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Sample records for positional vertigo bppv

  1. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) BPPV is the most common vestibular disorder. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (or BPPV) is the most common cause of ...

  2. Differentiation of migrainous positional vertigo (MPV) from horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV).

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard A; Gans, Richard E; Kastner, Allison H

    2006-04-01

    This article presents an approach to differentiation of migrainous positional vertigo (MPV) from horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV). Such an approach is essential because of the difference in intervention between the two disorders in question. Results from evaluation of the case study presented here revealed a persistent ageotropic positional nystagmus consistent with MPV or a cupulolithiasis variant of HC-BPPV. The patient was treated with liberatory maneuvers to remove possible otoconial debris from the horizontal canal in an attempt, in turn, to provide further diagnostic information. There was no change in symptoms following treatment for HC-BPPV. This case was diagnosed subsequently as MPV, and the patient was referred for medical intervention. Treatment has been successful for 22 months. Incorporation of HC-BPPV treatment, therefore, may provide useful information in the differential diagnosis of MPV and the cupulolithiasis variant of HC-BPPV.

  3. Diagnosis and management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    PubMed

    Parnes, Lorne S; Agrawal, Sumit K; Atlas, Jason

    2003-09-30

    There is compelling evidence that free-floating endolymph particles in the posterior semicircular canal underlie most cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Recent pathological findings suggest that these particles are otoconia, probably displaced from the otolithic membrane in the utricle. They typically settle in the dependent posterior canal and render it sensitive to gravity. Well over 90% of patients can be successfully treated with a simple outpatient manoeuvre that moves the particles back into the utricle. We describe the various techniques for this manoeuvre, plus treatments for uncommon variants of BPPV such as that of the lateral canal. For the rare patient whose BPPV is not responsive to these manoeuvres and has severe symptoms, posterior canal occlusion surgery is a safe and highly effective procedure.

  4. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) Condition Family HealthMenWomen Share Benign Paroxysmal Positional ...

  5. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV): History, Pathophysiology, Office Treatment and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Hornibrook, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    BPPV is the most common cause of vertigo. It most often occurs spontaneously in the 50 to 70 year age group. In younger individuals it is the commonest cause of vertigo following head injury. There is a wide spectrum of severity from inconsistent positional vertigo to continuous vertigo provoked by any head movement. It is likely to be a cause of falls and other morbidity in the elderly. Misdiagnosis can result in unnecessary tests. The cardinal features and a diagnostic test were clarified in 1952 by Dix and Hallpike. Subsequently, it has been established that the symptoms are attributable to detached otoconia in any of the semicircular canals. BPPV symptoms can resolve spontaneously but can last for days, weeks, months, and years. Unusual patterns of nystagmus and nonrepsonse to treatment may suggest central pathology. Diagnostic strategies and the simplest "office" treatment techniques are described. Future directions for research are discussed.

  6. Effectiveness of canalith repositioning manoeuvers (CRM) in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    PubMed

    Tevzadze, N; Shakarishvili, R

    2007-01-01

    BPPV is the most common disorder of the vestibular system affected up to 21% of vertigo patients, characterised by short-lasting episodes of vertigo in association with rapid changes in head position. We have detected, treated and followed up 204 patients with BPPV during two years. 204 patients (163 women 41men) were enrolled in this study, at the time of evolution the duration of symptoms varied from several days to several months. We evaluated idiophatic forms of BPPV in 126 cases and secondary types BPPV in 78 cases. All patients with typical history of BPPV underwent neurological examination, including Dix-Hallpike (to detect posterior and anterior canal BPPV) and Roll Test (to detect horizontal canal BPPV). We treat patients with CRM and followed up them in 48 hours and 7 days, one month, 6 month and one year after initial management. Posterior semicircular canal was involved in 170 patients, remain 34 patients suffered from canalolithiasis of horisontal (31 patients) and anterior (3 patients) semicircular canal. After a single treatment session the symptoms disappeared completely in 139 patients, in 40 patients after twice, 16 patients after 3 times and 9 patients after 4 times maneuver sessions. No effectiveness was found in 5 patients; during follow-up 7 successfully treated patients experienced a recurrence between 1 and 6 months, in two cases after one year; they were retreated and all achieved a positive result. It is concluded that diagnosis of BPPV is simple and save, do not need expensive neuroradiological tests; CRM provides effective and long term control of symptoms in patients with BPPV.

  7. [Treatment of the benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) by Epley maneuver].

    PubMed

    Pino Rivero, V; Pantoja Hernández, C G; González Palomino, A; Mora Santos, M E; Marcos García, M; Montero García, C; Blasco Huelva, A

    2007-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common of the peripheral vertigo. We report the case of a 45 years old female with that pathology suspected by the symptoms which the patient related to head changes of positions and movements. Her diagnosis was confirmed by the maneuver of Dix-Hallpike, that was positive, and the treatment consisted in a maneuver of canalicular reposition according to Epley's technique. Such maneuver was successful and actually the patient is without symptoms after more than 2 years since the first episode. Finally we have performed a bibliographic review to verify the effectiveness of that treatment.

  8. Complications in implant surgery by Summer's technique: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    PubMed

    Galli, M; Petracca, T; Minozzi, F; Gallottini, L

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study is to show the correlation between implant surgery using an osteotomic technique and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The case of a 55-year-old patient submitted to oral implant surgery in the 2.3 area is described. The ridge was thin in this particular location and therefore the maxillary expansion technique according to Summer was preferred. After removing the sutures, the patient suffered from vertigo and was in a confusional state. The patient was therefore placed in the Tredelenburg's position and a few minutes later he felt better. However, the symptomatology that seemed disappeared was present again the following day. A careful check-up showed the presence of BPPV, treated as described in this paper.

  9. Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) related with recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    PubMed

    Manzari, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    The vestibular aqueduct is a bony canal related to the bony labyrinth of the inner ear and represents the non-sensory components of the endolymph-filled, closed, membranous labyrinth. The association of congenital sensorineural hearing loss with a large or enlarged vestibular aqueduct is well known as the large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS). The enlarged VA (EVA) comprises abnormalities not only in the structure of the inner ear, but also in the physiology of the auditory and vestibular systems. The clinical picture of this clinical entity is variable [Yetiser S, Kertment M, Ozkaptan Y. Vestibular disturbance in patients with Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (LVAS). Acta Otolaryngol (StochK) 1999;119: 641-646]. Signs and symptoms of the auditory impairment are more commonly described in the literature: hearing loss ranges from mild to profound, arising from fluctuating to stepwise progressive or sudden. Vestibular disturbances, ranging from mild imbalance to episodic vertigo, are rarely described in the literature. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a labyrinthine disorder with a typical behavior: intense crises of rotational vertigo induced by postural changes of the head, with short duration and usually good responsiveness to rehabilitative maneuvers. These maneuvers are effective in about 80% of patients with BPPV. BPPV often recurs. About 1/3 of patients have a recurrence in the first year after treatment, and by five years, about half of all patients have a recurrence. Vestibular aqueduct has been demonstrated by conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT), however, CT scans cannot show the membranous labyrinth itself. On MR images it is not the vestibular aqueduct that is visualized but its contents, the endolymphatic duct and sac, and can show the abnormalities of the fluid spaces related to the membranous labyrinth. It is proposed that recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is related with volumetric abnormalities

  10. Benign positional vertigo - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Vertigo - positional - aftercare; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - aftercare; BPPV - aftercare; Dizziness - positional vertigo ... Your health care provider may have treated your vertigo with the Epley maneuver . These are head movements ...

  11. Unintentional conversion of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo caused by repositioning procedures for canalithiasis: transitional BPPV.

    PubMed

    Babic, Borivoj B; Jesic, Snezana D; Milovanovic, Jovica D; Arsovic, Nenad A

    2014-05-01

    BPPV when diagnosed before any repositioning procedure is called primary BPPV. Primary BPPV canalithiasis treatment with repositioning procedures sometimes results in unintentional conversion of BPPV form: transitional BPPV. Objectives were to find transitional BPPV forms, how they influence relative rate of canal involvement and how to be treated. This study is a retrospective case review performed at an ambulatory, tertiary referral center. Participants were 189 consecutive BPPV patients. Main outcome measures were detection of transitional BPPV, outcome of repositioning procedures for transitional canalithiasis BPPV and spontaneous recovery for transitional cupulolithiasis BPPV. Canal distribution of primary BPPV was: posterior canal (Pc): 85.7% (162/189), horizontal canal (Hc): 11.6% (22/189), anterior canal (Ac): 2.6% (5/189); taken together with transitional BPPV it was: Pc: 71.3% (164/230), Hc: 26.5% (61/230), Ac: 2.2% (5/230). Transitional BPPV forms were: Hc canalithiasis 58% (24/41), Hc cupulolithiasis 37% (15/41) and common crux reentry 5% (2/41). Treated with barbecue maneuver transitional Hc canalithiasis cases either resolved in 58% (14/24) or transitioned further to transitional Hc cupulolithiasis in 42% (10/24). In follow-up of transitional Hc cupulolithiasis we confirmed spontaneous recovery in 14/15 cases in less than 2 days. The most frequent transitional BPPV form was Hc canalithiasis so it raises importance of barbecue maneuver treatment. Second most frequent was transitional Hc cupulolithiasis which very quickly spontaneously recovers and does not require any intervention. The rarest found transitional BPPV form was common crux reentry which is treated by Canalith repositioning procedure. Transitional BPPV taken together with primary BPPV may decrease relative rate of Pc BPPV, considerably increase relative rate of Hc BPPV and negligibly influence relative rate of Ac BPPV. Transitional BPPV forms can be produced by repositioning maneuvers

  12. [CROATIAN GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO (BPPV)].

    PubMed

    Maslovara, Sinisa; Butković-Soldo, Silva; Drvis, Petar; Roje-Bedeković, Marina; Trotić, Robert; Branica, Srećko; Habek, Mario; Cvjetko, Tereza; Vesligaj, Tihana; Adamec, Ivan; Gabelić, Tereza; Jurić, Stjepan; Vceva, Andrijana; Vranjes, Zeljko; Sarić, Ingrid; Cejić, Olivera; Zivić, Tihomir

    2015-01-01

    BPPV is generally the most common cause of vertigo, caused by a pinch-off of tiny calcium carbonate crystals (called the otoconia or the otoliths) from the macula utriculi, most frequently due to the degenerative processes or a trauma, whereby the crystals, under the action of gravity in certain head positions coinciding with its direction, arrive to some of the semicircular canals, usually the posterior one, due to the existent anatomical circumstances and relationships, thus creating an inadequate stimulus of the cupular senses while floating through the endolymph and provoking symptoms of a strong and short-term dizziness. Two main clinical forms can be distinguished: canalolythiasis, with an accommodation of otolithic debris in the semicircular canal, and cupulolythiasis, with their location immediately next to the cupular sense. The diagnosis is established by a positive positioning test, Dix-Hallpike for the posterior and the supine roll for the lateral canal. Although one can expect a spontaneous recovery subsequent to few weeks or months, various methods of otolith repositioning to a less sensitive place lead to a prompt improvement while reducing or withdrawing the symptoms completely. These guidelines are intended for all who treat the BPPV in their work, with an intention to assist in the diagnosis and application of an appropriate therapeutic method.

  13. Bilateral posterior semi-circular canal obliteration surgery for refractory benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in three patients.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudip; Rea, Peter A

    2016-02-15

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common cause of peripheral vestibular disorder(1) characterised by a short lasting rotatory vertigo triggered by movement of the head. Unilateral posterior canal plugging has become an accepted, if uncommonly used, method of treating intractable cases. However there is very limited experience of bilateral posterior canal plugging. When the current series of cases began, there were no cases reported in the literature. Two small series have since been reported from America and Australia.(2,3) This is the first published UK series to our knowledge. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Direction-fixed paroxysmal nystagmus lateral canal benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV): another form of lateral canalolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Califano, L; Vassallo, A; Melillo, M G; Mazzone, S; Salafia, F

    2013-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV) is the most frequent vertiginous syndrome. It is caused either by free-floating otoliths in the semicircular canals (canalolithiasis) or by otoconial debris adhering to a canal cupula (cupulolithiasis). The posterior canal is the most frequently involved (80%), while the lateral canal is involved less frequently (15%), and the rarest conditions are anterior canalolithiasis and apogeotropic posterior canalolithiasis (5%). The main diagnostic sign of lateral canal BPPV is paroxysmal horizontal bidirectional positioning nystagmus evoked through Pagnini-McClure's test (head roll in the yaw plane in supine position). In the geotropic variant, which is more frequent, the fast phase of the nystagmus is directed towards the lowermost ear, when the patient lies on the affected side or on the healthy side; in the apogeotropic variant, which is less frequent, the fast phase is directed always toward the uppermost ear, regardless of which side the patient lies on. Paroxysmal nystagmus is more intense on the affected side in the geotropic form, and more intense on the healthy side in the apogeotropic form. The authors describe five cases of another primitive and rare form of lateral BPPV, defined as "direction-fixed paroxysmal nystagmus lateral canal BPPV", which has previously been described by other authors as a transitory step observed during the transformation from an apogeotropic into a geotropic form. It is characterized by typical BPPV symptoms and diagnosed by the presence of a paroxysmal horizontal unidirectional positioning nystagmus, evoked through Pagnini-McClure's test, which is apogeotropic on the affected side and geotropic on the healthy side. In the reported cases, direction-fixed horizontal paroxysmal nystagmus was always transformed into a typical geotropic form. The clinical features and pathophysiology of direction-fixed nystagmus lateral canal BPPV are discussed.

  15. An iPhone-assisted particle repositioning maneuver for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV): a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Organ, Brock; Liu, Hao; Bromwich, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The Epley particle repositioning maneuver (PRM) is an effective treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common cause of peripheral vertigo in primary care settings. The goal of this study was to determine whether the use of an iPhone application (DizzyFIX; Clearwater Clinical Ltd, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) by medical students had a significant impact on the performance of the PRM. We recruited senior medical students who had previously been trained in the management of BPPV and asked them to perform the PRM on a healthy volunteer. One half of the students used a real iPhone application, whereas the others used a sham application. The PRM performance scores of the 2 groups were compared. iPhone application users scored significantly higher on their PRM performance compared with controls (P < .0001) and performed the PRM significantly more slowly (P < .0001). Senior medical students performed a more correct PRM when assisted by the iPhone application. This application represents a significant improvement from standard medical school training using written instructions. Family physicians could also use this iPhone application for the quick and effective treatment of BPPV. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  16. Clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in Taiwan: differences between young and senior age groups.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Chern, Chang-Ming; Chen, Liang-Kung; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2009-12-01

    BPPV is a common cause of vertigo. Several treatment procedures can facilitate recovery. In this study, we aimed to identify the demographic features, resolution and recurrence rates and impacts on daily activities in BPPV patient between young and senior age groups in Taiwan. This retrospective study recruited 218 patients of BPPV. Medical history, canal involvement, treatment required for complete resolution, symptom free period and recurrence rates were evaluated between the two age groups. Up to 80.7% of patients were successfully treated by a single treatment. For patients aged more than 65 years, the recurrence rate was 1.7 times higher than that in the younger age group (p = 0.07). The symptom-free period before recurrence was nearly 2.2 times longer in the senior age group (p = 0.03). Work-related activities were influenced more by BPPV in the younger age group (p = 0.03). We conclude that BPPV is prone to occur and recur in people of senior age. Clinicians should have the knowledge to diagnose different types of BPPV and treat it accordingly to prevent further complications.

  17. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    von Brevern, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common and the most effectively treated vestibular disorder. The prevailing pathomechanism is canalolithiasis, which is otoconia falling in one of the semicircular canals where they move in response to changes of the head position, triggering excitation of the vestibular receptors of the affected canal. In the majority of patients with BPPV, the posterior canal is affected by canalolithiasis and there are two highly effective therapeutic maneuvers for treatment. About 20% of patients present with lithiasis of the horizontal or anterior canal. The author focuses on recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of the more rare variants of BPPV.

  18. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo Part II: A qualitative review of non-pharmacological, conservative treatments and a case report presenting Epley’s “canalith repositioning procedure”, a non-invasive bedside manoeuvre for treating BPPV

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, Gabrielle M

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To review the range of treatment interventions for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) with a focus on recent physical treatments (repositioning manoeuvres) inspired by the theoretical pathophysiology canalithiasis. To qualitatively review clinical trials which have examined the efficacy of these repositioning manoeuvres for treating BPPV and present a case report of BPPV treated with a repositioning manoeuvre. Data sources: Relevant studies were identified using the bibliographic database MEDLINE spanning from 1966 to March 1997. Study selection: A total of 21 studies were selected on the basis of their relevance to Part II of this review. Data extraction: The findings and results of relevant studies, and their subsequent conclusions were compared and compiled into a historical summary of the physical treatment of BPPV, focusing on the state of the knowledge regarding the efficacy of repositioning manoeuvres. Results of the data synthesis: The most recent pathophysiological theories for BPPV, cupulolithiasis and canalithiasis, have inspired a number of physical treatments which seek to reverse the pathological mechanisms believed to be responsible for BPPV. The most recent physical treatments, Epley’s canalith repositioning procedure and its variations, are “bedside” procedures which seeks to reverse canalithiasis by the application of a series of positioning manoeuvres. Conclusion: The efficacy of these repositioning manoeuvres has not been satisfactorily determined, but despite this, their popularity is apparently growing. The repositioning manoeuvre can easily be performed in the chiropractic practice setting. However, prior to undertaking these physical treatments, the chiropractor should be confident in the diagnosis of BPPV, given that numerous causes of vertigo are serious and life-threatening.

  19. Horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in a fighter pilot

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Su-Jiang; Wang, Jiang-Chang; Ding, Li; Sun, Xi-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common disorder of the peripheral vestibular system, characterized by intense, positional provoked vertigo. BPPV is thought to occur due to canalithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal. Recently, a new entity of BPPV, known as horizontal canal (HC)-BPPV, has been recognized. Although only 3 to 8% of BPPV is due to horizontal canal involvement, HC-BPPV is not rare. We present a case of a naval fighter pilot who had an incident of HC-BPPV on the ground. The pilot aeromedical evaluation and considerations are discussed. PMID:21716841

  20. Horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in a fighter pilot.

    PubMed

    Xie, Su-Jiang; Wang, Jiang-Chang; Ding, Li; Sun, Xi-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common disorder of the peripheral vestibular system, characterized by intense, positional provoked vertigo. BPPV is thought to occur due to canalithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal. Recently, a new entity of BPPV, known as horizontal canal (HC)-BPPV, has been recognized. Although only 3 to 8% of BPPV is due to horizontal canal involvement, HC-BPPV is not rare. We present a case of a naval fighter pilot who had an incident of HC-BPPV on the ground. The pilot aeromedical evaluation and considerations are discussed.

  1. Vertigo during the Epley maneuver and success rate in patients with BPPV.

    PubMed

    Fyrmpas, Georgios; Barkoulas, Eustathios; Haidich, Anna Bettina; Tsalighopoulos, Miltiadis

    2013-09-01

    To investigate whether reported vertigo during the Epley maneuver predicts therapeutic success in patients with benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo of the posterior semicircular canal (pc-BPPV). Fifty consecutive adult patients with pc-BPPV, based on a positive Dix-Hallpike test (DHT), were treated with the Epley maneuver and retested after 2 days. Patients were asked to report the presence of vertigo upon assuming each of the four positions of the maneuver. Thirty seven patients (74 %) were treated successfully in one session. Twenty out of 23 patients who reported vertigo at turning the head to the opposite side (2nd position) had a negative DHT on follow-up. These patients had a higher chance of a successful outcome compared to patients who did not report vertigo in the 2nd position (Odds ratio 5.3, 95 % CI: 1.3-22.2, p = 0.022). Report of vertigo at the other positions was not associated with the outcome. Report of vertigo at the second position of a single modified Epley maneuver is associated with therapeutic success.

  2. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV): influence of pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapy on patients' recovery rate and life quality.

    PubMed

    Maslovara, Sinisa; Soldo, Silva Butkovic; Puksec, Mirjana; Balaban, Branka; Penavic, Ivana Pajic

    2012-01-01

    This prospective clinical study includes 96 BPPV patients with the results of DHI testing ≥ 40 points. They were segregated to be taken into this study and randomly divided into two therapy groups: 48 patients in Group I were treated pharmacotherapeutically with Betahistine Chloride (BC) and 48 patients in Group II underwent a rehabilitation treatment by performing an Epley maneuver. Total study duration was eight weeks, during which the patients were first examined upon arrival, checked after one, and rechecked after eight weeks. The tests included otoneurological examination and VNG, as well as completing three questionnaires: DHI, SF-36®, and HADS®. During the first checkup after one week, 86.96% of patients in Group I and 93.33% in Group II had negative results at the Dix-Hallpike test. During the second checkup after an eight weeks' treatment, 95.65% in Group I and 97.78% patients in Group II had a negative result. At the beginning of the study, the values of patients' physical, emotional, and functional health (QoL) were equally distributed in both therapy groups, compared to standardized values of healthy population. During the first checkup, the values were significantly higher and by the second checkup, reached the statistic average, which corresponds with the healthy population. There was an obviously faster and more complete recovery of the patients in Group II, who underwent a rehabilitation treatment.

  3. Menopause and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Ogun, Oluwaseye Ayoola; Büki, Bela; Cohn, Edward S; Janky, Kristen L; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the age and sex distribution and the effects of menopause in a large cohort of participants diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). We analyzed 1,377 BPPV patients and surveyed 935 women from this group-all diagnosed at the Boys Town National Research Hospital in the last decade. A detailed age and sex distribution analysis of BPPV onset showed that aging had a profound impact on BPPV occurrence in both sexes, and that perimenopausal women were especially susceptible to BPPV (3.2:1 female-to-male ratio). The latter is a novel finding and was confirmed by a direct survey of female BPPV patients (168 participated). In addition, there was a pronounced female preponderance (6.8:1 female-to-male ratio) in BPPV in the teenage group despite its low prevalence in this age group. Data suggest that hormonal fluctuations (especially during menopause) may increase the tendency to develop BPPV.

  4. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo following septorhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Koc, Eltaf Ayca Ozbal; Koc, Bulent; Eryaman, Esra; Ozluoglu, Levent N

    2013-01-01

    We present 2 cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) following septorhinoplasty. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo following septorhinoplasty is an unusual entity. Two young women who had difficulty in breathing and nasal deformity underwent septorhinoplasty. On the second and the third postoperative days, the patients experienced vertigo that was induced by position changes. Both patients had neither preexisting ear disease nor vertigo before the surgery. All the examinations were normal. With Dix-Hallpike maneuver, which is the criterion-standard test, the characteristic nystagmus was observed. Right posterior canal BPPV was diagnosed, and they were both treated with Epley canalith repositioning maneuver. Publications related to postsurgical vertigo are available in literature, but it is still an underdiagnosed disorder. We would like to mention about this rare entity and inform the surgeons that they must keep in mind that a patient who is complaining about vertigo or dizziness after the surgery should be observed and investigated for BPPV.

  5. Diagnosing and treating benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Mary; Jepson, Terry; Jones, Susan

    2006-12-01

    Gerontological nurses play a critical role in the early recognition of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), a condition that accounts for approximately 50% of vertigo in older adults. BPPV results in vertigo when debris collects in one or more of the semicircular canals, most typically the posterior canal. It may be differentiated from other forms of vertigo because it results in dizziness when recumbent or with head position changes. BPPV may be successfully treated with repositioning therapy, such as the Epley maneuver. Nurses working in medical offices, longterm care facilities, and assisted living may be called on to perform this maneuver. Gerontological nurses play a key role in assessing and treating BPPV, therefore minimizing unnecessary testing and medication and reducing the suffering and expense for patients with this condition.

  6. [Surgical treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Y; Grosjean, P; Maire, R

    2012-10-03

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common disorder that presents to the general practitioner. This condition represents one of the most common causes of peripheral vertigo. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds. The treatment relies on repositioning maneuvers with relief of symptoms that occur in a few weeks in the majority of the cases. Rarely, patients are incapacitated by persistent or recurrent BPPV despite multiple repositioning maneuvers. In these cases, surgical therapies are available which provide excellent results.

  7. [Anterior semicircular canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo].

    PubMed

    Alzuphar, Stephen Jacques; Maire, Raphaël

    2016-10-05

    Anterior semicircular canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (antBPPV) is the rarest form of semicircular canalolithiasis, corresponding to about 1-2 % of the BPPV. The diagnosis is obtained by either the Dix-Hallpike maneuver or the straight head hanging positioning maneuver, which provoke a characteristic positional down-beating nystagmus. This vertical nystagmus can be associated with a torsional component that helps in localizing the affected side. The differential diagnosis of antBPPV includes the various central lesions that produce vertical down beating nystagmus (posterior fossa). Several liberatory maneuvers have been proposed for the treatment of antBPPV, but still need standardization.

  8. [The preliminary research of progress on sudden deafness with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Yu, Youjin; Zhao, Yuanxin; Wang, Yuejian; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Qiuling

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the prognosis of sudden deafness patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The clinical data of 24 sudden deafness patients with BPPV was analyzed. The outcome of 125 sudden deafness patients without BPPV at the same time was compared. Hearing improvement after three months treatment was 41.67% and 72.80% in sudden deafness patients with BPPV and sudden deafness patients without BPPV, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The prognosis of hearing in sudden deafness patients with BPPV is worse than that in sudden deafness patients without BPPV. BPPV may predict a poor hearing outcome in sudden deafness.

  9. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after use of noise-canceling headphones.

    PubMed

    Dan-Goor, Eric; Samra, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common cause of vertigo. We describe a case of a woman presenting acutely with a severe episode of disabling positional vertigo. Although she had no known etiologic risk factors, this attack followed 12 hours of continuously wearing digital noise-canceling headphones. This is the first such reported association between BPPV and the use of this gadget. We also provide a short review of BPPV and speculate on the possible pathogenic mechanisms involved.

  10. Natural history of horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is truly short.

    PubMed

    Shim, Dae Bo; Ko, Kyung Min; Lee, Joon Hee; Park, Hong Ju; Song, Mee Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to characterize the natural course of positional vertigo and nystagmus in patients with horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (h-BPPV) and to analyze the difference in the natural course between the two variants of h-BPPV. We conducted a prospective study in 106 patients with geotropic type h-BPPV [h-BPPV (Geo)] (n = 43) and apogeotropic type h-BPPV [h-BPPV (Apo)] (n = 63) who agreed and signed the written informed consent of no treatment. All patients were asked to answer a detailed interview about the onset time of positional vertigo and to visit the hospital every 1-3 days. At every visit, they were interviewed about cessation time of positional vertigo and positional nystagmus was assessed. The mean period ± SD between the onset and remission of vertigo in the h-BPPV (Geo) was 6.7 ± 6.3 days, whereas that in the h-BPPV (Apo) was 3.7 ± 4.1 days. In addition, the mean period ± SD from the initial diagnosis to the disappearance of positional nystagmus in the h-BPPV (Geo) was 4.7 ± 3.9 days, whereas that in the h-BPPV (Apo) was 4.4 ± 5.0 days. Although the duration until natural remission of positional nystagmus did not differ between the two variants of h-BPPV, the remission of vertigo occurred faster in h-BPPV (Apo) than h-BPPV (Geo) (p < 0.05). The natural course of h-BPPV is much shorter than that indicated in previous reports. The positional vertigo disappeared faster in the h-BPPV (Apo) compared to the h-BPPV (Geo) unlike the positional nystagmus.

  11. [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: provocation and freeing manoeuvres].

    PubMed

    Herreros Fernández, M L; Beato Martínez, A; Barja Tur, J; Moreno Juara, A; González Laguillo, A

    2008-08-01

    The benign paroxystic positional vertigo (BPPV) is defined by brief episodic vertigo attacks and accompanied by a rotary-linear nystagmus, triggered by head position changes and is always produced in that position. The theory that better explains the BPPV is canalithiasis: free-floating particles leave the utricular macula and enter one of the semicircular canals, producing an endolymphatic movement that stimulates the cupula and produces vertigo and nystagmus. The diagnosis is based on a typical clinical history, normal ear and neurological examination and provocation maneuvers, such as the Dix-Hallpike test, reproduce the vertigo attacks. The treatments are the liberatory maneuvers, such as the Epley maneuver which makes the vertigo disappear. We present two cases of vertigo with a compatible clinic history of BPPV, where the Dix-Hallpike maneuver confirmed the diagnosis. The treatment in both cases was the Epley maneuver.

  12. Classification, diagnostic criteria and management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takao; Takeda, Noriaki; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Shigeno, Kohichiro; Asai, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Yukio; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2017-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vertigo and the posterior and/or lateral semicircular canals are usually affected. BPPV is characterized by brief attacks of rotatory vertigo associated with positional and/or positioning nystagmus, which are elicited by specific head positions or changes in head position relative to gravity. In patients with the posterior-canal-type of BPPV, torsional nystagmus is induced by the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. In patients with the lateral-canal-type of BPPV, horizontal geotropic or apogeotropic nystagmus is induced by the supine roll test. The pathophysiology of BPPV is canalolithiasis comprising free-floating otoconial debris within the endolymph of a semicircular canal, or cupulolithiasis comprising otoconial debris adherent to the cupula. The observation of positional and/or positioning nystagmus is essential for the diagnosis of BPPV. BPPV is treated with the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP). Through a series of head position changes, the CRP moves otoconial debris from the affected semicircular canal to the utricle. In this review, we provide the classification, diagnostic criteria, and examinations for the diagnosis, and specific and non-specific treatments of BPPV in accordance with the Japanese practical guidelines on BPPV published by the Japan Society for Equilibrium Research.

  13. Epley and beyond: an update on treating positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the commonest cause of dizziness. It is characterised by brief episodes of vertigo and imbalance with nystagmus. The direction of nystagmus allows the identification of the culprit semicircular canal. As it is readily treatable--and often curable--BPPV should not be missed. Although recurrent episodes of vertigo triggered by movement suggest BPPV, the diagnosis can only be confirmed with the Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre. Here we review the diagnostic manoeuvres required to diagnose BPPV, and the various repositioning manoeuvres for treating different types of BPPV. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Salvinelli, F; Firrisi, L; Casale, M; Trivelli, M; D'Ascanio, L; Lamanna, F; Greco, F; Costantino, S

    2004-09-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) has been recognized as the most common vestibular disorder; it is a term coined in 1952 by Dix and Hallpike, and it is most commonly used to describe a disease with a characteristic clinical presentation believed to be caused by free-floating particles leaving the macula and entering one of the semicircular canals, usually the posterior one, more rarely the horizontal or superior ones. A lot of studies showed as the prevalence is higher in females than in males with a ratio of 2:1; furthermore, prevalence increases with the age: the mean age at onset is 54 years, with a range of 11 to 84 years. The most important clinical manifestations of BPPV are: vertigo, lightheadedness, dysequilibrium and sometimes nausea, vomiting, pallor and sweating. The diagnosis of BPPV is very simple through the Dix-Hallpike test or the diagnostic Semont's maneuver; the increasing information about the BPPV's pathogenesis has led most authors to consider the rehabilitative therapy, and in particular the so-called Semont's "liberatory" maneuver, as the first choice treatment of BPPV, in relation to its quickness and efficacy. In this treatment the debris are moved from the posterior semicircular canal to another location within the vestibular labyrinth. In our review we consider the possible pathogenesis of this disease and the best therapies, like repositioning maneuvers, in a patient affected by BPPV.

  15. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo Part I: Background and clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, Gabrielle M

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To review recent theories regarding the aetiology and pathophysiology of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), including its epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and differential diagnosis. Data sources: Relevant studies were identified by searching MEDLINE from 1966 - March, 1997. Study selection: A total of 35 studies were selected on the basis of their relevance to Part I of this review. Data extraction: The findings and results of relevant studies and their subsequent theories and conclusions are discussed and compiled into a general overview of BPPV. Results of data synthesis: BPPV is considered the most common cause of vertigo of peripheral origin. A potential causal association has been observed with numerous apparent aetiological factors, all of which may lead to peripheral vestibular trauma. Findings of densities within the posterior semi-circular canal have given rise to the most recent theories regarding the pathophysiology for BPPV, canalithiasis and cupulolithiasis. Conclusions: BPPV is a multiaetiological peripheral vestibular disease whose underlying cause remains an enigma. The existing evidence supports two recent pathophysiological theories, cupulolithiasis and canalithiasis. Two conditions of special concern to the chiropractor, vertebrobasilar insufficiency and cervicogenic vertigo, closely ressemble BPPV, and can be differentiated by certain identifying features. BPPV may be diagnosed clinically, after ruling out conditions in which vertigo is a central feature. A review of the treatment for BPPV, focusing on recent physical treatments will be discussed in Part II of this paper.

  16. Natural history of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and efficacy of Epley and Lempert maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Kazunori; Imai, Takao; Sato, Go; Ito, Mahito; Takeda, Noriaki

    2006-10-01

    We assessed the efficacy of Epley maneuver in patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (P-BPPV) and Lempert maneuver in patients with horizontal canal BPPV (H-BPPV). In patients with P-BPPV, positional vertigo in patients treated by Epley maneuver was significantly resolved more quickly than that in untreated patients. But in patients with H-BPPV, there were no significant differences of time course in remission of positional vertigo between untreated patients and patients treated by Lempert maneuver. Among the untreated patients, the positional vertigo in patients with H-BPPV was significantly resolved more quickly than that in patients with P-BPPV. Epley maneuver was effective for the treatment of patients with P-BPPV, whereas the efficacy of Lempert maneuver for the treatment of patients with H-BPPV was limited. The natural courses in remission of positional vertigo in untreated patients with H-BPPV showed significantly faster resolution than that in patients with P-BPPV.

  17. [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in children after head trauma].

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Maria Schøler; Rokkjær, Malene Sine; Berg, Jette; Lüscher, Michael

    2015-06-15

    We present an eight-year-old boy with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) after a head trauma, successfully treated with Epley's manoeuvre. BPPV is a common cause of vestibular vertigo in adults, but it is rarely seen in children. Diagnostic work-up is challenging as children often lack the ability to describe their symptoms accurately and to cooperate in clinical examination. The diagnosis should be suspected in children with a relevant medical history and verified by positional testing. BPPV of childhood is treated with otolith repositioning manoeuvres, and the prognosis is good.

  18. Can the affected semicircular canal be predicted by the initial provoking position in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?

    PubMed

    Shim, Dae Bo; Ko, Kyung Min; Kim, Ji Hong; Lee, Won-Sang; Song, Mee Hyun

    2013-09-01

    The study evaluated the relationship between the position that initially provoked vertigo and the affected semicircular canal (SCC) in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and aimed to predict the side affected by BPPV through history taking regarding the provoking position. Prospective study at a tertiary hospital. A total of 521 patients with BPPV involving the posterior or horizontal SCCs performed questionnaires at initial visit asking to choose the initial provoking position among the 10 positions corresponding to one of the three planes (roll, pitch, or yaw). After excluding 45 patients showing signs of simultaneous multiple canal or anterior canal involvement, the frequency of the provoking positions and the correlation between the side of the provoking position and the ear affected by BPPV were analyzed. There were 239 patients with posterior SCC BPPV (p-BPPV) and 237 patients with horizontal SCC BPPV (h-BPPV). The waking-up position was the most common provoking position in both types of BPPV. Statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the side of the provoking position at the onset of vertigo and the affected side by BPPV (P < .01) in patients with p-BPPV as well as h-BPPV (geotropic type [Geo]), but not in patients with h-BPPV (apogeotropic type [Apo]). History taking regarding the side of provoking position at the onset of vertigo may help predict the side affected by BPPV in p-BPPV and h-BPPV (Geo). When h-BPPV (Apo) is suspected, further detailed examinations using additional localization methods should be performed. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Fife, Terry D; von Brevern, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common cause of vertigo characterized by brief episodes provoked by head movements. The first attack of BPPV usually occurs in bed or upon getting up. Because it often begins abruptly, it can be alarming and lead to emergency department evaluation. The episodes of spinning often last 10 to 20 seconds, but may occasionally last as long as 1 minute. There are several forms of BPPV. In nearly all cases, highly effective treatment can be offered to patients. This article reviews the current state of our understanding of this condition and its management.

  20. Role of vestibular testing in diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    López-Escámez, José A

    2009-07-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a mixture of empiricism of particle repositioning with the rationally-based knowledge obtained from clinical observations, histopathology, and neurophysiological experiments. The recently published clinical practice guideline on BPPV makes recommendations on the management of BPPV. One of the statements discourages the use of radiographic or vestibular testing, unless the diagnosis was uncertain or there were additional signs or symptoms unrelated to BPPV. The role of video-oculography in diagnosis and treatment of BPPV is argued, since vestibular testing has provided key relevant information to understand positional nystagmus in patients with BPPV.

  1. Does benign paroxysmal positional vertigo explain age and gender variation in patients with vertigo by mechanical assistance maneuvers?

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-Lu; Jia, Xian-Hao; Tian, Liang; Richard-Vitton, Th

    2014-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common peripheral vestibular diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of BPPV in vertigo patients and the characteristics of BPPV in diagnosis and repositioning using mechanical assistance maneuvers and to analyze and summarize the reasons showing these characteristics. Seven hundred and twenty-six patients with vertigo were enrolled in this study. All patients were inspected by TRV armchair (SYNAPSYS, model TRV, France). BPPV patients were identified by the examination results. The characteristics and results using TRV armchair in diagnosis and treatment of BPPV were compared and analyzed. Of 726 vertigo patients, 209 BPPV patients were diagnosed, including 58 men and 151 women, aged from 16 to 87 (mean 52.90 ± 11.93) years. There were significant differences in the proportion of BPPV in male and female vertigo patients (P = 0.0233), but no differences among all age groups (P = 0.3201). Of 209 BPPV patients, 208 cases were repositioned by TRV armchair and no one appeared to have otolithic debris relocated into another canal in the repositioning procedures. 202 cases (97.12 %) were successful and six cases (2.87 %) were effective. None of them failed. This study suggests that BPPV is one of the most common diseases in the young vertigo patients, just like that in the old ones. Female of the species has predilection for BPPV and the site of predilection is the right posterior semicircular canals (PC-BPPV). The results of repositioning are perfect using mechanical assistance maneuvers.

  2. Prevalence of unrecognized benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in older patients.

    PubMed

    van der Zaag-Loonen, H J; van Leeuwen, R B; Bruintjes, Tj D; van Munster, B C

    2015-06-01

    Dizziness is a relatively common complaint which occurs more often with increasing age. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is an important cause which can easily be treated but is frequently not recognized by professionals. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of unrecognized BPPV in older patients. Patients ≥70 years of age (n = 989) indicated whether they experienced dizziness, and if so whether the symptoms were typical for BPPV. If affirmed, a diagnostic maneuver was performed. Positive patients were treated at once. All suspected patients completed quality of life questionnaires and were followed for 3 and 6 months. Positive BPPV patients were compared with negative (but suspected) patients. Almost one quarter of the patients (226 patients, 23 %) suffered from dizziness, among whom 101 were suspected of BPPV. Less than half (n = 45) underwent the diagnostic maneuver, of whom 13 (29 %) were positive for BPPV. At follow-up, one patient developed BPPV, leading to a total of 14 positive patients (overall prevalence 1.4 %). BPPV positive patients did not differ from BPPV negative patients. Among a large group of older patients, one quarter experiences dizziness, and 1.4 % has definite BPPV.

  3. Management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with the canalith repositioning maneuver in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, David B; Sacco, Regina; Rupp, Valerie

    2010-10-01

    Vertigo is a common clinical manifestation in the emergency department (ED). It is important for physicians to determine if the peripheral cause of vertigo is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), a disorder accounting for 20% of all vertigo cases. However, the Dix-Hallpike test--the standard for BPPV diagnosis--is not common in the ED setting. If no central origin of the vertigo is determined, patients in the ED are typically treated with benzodiazepine, antihistamine, or anticholinergic agents. Studies have shown that these pharmaceutical treatment options may not be the best for patients with BPPV. The authors describe a case of a 38-year-old woman who presented to the ED with complaints of severe, sudden-onset vertigo. The patient's BPPV was diagnosed by means of a Dix-Hallpike test and the patient was acutely treated in the ED with physical therapy using the canalith repositioning maneuver.

  4. Headache during a cluster of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo attacks.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Lea; Pollak, Eitan

    2014-12-01

    In view of patients' recurrent complaints, we were interested in investigating the frequency and headache characteristics in patients during a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) cluster. Patients with BPPV treated at an outpatient dizziness clinic were interviewed about the presence of headache; its quality, localization, severity, time course, and aggravating and alleviating factors; and headache-related disability during their present vertigo cluster. Among 152 patients with BPPV, 53 (34.8%) reported headache associated with vertigo. According to The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 8 (15%) patients could be classified as migraine without aura (1.1), 14 (26%) were classified as infrequent episodic tension-type headache associated with pericranial tenderness (2.1.1), 23 (43%) were classified as infrequent episodic tension-type headache without pericranial tenderness (2.1.2), 6 (11%) had cervicogenic headache (11.2.1), and in 2 (4%) patients, the headache could not be specified (14.2). Fifty-two age-matched BPPV patients without headache did not differ in history of headaches, BPPV history, or background diseases. The distribution of canal involvement and number of treatment maneuvers was also similar in both groups. Headache is frequent in BPPV. The most common is tension-type headache, followed by migraine and cervicogenic headache. Head pain seems to be an independently associated epiphenomenon of BPPV that can worsen patients' distress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. A Geriatric Perspective on Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Parham, Kourosh; Kuchel, George A

    2016-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo in older adults. Beyond the unpleasant sensation of vertigo, BPPV also negatively affects older adults' gait and balance and increases their risk of falling. As such it has a profound effect on function, independence, and quality of life. Otoconia are the inner ear structures that help detect horizontal and vertical movements. Aging contributes to the fragmentation of otoconia, whose displacement into the semicircular, most commonly posterior canals, can produce rotatory movement sensations with head movement. BPPV is more commonly idiopathic in older adults than in younger individuals, can present atypically, and has a more-protracted course and higher risk of recurrence. Medications such as meclizine that are commonly prescribed for BPPV can be associated with significant side effects. Dix-Hallpike and Head Roll tests can generally identify the involved canal. Symptoms resolve as otoconia fragments dissolve into the endolymph, but appropriate canalith repositioning (e.g., Epley maneuver) can expedite recovery and reduce the burden of this disorder. Observations suggesting an association between idiopathic BPPV and vitamin D deficiency and osteoporosis indicate that BPPV may share risk factors with other common geriatric conditions, which highlights the importance of moving beyond purely otological considerations and addressing the needs of older adults with vertigo through a systems-based multidisciplinary approach.

