exact mass of the precursor ions (16-35 ppm), and (iii) enhanced product ion (EPI) scan as dependent scan to obtain structural information. LC-DAD-multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) chromatograms were also acquired for the identification of targeted carotenoids occurring at low concentrations; for the first time, the relative abundance between the MRM transitions (ion ratio) was used as an extra tool for the MS distinction of structural isomers and the related families of geometrical isomers. The whole analytical strategy was high-throughput, because a great number of experimental data could be acquired with few analytical steps, and cost-effective, because only few standards were used; when applied to characterize some tomato varieties ('Tangerine', 'Pachino', 'Datterino', and 'Camone') and passata of 'San Marzano' tomatoes, our method succeeded in identifying up to 44 carotenoids in the 'Tangerine'" variety.

  4. Cleaning validation 2: development and validation of an ion chromatographic method for the detection of traces of CIP-100 detergent.

    PubMed

    Resto, Wilfredo; Hernández, Darimar; Rey, Rosamil; Colón, Héctor; Zayas, José

    2007-05-09

    A cleaning validation method, ion chromatographic method with conductivity detection was developed and validated for the determination of traces of a clean-in-place (CIP) detergent. It was shown to be linear with a squared correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9999 and average recoveries of 71.4% (area response factor) from stainless steel surfaces and 101% from cotton. The repeatability was found to be 2.17% and an intermediate precision of 1.88% across the range. The method was also shown to be sensitive with a detection limit (DL) of 0.13 ppm and a quantitation limit (QL) of 0.39 ppm for EDTA, which translates to less than 1 microL of CIP diluted in 100mL of diluent in both cases. The EDTA signal was well resolved from typical ions encountered in water samples or any other interference presented from swabs and surfaces. The method could be applied to cleaning validation samples. The validated method could be included as a suitable one for rapid and reliable cleaning validation program.

  5. UV-Visible Spectroscopy Detection of Iron(III) Ion on Modified Gold Nanoparticles With a Hydroxamic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, C.; Alizadeh, A.; Taher, M. A.; Hamidi, Z.; Bahrami, B.

    2016-09-01

    The present work describes the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with hydroxamic acid and the use of them in UV-visible spectroscopy detection of iron(III) ions. The prepared AuNPs were thoroughly characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy, TEM, and 1H NMR techniques. The newly synthesized hydroxamic acid-AuNPs are brown in color due to the intense surface plasmon absorption band centered at 527 nm. In the presence of Fe(III), the surface plasmon absorption band is centered at 540 nm. However, the sensitivity of hydroxamic acid-AuNPs towards other metal ions such as Mg(II), Ca(II), Ag(I), Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(II), Ni(II), Co(II),Fe(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) can be negligible. This highly selective sensor allows a direct quantitative assay of Fe(III) with a UVvisible spectroscopy detection limited to 45.8 nM.

  6. A highly selective sulfur-free iridium(III)-complex-based phosphorescent chemidosimeter for detection of mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Yu, Fang; Dai, Jun; Sun, Huiqin; Lu, Zhiyun; Li, Ming; Jiang, Qing; Huang, Yan

    2012-04-28

    A neutral phosphorescent coordination compound bearing a benzimidazole ligand, Ir(pbi)(2)(acac) (Hpbi = 1,2-diphenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole; Hacac = acetylacetone), is demonstrated to be the first example of a sulfur-free iridium complex for the detection of Hg(2+) cations with high selectivity and sensitivity. Ir(pbi)(2)(acac) shows a multisignaling response towards mercury(II) ions through UV-vis absorption, phosphorescence and electrochemistry measurements. Upon addition of Hg(2+) ions, solutions of this complex change from yellow to colorless, which could be observed easily by the naked eye, while its phosphorescence turns from bright green (λ(PLmax) = 520 nm) into faint skyblue (λ(PLmax) = 476 nm), and the detection limit is calculated to be 2.4 × 10(-7) mol L(-1). (1)H NMR spectroscopic titration as well as ESI-MS results indicate that the decomposition of Ir(pbi)(2)(acac) in the presence of Hg(2+) through rupture of Ir-O bonds is responsible for the significant variations in both optical and electrochemical signals.

  7. l-Tryptophan-capped carbon quantum dots for the sensitive and selective fluorescence detection of mercury ion in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xuejuan; Li, Shifeng; Zhuang, Lulu; Tang, Jiaoning

    2016-07-01

    l-Tryptophan-capped carbon quantum dots ( l-CQDs) were facilely synthesized through "green" methodology, and the obtained material was utilized as a sensitive and selective fluorescence sensor for mercury ion (Hg2+) in pure aqueous solutions. Carboxyl-functionalized CQDs were first green synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal route, and l-tryptophan was then attached to CQDs via direct surface condensation reaction in aqueous solution at room temperature. The as-synthesized l-CQDs had an average size of ca. 5 nm with a good dispersity in water, and exhibited a favorable selectivity for Hg2+ ions over a range of other common metal cations in aqueous solution (10 mM PBS buffer, pH 6.0). Upon the addition of Hg2+, a complete fluorescence quenching (ON-OFF switching) of l-CQDs was evident from the fluorescence titration experiment, and the fluorescence detection limit of Hg2+ was calculated to be 11 nM, which indicated that the obtained environmentally friendly l-CQDs had sensitive detection capacity for Hg2+ in aqueous solution.