  6. Protracted benign paroxysmal positional vertigo following osteotome sinus floor elevation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Su, George Nan-Chang; Tai, Pei-Wei; Su, Po-Tsang; Chien, Hua-Hong

    2008-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a relatively rare condition characterized by onset of rotation dizziness triggered by head movements or change in posture. BPPV etiology includes head injury, infection, vascular disorders, surgical trauma, and idiopathic events. This report presents a case of protracted BPPV following osteotome sinus floor elevation and simultaneous implant placement. A 49-year-old female suffered intense vertigo and nausea immediately after implant placement using an osteotome sinus floor elevation procedure, especially when changing head position while sitting upright. Despite antivertigo medications, the condition did not improve. Following referral to a neurotologist, BPPV contralateral to the operation site was diagnosed 14 days after the osteotome sinus floor elevation procedure. The Epley's maneuver was then applied and, gradually, symptoms of BPPV disappeared 3 months after the implant surgery. No recurrence of BPPV was observed during further 3-month follow-up. Prevention and management of osteotome sinus floor elevation-related BPPV are reviewed in this report.

  7. [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Diagnosis, course, physiopathology and treatment].

    PubMed

    Sauron, B; Dobler, S

    1994-02-01

    The benign paroxystic positional vertigo (BPPV) is defined by brief attacks of rotational vertigo and concomitant rotatory-linear nystagmus, triggered by rapid extension and by lateral head tilt toward the affected ear. Cupulolithiasis of the posterior semi-circular canal from one inner ear is responsible of this peculiar type of positional vertigo. Definition diagnostic criteria are based upon the time history of the burst of rotational vertigo associated with the typical positioning nystagmus induced by rapid position changes from the setting to the head hanging right or left position during the Nylen-Barany maneuver. The nystagmus, which is a torsional nystagmus of the eye-balls rolling on the orbit's ground toward the affected and undermost ear, begins a few seconds after the head tilt, is best seen with Frentzel's glasses, preventing the suppression of the nystagmus by fixation, and the repetition of the maneuver will result in everlasting symptoms. According to the largest series of the literature the BPPV is the most frequent recognized cause of vertigo, with more than 30% of the cases of vertigo, explored in a dizziness clinic. In half of the cases, a peculiar etiology can be found, such as head trauma, ototoxic drug, or viral labyrinthitis, with a sex-ratio of one. On the contrary the sex-ratio among the idiopathic forms of BPPV is of two females for one male. The prognosis of BPPV is benign because of its recovery within weeks or months, either spontaneously, or after the liberatory maneuver. In rare cases, the vertigo recurs or persists for months or years. For some very handicapping BPPV, a surgical treatment can be proposed.

  8. Benign positional vertigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical practice guideline: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2008;139(5 Suppl 4):S47-S81. ... BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015: ...

  9. Positional vertigo afterwards maxillary dental implant surgery with bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Gutiérrez, Carlos; Rodríguez Gómez, Enrique

    2007-03-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common form of vertigo. It is caused by loose otoconia from the utricle which, in certain positions, displaced the cupula of the posterior semicircular canal. BPPV most often is a result of aging. It also can occur after a blow to the head. Less common causes include a prolonged positioning on the back (supine) during some surgical procedures. Additionally one can include in this ethiopathogenesis the positioning required during the maxillary dental implant surgery with bone regeneration related to a forced head positioning and inner ear trauma induced by dental turbine noise working in the maxillary bone. Two cases of patients who suffered BPPV after undergoing maxillary dental implant with bone regeneration procedures are reported. Diagnosis and treatment are also described.

  10. [The variety of symptoms in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo--revision].

    PubMed

    Pollak, Lea

    2013-02-01

    Despite its frequent occurrence and effective treatment options, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) still remains underestimated in the community. Acquaintance of the physician with the various presentation symptoms assists in recognition of the entity. We report the complaints and subjective outcome in our cohort of BPPV patients and discuss the possible origin of the atypical, but common, symptoms.

  11. New therapeutic maneuver for anterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Yacovino, Dario A; Hain, Timothy C; Gualtieri, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    This article describes the clinical features of anterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (AC-BPPV) and a new therapeutic maneuver for its management. Our study was a retrospective review of cases from an ambulatory tertiary referral center. Thirteen patients afflicted with positional paroxysmal vertigo exhibiting brief positional down-beating nystagmus in positional tests (Dix-Hallpike and head-hanging position) were treated with a maneuver comprised of the following movements: Sequential head positioning beginning supine with head hanging 30 degrees dependent with respect to the body, then supine with head inclined 30 degrees forward, and ending sitting with head 30 degrees forward. All cases showed excellent therapeutic response to our repositioning procedure, i.e. relief of vertigo and elimination of nystagmus. The maneuver described is an option for AC-BPPV treatment.

  12. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in an airline pilot.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ahmet; Al-Deleamy, Louai S; Kendirli, Tansel M

    2007-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common types of peripheral vertigo, characterized by violent whirling vertigo after a positional change. Although the condition is termed "benign," the clinical presentation can be incapacitating for pilots in certain maneuvers. We present a case of an airline transport pilot with the complaint of vertigo for 5 d. The vertigo was aggravated by head movements when looking up or rolling over, lasting for a few seconds. The patient was diagnosed with BPPV, and he was treated with physical therapy with the use of Epley maneuver. The airman applied for his First-Class medical examination after the treatment was successfully completed. The aviation medical examiner (AME) issued the airman medical certificate after contacting and receiving verbal approval from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Aerospace Medical Certification Division (AMCD). While evaluating aviators who have had BPPV, AMEs should not issue medical certificates for any class until the condition is fully resolved. Although the AME Guide states that certification of pilots with other types of vertigo requires an FAA decision, once the patient is successfully treated and free of symptoms, approval for issuing the medical certificate can be obtained through contacting AMCD and by submitting all information and documentation pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment.

  13. First-referral presentations of patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who were negative on positional testing and who lacked nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jun; Yu, Dongzhen; Feng, Yanmei; Song, Qiang; You, Jin; Shi, Haibo; Yin, Shankai

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the demographic, clinical, and pathogenetic features; and treatment outcomes of patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) who were negative upon positional testing at their first referral. A total of 133 patients presented with histories of BPPV but were negative, in our hands, upon positional testing. Patients were told to cease taking vestibular suppressant medication (if any) and were to return for re-examination when positional vertigo symptoms recurred. If BPPV was diagnosed, the appropriate repositioning maneuver was applied and patients were re-examined weekly until the characteristic nystagmus and vertigo disappeared. Follow-up was performed 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after diagnosis. The 133 patients were compared with a group of 250 patients with typical BPPV. Sixty-five of the 133 patients (termed the n-BPPV group) were subsequently identified with typical BPPV. Such diagnoses were made within 10 days of the first referral in 37 (56.9%) cases. Patients of the n-BPPV group had a longer duration of the last episode of vertigo than did others (39.7 ± 38.4 vs. 26.1 ± 36.7 days, p < 0.001), and a higher proportion used vestibular suppressant medication prior to first referral (75.4 vs. 54.8%, p = 0.003). The n-BPPV and typical BPPV patients responded similarly to treatment and exhibited similar recurrence rates. BPPV patients who were negative upon positional testing at first referral were quite common, accounting for 26% of all typical BPPV patients. No significant difference in either treatment outcome or recurrence rate was evident between n-BPPV and typical BPPV positions. Positional vertigo and nystagmus are not always present as BPPV progresses.

  14. Revised criteria for suspicion of non-benign positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Soto-Varela, A; Rossi-Izquierdo, M; Sánchez-Sellero, I; Santos-Pérez, S

    2013-04-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most commonly diagnosed vestibular vertigo. BPPV can be diagnosed by clinical examination and its treatment is based on particle repositioning manoeuvres, and specialized equipment is not required. Therefore, most patients could be diagnosed and treated by their general practitioner. Unfortunately, not all positional vertigos are benign. Symptoms similar to those of BPPV can be caused by diseases that affect the central nervous system. It must be possible to define criteria that allow us to suspect, in a patient with symptoms of positional vertigo, the possibility of a cerebral origin ('non-benign PV'). Requests for magnetic resonance imaging must be justified by the fulfillment of these criteria. That is especially relevant in primary care, because these criteria should make possible to distinguish between patients with positional vertigo that could be treated by general practitioner and patients that need to be directed to especialized units. We propose the following revised criteria for suspected non-benign PV: (i) association with signs or symptoms of neurological disorder, (ii) nystagmus without dizziness in positional diagnostic tests, (iii) atypical nystagmus direction, (iv) poor response to therapeutic manoeuvres and (v) recurrence (confirmed by positional tests) on at least three occasions.

  15. Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Gubbels, Samuel P; Schwartz, Seth R; Edlow, Jonathan A; El-Kashlan, Hussam; Fife, Terry; Holmberg, Janene M; Mahoney, Kathryn; Hollingsworth, Deena B; Roberts, Richard; Seidman, Michael D; Steiner, Robert W Prasaad; Do, Betty Tsai; Voelker, Courtney C J; Waguespack, Richard W; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2017-03-01

    Objective This update of a 2008 guideline from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), defined as a disorder of the inner ear characterized by repeated episodes of positional vertigo. Changes from the prior guideline include a consumer advocate added to the update group; new evidence from 2 clinical practice guidelines, 20 systematic reviews, and 27 randomized controlled trials; enhanced emphasis on patient education and shared decision making; a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships; and new and expanded recommendations for the diagnosis and management of BPPV. Purpose The primary purposes of this guideline are to improve the quality of care and outcomes for BPPV by improving the accurate and efficient diagnosis of BPPV, reducing the inappropriate use of vestibular suppressant medications, decreasing the inappropriate use of ancillary testing such as radiographic imaging, and increasing the use of appropriate therapeutic repositioning maneuvers. The guideline is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and manage patients with BPPV, and it applies to any setting in which BPPV would be identified, monitored, or managed. The target patient for the guideline is aged ≥18 years with a suspected or potential diagnosis of BPPV. The primary outcome considered in this guideline is the resolution of the symptoms associated with BPPV. Secondary outcomes considered include an increased rate of accurate diagnoses of BPPV, a more efficient return to regular activities and work, decreased use of inappropriate medications and unnecessary diagnostic tests, reduction in recurrence of BPPV, and reduction in adverse events associated with undiagnosed or untreated BPPV. Other outcomes considered include minimizing costs in the diagnosis and treatment of BPPV, minimizing potentially unnecessary return physician visits, and maximizing

  16. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Balatsouras, Dimitrios G; Koukoutsis, George; Ganelis, Panayotis; Economou, Nicolas C; Moukos, Antonis; Aspris, Andreas; Katotomichelakis, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to present the demographic, pathogenetic and clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) secondary to vestibular neuritis (VN). The medical records of 22 patients, who presented with BPPV within 12 weeks after the onset of VN, were reviewed. Data of a complete otolaryngological, audiological, neurotologic and imaging evaluation were available for all patients. Two hundred and eighty-four patients with idiopathic BPPV were used as a control group. The patients with BPPV secondary to VN presented the following features, in which they differed from the patients with idiopathic BPPV: (1) a lower mean age; (2) involvement of the posterior semicircular canal; (3) presence of canal weakness; (4) more therapeutic sessions needed for cure and a higher rate of recurrence. It may be, thus, concluded that BPPV associated with VN differs from idiopathic BPPV in regard to several epidemiological and clinical features, it responds less effectively to treatment and may follow a protracted course, having a tendency for recurrence.

  17. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Following Sinus Floor Elevation in Patient with Antecedents of Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Akcay, Huseyin; Ulu, Murat; Kelebek, Seyfi; Aladag, Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is an unfamiliar and rare complication occurring following osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) and simultaneous implant placement. Etiology of this disorder is commonly displacement of otoliths by vibratory forces transmitted by osteotomes and mallet along with the hyperextension of the head during the operation, causing them to float around in the endolymph. This report presents a case of protracted BPPV following OSFE and simultaneous implant placement. A 43-year-old female suffered intense vertigo and nausea immediately after implant placement using an OSFE procedure. Upon further questioning after the procedure she gave an account of two times vertigo history within the last 9 years. Despite nootropic drug medication and canalith repositioning procedure applied by a specialist at operation night, the condition did not improve. Patient did not totally recover and was admitted again after 1 month. After repeated maneuvers, nine dosage intravenous serous fluid and piracetam administration the patient recovered. Duration of these procedures took 10 days and the patient was successfully treated with no recurrence of dizziness. Prevention and management of OSFE related BPPV are reviewed especially in patients having prior vertigo history in this report.

  18. Prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo among motocross racers: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hancı, Deniz; Altun, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) among motocross racers after cross-country up and downhill activities. This case-control study included 40 motocross racers (39 males, 1 female; mean age 26 years; range 21 to 43 years) and 40 healthy controls (30 males, 10 females; mean age 28 years; range 22 to 43 years) who had no hearing or balance problems. The Dix-Hallpike maneuver was applied to confirm the diagnosis of BPPV. Patients with BPPV were administered the Epley maneuver every week for one month and followed-up for treatment response assessment. Motocross and control groups were similar in terms of demographic and laboratory parameters. While BPPV was detected in four motocross racers (10%) according to Dix-Hallpike maneuver outcome and clinical findings, there was no BPPV in the control group. Of the motocross racers with BPPV, three had unilateral, one had bilateral disease. Of these patients, Epley maneuver was applied two times in two patients and three times in the other two patients. There was no vertigo or nystagmus in any of the patients with BPPV in one month. Intensive motocross activity is a cause of post-traumatic BPPV developing without head trauma. Large-scale, randomized controlled studies are needed to establish the post-traumatic etiology of BPPV in motocross racers.

  19. Association of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo with Osteoporosis and Vitamin D Deficiency: A Case Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Karataş, Abdullah; Acar Yüceant, Gülşah; Yüce, Turgut; Hacı, Cemal; Cebi, Işıl Taylan; Salviz, Mehti

    2017-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common type of vertigo caused by the peripheral vestibular system. The majority of cases are accepted as idiopathic. Calcium metabolism also plays a primary role in the synthesis/absorption of otoconia made of calcium carbonate and thus might be an etiological factor in the onset of BPPV. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of osteoporosis and vitamin D in the etiology of BPPV by comparing BPPV patients with hospital-based controls. This is a case-control study comparing the prevalence of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency in 78 BPPV patients and 78 hospital-based controls. The mean T-scores and serum vitamin D levels were compared. The risk factors of osteoporosis, physical activity, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and blood pressure were all compared between the groups. To avoid selection bias, the groups were stratified as subgroups according to age, sex, and menopausal status. In this study, the rates of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency detected in BPPV patients were reasonably high. But there was no significant difference in mean T-scores and vitamin D levels, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency prevalence between the BPPV group and controls. The prevalence of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency is reasonably high in the general population. Unlike the general tendencies in the literature, our study suggests that osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency are not risk factors for BPPV; we conclude that the coexistence of BPPV with osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency is coincidental.

  20. Treatment of horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a new rehabilitation technique.

    PubMed

    Testa, D; Castaldo, G; De Santis, C; Trusio, A; Motta, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new technical variant applied to the Gufoni's manoeuvre, in the treatment of horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HSC-BPPV). 87 patients with BPPV of HSC (55 women and 32 men), aged between 21 and 80 years, were randomized either to modified Gufoni's manoeuvre or to the Gufoni's manoeuvre. 93% of patients treated with modified Gufoni's manoeuvre was cured after the first treatment session, of which only 2% had a conversion into PSC-BPPV, while the Gufoni's manoeuvre led to a symptoms resolution in 88% of cases, of which 16% had a conversion into PSC-BPPV. Therefore, the modified Gufoni's manoeuvre shows the same effectiveness in the resolution of symptoms of Gufoni's manoeuvre, but it appears more effective than the latter to reduce the percentage of conversion of the HSC-BPPV into PSC-BPPV (χ(2) = 6.13, P = 0.047).

  1. Visual dependence and BPPV.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, K; Bronstein, A M; Faldon, M E; Mandalà, M; Murray, K; Silove, Y

    2012-06-01

    The increased visual dependence noted in some vestibular patients may be secondary to their vertigo. We examine whether a single, brief vertigo attack, such as in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), modifies visual dependency. Visual dependency was measured before and after the Hallpike manoeuvre with (a) the Rod and Frame and the Rod and Disc techniques whilst seated and (b) the postural sway induced by visual roll-motion stimulation. Three subject groups were studied: 20 patients with BPPV (history and positive Hallpike manoeuvre; PosH group), 20 control patients (history of BPPV but negative Hallpike manoeuvre; NegH group) and 20 normal controls. Our findings show that while both patient groups showed enhanced visual dependency, the PosH and the normal control group decreased visual dependency on repetition of the visual tasks after the Hallpike manoeuvre. NegH patients differed from PosH patients in that their high visual dependency did not diminish on repetition of the visual stimuli; they scored higher on the situational characteristic questionnaire ('visual vertigo' symptoms) and showed higher incidence of migraine. We conclude that long term vestibular symptoms increase visual dependence but a single BPPV attack does not increase it further. Repetitive visual motion stimulation induces adaptation in visual dependence in peripheral vestibular disorders such as BPPV. A positional form of vestibular migraine may underlie the symptoms of some patients with a history of BPPV but negative Hallpike manoeuvre. The finding that they have non adaptable increased visual dependency may explain visuo-vestibular symptoms in this group and, perhaps more widely, in patients with migraine.

  2. Canalith Repositioning Variations for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Helen S.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if variations in common treatments for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) affected efficacy. Study Design Prospective, pseudo-randomized study. Setting Out-patient practice in a tertiary care facility Subjects and Methods Patients (n=118) with unilateral BPPV of the posterior canal, including 13 patients with BPPV of the lateral canal were tested at a tertiary care center on one of five interventions: canalith repositioning maneuver (CRP), CRP plus home exercise, modified CRP, CRP for patients with involvement of two semicircular canals, self-CRP home exercise. Self-CRP was also compared to previously published data on efficacy of the Brandt Daroff exercise. Main outcome measures were vertigo intensity and frequency, presence/ absence of Dix-Hallpike responses, Vestibular Disorders Activities of Daily Living Scale (VADL), computerized dynamic posturography. Results Vertigo intensity and frequency and Dix-Hallpike responses decreased significantly and posturography and VADL improved significantly from pre- to post tests. No other significant changes were found. The groups did not differ significantly. Vertigo intensity and frequency were not strongly related at pre-test but were related at post-test. Length of illness and age did not influence the results. Conclusions However the head is moved, as long as it is moved rapidly enough and through the correct planes in space repositioning treatments are likely to be effective. Therefore clinicians have a range of choices in selecting the treatment best suited for each patient’s unique needs. PMID:20723779

  3. Apogeotropic Posterior Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Some Clinical and Therapeutic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Vannucchi, Paolo; Pecci, Rudi; Giannoni, Beatrice; Di Giustino, Fabio; Santimone, Rossana; Mengucci, Arianna

    2015-01-01

    We lately reported the cases of patients complaining positional vertigo whose nystagmic pattern was that of a peripheral torsional vertical positional down beating nystagmus originating from a lithiasis of the non-ampullary arm of the posterior semicircular canal (PSC). We considered this particular pathological picture the apogeotropic variant of PSC benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Since the description of the pilot cases we observed more than 150 patients showing the same clinical sign and course of symptoms. In this paper we describe, in detail, both nystagmus of apogeotropic PSC BPPV (A-PSC BPPV) and symptoms reported by patients trying to give a reasonable explanation for these clinical features. Moreover we developed two specific physical therapies directed to cure A-PSC BPPV. Preliminary results of these techniques are related. PMID:26557364

  4. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo during lateral window sinus lift procedure: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Reddy K, Sudhakara; Shivu, M E; Billimaga, Akarsh

    2015-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a possible and well-documented complication after the osteotome internal sinus lift technique. But we report a case of unexpected BPPV complication after direct sinus lift by lateral approach for implant placement that was not reported till date. A 30-year-old woman had undergone direct sinus lift procedure by lateral window technique to replace her missing right molar with dental implant. The patient suffered with intense vertigo with nausea, vomiting, and aggravated when she changed the position of her head towards right immediately after procedure and was diagnosed with BPPV after the referral. We assume that prolonged hyperextended head position of iatrogenic origin can be the reason, in this case, for BPPV after direct lateral sinus lift procedure. There is also a possibility that the temporal relationship with the surgical area and surgical action by rotating tools during window preparation are also contributing factors.

  5. Evaluation of vertebrobasilar artery changes in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daopei; Zhang, Shuling; Zhang, Hongtao; Xu, Yuming; Fu, Shengqi; Yu, Meng; Ji, Peng

    2013-09-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) lesions in elderly patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) by magnetic resonance angiography. VBA lesions in patients older than 65 years of age with BPPV were prospectively investigated by magnetic resonance angiography. Vascular risk factors, blood vessel changes, and vertigo severity were recorded. Age-matched individuals without BPPV were included in the control group. Of 126 patients screened for this study, 104 were included. Relevant comorbidities included diabetes (12 patients), hypertension (23 patients), and dyslipidemia (20 patients). Findings included left or right vertebral artery (VA) stenosis or occlusion (22 patients, 21.2%), VA tortuosity (25 patients, 24.0%), VA dominance (20 patients, 19.2%), basilar artery (BA) stenosis or occlusion (nine patients, 8.6%), and BA tortuosity (12 patients, 11.5%). These abnormal vessels differed between BPPV patients and the control group (all P<0.05). The severity of Vertigo did not differ between the abnormal VA and abnormal BA groups (P>0.05), but did differ between the normal group and the abnormal VA or BA group (P<0.05). Vertigo severity correlated with VA stenosis or occlusion, VA dominance, and unilateral or bilateral VA tortuosity. VBA tortuosity and VA dominance were common in BPPV patients and may contribute toward BPPV.

  6. Performance of DHI Score as a Predictor of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in Geriatric Patients with Dizziness/Vertigo: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Amrish; Prabhakar, Manish Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness/vertigo is one of the most common complaint and handicapping condition among patients aged 65 years and older (Geriatric patients). This study was conducted to assess the impact of dizziness/vertigo on the quality of life in the geriatric patients attending a geriatric outpatient clinic. Settings and Design A cross-sectional study was performed in a geriatric outpatient clinic of a rural teaching tertiary care hospital in central India. Materials and Methods In all consecutive geriatric patients with dizziness/vertigo attending geriatric outpatient clinic, DHI questionnaire was applied to assess the impact of dizziness/vertigo and dizziness associated handicap in the three areas of a patients’ life: physical, functional and emotional domain. Later, each patient was evaluated and underwent Dix-Hallpike maneuver by the physician who was blind of the DHI scoring of the patient. Statistical Analysis Used We compared means and proportions of variables across two categories of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and non-BPPV. For these comparisons we used Student’s t-test to test for continuous variables, chi-square test for categorical variables and Fisher’s exact test in the case of small cell sizes (expected value<5). Results The magnitude of dizziness/vertigo was 3%. Of the 88 dizziness/vertigo patients, 19 (22%) and 69(78%) cases, respectively, were attributed to BPPV and non-BPPV group. The association of DHI score ≥50 with the BPPV was found to be statistically significant with x2 value = 58.2 at P<0.01. Conclusion DHI Score is a useful tool for the prediction of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Correct diagnosis of BPPV is 16 times greater if the DHI Score is greater than or equal to 50. The physical, functional and emotional investigation of dizziness, through the DHI, has demonstrated to be a valuable and useful instrument in the clinical routine. PMID:23472142

  7. Co-existence of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and Meniere's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yetişer, Sertaç

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies indicate interrelation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and Meniere's disease (MD). These two entities may have different clinical characteristics. Five hundred thirty patients with BPPV evaluated between 2009-2015 were enrolled in the study. 351 patients who had no clear problem associated with BPPV (idiopathic) and 17 patients with MD were analyzed in detail. The age, sex, site of involvement, type of BPPV, symptom duration, and treatment outcome were compared. Meniere's disease + BPPV was more common in the female population (2/15; 7.5 v 127/224; 1.8, p<0.05). Comparative analysis of average age was not statistically significant (42.82±9.94 v. 40.29±1.65, p=0.601). There was no difference in right and left ear involvement between groups. Lateral canal involvement was more common in the BPPV + MD group (9/17; 53% v. 100/351; 28%, p<0.05). BPPV was ipsilateral to the ear with MD in 75% of patients and it was present before the diagnosis of BPPV in 82.3% of patients. Comparative analysis of cure rate between idiopathic BPPV and BPPV + MD after one session was significant (64.7% v 78%, p<0.05). Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with MD presented a divergent picture. It was more frequent in females. Lateral canal involvement was higher. Patients had MD before the development of BPPV and they had prolonged symptoms, which raised a question of diagnostic delay since these two problems were in the same ear in majority of patients. Finally, relief of symptoms required more attempts of repositioning maneuvers.

  8. Horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: diagnosis and treatment of 37 patients.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Maranhão Filho, Péricles

    2015-06-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most frequent cause of vertigo is associated with high morbidity in the elderly population. The most common form is linked to debris in the posterior semicircular canal. However, there has been an increasing number of reported BPPV cases involving the horizontal canals. The purpose of this article is to highlight the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment in 37 patients with horizontal canal BPPV; twenty-six with geotropic nystagmus, and eleven with the apogeotropic form. Treatment consisted of the Gufoni manoeuver in eighteen patients (48.6%), the barbecue 360° maneuver in twelve patients (32.4%), both manoeuvers in four patients (10.8%), both manoeuvers plus head shaking in one patient (2.7%), and the Gufoni maneuver plus head shaking in two patients. Cupulolithiasis patients were asked to sleep in a forced prolonged position. We obtained a complete resolution of vertigo and nystagmus in 30 patients (81.0%) on the initial visit.

  9. Neurally mediated syncope presenting with paroxysmal positional vertigo and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Tsutsumi, Tomoko; Nakamura, Iwao; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2012-10-01

    A 72-year-old man with positional vertigo and tinnitus was referred to us. He did not want to perform provoking test except once due to his fear. No positional nystagmus was provoked. He found that his attacks usually occurred when he lay on his right ear. From his clinical history, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo was suspected. Conventional pharmacotherapy as well as non-specific physical therapy did not have significant effect. His feeling of positional vertigo with pyrosis was actually presyncope. We suspected cardiovascular disorders, and referred him to a cardiologist. Portable cardiogram monitoring revealed paroxysmal bradycardia. He was diagnosed with neurally mediated syncope, and a pacemaker was implanted. His paroxysmal dizziness soon disappeared. It is important to study the clinical history of the patients in detail, as they are not always able to accurately explain their symptoms. We should carefully rule out cardiovascular disorders, especially when we see the patients with suspected BPPV without the characteristic positional nystagmus.

  10. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after surgical drilling of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Kyoung; Kim, So Young; Han, Kyu-Hee; Hong, Sung Kwang; Kim, Ji Soo; Koo, Ja-Won

    2013-10-01

    To present the clinical characteristics of secondary BPPV after surgical drilling of the temporal bone. Retrospective study. Tertiary referral academic medical center. Ten patients who developed BPPV after surgical procedure of temporal bone drilling were identified from 965 subjects who underwent surgical drilling of the temporal bone at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. The localization and lateralization of BPPV were based on positional test using video eye movement recording system and videonystagmography. Onset of BPPV after surgery, distributions of involved semicircular canals, response to particle repositioning maneuver and factors that may influence the development of secondary BPPV after surgical drilling of the temporal bone. Onset of positional vertigo was mostly within 3 days except 1 case (sixth postoperative day). Postoperative BPPV was usually in the contralateral ear in 9 cases (90%), which occurred predominantly on the contralateral horizontal canal in 8 patients (80%). Positional vertigo was resolved after repositioning maneuvers in every case. None of them showed aggravation of bone conduction threshold. The incidence of BPPV after surgical drilling of the temporal bone was around 1%, and the horizontal semicircular canal of the contralateral ear was predominantly involved. Head position during surgery (head restriction to contralateral ear down) as well as limitation of head movement due to compressive mastoid bandage after surgery seems to be responsible for such predominance.

  11. Diagnosis and Treatment of Anterior-Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kouzi, Ioanna; Spengos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In contrast to the posterior- and horizontal-canal variants, data on the frequency and therapeutic management of anterior-canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (AC-BPPV) are sparse. To synthesize the existing body of evidence into a systematic review regarding the incidence and treatment of AC-BPPV. Methods Systematic search of medical databases employing predefined criteria, using the term "anterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo." Results The electronic search retrieved 178 unique citations, 31 of which were considered eligible for further analysis. Analysis of the collected data revealed an estimated occurrence of AC-BPPV among benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients of 3% (range 1-17.1%). No controlled therapeutic trials could be identified, and so the analysis was focused on uncontrolled case series. Treatment was categorized into three groups: Epley maneuver, Yacovino maneuver, and specific, nonstandard maneuvers described in individual articles. All three categories demonstrated success rates of over 75%, and the overall sample-size-weighted mean was 85.6%. Conclusions The present analysis demonstrated that AC-BPPV comprises about 3% of all BPPV cases. It can be treated safely using the Epley, Yacovino, and other maneuvers with rates of symptom resolution lying in the range of that reported for the other, more frequent canal variants. Multicenter controlled trials are needed in order to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of AC-BPPV. PMID:26022461

  12. Benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo: classic descriptions, origins of the provocative positioning technique, and conceptual developments.

    PubMed

    Lanska, D J; Remler, B

    1997-05-01

    The original description of benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV) has been variously attributed to Bárány, Adler, and others. In addition, the proper eponymic designation for the provocative positioning test used to diagnose BPPV has been unclear, because authors use a variety of different terms, including Bárány, Nylén-Bárány, Nylén, Hallpike, Hallpike-Dix, and Dix-Hallpike to refer to the procedure in current use. Based on a review of the extant medical literature, Bárány was the first to describe the condition in detail, and Dix and Hallpike were the first to clearly describe both the currently used provocative positioning technique and the essential clinical manifestations of benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo elicited by that technique. Nevertheless, despite their important contributions, neither Bárány nor Dix and Hallpike understood the pathophysiology of BPPV nor did they appreciate that the positioning techniques they used actually demonstrated pathology in the semicircular canals rather than the utricle. The modern understanding of the pathophysiology of BPPV began with Schuknecht's proposal that the dysfunction resulted from the gravity-dependent movement of loose or fixed dense material within the posterior semicircular canal ("cupulolithiasis"). Although Schuknecht's formulations were not consistent with all clinical features of the disease, they led to the modern "canalolithiasis theory" and highly effective canalith repositioning or "liberatory" maneuvers for BPPV.

  13. Can CK-MB be used as a marker in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo attack?

    PubMed

    Torun, Mümtaz Taner; Yalçın, Yusuf; Özkan, Özalkan

    2017-04-19

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the main causes of vertigo. More than 90% of cases of positional vertigo and nystagmus can be associated with BPPV. There is no known specific laboratory test for BPPV. Because of the possible muscle activity in BPPV (especially result of nause, vomiting and increasing heart rate) we thought the CK-MB levels may change in this situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between serum CK-MB levels and BPPV and attacks. The medical records of 35 patients with BPPV presenting to our clinic between November 2014 and November 2015 were investigated retrospectively. Thirty-two control patients with no vertigo, muscular or cardiac disease and with measured CK-MB levels were randomized into a control group. Both groups' existing CK-MB levels were obtained from the patient records. CK-MB values measured before BPPV attack from 11 patients in the patient group were also recorded. The patient and control groups were similar in terms of demographic parameters. CK-MB values at time of attack in the patient group ranged between 5.4 and 38.9 (mean: 19.67 ± 6.81), while control group values ranged between 12 and 27.9 (mean: 20.31 ± 4.54). CK-MB values in 11 patients in the patient group measured before attack ranged between 8.9 and 24 (mean: 17.02 ± 4.97), and CK-MB values during attack ranged between 9 and 34 (mean: 19.74 ± 7.64). Although CK-MB elevation at time of attack was determined in patients with BPPV, this was not statistically significant.

  14. Physical Activity in the Prevention of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Probable Association

    PubMed Central

    Bazoni, Jéssica Aparecida; Mendes, William Siqueira; Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz; Melo, Juliana Jandre; Costa, Viviane de Souza Pinho; Teixeira, Denilson de Castro; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Physical inactivity is an important risk factor for many age-related diseases and symptoms such as dizziness and vertigo. Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the possible association between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and regular physical activity in elderly subjects. Methods This cross-sectional study included 491 elderly individuals who lived independently. Physical exercise was assessed through a questionnaire and BPPV by history and the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Results The present study indicates no significant association between BPPV with lack of physical activity in men and in the total population. We have confirmed associations between BPPV with lack of physical activity in women (p = 0.01). Women with a sedentary lifestyle who do not practice physical activity are 2.62 more likely to have BPPV than those with regular physical activity. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for BPPV that can be modified through specific interventions. Regular physical activity is a lifestyle with potential to decrease the risk of vertigo in women. PMID:25992128

  15. Post-traumatic refractory multiple canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dundar, Mehmet Akif; Derin, Serhan; Aricigil, Mitat; Eryilmaz, Mehmet Akif; Arbag, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most prevalent form of peripheral vertigo and is seen in a significant number of patients who present at neurology and ear, nose, and throat clinics. Various maneuvers may be used to determine the affected canal based on observation of specific nystagmus signs, and may also be used for treatment. Multiple canal pathology can make diagnosis and treatment more difficult. Presently described is case of BPPV with multiple canal pathology and traumatic etiology that was resistant to treatment. PMID:28275757

  16. Investigating the role of Sirt1-modulated oxidative stress in relation to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kun-Ling; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Lee, Yi-Yen; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Ding-Hao; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2015-09-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most frequently encountered primary complaints in dizziness clinics. The incidence of BPPV has been proven to increase with age. The relationship between BPPV and another neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson's disease (PD), has not been previously discussed. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of BPPV and PD with oxidative stress. A total of 30,811 subjects participated in our cohort study. The study cohort comprised 5057 BPPV patients and a comparison cohort of 25,754 nonBPPV patients. SIRT1 axis gene expression was investigated in BPPV patient blood samples and a PD cell model of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated PC-12 cells to elucidate the potential in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of degeneration in PD and BPPV. Our data suggest that BPPV patients with histories of head injuries show a significantly higher hazard to develop subsequent PD (hazard ratio, 3.942; confidence interval, 1.523-10.205, p = 0.005). We also observed that oxidative status is increased in blood samples from patients with BPPV. Our in vitro study suggests that SIRT1 function is inhibited by oxidative stress, which thereby promotes 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death. We conclude that BPPV is independently associated with an increased risk of PD. This finding may be attributed to oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of SIRT1 expression levels.

  17. Vestibular rehabilitation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Reality or fiction?

    PubMed

    Bressi, Federica; Vella, Paola; Casale, Manuele; Moffa, Antonio; Sabatino, Lorenzo; Lopez, Michele Antonio; Carinci, Francesco; Papalia, Rocco; Salvinelli, Fabrizio; Sterzi, Silvia

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this article is to systematically review the evidence on the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation (VR) in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Relevant published studies about VR in BPPV were searched in PubMed, Google Scholar and Ovid using various keywords. We included trials that were available in the English language and did not apply publication year or publication status restrictions. Studies based on the VR in other peripheral and/or central balance disorders are excluded. Primary outcome was the effect on vertigo attacks and balance. Of 42 identified trials, only 12 trials fulfilled our inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Three of them investigated the role of VR in patients with BPPV comparing with no treatment, two of them evaluated the efficacy of VR versus medications, seven of them have highlighted the benefits of the VR alone or in combination with canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) compared to CRP alone. The studies differed in type of intervention, type of outcome and follow-up time. VR improves balance control, promoting visual stabilization with head movements, improving vestibular-visual interaction during head movement and expanding static and dynamic posture stability. CRP and VR seem to have a synergic effect in patients with BPPV, especially in elderly patients. VR does not reduce the recurrence rate, but it seems to reduce the unpleasantness. So VR can substitute CRP when spine comorbidities contraindicate CRP and can reduce the uptake of anti-vertigo drugs post CRP. Further studies are needed to confirm these encouraging results.

  18. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Management and Its Impact on Falls.

    PubMed

    Jumani, Kiran; Powell, Jason

    2017-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of dizziness in the elderly. This has been identified as a risk factor in falls. Falls are the leading cause of disability and the leading cause of death from injury among people over 75 in the UK. We assessed the effect of BPPV treatment on falls in an elderly population by retrospectively reviewing one unit's experience of BPPV management over an 8-year period from June 2008 to June 2016. We specifically assessed patients who were referred for the primary reason of falls and were aged over 65 years. These patients were evaluated and treated with particle repositioning maneuvers if their positional tests were positive. The frequency of falls prior to their visit and at 6-month clinic follow-up were reviewed. The total number of falls in the cohort reduced significantly ( P < .0001) after the procedure, from 128 to 46 falls (64% reduction). Associated comorbidities were also evaluated in this group. A prompt and effective treatment of BPPV is prudent to prevent devastating falls in older people in our communities.

  19. Increased risk of ischemic stroke in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a 9-year follow-up nationwide population study in taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Ma, Hsin-I; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common form of vertigo and is characterized by episodic dizziness related to changes in head position relative to gravity. BPPV symptoms can be similar to those of central nervous system vascular diseases. The association between BPPV and ischemic stroke has not yet been investigated. The study cohort consisted of patients who were diagnosed with BPPV at least twice in the previous year as an outpatient or for whom BPPV was the primary diagnosis as an inpatient (n = 4104). An age- and gender-matched sample that excluded patients with a diagnosis of any form of vertigo was selected as the comparison cohort (n = 8397). All cases were followed up from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2008. The demographic characteristics, medical comorbidities, and use of medications in both groups were investigated using chi-square tests. A stratified analysis of stroke risk factors was performed to determine the hazard ratios of BPPV. During the 9-year follow-up period, 185 of the 4104 (4.5%) subjects with BPPV and 240 of the 8379 (2.9%) subjects without BPPV developed ischemic strokes. The crude hazard ratio of BPPV for developing ischemic strokes was 1.708. After adjusting for stroke risk factors, the risk of developing ischemic strokes in BPPV subjects was 1.415-fold higher than the risk among those without BPPV (confidence interval: 1.162-1.732, p = 0.001). After a subgroup analysis stratified according to stroke risk factors, BPPV remained independently associated with a higher risk of developing future ischemic stroke. We conclude that BPPV is independently associated with a risk of subsequent ischemic stroke. More aggressive control of modifiable risk factors for ischemic strokes should be conducted in patients with BPPV.

  20. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A 9-Year Follow-Up Nationwide Population Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Ma, Hsin-I; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common form of vertigo and is characterized by episodic dizziness related to changes in head position relative to gravity. BPPV symptoms can be similar to those of central nervous system vascular diseases. The association between BPPV and ischemic stroke has not yet been investigated. The study cohort consisted of patients who were diagnosed with BPPV at least twice in the previous year as an outpatient or for whom BPPV was the primary diagnosis as an inpatient (n = 4104). An age- and gender-matched sample that excluded patients with a diagnosis of any form of vertigo was selected as the comparison cohort (n = 8397). All cases were followed up from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2008. The demographic characteristics, medical comorbidities, and use of medications in both groups were investigated using chi-square tests. A stratified analysis of stroke risk factors was performed to determine the hazard ratios of BPPV. During the 9-year follow-up period, 185 of the 4104 (4.5%) subjects with BPPV and 240 of the 8379 (2.9%) subjects without BPPV developed ischemic strokes. The crude hazard ratio of BPPV for developing ischemic strokes was 1.708. After adjusting for stroke risk factors, the risk of developing ischemic strokes in BPPV subjects was 1.415-fold higher than the risk among those without BPPV (confidence interval: 1.162–1.732, p = 0.001). After a subgroup analysis stratified according to stroke risk factors, BPPV remained independently associated with a higher risk of developing future ischemic stroke. We conclude that BPPV is independently associated with a risk of subsequent ischemic stroke. More aggressive control of modifiable risk factors for ischemic strokes should be conducted in patients with BPPV. PMID:24917815

  1. Concurrent posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in patients with ipsilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss: is it caused by otolith particles?

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hee; Shin, Jung Eun; Park, Hong Ju; Koo, Ja-Won; Lee, Jun Ho

    2014-04-01

    The etiology of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is still elusive even though detached otolith particles from the utricular macula are generally thought to be responsible for the pathogenesis of BPPV. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), of which the etiology is also idiopathic in most cases, may accompany concurrent BPPV. This uncommon condition of concurrent BPPV with SSNHL has been assumptively explained as selective damage of the cochlea and the utricle due to viral neurolabyrinthitis. Recently, radiological evidences that inner ear hemorrhage is observed in patients with SSNHL accompanied by severe vertigo have been reported. The basic hypothesis for this study is that blood debris in the endolymphatic fluid due to inner ear hemorrhage is one of the causes of concurrent posterior semicircular canal (PSCC) BPPV in patient with ipsilateral SSNHL. In this report, we will outline the clinical findings of 4 patients with PSCC BPPV with SSNHL, and present an experimental results using whole blood in artificial endolymph to evaluate the hypothesis.

  2. Bedside therapeutic experiences with horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (cupulolithiasis).

    PubMed

    Boleas-Aguirre, María Soledad; Pérez, Nicolás; Batuecas-Caletrío, Angel

    2009-11-01

    After forced prolonged position type one (FPP-one) and the appropriate repositioning maneuvers, or FPP-two, 95.45% of patients with cupulolithiasis of the horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HSC-BPPV).were symptom-free. To treat patients with cupulolithiasis of the HSC-BPPV. This was a prospective study including 22 subjects with HSC-BPPV (cupulolithiasis) based on apogeotropic direction-changing positional nystagmus (apo-DCPN). Patients adopted FPP-one, which means lying down on the side of the weaker nystagmus during nightly rest for 2 weeks. If apo-DCPN persisted, subjects adopted type two FPP (FPP-two), which means lying on the strongest nystagmus side during nightly rest for 2 weeks. No vertigo or nystagmus was observed in 15 subjects after FPP-one. One subject experienced geotropic DCPN (geo-DCPN), two subjects had posterior BPPV, and another had superior BPPV. Three subjects had persistent apo-DCPN and they were subjected to FPP-two. After that, no vertigo or nystagmus was detected in two subjects. Apo-DCPN persisted in the other remaining subject after FPP-two.

  3. Quantitative analysis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo fatigue under canalithiasis conditions.

    PubMed

    Boselli, F; Kleiser, L; Bockisch, C J; Hegemann, S C A; Obrist, D

    2014-06-03

    In our daily life, small flows in the semicircular canals (SCCs) of the inner ear displace a sensory structure called the cupula which mediates the transduction of head angular velocities to afferent signals. We consider a dysfunction of the SCCs known as canalithiasis. Under this condition, small debris particles disturb the flow in the SCCs and can cause benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), arguably the most common form of vertigo in humans. The diagnosis of BPPV is mainly based on the analysis of typical eye movements (positional nystagmus) following provocative head maneuvers that are known to lead to vertigo in BPPV patients. These eye movements are triggered by the vestibulo-ocular reflex, and their velocity provides an indirect measurement of the cupula displacement. An attenuation of the vertigo and the nystagmus is often observed when the provocative maneuver is repeated. This attenuation is known as BPPV fatigue. It was not quantitatively described so far, and the mechanisms causing it remain unknown. We quantify fatigue by eye velocity measurements and propose a fluid dynamic interpretation of our results based on a computational model for the fluid-particle dynamics of a SCC with canalithiasis. Our model suggests that the particles may not go back to their initial position after a first head maneuver such that a second head maneuver leads to different particle trajectories causing smaller cupula displacements.

  4. [Analysis of relation between the development of study and literatures about benign positional paroxysmal vertigo published international and domestic].

    PubMed

    Jia, Jianping; Sun, Xiaohui; Dai, Song; Sang, Yuehong

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common vestibular disorder that causes vertigo. Study of BPPV has dramatically rapid progress in recent years. We analyze the BPPV growth We searched the international data quantity year by year in database of PubMed, ScienceDirect and WILEY before 2014 respectively, then we searched the domestic data quantity year by year in database of CNKI, VIP and Wanfang Data before 2015 by selecting "Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo" as the keywords. Then we carried out regression analysis with the gathered results in above databases to determine data growth regularity and main factors that affect future development of BPPV. Also, we analyzes published BPPV papers in domestic and international journals. PubMed database contains 808 literatures, ScienceDirect contains 177 database and WILEY contains 46 literatures, All together we collected 1 038 international articles. CNKI contains 440 literatures, VIP contains 580 literatures and WanFang data contains 449 literatures. All together we collected 1 469 domestic literatures. It shows the rising trend of the literature accumulation amount of BPPV. The scattered point diagram of BPPV shows an exponential growing trend, which was growing slowly in the early time but rapidly in recent years. It shows that the development of BPPV has three stages from international arical: exploration period (before 1985), breakthrough period (1986-1998). The deepening stage (after 1998), Chinese literature also has three stages from domestic BPPV precess. Blank period (before the year of 1982), the enlightenment period (1982-2004), the deepening stage (after the year of 2004). In the pregress of BPPV, many outsantding sccholars played an important role in domestic scitifction of researching, which has produced a certain influence in the worldwide.

  5. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Methods Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Results In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39–2.26). Conclusions Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should

  6. Management of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Comparative Study between Epleys Manouvre and Betahistine.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Japneet; Shamanna, Karthik

    2017-06-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder, accounting for 20% of all vertigo cases. Idiopathic BPPV is most common between the ages of 50 and 70, although the condition is found in all age groups. This study was conducted in our institute on 90 patients who presented to the outpatient department with history of vertigo and were diagnosed with BPPV via a positive Dix Hallpike test. Patients were randomnly placed in three groups of 30 each. Patients in Group A were treated with Epleys manoeuvre alone, in Group B were treated with Epleys Manouvre followed by oral Betahistine and patients in Group C were treated with Betahistine alone. All the patients were followed up after 1 week and 4 weeks following treatment. In our study we found that patients responded better when they were treated with Epleys Manouvre with Betahistine with less relapse and recurrence. Treatment with Epleys manouvre resulted in early improvement of symptoms. It was found in our study that Betahistine as a sole modality of treatment of vertigo in BPPV can be preferred in patients who are unfit to undergo canal repositioning manouvres.

  7. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with current practice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Yu, Dongzhen; Song, Ningying; Su, Kaiming; Yin, Shankai

    2014-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the current status of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) management and the advantages of repositioning maneuvers as well as to facilitate the accurate and efficient diagnosis and management of BPPV. Of 131 participants with severe dizziness/vertigo who were examined and treated, 31 (23.7%) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for BPPV. All patients in the study had a diagnosis of BPPV confirmed by their history, typical subjective symptom reports, and characteristic positional nystagmus during the Dix-Hallpike test and/or roll test. All participants were comprehensively interviewed regarding their medical history, characteristics of the first attack of vertigo, associated symptoms, previous financial costs, and number of hospital visits. The average duration from the appearance of the first symptoms until a final diagnostic positional maneuver was >70 months. On average, patients visited hospitals more than eight times before the final diagnosis due to initial visits to inappropriate departments, including neurology, emergency, orthopaedic surgery, and Traditional Chinese Medicine, with a corresponding average financial cost of more than 5,000 RMB. The canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) was effective in 80.65% of patients after the first repositioning maneuver. Our data demonstrated that despite the significant prevalence of BPPV, delays in diagnosis and treatment frequently occur, which have both cost and quality-of-life impacts on both patients and their caregivers. The CRP is very effective for patients with BPPV. It is important for patients to pay more attention to the impact of BPPV on their lives and recognize its nature to ensure compliant follow-up in otolaryngology.

  8. Decreased serum vitamin D in idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Kim, Ji-Soo; Shin, Jong Wook; Kim, Sungbo; Lee, Hajeong; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon; Jo, Hyunjin; Song, Junghan; Ghim, Yuna

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association of osteopenia/osteoporosis with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Since vitamin D takes part in the regulation of calcium and phosphorus found in the body and plays an important role in maintaining proper bone structure, decreased bone mineral density in patients with BPPV may be related to decreased serum vitamin D. We measured the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 100 patients (63 women and 37 men, mean age ± SD = 61.8 ± 11.6) with idiopathic BPPV and compared the data with those of 192 controls (101 women and 91 men, mean age ± SD = 60.3 ± 11.3) who had lived in the same community without dizziness or imbalance during the preceding year. The selection of the controls and acquisition of clinical information were done using the data from the Fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008. The serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was lower in the patients with BPPV than in the controls (mean ± SD = 14.4 ± 8.4 versus 19.1 ± 6.8 ng/ml, p = 0.001). Furthermore, patients with BPPV showed a higher prevalence of decreased serum vitamin D (<20 ng/ml, 80.0 vs. 60.1 %, p < 0.001) than the controls. Multiple logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, proteinuria, regular exercise and the existence of decreased bone mineral density demonstrated that vitamin D insufficiency (10-20 ng/ml) and deficiency (<10 ng/ml) were associated with BPPV with the odds ratios of 3.8 (95 % confidence interval = 1.51-9.38, p = 0.004) and 23.0 (95 % confidence interval = 6.88-77.05, p < 0.001). Our study demonstrated an association between idiopathic BPPV and decreased serum vitamin D. Decreased serum vitamin D may be a risk factor of BPPV.

  9. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo simultaneously affecting several canals: a 46-patient series.

    PubMed

    Soto-Varela, Andrés; Rossi-Izquierdo, Marcos; Santos-Pérez, Sofía

    2013-03-01

    Although it is uncommon for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) to affect more than one canal simultaneously, it is not exceptional. We attempt to determine whether these patients present differences relative to "single-canal" cases. A prospective study was done in patients with BPPV, divided into three groups: single-canal BPPV, multi-canal BPPV in one ear and multi-canal BPPV in both ears. Diagnosis was by Dix and Hallpike, supine roll and cephalic hyperextension tests. Treatment was according to the affected canals, by Semont, Epley, Lempert and Yacovino manoeuvres. Aetiology, sex, age, response to treatment, recurrence and final status in each of the three groups was evaluated. Five hundred and eighty-three patients were diagnosed with BPPV: 537 single-canal (92 %) and 46 multi-canal (8 %); of the latter, 36 bilateral and 10 unilateral cases. Basic differences between groups were: greater percentage of idiopathic cases in single-canal (p < 0.0001, Chi-square), greater percentage of post-traumatic cases in bilateral multi-canals (p = 0.006, Chi-square) and prior history of BPPV was more common in unilateral multi-canal (p = 0.006, Chi-square). No differences between groups in response to treatment, recurrence and final status were detected. There are aetiological differences between patients with single-canal BPPV, unilateral multi-canal BPPV and bilateral multi-canal BPPV. Response to therapeutic manoeuvres, however, shows that over 90 % of the patients in all the groups are cured.

  10. Severe hydrocephalus complicated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: one case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Jun; Cheng, Wei Jin; Rao, Jie; Lu, Ye Fen; Qiu, Wei Wen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we reported one female patient diagnosed with severe hydrocephalus who presented with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). She presented with progressive headache and dizziness prior to hospitalization as chief complaints. She received Diagnostic Dix-Hallpike and Roll tests to make a definite diagnosis. The patient was cured after Gufoni maneuver and did not recur after 6-month follow-up. The diagnostic procedures of this female case prompted that prior to formal treatment, patients developing severe hydrocephalus complicated with BPPV should receive provocative test for positional dizziness, performed by experienced physicians from the Department of neurology and otolaryngology. PMID:26885146

  11. Effect of Repositioning Maneuver Type and Postmaneuver Restrictions on Vertigo and Dizziness in Benign Positional Paroxysmal Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Toupet, Michel; Ferrary, Evelyne; Bozorg Grayeli, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. To compare the efficiency of Epley (Ep) and Sémont-Toupet (ST) repositioning maneuvers and to evaluate postmaneuver restriction effect on short-term vertigo and dizziness after repositioning maneuvers by an analog visual scale (VAS) in benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV). Material and Methods. 226 consecutive adult patients with posterior canal BPPV were included. Patients were randomized into 2 different maneuver sequence groups (n = 113): 2 ST then 1 Ep or 2 Ep then 1 ST. Each group of sequence was randomized into 2 subgroups: with or without postmaneuver restrictions. Vertigo and dizziness were assessed from days 0 to 5 by VAS. Results. There was no difference between vertigo scores between Ep and ST groups. Dizziness scores were higher in Ep group during the first 3 days but became similar to those of ST group at days 4 and 5. ST maneuvers induced liberatory signs more frequently than Ep (58% versus 42% resp., P < 0.01, Fisher's test). After repositioning maneuvers, VAS scores decreased similarly in patients with and without liberatory signs. Postmaneuver restrictions did not influence VAS scores. Conclusion. Even if ST showed a higher rate of liberatory signs than Ep in this series, VAS scores were not influenced by these signs. PMID:22973168

  12. Residual dizziness after successful repositioning maneuvers for idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Teggi, Roberto; Giordano, Leone; Bondi, Stefano; Fabiano, Beatrice; Bussi, Mario

    2011-04-01

    Even after successful repositioning maneuvers for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), some patients report dizziness lasting for a certain period afterwards. We studied the prevalence and clinical factors associated with residual dizziness in a sample of elderly patients. Sixty outpatients over 65 years of age, affected by idiopathic BPPV were recruited; the exclusion criterion was a history of previous episodes of vertigo, including positional. The patients were asked to describe their self-perceived anxiety for vertigo on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and successively treated with appropriate maneuvers till resolution of nystagmus. Data concerning the demographic and clinical features of BPPV were collected. Patients were followed until complete resolution of subjective dizziness and imbalance without positional nystagmus. Data about residual dizziness were collected from the second day from resolution of BPPV. Clinical and demographic factors related to residual dizziness were analyzed. Twenty-two subjects (37%) reported residual dizziness. In these subjects, the mean duration of residual dizziness was 13.4 ± 7.5 days. No association was observed between residual dizziness and gender, involved canal and the number of repositioning maneuvers before resolution. On the other hand, age older than 72 years, symptom duration greater than 9 days and VAS scale for anxiety greater than 10/100 were associated with an increased risk of residual dizziness. The odds ratio were respectively 6.5 (age-residual dizziness, Confidence Interval 95%), 6.5 (duration of vertigo-residual dizziness, Confidence Interval 95%) and 15.5 (anxiety levels-residual dizziness, Confidence Interval 95%). Longer symptom duration before diagnosis was associated with higher anxiety levels. The results underline the necessity for an early and correct diagnosis of BPPV, especially in the elderly.

  13. New Treatment Strategy for Apogeotropic Horizontal Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    e Maia, Francisco Zuma

    2016-01-01

    The apogeotropic variant of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV) is attributed to canalithiasis of the anterior arm or cupulolithiasis. Despite some therapeutic maneuvers, I propose a new treatment strategy for apogeotropic HC-BPPV that is designed to detach both the otoconial debris from the anterior arm of the semicircular canal and the debris that is attached to the utricular side of the cupula using inertia and gravity and based on simulations with a 3D biomechanical model. PMID:27942374

  14. Automated Romberg testing in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Adelsberger, Rolf; Valko, Yulia; Straumann, Dominik; Tröster, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of dizziness. The underlying pathomechanism responsible for the recurrent vertigo attacks has been elucidated in detail and highly effective treatment strategies (liberation maneuvers) have been developed. However, many BPPV patients complain about problems of balance especially following liberation maneuvers. To objectively demonstrate differences in balance performance in BPPV patients compared to healthy subjects both prior and after BPPV liberation maneuvers. Seven patients with BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal and nine healthy subjects participated. To assess balance while standing, we analyzed the location and temporal stability of the center of pressure recorded by pressure-sensitive electronic soles during Romberg testing (on stable ground and on foam) and tandem stand. To assess regularity of gait, we analyzed the step frequency during walking of 50 m. All tests were performed prior and after liberation maneuvers in both groups. Healthy subjects and patients differ significantly in their balance performance and use different stabilization strategies both prior and after liberation maneuvers. Both Romberg tests indicated poorer balance in BPPV patients (mean COP shifted towards toes), especially in posttreatment tests, while tandem stand appeared unaltered. We did not observe differences in escorted (by an experimenter) walking regularities between patients and healthy subjects and between pre- and post-maneuver testing. Our findings confirm the typical clinical observation of a further posttreatment deterioration of already impaired postural performance in BPPV patients. While the etiology and the time course of this peculiar problem warrants further studies, the treating physician should be familiar with this transient side effect of therapeutic maneuvers to provide adequate counseling of patients. Finally, we successully demonstrated the pressure-sensitive electronic soles as a

  15. Anterior canal BPPV and apogeotropic posterior canal BPPV: two rare forms of vertical canalolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Califano, L; Salafia, F; Mazzone, S; Melillo, M G; Califano, M

    2014-06-01

    Posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most frequent form of BPPV. It is characterized by a paroxysmal positioning nystagmus evoked through Dix-Hallpike and Semont positioning tests. Anterior canal BPPV (AC) is more rare than posterior canal BPPV; it presents a prevalent down beating positioning nystagmus, with a torsional component clockwise for the left canal, counterclockwise for the right canal. Due to the possible lack of the torsional component, it is sometimes difficult to identify the affected ear. An apogeotropic variant of posterior BPPV (APC) has recently been described, characterised by a paroxysmal positional nystagmus in the opposite direction to the one evoked in posterior canal BPPV: the linear component is down-beating, the torsional component is clockwise for the right canal, counter-clockwise for the left canal, so that a contra-lateral anterior canal BPPV could be simulated. During a 16 month period, of 934 BPPV patients observed, the authors identified 23 (2.5%) cases of apogeotropic posterior canal BPPV and 11 (1.2%) cases of anterior canal BPPV, diagnosed using the specific oculomotor patterns described in the literature. Anterior canal BPPV was treated with the repositioning manoeuvre proposed by Yacovino, which does not require identification of the affected side, whereas apogeotropic posterior canal BPPV was treated with the Quick Liberatory Rotation manoeuvre for the typical posterior canal BPPV, since in the Dix-Hallpike position otoliths are in the same position if they come either from the ampullary arm or from the non-ampullary arm. The direct resolution of BPPV (one step therapy) was obtained in 12/34 patients, 8/23 patients with APC and 4/11 patients with AC; canalar conversion into typical posterior canal BPPV, later treated through Quick Liberatory Rotation (two-step therapy), was obtained in 19 patients,14/23 with APC and 5/11 with AC. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Considering the effects of

  16. Image-based computer-assisted diagnosis system for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohigashi, Satoru; Nakamae, Koji; Fujioka, Hiromu

    2005-04-01

    We develop the image based computer assisted diagnosis system for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) that consists of the balance control system simulator, the 3D eye movement simulator, and the extraction method of nystagmus response directly from an eye movement image sequence. In the system, the causes and conditions of BPPV are estimated by searching the database for record matching with the nystagmus response for the observed eye image sequence of the patient with BPPV. The database includes the nystagmus responses for simulated eye movement sequences. The eye movement velocity is obtained by using the balance control system simulator that allows us to simulate BPPV under various conditions such as canalithiasis, cupulolithiasis, number of otoconia, otoconium size, and so on. Then the eye movement image sequence is displayed on the CRT by the 3D eye movement simulator. The nystagmus responses are extracted from the image sequence by the proposed method and are stored in the database. In order to enhance the diagnosis accuracy, the nystagmus response for a newly simulated sequence is matched with that for the observed sequence. From the matched simulation conditions, the causes and conditions of BPPV are estimated. We apply our image based computer assisted diagnosis system to two real eye movement image sequences for patients with BPPV to show its validity.

  17. Influence of supplemental vitamin D on intensity of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A longitudinal clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhzadeh, Mahboobeh; Lotfi, Yones; Mousavi, Abdollah; Heidari, Behzad; Monadi, Mohsen; Bakhshi, Enayatollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is linked to vitamin D deficiency. This clinical trial aimed to determine the influence of vitamin D supplementation on intensity of BPPV. Methods: The study population was selected consecutively and the diagnosis of BPPV was made by history and clinical examination and exclusion of other conditions. Intensity of BPVV was assessed based on VAS score (0-10). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) was measured using ELISA method and levels < 20 ng/ml was considered a deficiency. All patients received rehabilitation treatment using Epley's maneuver one time per week for one month. Serum 25-OHD deficient patients were classified as treated and non-treated groups (rehabilitation with or without 50.000 IU cholecalciferol weekly for two months).The results of treatment were compared with vitamin D sufficient group as control. All patients were followed-up for 6 months. Results: After two months of treatment, in both vitamin D treated and non-treated groups the intensity of BPPV decreased significantly as compared with control (P=0.001 for both groups) but at endpoint, the intensity of BPPV aggravated and regressed to the baseline value in vitamin D deficient non-treated group (P=0.001) whereas, in vitamin D treated group, improvement of BPPV remained stable and unchanged over the study period. Conclusion: This study indicates that correction of vitamin D deficiency in BPPV provides additional benefit to rehabilitation therapy (Epley maneuver) regarding duration of improvement. These findings suggest serum 25-OHD measurement in recurrent BPPV. PMID:27386060

  18. Retrospective data suggests that the higher prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in Individuals with type 2 diabetes is mediated by hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Staecker, Hinrich; Lin, James; Sykes, Kevin J.; Phadnis, Milind A.; McMahon, Tamara M.; Connolly, Dan; Sabus, Carla H.; Whitney, Susan L.; Kluding, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) has been linked to comorbidities like diabetes and hypertension. However, the relationship between type 2 diabetes (DM) and BPPV is unclear. The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the relationship between DM and BPPV in the presence of known contributors like age, gender and hypertension. Methods A retrospective review of the records of 3933 individuals was categorized by the specific vestibular diagnosis and for the presence of type 2 DM and hypertension. As the prevalence of BPPV was higher in people with type 2 DM compared to those without DM, multivariable logistic regressions were used to identify variables predictive of BPPV. The relationship between type 2 DM, hypertension and BPPV was analyzed using mediation analysis. Results BPPV was seen in 46% of individuals with type 2 DM, compared to 37% of individuals without DM (p<0.001). Forty two percent of the association between type 2 DM and BPPV was mediated by hypertension, and supported hypertension as a complete mediator in the relationship between type 2 DM and BPPV. Conclusions Hypertension may provide the mediating pathway by which diabetes affects the vestibular system. Individuals with complaints of dizziness, with comorbidities including hypertension and diabetes, may benefit from a screening for BPPV. PMID:26890424

  19. The potential role of epigenetic modulations in BPPV maneuver exercises.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kun-Ling; Wang, Chia-To; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Ma, Hsin-I; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2016-06-14

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common complaints encountered in clinics and is strongly correlated with advanced age or, possibly, degeneration. Redistribution exercises are the most effective approaches to treat BPPV, and canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) cure most BPPV cases. However, the mechanisms through which the treatment modulates systemic molecules in BPPV patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that the miR-34a and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) genes correlated with the treatment effects of CRP in BPPV subjects. We found that miR-34a expression was largely inhibited and SIRT1 expression was significantly reversed after BPPV maneuver treatment. We also confirmed that the PPAR-γ, PGC-1 and FoxO gene expressions were decreased immediately after canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for BPPV, and were largely increased after a complete cure of BPPV. Moreover, we observed that after a complete recovery of BPPV, the ROS concentrations, pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations and p53 expression levels were attenuated. We conclude that BPPV treatment might involve some epigenetic regulations through the mediation of miR-34a, SIRT1 functions and repression of redox status.

  20. The potential role of epigenetic modulations in BPPV maneuver exercises

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kun-Ling; Wang, Chia-To; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Ma, Hsin-I; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common complaints encountered in clinics and is strongly correlated with advanced age or, possibly, degeneration. Redistribution exercises are the most effective approaches to treat BPPV, and canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) cure most BPPV cases. However, the mechanisms through which the treatment modulates systemic molecules in BPPV patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that the miR-34a and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) genes correlated with the treatment effects of CRP in BPPV subjects. We found that miR-34a expression was largely inhibited and SIRT1 expression was significantly reversed after BPPV maneuver treatment. We also confirmed that the PPAR-γ, PGC-1 and FoxO gene expressions were decreased immediately after canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for BPPV, and were largely increased after a complete cure of BPPV. Moreover, we observed that after a complete recovery of BPPV, the ROS concentrations, pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations and p53 expression levels were attenuated. We conclude that BPPV treatment might involve some epigenetic regulations through the mediation of miR-34a, SIRT1 functions and repression of redox status. PMID:27203679

  1. Evaluation of the otolith function using sinusoidal off-vertical axis rotation in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Sugita-Kitajima, Akemi; Azuma, Miki; Hattori, Kosuke; Koizuka, Izumi

    2007-07-05

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was studied via sinusoidal off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) to evaluate the otolith function in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Subjects were sinusoidally rotated with eyes open in complete darkness at frequencies of 0.4 and 0.8 Hz with a maximum angular velocity of 60 degrees s(-1) in earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR) and OVAR. Twenty-three controls and 24 BPPV patients were investigated. Results showed that VOR gain during OVAR at 0.8 Hz in a 30 degrees nose-up position in BPPV patients was significantly less than the gain during EVAR, whereas the gain was not significantly different between EVAR and OVAR in the controls in each condition. In addition, to examine each type of BPPV, we also investigated whether there were any differences between the patients who suffered from dizziness and those who did not. VOR gain in OVAR of BPPV patients who were suffering from dizziness was significantly less than that of BPPV patients without dizziness. Not only cupulolithiasis or canalolithiasis, but also otolith dysfunction was considered to be the possible origin of BPPV. Because sinusoidal OVAR produced minimal nausea compared to constant velocity OVAR, the stimulation of 0.8 Hz nose-up in sinusoidal OVAR may be used to evaluate otolith function without discomfort for patients.

  2. A multicenter observational study on the role of comorbidities in the recurrent episodes of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Alessandro; Dispenza, Francesco; Suarez, Hamlet; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel; Ban, Jae Ho; Kim, Min-Beom; Kim, Min Beom; Strupp, Michael; Feil, Katharina; Oliveira, Carlos A; Sampaio, Andres L; Araujo, Mercedes F S; Bahmad, Fayez; Ganança, Mauricio M; Ganança, Fernando F; Dorigueto, Ricardo; Lee, Hyung; Kulamarva, Gautham; Mathur, Navneet; Di Giovanni, Pamela; Petrucci, Anna Grazia; Staniscia, Tommaso; Citraro, Leonardo; Croce, Adelchi

    2014-02-01

    Primary objective of this study was to find a statistical link between the most worldwide comorbidities affecting the elderly population (hypertension, diabetes, osteoarthrosis, osteoporosis and depression) and recurrent episodes of BPPV. Secondary objective was defining possible "groups of risk" for people suffering recurrent positional vertigo related to the presence of a well documented comorbidity. This was an observational, cross-sectional, multicenter, spontaneous, non-pharmacological study. The data of 1092 patients suffering BPPV evaluated in 11 different Departments of Otolaryngology, Otoneurology and Neurology, referring Centers for positional vertigo evaluation, were retrospectively collected. Regarding evaluated comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, osteoarthrosis, osteoporosis and depression), data analysis showed the presence of at least one comorbid disorder in 216 subjects (19.8%) and 2 or more in 408 subjects (37.4%). Moreover there was a statistical significant difference between the number of comorbidities and the number of recurrences, otherwise said as comorbidity disorders increased the number of relapses increased too. The presence of a systemic disease may worsen the status of the posterior labyrinth causing a more frequent otolith detachment. This condition increases the risk for patients suffering BPPV to have recurrent episodes, even if correctly managed by repositioning maneuvers. The combination of two or more of aforementioned comorbidities further increases the risk of relapsing BPPV, worsened by the presence of osteoporosis. On the basis of this results it was possible to define "groups of risk" useful for predicting BPPV recurrence in patients with one or more comorbidity. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Is There a Possible Association between Dietary Habits and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Elderly? The Importance of Diet and Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Adriane Rocha; Neves-Souza, Rejane Dias; Costa, Viviane de Souza Pinho; Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz; Franco, Pricila Perini Rigotti; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Poor diet habits and inadequate intake of nutrients are a concern in the elderly. Nutritional education with guidance may improve the results of the treatment of vertigo. Objective Evaluate the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) associated with feeding habits. Methods Cross-sectional study with elderly people living independently. We evaluated nutritional habits through the method of dietary 24-hour recall and manipulation of Dix-Hallpike. Results Based on a sample of 487 individuals, 117 had BPPV. Among the 117 elderly patients with BPPV, 37 (31.62%) had inadequate feeding. From those 370 individuals without BPPV, 97 (26.21%) had inappropriate feeding. No significant association between nutritional habits and BPPV in the total population was observed (p = 0.3064). However, there was significant relation between BPPV and inadequate carbohydrate intake (p = 0.0419) and insufficient fiber intake (p = 0.03), and the diet of these subjects was rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.0084). Conclusion These data correlate with the dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia status, making it extremely important to reduce the intake of fats and carbohydrates and increase the fiber intake to stabilize triglycerides and thus minimize harmful effects on the inner ear. Food readjustment is suggested in patients with BPPV, along with the work of a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of the elderly. PMID:26491473

  4. Is There a Possible Association between Dietary Habits and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Elderly? The Importance of Diet and Counseling.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Adriane Rocha; Neves-Souza, Rejane Dias; Costa, Viviane de Souza Pinho; Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz; Franco, Pricila Perini Rigotti; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Poor diet habits and inadequate intake of nutrients are a concern in the elderly. Nutritional education with guidance may improve the results of the treatment of vertigo. Objective Evaluate the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) associated with feeding habits. Methods Cross-sectional study with elderly people living independently. We evaluated nutritional habits through the method of dietary 24-hour recall and manipulation of Dix-Hallpike. Results Based on a sample of 487 individuals, 117 had BPPV. Among the 117 elderly patients with BPPV, 37 (31.62%) had inadequate feeding. From those 370 individuals without BPPV, 97 (26.21%) had inappropriate feeding. No significant association between nutritional habits and BPPV in the total population was observed (p = 0.3064). However, there was significant relation between BPPV and inadequate carbohydrate intake (p = 0.0419) and insufficient fiber intake (p = 0.03), and the diet of these subjects was rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.0084). Conclusion These data correlate with the dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia status, making it extremely important to reduce the intake of fats and carbohydrates and increase the fiber intake to stabilize triglycerides and thus minimize harmful effects on the inner ear. Food readjustment is suggested in patients with BPPV, along with the work of a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of the elderly.

  5. Diagnosis and management of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Halmagyi, G M

    2005-01-01

    Vertigo is an illusion of rotation due to a disorder of the vestibular system, almost always peripheral. In the history it must be distinguished from pre-syncope, seizures and panic attacks. A single attack of acute, isolated spontaneous vertigo lasting a day or more is due either to vestibular neuritis or cerebellar infarction; distinguishing between the two requires mastery of the head impulse test. Recurrent vertigo is mostly due to benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV), Meniere's disease or migraine. With a good history, a positional test, an audiogram and a caloric test, it is usually possible to distinguish between these. BPPV is the single most common cause of recurrent vertigo and can usually be cured immediately with a particle repositioning manoeuvre. Posterior circulation ischaemia very rarely causes isolated vertigo attacks and when it does the attacks are brief and frequent and the history is short.

  6. Treating Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Patient With Traumatic Brain Injury: Effectiveness of the Canalith Repositioning Procedure.

    PubMed

    Ouchterlony, Donna; Masanic, Cheryl; Michalak, Alicja; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Rutka, John A

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) among patients after mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury. An unblinded, nonrandomized, case comparison interventional study with repeated measures (1, 5, 9, and 12 weeks postenrollment) of three groups of patients with traumatic brain injury (BPPV, n = 21; nonspecific dizziness, n = 23; no dizziness, n = 12) was conducted. Patients in the BPPV group received the CRP at baseline and repeatedly until a negative Dix-Hallpike Maneuver was observed. Participants in the other two groups did not receive the CRP. Symptom resolution at the 12-week follow-up was observed in 75% of patients in the BPPV group versus 8.3% in the nonspecific dizziness group (p = .0006). A significant Group × Time interaction was observed for the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (F = 4.2, p = .003) and 36-item Short Form Health Questionnaire physical component scores (F = 2.16, p = .035) with the BPPV group showing significantly improved scores by the 12-week follow-up. Although there were between-group differences on the 36-item Short Form Health Questionnaire mental health component scores (F = 4.06, p = .022), changes over time were not significant in the groups. Treatment with the CRP for posttraumatic BPPV resulted in significant symptom resolution and improvement in perceived physical health status.

  7. Otolith Dysfunction in Persons With Both Diabetes and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    PubMed

    DʼSilva, Linda J; Staecker, Hinrich; Lin, James; Maddux, Christy; Ferraro, John; Dai, Hongying; Kluding, Patricia M

    2017-03-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a well-recognized complication of type 2 diabetes (DM) that may contribute to increased fall risk. The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is higher in people with DM. The impact of DM on the otolith organs of the vestibular system in people with BPPV is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze otolith function using vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests in people with DM and concurrent BPPV (BPPV + DM), and to examine the relationships between VEMP variables and diabetes-related variables. Prospective, cross-sectional study. Tertiary academic medical center. Participants 40 to 65 years were recruited in four groups: controls (n = 20), people with DM (n = 19), BPPV (n = 18), and BPPV + DM (n = 14). Saccule and utricle function were examined using cervical VEMP (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP), respectively. Diabetes-related variables such as HbA1c, duration of diabetes, and presence of sensory impairment due to diabetes were collected. The frequency of abnormal cVEMP responses was higher in the DM (p = 0.005), BPPV (p = 0.003), and BPPV + DM (p <0.001) groups compared with controls. In the participants with diabetes, higher HbA1c levels were correlated with prolonged P1 (p = 0.03) and N1 latencies (p = 0.03). The frequency of abnormal oVEMP responses was not different between groups (p = 0.2). Although BPPV and DM may independently affect utricle and saccule function, they do not seem to have a distinct cumulative effect.

  8. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with BPPV

    PubMed Central

    Korres, Stavros; Gkoritsa, Eleni; Giannakakou-Razelou, Dimitra; Yiotakis, Ioannis; Riga, Maria; Nikolpoulos, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The probable cause of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is a degeneration of the oto lithic organs (utricle and saccule). The aim of the study is to find possible alterations in Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) recordings in BPPV patients, because the saccule is part of the VEMP pathway. Material/Methods 27 BPPV patients (24 unilateral and 3 bilateral) aged 20 to 70 years and 30 healthy age matched controls. BPPV was diagnosed by the upbeating geotropic nystagmus found in the supine position with the head overextended towards one side. The subjects were investigated with pure tone audiometry, bi-thermal caloric test with electronystagmographic (ENG) recording, and VEMP recording. Results P1 latency and N1 latency did not present any statistical difference between control ears and affected ears of the BPPV population. The percentage of abnormal VEMP in the BPPV population was statistically higher than in the control ears (p<0.005). No significant relationship could be shown between the occurrence of Canal Paresis and abnormal VEMP. No relationship was found between the side (right or left ear) where BPPV appeared clinically and the side where abnormal VEMP was registered. Conclusions BPPV is a clinical entity associated with increased occurrence of abnormal VEMP recordings, possibly due to degeneration of the saccular macula, which is part of the neural VEMP pathway. PMID:21169909

  9. Frequency of Sinus Disease in Normal Subjects and Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, H.S.; Stewart, M.G.; Brissett, A.E.; Olson, K.L.; Takashima, M.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, H.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims To determine if patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) have a higher frequency of rhinosinusitis than people with normal vestibular function. Methods The subjects were 52 patients with BPPV and 46 normal people. Every subject had a sinus CT scan, a blood draw for IgE and a rhinologic examination by an otolaryngologist. Results The frequency of rhinosinusitis based on physician diagnosis was 49% and based on CT scan findings 59%. This difference approached significance (p = 0.08). The observed frequency of rhinosinusitis was higher than predicted by survey data about the southern US region. The data trended toward higher prevalence of rhinosinusitis (by physician diagnosis) in the BPPV patients versus controls (58 vs. 39%, p = 0.06). Conclusion BPPV patients have a higher frequency of sinus disease compared to people with normal vestibular systems, perhaps due to age differences, but physiologic factors may also be involved. The higher frequency of rhinosinusitis in this geographical area than reported rates based on survey data raises concerns about the usefulness of questionnaire data for estimating population prevalence. PMID:20424495

  10. [Peripheral, central and functional vertigo syndromes].

    PubMed

    Strupp, M; Dieterich, M; Zwergal, A; Brandt, T

    2015-12-01

    Depending on the temporal course, three forms of vertigo syndrome can be differentiated: 1) vertigo attacks, e.g. benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Menière's disease and vestibular migraine, 2) acute spontaneous vertigo lasting for days, e.g. acute unilateral vestibulopathy, brainstem or cerebellar infarction and 3) symptoms lasting for months or years, e.g. bilateral vestibulopathy and functional vertigo. The specific therapy of the various syndromes is based on three principles: 1) physical treatment with liberatory maneuvers for BPPV and balance training for vestibular deficits, 2) pharmacotherapy, e.g. for acute unilateral vestibulopathy (corticosteroids) and Menière's disease (transtympanic administration of gentamicin or steroids and high-dose betahistine therapy); placebo-controlled pharmacotherapy studies are currently being carried out for acute unilateral vestibulopathy, vestibular paroxysmia, prophylaxis of BPPV, vestibular migraine, episodic ataxia type 2 and cerebellar ataxia; 3) psychotherapy for functional dizziness.

  11. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Mezzalira, Raquel Mezzalira; Furtado, Paula Lobo; Venosa, Alessandra Ramos; Sampaio, Andre Luis Lopes; Pires de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa

    2011-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a common disorder in Neurotology. This vestibular syndrome is characterized by transient attacks of vertigo, caused by change in head position, and associated with paroxysmal characteristic nystagmus. The symptoms result from movement of the free floating otoconia particles in the endolymph or their attachment to the cupulae of the semicircular canal. The diagnosis is essentially clinical and should be confirmed by performing diagnostic maneuvers. Treatment is based on the identification of the affected semicircular canal and performance of liberatory maneuvers or repositioning of free floating particles of otoliths. The effectiveness varies from 70 to 100%.

  12. Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Otoneurology Committee of Spanish Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery Consensus Document.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vázquez, Paz; Franco-Gutiérrez, Virginia; Soto-Varela, Andrés; Amor-Dorado, Juan Carlos; Martín-Sanz, Eduardo; Oliva-Domínguez, Manuel; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2017-08-18

    Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is the most frequent episodic vestibular disorder. The purpose of this guide, requested by the committee on otoneurology of the Spanish Society of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, is to supply a consensus document providing practical guidance for the management of BPPV. It is based on the Barany Society criteria for the diagnosis of BPPV. This guideline provides recommendations on each variant of BPPV, with a description of the different diagnostic tests and the therapeutic manoeuvres. For this purpose, we have selected the tests and manoeuvres supported by evidence-based studies or extensive series. Finally, we have also included a chapter on differential diagnosis and a section relating to general aspects in the management of BPPV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  13. Validation of 5-item and 2-item questionnaires in Chinese version of Dizziness Handicap Inventory for screening objective benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shu, Liang; Wang, Qian; Pan, Hui; Wu, Jing; Fang, Jie; Sun, Xu-Hong; Zhai, Yu; Dong, You-Rong; Liu, Jian-Ren

    2016-08-01

    As possible candidate screening instruments for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), studies to validate the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) sub-scale (5-item and 2-item) and total scores are rare in China. From May 2014 to December 2014, 108(55 with and 53 without BPPV) patients complaining of episodic vertigo in the past week from a vertigo outpatient clinic were enrolled for DHI evaluation, as well as demographic and other clinical data. Objective BPPV was subsequently determined by positional evoking maneuvers under the record of optical Frenzel glasses. Cronbach's coefficient α was used to evaluate the reliability of psychometric scales. The validity of DHI total, 5-item and 2-item questionnaires to screen for BPPV was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. It revealed that the DHI 5-item questionnaire had good internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient α = 0.72). Area under the curve of total DHI, 5-item and 2-item scores for discriminating BPPV from those without was 0.678 (95 % CI 0.578-0.778), 0.873(95 % CI 0.807-0.940) and 0.895(95 % CI 0.836-0.953), respectively. It revealed 74.5 % sensitivity and 88.7 % specificity in separating BPPV and those without, with a cutoff value of 12 in the 5-item questionnaire. The corresponding rate of sensitivity and specificity was 78.2 and 88.7 %, respectively, with a cutoff value of 6 in 2-item questionnaire. The present study indicated that both 5-item and 2-item questionnaires in the Chinese version of DHI may be more valid than DHI total score for screening objective BPPV and merit further application in clinical practice in China.

  14. Canal switch and re-entry phenomenon in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: difference between immediate and delayed occurrence.

    PubMed

    Dispenza, F; DE Stefano, A; Costantino, C; Rando, D; Giglione, M; Stagno, R; Bennici, E

    2015-04-01

    This prospective study was designed to evaluate the differences between immediate and delayed canal re-entry of otoliths after therapeutic manoeuvres in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). A total of 196 patients with BPPV were visited and 127 matched our inclusion criteria. The mean age was 54.74 years. The horizontal semicircular canal (HSC) was involved in 30 cases and the posterior semicircular canal (PSC) in 97 patients. Patients with hearing loss in the ear affected by BPPV have a more recurrent form, compared to those with normal hearing. An immediate canal re-entry was recorded in 3 patients with HSC BPPV, all with geotropic nystagmus. In 7 patients with PSC BPPV, the immediate canal re-entry was detected and the delayed form was noted in 5 patients. The patients with the delayed canal re-entry underwent more than 2 previous manoeuvres. The canal re-entry was not related to the manoeuvre performed. The timing of the Dix-Hallpike test to verify the resolution of the BPPV had a significant role in immediate canal re-entry. A recurrence in the follow-up at least one month after treatment was recorded in 20 patients and was more frequent in patients that had canal re-entry. The canal re-entry or canal switch is a clinical entity that should be kept in mind of the neurotologist when approaching BPPV patients. It is important to distinguish it from recurrence when delayed and from manoeuvre failure when immediate. The timing of manoeuvre performing, in particular the final verification test after therapeutic sessions, is important to prevent the immediate reflux of particles into canals.

  15. Evidence-Based Practice: Management of Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The article focuses on the evidence basis for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common diagnosis of vertigo in both primary care and subspecialty settings. Like all articles in this compilation of evidence-based practice, an overview is presented along with evidence based clinical assessment, diagnosis, and management. Summaries of differential diagnosis of vertigo and outcomes are presented. PMID:22980676

  16. Efficacy of the Li maneuver in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinrang; Tian, Shiyu; Zou, Shizhen

    2017-06-01

    The Li maneuver is a safe, effective, and simple repositioning method for the treatment of BPPV. It is simple to master and exerts an exact effect. As a rapid repositioning method, the Li maneuver can result in reduced treatment times and increased treatment efficacy, and is, therefore, especially suitable for patients with limited cervical spine movement. To compare the short-term efficacies of the Li and Epley maneuvers in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PC-BPPV). A total of 120 patients with PC-BPPV were randomly treated by either the Li or Epley maneuvers at our department between May 5, 2014 and July 30, 2015. Follow-up examinations were performed 3 days and 1 week after the first repositioning. Of the 120 patients initially enrolled, 113 (72 females; 41 males; average age = 52 years; Li and Epley maneuver groups, 56 and 57 cases, respectively) satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria of this study. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups of patients in terms of the success rates of treatment at either the 3-day or 1-week follow-ups (p = .756 and .520, respectively).

  17. The Clinical Utility of Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials in Patients of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Anuprasad; Parida, Pradiptata Kumar; Alexander, Arun; Saxena, Sunil Kumar; Suria, Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Context Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) is an emerging tool to diagnose Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV). The clinical utility of VEMP has been reported only in small accord in Indian literature. Aim To study the latency and amplitude of VEMP in patients with BPPV and compare it with that of normal subjects. Settings and Design The study included two groups. Group one (control group) were 18 normal subjects. Group two (test group) were 15 subjects with unilateral BPPV. Materials and Methods Those subjects who fulfilled the selection criteria based on case history and audiological assessment were taken for the VEMP recording. The VEMP response consist of positive and negative successive waves (pI-nI), with latency values in adults about 13 and 23 milliseconds respectively. Statistical Analysis Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 12 (Chicago, IL, USA). Unpaired t-test was employed to measure the statistical difference between control group and test group. Results The difference in n23 and the peak to peak amplitude between the ipsilateral and contralateral ears of the test group were statistically significant, whereas such a difference in the p13 latency turned out to be statistically insignificant. It should be noted that, out of 15 patients in the test group, five patients showed only artifact tracer recordings in both the ears which is considered as no response. The heterogeneity of the results extended from absence of VEMP to prolongation of both p13, n23; prolongation of p13 alone; and even side to side variations. Conclusion Absent response from the ipsilateral ear, prolonged latency of n23 and decreased peak to peak amplitude (p13, n23), indicates the disease pathology. However, large sample size is required to draw further conclusions and to consolidate the usage of VEMP in the diagnosis of BPPV. PMID:26266140

  18. Postural sway in individuals with type 2 diabetes and concurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Linda J; Kluding, Patricia M; Whitney, Susan L; Dai, Hongying; Santos, Marcio

    2017-04-25

    diabetes has been shown to affect the peripheral vestibular end organs and is associated with an increase in the frequency of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). People with diabetes have higher postural sway; however, the impact of symptomatic BPPV on postural sway in individuals with diabetes is unclear. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine postural sway in people with type 2 diabetes who have symptomatic, untreated BPPV (BPPVDM). fifty-two participants (mean age 56.9 ± 5.6 years) were enrolled: controls (n = 14), diabetes (n = 14), BPPV only (n = 13) and BPPVDM (n = 11). An inertial motion sensor was used to detect pelvic acceleration across five standing conditions with eyes open/closed on firm/foam surfaces. Range of acceleration (cm/s(2)), peak velocity (cm/s) and variability of sway [root mean square (RMS)] in the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) directions were used to compare postural sway between groups across conditions. participants with BPPVDM had higher ranges of acceleration in the AP (p = 0.02) and ML (p = 0.02) directions, as well as higher peak velocity (p < 0.001) and RMS values (p = 0.006) in the AP direction compared to the control and diabetes groups. Standing on foam with eyes closed and tandem stance were challenging conditions for people with BPPVDM. clinicians may consider using standing on foam with eyes closed and tandem standing with eyes open to assess postural control in people with BPPVDM to identify postural instability.