  8. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, Robert E.; Sobotka, Lee G.; Blackmon, Jeff C.; Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2015-12-29

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested and the performance characterized in a series of tests using particle beams with a variety of atomic numbers at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba facility (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required

  9. Simple Colorimetric Detection of Amyloid β-peptide (1-40) based on Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles in the Presence of Copper Ions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Dong, Hui; Liu, Lantao; Xu, Maotian

    2015-05-13

    A simple method for specific colorimetric sensing of Alzheimer's disease related amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is developed based on the aggregation of gold nanoparticles in the presence of copper ion. The detection of limit for Aβ(1-40) is 0.6 nM and the promising results from practical samples (human serum) indicate the great potential for the routine detection.

  10. Effective fluorescent chemosensors for the detection of Zn2+ metal ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabharathi, J.; Thanikachalam, V.; Jayamoorthy, K.

    2012-09-01

    Benzimidazole derivatives synthesized from three components assembling condensation reaction behaves as a selective fluorescent sensor for Zn2+ metal ion. These benzimidazole derivatives were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR, mass and elemental analysis. XRD analysis was carried out for 1-(4-methylbenzyl)-2-p-tolyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole. The increase in the fluorescence enhancement can be explained on the basis of photo induced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. The blockage of the photoinduced electron transfer process from benzimidazole ring to aryl fluorophore induced by Zn2+ co-ordination induced emission enhancement.

  11. EnFET for urea determination in biological fluids using ammonium ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawgul, Marek; Trybun, Tomasz; Pijanowska, Dorota G.; Torbicz, Wladyslaw

    2003-09-01

    In this paper a method of urease immobilization on the surface of the Siloprene membrane of the ammonium ion sensitive ChemFET is presented. The usability of the sensor for determination of urea in solutions at pH typical for biological fluids (pH 6 to pH 7.5) has been investigated. Due to the fact that the sensor exhibits high sensitivity to samples of low buffer capacity, the method of preliminary sample treatment, consisting in addition of buffers at adequate buffer capacity was developed. The sensors were tested in dialysate and blood plasma.

  12. Direct detection of atomic ions from molecular photofragmentation during nonresonant multiphoton ionization of sputtered species

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Burnett, J.W.; White, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    The photoionization of sputtered Cu, Al, and Ru atoms and dimers was investigated by measuring velocity distributions using both resonant and nonresonant photoionization. Nonresonant ionization produced an atomic distribution that peaked at the same velocity as the respective dimer distribution, indicating that virtually all the nonresonant atomic ion signal is from photofragmented dimers. Various mechanisms of dimer photofragmentation are discussed. Domination of the atomic photoion channel by molecule fragmentation appears to be a general phenomenon that must be accounted for in all gas-phase multiphoton nonresonant ionization experiments at easily achievable laser power densities ({le} 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}).

  13. Second harmonic detection in the electrochemical strain microscopy of Ag-ion conducting glass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Sangmo; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Jesse, Stephen; Noh, Tae Won; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-11-14

    The first and second harmonic electromechanical responses and their cross-correlation in Ag-ion conducting glass were investigated using band-excitation electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). Consecutive ESM images with increasing magnitudes of the applied AC voltage allowed observation of not only reversible surface displacement but also irreversible silver nanoparticle formation above a certain threshold voltage. The second harmonic ESM response was anticorrelated with the first harmonic response in many local regions. Furthermore, the nucleation sites of silver nanoparticles were closely related to the anti-correlated regions, specifically, with low second harmonic and high first harmonic ESM responses. The possible origins of the second harmonic ESM response are discussed.

  14. [Fe(CN)6]4- decorated mesoporous gelatin thin films for colorimetric detection and as sorbents of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li; Huang, Hubiao; Sun, Luwei; Lu, Yanping; Du, Binyang; Mao, Yiyin; Li, Junwei; Ye, Zhizhen; Peng, Xinsheng

    2013-09-28

    [Fe(CN)6](4-) decorated mesoporous gelatin films, acting as colorimetric sensors and sorbents for heavy metal ions, were prepared by incorporating [Fe(CN)6](4-) ions into the mesoporous gelatin films through electrostatic interaction. Gelatin-Prussian blue (PB) and gelatin-PB analogue composite films were successfully synthesized by immersing the [Fe(CN)6](4-) decorated gelatin films into aqueous solutions of metal ions, such as Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) (all as nitrates). The in situ formation process of PB or its analogues in the films was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. According to the different colors of the PB nanoparticles and its analogues, the [Fe(CN)6](4-) decorated mesoporous gelatin films demonstrated colorimetric sensor abilities for detecting the corresponding metal ions by the naked eye with sufficient sensitivity at 1 ppm level and a quite short response time of 5 minutes. Moreover, due to the [Fe(CN)6](4-) functionality and other functional groups of gelatin itself, this [Fe(CN)6](4-) decorated mesoporous gelatin film shows a tens times higher adsorption ability for heavy metal ions in water than that of activated carbon. Due to both the efficient detection and high adsorption ability for heavy metal ions, this film has wide potential applications for the detection and purification of heavy metal ions from polluted water.