  19. Recovery of otolith function in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo evaluated by sinusoidal off-vertical axis rotation.

    PubMed

    Sugita-Kitajima, Akemi; Koizuka, Izumi

    2008-05-09

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was studied via sinusoidal off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) to evaluate otolith function in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Subjects were sinusoidally rotated with eyes open in complete darkness at frequencies of 0.4 and 0.8 Hz with a maximum angular velocity of 60 degrees /s in earth vertical axis rotation (EVAR) and OVAR. Ten patients with BPPV patients were investigated. We performed OVAR tests for all patients for the following different points and compared otolith function: (1) The point at which patients had typical nystagmus; we call this state 'Before', that is, before recovery. (2) The point when their nystagmus disappeared; we call this state 'After' that is, after nystagmus disappear. Results showed that VOR gain during OVAR at 0.8 Hz in a 30 degrees nose-up position in BPPV patients was significantly less than the gain during EVAR at the point Before. On the other hand, gain was not significantly different between EVAR and OVAR at the point After. VOR gain itself at 0.8 Hz nose-up OVAR showed a significant increase at the point After compared to Before. This increase of VOR gain might be caused by the recovery of the otolith function in patients with BPPV.

  20. Sudden hearing loss with simultaneous posterior semicircular canal BPPV: possible etiology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    El-Saied, Sabri; Joshua, Ben-Zion; Segal, Nili; Kraus, Mordechai; Kaplan, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the clinical course and outcome of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) in conjunction with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and hypothesize the possible pathophysiology of this entity. Retrospective study of all patients with evidence of SSNHL with any type of BPPV between 2008 and 2012. Tertiary care university hospital. Five patients aged 56 to 71 were diagnosed with unilateral profound SSNHL and BPPV. Neurotologic examination revealed an ipsilateral torsional, up-beating nystagmus on Dix-Hallpike exam. Severe or profound ipsilateral-sensorineural hearing loss was recognized on audiometry. The rest of the exam was normal; this was in keeping with the diagnosis of SSNHL with ipsilateral posterior semicircular canal BPPV. All patients were treated with a modified Epley maneuver; oral steroids were administered for two weeks. In all cases vertigo resolved and the Dix-Hallpike exam became normal within several weeks. However, the hearing loss remained unchanged in two patients. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head was normal and ENG caloric test demonstrated mild ipsilateral canal paresis in two patients. 1. Patients with SSNHL and BPPV can have a variable clinical course and outcome. This entity may be quite common, but the diagnosis of BPPV can be missed if a complete neurological physical examination is not performed. 2. Arterial occlusions or selective multiple vascular or neural involvement may explain the pathophysiology of SSNHL with BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal. © 2014.

  1. Long-term outcome and health-related quality of life in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Escamez, Jose A; Gamiz, Maria J; Fernandez-Perez, Antonio; Gomez-Fiñana, Manuel

    2005-06-01

    A prospective cohort study was designed to evaluate the long-term outcome and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PC-BPPV) treated by the particle repositioning maneuver (PRM) in the outpatient clinic of a general community hospital. Fifty individuals with PC-BPPV were included, and 45 (90%) completed the study. The diagnosis was based on the history of short episodes of vertigo and a positional nystagmus during the Dix-Hallpike test (DHT). All patients were treated by a single PRM, and relapses were evaluated by DHT at 30, 180 and 360 days post-treatment; a new PRM was performed if the DHT was positive. The main outcome measures were: percentage of patients with a negative DHT after treatment, scores obtained on the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory Short Form (DHI-S) before and 30, 180 and 360 days post-treatment. The DHT was found negative in 80% (40/50) of individuals at 30 days. Ten, seven and five patients presented a positive DHT at 30, 180 and 360 days, respectively. Persistent BPPV was observed in 5% (2/50) of patients at 360 days, despite repeated PRM. Relapses (DH+ after successful PRM) were observed in 7.5% (3/50) at 180 days and 360 days. Both questionnaires showed a reliability Cronbach's alpha >0.7. The average standardized score for each SF-36 scale was compared with the reference population normative data, showing differences with norms for all scales except for vitality. After PRM, patients improved their scores with both instruments, indicating a restoration of HRQoL at 30 days. Physical dimension scores of the SF-36 improved from day 30 to 360. DHI-S scores were statistically better after PRM (P < 0.001). Our results show that the effectiveness of PRM is 88% after 1 year of follow-up. Patients with BPPV experienced a decrease in HRQoL, which was restored after PRM. Although relapses were observed in 7.5% of

  2. Evaluation of the utricular and saccular function using oVEMPs and cVEMPs in BPPV patients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Liang, Fa-ya; Chen, Liang; Song, Xi-cheng; Tong, Michael Chi Fai; Thong, Jiun Fong; Zhang, Qing-quan; Sun, Yan

    2016-02-09

    It is well-known that ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) predominantly reflect utricular function whilst cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) reflect saccular function. To date, there are no published reports on the systemic evaluation of utricular and saccular function in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), nor are there any reports on the differences in VEMPs between patients with recurrent and non-recurrent BPPV. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in cervical and ocular (c/o)VEMPs between patients with BPPV and normal controls, as well as between patients with recurrent and non-recurrent BPPV. Thirty patients with posterior canal BPPV and 30 healthy subjects (as normal controls) were prospectively enrolled. cVEMP and oVEMP testing using 500 Hz tone-burst stimuli were performed on all. VEMP tests were repeated 3 times on each subject to ensure reliability and reproducibility of responses. VEMPs were defined as present or absent. Abnormal VEMP was defined by lack of VEMP response. In the control group, abnormal cVEMPs responses were detected in 6.67% and abnormal oVEMPs responses were detected in 3.34%. In BPPV patients (10 with recurrent BPPV, 20 with non-recurrent BPPV), abnormal cVEMPs responses were detected in 30% and abnormal oVEMPs responses were detected in 56.7%. More patients with BPPV showed abnormal responses in c/oVEMPs as compared to the control group (p < 0.05). oVEMPs was more often abnormal as compared to cVEMPs in BPPV patients (p < 0.05). There was no statistical difference between abnormal cVEMP responses in non-recurrent BPPV patients (25%) and recurrent BPPV patients (40%) (p > 0.05). Differences in abnormal oVEMP responses (non-recurrent BPPV, 40%; recurrent BPPV, 90%) were significant (p < 0.05). An increased occurrence of abnormal c/oVEMP recordings appeared in BPPV patients, possibly as a result of degeneration of the otolith macula. oVEMPs were more often

  3. The effects of abnormality of cVEMP and oVEMP on rehabilitation outcomes in patients with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Hoseinabadi, Reza; Pourbakht, Akram; Yazdani, Nasrin; Kouhi, Ali; Kamali, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The presence of utricular and saccular dysfunction impairs quality of life (QoL) in patients. The aims of the present study were to examine the effect of repositioning maneuvers on QoL of patients with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and to describe the effect of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) or ocular VEMP (oVEMP) abnormalities on patient recovery after rehabilitation. Thirty idiopathic BPPV patients with/without otolith dysfunctions (n = 15, each group) were included in this clinical trial study. Otolith dysfunction was determined using oVEMP and cVEMP abnormalities. EcochG and caloric tests were performed to rule out other causes of secondary BPPV. The QoL in groups of patients with idiopathic BPPV was assessed using a Persian version of the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI-P) before and after treatment with Epley's maneuver. Pre-treatment results showed significant handicaps in both groups. DHI-P scores were higher in BPPV patients with otolith dysfunction (total, functional, emotional, physical score: 34.13, 11.20, 7.06, 15.86, respectively) than those in patients without otolith dysfunction (total, functional, emotional, physical score: 25.46, 7.86, 6.13, 11.46, respectively, P < 0.05). After treatment, DHI-P scores decreased in both groups. However, in the otolith dysfunction group, DHI-P scores (total, functional, emotional, physical score: 9.20, 3.33, 1.33, 4.53, respectively) were higher than those in patients without otolith dysfunction (total, functional, emotional, physical score: 4.13, 0.93, 1.06, 2.00, respectively). In BPPV patients with cVEMP or oVEMP abnormalities, QoL is more compromised in comparison with that in BPPV patients without these dysfunctions. Otolith dysfunction enhances the negative effects of BPPV on QoL.

  4. An approach to vertigo in general practice.

    PubMed

    Dommaraju, Sindhu; Perera, Eshini

    2016-04-01

    Dizziness is a common and very distressing presentation in general practice. In more than half of these cases, the dizziness is due to vertigo, which is the illusion of movement of the body or its surroundings. It can have central or peripheral causes, and determining the cause can be difficult. The aim of this article is to provide a clear framework for approaching patients who present with vertigo. A suggested approach to the assessment of vertigo is outlined. The causes of vertigo may be central (involving the brainstem or cerebellum) or peripheral (involving the inner ear). A careful history and physical examination can distinguish between these causes. The most common causes of vertigo seen in primary care are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), vestibular neuronitis (VN) and Ménière's disease. These peripheral causes of vertigo are benign, and treatment involves reassurance and management of symptoms.

  5. Recognition and management of BPPV for an elderly female patient referred for low back pain: a resident's case study.

    PubMed

    Massey, B James; Osborne, Raine; Beneciuk, Jason M; Rowe, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is common among older adults and frequently misdiagnosed or unidentified. Undiagnosed BPPV has been associated with depression, falls and ADL limitations. This case study describes the diagnostic process and management of BPPV for a 65-year-old patient with a primary complaint of chronic low back pain (LBP) in an outpatient orthopedic physical therapy setting. Following routine screening performed on initial evaluation, the patient was educated about examination findings that indicated the potential for BPPV and given the option to proceed with further assessment or defer until LBP was under control. The patient attended 16 visits over the course of care and the complaint of vertigo, described as a true spinning sensation, was assessed further on the visit 5. Continued assessment confirmed BPPV and the canalith repositioning procedure was administered. Following positive response to this intervention, the maneuver was re-administered on visit 6. Complete resolution of symptoms was reported on visit 7 and for the remainder of physical therapy services over the following month. Physical therapists may play a vital role in reducing healthcare expenses associated with cost to arrive at the diagnosis of BPPV, as well as improving the quality of life and safety of the older adult population affected by BPPV.

  6. Horizontal otolith-ocular responses to lateral translation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulos, D; Lempert, T; Gianna, C; Gresty, M A; Bronstein, A M

    1997-07-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is assumed to result from utricular damage, but it is controversial if patients have manifest utricular dysfunction. Therefore, we investigated linear vestibulo-ocular reflexes (LVORs) during lateral whole-body translation in 14 patients with unilateral BPPV. Patients were subjected to linear acceleration steps of 0.24 g along the interaural axis, which were applied randomly to the left and right, both in the dark and in the light with a visual target at a distance of 60 cm. The LVOR was measured by EOG from the slow phase velocity of the averaged and desaccaded compensatory eye movement. In normal cases, maximum asymmetry of LVOR velocity was 13% in the dark and 10% in the light. In patients, LVOR velocities were normal in the dark but mildly reduced in the light (p < 0.05). Five patients had mild LVOR asymmetries in the dark (range 18-38%) and two in the light (11 and 13%), but there was no consistent relationship to the affected side. The absence of gross changes of the LVOR may be explained either by minor utricular damage that is functionally irrelevant or by central compensation of a chronic unilateral deficit.

  7. Impaired mental rotation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and acute vestibular neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Candidi, Matteo; Micarelli, Alessandro; Viziano, Andrea; Aglioti, Salvatore M.; Minio-Paluello, Ilaria; Alessandrini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular processing is fundamental to our sense of orientation in space which is a core aspect of the representation of the self. Vestibular information is processed in a large subcortical–cortical neural network. Tasks requiring mental rotations of human bodies in space are known to activate neural regions within this network suggesting that vestibular processing is involved in the control of mental rotation. We studied whether mental rotation is impaired in patients suffering from two different forms of unilateral vestibular disorders (vestibular neuritis – VN – and Benign Paroxysmal positional VertigoBPPV) with respect to healthy matched controls (C). We used two mental rotation tasks in which participants were required to: (i) mentally rotate their own body in space (egocentric rotation) thus using vestibular processing to a large extent and (ii) mentally rotate human figures (allocentric rotation) thus using own body representations to a smaller degree. Reaction times and accuracy of responses showed that VN and BPPV patients were impaired in both tasks with respect to C. Significantly, the pattern of results was similar in the three groups suggesting that patients were actually performing the mental rotation without using a different strategy from the control individuals. These results show that dysfunctional vestibular inflow impairs mental rotation of both own body and human figures suggesting that unilateral acute disorders of the peripheral vestibular input massively affect the cerebral processes underlying mental rotations. PMID:24324422

  8. Efficacy of cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in evaluation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of posterior semicircular canal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Apeksha, Kumari

    2016-09-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) constitutes a major proportion of the population with peripheral vestibulopathies. Although the freely floating otoconia within the semicircular canals is responsible for the symptoms of BPPV, the source of the otoconia debris is mainly believed to be the otolith organs. Therefore, the pathology in either or both the otolith organs appears a logical proposition. Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP), being the tests for functional integrity of the otolith organs, appear promising for investigating otolith involvement in BPPV. While recent evidences are suggestive of equivocal findings for cVEMP, there are only a few studies on oVEMP. Additionally, both these potentials have never been explored in the same set of individuals with BPPV. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the functional integrity of the otolith organs through cVEMP and oVEMP in individuals with posterior canal BPPV. Thirty-one individuals with unilateral posterior canal BPPV and 31 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent 500 Hz tone-burst-evoked cVEMP and oVEMP. The results demonstrated no significant group difference on any of the cVEMP parameters (p > 0.05). A similar trend was noticed for the latency-related parameters of oVEMP. However, the peak-to-peak amplitude was significantly smaller in the affected ears of individuals with BPPV than their unaffected ears and the ears of healthy controls (p < 0.05). The BPPV group showed significantly higher inter-aural amplitude difference ratio than the healthy controls (p < 0.05). Further, the sensitivity and specificity of oVEMP were also found to be far superior to those of cVEMP. Thus, the outcome of the present study revealed involvement of utricle rather than saccule in posterior canal BPPV, and therefore, oVEMP appears to be better suited to clinical investigation than cVEMP in individuals with posterior canal BPPV.

  9. Ocular VEMPs indicate repositioning of otoconia to the utricle after successful liberatory maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo.

    PubMed

    Bremova, Tatiana; Bayer, Otmar; Agrawal, Yuri; Kremmyda, Olympia; Brandt, Thomas; Teufel, Julian; Strupp, Michael

    2013-12-01

    This study showed a transient increase of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) amplitudes in the affected ear after successful liberatory maneuvers and no changes in cervical VEMP (cVEMP) amplitudes. These findings support the hypothesis that successful liberatory maneuvers can lead to a repositioning of otoconia to the utricle. To evaluate whether oVEMP amplitudes increase after successful liberatory maneuvers in patients with posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (pc-BPPV), while cVEMP amplitudes do not change. These findings may indicate a successful repositioning of dislodged otoconia to the utricular macula, but not to the saccular macula. Thirty patients with unilateral pc-BPPV were prospectively examined with bone-conducted oVEMP and air-conducted cVEMP at four time points: before, after, 1 week after, and 1 month after the liberatory maneuvers (Sémont maneuvers). At the 1-week follow-up, 20 of 30 patients were asymptomatic (responders); BPPV could still be induced in the other 10 (non-responders). In responders the mean n10 amplitude on the affected side increased from 12 ± 6.5 µV at baseline (before the treatment) to 15.9 ± 7.1 µV at 1 week after treatment; this increase was significantly (p = 0.001) higher in responders than in non-responders. cVEMP did not differ significantly.

  10. Ocular VEMPs indicate repositioning of otoconia to the utricle after successful liberatory maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo

    PubMed Central

    BREMOVA, TATIANA; BAYER, OTMAR; AGRAWAL, YURI; KREMMYDA, OLYMPIA; BRANDT, THOMAS; TEUFEL, JULIAN; STRUPP, MICHAEL

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions This study showed a transient increase of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) amplitudes in the affected ear after successful liberatory maneuvers and no changes in cervical VEMP (cVEMP) amplitudes. These findings support the hypothesis that successful liberatory maneuvers can lead to a repositioning of otoconia to the utricle. Objectives To evaluate whether oVEMP amplitudes increase after successful liberatory maneuvers in patients with posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (pc-BPPV), while cVEMP amplitudes do not change. These findings may indicate a successful repositioning of dislodged otoconia to the utricular macula, but not to the saccular macula. Methods Thirty patients with unilateral pc-BPPV were prospectively examined with bone-conducted oVEMP and air-conducted cVEMP at four time points: before, after, 1 week after, and 1 month after the liberatory maneuvers (Sémont maneuvers). Results At the 1-week follow-up, 20 of 30 patients were asymptomatic (responders); BPPV could still be induced in the other 10 (non-responders). In responders the mean n10 amplitude on the affected side increased from 12 ± 6.5 μV at baseline (before the treatment) to 15.9 ± 7.1 μV at 1 week after treatment; this increase was significantly (p = 0.001) higher in responders than in non-responders. cVEMP did not differ significantly. PMID:24245699

  11. [Management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in first care centers].

    PubMed

    Carnevale, C; Muñoz-Proto, F; Rama-López, J; Ferrán-de la Cierva, L; Rodríguez-Villalba, R; Sarría-Echegaray, P; Mas-Mercant, S; Tomás-Barberán, M

    2014-01-01

    The benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most common disease in the group of peripheral vertigo. It's characterized by vertiginous sensation triggered by the positional changes of the head and usually lasts less than one minute. It is most frequently seen in middle-aged patients (40-50 years old) and in up 50% of cases we do not know the cause, so we refer to them as idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Because of the high incidence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in general population, it is of utmost importance to be aware of the differential diagnosis and to be able to treat this pathology with efficacy, because in most cases we can achieve excellent results performing specific and simple maneuvers.

  12. Mechanism of posterior semicircular canal stimulation in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Honrubia, V; House, M

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative study of the stimuli and vestibulo-ocular response associated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) was made to test and further develop the canalithiasis theory of BPPV. The angular velocities of the head in the planes of the semicircular canals during the Dix-Hallpike test were measured in four healthy subjects using electromagnetic sensors to record the position of the head in a six degrees of freedom paradigm. Next, the nystagmus reactions in seven patients diagnosed with idiopathic BPPV were recorded with video-oculography. The characteristics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) response were analyzed using three-dimensional vector techniques. The angular velocity of the head was primarily, but not exclusively, in the plane of the posterior semicircular canal (PSC) in question. Both the anterior and horizontal canals were also stimulated by a lesser degree. The duration of the motion stimulus in the PSC was < 1.3 s with peak angular velocities of 150 deg/s. The eye response in BPPV patients began 4 s after the test and had a duration of 15-20 s. Peak slow-component eye velocities of about 42 deg/s were reached 3-5 s after onset of nystagmus. The motion of the eye, as predicted by the cupulolithiasis theory, is disconjugated and has torsional, vertical, and horizontal components. In the eye ipsilateral to the tested ear it is primarily torsional (0.80, 0.54, 0.16) and in the contralateral eye it is mainly vertical (0.57, 0.73, 0.08). These results suggest that particles, initially resting on the floor of the cupula dome in the PSC, are perturbed by the Dix-Hallpike test and disperse freely into the endolymph where they are propelled by gravity into the canal lumen. This creates abnormal pressure on the cupula and the specific VOR activation of the ipsilateral superior oblique and the contralateral inferior rectus muscles, whose force vectors are indistinguishable from the measured eye motion vectors. The estimated pressure exerted on

  13. Evaluation of quality of life pre- and post-vestibular rehabilitation in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with Meniere's disease

    PubMed Central

    Socher, Dayra Dill; Socher, Jan Alessandro; Azzi, Viviane Jacintha Bolfe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Vertigo is a symptom that impacts the patients' quality of life and may force them to cease performing activities of daily living. Here, we discuss benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and Meniere's disease (MD), which show exacerbated symptoms when they appear in association. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is an effective treatment in reducing vertigo, especially in conjunction with other therapies. Aim: To evaluate the quality of life of patients with BPPV and MD before and after VR. Method: We conducted a descriptive observational qualitative and quantitative case study with 12 patients aged 35 to 86 years. All patients diagnosed with BPPV and MD received treatment in the ENT clinic. The Brazilian DHI questionnaire, which assesses the quality of life with a focus on physical, emotional, and functional aspects, was used for data collection, and was completed by patients before the first session and after the fifth session of VR. Data were tested using the Shapiro-Wilk normality test, followed by Wilcoxon, Friedman, and Spearman correlation tests (p < 0.05). Results: There were significant improvements in scores for all aspects, with median changes ranging from 12 to 0 in the physical, 6 to 1 in the emotional, and 11 to 1 in the functional aspect. There were no correlations between the scores and sample characteristics. Conclusion: VR was an effective method for the treatment of patients with BPPV and MD; it improves quality of life and shows the maximal influence on physical aspect scores, regardless of age or gender. PMID:25991970

  14. [Canalith repositioning maneuver: proposal of a new therapy for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the posterior semicircular canal].

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, F; Costa, G; Mazzone, A; Barillari, U

    1998-10-01

    A new therapy is proposed for the treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (B.P.P.V.) of the Posterior Semicircular Canal (P.S.C.): the Canalith Repositioning Maneuver (C.R.M.). The need for a new maneuver to treat B.P.P.V. of the P.S.C. arises from the difficulties encountered in daily practice, under particular conditions (i.e. elderly, obese, traumatized patients and in the presence of rachis pain, etc.), to perform the most common rehabilitative techniques such as the Semont Maneuver and Epley's Canalith Repositioning Procedure (C.R.P.). The results achieved using this new technique on a group of 47 consecutive out-patients are presented and compared to those achieved using the Semont Maneuver in an analogous group of 23 patients. C.R.M. and the Semont Maneuver were performed once per treatment session and all patients were checked every 3 days until the symptoms of B.P.P.V. disappeared. Thereafter they were invited to return for check-up if signs of vertigo returned (follow-up 6-25 months). The two techniques proved equally effective: 87.5% of the cases were resolved with C.R.M., 82.6% with the Semont Maneuver. However, the C.R.M. provided other advantages as it resolved the problem immediately (i.e. in a single session) in 81% of the cases vs. 68.4% for the Semont Maneuver. In view of the Canalith theory, the action mechanism envisaged for all three maneuvers--C.R.M., the Semont Maneuver and the Epley C.R.P.--can be explained assuming that the canalith passes from the ampullar to the non ampullar branch of the (P.S.C.) passing finally through the Common Duct and into the Utricle. C.R.M. is a specific treatment for the B.P.P.V. of the P.S.C. and is simple to perform, well tolerated and quite effective. It is indicated in all cases of B.P.P.V. of the P.S.C. both as initial treatment and as alternative to other treatment methods which have proved ineffective or difficult to perform. Indeed, in therapy it is best to be quite skilled in more than one

  15. The epidemiology of dizziness and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, H K

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the epidemiology of dizziness, vertigo, and imbalance, and of specific vestibular disorders. In the last decade, population-based epidemiologic studies have complemented previous publications from specialized settings and provided evidence for the high burden of dizziness and vertigo in the community. Dizziness (including vertigo) affects about 15% to over 20% of adults yearly in large population-based studies. Vestibular vertigo accounts for about a quarter of dizziness complaints and has a 12-month prevalence of 5% and an annual incidence of 1.4%. Its prevalence rises with age and is about two to three times higher in women than in men. Imbalance has been increasingly studied as a highly prevalent complaint particularly affecting healthy aging. Studies have documented the high prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and vestibular migraine (VM), as well as of comorbid anxiety at the population level. BPPV and VM are largely underdiagnosed, while Menière's disease, which is about 10 times less frequent than BPPV, appears to be overdiagnosed. Risk factor research is only at its beginning, but has provided some interesting observations, such as the consistent association of vertigo and migraine, which has greatly contributed to the recognition of VM as a distinct vestibular syndrome. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of the Epley’s maneuver performed in primary care to treat posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vertigo is a common medical condition with a broad spectrum of diagnoses which requires an integrated approach to patients through a structured clinical interview and physical examination. The main cause of vertigo in primary care is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which should be confirmed by a positive D-H positional test and treated with repositioning maneuvers. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Epley’s maneuver performed by general practitioners (GPs) in the treatment of BPPV. Methods/Design This study is a randomized clinical trial conducted in the primary care setting. The study’s scope will include two urban primary care centers which provide care for approximately 49,400 patients. All patients attending these two primary care centers, who are newly diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, will be invited to participate in the study and will be randomly assigned either to the treatment group (Epley’s maneuver) or to the control group (a sham maneuver). Both groups will receive betahistine. Outcome variables will be: response to the D-H test, patients’ report on presence or absence of vertigo during the previous week (dichotomous variable: yes/no), intensity of vertigo symptoms on a Likert-type scale in the previous week, total score on the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and quantity of betahistine taken. We will use descriptive statistics of all variables collected. Groups will be compared using the intent-to-treat approach and either parametric or nonparametric tests, depending on the nature and distribution of the variables. Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test will be conducted to compare categorical measures and Student’s t-test or Mann–Whitney U-test will be used for intergroup comparison variables. Discussion Positive results from our study will highlight that treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo can be performed by trained general practitioners (GPs) and

  17. New Analyses of the Sensory Organization Test Compared to the Clinical Test of Sensory Integration and Balance in Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Cohen, Helen S.; Peters, Brian T.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) of the computerized dynamic posturography battery or the Clinical Test of Sensory Integration and Balance (CTSIB) is more likely to indicate balance disorders in people with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Study design Normal controls were compared to patients with unilateral benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the posterior semicircular canal (BPPV). Methods Subjects performed tests with eyes open or closed on stable and unstable surfaces, with head still or with head moving at 0.33 Hz in pitch or yaw. Dependent variables were the percent time of the standard duration each subject could perform the task, the number of head motions made, and kinematic variables measured with head- and torso-mounted inertial motion units. Results Because equilibrium scores of normals improved significantly over repeated trials on SOT patients were given only 1 trial per condition. For percent time between-group differences were found on CTSIB with eyes closed, on foam, head moving in yaw showing significantly reduced performance by BPPV subjects compared to controls. Compared to controls patients made significantly fewer head movements on CTSIB, eyes closed, on foam, head still, pitch and yaw. Kinematic data also differed between the groups on tests with eyes closed, unstable surfaces with different head movement combinations, indicating increased instability in BPPV patients. Conclusion For screening, CTSIB with head movements is more likely than SOT to indicate balance deficits, especially when dependent measures include percent time as well as head movement counts and kinematic measures. PMID:23553110

  18. The effect of serum vitamin D normalization in preventing recurrences of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhzadeh, Mahboobeh; Lotfi, Yones; Mousavi, Abdollah; Heidari, Behzad; Bakhshi, Enyatollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a condition with recurrent attacks in a significant proportion of patients. The present case- control study was conducted to assess the influence of serum vitamin D normalization on recurrent attacks of vitamin D deficient patients. Methods: Diagnosis of BPPV was made based on history and clinical examination and exclusion of other conditions. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD) was measured using ELISA method and a levels of < 20 ng/ml was considered a deficiency of vitamin D. Inclusion criteria were as follows: history of recurrent attacks and serum 25-OHD<20.ng/ml. While the patients with history of trauma, surgery and chronic systemic diseases were excluded. The patients were classified into two groups: treatment and control, intermittently. Both groups received Epley rehabilitation therapy one session per week for 4 weeks but the treatment group received an additional supplement of 50.000 IU of vitamin D (cholecalciferol) weekly for two months to achieve serum 25-OHD ≥ 30 ng/ml and the study patients were followed-up for 6 months. Results: Twenty-seven patients were allocated to each group. At baseline, serum 25-OHD was similar (10.7±2.3 vs 11.41±1.9, P=0.23). At month 2, serum 25-OHD in the treatment group increased significantly to ≥ 30 ng/ ml, whereas serum 25-OHD in the control group remained unchanged (34.2±3.3 vs 10.6 10.6±2.2 ng/ml, P=0.001). During the follow-up period, attacks of BPPV in the treatment group decreased significantly compared with the control group (14.8% vs 96.3% OR= 0.18, P=0.001). Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that the normalization of serum vitamin D significantly reduces BPPV recurrences. PMID:27757201

  19. The evaluation of anxiety and panic agarophobia scores in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo on initial presentation and at the follow-up visit.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Serif Samil; Arli, Cengiz; Copoglu, Umit Sertan; Kokacya, Mehmet Hanifi; Colak, Sait

    2017-05-01

    Patients with BPPV experienced short but intense anxiety and/or panic disorder, especially at the initial visit, but most patients recovered without medication with successful treatment. Recent studies have shown that people with dizziness report some psychological problems such as panic and agoraphobia and anxiety. The aim of this study was to evaluate anxiety and panic agorophobia levels in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo on initial presentation and at the follow-up visit and compare the scores with the control group. All the 32 patients in the study had a diagnosis of BPPV confirmed by their history, typical subjective symptom reports, and characteristic positional nystagmus during the Dix-Hallpike test and/or Roll test. The patients were instructed to complete the standard forms of Beck anxiety inventory and panic agoraphobia scale questionnaire before and at 7 and 14 days after the canalith repositioning treatment. The validity scores of panic agoraphobia were statistically significantly higher in patients with BPPV than in the control group in each period (p < .001) and the validity scores of the Beck anxiety inventory were statistically significantly higher in patients with BPPV than in the control group at the first and second evaluation (p < .001).

  20. A multicenter randomized double-blind study: comparison of the Epley, Semont, and sham maneuvers for the treatment of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Dae; Shim, Dae Bo; Park, Hong Ju; Song, Chan Il; Kim, Min-Beom; Kim, Chang-Hee; Byun, Jae Yong; Hong, Sung Kwang; Kim, Tae Su; Park, Kye Hoon; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Shim, Byoung Soo; Lee, Joon Han; Lim, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Eun-Ju

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the short-term efficacy of Epley, Semont, and sham maneuvers for resolving posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in a prospective multicenter randomized double-blind controlled study. Subjects were randomly divided into three groups: Epley (36 patients), Semont (32 patients), and sham (Epley maneuver for the unaffected side, 31 patients). Out of 14 institutes which participated in this study, 5 institutes had previous experience of the Epley but not the Semont maneuver and the other 9 had previous experience of both maneuvers. Each maneuver was repeated twice if there was still positional vertigo or nystagmus on day 0, and the presence of nystagmus and vertigo on positional testing were evaluated immediately, 1 day, and 1 week after treatment. After the first maneuver, the Epley group showed a significantly higher resolution rate of positional nystagmus than the Semont or sham groups (63.9, 37.5, and 38.7%, respectively). After the second maneuver, the resolution rate (83.3%) of the Epley group was significantly higher than that (51.6%) of the sham group. At 1 day and 1 week after treatment, the resolution rate of the Epley group was significantly higher than those of the other groups. Similar results were seen for the resolution of positional vertigo. The Epley maneuver showed persistent resolution rates of positional vertigo and nystagmus without a fatigue phenomenon. The Epley maneuver was significantly more effective per maneuver than Semont or sham maneuvers for the short-term treatment of posterior canal BPPV. The Semont maneuver showed a higher success rate than the sham maneuver, but it was not significantly different.

  1. Double-blind randomized trial on short-term efficacy of the Semont maneuver for the treatment of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Marco; Santoro, Giovanni Paolo; Asprella Libonati, Giacinto; Casani, Augusto Pietro; Faralli, Mario; Giannoni, Beatrice; Gufoni, Mauro; Marcelli, Vincenzo; Marchetti, Pierpaolo; Pepponi, Emanuela; Vannucchi, Paolo; Nuti, Daniele

    2012-05-01

    The need for Class I and II studies on the efficacy of Semont's liberatory maneuver (SLM) in the treatment of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PC-BPPV) motivated the present double-blind randomized trial on the short-term efficacy of SLM. A total of 342 patients with unilateral PC-BPPV were recruited for a multicenter study. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment by SLM (n = 174) or sham treatment (n = 168). Subjects were followed up twice (1 and 24 h) with the Dix-Hallpike maneuver by blinded examiners. At the 1 and 24 h follow-up, 79.3 and 86.8%, respectively, of patients undergoing SLM had recovered from vertigo, compared to none of the patients undergoing the sham maneuver (p < 0.0001). Patients who manifested liberatory nystagmus at the end of SLM showed a significantly higher percentage of recovery (87.1 vs. 55.7%; p < 0.0001). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Class I study on the efficacy of SLM. SLM proved highly effective with respect to the sham maneuver (p < 0.0001). Liberatory nystagmus was demonstrated to be a useful prognostic factor for the efficacy of treatment. The present Class I study of efficacy of SLM changes the level of recommendation of the maneuver for treating PC-BPPV from level C to level B.

  2. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and digital vectoelectro-nystagmography's study in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Maria da Silva Lira-Batista, Marta; Schaffeln Dorigueto, Ricardo; Freitas Ganança, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is a very common vestibular disorder characterized by brief but intense attacks of rotatory vertigo triggered by simple rapid movement of the head. The integrity of the vestibular pathways can be assessed using tests such as digital vectoelectronystagmography (VENG) and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP). Aim: This study aimed to determine the VEMP findings with respect to latency, amplitude, and waveform peak to peak and the results of the oculomotor and vestibular components of VENG in patients with BPPV. Method: Although this otoneurological condition is quite common, little is known of the associated VEMP and VENG changes, making it important to research and describe these results. Results: We examined the records of 4438 patients and selected 35 charts after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of these, 26 patients were women and 9 men. The average age at diagnosis was 52.7 years, and the most prevalent physiological cause, accounting for 97.3% of cases, was ductolithiasis. There was a statistically significant association between normal hearing and mild contralateral sensorineural hearing loss. The results of the oculomotor tests were within the normal reference ranges for all subjects. Patients with BPPV exhibited symmetrical function of the semicircular canals in their synergistic pairs (p < 0.001). The caloric test showed statistically normal responses from the lateral canals. The waveforms of all patients were adequate, but the VEMP results for the data-crossing maneuver with positive positioning showed a trend toward a relationship for the left ear Lp13. There was also a trend towards an association between normal reflexes in the caloric test and the inter-peak VEMP of the left ear. It can be concluded that although there are some differences between the average levels of the VENG and VEMP results, these differences were not statistically significant

  3. Pharmacological treatment of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Hain, Timothy C; Uddin, Mohammed

    2003-01-01

    This review discusses the physiology and pharmacological treatment of vertigo and related disorders. Classes of medications useful in the treatment of vertigo include anticholinergics, antihistamines, benzodiazepines, calcium channel antagonists and dopamine receptor antagonists. These medications often have multiple actions. They may modify the intensity of symptoms (e.g. vestibular suppressants) or they may affect the underlying disease process (e.g. calcium channel antagonists in the case of vestibular migraine). Most of these agents, particularly those that are sedating, also have a potential to modulate the rate of compensation for vestibular damage. This consideration has become more relevant in recent years, as vestibular rehabilitation physical therapy is now often recommended in an attempt to promote compensation. Accordingly, therapy of vertigo is optimised when the prescriber has detailed knowledge of the pharmacology of medications being administered as well as the precise actions being sought. There are four broad causes of vertigo, for which specific regimens of drug therapy can be tailored. Otological vertigo includes disorders of the inner ear such as Ménière's disease, vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and bilateral vestibular paresis. In both Ménière's disease and vestibular neuritis, vestibular suppressants such as anticholinergics and benzodiazepines are used. In Ménière's disease, salt restriction and diuretics are used in an attempt to prevent flare-ups. In vestibular neuritis, only brief use of vestibular suppressants is now recommended. Drug treatments are not presently recommended for BPPV and bilateral vestibular paresis, but physical therapy treatment can be very useful in both. Central vertigo includes entities such as vertigo associated with migraine and certain strokes. Prophylactic agents (L-channel calcium channel antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, beta-blockers) are the mainstay of treatment

  4. A perspective on recurrent vertigo.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Richard R

    2013-01-01

    The recurrent nature of the 3 most common vestibulopathies suggests a recurrent cause. Histopathology in temporal bones from patients with these syndromes - vestibular neuronitis (VN, n = 7), Ménière's disease (MD, n = 8) and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, n = 5) - shows focal degeneration of vestibular nerve axons and degenerated nearby facial nerve meatal ganglion cells. Transmission electron microscopic confirmation of intracytoplasmic viral particles in surgically excised vestibular nerves from patients with VN and MD support a viral etiology in these vestibulopathies. Antiviral treatment of these syndromes in a series of 211 patients with a 3- to 8-year follow-up resulted in complete control of vertigo in VN (88%), MD (90%) and BPPV (60%).

  5. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xizheng; Wang, Amy; Wang, Entong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a common vestibular disorder and it may be idiopathic or secondary to some conditions such as surgery, but rare following laparoscopic surgery. Methods: We report two cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery, one after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 51-year-old man and another following laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 60-year-old woman. Results: Both patients were treated successfully with manual or device-assisted canalith repositioning maneuvers, with no recurrence on the follow-up of 6 -18 months. Conclusions: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a rare but possible complication of laparoscopic surgery. Both manual and device-assisted repositioning maneuvers are effective treatments for this condition, with good efficacy and prognosis. PMID:28255446

  6. Effects of balance Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy in elderly with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Karyna Myrelly Oliveira Bezerra de Figueiredo; Freitas, Raysa Vanessa de Medeiros; Ferreira, Lidiane Maria de Brito Macedo; Deshpande, Nandini; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate short-term effects of balance Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT) on balance, dizziness symptoms and quality of life of the elderly with chronic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV). In this randomized, single-blind and controlled trial, older adults with chronic BPPV were randomized into two groups, the experimental group (n = 7, age: 69 (65-78) years) and the control group (n = 7, age: 73 (65-76) years). Patients in the experimental group underwent balance VRT (50 min per session, two times a week) and Canalith Repositioning Maneuver (CRM) as required, for 13 weeks. The control group was treated using only CRM as required. Standing and dynamic balance, dizziness symptoms and quality of life were measured at the baseline, and at one, five, nine and thirteen weeks. There were no between-group differences in dizziness, quality of life and standing balance over the 13 weeks. Significant differences were observed in dynamic balance measures between groups (p <  0.05 for most tests) through assessments. In intragroup analysis, both groups showed improvements in all measurements except no improvement was found in majority of the dynamic balance tests in the control group. The patients who received additional balance VRT demonstrated better results in dynamic balance than those who received only CRM. Implications for Rehabilitation The findings that balance VRT in addition to CRM improves dynamic balance in elderly people with BPPV should be useful in guiding rehabilitation professionals' clinical decision making to design interventions for seniors suffering from BPPV; Improvements in tests of dynamic balance suggest that the risk of adverse consequences of BPPV in the elderly such as falls and fractures can be potentially reduced through implementation of CRM in conjunction with balance VRT; Lack of additional improvement in Visual Analogue Scale of dizziness and Dizziness Handicap Index suggests that addition of balance VRT does

  7. [Comparison of anxiety and depression state among patients with different type of vestibular peripheral vertigo].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Shi, Dongmei; Yu, Lisheng; Ke, Xingxing; Zhang, Hua

    2014-04-01

    To investigate and analyze the status of anxiety and depression among patients with four types of peripheral vertigo. The clinical data of patients with one of the four types of peripheral vertigo, namely benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), vestibular migraine (VM), Menière's disease (MD), and vestibular neuritis (VN), were collected. Thorough otological and neuro-otological examinations were performed on these patients, and their status of anxiety and depression were assessed using self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and self-rating depression scale (SDS). A total of 129 patients with one of the four types of peripheral vertigo(49 cases of BPPV, 37 cases of VM, 28 cases of MD and 15 cases of VN) were included in the study. The scores of SAS and SDS were higher in the patients with VM or MD than those with BPPV or VN (P < 0.05), and the incidence of anxiety (VM = 45.9% MD = 50.0%) and depression (VM = 27.0% MD = 28.6%) were higher in the patients with VM or MD than those with BPPV or VN (P < 0.05). Paired comparisons showed the differences between the incidences of BPPV and MV groups, BPPV and MD groups, and MD and VN groups were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Among patients with different types of peripheral vertigo, anxiety/depression is more common in patients with VM or MD. This may be due to the different mechanisms involved in different types of vertigo, as well as differences in the prevention and self-control of the patients against the vertigo.

  8. Abnormality of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in patients with recurrent benign paroxysmal postitional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Dae; Park, Moo Kyun; Lee, Byung Don; Lee, Tae Kyeong; Sung, Ki-Bum; Park, Ji Yun

    2013-02-01

    Our results show that cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) or ocular VEMP (oVEMP) abnormalities in the recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) group were significantly higher than those in the non-recurrent BPPV group. Therefore, we can infer that VEMP abnormality is one of risk factors for BPPV recurrence. This prospective study aimed to test the hypothesis that otolith dysfunction using the VEMP test is a cause of recurrence of BPPV. cVEMP and oVEMP tests using 500 Hz tone-burst stimuli were performed on 16 patients with recurrent BPPV between March 2010 and December 2011. Both VEMP tests were performed in 20 patients with non-recurrent BPPV. The differences in age, sex, and involved canal between the recurrent and non-recurrent BPPV groups were not significant. Abnormal cVEMP responses were detected in 5 of 16 (31.3%) subjects in the recurrent BPPV group and abnormal oVMEP responses were detected in 4 of 16 (25%) subjects in the recurrent BPPV group. When we defined VEMP abnormality as an abnormal cVEMP or abnormal oVEMP, VEMP abnormalities were detected in eight (50%) subjects in the recurrent BPPV group and in three (15%) subjects in the non-recurrent BPPV group; the difference between groups was significant.

  9. [Practical approach to recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    PubMed

    López-Escámez, José A

    2008-10-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most common vestibular disorder and it has a significant impact on health-related quality of life. The disease is probably caused by the accumulation of lithiasis material from the otolithic membrane of the utricle. Patients experience multiple short vertigo crises lasting seconds when they go to bed or turn over. There are several clinical variants affecting posterior, horizontal or anterior canals and in some cases vestibular lithiasis can occur in two canals simultaneously. Diagnosis is by video-oculographic recording of positional nystagmus during positional tests to identify the canal affected. There are specific treatment manoeuvres for each clinical variant, which a high degree of short-term effectiveness.

  10. Clinical decision-making to address poor outcomes in persistent horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A case study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian M

    2017-05-01

    Horizontal semicircular canal BPPV (HSC-BPPV) can occur in 10-30% of BPPV cases. Lower success rates are reported for HSC-BPPV. The apogeotropic form of HSC-BPPV is more difficult to treat, as 5-40% of cases are described to be refractory to repositioning maneuvers. To describe the assessment and treatment of a patient presenting with HSC-BPPV and to demonstrate the potential use of Forced-Prolonged Positioning (FPP) as a home exercise program (HEP) for persistent HSC-BPPV in an elderly patient. An 89-year-old female referred to physical therapy with a diagnosis of BPPV. She experienced dizziness with positional changes and was found to have apogeotropic form of HSC-BPPV. To supplement maneuvers performed in the clinic, the patient was provided instructions for the FPP as her HEP. With continued symptoms and positive positional tests by week four of treatment, the patient was instructed to switch the FPP with the opposing ear directed toward the floor. Following 2 weeks of performing FPP on the opposite side, the patient reported symptoms had resolved and positional testing confirmed resolution of HSC-BPPV. There is a potential benefit of using FPP as a HEP to supplement maneuvers used in the clinic to improve outcomes in patients with HSC-BPPV that are refractory to traditional repositioning maneuvers. Prescribing the FPP maneuver as a HEP is feasible, and clinicians should consider the FPP technique as a HEP to adjunct repositioning maneuvers performed in the clinic to address persistent HSC-BPPV.

  11. Subjective visual vertical after treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maristela Mian; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2016-09-28

    Otolith function can be studied by testing the subjective visual vertical, because the tilt of the vertical line beyond the normal range is a sign of vestibular dysfunction. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a disorder of one or more labyrinthine semicircular canals caused by fractions of otoliths derived from the utricular macula. To compare the subjective visual vertical with the bucket test before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. We evaluated 20 patients. The estimated position where a fluorescent line within a bucket reached the vertical position was measured before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver. Data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Before repositioning maneuver, 9 patients (45.0%) had absolute values of the subjective visual vertical above the reference standard and 2 (10.0%) after the maneuver; the mean of the absolute values of the vertical deviation was significantly lower after the intervention (p<0.001). There is a reduction of the deviations of the subjective visual vertical, evaluated by the bucket test, immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Persistent Direction-Fixed Nystagmus Following Canalith Repositioning Maneuver for Horizontal Canal BPPV: A Case of Canalith Jam.

    PubMed

    Chang, Young-Soo; Choi, Jeesun; Chung, Won-Ho

    2014-06-01

    The authors report a 64-year-old man who developed persistent direction fixed nystagmus after a canalith repositioning maneuver for horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV). The patient was initially diagnosed with right HC-BPPV given that the Dix-Hallpike test showed geotropic horizontal nystagmus that was more pronounced on the right side, although the roll test did not show any positional nystagmus. The patient was treated with a canalith repositioning maneuver (Lempert maneuver). The next day, the patient experienced a different character of dizziness, and left-beating spontaneous nystagmus regardless of head position was observed. After a forced prolonged left decubitus and frequent head shaking, his symptoms and nystagmus resolved. This condition, referred to as canalith jam, can be a complication after the repositioning maneuver in patients with BPPV. Atypical positional tests suggest that abnormal canal anatomy could be the underlying cause of canalith jam.

  13. Surgical Treatment for Recurrent Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Corvera Behar, Gonzalo; García de la Cruz, Miguel Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a generally benign condition that responds to repositioning maneuvers and frequently resolves spontaneously. However, for some patients it can become a disabling condition in which surgery must be considered. Two different surgical techniques exist, singular neurectomy and posterior semicircular canal occlusion. Objective The objective of this study is to review the current status of singular nerve section and posterior semicircular canal occlusion as treatments for intractable benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and to determine if there are published data available that favors one over the other. Data Sources MEDLINE and OLDMEDLINE databases of the National Library of Medicine. Data Synthesis Four studies regarding singular neurectomy and 14 reports on semicircular canal occlusion were analyzed. Both techniques are reported to provide similar symptomatic benefit, with low risk of hearing loss and balance impairment. However, anatomical and clinical studies of singular neurectomy show it to be a more challenging technique, and considering that it is indicated in a very small number of cases, it may be difficult to master. Conclusions Both singular neurectomy and semicircular canal occlusion can be safe and effective in those few patients that require surgery for intractable positional vertigo. Although semicircular canal occlusion requires a postauricular transmastoid approach, it is ultimately easier to learn and perform adequately, and thus may be considered the best alternative. PMID:28382130

  14. Supine to prolonged lateral position: a novel therapeutic maneuver for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Ping; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2013-05-01

    The treatment of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo often involves repositioning maneuvers and exercises; however, these procedures may not be suitable for patients with limb disabilities or back disorders, or for elder patients. We sought to develop a simple therapeutic maneuver as an alternative procedure, suitable for patients with a wide range of physical ability. A simple therapeutic maneuver, supine to prolonged lateral position, was developed based on the mechanism of canalolithiasis. Its efficacy in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo was evaluated in a prospective study consisting of 81 objective and 13 subjective posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients. A successful outcome was defined as a negative Dix-Hallpike test within 2 weeks followed by the continued absence of symptoms of vertigo or dizziness for the next 4 weeks. Seventy-two patients with objective posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and all 13 patients with subjective posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were successfully treated: resolution rates were 88.9 and 100 %, respectively. In the objective group, negative Dix-Hallpike tests were obtained at 1 and 2 weeks in 66.7 and 88.9 % of patients, respectively. In the subjective group, the percentages of patients free of side-dependent vertigo illusions at 1 and 2 weeks were 84.6 and 100 %, respectively. These results suggest that the supine to prolonged lateral position maneuver, which is easy to perform and generally well tolerated, could be recommended as an alternative treatment modality for patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  15. Refractory Positional Vertigo With Apogeotropic Horizontal Nystagmus After Labyrinthitis: Surgical Treatment and Identification of Dysmorphic Ampullae.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sameer; Heidenreich, Katherine D; McHugh, Jonathan B; Altschuler, Richard A; Carender, Wendy J; Telian, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    To describe the rationale, intraoperative details, and histopathologic findings discovered when treating an unusual case of apogeotropic horizontal canal positional vertigo with a transmastoid labyrinthectomy. A single case report. Therapeutic. Resolution of apogeotropic nystagmus and improvement of positional vertigo. The apogeotropic variant of horizontal canal positional vertigo can be a difficult entity to treat. This report describes a patient who developed profound sensorineural hearing loss and vertigo after an acute left labyrinthitis. Ten months later, she developed vertigo with apogeotropic positional nystagmus involving the left horizontal semicircular canal. Particle repositioning maneuvers and vestibular physical therapy were unsuccessful. In addition, she developed intermittent positional vertigo affecting the ipsilateral vertical semicircular canals. Given the persistence of her vertigo, multiple canal involvement, and patient preference for definitive treatment, a transmastoid labyrinthectomy was performed. Intraoperatively, the ampulla of the horizontal canal as well as that of the other canals was grossly abnormal as later confirmed on histology. After surgery, her apogeotropic nystagmus and vertigo resolved, and her balance ability gradually improved to a highly functional level. This case illustrates a unique form of positional vertigo that developed and persisted after acute labyrinthitis. Conservative measures were unsuccessful and a transmastoid labyrinthectomy documented dense inflammatory tissue involving all three ampullae. We postulate that the post-labyrinthitic inflammatory changes resulted in mass loading of the membranous ampullae, causing abnormal nystagmus patterns and positional vertigo, which resolved after the labyrinthectomy.

  16. New analyses of the sensory organization test compared to the clinical test of sensory integration and balance in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Cohen, Helen S; Peters, Brian T; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2013-09-01

    To determine whether the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) of the computerized dynamic posturography battery or the Clinical Test of Sensory Integration and Balance (CTSIB) is more likely to indicate balance disorders in people with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Normal controls were compared to patients with unilateral BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal. Subjects performed tests with eyes open or closed on stable and unstable surfaces, with head still or with head moving at 0.33 Hz in pitch or yaw. Dependent variables were the percent time of the standard duration each subject could perform the task, the number of head motions made, and kinematic variables measured with head- and torso-mounted inertial motion units. Because equilibrium scores of control subjects improved significantly over repeated trials on SOT, patients were given only one trial per condition. For percent time between-group differences were found on CTSIB with eyes closed, on foam, head moving in yaw showing significantly reduced performance by BPPV subjects compared to controls. Compared to controls, patients made significantly fewer head movements on CTSIB, eyes closed, on foam, head still, in pitch and yaw. Kinematic data also differed between the groups on tests with eyes closed and unstable surfaces with different head movement combinations, indicating increased instability in BPPV patients. For screening, CTSIB with head movements is more likely than SOT to indicate balance deficits, especially when dependent measures include percent time as well as head movement counts and kinematic measures. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Vertiginous Symptoms and Objective Measures of Postural Balance in Elderly People with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Submitted to the Epley Maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Camila Nicácio da; Ribeiro, Karyna Myrelly O. B. de Figueiredo; Freitas, Raysa Vanessa de Medeiros; Ferreira, Lidiane Maria de Britho Macedo; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common and treatable causes of peripheral vestibular vertigo in adults. Its incidence increases with age, eventually leading to disability and a decreased quality of life. Objective The research aims to assess short-term effects of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver (ORM) on dizziness symptoms, quality of life, and postural balance in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Methods A quasi-experimental study, which evaluated 14 elderly people that underwent the Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and reevaluation after one week. The authors performed statistical analysis by descriptive analysis of central tendency and dispersion; for pre- and post-treatment conditions, the authors used the Wilcoxon test. Results All aspects of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (physical, functional, emotional, and total scores) as well as the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) decreased after therapy (p < 0.05 and p = 0.001, respectively). However, more than half of the elderly participants did not achieve negative Dix-Hallpike. Regarding static and dynamic balance, there were significant differences in some parameters of the modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance, Limits of Stability and gait assessment measured by the Dizziness Gait Index (p < 0.05). Conclusion Results reveal clinical and functional benefits in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo submitted to Otolith Repositioning Maneuver. However, most of the participants did not overcome Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and not all aspects of postural balance improved. Therefore, a longer follow-up period and a multidisciplinary team are required to establish comprehensive care for elderly patients with dizziness complaints. PMID:26722348

  18. Vertiginous Symptoms and Objective Measures of Postural Balance in Elderly People with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Submitted to the Epley Maneuver.

    PubMed

    Silva, Camila Nicácio da; Ribeiro, Karyna Myrelly O B de Figueiredo; Freitas, Raysa Vanessa de Medeiros; Ferreira, Lidiane Maria de Britho Macedo; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common and treatable causes of peripheral vestibular vertigo in adults. Its incidence increases with age, eventually leading to disability and a decreased quality of life. Objective The research aims to assess short-term effects of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver (ORM) on dizziness symptoms, quality of life, and postural balance in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Methods A quasi-experimental study, which evaluated 14 elderly people that underwent the Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and reevaluation after one week. The authors performed statistical analysis by descriptive analysis of central tendency and dispersion; for pre- and post-treatment conditions, the authors used the Wilcoxon test. Results All aspects of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (physical, functional, emotional, and total scores) as well as the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) decreased after therapy (p < 0.05 and p = 0.001, respectively). However, more than half of the elderly participants did not achieve negative Dix-Hallpike. Regarding static and dynamic balance, there were significant differences in some parameters of the modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance, Limits of Stability and gait assessment measured by the Dizziness Gait Index (p < 0.05). Conclusion Results reveal clinical and functional benefits in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo submitted to Otolith Repositioning Maneuver. However, most of the participants did not overcome Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and not all aspects of postural balance improved. Therefore, a longer follow-up period and a multidisciplinary team are required to establish comprehensive care for elderly patients with dizziness complaints.

  19. [Nystagmus the diagnosis of vertigo and dizziness].

    PubMed

    Johkura, Ken

    2013-09-01

    Vertigo or dizziness is primarily caused by peripheral vestibular disorders, such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and vestibular neuritis. BPPV can be diagnosed from associated positional torsional or direction-changing horizontal nystagmus and can be treated with canalith repositioning procedures. In contrast, vestibular neuritis and other acute peripheral vestibulopathies can be diagnosed from associated unidirectional horizontal nystagmus. Evaluation of nystagmus is essential for the diagnosis of peripheral vestibular disorders. Vertigo/dizziness caused by disorders in the brainstem or upper cerebellum is usually associated with other neurological signs or symptoms, such as motor palsy, sensory deficit, dysarthria, ocular motor palsy, and limb ataxia. In contrast, vertigo/dizziness caused by disorders in the lower cerebellum is not associated with these signs or symptoms; however, truncal ataxia becomes apparent in a standing position. Small lesions in the lower cerebellum can rarely cause unidirectional horizontal nystagmus directed toward the side of the lesions or direction-changing apogeotropic positional nystagmus; both types of nystagmus are enhanced when a patient lies on the non-affected side. This positional enhancement suggests that the same pathogenetic mechanism is involved in both types of nystagmus. The cerebellar lesions may disinhibit both semicircular-ocular and otolith-ocular reflexes. Semicircular-ocular reflex-dominant disinhibitions may result in the ipsilateral horizontal nystagmus, whereas otolith-ocular reflex-dominant disinhibitions may result in the direction-changing apogeotropic positional nystagmus.

  20. Migraine and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a single-institution review.

    PubMed

    Teixido, M; Baker, A; Isildak, H

    2017-06-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and migraine-associated dizziness are common. The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo seems to be higher in patients with migraine-associated dizziness than in those without migraine. A database of 508 patients seen at the primary author's balance clinic was analysed to determine the prevalence of migraine, as defined by International Headache Society criteria, in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The percentage of patients with dizziness or vertigo who met criteria for migraine was 33.7 per cent, with a prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of 42.3 per cent. When excluding patients with migrainous vertigo, patients with migraine frequently had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (66.7 per cent vs 55.8 per cent), although this finding was not statistically significant. The results for the entire sample suggest that, after excluding patients with migrainous vertigo, patients with migraine seem more likely to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; however, this association was not significant, probably because of the small sample size.

  1. Residual dizziness after the first BPPV episode: role of otolithic function and of a delayed diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Faralli, Mario; Lapenna, Ruggero; Giommetti, Giorgia; Pellegrino, Cristina; Ricci, Giampietro

    2016-10-01

    Residual dizziness (RD) following the resolution of a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BBPV) episode is frequently reported by patients. Possible causes are still under debate in the literature. This study discusses the possible role of otolithic function and of elapsed time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis in the genesis of RD. In total, 116 patients younger than 65 years with their first episode of BPPV and without any other comorbidities were enrolled in the study. Before a bedside examination, subjective visual vertical (SVV) was determined in the case of a history suggestive of BPPV. SVV was tested 1 week later in those patients with BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal, and in whom positioning maneuvers showed resolution of BPPV. At 1 week control, reported RD and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) were recorded. Diagnosis and treatment of BPPV occurred within 4 days in 43 patients (group A), between 5 and 8 days in 38 patients (group B) and in more than 9 days in 35 patients (group C). Higher values of reported RD and DHI were recorded in group C, while higher values of SVV deviation were recorded in group A with an inverse relationship between SVV and DHI. Initial peripheral vestibular function asymmetry due to BPPV can induce a new central adaptation. This adaptation becomes better established the longer otoconia remain floating in the endolymph. Because of these changes, the brain is unable to quickly readapt to the old pattern after resolution resulting in more persistent RD.

  2. THE USEFULNESS OF MONITORING THE NEUTROPHIL TO LYMPHOCYTE RATIO IN PATIENTS WITH PERIPHERAL VERTIGO.

    PubMed

    Sahin, C; Varim, C; Uyanik, M; Acar, B; Acar, T; Nalbant, A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in a differential diagnosis and follow-up of patients with peripheral vertigo. Twenty patients with benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV) and 20 patients diagnosed with vestibular neuritis (VN) were included in the study. Serum samples were analysed at the initial presentation and on the seventh day of admission retrospectively. The WBC (white blood cell) count was 10500±2100 /mm3, the neutrophil count was 4700±1100/mm3, the lymphocyte count was 5000±1200/mm3 and the NLR was 0.9±0.2 in the VN group. In patients with BPPV, the WBC count was 9200±1300/mm3, the neutrophil count was 5200±1200/mm3, the lymphocyte count was 3100±1200/mm3 and the NLR was 1.9±0.9. The NLR was lower in patients with VN than in patients diagnosed with BPPV. The WBC and lymphocyte count was significantly higher in the patients with VN than in the patients diagnosed with BPPV. Within the first week of admission, the WBC and lymphocyte counts in patients with VN decreased, and the NLR was more elevated than at the admission. It is highly recommended that NLR is used in the diagnosis and follow-up of the most commonly observed aetiological factors of peripheral vertigo, BPPV and VN.

  3. [The importance of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials for the assessment of the otolith function in the patients presenting with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    PubMed

    Kunel'skaya, N L; Baybakova, E V; Guseva, A L; Chugunova, M A; Manaenkova, E A

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the otolith function in the patients presenting with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (pBPPV) attributable to the occlusion of the posterior semicircular canal (PSCC) of the inner ear with the use of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP). Cervical (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) were measured in 34 patients with idiopathic pBPPV before and 7 days after the treatment by means of reposition maneuvers. The results of the repeated Dix-Hallpike test performed 7 days after the repositioning maneuver were negative in 27 patients and positive in 7 patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the amplitude of cervical VEMP between the healthy and affected ears either before or after the repositioning treatment. The measurement of oVEMP revealed a reduction of the response amplitude on the affected side. The average values of the plnl on the healthy side were 12.84±1.09 and those on the affected side 4.62±0.69 (p<0,05). The successful repositioning treatment resulted in a significant increase of the oVEMP amplitude on the affected side (p<0,05). In the patients presenting with the persistent symptoms of pBPPV, the repositioning maneuvers did not cause an appreciable increase in the amplitude of oVEMP on the affected side (p<0.05). The results of the present study give evidence that pBPPV of the posterior semicircular canal is associated with the impairment of the function of the receptor structures of the utriculus and the preserved function of the succulus as suggested by the reduction of the oVEMP amplitude and clinically significant asymmetry of ocular VEMP on the affected side with intact cervical VEMP on both sides. The successful treatment of pBPPV of PSCC with the use of the liberatory maneuver results in the increase of the oVEMP amplitude on the affected side increases while the response asymmetry between both sides significantly decreases which indicates the repair of the

  4. [Clinical evaluation of vertigo in menopausal women].

    PubMed

    Owada, Satoko; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Suzuki, Mitsuya; Yoshida, Tomoe; Nomura, Toshiyuki

    2012-05-01

    Vertigo is one of the usual menopausal symptoms. We have often examined some women under the complaint of vertigo related with the menopause. We diagnosed each disease based on neuro-otological examinations and investigated the characteristics of menopausal-associated vertigo. We studied 413 women aged 40-59 years old who complained of vertigo. There were 73 women with menopause symptoms (14 women introduced from the gynecologist in our medical center, 18 women had undergone treatment at another female clinic, and 41 women visited an otorhinolaryngologist first) compared with 340 women without menopause symptoms. In the menopause group, 41 (56.2%) cases were diagnosed as having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 13 (17.8%) cases had Meniere's disease, sudden deafness with vertigo accounted 2 cases, one was an acoustic tumor, and so on. The percentage of patients with BPPV was almost same ratio between the menopause group (56.2%) and the non-menopause group (52.9%). The percentage of patients with Meniere's disease was higher markedly in the menopausal group (17.8%). than the non-menopause group (9.7%). Menopausal symptoms are caused not only by hot flashes related to a lack of estrogen but also by psychological factors. The onset of Meniere's disease can also be influenced by psychological factors. As for the diagnosis of Meniere's disease, we supposed the reason for the higher percentage in the menopausal group was its relationship with psychological factors. We could diagnose and treat some menopausal women with vertigo. We believe that joint consultation with a gynecologist and otorhinolaryngologist would be necessary to ensure an optimum quality of life for such patients.

  5. A New Variant of Posterior Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Nonampullary or Common Crus Canalolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Yetiser, Sertac

    2015-01-01

    Clockwise or counterclockwise, rotational, upbeating nystagmus is seen in patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo during left or right head-hanging test, respectively. Rotating of nystagmus in opposite direction to the ear tested or even reversal of initial positioning rotational nystagmus is not usual and has never been reported before. We propose a new variant of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo due to unusual behavior and location of the otoliths inside the membranous labyrinth. Unexpected rotational direction may lead to confusion about the site. The examiner should be aware of this abnormal or atypical variant of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. PMID:26114003

  6. Causes and time-course of vertigo in an ear, nose, and throat clinic.

    PubMed

    Isaradisaikul, Suwicha; Navacharoen, Niramon; Hanprasertpong, Charuk; Kangsanarak, Jaran; Panyathong, Rapeepun

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to review etiologies and identify the time-course of vertigo presenting in an ear, nose, and throat clinic, and serve as a reference guide for other clinics. The study includes retrospective chart review in a tertiary care, university hospital. The patient data with reported ICD-10 codes as causes of vertigo between April 2005 and December 2007 were extracted from the database. At each visit, the main diagnosis as to etiology, characteristics of the vertigo, its time-course, and patient demographic data were recorded. Of 547 cases, 17 diagnoses were made in 73.9%. Diagnostic categories included peripheral vertigo 72.9%, central vertigo 0.8%, psychogenic cause 0.2%, and unknown 26.1%. Common causes of vertigo were benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) 52.5%, Meniere's disease 14.6%, and sudden idiopathic hearing loss 2.9%. Less common diagnoses were benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood 0.7%, labyrinthitis 0.7%, and vestibular schwannoma 0.3%. Rare conditions were delayed endolymphatic hydrops, Ramsey Hunt syndrome, otosyphilis, vestibular neuritis, temporal bone fracture, post-concussion syndrome, cerebellar infarction, epilepsy, cervical vertigo, Streptococcus suis meningitis, and psychogenic vertigo. Ninety-nine cases who reported remission of vertigo during the study period had median onset of the remission at 4 weeks. In the ear, nose, and throat clinic at Chiang Mai University, a tertiary university hospital, peripheral vestibular disorders were the main etiology of vertigo. The three most common causes were BPPV, Meniere's disease, and sudden idiopathic hearing loss. Half of the cases who returned for follow up had remitted symptoms within 4 weeks.

  7. Anxiety and depression among patients with different types of vestibular peripheral vertigo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Yu, Lisheng; Shi, Dongmei; Ke, Xingxing; Zhang, Hua

    2015-02-01

    Numerous studies have been published on comorbid anxiety and depression in patients with vertigo. However, very few studies have separately described and analyzed anxiety or depression in patients with different types of vestibular peripheral vertigo. The present study investigated anxiety and depression among patients with 4 different types of peripheral vertigo. A total of 129 patients with 4 types of peripheral vertigo, namely, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, n = 49), migrainous vertigo (MV, n = 37), Menière disease (MD, n = 28), and vestibular neuritis (VN, n = 15), were included in the present study. Otological and neurootological examinations were carefully performed, and self-rating anxiety scale and self-rating depression scale were used to evaluate anxiety and depression. Patients were divided into 2 groups, according to the vestibular function: normal and abnormal vestibular function. There was no significant difference in the risk of anxiety/depression between these 2 groups. However, for patients with the 4 different vertigo types, the prevalence of anxiety (MV = 45.9%, MD = 50%) and depression (MV = 27%, MD = 28.6%) was significantly higher in the patients with MV or MD than those with BPPV or VN (P < 0.05). Vestibular function is not significantly associated with the risk of anxiety/depression. Anxiety/depression is more common in patients with MV or MD than those with BPPV or VN. This may be due to the different mechanisms involved in these 4 types of vertigo, as well as differences in the prevention and self-control of the patients against the vertigo.

  8. Anxiety and Depression Among Patients With Different Types of Vestibular Peripheral Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing; Yu, Lisheng; Shi, Dongmei; Ke, Xingxing; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Numerous studies have been published on comorbid anxiety and depression in patients with vertigo. However, very few studies have separately described and analyzed anxiety or depression in patients with different types of vestibular peripheral vertigo. The present study investigated anxiety and depression among patients with 4 different types of peripheral vertigo. A total of 129 patients with 4 types of peripheral vertigo, namely, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, n = 49), migrainous vertigo (MV, n = 37), Menière disease (MD, n = 28), and vestibular neuritis (VN, n = 15), were included in the present study. Otological and neurootological examinations were carefully performed, and self-rating anxiety scale and self-rating depression scale were used to evaluate anxiety and depression. Patients were divided into 2 groups, according to the vestibular function: normal and abnormal vestibular function. There was no significant difference in the risk of anxiety/depression between these 2 groups. However, for patients with the 4 different vertigo types, the prevalence of anxiety (MV = 45.9%, MD = 50%) and depression (MV = 27%, MD = 28.6%) was significantly higher in the patients with MV or MD than those with BPPV or VN (P < 0.05). Vestibular function is not significantly associated with the risk of anxiety/depression. Anxiety/depression is more common in patients with MV or MD than those with BPPV or VN. This may be due to the different mechanisms involved in these 4 types of vertigo, as well as differences in the prevention and self-control of the patients against the vertigo. PMID:25654382

  9. Use of BPPV processes in Emergency Department Dizziness Presentations: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, Kevin A.; Burke, James F.; Skolarus, Lesli E.; Meurer, William J.; Callaghan, Brian C.; Brown, Devin L.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; McLaughlin, Thomas J.; Fendrick, A. Mark; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective A common cause of dizziness, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), is effectively diagnosed and cured with the Dix-Hallpike test (DHT) and the canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM). We aimed to describe the use of these processes in Emergency Departments (ED), to assess for trends in use over time, and to determine provider level variability in use. Design Prospective population-based surveillance study Setting EDs in Nueces County, Texas, January 15, 2008 to January 14, 2011 Subjects and Methods Adult patients discharged from EDs with dizziness, vertigo, or imbalance documented at triage. Clinical information was abstracted from source documents. A hierarchical logistic regression model adjusting for patient and provider characteristics was used to estimate trends in DHT use and provider level variability. Results 3,522 visits for dizziness were identified. A DHT was documented in 137 visits (3.9%). A CRM was documented in 8 visits (0.2%). Among patients diagnosed with BPPV, a DHT was documented in only 21.8% (34 of 156) and a CRM in 3.9% (6 of 156). In the hierarchical model (c statistic = 0.93), DHT was less likely to be used over time (odds ratio, 0.97, 95% CI [0.95, 0.99]) and the provider level explained 50% (ICC, 0.50) of the variance in the probability of DHT use. Conclusion BPPV is seldom examined for, and when diagnosed, infrequently treated in this ED population. DHT use is decreasing over time, and varies substantially by provider. Implementation research focused on BPPV care may be an opportunity to optimize management in ED dizziness presentations. PMID:23264119

  10. The fluid mechanics of the inner-ear disorder BPPV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Michael; Squires, Todd; Stone, Howard

    2001-11-01

    The inner ear of mammals contains fluid-filled semi-circular canals with a flexible sensory membrane (called a cupula) which detects rotational acceleration. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common disorders of this system diagnosed today, and is characterized by symptoms of dizziness and nausea brought on by sudden changes in head orientation. BPPV is believed to have a mechanical (rather than nervous) origin, in which dense particles called otoconia settle into the canals and trigger false sensations of rotational acceleration. Several qualitative mechanisms have been proposed by the medical community, which we examine from a fluid mechanical standpoint. Traditionally, the semicircular canal and the cupula are modeled as an over-damped torsional pendulum with a driving force provided by rotational acceleration. We extend this model to include the time-dependent mechanical response owing to sedimentation of the otoconia. We make qualitative and quantitative predictions associated with the proposed mechanisms, with an eye towards differentiating between them and perhaps towards more effective diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  11. Iatrogenic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: review and personal experience in dental and maxillo-facial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chiarella, G; Leopardi, G; De Fazio, L; Chiarella, R; Cassandro, C; Cassandro, E

    2007-01-01

    Summary The post-traumatic origin of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo remains the most likely, from a patho-physiologic point of view. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo due to surgical “traumas” has been described in the medical literature. According to personal experience, these iatrogenic cases represent a rare possibility and may be the consequence of surgical interventions differing according to the anatomical district involved and surgical technique performed. The temporal relationship with the surgical action and clinical features may be involved in some of these cases, even if it is not possible to define any real cause-effect link. Herewith some cases of paroxysmal positional vertigo are described, strongly held to be of iatrogenic origin, focusing on dental and maxillo-facial surgery as risk factors for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. PMID:17883189

  12. Persistent Positional Vertigo in a Patient with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Won; Shin, Jung Eun; Lee, Yong-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Because inner ear organs are interconnected through the endolymph and surrounding endolymphatic membrane, the patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) often complain of vertigo. In this study, we report a patient with SSNHL accompanied by persistent positional vertigo, and serial findings of head-roll tests are described. At acute stage, head-roll test showed persistent geotropic direction-changing positional nystagmus (DCPN), which led to a diagnosis of SSNHL and ipsilateral light cupula. Although vertigo symptom gradually improved, positional vertigo lasted for more than 3 weeks. At this chronic stage, persistent apogeotropic DCPN was observed in a head roll test, which led to a diagnosis of the heavy cupula. Although the mechanism for the conversion of nystagmus direction from geotropic to apogeotropic persistent DCPN is unclear, the change of specific gravity of the endolymph might be one of the plausible hypothetical explanations. PMID:26413578

  13. Dizziness and vertigo - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Meniere disease - aftercare; Benign positional vertigo - aftercare ... certain activities can be dangerous. Wait 1 week after a severe spell ... provider for advice. Chronic lightheadedness or vertigo can ...

  14. Vestibular suppressants after canalith repositioning in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Beom; Lee, Hyun S; Ban, Jae H

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the characteristics of residual symptoms and to evaluate the effects of adjuvant vestibular suppressants on residual symptoms after successful canalith repositioning procedures (CRPs). Individual randomized controlled trial. One hundred fifty patients with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who achieved successful CRPs on initial visit participated in this study. Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) questionnaires were completed before CRPs. All study populations were divided into three groups after successful CRPs on the initial visit day: the medication (V) group (treated with a vestibular suppressant [dimenhydrinate 50 mg per day]), the placebo (P) group, and the no medication (N) group. One week after successful CRPs, residual symptoms were checked and repeated DHI questionnaires were completed to compare residual symptoms. Among the 138 patients who did not show positional nystagmus at follow-up, 67 (48.5%) complained of residual symptoms. The presence of residual symptoms was more prevalent in the P and N group compared with the V group (P = .035, P = .017, respectively). The most frequent residual symptom was lightheadedness (n = 42). Moreover, in the V group, lightheadedness was significantly reduced compared with the P group (P = .029). However, in the analysis of DHI, total and subscale scores did not differ across the three groups before or after successful CRP. Vestibular suppressants significantly reduced residual symptoms compared to both placebo and no medication after CRP. However, there was no significant reduction in DHI score compared with the control group, suggesting that the residual symptoms could not be evaluated by DHI score alone. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Arnold-Chiari type I malformation presenting as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Unal, M; Bagdatoglu, C

    2007-03-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformations are a group of congenital hindbrain and spinal cord abnormalities characterized by herniation of the contents of the posterior cranial fossa caudally through the foramen magnum into the upper cervical spine. It is important to recognize Arnold-Chiari type I malformation in the differential diagnosis of adult vertigo cases. We present a 51-year-old patient with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation that was initially diagnosed as posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  16. Nystagmus intensity and direction in bow and lean test: an aid to diagnosis of lateral semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, V

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to evaluate nystagmus intensity and direction (NID) during bow and lean test (BLT) in subjects suffering from idiopathic lateral semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (LSC-BPPV), in order to differentiate between the geotropic and the apogeotropic form and to determine the affected ear before using classic diagnostic procedures. The BLT was performed in 32 subjects affected by LSC-BPPV. "Nystagmus intensity" evaluation allows distinguishing the geotropic variant from the apogeotropic one, while the "nystagmus direction" allows identification of the side. In particular, a more intense nystagmus in the bow position compared to the lean position indicates an ampullipetal flow caused by the presence of free-floating particles in the non-ampullary arm, and is suggestive of geotropic form. In this case, if the nystagmus in the bow position is left beating, the free-floating particles necessarily occupy the left LSC non-ampullary arm, while a right-beating nystagmus indicates the right LSC involvement. In contrast, a more intense nystagmus in the lean position compared to the bow position indicates an ampullifugal flow due to the presence of particles adherent to the cupula (cupulolithiasis) or free-floating in the ampullary arm (canalolithiasis), suggesting an apogeotropic form. In this situation, if the nystagmus in the lean position is left beating, the particles are in the left LSC ampullar arm or are coated on the left LSC cupula; vice versa, a right-beating nystagmus in the lean position is suggestive of the involvement of the right LSC. As a general rule, in both forms the direction of the more intense nystagmus points to the affected side. "NID-BLT" was effective in identifying the form and the side in 22/28 subjects (79% of the study population). The proper execution and interpretation of the "NID-BLT" helps to establish the form (geotropic versus apogeotropic) and side (right versus left) in most cases of LSC-BPPV. Unlike

  17. Health services utilization of patients with vertigo in primary care: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grill, Eva; Strupp, Michael; Müller, Martin; Jahn, Klaus

    2014-08-01

    Vertigo and dizziness count among the most frequent symptoms in outpatient practices. Although most vestibular disorders are manageable, they are often under- and misdiagnosed in primary care. This may result in prolonged absence from work, increased resource use and, potentially, in chronification. Reliable information on health services utilization of patients with vertigo in primary care is scarce. Retrospective cohort study in patients referred to a tertiary care balance clinic. Included patients had a confirmed diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Menière's disease (MD), vestibular paroxysmia (VP), bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP), vestibular migraine (VM), or psychogenic vertigo (PSY). All previous diagnostic and therapeutic measures prior to the first visit to the clinic were recorded. 2,374 patients were included (19.7 % BPPV, 12.7 % MD, 5.8 % VP, 7.2 % BVP, 14.1 % VM, 40.6 % PSY), 61.3 % with more than two consultations. Most frequent diagnostic measures were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 76.2 %, 71 % in BPPV) and electrocardiography (53.5 %). Most frequent therapies were medication (61.0 %) and physical therapy (41.3 %). 37.3 % had received homoeopathic medication (39 % in BPPV), and 25.9 % were treated with betahistine (20 % in BPPV). Patients had undergone on average 3.2 (median 3.0, maximum 6) diagnostic measures, had received 1.8 (median 2.0, maximum 8) therapies and 1.8 (median 1.0, maximum 17) different drugs. Diagnostic subgroups differed significantly regarding number of diagnostic measures, therapies and drugs. The results emphasize the need for establishing systematic training to improve oto-neurological skills in primary care services not specialized on the treatment of dizzy patients.

  18. Bilateral posterior semicircular canal aplasia and atypical paroxysmal positional vertigo: a case report.

    PubMed

    Walther, L E; Nath, V; Krombach, G A; Di Martino, E

    2008-04-01

    Isolated congenital malformations of semicircular canals are rare abnormalities. Most inner ear abnormalities occur in syndromes and are associated with hearing loss. Unilateral or bilateral single aplasia of one semicircular canal does not usually result in vertigo, but these become clinically important if there are clinical complaints of vertigo. Computed tomography imaging and high resolution magnetic resonance imaging may reveal inner ear abnormalities. The case is presented here of a 46-year-old male with a 10-year history of recurrent positional vertigo with strong onset when changing position to the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear showed a bilateral posterior semicircular canal aplasia as well as an enlarged vestibule on both sides. Dix-Hallpike positional manoeuvre revealed a positional nystagmus in the left head-hanging position of short duration and latency of a few seconds. When rising, vertigo occurred, but no nystagmus was visible. The fast phase of the nystagmus was mainly vertical down-beating with a slight torsional component to the uppermost ear. Although benign paroxysmal vertigo of the anterior canal was suspected, physical therapy was not effective using a modified liberatory manoeuvre. Brandt-Daroff therapy was effective permanently.

  19. Etiology of vertigo in Thai patients at Thammasat Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bunasuwan, Parichat; Bunbanjerdsuk, Sacarin; Nilsuwan, Amornwan

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the causes of vertigo in the patients at Otoneurology Clinic, Thammasat Hospital. The data of these patients, collected from the medical records between January 2010 and January 2011, were reviewed and analyzed. From one hundred and forty-nine cases, 49 cases (33%) were men and 100 cases (67%) were women, which yielded the male-to-female ratio of 1:2. The average age of patients was 55 year olds. The most common diagnostic category was peripheral vestibular disorders (80.5%). Other causes were central vestibular disorders (4.7%) and non-vestibular related (4%), whereas the remaining (10.1%) was undiagnosed. The causes of vertigo included benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: BPPV (53%), Meniere's disease (10.1%) and recurrent vestibulopathy (8.1%), while the underlying diseases found were diabetes mellitus (11.4%), hypertension (32.2%) and dyslipidemia (34.2%). In Otoneurology Clinic, Thammasat Hospital, the peripheral vestibular disorders was the main etiology of vertigo, while the three most common causes were BPPV Meniere's disease, and recurrent vestibulopathy respectively.

  20. Effect of treatment with betahistine dihydrochloride on the postural stability in patients with different duration of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Stambolieva, Katerina; Angov, Georgi

    2010-01-01

    The effect of betahistine dihydrochloride on the postural stability after repositioning Epley's maneuver (EM) in patients with BPPV was evaluated by static posturography in open and closed eyes conditions. Ninety patients were divided into four groups by duration (less and above 60 days of BPPV) and by treatment (with and without treatment with betahistine). The investigation was made one hour after the positive Dix-Hallpike test, 10 and 20 days after the treatment with EM. "Sway velocity" (SV) was calculated to evaluate postural stability. The results show dependence between efficacy of treatment with betahistine applied after EM and duration of BPPV. Betahistine normalized postural stability of patients with duration of BPPV less than 60 days after 10 days of treatment and had less effect on patients with duration of BPPV above 60 days. We assume that after removing the otoconia betahistine plays an important role for improving blood flow in the inner ear. The short presence of otoconia didn't damage sensory receptor, and restoring the normal function of motion-sensitive hairs cells and stabilizing the posture was observed.

  1. Insights into horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo from a human case report.

    PubMed

    Aron, Margaret; Bance, Manohar

    2013-12-01

    For horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, determination of the pathologic side is difficult and based on many physiological assumptions. This article reports findings on a patient who had one dysfunctional inner ear and who presented with horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, giving us a relatively pure model for observing nystagmus arising in a subject in whom the affected side is known a priori. It is an interesting human model corroborating theories of nystagmus generation in this pathology and also serves to validate Ewald's second law in a living human subject. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. The canalith repositioning procedure for the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Froehling, D A; Bowen, J M; Mohr, D N; Brey, R H; Beatty, C W; Wollan, P C; Silverstein, M D

    2000-07-01

    To compare the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) with a sham maneuver for the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. We recruited 50 patients with a history of positional vertigo and unilateral positional nystagmus on physical examination (Dix-Hallpike maneuver). Patients were randomized to either the CRP (n = 24) or a sham maneuver (n = 26). Measured outcomes included resolution of vertigo and positional nystagmus at follow-up examination. The mean duration of follow-up was 10 days for both groups. Resolution of symptoms was reported by 12 (50%) of the 24 patients in the CRP group and by 5 (19%) of the 26 patients in the sham group (P = .02). The results of the Dix-Hallpike maneuver were negative for positional nystagmus in 16 (67%) of 24 patients in the CRP group and in 10 (38%) of 26 patients in the sham group (P = .046). The CRP is effective treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and this procedure can be performed by general internists on outpatients with this disorder.

  3. Particle sedimentation in curved tubes: A 3D simulation and optimization for treatment of vestibular vertigo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Squires, Todd M.; Hain, Timothy C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2003-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a mechanical disorder of the vestibular system where micron-size crystals abnormally drift into the semicircular canals of the inner ear that sense angular motion of the head. Sedimentation of these crystals causes sensation of motion after true head motion has stopped: vertigo results. The usual clinical treatment is through a series of head maneuvers designed to move the particles into a less sensitive region of the canal system. We present a three-dimensional model to simulate treatment of BPPV by determining the complete hydrodynamic motion of the particles through the course of a therapeutic maneuver while using a realistic representation of the actual geometry. Analyses of clinical maneuvers show the parameter range for which they are effective, and indicate inefficiencies in current practice. In addition, an optimization process determines the most effective head maneuver, which significantly differs from those currently in practice.

  4. Use of betahistine in the treatment of peripheral vertigo.

    PubMed

    Ramos Alcocer, Rubén; Ledezma Rodríguez, José Gregorio; Navas Romero, Antonio; Cardenas Nuñez, José Luis; Rodríguez Montoya, Vicente; Deschamps, Jose Junior; Liviac Ticse, Jorge Anibal

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and meta-analyses demonstrated that betahistine is effective and safe in the treatment of Ménière's disease, BPPV (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo), vestibular neuronitis, and other types of peripheral vertigo. The goal of this paper is to review the pharmacological profile of betahistine and the evidence for its effectiveness and safety in the treatment of peripheral vertigo. Selection criteria for the publications on betahistine included randomized clinical trials that evaluated the effectiveness and safety of betahistine vs placebo or active control in the treatment of peripheral vertigo. Recent meta-analyses were also included. Databases searched included PubMed, the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register, and ICTRP. The review also presents an update on the mechanisms of action, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of betahistine. Efficacy and safety of betahistine has been demonstrated in numerous clinical trials. The precise mechanism of action of betahistine is still not completely understood, but the clinical experience demonstrated the benefit of betahistine in different types of peripheral vertigo. In more than 40 years of clinical use, betahistine has shown an excellent safety profile with the usual dose range from 8-48 mg daily. According to clinical studies, betahistine 48 mg daily during 3 months is an effective and safe option for the treatment of peripheral vertigo.

  5. Clinical and Demographic Features of Vertigo: Findings from the REVERT Registry

    PubMed Central

    Agus, Sam; Benecke, Heike; Thum, Cornelia; Strupp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Despite being a common disease, data on vertigo management in a real-world setting are scarce. Aims: To provide information on the vertigo and its management in a real-world setting. Methods: Data were collected from 4,294 patients with vertigo in 13 countries over 28 months via a multi-national, non-interventional observational study (the so-called REVERT registry). Data included medical history and details of anti-vertigo therapy. “Clinical global impression” (CGI) of severity (CGI-S) was assessed at baseline (V1) and then at 6 months follow-up (V2) along with CGI change (CGI-C). All variables were analyzed descriptively. Results: The majority of patients were female, >40 years of age, and almost half had co-morbid cardio-vascular disease. Diagnoses were split into four categories: 37.2% “other vertigo of peripheral vestibular origin,” 26.9% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 20.5% “peripheral vestibular vertigo of unknown origin,” and 15.4% Ménière’s disease (MD). Betahistine was the most commonly prescribed therapy prior to and after enrollment, and was followed by piracetam, ginkgo biloba, and diuretics. MD had the highest proportion of betahistine treated patients. Almost half of patients were “moderately ill” at V1 based on CGI-S. At V2, patient distribution moved toward “less severe illness” (91.0% improved). The greatest improvements were in the more severely ill, and those with BPPV or “other vertigo of peripheral origin.” Conclusion: There was a reduction in illness severity over the course of the study, some of which is likely to be due to pharmacological intervention. Further studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:23675366

  6. [Vertigo and dizziness: the neurologist's perspective].