  15. Evidence of ammonium ion-exchange properties of natural bentonite and application to ammonium detection.

    PubMed

    Zazoua, A; Kazane, I; Khedimallah, N; Dernane, C; Errachid, A; Jaffrezic-Renault, N

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium exchange with hybrid PVC-bentonite (mineral montmorillonite clay) thin film was revealed using FTIR spectroscopy, EDX, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effect of ammonium exchange on the charge transfer resistance of PVC-bentonite hybrid thin film was attributed to a modification of the intersheet distance and hydration of bentonite crystals. The obtained impedimetric ammonium sensor shows a linear range of detection from 10(-4)M to 1M and a detection limit around 10(-6)M.

  16. Improving Ion Mobility Spectrometry Detection Methods for Trace Forensics and Military Field Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-11

    Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine RSD Relative Standard Deviation SAW Surface Acoustical Wave SN Sodium Nitrate TATP Triacetone Triperoxide TCD Thermal...latter tend to be less effective. Competing trace detection technologies available for explosive compounds include surface acoustical wave (SAW...spectrometry (LC-MS). Surface acoustic wave (SAW) detection is based on piezoelectric crystals that resonate at a specific, measurable frequency.12

  17. Detection of potato storage disease via gas analysis: a pilot study using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rutolo, Massimo; Covington, James A; Clarkson, John; Iliescu, Daciana

    2014-08-28

    Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry). In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection) and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection). A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis) that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation).

  18. Detection of anionic energetic material residues in enhanced fingermarks on porous and non-porous surfaces using ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Love, Catherine; Gilchrist, Elizabeth; Smith, Norman; Barron, Leon

    2013-09-10

    The ability to link criminal activity and identity using validated analytical approaches can be of great value to forensic scientists. Herein, the factors affecting the recovery and detection of inorganic and organic energetic material residues within chemically or physically enhanced fingermarks on paper and glass substrates are presented using micro-bore anion exchange chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection. Fingermarks on both surfaces were enhanced using aluminium powder or ninhydrin after spiking with model test mixtures or through contact with black-powder substitutes. A quantitative study of the effects of environmental/method interferences, the sweat matrix, the surface and the enhancement technique on the relative anion recovery of forensically relevant species is presented. It is shown that the analytical method could detect target analytes at the nanogram level even within excesses of enhancement reagents and their reaction products when using solid phase extraction and/or microfiltration. To our knowledge, this work demonstrates for the first time that ion chromatography can detect anions in energetic materials within fingermarks on two very different surfaces, after operational enhancement techniques commonly used by forensic scientists and police have been applied.

  19. An ion-optical bench for testing ion source lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, J. J.; Ells, D. R.

    1988-06-01

    An ion-optical bench has been designed and constructed to obtain experimental data on the focusing properties of ion lenses in three dimensions. The heart of the apparatus is a position-sensitive detector (PSD) that gives output signals proportional to the x and y positions of each ion impact. The position signals can be displayed on an oscilloscope screen and analyzed by a two-parameter pulse-height analyzer, thereby giving a visual picture of the ion beam cross section and intensity distribution. The PSD itself is mounted on a track and is movable during operation from a position immediately following the ion lens to 30 cm away. This enables the rapid collection of accurate data on the intensity distribution and divergence angles of ions leaving the source lens. Examples of ion lens measurements are given.

  20. Monolayer g-C3N4 Fluorescent Sensor for Sensitive and Selective Colorimetric Detection of Silver ion from Aqueous Samples.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yujuan; Wu, Wei; Wang, Song; Peng, Hong; Hu, Xiaogang; Yu, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of heavy-metal ions in natural water environments worldwide is urgently needed because of their severe threats to human health. In the present work, monolayer graphite-like flake C3N4 (g-C3N4) materials were applied as a new fluorescent sensor for the detection of trace silver ion in aqueous solution. The thickness of synthesized g-C3N4 was 0.45 nm and obtained by exfoliating twice with ultrasonic. With the presence of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid as a screening agent, the highly sensitive sensor reached a low detection limit of 52.3 nmol/L for silver (I) ion and there was no disturbance when silver (I) ion coexisted with other metal ions in water samples. Under the optimal conditions, the monolayer g-C3N4 was successfully used to detect trace silver (I) ion in different environmental water and drinking water samples.