    PubMed

    Strupp, M

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of diagnoses of patients with dizziness as the leading symptom who consult a neurologist does not differ greatly from the spectrum of those who consult ear nose and throat (ENT) specialists or general practitioners (GP). The most frequent forms are benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV), phobic postural vertigo, central vertigo disorders, Menière's disease, vestibular neuritis and bilateral vestibulopathy. However, the first and most important question that is posed to neurologists is whether it is a central or peripheral syndrome. In more than 90 % of cases this differentiation is possible by taking the patient history (asking about the type of vertigo, the duration, triggers and accompanying symptoms) and conducting a physical examination of the patient. In the case of acute vertigo disorders in particular, a five-step procedure has proved to be helpful: the cover test to look for skew deviation as the central sign and component of the ocular tilt reaction, an examination with and without Frenzel's goggles to differentiate between peripheral vestibular spontaneous nystagmus and central fixation nystagmus, an examination of smooth pursuit and gaze-holding function and finally the head-impulse test to look for a deficit in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Considerable advances have been made in the treatment of vertigo disorders in the last 10 years, e.g., cortisone for the treatment of acute vestibular neuritis, betahistine as a high-dosage, long-term treatment for Menière's disease, carbamazepine to treat vestibular paroxysmia and aminopyridine for downbeat nystagmus and episodic ataxia type 2.

  7. Betahistine for symptoms of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Murdin, Louisa; Hussain, Kiran; Schilder, Anne G M

    2016-06-21

    Vertigo is a symptom in which individuals experience a false sensation of movement. This type of dizziness is thought to originate in the inner ear labyrinth or its neural connections. It is a commonly experienced symptom and can cause significant problems with carrying out normal activities. Betahistine is a drug that may work by improving blood flow to the inner ear. This review examines whether betahistine is more effective than a placebo at treating symptoms of vertigo from different causes. To assess the effects of betahistine in patients with symptoms of vertigo from different causes. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane ENT Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 8); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. The date of the search was 21 September 2015. We included randomised controlled trials of betahistine versus placebo in patients of any age with vertigo from any neurotological diagnosis in any settings. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Our primary outcome was the proportion of patients with reduction in vertigo symptoms (considering together the intensity, frequency and duration those symptoms). We included 17 studies, with a total of 1025 participants; 12 studies were published (567 patients) and five were unpublished (458 patients). Sixteen studies including 953 people compared betahistine with placebo. All studies with analysable data lasted three months or less. The majority were at high risk of bias, but in some the risk of bias was unclear. One study, at high risk of bias, included 72 people with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and compared betahistine with placebo; all patients also had particle repositioning manoeuvres. The studies varied considerably in terms of types of participants, their

  8. 25 (OH) D3 levels, incidence and recurrence of different clinical forms of BPPV.

    PubMed

    Maslovara, Sinisa; Butkovic Soldo, Silva; Sestak, Anamarija; Milinkovic, Katarina; Rogic-Namacinski, Jasna; Soldo, Anamarija

    2017-06-11

    Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of dizziness in the general population. It is a condition with potential impact of reduced levels of vitamin D on its recurrent attacks. The aim of this study was to measure the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D3) in patients with BPPV and determine whether there is a difference in the serum levels of vitamin D3 between patients with and without recurrence, as well as between the different clinical forms of BPPV. The study included 40 patients who came to the regular medical examination, diagnosed with PC-BPPV based on the positive Dix-Hallpike's test. All patients underwent Epley manoeuvre after the diagnosis. Patients were classified according to current guidelines for levels of vitamin D3 in the serum in three groups: the deficiency, insufficiency and adequate level. The average serum level of 25-OH D3 among respondents was 20.78ng/mL, indicating a lack or insufficiency of the aforementioned 25-OH D3. According to the levels of 25-OH D3, most patients suffer from deficiency (47.5%). 7 (17.5%) respondents had adequate blood level of 25-OH D3, and 14 (35%) respondents suffer from insufficiency. A significant difference was not found in the serum level of 25-OH D3 between patients with and without BPPV recurrence. There was a significant difference in the serum levels of 25-OH D3 in comparison to the clinical form of the disease. Lower 25-OH D3 values were found in patients with canalithiasis compared to those with cupulolithiasis. There were no significant differences in the vitamin D3 serum level in patients with and without recurrence. The study showed a low level of serum vitamin D3 in most patients, indicating the need for supplemental therapy. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Conversion of canalolithiasis to cupulolithiasis in the course of a horizontal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo case.

    PubMed

    Psillas, George; Vital, Iosif; Rachovitsas, Dimitrios; Vital, Victor; Tsalighopoulos, Miltiadis

    2011-01-01

    The benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal semicircular canal is manifested with either geotropic or apogeotropic horizontal nystagmus. A 61-year-old male patient who experienced repeated episodes of positional vertigo is presented in this study. The vertigo was reported to be more severe while rotating his head to the left and then to the right. The initial examination revealed a geotropic purely horizontal nystagmus at the lateral positions of the head compatible with canalolithiasis of the left horizontal semicircular canal. In this case, the otoconia debris migrates from the vestibule into the horizontal semicircular canal through its nonampullary end, where they float freely (canalolithiasis). Five days later, the geotropic nystagmus transformed to apogeotropic. Thus, it may be assumed that the otoconia debris adhered to the cupula and converted the canalolithiasis to cupulolithiasis of the horizontal semicircular canal on the same side. With rotation of the head to the left while the patient was in the supine position, gravity causes the weighted cupula to deflect ampullofugally, resulting in apogeotropic nystagmus; the opposite was noticed when the head was rotated to the right. The so-called barbecue maneuver was initially effective curing the geotropic form of the condition and consequently the modified Semont maneuver for the apogeotropic form. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of Epley's Maneuver in Treating BPPV Patients: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Sushil; Awasthi, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadouriya, Sunil Kumar Singh; Saxena, Rohit; Pathak, Vivek Kumar; Bisht, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo and balance disorders are among the most common symptoms encountered in patients who visit ENT outpatient department. This is associated with risk of falling and is compounded in elderly persons with other neurologic deficits and chronic medical problems. BPPV is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. BPPV is a common vestibular disorder leading to significant morbidity, psychosocial impact, and medical costs. The objective of Epley's maneuver, which is noninvasive, inexpensive, and easily administered, is to move the canaliths out of the canal to the utricle where they no longer affect the canal dynamics. Our study aims to analyze the response to Epley's maneuver in a series of patients with posterior canal BPPV and compares the results with those treated exclusively by medical management alone. Even though many studies have been conducted to prove the efficacy of this maneuver, this study reinforces the validity of Epley's maneuver by comparison with the medical management. PMID:26495002

  11. Treatment of apogeotropic benign positional vertigo: comparison of therapeutic head-shaking and modified Semont maneuver.

    PubMed

    Oh, S-Y; Kim, Ji-Soo; Jeong, S-H; Oh, Y-M; Choi, K-D; Kim, B-K; Lee, S-H; Lee, H-S; Moon, I-S; Lee, J-J

    2009-08-01

    Several methods of physiotherapy have been advanced for apogeotropic type benign positional vertigo involving the horizontal semicircular canal (HC-BPV). The aim of this study was to determine the therapeutic efficacies of the proposed maneuvers in apogeotropic HC-BPV. Using a prospective randomized trial involving seven nationwide dizziness clinics in Korea, we compared the immediate efficacies of head-shaking and modified Semont maneuvers in 103 consecutive patients with apogeotropic HC-BPV. We also determined an additional therapeutic benefit of mastoid oscillation while the patients without response to both maneuvers were performing the Brandt-Daroff exercise. Successful treatment was defined as resolution of positional vertigo and nystagmus, or as transition into geotropic HC-BPV. Results showed that head shaking was more effective than the modified Semont maneuver (37.3 vs. 17.3%, P = 0.02). However, therapeutic efficacy did not differ between the maneuvers after the initial non-responders switched over to the other maneuver (23.3 vs. 25.0%, P = 0.861). Mastoid oscillation provided no additional benefit while the patients without response to both maneuvers were performing the Brandt-Daroff exercise. Most positional vertigos resolved within a week (89.4%) irrespective of the treatment modalities applied and all showed resolution within 28 days. The head-shaking maneuver described here proved more effective than the modified Semont maneuver in treating apogeotropic HC-BPV. Mastoid vibration conferred no additional benefit during the Brandt-Daroff exercise.

  12. Benign paroxysmal vertigo secondary to placement of maxillary implants using the alveolar expansion technique with osteotomes: a study of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Rambla-Ferrer, Javier; Perez, Vanesa; Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio

    2008-01-01

    The osteotome method is an often-used technique of great utility in certain patients with maxillary bone atrophy. However, it has been associated with the provocation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which has been described as a consequence of working the implant bed with osteotomes. During the placement of maxillary dental implants using the osteotome technique, the trauma induced by percussion with the surgical hammer, along with hyperextension of the neck during the operation, can displace otoliths and induce BPPV. Four cases of BPPV occurring after the preparation of maxillary implant beds are presented. Treatment consists fundamentally of maneuvers to move the calcium carbonate crystals from their anomalous location in the semicircular canal to their correct place in the utricle.

  13. Persistent otolith dysfunction even after successful repositioning in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Joong; Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Yang, Tae-Ho; Yang, Si-Young

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate utricular and saccular function during the acute and resolved phases of BPPV, ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were studied in 112 patients with BPPV and 50 normal controls in a referral-based University Hospital. Ocular (oVEMPs) and cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs) were induced using air-conducted sound (1000Hz tone burst, 100dB normal hearing level) at the time of initial diagnosis and 2 months after successful repositioning in patients with BPPV, and the results were compared with those of the controls. Abnormalities of cVEMPs and oVEMPs in patients with BPPV were prevalent and significantly higher compare to the healthy control group (p<0.01 in each VEMP by chi-square test). In the patient group, difference between the proportions of abnormal responses of cVEMP and oVEMP was not significant in both affected (p=0.37, chi-squared test) and non-affected (p=1.00) ears. The abnormalities were more likely reduced or absent responses rather than delayed ones; reduced or absent responses are 17.6% in cVEMPs (p=0.04, chi-square) and 21.6% in oVEMPs (p<0.01). The non-affected ear in the BPPV group also showed significantly higher abnormalities of cVEMP and oVEMP when compared to the control group. The follow-up VEMPs after repositioning maneuvers were not significantly different compared to the initial values from both stimulated affected and non-affected ears. Although most patients had unilateral BPPV, bilateral otolithic dysfunction was often shown by persistently reduced or absent cervical and ocular VEMPs, suggesting that BPPV may be caused by significant bilateral damage to the otolith organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Significance of ENG and DPG in the vestibular function examination in patients suffering BPPV].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Guo, Suying; Wang, Kun; Li, Zhen; Du, Zhaowen; Xie, Wen; Liu, Yuehui

    2012-04-01

    To detect the significance of the electronystagmography (ENG) and the dynamic posturography (DPG) in the vestibular function examination in patients suffering BPPV. Forty, 34 to 79 old vertigo patients were examined with DPG and ENG. DPG evaluation parameters includes sense organization test from vestibular sensory score, proprioception score, visual score, Romber's score and composite score. ENG examination include caloric test. Twenty-six out of 40 BPPV patients got abnormal caloric test results; 33 patients got DPG abnormality which led to a low vestibular perception scores. Twenty-four out of these patients got abnormal results in both caloric test and DPG, while in 9 patients that got normal caloric results came up with low vestibular perception scores, except for which there was no significant abnormality in SOT. Besides, the BPPV patients, compared with normal, got abnormal scores in caloric test of ENG and vestibular perception test of DPG (P < 0.05), if course of BPPV was over 12 months, higher abnormal degrees appeared (P < 0.05). ENG and DPG are important methods in vestibular function tests, a comprehensive analysis of both is applied to value the severity of vestibular function in patients with BPPV and the duration of BPPV directly affects the vestibular function.

  15. Effectiveness of Otolith Repositioning Maneuvers and Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Karyna Figueiredo; Oliveira, Bruna Steffeni; Freitas, Raysa V; Ferreira, Lidiane M; Deshpande, Nandini; Guerra, Ricardo O

    2017-06-29

    Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is highly prevalent in elderly people. This condition is related to vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus, poor balance, gait disturbance, and an increase in risk of falls, leading to postural changes and quality of life decreasing. To evaluate the outcomes obtained by clinical trials on the effectiveness of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises in the treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in elderly. The literature research was performed using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and PEDro databases, and included randomized controlled clinical trials in English, Spanish and Portuguese, published during January 2000 to August 2016. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed by PEDro score and the outcomes analysis was done by critical revision of content. Six studies were fully reviewed. The average age of participants ranged between 67.2 and 74.5 years. The articles were classified from 2 to 7/10 through the PEDro score. The main outcome measures analyzed were vertigo, positional nystagmus and postural balance. Additionally, the number of maneuvers necessary for remission of the symptoms, the quality of life, and the functionality were also assessed. The majority of the clinical trials used Otolith Repositioning Maneuver (n=5) and 3 articles performed Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises in addition to Otolith Repositioning Maneuver or pharmacotherapy. One study showed that the addition of movement restrictions after maneuver did not influence the outcomes. There was a trend of improvement in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo symptomatology in elderly patients who underwent Otolith Repositioning Maneuver. There is sparse evidence from methodologically robust clinical trials that examined the effects of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises for treating Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the elderly. Randomized controlled clinical trials with

  16. [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal canal: A multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Amor Dorado, J C; Martín, E; Arán, I; Barreira, P; Barona, R

    2006-05-01

    BPPV localized in the horizontal semicircular canal is an infrequent entity. Nowadays there are controversies about the different treatments available. The objective of this study is to present our results. A multicenter and retrospective study was performed in 31 patients diagnosed of BPPV-HSC between January 1996 and May 2004. cupulolithiasis was diagnosed in 48% on the patients. Symptoms disappeared before signs (p<0.05). Global cure rate was 85%, while relapses were 16% at one year. No relations were found between cure rate and relapses and age, gender, duration of symptoms, canalithiasis and cupulolithiasis. Our results support that there are not differences between the treatments performed in the BPPV-HSC. Symptoms disappeared before signs when canalith repositioning particles (CRP) maneuver was performed.

  17. [Vertigo in children].

    PubMed

    Toupet, M; Toupet, F

    1994-02-01

    Oto-neurologic investigation in the child with vertigo is fundamentally important. In 3% of cases, it reveals the presence of a cerebral tumour. Technical difficulties in examining a child under 5 years of age stem from their fear of the dark, insecurity in a medical setting and a labile attention span. Major causes are migraine (in 28% of cases) and childhood idiopathic paroxysmal vertigo, and recurring vestibular disorders (13% of cases). Classic disorders such as Ménière's disease are rare in the child (3% of cases), as are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and cupulolithiasis (only 5% of children with vertigo).

  18. [Psychosomatic vertigo disorders].

    PubMed

    Eckhardt-Henn, A

    2013-09-01

    Somatoform vertigo is one of the most frequent forms of vertigo, alongside neuropathia vestibularis and benign peripheral positional vertigo. False diagnoses often lead to patients suffering from symptoms for periods of months or even years, which imposes significant limitations on their working and private lives. An early interdisciplinary diagnosis and the consequent timely commencement of a specific psychosomatic therapy is thus essential. Somatoform vertigo can be caused by many different psychological disorders. The clinical symptomatology, diagnosis and differential diagnosis are described and illustrated by case vignettes. Risk factors and preventive measures are briefly summarized.

  19. Pseudo-spontaneous nystagmus: a new sign to diagnose the affected side in lateral semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Asprella-Libonati, G

    2008-04-01

    Early diagnosis of the affected side in Lateral Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is important in effectively applying treatment manoeuvres. This study was performed to examine the frequency of a new clinical sign, pseudo-spontaneous nystagmus, in a large cohort of patients with Lateral Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo, comparing its efficacy in the identification of the involved side with that of other diagnostic signs, seated supine positioning nystagmus, and the intensity of the nystagmus evoked by the head yaw test in the supine position. Overall, 293 patients affected by Lateral Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (197 geotropic and 96 apogeotropic forms) were examined. Pseudo-spontaneous nystagmus was observed in 222 patients (76%). After a very slow, repeated horizontal rotation of the head, in the seated position, this percentage increased to 96% (281 patients). The pseudo-spontaneous nystagmus and the seated supine positioning nystagmus always beat in the same direction and both were in accordance in identifying the affected side with the nystagmus evoked by the head yaw test. The differential diagnosis between spontaneous nystagmus and pseudo-spontaneous nystagmus is easily achieved with the head pitch test in the sitting position: the pseudo-spontaneous nystagmus disappears with the head bent forward 30 degrees (neutral position), it reverses its direction with the head bent 60 degrees forward, it returns visible bringing the head in axis with the body and increases its intensity extending the head about 30 degrees backwards. Pseudo-spontaneous nystagmus is an important sign for determining the affected ear in Lateral Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Early identification of the affected side improves efficacy of treatment and compliance of patients.

  20. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a study of two manoeuvres with and without betahistine.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, M; Mottola, G; Iemma, M

    2005-04-01

    Efficacy of the liberatory manoeuvre and of gradual otolitis dispersion technique, with or without associated drug therapy, have been compared. Included in this prospective study were 103 patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo seen in the Outpatient Department. Patients were classified into 4 groups according to treatment: Liberatory Manoeuvre according to methods described by Semont et al., with and without betahistine, Gradual Otolitis Dispersion Technique according to Brandt and Daroff, with and without betahistine. Evaluation was performed at baseline and at 3, 7, 14, 30, 60 and 90 days after start of treatment. Response to treatment was evaluated using criteria of Epley. At day 14, liberatory manoeuvre-betahistine and Brandt and Daroff-betahistine groups did significantly better than liberatory manoeuvre and Brandt and Daroff groups (p < 0.05). Improvement reached at day 30 was: 100% in liberatory manoeuvre-betahistine group; 96.30% (p > 0.05) in Brandt and Daroff-betahistine group; these results were significantly better (p < 0.05) than those of liberatory manoeuvre (54.17%) and Brandt and Daroff (25%) groups. As far as concerns differences between disease onset and start of therapy (less and more than 2 weeks), and age (< or =60 years and > or =60 years), response to treatment was similar. In conclusion, both liberatory manoeuvre and Brandt and Daroff, when associated with betahistine, were significantly more effective than manoeuvres alone (p < 0.05). Improvement in liberatory manoeuvre-betahistine group, in the initial phase, was greater that in Brandt and Daroff-betahistine group, albeit, differences were not significant (p > 0.05). Age-related effects of manoeuvres were compared in 71 patients < 60 years and 32 patients > or =60 years, showing a similar improvement rate at the end of the investigation in both groups. In our opinion, liberatory manoeuvre and Brandt and Daroff associated with betahistamine produces faster recovery compared to

  1. Using the Physical Examination to Diagnose Patients with Acute Dizziness and Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Jonathan A; Newman-Toker, David

    2016-04-01

    Emergency department (ED) patients who present with acute dizziness or vertigo can be challenging to diagnose. Roughly half have general medical disorders that are usually apparent from the context, associated symptoms, or initial laboratory tests. The rest include a mix of common inner ear disorders and uncommon neurologic ones, particularly vertebrobasilar strokes or posterior fossa mass lesions. In these latter cases, misdiagnosis can lead to serious adverse consequences for patients. Our aim was to assist emergency physicians to use the physical examination effectively to make a specific diagnosis in patients with acute dizziness or vertigo. Recent evidence indicates that the physical examination can help physicians accurately discriminate between benign inner ear conditions and dangerous central ones, enabling correct management of peripheral vestibular disease and avoiding dangerous misdiagnoses of central ones. Patients with the acute vestibular syndrome mostly have vestibular neuritis, but some have stroke. Data suggest that focused eye movement examinations, at least when performed by specialists, are more sensitive for detecting early stroke than brain imaging, including diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with the triggered episodic vestibular syndrome mostly have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), but some have posterior fossa mass lesions. Specific positional tests to provoke nystagmus can confirm a BPPV diagnosis at the bedside, enabling immediate curative therapy, or indicate the need for imaging. Emergency physicians can effectively use the physical examination to make a specific diagnosis in patients with acute dizziness or vertigo. They must understand the limitations of brain imaging. This may reduce misdiagnosis of serious central causes of dizziness, including posterior circulation stroke and posterior fossa mass lesions, and improve resource utilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079355 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (foreground), Expedition 40 commander; and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, flight engineer, conduct a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  3. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079332 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (foreground), Expedition 40 commander; and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, flight engineer, conduct a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  4. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079129 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (left), Expedition 40 commander; and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, flight engineer, conduct a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  5. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079083 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, enters data in a computer in preparation for a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  6. SPHERES Vertigo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-079910 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson (left), Expedition 40 commander; and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, flight engineer, conduct a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  7. Positive to Negative” Dix-Hallpike test and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo recurrence in elderly undergoing Canalith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Karyna M. O. B. de Figueiredo; Ferreira, Lidiane Maria de Brito Macedo; Freitas, Raysa Vanessa de Medeiros; Silva, Camila Nicácio da; Deshpande, Nandini; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is the most common cause of dizziness in elderly people. Recent studies have shown that the elderly present higher Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo recurrence and that vertiginous symptomatology remission varies according to comorbidities and the therapeutic techniques applied. Objective To assess the short-term effectiveness of Vestibular Rehabilitation in addition to Canalith Repositioning Maneuver on positive to negative Dix-Hallpike test, on recurrence and number of maneuvers to achieve a negative test in elderly patients with chronic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, 7 older adults (median age: 69 years, range 65–78) underwent Canalith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation for thirteen weeks. Seven older adults (median age: 73 years, range 65–76) in the control group received only Canalith Repositioning Maneuver. The participants were assessed at baseline (T0), one (T1), five (T5), nine (T9), and thirteen weeks (T13). We assessed the differences between the groups by Mann-Whitney and Fisher exact tests, and used the Friedman and Wilcoxon tests to determine the intragroup differences. Results No significant differences were found between groups for the positive to negative Dix-Hallpike test, recurrence, and number of maneuvers to achieve a negative test. The number of maneuvers to achieve negative Dix-Hallpike test was lower in intragroup comparisons in the experimental group. Conclusion The findings suggest that additional Vestibular Rehabilitation did not influence the positive to negative Dix-Hallpike test, recurrence, or number of maneuvers to achieve a negative test in elderly patients with chronic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. PMID:27746838

  8. "Positive to Negative" Dix-Hallpike test and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo recurrence in elderly undergoing Canalith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Karyna M O B de Figueiredo; Ferreira, Lidiane Maria de Brito Macedo; Freitas, Raysa Vanessa de Medeiros; Silva, Camila Nicácio da; Deshpande, Nandini; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is the most common cause of dizziness in elderly people. Recent studies have shown that the elderly present higher Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo recurrence and that vertiginous symptomatology remission varies according to comorbidities and the therapeutic techniques applied. Objective To assess the short-term effectiveness of Vestibular Rehabilitation in addition to Canalith Repositioning Maneuver on positive to negative Dix-Hallpike test, on recurrence and number of maneuvers to achieve a negative test in elderly patients with chronic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, 7 older adults (median age: 69 years, range 65-78) underwent Canalith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation for thirteen weeks. Seven older adults (median age: 73 years, range 65-76) in the control group received only Canalith Repositioning Maneuver. The participants were assessed at baseline (T0), one (T1), five (T5), nine (T9), and thirteen weeks (T13). We assessed the differences between the groups by Mann-Whitney and Fisher exact tests, and used the Friedman and Wilcoxon tests to determine the intragroup differences. Results No significant differences were found between groups for the positive to negative Dix-Hallpike test, recurrence, and number of maneuvers to achieve a negative test. The number of maneuvers to achieve negative Dix-Hallpike test was lower in intragroup comparisons in the experimental group. Conclusion The findings suggest that additional Vestibular Rehabilitation did not influence the positive to negative Dix-Hallpike test, recurrence, or number of maneuvers to achieve a negative test in elderly patients with chronic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

  9. Efficacy of particle repositioning manoeuvres in benign positional paroxysmal vertigo: A revision of 176 cases treated in a tertiary care centre.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Claudio; Arancibia-Tagle, Diego J; Rizzo-Riera, Elena; Til-Perez, Guillermo; Sarría-Echegaray, Pedro L; Rama-Lopez, Julio J; Quer-Canut, Santiago; Fermin-Gamero, German; Tomas-Barberan, Manuel D

    2017-09-28

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most common peripheral vertigo disease. The aim of this paper is to review the results obtained with the different specific particle repositioning manoeuvres, evaluating the possible risk factors linked to a poorer prognosis. One hundred and seventy-six patients with a diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were reviewed retrospectively, of whom 150 had vertigo of the posterior canal, 20 had vertigo of the horizontal canal, 3 had vertigo of the superior canal, and 3 had a double vertigo. The Epley manoeuvre was used to treat the posterior and superior canals, and Lempert manoeuvre was used to treat the horizontal canal. An imaging study by nuclear magnetic resonance with gadolin was always used in refractory cases. The Epley manoeuvre showed an efficacy of 74.6 and 100% at first attempt for posterior and superior canals respectively. The efficacy of the Lempert manoeuvre for the horizontal canal was 72.72% in the patients with canalolithiasis, and 58.33% in the patients with cupulolithiasis. The treatment of patients with more than one affected canal and a history of surgery in the previous month was more difficult. Particle repositioning manoeuvres show a very high success rate, allowing better results in the treatment of the posterior canal. We need more studies to confirm the suspicion that surgery may be a factor of poorer prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  10. [Surgery for vertigo].

    PubMed

    Lacombe, H

    2009-04-01

    Spontaneous recovery or central compensation makes surgical procedures rare in patients with vertigo. Surgery for vertigo proposed after pharmacological or physical therapy fails to eliminate Ménière's disease and some very rare cases of paroxystic positional vertigo. The main target in treating Ménière's disease is to promote vestibular compensation, which is possible only with a nonprogressive and stable deficit leading to readjustment of vestibular reflexes. Surgical procedures can be classified as nondestructive (endolymphatic sac decompression, vestibular nerve decompression, patching of perilymphatic fistulas), selectively destructive (middle fossa or retrosigmoid vestibular neurotomy, lateral semi-circular plugging) and destructive (labyrinthectomy). Surgical indications essentially concern incapacitating vertigo and depend mainly on hearing status. In Ménière's disease, vestibular neurotomy can be regarded as the gold standard considering its good results on vertiginous episodes; however, scoring with functional and quality-of-life scales bring out residual deficiency in some cases.

  11. [Peripheral vertigo classification. Consensus document. Otoneurology committee of the Spanish otorhinolaryngology society (2003-2006)].

    PubMed

    Morera, Constantino; Pérez, Herminio; Pérez, Nicolás; Soto, Andrés

    2008-02-01

    There are many different vertigo classifications and different denominations are frequently used for the same clinical processes. The Otoneurology Committee of the Spanish Society for Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Pathology proposes an eminently practical classification of peripheral vertigo to facilitate a common terminology that can be easily used by the general ENT practitioners. The methodology used has been by consensus within our Society and especially among the most outstanding work groups in the area of otoneurology in Spain. Initially vertigo is divided into single-episode vertigo and recurring attacks of vertigo, and these are then sub-divided into 2 groups, depending on whether or not hearing loss is present. Acute vertigo without hearing loss corresponds to vestibular neuritis and if it is associated with hearing loss, it is due to labyrinthitis of different aetiologies and cochleo-vestibular neuritis. Recurrent vertigos without hearing loss are classified as induced, either by posture (BPPV) or pressure (perilymphatic fistula), or as spontaneous, including migraine-associated vertigo, metabolic vertigo, childhood paroxysmal vertigo and vertigo of vascular causes (AITs, vertebral-basilar failure). Finally, recurrent vertigo with hearing loss includes Ménière's disease and others such as vertigo-migraine (with hearing loss), autoimmune pathology of the inner ear, syphilitic infection, and perilymphatic fistula (with hearing loss).

  12. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Cervical Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongchao; Peng, Baogan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical vertigo is characterized by vertigo from the cervical spine. However, whether cervical vertigo is an independent entity still remains controversial. In this narrative review, we outline the basic science and clinical evidence for cervical vertigo according to the current literature. So far, there are 4 different hypotheses explaining the vertigo of a cervical origin, including proprioceptive cervical vertigo, Barré-Lieou syndrome, rotational vertebral artery vertigo, and migraine-associated cervicogenic vertigo. Proprioceptive cervical vertigo and rotational vertebral artery vertigo have survived with time. Barré-Lieou syndrome once was discredited, but it has been resurrected recently by increased scientific evidence. Diagnosis depends mostly on patients' subjective feelings, lacking positive signs, specific laboratory examinations and clinical trials, and often relies on limited clinical experiences of clinicians. Neurological, vestibular, and psychosomatic disorders must first be excluded before the dizziness and unsteadiness in cervical pain syndromes can be attributed to a cervical origin. Treatment for cervical vertigo is challenging. Manual therapy is recommended for treatment of proprioceptive cervical vertigo. Anterior cervical surgery and percutaneous laser disc decompression are effective for the cervical spondylosis patients accompanied with Barré-Liéou syndrome. As to rotational vertebral artery vertigo, a rare entity, when the exact area of the arterial compression is identified through appropriate tests such as magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), computed tomography angiography (CTA) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) decompressive surgery should be the chosen treatment.

  13. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 with positional vertigo and acetazolamide responsive episodic ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Jen, J.; Yue, Q.; Karrim, J.; Nelson, S.; Baloh, R.

    1998-01-01

    The SCA6 mutation, a small expansion of a CAG repeat in a calcium channel gene CACNA1A, was identified in three pedigrees. Point mutations in other parts of the gene CACNA1A were excluded and new clinical features of SCA6 reported—namely, central positional nystagmus and episodic ataxia responsive to acetazolamide. The three allelic disorders, episodic ataxia type 2, familial hemiplegic migraine, and SCA6, have overlapping clinical features.

 PMID:9771787

  14. Posttraumatic vertigo and dizziness.

    PubMed

    Fife, Terry D; Giza, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Dizziness and vertigo are common symptoms following minor head trauma. Although these symptoms resolve within a few weeks in many patients, in some the symptoms may last much longer and impede ability to return to work and full functioning. Causes of persisting or recurrent dizziness may include benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, so-called labyrinthine concussion, unilateral vestibular nerve injury or damage to the utricle or saccule, perilymphatic fistula, or less commonly traumatic endolymphatic hydrops. Some dizziness after head trauma is due to nonlabyrinthine causes that may be related to structural or microstructural central nervous system injury or to more complicated interactions between migraine, generalized anxiety, and issues related to patients self-perception, predisposing psychological states, and environmental and stress-related factors. In this article, the authors review both the inner ear causes of dizziness after concussion and also the current understanding of chronic postconcussive dizziness when no peripheral vestibular cause can be identified.

  15. Clinical use of Malay Version of Vertigo Symptom Scale (MWSS) in patients with peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD).

    PubMed

    Zainun, Zuraida; Zakaria, Mohd Normani; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi; Ismail, Zalina

    2012-08-01

    The Vertigo symptom scale (VSS) is a well established tool for the evaluation of vestibular disorders and the associated symptoms of autonomic arousal and somatosensation. By using a validated Malay version of vertigo symptom scale (MVVSS) questionnaire, the severity of the vertigo from patients' perspective can be determined and rated. Before MVVSS can be applied clinically among Malaysians, it was of interest to determine its clinical value in identifying vestibular disorders. Forty normal and 65 PVD subjects participated in this cross-sectional study. Normal subjects were recruited amongst Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) staff and students who had no history of ear and vestibular disorders. Mean total score of MVVSS in normal and PVD subjects were 13.9 +/- 11.1 and 30.1 +/- 20.9, respectively. When the total scores of normal and PVD group were compared, the Mann-Whitney U test showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups (p < 0.05). This is consistent with previous studies. It was also of interest to see if subtypes of PVD [benign paroxymal positional vertigo (BPPV), Meniere's disease, labyrinthitis and unknown] have different MVVSS results. However, analysis of variance (ANOVA) found no significant difference in term of outcomes of MVVSS among the different PVD pathologies. Using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) method, the sensitivity and specificity of MVVSS were 71% and 60%, respectively. MVVSS is able to discriminate clinically among the normal and PVD subjects. However, it is not a good indicator for differential diagnosis of PVD subtypes, at least in this study. Its sensitivity and specificity in clinical diagnosis are reasonably high. Perhaps a bigger sample size would be useful to further study the clinical usefulness of MVVSS.

  16. Drug treatment of vertigo in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Berisavac, Ivana I; Pavlović, Aleksandra M; Trajković, Jasna J Zidverc; Šternić, Nadežda M Čovičković; Bumbaširević, Ljiljana G Beslać

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo is a common symptom in everyday clinical practice. The treatment depends on the specific etiology. Vertigo may be secondary to inner ear pathology, or any existing brainstem or cerebellar lesion but may also be psychogenic. Central vertigo is a consequence of a central nervous system lesion. It is often associated with a focal neurological deficit. Peripheral vertigo is secondary to dysfunction of the peripheral vestibular system and is usually characterized by an acute vertigo with loss of balance, sensation of spinning in the space or around self, and is exaggerated with changes of the head and body position; no other neurological deficit is present. Some medications may also cause vertigo. Depending on the cause of the vertigo, drugs with different mechanisms of action, physical therapy, psychotherapy, as well as surgery may be used to combat this disabling malady. Symptomatic treatment has a particularly important role, regardless of the etiology of vertigo. We reviewed the current medications recommended for patients with vertigo, their mechanisms of action and their most frequent side effects.

  17. The treatment of acute vertigo.

    PubMed

    Cesarani, A; Alpini, D; Monti, B; Raponi, G

    2004-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are very common symptoms in the general population. The aim of this paper is to describe the physical and pharmacological treatment of symptoms characterized by sudden onset of rotatory vertigo. Acute vertigo can be subdivided into two main groups: (1) spontaneous vertigo and (2) provoked vertigo, usually by postural changes, generally called paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV). Sudden onset of acute vertigo is usually due to acute spontaneous unilateral vestibular failure. It can be also fluctuant as, e.g., in recurrent attacks of Ménière's disease. Pharmacotherapy of acute spontaneous vertigo includes Levo-sulpiride i.v., 50 mg in 250 physiologic solution, once or twice a day, methoclopramide i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, or triethilperazine rectally, once or twice a day, to reduce neurovegetative symptoms; diazepam i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, to decrease internuclear inhibition, sulfate magnesium i.v., two ampoules in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, or piracetam i.v., one ampoule in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, to decrease vestibular damage. At the onset of the acute symptoms, patients must lie on their healthy side with the head and trunk raised 20 degrees. The room must be quiet but not darkened. If the patient is able to swallow without vomiting, it is important to reduce nystagmus and stabilize the visual field with gabapentine, per os, 300 mg twice or three times a day. The first step of the physical therapy of acute vertigo is vestibular electrical stimulation, that is to say, a superficial paravertebral electrical stimulation of neck muscles, aimed to reduce antigravitary failure and to increase proprioceptive cervical sensory substitution. PPV is a common complaint and represents one of the most common entities in peripheral vestibular pathology. While the clinical picture is well known and widely described, the etiopathogenesis of PPV is still a matter of debate. Despite the different

  18. Mastracchio during SPHERES Vertigo Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-24

    ISS038-E-035434 (23 Jan. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with a pair of basketball-sized, free-flying satellites known Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. For this experiment session, the crew members equipped one of the two SPHERES with a pair of stereoscopic goggles dubbed the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO. As the second SPHERES tumbled and spun, the VERTIGO-equipped robot attempted to map it and perform relative navigation around it.

  19. Mastracchio during SPHERES Vertigo Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-23

    ISS038-E-035432 (23 Jan. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with a pair of basketball-sized, free-flying satellites known Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. For this experiment session, the crew members equipped one of the two SPHERES with a pair of stereoscopic goggles dubbed the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO. As the second SPHERES tumbled and spun, the VERTIGO-equipped robot attempted to map it and perform relative navigation around it.

  20. SPHERES-Vertigo experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-080130 (25 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducts a session with a trio of soccer-ball-sized robots known as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The free-flying robots were equipped with stereoscopic goggles called the Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects, or VERTIGO, to enable the SPHERES to perform relative navigation based on a 3D model of a target object.

  1. Diagnosing the cause of vertigo: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alex T H

    2012-08-01

    Dizziness is among the commonest of chief complaints. It often presents a significant challenge to the attending physician, because the symptoms and signs are often vague and non-specific. However, a robust systematic approach can usually arrive at the diagnosis. Maintaining balance requires sensory inputs from the vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems and the cerebellum fine-tunes inaccurate motor outputs. Causes of vertigo are most commonly otological, followed by central, somatosensory, and visual. The first question in approaching patients with dizziness is to categorise dizziness into one of the four groups: lightheadedness, pre-syncope, disequilibrium, and vertigo. Secondly, central vertigo has to be differentiated with peripheral vertigo. For peripheral vertigo, the most common cause is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and should be specifically looked for. The tempo of the vertiginous attacks and other associated symptoms can help differentiate the other causes of peripheral vertigo, including Meniere's disease, vestibular neuronitis, labyrinthitis, and a perilymph fistula.

  2. Isolated Vascular Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Strokes in the distribution of the posterior circulation may present with vertigo, imbalance, and nystagmus. Although the vertigo due to a posterior circulation stroke is usually associated with other neurologic symptoms or signs, small infarcts involving the cerebellum or brainstem can develop vertigo without other localizing symptoms. Approximately 11% of the patients with an isolated cerebellar infarction present with isolated vertigo, nystagmus, and postural unsteadiness mimicking acute peripheral vestibular disorders. The head impulse test can differentiate acute isolated vertigo associated with cerebellar strokes (particularly within the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery) from more benign disorders involving the inner ear. Acute audiovestibular loss may herald impending infarction in the territory of anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Appropriate bedside evaluation is superior to MRIs for detecting central vascular vertigo syndromes. This article reviews the keys to diagnosis of acute isolated vertigo syndrome due to posterior circulation strokes involving the brainstem and cerebellum. PMID:25328871

  3. Vertigo in childhood: a methodological approach.

    PubMed

    Dispenza, F; De Stefano, A

    2012-01-01

    Children complaints dizziness merit meticulous evaluation to differentially diagnose a vestibular disease. A syndrome mimicking certain classic signs and symptoms of adult vestibular disorders may be presents in children, such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, usually associated with aging. Benign paroxysmal vertigo, in which migraine is a manifestation, with sudden onset of dizziness is a rare peripheral vestibular disorder that is commonly ignored or misdiagnosed. This review covers the development of the diagnosis, evaluation and treatment approaches of vertigo of childhood, a valid support for physician that approach dizzy children (Ref. 25). Full Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  4. Dizziness and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Della-Morte, David; Rundek, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Dizziness is a general, non-specific term to indicate a sense of disorientation. Vertigo is a subtype of dizziness and refers to an erroneous perception of self- or object-motion or an unpleasant distortion of static gravitational orientation that is a result of a mismatch between vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems. Vertigo is among the most common complaints in medicine, affecting approximately 20-30% of the general population. Stroke accounts for 3-7% among all causes of vertigo. The blood perfusion to the inner ear, brainstem, and cerebellum arise from the vertebrobasilar system. Vertigo, nausea, and vomiting, along with nystagmus, represent symptoms of stroke in posterior fossa due to arterial occlusion or rupture of the vertebrobasilar system. However, the spectrum of signs and symptoms as a manifestation of stroke associated with dizziness and vertigo may be variable depending on the affected vascular territories. Stroke or transient ischemic attack should be seriously considered in patients presenting with acute vertigo in the emergency room. Differential diagnosis between vascular vertigo and other causes of vertigo can result in misclassification due to the overlapping of symptoms. Careful medical history, physical examination, neuroimaging and ear, nose, and throat studies may help to distinguish vascular vertigo from other causes.

  5. Cervicogenic causes of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Hain, Timothy C

    2015-02-01

    Herein we discuss the recent literature concerning cervicogenic vertigo including vertigo associated with rotational vertebral artery syndrome, as well as whiplash and degenerative disturbances of the cervical spine. We conclude with a summary of progress regarding diagnostic methods for cervicogenic vertigo. Several additional single case studies of the exceedingly rare rotational vertebral artery syndrome have been added to the literature over the last year. Concerning whiplash and degenerative disturbances of the cervical spine, four reviews were published concerning using physical therapy as treatment, and two reviews reported successful surgical management. Publications regarding diagnostic methodology remain few and unconvincing, but the cervical torsion test appears the most promising. Little progress has been made over the last year concerning cervicogenic vertigo. As neck disturbances combined with dizziness are commonly encountered in the clinic, the lack of a diagnostic test that establishes that a neck disturbance causes vertigo remains the critical problem that must be solved.

  6. Vertigo-associated disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or that the world is spinning around them. Causes There are two types of vertigo, peripheral and ... Elsevier; 2014:chap 23. Kerber KA, Baloh RW. Neuro-otology: diagnosis and management of neuro-otoligical disorders. ...

  7. Dizziness and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Wipperman, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    Dizziness is a common and challenging condition seen in the primary care office. Because dizziness is a vague term that can include a wide array of medical disorders, it is important to use a stepwise approach to differentiate between causes. This article focuses on vertigo and its four most common causes: benign paroxysmal peripheral vertigo, vestibular neuritis, vestibular migraine, and Meniere's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Vertigo and dizziness--a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Chatterjee, S K; Chakravarty, A

    2003-11-01

    Dizziness is a term which is used to describe a variety of sensations. It is possible to group these complaints into four types: a rotational sensation (Type I dizziness), impending faint (Type II dizziness), dysequilibrium (Type III dizziness) and vague lightheadness (Type IV dizziness). Type I dizziness or vertigo is due to disease of the vestibular system--peripheral or central, and is characterized by a feeling of movement relative to one's surrounding. The majority of dizzy patients, however, belong to Types II, III and IV, collectively called the non-vestibular system disorders. The distinction is usually possible by a detailed history and clinical examination, but some special bedside tests--the dizziness simulation battery--are often required for properly distinguishing the various types of dizziness. Important causes of vertigo and the non-vestibular system disorders have been discussed with focus on benign positional vertigo, acute peripheral vestibulopathy, Menieres' disease, toxic damage to labyrinths, perilymph fistula, cerebrovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebellopontine angle tumors, basilar migraine, vestibular epilepsy, cervical vertigo and phobic postural vertigo.

  9. Tinnitus Outcome in Surgery for Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Wazen; Caruso

    1997-01-01

    The effect of surgery for vertigo on tinnitus was evaluated in 90 patients who underwent surgery for disabling vertigo for Menieres disease. The three procedures studies included a destructive labyrinthectomy, endolymphatic sac decompression and shunt, and vestibular neurectomy. Patients who underwent a vestibular neurectomy had a significantly better tinnitus outcome than those who underwent shunt surgery (50% vs 22.7%). The labyrinthectomy and the neurectomy groups showed an equal positive response of 50%. The severity of the preoperative hearing loss did not correlate with the tinnitus outcome in all groups. Patients who have serviceable hearing and require surgery for disabling vertigo appear to have a better chance of tinnitus control with the vestibular neurectomy rather than an endolymphatic sac decompression and shunt.

  10. Association between gout and vertigo in a Taiwanese population.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ting; Lin, Hui-Wen; Huang, Yu-Chen; Ho, Wen-Tsao; Li, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Ting-Jui

    2013-06-01

    There are reports of an association between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and hyperuricemia. We sought to determine the risk of vertigo among patients with gout compared with the general population, using a nationwide Taiwanese population-based claims database. Our study cohort consisted of patients with a diagnosis of gout disorders in 2004 (N = 18773). Four age- and gender-matched controls for every patient in the study cohort were selected using random sampling as the comparison cohort (N = 75092). All subjects were followed from the date of cohort entry until they developed vertigo or to the end of 2006. Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed to evaluate the 3-year vertigo-free survival rates. Of the total sample, 2563 (incidence, 10.09 per 1000 person-years) had vertigo during the 3-year follow-up period: 570 (incidence, 11.78 per 1000 person-years) from the study cohort and 1993 (incidence, 9.69 per 1000 person-years) from the comparison cohort. The adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of peripheral and central vertigo in patients with gout compared with controls during the 2-3-year follow-up were 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.29, p = 0.003) and 1.08 (95% CI = 0.86-1.36, p = 0.53), respectively. This is the first population-based study performed to suggest that patients with gout may have an increased risk of peripheral vertigo but not central vertigo. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo may be the reason for the observed association; however, future studies are required to further ascertain the relationship between gout and the various causes of peripheral vertigo.

  11. [Vertigo from the practitioner's standpoint].

    PubMed

    Kallela, Mikko; Kentala, Erna

    2014-01-01

    One third of the population suffer from vertigo at some stage of their life. Some of its causes are harmless, some life-threatening, some will resolve spontaneously and some never. Vertigo is divided into four main types: vertigo, syncope, disturbance of balance and nonspecific vertigo. Medical history is the most important method of examination and leads to diagnosis in two out of three cases. Attempts are always made to provoke the sensation of vertigo and the possible nystagmus during the consultation. The success of the specific treatment in accordance with the primary cause determines the patient's prognosis.

  12. [Canalith reposition procedure for the treatment of benign paroxysmal postural vertigo].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, V; Neira, P; Viada, J

    2000-06-01

    Paroxysmal positional vertigo is a frequent and handicapping disease. To assess the effectiveness of physical therapies using particle reposition procedures in the treatment of paroxysmal positional vertigo. Fifty nine patients (13 male) with paroxysmal positional vertigo were studied. Clinical data was gathered, the affected channel was identified. In the same session, the corresponding canalith reposition procedure was performed (Epley maneuver for posterior channel and Lempert maneuver for lateral channel) and the immediate response was recorded. Twenty seven percent of patients had recurring episodes of vertigo and 60% had more than two weeks of evolution. In 49% of patients, vertigo was considered idiopathic and in 92%, the posterior channel was affected. One patient had a combined lesion of posterior and lateral channels and two patients had isolated lateral channel lesions. Seventy percent of patients recovered after two sessions of canalith reposition procedure. Canalith reposition maneuvers were highly effective for the treatment of paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  13. Vertigo and Dizziness in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Lara; Breinbauer, Hayo A.; Delano, Paul Hinckley

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vertigo and dizziness in people aged more than 60 years reaches 30%, and due to aging of world population, the number of patients is rapidly increasing. The presence of dizziness in the elderly is a strong predictor of falls, which is the leading cause of accidental death in people older than 65 years. Balance disorders in the elderly constitute a major public health problem, and require an adequate diagnosis and management by trained physicians. In the elderly, common causes of vertigo may manifest differently, as patients tend to report less rotatory vertigo and more non-specific dizziness and instability than younger patients, making diagnosis more complex. In this mini review, age-related degenerative processes that affect balance are presented. Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches oriented to the specific impaired system, including visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular pathways, are proposed. In addition, presbystasis – the loss of vestibular and balance functions associated with aging – benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and stroke (in acute syndromes) should always be considered. PMID:26167157

  14. Vertigo as a migraine phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Migraine is a complex disorder with many different manifestations. There has been an increasing interest in the association of migraine and vertigo. Many different terms have been developed to describe this concept, the more popular being vestibular migraine, migrainous vertigo, and migraine-associated vertigo. The most commonly cited diagnostic criteria are that of Neuhauser though this has yet to be included in the International Classification of Headache Disorders (2nd edition). At this time, there is a lack of consensus regarding migraine-related vertigo and its pathomechanism. Regardless, a few randomized controlled prospective studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of various medications. Topiramate has been shown to be effective for migraine-related vertigo. At this time there is no specific treatment for migraine-related dizziness outside of conventional migraine management. The genetics have yet to be fully realized though an autosomal dominant familial migraine vertigo disorder has been identified.

  15. Betahistine dihydrochloride in the treatment of peripheral vestibular vertigo.

    PubMed

    Mira, Eugenio; Guidetti, G; Ghilardi, L; Fattori, B; Malannino, N; Maiolino, L; Mora, R; Ottoboni, S; Pagnini, P; Leprini, M; Pallestrini, E; Passali, D; Nuti, D; Russolo, M; Tirelli, G; Simoncelli, C; Brizi, S; Vicini, C; Frasconi, P

    2003-02-01

    The present study compares the efficacy and safety of betahistine dihydrochloride to that of a placebo in recurrent vertigo resulting from Meniere's disease (MD) or in paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV) of probable vascular origin. The design was double-blind, multicentre and parallel-group randomised. Eleven Italian centres enrolled 144 patients: 75 of the patients were treated with betahistine (41 MD/34 PPV) and 69 with placebos (40 MD/29 PPV). The betahistine dosage was 16 mg twice per day for 3 months. Compared to the placebo, betahistine had a significant effect on the frequency, intensity and duration of vertigo attacks. Associated symptoms and the quality of life also were significantly improved by betahistine. Both the physician's judgement and the patient's opinion on the efficacy and acceptability of the treatment were in agreement as to the superiority of betahistine. The effective and safe profile of betahistine in the treatment of vertigo due to peripheral vestibular disorders was confirmed.

  16. A systematic review of vertigo in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, K; O'Dowd, T; Considine, N

    2001-01-01

    The symptom of vertigo is usually managed in primary care without further referral. This review examines the evidence on which general practitioners can base clinical diagnosis and management of this relatively common complaint. Research in this area has in the main been from secondary and tertiary centres and has been of variable quality. Indications are that the conditions that present in general practice are most likely to be benign positional vertigo, acute vestibular neuronitis, and Ménière's disease; however, vascular incidents and neurological causes, such as multiple sclerosis, must be kept in mind. An important practice point is that vestibular sedatives are not recommended on a prolonged basis for any type of vertigo. There is a need for basic epidemiological and clinical management research of vertigo in general practice. PMID:11510399

  17. [Vertigo in children and adolescents. Part 1: Epidemiology and diagnosis of peripheral vestibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Langhagen, T; Lehnen, N; Krause, E; Jahn, K

    2013-09-01

    Migraine equivalents are the most common cause of vertigo in children and adolescents. Vertigo and balance disorders occur frequently in children during the course of otitis media, middle ear effusion and viral infections. If otitis media is associated with reduced hearing and vertigo, labyrinthitis must be considered. Craniocerebral injury is another important cause of vertigo in children. In contrast, spontaneous benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is rare among children. The isolated cases of endolymphatic hydrops that occur in children are usually secondary. Perilymph fistula can have congenital, infectious or trauma-related causes. The following characteristics are useful for differentiating between different vertiginous syndromes: type and duration of vertigo, triggering/aggravating/alleviating factors and accompanying symptoms. A neuro-ophthalmologic examination is essential to rule out central vestibular disorders.

  18. 10 years of Vertigo Clinic at National Hospital Abuja, Nigeria: what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Olusesi, Abiodun D; Abubakar, J

    2016-11-01

    The clinician's major role in management of the dizzy patient involves determining what dizziness is vertigo, and what vertigo is of central or peripheral origin. These demand attention to details of history, otolaryngological workup including vestibular assessment, and often use of diagnostic and management algorithms. There is paucity of published reports of the management outcomes of peripheral vestibular diseases from Africa. Two tertiary care otologist-led dedicated vertigo clinics are located in Abuja, Nigeria. A prospective, non-randomized study of patients presenting with features of peripheral vestibular diseases attending the National Hospital Abuja Nigeria (between May 2005 and April 2014) and CSR Otologics Specialist Clinics (May 2010 to April 2014) was carried out. Both institutions adopted the same diagnostic and management protocols. Data extracted from anonymized databases created for this study include age, sex, vertigo duration (acute <12 weeks, chronic >12 weeks), dizziness handicap inventory score at presentation and at subsequent visits, otological and vestibular findings, ice-water caloric testing results, other investigation outcomes, treatments offered and outcomes. 561/575 (97.5 %) of the cases recorded had peripheral vestibular disease. The male-to-female ratio was 290:271. The mean age of the subjects was 44.7 years. Duration of vertigo at presentation was acute in 278 subjects and chronic in 283 subjects. Identifiable clinical diagnostic groups include BPPV (n = 200), Meniere's disease (n = 189), cervicogenic vertigo (n = 35), labyrinthitis (n = 32), Migraine-associated vertigo (MAV) (n = 32), cholesteatoma/perilymph Fistula (n = 10), climacteric vertigo (n = 8) and unclassified vertigo (n = 55). Migraine-associated vertigo recorded the highest DHI score (95 % CI 75 ± 4.3), followed by cholesteatoma/perilymph fistula (95 % CI 72 ± 6.1) and labyrinthitis (95 % CI 62 ± 1.9). Pure tone audiometry (95 % CI 67

  19. Associations between peripheral vertigo and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Viliušytė, Edita; Macaitytė, Raminta; Vaitkus, Antanas; Rastenytė, Daiva

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that peripheral vertigo is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Two mechanisms could be considered – gastric acids may directly irritate the respiratory mucosa and cause inflammation, or Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) could be present and cause local infection. Reflux material (Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and pepsin) could get into the middle ear via Eustachian tube and affect osseous structures directly. Disturbance of ossicles could cause tinnitus, which is more common for peripheral vertigo. H. pylori could also get in the esophagus and in the upper respiratory tract via gastroesophageal reflux, and could cause tympanosclerosis and fixation of ossicles. In our study group, 120 of 153 (78.4%) patients had gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diagnostic tests of H. pylori (rapid urease test or blood antibody test) were performed for 96 of 120 (80%) patients with GERD and were found positive for 32 of 96 (33.3%) patients. Peripheral vertigo was present in 93 of 120 (77.6%) patients with GERD compared to 33 of 126 (26%) patients without GERD (χ(2)=9.016, p=0.003). H. pylori and peripheral vertigo coexisted in 26 of 126 patients (20.6%) (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.49-3.74, p=0.55). Our study demonstrated statistically significant association between peripheral vertigo and GERD but not between peripheral vertigo and H. pylori. Further more extensive investigations are needed in order to explore our hypothesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tetra-ataxiometric Posturography in Patients with Migrainous Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Ongun, Nedim; Atalay, Nilgun S; Degirmenci, Eylem; Sahin, Fusun; Bir, Levent Sinan

    2016-01-01

    measures vertical pressure fluctuations on 4 independent stable platforms, each placed beneath 2 heels and toe parts of the patient; inputs from these platforms are integrated and processed by a computer digitally. Four separate plates are used and perpendicular pressures of the anterior and posterior feet are measured. Pressure of each force plate is measured and data was analyzed by the software program. A very small, non-randomized, and controlled study with the inability to find an answer to the mechanism of involvement of the somatosensorial system and vestibular system in migrainous headaches. The distribution of patients with posturographical abnormalities in the migrainous vertigo group was significantly different than the control group. Distribution of the patients with posturographical abnormalities in the high frequencies of the head-right position was significantly different in the migrainous vertigo group than in the control group and distribution of the patients with posturographical abnormalities in high frequencies of the head-right position was significantly different in the migraine group than in the controls groups. The stability index of the migrainous vertigo group was significantly higher than in the control group when tested on in the neutral-head position with open eyes. In this first study of tetra-ataxiometric static posturography evaluating postural abnormalities in a well-defined population of patients with migrainous vertigo, the central part of the vestibular apparatus would be responsible of postural abnormalities in patients with migraine and migrainous vertigo.

  1. Vertigo and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Newman-Toker, David E; Della Santina, Charles C; Blitz, Ari M

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms referable to disorders affecting the inner ear and vestibulocochlear nerve (eighth cranial nerve) include dizziness, vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss, in various combinations. Similar symptoms may occur with involvement of the central nervous system, principally the brainstem and cerebellum, to which the vestibular and auditory systems are connected. Imaging choices should be tailored to patient symptoms and the clinical context. Computed tomography (CT) should be used primarily to assess bony structures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be used primarily to assess soft-tissue structures. Vascular imaging by angiography or venography should be obtained when vascular lesions are suspected. No imaging should be obtained in patients with typical presentations of common peripheral vestibular or auditory disorders. In current clinical practice, neuroimaging is often overused, especially CT in the assessment of acute dizziness and vertigo in the emergency department. Despite low sensitivity for ischemic strokes, CT is often used to rule out neurologic causes. When ischemic stroke is the principal concern in acute vestibular presentations, imaging should almost always be by MRI with diffusion-weighted images, rather than CT. In this chapter, we describe recommended strategies for audiovestibular imaging based on patient symptoms and signs.

  2. [Acute vertigo of neurological origin].

    PubMed

    Bruun, Marie; Højgaard, Joan L Sunnleyg; Kondziella, Daniel

    2013-11-04

    Acute vertigo of neurological origin may be caused by haemorrhages and tumours in the posterior fossa and, most frequently, by ischaemic infarction in the vertebrobasilar circulation. Urgent diagnosis is necessary to avoid further ischaemic episodes, herniation due to cerebellar oedema and/or fatal brainstem infarction. The history should focus on accompanying neurological symptoms. However, vertigo with cerebellar lesions may be monosymptomatic and then bedside evaluation of oculomotor function is the key to correct diagnosis. This paper discusses the pathophysiology, symptomatology and clinical evaluation of acute vertigo of neurological origin.

  3. Preliminary Report on the Investigation of the Association Between BPPV and Osteoporosis Using Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Daniel; Parham, Kourosh

    2015-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that levels of a BPPV biomarker, otolin-1, correlate with those of osteoporosis markers, aminoterminal propeptide of protocollagen type I (P1NP), and aminoterminal telopeptides of collagen (NTX), thus further supporting a link between the two diseases. Prospective pilot clinical trial (Level of Evidence: 2b). Postmenopausal women with BPPV. Diagnostic. Serum levels of otolin-1, P1NP, NTX, vitamin D, and calcium were examined in relation to each other, age, and DEXA scan T-scores. There was a strong, negative correlation between T-scores and otolin-1 levels. Although P1NP and NTX levels were strongly correlated, neither had statistical correlations with otolin-1. Despite a strong correlation between DEXA scan results and otolin-1 levels, there were no significant correlations between otolin-1 and P1NP or NTX. This suggests that the association between osteoporosis and BPPV is complex, but not likely to be causal. Although more work is needed to elucidate these relationships, this preliminary finding has important practical implications for BPPV in that proactive management of osteoporosis, per se, would not be expected to have benefits in management of BPPV.

  4. Gender difference and laterality of sleep position.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, Hiroaki; Akita, Miwaoki

    2017-08-29

    A higher incidence in women (approximately 7:3) and a predominant involvement of the right ear (approximately 7:5) are interesting features of BPPV (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo). It is speculated that these features are related to sleep position. The first aim of this study was to compare the frequency of position shifts during sleep between men and women. The second aim was to elucidate any differences in sleep position between men and women. The third aim was to clarify the laterality of sleep position. We retrospectively selected the data of 30 males (mean, 53.1 years) and 22 females (mean, 50.6 years) diagnosed as mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea. A position sensor was attached to the patient's anterior chest. Supine position was defined as less than 45° tilt, and lateral position was defined as more than 45° tilt. A single overnight laboratory polysomnography provided the number of position shifts, total sleep time, sleep time spent in the supine position (S), sleep time spent in the right-side-down lateral position (R), and sleep time spent in the left-side-down lateral position (L). The mean value and standard deviation of the number of position shifts per hour was 2.4±1.3 in males, and 2.3±1.1 in females. There was no significant difference between males and females. Twelve cases (40%) were lateral type (SR+L) in males. Ten cases (45%) were lateral type, and 12 (55%) were supine type in females. There was no significant difference between males and females. Seventeen cases (56.6%) were right-dominant type (R-L>0), and 13 (43.3%) were left-dominant type (R-L<0) in males. Thirteen cases (59%) were right-dominant type, and 9 (41%) were left-dominant type in females. Body position and the number of position shifts during sleep differ substantially between individuals. There is no gender difference in the frequency of position shifts. Although the supine type is more common than the lateral type, there

  5. [Differential diagnosis "vertigo and dizziness"].

    PubMed

    Plontke, S K; Walther, L E

    2014-08-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are symptoms of interdisciplinary dimension. However, the differentiation and classification of vertigo syndromes also require experience and multidisciplinary knowledge. Since the clinical syndrome is subjective, a detailed analysis of the complaints underlying is required. International disease definitions are an indispensable tool in the differential diagnosis of vertigo syndromes today. With simple diagnostic tools eye movement disorders and nystagmus can be examined and assigned to specific vestibular disorders today. Screening tests (e.g. head impulse test) are now an important instrument in the investigation of patients with vertigo syndromes in case of emergency. With objective diagnostic methods (caloric irrigation, video head impulse test, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials) the degree of functional impairment of the five vestibular receptors can be assessed quantitatively. Furthermore, in vestibulopathies, a receptor and side-specific diagnostic assessment can be performed even with regard to dynamic aspects.

  6. Vertigo and dizziness in children.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Klaus; Langhagen, Thyra; Heinen, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Vertigo and dizziness occur with considerable frequency in childhood and adolescence. Most causes are benign and treatable. This review aims to make physicians more alert to the frequent causes of dizziness in the young. Epidemiological data confirm that migraine-related syndromes are the most common cause of vertigo in children. Vestibular migraine and benign paroxysmal vertigo have now been defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders. About half of the adolescents with vertigo and dizziness show psychiatric comorbidity and somatization. Vestibular paroxysmia has been described as a new entity in children that can be treated with low doses of carbamazepine. To assess vestibular deficits, video head impulses (for the semicircular canals) and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (for the otoliths) are increasingly being used. Pediatricians and neuro-otologists should be aware of the full spectrum of causes of vertigo and dizziness in children and adolescents. Vestibular function can reliably be tested nowadays. Although treatment for the common migraine-related syndromes can be done in analogy to the treatment of migraine in general, specific approaches are required for somatoform vertigo, the most frequent diagnosis in adolescent girls.

  7. The Burden and Impact of Vertigo: Findings from the REVERT Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Benecke, Heike; Agus, Sam; Kuessner, Daniel; Goodall, Gordon; Strupp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Despite the high prevalence of vertigo globally and an acknowledged, but under-reported, effect on an individual’s wellbeing, few studies have evaluated the burden on healthcare systems and society. This study was aimed to quantitatively determine the impact of vertigo on healthcare resource use and work productivity. Methods: The economic burden of vertigo was assessed through a multi-country, non-interventional, observational registry of vertigo patients: the Registry to Evaluate the Burden of Disease in Vertigo. Patients included were those with a new diagnosis of Meniere’s disease, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, other vertigo of peripheral vestibular origin, or peripheral vestibular vertigo of unknown origin. Results: A total of 4,294 patients at 618 centers in 13 countries were included during the registry. Of the 4,105 patients analyzed, only half were in employment. Among this working patient population, 69.8% had reduced their workload, 63.3% had lost working days, and 4.6% had changed and 5.7% had quit their jobs, due to vertigo symptoms. Use of healthcare services among patients was high. In the 3 months preceding Visit 1, patients used emergency services 0.4 ± 0.9 times, primary care consultations 1.6 ± 1.8 times, and specialist consultations 1.4 ± 2.0 times (all mean ± SD). A mean of 2.0 ± 5.4 days/patient was also spent in hospital due to vertigo. Conclusion: In addition to the negative impact on the patient from a humanistic perspective, vertigo has considerable impact on work productivity and healthcare resource use. PMID:24106487

  8. Vertigo and dizziness in childhood - update on diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Jahn, K; Langhagen, T; Schroeder, A S; Heinen, F

    2011-08-01

    Vertigo and balance disorders are not uncommon in children. The prevalence of vestibular vertigo in 10-year-Dolds is estimated to be 5.7%. The most common cause is vestibular migraine which accounts for almost 40% of the diagnoses. In adolescents, the incidence of somatoform vertigo syndromes increases. Vestibular function can be reliably evaluated at the bedside by the head-impulse test for vestibulo-ocular reflex function, ocular motor testing of the central vestibular system, and balance tests for vestibulo-spinal function. Vestibular migraine is treated by behavioural and drug therapies. Somatoform vertigo improves if information about the disorder and behavioual advice are provided. Sometimes psychotherapy is useful; drug therapy is recommended in severe cases. Other common vestibular disorders in children include benign positioning nystagmus and labyrinthitis. In summary, the underlying causes of vertigo and dizziness in children can be diagnosed on the basis of patient history and clinical bedside testing. Reponses to caloric irrigation of the ears, rotational chair testing, posturography, and video-oculography can be used to ascertain the diagnosis. Brain imaging is indicated in patients presenting with subacute central vestibular signs. The majority of syndromes have a favourable prognosis and can be successfully treated.

  9. Relationship of the changes of cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP in patients with "isolated" vertigo.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenzhen; Zhang, Xueqing

    2014-01-01

    To study the relationship and changes of cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP in patients with "isolated" vertigo. The relationship and changes of cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP were investigated respectively in 125 patients with "isolated" vertigo and 100 healthy controls. There were statistically significant differences between two groups for overall abnormalities of TCD (X(2) = 61.96, P<0.01), BAEP (X(2) = 97.99, P<0.01), and cervical MRI severity scale (Z = -8.71, P<0.01). In vertigo group, results showed significant correlations between TCD and cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP as well. And analysis on TCD PI and some items of BAEP demonstrated positive linear correlations. There were no statistical differences or correlations in control group. TCD is a sensitive method of "isolated" vertigo screening. A combined test protocol of cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP has superiorities to assess "isolated" vertigo.

  10. [Vertigo and dizziness. Diagnostic algorithm from the perspective of emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Dodt, C; Zelihic, E

    2013-02-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are common symptoms in the acute care setting and have a wide diagnostic range. The most deleterious diagnosis is vertebrobasilar disease with brain infarction in the posterior fossa. Therefore, every patient with acute vestibular syndrome needs to be evaluated by a structured interview and a systematic physical examination for red flag symptoms which indicate vertebrobasilar infarction. Routinely, the physical examination should cover the head impulse (Halmagyi) test, test for nystagmus as well as the test of skew and in cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, by the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. The suspicion of a central cause of vertigo is ideally confirmed by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Most patients with a peripheral cause of vertigo can be discharged under symptomatic therapy with the advice to consult an ear nose and throat physician while patients with a central cause of vertigo are admitted for further neurological treatment.

  11. [Therapeutic effect and mechanism of the surgical treatment for cervical vertigo with cervical spondylosis].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhuolin; Hu, Jianhua; Zhai, Jiliang; Tian, Ye; Qiu, Guixing; Weng, Xisheng; Wu, Gui; Zhu, Qiankun; Zhao, Lijuan

    2015-07-07

    To investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the surgical treatment for cervical vertigo with cervical spondylosis. Thirty-five patients in Department of Orthopaedics, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, who received surgical treatment for cervical spondylosis concomitant with cervical vertigo from 2004 to 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. The preoperative cervical curvature index (CCI), slip distance and intervertebral angle, as well as the pre-and-postoperative Cobb angle were measured. The pre-and-postoperative degree of vertigo was reported according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium standard. The therapeutic effect and mechanism for patients with different imaging features and thus underwent various surgical approaches were analyzed. The mean follow-up was 40.6 months. Cervical instability was found in 33 patients. 29 of 35 (82.9%) patients had a satisfied recovery from cervical vertigo. The difference in Cobb angle in pre- and postoperative neutral cervical X-ray images was positively associated with the improvement for the vertigo (Pearson's test, P < 0.05). Cervical instability may be the major cause of cervical vertigo in the context of cervical spondylosis. Cervical sympathetic nerves may have played an important role in the cervical vertigo. Surgery may relieve the cervical vertigo accompanying the cervical spondylosis.

  12. Body balance in patients with systemic vertigo after rehabilitation exercise.

    PubMed

    Mraz, M; Curzytek, M; Mraz, M A; Gawron, W; Czerwosz, L; Skolimowski, T

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to characterize structural balance of the body in people with systemic vertigo after applying rehabilitation exercise, such as motor-visual coordination on a posturographic platform and balance exercise. Physiotherapeutic procedures were carried out in a group of 12 people, aged 25-60 years suffering from vertigo. The evaluation of body balance in the standing position was performed by means of recording of postural sways based on force-plate posturography. The examination was performed before and after the rehabilitation program. Standard tests were done, with eyes open, eyes closed, and with conscious visual control-biofeedback. Patients with vertigo underwent a month-long therapy, which included: exercise of motor-visual coordination on a posturographic platform and balance exercise, which consisted of repeated visual, vestibular, and somatosensory stimulation for conscious postural control. The rehabilitation program resulted in a decrease of the range of sways, improved visuomotor coordination and thus also improved balance.

  13. Marshburn conducts the SPHERES VERTIGO Experiment in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-26

    ISS034-E-056096 (26 Feb. 2013) --- Inside the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Kibo lab on the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn conducts a session of the ongoing SPHERES-VERTIGO investigation. SPHERES stands for Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient Experimental Satellites. Each satellite is an 18-sided polyhedron that is 0.2 meter in diameter and weighs 3.5 kilograms. The prism-shaped device (called Goggles) which is hooked up to the red or forward-most polyhedron in the picture is called Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects (VERTIGO).

  14. Marshburn conducts the SPHERES VERTIGO Experiment in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-26

    ISS034-E-056100 (26 Feb. 2013) --- Inside the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Kibo lab on the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn conducts a session of the ongoing SPHERES-VERTIGO investigation. SPHERES stands for Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient Experimental Satellites. Each satellite is an 18-sided polyhedron that is 0.2 meter in diameter and weighs 3.5 kilograms. The prism-shaped device (called Goggles) which is hooked up to the red or forward-most polyhedron in the picture is called Visual Estimation and Relative Tracking for Inspection of Generic Objects (VERTIGO).

  15. [Some characteristics of vertigo in vestibular neuronitis].

    PubMed

    Skliut, I A; Likhachev, S A; Rybina, O V

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a detailed clinical analysis of objective neurological symptoms and vertigo in patients with vestibular neuronitis. Diagnostic criteria are specified allowing differentiation between vertigo and dizziness, pathognomonic signs of vestibular neuronitis are outlined. Peripheral location of the pathological process in vestibular neuronitis is suggested. How rotating vertigo is forming in patients with vestibular neuronitis is hypothesized.

  16. Seasonality of dizziness and vertigo in a tropical region.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alcione Botelho; Almeida, Leonardo Alves Ferreira; Pereira, Nayara Gorette; Menezes, Patrícia Andrade Freitas de; Felipe, Lilian; Volpe, Fernando Madalena

    2015-06-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most common medical complaints in the emergency room, and are associated with a considerable personal and health care burden. Scarce and conflicting reports indicate those symptoms may present a seasonal distribution. This study aimed at investigating the existence of a seasonal distribution of vertigo/dizziness in a tropical region, and the correlations of these findings with climatic variables. The charts of all patients consecutively admitted between 2009 and 2012 in the emergency room of a Brazilian general hospital were reviewed. A total of 4920 cases containing these terms were sorted from a sample of 276,076 emergency records. Seasonality was assessed using Cosinor Analysis. Pearson's correlations were performed between the incidence of consultations, considering separately dizziness and vertigo and each of the predictor climatic variables of that index month. Significant seasonal patterns were observed for dizziness and vertigo in the emergency room. Vertigo was more frequent in late winter-spring, negatively correlating to humidity (r = -0.374; p = 0.013) and rainfall (r = -0.334; p = 0.020). Dizziness peaked on summer months, and positively correlated to average temperatures (r = 0.520; p < 0.001) and rainfall (r = 0.297; p = 0.040), but negatively to atmospheric pressure (r = -0.424; p = 0.003). The different seasonal patterns evidenced for dizziness and vertigo indicate possible distinct underlying mechanisms of how seasons may influence the occurrence of those symptoms.

  17. Clinical characteristics of cervicogenic-related dizziness and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Yacovino, Dario A; Hain, Timothy C

    2013-07-01

    Cervical vertigo has long been a controversial entity and its very existence as a medical entity has advocates and opponents. Supporters of cervical vertigo claim that its actual prevalence is underestimated due to the overestimation of other diagnostic categories in clinics. Furthermore, different pathophysiological mechanisms have been attributed to cervical vertigo. Here the authors discuss the clinical characteristics of rotational vertebral artery vertigo, postwhiplash vertigo, proprioceptive cervical vertigo, and cervicogenic vertigo of old age. A clinical entity named subclinical vertebrobasilar insufficiency appears in the context of cervical osteoarticular changes. Migraine-associated vertigo may explain why some patients suffering from cervical pain have vertigo while others do not.

  18. Epigone migraine vertigo (EMV): a late migraine equivalent.

    PubMed

    Pagnini, P; Vannucchi, P; Giannoni, B; Pecci, R

    2014-02-01

    Migrainous headache is determined by pathogenetic mechanisms that are also able to affect the peripheral and/or central vestibular system, so that vestibular symptoms may substitute and/or present with headache. We are convinced that there can be many different manifestations of vestibular disorders in migrainous patients, representing true different clinical entities due to their different characteristics and temporal relashionship with headache. Based on such considerations, we proposed a classification of vertigo and other vestibular disorders related to migraine, and believe that a particular variant of migraine-related vertigo should be introduced, namely "epigone migraine vertigo" (EMV): this could be a kind of late migraine equivalent, i.e. a kind of vertigo, migrainous in origin, starting late in the lifetime that substitutes, as an equivalent, pre-existing migraine headache. To clarify this particular clinical picture, we report three illustrative clinical cases among 28 patients collected during an observation period of 13 years (November 1991 - November 2004). For all patients, we collected complete personal clinical history. All patients underwent standard neurotological examination, looking for spontaneous-positional, gaze-evoked and caloric induced nystagmus, using an infrared video camera. We also performed a head shaking test (HST) and an head thrust test (HTT). Ocular motility was tested looking at saccades and smooth pursuit. To exclude other significant neurological pathologies, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium was performed. During the three months after the first visit, patients were invited to keep a diary noting frequency, intensity and duration of vertigo attacks. After that period, we suggested that they use prophylactic treatment with flunarizine (5 mg per day) and/or acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg per day), or propranolol (40 mg twice a day). All patients were again recommended to note in their diary the frequency

  19. Vertigo and dizziness in children.

    PubMed

    Jahn, K

    2016-01-01

    Vertigo and dizziness of at least moderate severity occur in >5% of school-aged children and cause considerable restrictions in participation in school and leisure activity. More than 50% of dizzy children also have headache. Vestibular migraine and benign paroxysmal vertigo as a migraine precursor are the most common diagnoses in dizziness clinics for children and adolescents. They account for 30-60% of diagnoses. Other common causes are somatoform, orthostatic, or posttraumatic dizziness. All other disorders that are known to cause vertigo and dizziness in adults also occur in children, but incidence rates are usually lower. The vestibular and balance systems are largely developed after 1 year of age. Therefore, clinical and laboratory testing is reliable. Brain magnetic resonance imaging to exclude severe conditions, such as a brainstem tumor, is necessary only if clinical - in particular, ocular motor - testing is abnormal. Most conditions causing vertigo and dizziness in childhood and adolescence are treatable. Nonpharmacologic prophylaxis should always be recommended in vestibular migraine. Behavioral support is useful in somatization. Evidence for the effectiveness of drug therapy is largely based on experience in adult populations. High-quality controlled studies in childhood cohorts are sparse. It is important to make a correct diagnosis early on, as counseling and appropriate treatment may avoid chronic illness. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Bedside diagnosis of vertigo: value of the history and neurological examination.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Kathleen A

    2003-12-01

    Vertigo is caused by disturbance of the input or central processing of sensory signals from the vestibular apparatus that provide information regarding the position of the body in space. It is caused either by asymmetric disruption of sensory input from the vestibular organs or asymmetric integration of vestibular input into the central nervous system. Vertigo is readily differentiated from other causes of dizziness by a sensation of motion. A crucial aspect of the management of the emergency department patient with vertigo is the differentiation of vertigo associated with acute stroke syndromes from vertigo due to peripheral causes. Routine computerized axial tomography imaging is insensitive for posterior circulation strokes, so for emergency physicians, the history and neurological examination remain the most useful diagnostic tools. This article emphasizes the history and physical examination in the localization of the lesion in patients with vertigo and offers a rational basis for decisions regarding the need for special neurological imaging and consultation. It also emphasizes subtle findings that may prevent the erroneous diagnosis of peripheral vertigo in the presence of an acute stroke syndrome.

  1. [Diagnosis and treatment options in vertigo syndromes].

    PubMed

    Strupp, M; Dieterich, M; Zwergal, A; Brandt, T

    2015-10-01

    The key to diagnosing vertigo and balance disorders is systematic analysis of case history with clinical examination of the vestibular, oculomotor, and cerebral systems in particular. Important criteria for differentiating between the various vertigo syndromes are 1) the time course of symptoms, 2) the type of symptoms, 3) modulating factors, and 4) associated symptoms. For clinical examination of the vestibular system, six important tests are available: assessment of spontaneous nystagmus, head impulse test, dynamic visual acuity, subjective visual verticality, positioning manoeuvre, and the Romberg test/gait analysis with eyes open and closed. On the basis of five clinical signs (vertical divergence, central fixation nystagmus, gaze-evoked nystagmus, saccades, normal head impulse test), the clinical examination is able to differentiate between acute central and peripheral vestibular syndromes with a sensitivity and specificity of over 90%. The most relevant laboratory examinations are caloric irrigation and the video head-impulse test for canal function and the vestibular evoked myogenic potentials for otolith function. Finally, treatment is based upon four therapeutic principles: physiotherapy, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and in rare cases, surgery.

  2. Cervical vertigo after hair shampoo treatment at a hairdressing salon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Endo, K; Ichimaru, K; Shimura, H; Imakiire, A

    2000-03-01

    A case report of cervical vertigo that occurred after shampoo treatment in a hairdressing salon. Abnormalities were detected on magnetic resonance images and magnetic resonance angiography scans. To describe the diagnosis of cervical vertigo caused by neck hyperextension. Neck hyperextension may induce vertigo and dizziness; the pathophysiology remains unclear, however, because subjective findings are usually difficult to document. The diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of a patient with cervical vertigo that occurred after hair shampoo treatment in a hair dressing salon were assessed. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated narrowing of the left vertebral artery, whereas magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebellar infarction. Treatment included rest and drugs that activate cerebral circulation and prevent platelet aggregation. Improvement was noted within few days. The authors suggest that the hyperextended neck position during hair shampoo treatment in a beauty parlor may be a risk factor for back lifting or cerebellum vascular insufficiency. Public education should lead to avoidance of this position during hair shampoo treatment at hair dressing salons.

  3. Imbalance and vertigo: the aging human vestibular periphery.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Gail

    2009-11-01

    Dizziness, vertigo, and imbalance are likely the most common presenting complaints among patients 75 years and older in office practices. Although the cause of falls among the aging population is multifactorial, several studies have implicated senescence of the vestibular periphery. It is imperative that clinicians correctly diagnose and treat dizziness and vertigo in the geriatric population, as vestibular impairment is quite responsive to specifically designed rehabilitation. One of the most common causes of vertigo in older adults is benign positional vertigo. The aging otolithic membrane, alterations in calcium metabolism, and microvascular ischemia may all play a role. An age-related deterioration of vestibular function on quantitative testing has been documented, and the age of onset correlates with the age-related cellular loss in the vestibular periphery. Furthermore, longitudinal tests of decline in vestibular function correlate with decline in gait and balance on testing. It is likely that senescence of both the central and peripheral vestibular pathways plays a role in age-related decline in balance. Vestibular disorders in the older patient are associated with a diminished level of independent activities, an increased incidence of falls, and possibly also clinical depression. The author's laboratory is delineating the immunohistochemical expression of proteins in the basement membrane of the vestibular system in older adults as a potential cause of the age-related decline in sensory cell and neuronal number. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  4. Management of acute vertigo with betahistine.

    PubMed

    Bradoo, R A; Nerurkar, N K; Mhapankar, J B; Patil, S F; Kute, D G

    2000-04-01

    This open, prospective study was carried out in 29 outpatients of vertigo with Betahistine treatment at a dose of 16 mg three times daily far a maximum treatment period of 6 weeks or earlier until remission of vertigo attacks. The evaluations were carried out based on three parameters such as frequency, duration, and severity of vertigo attacks. Betahistino showed a significant improvement in the three parameters of frequency, duration and severity of vertigo attacks. Associated symptoms such as tinnitus, nausea, vomiting, headache, faintness showed a significant improvement with the therapy. Subgroup analysis showed a significant improvement of patients with severe and incapacitating verlign attaeks at baseline. Thus, this study proves excellent efficacy and goad tolerability of Betahistine as an anti-vertigo drug at a dose of 16 mg three times daily and gives a new insight for controlling acute or severe vertigo attacks without causing sedation.

  5. [Peripheral vertigo versus central vertigo. Application of the HINTS protocol].

    PubMed

    Batuecas-Caletrío, Ángel; Yáñez-González, Raquel; Sánchez-Blanco, Carmen; González-Sánchez, Enrique; Benito, José; Gómez, José Carlos; Santa Cruz-Ruiz, Santiago

    2014-10-16

    Introduccion. Uno de los dilemas mas importantes concernientes al vertigo en urgencias es su diagnostico diferencial. Existen signos de alarma de gran sensibilidad en la exploracion que pueden ponernos en la pista de encontrarnos ante un vertigo central. Objetivo. Determinar la eficacia de la aplicacion del protocolo HINTS en el diagnostico del accidente cerebrovascular que simula un vertigo periferico. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio observacional descriptivo sobre pacientes ingresados con diagnostico de sindrome vestibular agudo en urgencias. Todos los pacientes fueron objeto de un seguimiento diario hasta la mejoria de sus sintomas con informacion del nistagmo, la maniobra de impulso oculocefalico y el test de skew. Se comparan los resultados del estudio de resonancia magnetica con la alteracion en alguno de esos tres signos a lo largo del ingreso del enfermo. Resultados. Se reunio a 91 pacientes, con una edad media de 55,8 años. Se objetivo un accidente cerebrovascular en ocho de ellos. De estos (edad media: 71 años), en siete existia una alteracion en alguno de los signos HINTS y en uno el estudio fue normal (sensibilidad: 0,88; especificidad: 0,96). Todos ellos tenian algun factor de riesgo vascular. Conclusiones. Una exploracion adecuada y dirigida ante un paciente que acude a urgencias con un sindrome vestibular agudo resulta de vital importancia para establecer el diagnostico diferencial entre la patologia periferica y la central, ya que algunos accidentes cerebrovasculares se pueden presentar bajo la apariencia de un vertigo agudo. Aplicar un protocolo como HINTS permite sospechar la patologia central con una gran sensibilidad y especificidad.

  6. [The efficacy of intratympanic dexamethasone injection for the moderate and severe sudden deafness with BPPV].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Yu, Youjun; Zhao, Yuanxin; Wang, Yuejian; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Qiuling

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intratympanic dexamethasone injection for the moderate and severe sudden deafness with BPPV. A total of 63 patients diagnosed with sudden sensorineural hearing loss with BPPV were treated through OPD. Patients were divided into three groups: 20 cases in intratympanic dexamethasone injection as initial treatment (group A); 18 cases in systemic hormone therapy group (group B); 25 cases in intratympanic dexamethasone injection as salvage treatment (group C). In addition, routine drugs were used to all patients. The overall effective rate of group A, B and C in hearing recovery was 60.0%, 38.9% and 48.0%, respectively: (1) No significant difference of hearing recovery was observed among three groups (P > 0.05); (2) A significant difference of hearing recovery was evidenced between group A and C (P < 0.05); (3) A significant difference of hearing recovery was evidenced between group A and C (P < 0.05); (4) No statistically significant difference was found in the hearing recovery between group B and C (P > 0.05). Our data showed that intratympanic dexamethasone should be used as initial therapy for treating the moderate and severe sudden deafness with BPPV.

  7. Ischemic syndromes causing dizziness and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Choi, K-D; Lee, H; Kim, J-S

    2016-01-01

    Dizziness/vertigo and imbalance are the most common symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia. Even though dizziness/vertigo usually accompanies other neurologic symptoms and signs in cerebrovascular disorders, a diagnosis of isolated vascular vertigo is increasing markedly by virtue of recent developments in clinical neurotology and neuroimaging. It is important to differentiate isolated vertigo of a vascular cause from more benign disorders involving the inner ear, since therapeutic strategies and prognosis differ between these two conditions. Over the last decade, we have achieved a marked development in the understanding and diagnosis of vascular dizziness/vertigo. Introduction of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly enhanced detection of infarctions in patients with vascular dizziness/vertigo, especially in the posterior-circulation territories. However, well-organized bedside neurotologic evaluation is even more sensitive than MRI in detecting acute infarction as a cause of spontaneous prolonged vertigo. Furthermore, detailed evaluation of strategic infarctions has elucidated the function of various vestibular structures of the brainstem and cerebellum. In contrast, diagnosis of isolated labyrinthine infarction still remains a challenge. This diagnostic difficulty also applies to isolated transient dizziness/vertigo of vascular origin. Regarding the common nonlacunar mechanisms in the acute vestibular syndrome from small infarctions, individual strategies may be indicated to prevent recurrences of stroke in patients with vascular vertigo. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Point prevalence of vertigo and dizziness in a sample of 2672 subjects and correlation with headaches.

    PubMed

    Teggi, R; Manfrin, M; Balzanelli, C; Gatti, O; Mura, F; Quaglieri, S; Pilolli, F; Redaelli de Zinis, L O; Benazzo, M; Bussi, M

    2016-06-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are common symptoms in the general population, with an estimated prevalence between 20% and 56%. The aim of our work was to assess the point prevalence of these symptoms in a population of 2672 subjects. Patients were asked to answer a questionnaire; in the first part they were asked about demographic data and previous vertigo and or dizziness. Mean age of the sample was 48.3 ± 15 years, and 46.7% were males. A total of 1077 (40.3%) subjects referred vertigo/dizziness during their lifetime, and the mean age of the first vertigo attack was 39.2 ± 15.4 years; in the second part they were asked about the characteristics of vertigo (age of first episode, rotational vertigo, relapsing episodes, positional exacerbation, presence of cochlear symptoms) and lifetime presence of moderate to severe headache and its clinical features (hemicranial, pulsatile, associated with phono and photophobia, worse on effort). An age and sex effect was demonstrated, with symptoms 4.4 times more elevated in females and 1.8 times in people over 50 years. In the total sample of 2672 responders, 13.7% referred a sensation of spinning, 26.3% relapsing episodes, 12.9% positional exacerbation and 4.8% cochlear symptoms; 34.8% referred headache during their lifetime. Subjects suffering from headache presented an increased rate of relapsing episodes, positional exacerbation, cochlear symptoms and a lower age of occurrence of the first vertigo/dizziness episode. In the discussion, our data are compared with those of previous studies, and we underline the relationship between vertigo/dizziness from one side and headache with migrainous features on the other. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  9. Psychological distress longitudinally mediates the effect of vertigo symptoms on vertigo-related handicap.

    PubMed

    Probst, Thomas; Dinkel, Andreas; Schmid-Mühlbauer, Gabriele; Radziej, Katharina; Limburg, Karina; Pieh, Christoph; Lahmann, Claas

    2017-02-01

    Vertigo symptoms can lead to more or less vertigo-related handicap. This longitudinal study investigated whether depression, anxiety, and/or somatization mediate the relationship between vertigo symptoms and vertigo-related handicap. N=111 patients with vertigo/dizziness provided complete data on the following measures: Vertigo symptoms at baseline, depression at 6-month follow-up, anxiety at 6-month follow-up, somatization at 6-month follow-up, and vertigo handicap at 12-month follow-up. Mediation analyses with bootstrapping were performed to investigate the mediating role of anxiety, depression, and somatization in the relationship between vertigo symptoms and vertigo-related handicap. When the mediating role of anxiety, depression, and somatization was evaluated separately from each other in single mediation models, the effect vertigo symptoms at baseline exerted on vertigo-related handicap at 12-month follow-up was significantly mediated by depression at 6-month follow-up (p<0.05), by anxiety at 6-month follow-up (p<0.05), as well as by somatization at 6-month follow-up (p<0.05). When statistically controlling for the other mediators in a multiple mediator model, only depression at 6-month follow-up mediated the effect of vertigo symptoms at baseline on vertigo-related handicap at 12-month follow-up (p<0.05). Psychological distress is an important mechanism in the process how vertigo symptoms lead to vertigo-related handicap. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood.

    PubMed

    Drigo, P; Carli, G; Laverda, A M

    2001-03-01

    Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood (BPV) is a paroxysmal, non-epileptic, recurrent event characterized by subjective or objective vertigo that occurs in neurologically intact children. We recorded the history and the clinical aspects of 19 cases presenting with neurological problems to the outpatient clinic at the Pediatrics Department of Padova University between 1987 and 1998 and re-examined in 1999. Details were collected on the characteristics of their vertigo: age at onset, mode of onset, trigger factors, duration, frequency and recurrence of episodes, duration of symptoms in time and age at disappearance. An attempt was also made to establish any family history of migraine and kinetosis and the most important data were compared, when possible, with those reported in the literature. Differential diagnosis and pathogenetic hypothesis were also reported. It is worth emphasizing that it is important for pediatricians to be aware of these benign events to ensure a correct diagnostic approach, avoiding the child and family any pointless anxiety or costly and sometimes invasive diagnostic procedures.

  11. Evaluation and Treatment of the Patient with Vertigo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasscock, Michael E. III; Haynes, David S.

    1997-01-01

    The sensation of vertigo is a complex symptom that patients find difficult to describe, and physicians often find evaluating and treating patients with the vertigo a difficult task. This article outlines types and causes of vertigo and the work up, evaluation, and treatment of a patient with vertigo. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  12. Evaluation and Treatment of the Patient with Vertigo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasscock, Michael E. III; Haynes, David S.

    1997-01-01

    The sensation of vertigo is a complex symptom that patients find difficult to describe, and physicians often find evaluating and treating patients with the vertigo a difficult task. This article outlines types and causes of vertigo and the work up, evaluation, and treatment of a patient with vertigo. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  13. HINTS for differentiating peripheral from central causes of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Jaynstein, Dayna

    2016-10-01

    Dizziness and vertigo are common and difficult complaints encountered by providers. The differential diagnosis is large and varies from benign to life-threatening disorders. The true challenge becomes differentiating benign peripheral vertigo from central vertigo. The HINTS examination can help differentiate peripheral from central causes of dizziness and vertigo.

  14. How Commonly Is Stroke Found in Patients with Isolated Vertigo or Dizziness Attack?

    PubMed

    Doijiri, Ryosuke; Uno, Hisakazu; Miyashita, Kotaro; Ihara, Masafumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2016-10-01

    The sudden development of vertigo or dizziness without focal neurological symptoms is generally attributable to vestibular diseases such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Isolated vertigo or dizziness attack needs more attention than vestibular diseases. This retrospective study was performed to elucidate the frequency of strokes in patients with isolated vertigo or dizziness attack. We enrolled 221 patients (men, 119; women, 102; mean age, 68.4 ± 10.3 years) who were admitted to our hospital over the last 10 years because of sudden isolated vertigo or dizziness attack without other neurological symptoms except for nystagmus, deafness, or tinnitus. We investigated the clinical features, final diagnosis, neuroimaging findings, and short- or long-term outcome of these patients. One hundred eighteen patients had vertigo whereas the other 103 had dizziness. Brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging revealed recent stroke lesions in 25 patients (11.3%) (ischemic, 21; hemorrhagic, 4).The lesions were generally small and localized in the cerebellum (n = 21), pons (n = 1), medulla oblongata (n = 1), or corona radiata (n = 1). Of the 25 patients, 19 (76%) had dizzy-type spells; none had neurological dysfunction at the time of discharge. In the remaining 196 patients, no stroke was detected on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Stroke was found in 11% of patients with isolated vertigo or dizziness attack. The posterior inferior cerebellar artery area was the most frequently implicated for isolated vertigo or dizziness. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Importance of spontaneous nystagmus detection in the differential diagnosis of acute vertigo.

    PubMed

    Pavlin-Premrl, Davor; Waterston, John; McGuigan, Sean; Infeld, Bernard; Sultana, Ron; O'Sullivan, Richard; Gerraty, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Vertigo is a common cause of emergency department attendance. Detection of spontaneous nystagmus may be a useful sign in distinguishing vestibular neuritis from other vestibular diagnoses. We aimed to assess the contribution of spontaneous nystagmus in the diagnosis of acute vertigo. We enrolled consecutive consenting patients arriving at a single emergency department with acute vertigo. There was no declared protocol for the emergency department staff. A standardized history and examination was conducted by the investigators. Observation for spontaneous nystagmus, its response to visual fixation, and testing the vestibulo-ocular reflex with the horizontal head impulse test were the chief examination components. MRI was obtained within 24 hours. Clinical criteria and MRI were used to reach the final diagnosis. The investigators' physical findings and final neurological diagnosis were compared with the initial emergency department examination findings and the referral diagnosis. There were 28 patients, 15 with vestibular neuritis, six with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, one with stroke, suspected clinically, and three with migraine. In three the diagnosis remained uncertain. Spontaneous nystagmus was seen in all 15 patients with vestibular neuritis, fixation-suppressed in eight of 11 tested for this. The head impulse test was positive in 12 of 15 with vestibular neuritis. The emergency department referral diagnosis was correct in six of 23 patients. The ability to detect spontaneous nystagmus is useful in vestibular diagnosis, both in support of a diagnosis of vestibular neuritis and in avoiding false positive diagnoses of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Why do subjective vertigo and dizziness persist over one year after a vestibular vertigo syndrome?

    PubMed

    Best, Christoph; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Tschan, Regine; Dieterich, Marianne

    2009-05-01

    The overlap and interlinkage of dizzy symptoms in patients with psychiatric and vestibular vertigo/dizziness disorders is the subject of an ongoing debate. In a one-year follow up in 68 patients with vestibular vertigo syndromes, the persistency of vertigo and dizziness symptoms was examined and correlated with vestibular parameters and results from a psychiatric evaluation. Patients with vestibular migraine showed poorest improvement of vertigo and dizziness symptoms over time. In addition, patients who developed anxiety or depressive disorder after the onset of the vestibular disorder showed poor improvement and high persistency of symptoms.

  17. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  18. Incidence of dizziness and vertigo in Japanese primary care clinic patients with lifestyle-related diseases: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Masaoki; Takeshima, Taro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Oki, Hiroshi; Kajii, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dizziness and vertigo are highly prevalent symptoms among patients presenting at primary care clinics, and peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD) is their most frequent cause. However, the incidence of PVD has not been well documented. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD among patients presenting at a primary care clinic. Design This was an observational study. Setting and participants Between November 2011 and March 2013, we observed 393 patients, all at least 20 years old, who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for at least 6 months at a primary clinic (Oki Clinic) in Japan. Outcome The main outcome of interest was new incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD events. During the 1-year follow-up period, the otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported new PVD events. Results The mean age of the 393 participants at entry was 65.5 years. Of the study participants, 12.7%, 82.4%, and 92.6% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. We followed up all the participants (100%). During the 662.5 person-years of follow-up, 121 cases of dizziness or vertigo (dizziness/vertigo) and 76 cases of PVD were observed. The incidence of dizziness/vertigo and PVD was 194.7 (95% confidence interval: 161.6–232.6) per 1,000 person-years and 115.7 (95% confidence interval: 92.2–142.6) per 1,000 person-years, respectively. There were 61 cases of acute peripheral vestibulopathy, 12 of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and three of Meniere’s disease among the 76 PVD patients. Conclusion We reported the incidence of dizziness/vertigo among Japanese primary care clinic patients, which was higher than that usually observed in the general population. Furthermore, we described the incidence of PVD and found that it was a major cause of dizziness/vertigo. PMID:25931828

  19. Mastication-induced vertigo and nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Koo, Ja-Won; Oh, Seo Won; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Joon-Tae; Welgampola, Miriam; Deriu, Franca

    2014-03-01

    Even though trigeminovestibular connections are well established in animals, mastication-induced dizziness has been described only as a vascular steal phenomenon in humans. We determined induction or modulation of nystagmus in two index patients with mastication-induced vertigo, 12 normal controls, and 52 additional patients with peripheral (n = 38, 26 with vestibular neuritis/labyrinthitis and 12 with Meniere's disease) or central (n = 14, 11 with Wallenberg syndrome, two with cerebellar infarction, and one with pontine infarction) vestibulopathy during their acute or compensated phase. Both index patients developed mastication-induced vertigo after near complete resolution of the spontaneous vertigo from presumed acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy. The nystagmus and vertigo gradually built up during mastication and dissipated slowly after cessation of mastication. Brain MRI and cerebral angiography were normal in these patients. Mastication did not induce nystagmus in normal controls. However, mastication induced nystagmus in five (24 %) of the 21 patients without spontaneous nystagmus (SN) but with a previous history of a vestibular syndrome, and either increased (21/31, 68 %) or decreased (7/31, 23 %) the SN in almost all the patients (28/31, 90 %) with SN. Mastication may induce significant vertigo and nystagmus in patients with a prior history of acute vestibulopathy. The induction or modulation of nystagmus by mastication in both peripheral and central vestibulopathies supports trigeminal modulation of the vestibular system in human. The gradual build-up and dissipation suggest a role of the velocity storage mechanism in the generation of mastication-induced vertigo and nystagmus.

  20. Vertigo and nystagmus in orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-H; Seo, J-D; Kim, M-J; Choi, B-Y; Choi, Y R; Cho, B M; Kim, J S; Choi, K-D

    2015-04-01

    Generalized cerebral ischaemia from cardiovascular dysfunction usually leads to presyncopal dizziness, but several studies reported a higher frequency of rotatory vertigo in cardiovascular patients. Whether generalized cerebral ischaemia due to cardiovascular disorders may produce objective vestibular dysfunction was investigated. Thirty-three patients with orthostatic dizziness/vertigo due to profound orthostatic hypotension and 30 controls were recruited. All participants underwent recording of eye movements during two orthostatic challenging tests: the Schellong and the squatting-standing tests. Most patients had neuroimaging, and patients with abnormal eye movements were subjected to follow-up evaluations. Symptoms associated with orthostatic dizziness/vertigo included blurred vision, fainting and tinnitus. Ten (30%) of 33 patients developed rotatory vertigo and nystagmus during the Schellong (n = 5) or squatting-standing test (n = 5). Four of them showed pure downbeat nystagmus whilst five had downbeat and horizontal nystagmus with or without torsional component. Patients with orthostatic nystagmus had shorter duration of orthostatic intolerance than those without nystagmus (1.0 ± 1.6 vs. 11.0 ± 9.7 months, P < 0.001). In two patients, orthostatic nystagmus disappeared during follow-up despite the persistence of profound orthostatic hypotension. Generalized cerebral ischaemia caused by orthostatic hypotension induces rotatory vertigo due to objective vestibular dysfunction. The presence of orthostatic vertigo and nystagmus has an association with the duration of orthostatic intolerance. © 2014 EAN.

  1. Vertigo due to posterior circulation stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Hyung

    2013-07-01

    Stroke in the distribution of the posterior circulation may present as acute onset spontaneous vertigo and imbalance. Although vertigo due to posterior circulation stroke is usually associated with other neurologic symptoms or signs, small infarcts in the cerebellum or brainstem can present with vertigo without other localizing symptoms. Approximately 17% of patients with isolated posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarction presented with isolated vertigo, nystagmus, and postural unsteadiness. A head impulse test can differentiate acute isolated vertigo associated with cerebellar stroke from more benign disorders involving the inner ear. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss can be the initial symptom of impending posterior circulation ischemic stroke (particularly within the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery). In this case, evaluation of isolated audiovestibular loss may prevent the progression of acute vertigo and hearing loss into more widespread areas of infarction in the posterior circulation. In this article, the clinical syndromes and signs of acute vestibular syndrome due to posterior circulation stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum are summarized.

  2. Genetics of Recurrent Vertigo and Vestibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gazquez, Irene; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2011-01-01

    We present recent advances in the genetics of recurrent vertigo, including familial episodic ataxias, migraneous vertigo, bilateral vestibular hypofunction and Meniere’s disease. Although several vestibular disorders are more common within families, the genetics of vestibulopathies is largely not known. Genetic loci and clinical features of familial episodic ataxias have been defined in linkage disequilibrium studies with mutations in neuronal genes KCNA1 and CACNA1A. Migrainous vertigo is a clinical disorder with a high comorbidity within families much more common in females with overlapping features with episodic ataxia and migraine. Bilateral vestibular hypofunction is a heterogeneous clinical group defined by episodes of vertigo leading to progressive loss of vestibular function which also can include migraine. Meniere’s disease is a clinical syndrome characterized by spontaneous episodes of recurrent vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus and aural fullness and familial Meniere’s disease in around 10-20% of cases. An international collaborative effort to define the clinical phenotype and recruiting patients with migrainous vertigo and Meniere’s disease is ongoing for genome-wide association studies. PMID:22379397

  3. Vertigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of symptom triage is to decide when, and where, you should seek care when you have symptoms. Symptom triage does not replace a physician evaluation or make ...

  4. Period Prevalence of Dizziness and Vertigo in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Florian; Straube, Andreas; Filippopulos, Filipp; Landgraf, Mirjam N.; Gerstl, Lucia; Jahn, Klaus; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the period prevalence and severity of dizziness and vertigo in adolescents. Methods In 1661 students in 8th-10th grade in twelve grammar schools in Munich, Germany information on vertigo/dizziness was assessed by a questionnaire in the class room setting. Three month prevalence of dizziness/vertigo was estimated; symptoms were categorized as orthostatic dizziness, spinning vertigo, swaying vertigo or unspecified dizziness. Duration of symptoms and impact on daily life activities were assessed. Results 72.0% (95%-CI = [69.8–74.2]; N = 1196) of the students (mean age 14.5±1.1) reported to suffer from at least one episode of dizziness or vertigo in the last three months. Most adolescents ticked to have symptoms of orthostatic dizziness (52.0%, 95%-CI = [49.5–54.4], N = 863). The period prevalence for the other types of vertigo were spinning vertigo: 11.6%, 95%-CI = [10.1–13.3], N = 193; swaying vertigo: 12.2%, 95%-CI = [10.6–13.8], N = 202; and unspecified dizziness: 15.2%, 95%-CI = [13.5–17.1], N = 253. About 50% of students with spinning vertigo and swaying vertigo also report to have orthostatic dizziness. Most vertigo/dizziness types were confined to less than one minute on average. The proportion of students with any dizziness/vertigo accounting for failure attending school, leisure activities or obliging them to stay in bed were more pronounced for spinning or swaying vertigo. Conclusion Dizziness and vertigo in grammar school students appear to be as common as in adults. In face of the high period prevalence and clinical relevance of dizziness/vertigo in adolescents there is a need for prevention strategies. Risk factors for dizziness/vertigo need to be assessed to allow for conception of an intervention programme. PMID:26361225

  5. Period Prevalence of Dizziness and Vertigo in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Langhagen, Thyra; Albers, Lucia; Heinen, Florian; Straube, Andreas; Filippopulos, Filipp; Landgraf, Mirjam N; Gerstl, Lucia; Jahn, Klaus; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    To assess the period prevalence and severity of dizziness and vertigo in adolescents. In 1661 students in 8th-10th grade in twelve grammar schools in Munich, Germany information on vertigo/dizziness was assessed by a questionnaire in the class room setting. Three month prevalence of dizziness/vertigo was estimated; symptoms were categorized as orthostatic dizziness, spinning vertigo, swaying vertigo or unspecified dizziness. Duration of symptoms and impact on daily life activities were assessed. 72.0% (95%-CI = [69.8-74.2]; N = 1196) of the students (mean age 14.5±1.1) reported to suffer from at least one episode of dizziness or vertigo in the last three months. Most adolescents ticked to have symptoms of orthostatic dizziness (52.0%, 95%-CI = [49.5-54.4], N = 863). The period prevalence for the other types of vertigo were spinning vertigo: 11.6%, 95%-CI = [10.1-13.3], N = 193; swaying vertigo: 12.2%, 95%-CI = [10.6-13.8], N = 202; and unspecified dizziness: 15.2%, 95%-CI = [13.5-17.1], N = 253. About 50% of students with spinning vertigo and swaying vertigo also report to have orthostatic dizziness. Most vertigo/dizziness types were confined to less than one minute on average. The proportion of students with any dizziness/vertigo accounting for failure attending school, leisure activities or obliging them to stay in bed were more pronounced for spinning or swaying vertigo. Dizziness and vertigo in grammar school students appear to be as common as in adults. In face of the high period prevalence and clinical relevance of dizziness/vertigo in adolescents there is a need for prevention strategies. Risk factors for dizziness/vertigo need to be assessed to allow for conception of an intervention programme.

  6. Lateral medullary infarction presenting as isolated vertigo and unilateral loss of visual suppression.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Masahiko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Tomoe; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Kataoka, Manabu; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki

    2012-02-01

    Isolated vertigo is rare in lateral medullary infarction. We described early diagnostic challenges in such cases by a neuro-otological approach. We report a 56-year-old man who developed a lateral medullary infarction that presented as isolated vertigo. Before the day 4 from disease onset when diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became positive, this patient showed unilateral loss of visual suppression, a central type of vestibular dysfunction. Since MRI abnormalities may not appear in the early few days from disease onset, unilateral loss of visual suppression might become an important diagnostic option for isolated vertigo due to a lateral medullary infarction. This finding is presumably relevant to the inferior olive lesion.

  7. [Otogenic (labyrinthine) vertigo--when the ear fails to keep us in equilibrium].

    PubMed

    Krause, Eike; Gürkov, Robert; Hempel, John Martin

    2007-01-01

    The peripheral vestibular organ within the bony labyrinth of the inner ear is closely connected to the other parts of the equilibrium system. As a result of its constant active interaction with the other elements, it plays a major role in ensuring that we can maintain our balance. In the event of a disorder, otogenic vertigo can occur. Important evidence of a peripheral-vestibular disturbance is provided by the patient's history of dizziness, and confirmation of the suspected diagnosis is achieved by clinical and other appropriate examinations and tests. Common differential diagnoses include benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Ménière's disease, and vestibular neuropathy. These can be readily differentiated by applying a systematic approach, and usually respond to treatment. In recent years, improved diagnostic tools have made it possible to test the functioning of the otolith organs, and this may lead to new therapeutic options in labyrinthine vertigo in the future.

  8. La Mettrie's soul: vertigo, fever, massacre, and The Natural History.

    PubMed

    Hacking, Ian

    2009-01-01

    La Mettrie's materialist and monistic philosophy is that of a military doctor, knowing what dysentery did to his own mind, watching his regiment destroyed at Fontenoy, running French field hospitals in Flanders. He learned brain science in the injuries of his fellows. He knew pain and that man's main positive drive was sex. He despised the prudish hypocrisies of feeble materialists like Diderot and Voltaire. His brutal military life and his hedonism made him the most coherent monist against Cartesian dualism. His study of vertigo is sound clinical medicine, which well accords with one trend in today's medical practice.

  9. Vertigo and dizziness from environmental motion: visual vertigo, motion sickness, and drivers' disorientation.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Adolfo M; Golding, John F; Gresty, Michael A

    2013-07-01

    The normal vestibular system may be adversely affected by environmental challenges which have characteristics that are unfamiliar or ambiguous in the patterns of sensory stimulation they provide. A disordered vestibular system lends susceptibility even to quotidian environmental experiences as the sufferer becomes dependent on potentially misleading, nonvestibular sensory stimuli. In both cases, the sequelae may be vertigo, incoordination, imbalance, and unpleasant autonomic responses. Common environmental motion conditions include visual vertigo, motion sickness, and motorists' disorientation. The core therapy for visual vertigo, motion sickness, and drivers' disorientation is progressive desensitization within a cognitive framework of reassurance and explanation, plus anxiolytic tactics and autogenic control of autonomic symptoms.

  10. Evaluation of the patient with recurrent vertigo.

    PubMed

    Kaylie, David; Garrison, Douglas; Tucci, Debara L

    2012-06-01

    The evaluation of the patient with recurrent vertigo requires knowledge of vestibular anatomy and physiology. The patient's medical history and physical examination provide the majority of the information necessary for diagnosis. Many diagnostic tests are available to the clinician to aid in the diagnosis. Videonystagmography is useful for the evaluation of peripheral vestibular function and provides some information about central processes as well. Rotary chair testing provides excellent information about central processes and can aid in diagnosing peripheral vestibular impairment. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potential testing is sensitive for testing inferior vestibular nerve and saccule function. Many different medical and surgical options are available for the patient with recurrent vertigo.

  11. The development of a new questionnaire for cognitive complaints in vertigo: the Neuropsychological Vertigo Inventory (NVI).

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Emilie; Deggouj, Naima; Salvaggio, Samuel; Wiener, Valérie; Debue, Michel; Edwards, Martin Gareth

    2016-12-01

    Vertigo patients frequently complain of emotional and associated cognitive problems, yet currently, there is no satisfactory questionnaire to measure these associated problems. In the present paper, we propose a new internet-based Neuropsychological Vertigo Inventory (NVI; French) that evaluates attention, memory, emotion, space perception, time perception, vision, and motor abilities. The questionnaire was created using four steps: (1) open interviews with patients suffering from vertigo; (2) semi-structured interviews with an analysis grid to quantify and define the various cognitive and emotional problems reported by the patients; (3) a first version of an internet questionnaire tested on 108 vertigo participants; and (4) the selection of subscale items using principal component analyses (PCA). From the development phase, the revised NVI was composed of seven subscales, each with four items (28 items). In the validation phase, Cronbach's alphas were performed on the revised NVI for total and each subscale score, and to test extreme groups validity, the analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) taking into account age were performed between 108 vertigo and 104 non-vertigo participants. The Cronbach's alphas showed good to satisfactory coefficients for the total and for all subscale scores, demonstrating acceptable reliability. The extreme groups validity analyses (ANCOVAs) were reliable for the total scale and for four subscales. Supplementary analyses showed no effect of hearing difficulties and an inverse age effect for attention and emotion subscales, with reduced problems with increased age in the vertigo participants. The NVI provides a useful new questionnaire to determine cognitive and emotional neuropsychological complaints that are associated with vertigo.

  12. [Cardinal symptom vertigo from the neurologist's perspective].

    PubMed

    Strupp, M; Muth, C; Böttcher, N; Bayer, O; Teufel, J; Feil, K; Bremova, T; Kremmyda, O; Fischer, C S

    2013-09-01

    In most patients with vertigo, the first and clinically most important question posed to neurologists is whether it is a central or a peripheral syndrome. In more than 90 % of cases, this differentiation is made possible by systematically recording the patient history (asking about the type of vertigo, the duration, triggers and accompanying symptoms) and conducting a physical examination. Particularly in the case of acute vertigo disorders, a five-step procedure has proven useful: 1. A cover test to look for vertical divergence (skew deviation) as a central sign and component of the ocular tilt reaction (OTR); 2. Examination with and without Frenzel goggles to differentiate between peripheral vestibular spontaneous nystagmus and central fixation nystagmus; 3. Examination of smooth pursuit; 4. Examination of the gaze-holding function (particularly gaze-evoked nystagmus beating in the opposite direction to spontaneous nystagmus); 5. The head impulse test to look for a deficit in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Considerable advances have been made in the pharmacotherapy of vertigo disorders during the last 10 years, including cortisone for the treatment of acute vestibular neuritis, betahistine as a high-dose long-term treatment for Menière's disease, carbamazepine to treat vestibular paroxysmia and aminopyridine for down- and upbeat nystagmus and episodic ataxia type 2.

  13. Dizziness, vertigo, and presyncope: what's the difference?

    PubMed

    Saccomano, Scott J

    2012-12-10

    Dizziness is a general term used to express subjective patient complaints related to changes in sensation, movement, perception, or consciousness. There are four types of dizziness: vertigo, disequilibrium, presyncope/syncope, and dizziness as a result of psychological disturbances. Differentiating the type of dizziness will assist in the course of the evaluation.

  14. [Recent surgical options for vestibular vertigo].

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Dazert, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Vertigo is not a well defined symptom but a heterogenous entity diagnosed and treated mainly by otolaryngologists, neurologists, internal medicine and primary care physicians. Most vertigo syndroms have a good prognosis and management is predominantly conservative, whereas the need for surgical therapy is rare, but for a subset of patients often the only remaining option. In this paper, we describe the development of surgical therapy for hydropic inner ear diseases, Menière disease, dehiscence syndroms, perilymphatic fistulas, and benign paroxysmal vertigo. At the end, we shortly introduce the most recent development of vestibular implants. Surgical vestibular therapy is still indicated for selected patients nowadays when conservative options did not reduce symptoms and patients are still suffering. Success depends on the correct diagnosis and indication for the different procedures going along with an adequate patient selection. In regard to the invasiveness and the possible risks due to the surgery, in depth individual counselling is necessary. Ablative and destructive surgical procedures usually achieve a successful vertigo control, but go along with a high risk for hearing loss. Therefore, residual hearing has to be included in the decission making process for a surgical therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Vertigo in childhood: a retrospective series of 100 children.

    PubMed

    Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Anlar, Banu; Topçu, Meral; Turanlı, Güzide; Aysun, Sabiha

    2015-03-01

    Evaluation and management of vertigo in children vary between institutions and medical specialties. The aim of this study is to describe the characteristics of vertigo in children presenting to a pediatric neurology referral center and to investigate the relationship between vertigo and migraine. Patients <18 years old presenting with vertigo to Hacettepe University Ihsan Dogramaci Children's Hospital Neurology Unit between January 1996-January 2012 were included (n = 100). Data were obtained from patient files and phone interviews. Mean age was 7.5 years. The most common etiological groups were benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood (BPVC) (39%), psychogenic vertigo (21%), epileptic vertigo (15%), and migraine-associated vertigo (MAV) (11%). BPVC was the most common diagnosis in children ≤5 years of age while psychogenic vertigo prevailed in children >5 years. Staring episodes characterized epileptic vertigo patients (p = 0.021) while headache was more often described by MAV patients (p < 0.001). Vertigo attacks >5 min were uncommon in BPVC patients compared to others (p = 0.013). Twenty percent of BPVC patients contacted through phone interviews were experiencing migraine type headaches that started at a median age of 7.5 years. An algorithm for evaluation of children with vertigo was formed based on data obtained from this study and the literature. When this algorithm was applied to 100 cases of this series, 88 (88%) were correctly diagnosed. While most vertigo cases in children can be diagnosed accurately by a detailed medical history, physical and neurological examination, a standard algorithm can help with the correct classification. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Can emergency physicians accurately and reliably assess acute vertigo in the emergency department?

    PubMed

    Vanni, Simone; Nazerian, Peiman; Casati, Carlotta; Moroni, Federico; Risso, Michele; Ottaviani, Maddalena; Pecci, Rudi; Pepe, Giuseppe; Vannucchi, Paolo; Grifoni, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    To validate a clinical diagnostic tool, used by emergency physicians (EPs), to diagnose the central cause of patients presenting with vertigo, and to determine interrater reliability of this tool. A convenience sample of adult patients presenting to a single academic ED with isolated vertigo (i.e. vertigo without other neurological deficits) was prospectively evaluated with STANDING (SponTAneousNystagmus, Direction, head Impulse test, standiNG) by five trained EPs. The first step focused on the presence of spontaneous nystagmus, the second on the direction of nystagmus, the third on head impulse test and the fourth on gait. The local standard practice, senior audiologist evaluation corroborated by neuroimaging when deemed appropriate, was considered the reference standard. Sensitivity and specificity of STANDING were calculated. On the first 30 patients, inter-observer agreement among EPs was also assessed. Five EPs with limited experience in nystagmus assessment volunteered to participate in the present study enrolling 98 patients. Their average evaluation time was 9.9 ± 2.8 min (range 6-17). Central acute vertigo was suspected in 16 (16.3%) patients. There were 13 true positives, three false positives, 81 true negatives and one false negative, with a high sensitivity (92.9%, 95% CI 70-100%) and specificity (96.4%, 95% CI 93-38%) for central acute vertigo according to senior audiologist evaluation. The Cohen's kappas of the first, second, third and fourth steps of the STANDING were 0.86, 0.93, 0.73 and 0.78, respectively. The whole test showed a good inter-observer agreement (k = 0.76, 95% CI 0.45-1). In the hands of EPs, STANDING showed a good inter-observer agreement and accuracy validated against the local standard of care. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. Surgery for vertigo: 10-year audit from a contemporary vertigo clinic.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, U; Srivastava, A; Sikka, K; Thakar, A

    2015-12-01

    To present the profile of patients undergoing surgical treatment for vertigo at a contemporary institutional vertigo clinic. A retrospective analysis of clinical charts. The charts of 1060 patients, referred to an institutional vertigo clinic from January 2003 to December 2012, were studied. The clinical profile and long-term outcomes of patients who underwent surgery were analysed. Of 1060 patients, 12 (1.13 per cent) were managed surgically. Of these, disease-modifying surgical procedures included perilymphatic fistula repair (n = 7) and microvascular decompression of the vestibular nerve (n = 1). Labyrinth destructive procedures included transmastoid labyrinthectomy (n = 2) and labyrinthectomy with vestibular nerve section (n = 1). One patient with vestibular schwannoma underwent both a disease-modifying and destructive procedure (translabyrinthine excision). All patients achieved excellent vertigo control, classified as per the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 1995 criteria. With the advent of intratympanic treatments, surgical treatments for vertigo have become further limited. However, surgery with directed intent, in select patients, can give excellent results.

  18. Migraine-related vertigo and somatoform vertigo frequently occur in children and are often associated.

    PubMed

    Langhagen, Thyra; Schroeder, A Sebastian; Rettinger, Nicole; Borggraefe, Ingo; Jahn, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    Migraine-related syndromes are a common cause of episodic vertigo and dizziness in children. Somatoform vertigo (SV) is an important cause of chronic dizziness, especially in adolescents. Our aim was to elucidate the comorbidity of migraine and SV. Three diagnostic groups were defined: migraine-related vertigo (MRV), SV, and combined migraine-related and SV (MSV). A retrospective analysis was performed on patient data (demographics, diagnosis, neuro-orthoptic and neurologic status, and results of vestibular and balance testing) from 168 patients who were presented to the German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders (IFB) over a 2.5-year period. Mean age of patients was 12 ± 4 years (range: 1.4 to 18 years). The most frequent diagnosis was MRV (28%), followed by MSV (19%) and SV (14%). MSV occurred most frequently in adolescent girls (25%). MRV was the most common cause of dizziness in our cohort. MSV ranked second overall but ranked first in adolescent girls, followed by isolated SV. SV was most prevalent in adolescent girls. MRV, MSV, and SV account for about 60% of diagnoses established in our tertiary referral center. Competent care of childhood migraine should include skill in detecting both the clinical symptoms of vertigo and overlapping somatoform symptoms.

  19. Vertigo in downhill mountain biking and road cycling.

    PubMed

    Lion, Alexis; Vibert, Dominique; Bosser, Gilles; Gauchard, Gérome C; Perrin, Philippe P

    2016-01-01

    Vertigo has been described after the practice of mountain bike. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of vertigo following competitions or training sessions of downhill mountain biking (DMB) or road cycling (RC). One hundred and two DMB riders, 79 road cyclists and 73 control participants filled in a survey intended to evaluate the prevalence of vertigo in daily living activities and following competitions or training sessions. Vertigo causal factors (crashes, head trauma, fatigue, characteristics of the path/road ridden) were recorded. DMB riders and road cyclists did not report more vertigo during daily living activities than controls. But DMB riders older than 30 had more risk to report vertigo than age-matched road cyclists (OR: 5.06, 95% CI: 1.23-20.62). Road cyclists aged between 20 and 29 were 2.59-fold (95% CI: 1.06-6.27) more likely to report vertigo than controls. After competitions and training sessions, DMB riders were 2.33-fold (95% CI: 1.22-4.41) more likely to report vertigo than road cyclists. Vertigo causal factors were crash with head trauma in DMB riders and fatigue in road cyclists. Vertigo during daily living activities may be of concern for cyclists, particularly older DMB riders. The accumulation of impacts (crashes, vibrations) during the career of a DMB rider may generate micro-traumatisms of the central nervous system and/or peripheral vestibular structures, particularly the otolith organs. In RC, the pathophysiological mechanisms generating vertigo might be effort-related disturbance of homeostasis. To avoid injuries, DMB riders should be aware that vertigo may occur at the end of training sessions or competitions.

  20. Vertigo. How serious are recurrent and single attacks?

    PubMed

    Slater, R

    1988-10-01

    Through history taking and physical examination, the primary care physician should be able to distinguish between the four most common causes of recurrent vertigo. Particular caution is advised when dealing with the first attack of vertigo, because more sinister possibilities may be present, although most of the disorders that cause vertigo are benign. Categories of treatment that can be used include medical, rehabilitative or exercise-related, surgical, dietary, and unconventional (eg, acupuncture, manipulation).

  1. [Internet survey of the relationship between vertigo and stress].

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Horiike, Osamu; Okuda, Takeshi; Takemoto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Masahiro

    2003-09-01

    We studied the relationship between vertigo and stress, using an internet survey. A questionnaire posted on our homepage quantified and measured 4 categories: cause of anxiety, behavioral characteristics, mean of relaxation, and frequency of vertigo. There were 6065 responses. Scores for the cause of anxiety were significantly greater and scores of means of relaxation were less in older than younger respondents. Scores for the cause of anxiety and behavioral characteristics were singificantly greater in more frequent than less frequent vertigo. Scores for means of relaxation were less in frequent vertigo. These findings indicate an intimate relationship between the onset of vestibular disorder and stress.

  2. [Study of cerebellar infarction with isolated vertigo].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Ai; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kimura, Yu; Koizuka, Izumi; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2010-07-01

    Isolated vertigo is generally attributed to labyrinthine disease, but may also signal otherwise asymptomatic cerebellar infarction. Of 309 subjects admitted between April 2004 and March 2009 for the single symptom of acute vertigo initially thought to be labyrinthine, four were found to have cerebellar infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery area (PICA). All were over 60 years old and had risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, arrhythmia, and/or hyperlipidemia. Two had trunk ataxia, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing infarction within a few days. The other two could walk without apparent trunk ataxia, however, it took 4 to 7 days to find the infarction, mainly through neurological, neurootological, and MRI findings. Neurologically, astasia, dysbasia or trunk ataxia were important signs. Neurootologically, nystagmus and electronystagmographic testing involving eye tracking, saccade, and optokinetic patttens were useful.

  3. [Hyperinsulinemia in vertigo, tinnitus and hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Doroszewska, Grazyna; Kaźmierczak, Henryk

    2002-01-01

    48 patients (25 woman, mean age 42 +/- 9.9 years and 23 men, mean age 46.6 +/- 8.3 years) suffering from vertigo, tinnitus and hearing loss of unknown origin were included into this study. The occurrence and coexistence of symptoms was measured. Insulin levels were measured fasting and at the second hour of OGTT. Results were compared with the control group of 31 healthy persons (16 women, mean age 41.3 +/- 5.6 years and 15 men, mean age 47.6 +/- 9.4 years). The character of vertigo, localization of hearing loss and electronystagmographic findings showed the pathology of the inner ear. The occurrence of hyperinsulinemia was significantly more common in the patients group--43.8%, comparing to the control group--22.6%. Also the insulin levels in the second hour of OGTT, were statistically significantly higher in patients that in the control group.

  4. [Height vertigo, fear of heights, acrophobia].

    PubMed

    Rennert, H

    1990-06-01

    Height vertigo (acrophobia) is a very frequent phenomenon being of interest for its physiological and psychological background, though usually only of limited significance in neuropsychiatry and otology. The different aspects as to its nature and origin are discussed. If acrophobia has developed into a conditioned reaction of avoidance with pressure of suffering, or acrophobia in persons, who have to work at heights, behavior therapeutic measures with systematic desensibilisation, starting from an imaginative training, are indicated.

  5. The Neural Correlates of Chronic Symptoms of Vertigo Proneness in Humans.

    PubMed

    Alsalman, Ola; Ost, Jan; Vanspauwen, Robby; Blaivie, Catherine; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness. The vestibular network governs functions that might be impaired in patients affected with vestibular dysfunction. It is currently unclear how different brain regions/networks process vestibular information and integrate the information into a unified spatial percept related to somatosensory awareness and whether people with recurrent balance complaints have a neural signature as a trait affecting their development of chronic symptoms of vertigo. Pivotal evidence points to a vestibular-related brain network in humans that is widely distributed in nature. By using resting state source localized electroencephalography in non-vertiginous state, electrophysiological changes in activity and functional connectivity of 23 patients with balance complaints where chronic symptoms of vertigo and dizziness are among the most common reported complaints are analyzed and compared to healthy subjects. The analyses showed increased alpha2 activity within the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneues/cuneus and reduced beta3 and gamma activity within the pregenual and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex for the subjects with balance complaints. These electrophysiological variations were correlated with reported chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity. A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, there was a positive correlation between chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity and increased alpha-gamma nesting in the left frontal eye field. When compared to healthy subjects, there is evidence of electrophysiological changes in the brain of patients with balance complaints even outside chronic symptoms of vertigo

  6. The Neural Correlates of Chronic Symptoms of Vertigo Proneness in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Alsalman, Ola; Ost, Jan; Vanspauwen, Robby; Blaivie, Catherine; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness. The vestibular network governs functions that might be impaired in patients affected with vestibular dysfunction. It is currently unclear how different brain regions/networks process vestibular information and integrate the information into a unified spatial percept related to somatosensory awareness and whether people with recurrent balance complaints have a neural signature as a trait affecting their development of chronic symptoms of vertigo. Pivotal evidence points to a vestibular-related brain network in humans that is widely distributed in nature. By using resting state source localized electroencephalography in non-vertiginous state, electrophysiological changes in activity and functional connectivity of 23 patients with balance complaints where chronic symptoms of vertigo and dizziness are among the most common reported complaints are analyzed and compared to healthy subjects. The analyses showed increased alpha2 activity within the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneues/cuneus and reduced beta3 and gamma activity within the pregenual and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex for the subjects with balance complaints. These electrophysiological variations were correlated with reported chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity. A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, there was a positive correlation between chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity and increased alpha-gamma nesting in the left frontal eye field. When compared to healthy subjects, there is evidence of electrophysiological changes in the brain of patients with balance complaints even outside chronic symptoms of vertigo

  7. Bilateral subclavian steal syndrome with vertigo.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Sawai, Yachiyo; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Subclavian steal syndrome (SSS) is usually caused by unilateral subclavian artery (SA) occlusion, and bilateral SSS is very rare. Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is a chronic granulomatous form of vasculitis that affects the SA, most commonly in women aged 15-40 years. We report a rare case of bilateral SSS due to TA in a 52-year-old woman, who exhibited severe vertigo. Although her blood pressure was within the normal range and did not differ between her arms, Doppler ultrasonography revealed low antegrade blood flow in the right SA and retrograde flow in the left SA. Computed tomography angiography demonstrated complete obstruction of the bilateral SA proximal to the vertebral artery origin. The more marked decrease in the blood flow of the vertebrobasilar artery experienced in bilateral SSS compared with unilateral SSS is considered to have caused the severe rotatory vertigo in the present patient. Since the vascular conditions of TA progressively deteriorate, delayed diagnosis and treatment could result in poor outcomes and unfavorable prognosis. We suggest that SSS with TA might require an early detection and treatment as well as careful follow-up for preventing vertigo and other neurological deficits in the vertebrobasilar arterial region.

  8. Relationship of the changes of cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP in patients with “isolated” vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wenzhen; Zhang, Xueqing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship and changes of cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP in patients with “isolated” vertigo. Methods: The relationship and changes of cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP were investigated respectively in 125 patients with “isolated” vertigo and 100 healthy controls. Results: There were statistically significant differences between two groups for overall abnormalities of TCD (X2 = 61.96, P<0.01), BAEP (X2 = 97.99, P<0.01), and cervical MRI severity scale (Z = -8.71, P<0.01). In vertigo group, results showed significant correlations between TCD and cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP as well. And analysis on TCD PI and some items of BAEP demonstrated positive linear correlations. There were no statistical differences or correlations in control group. Conclusions: TCD is a sensitive method of “isolated” vertigo screening. A combined test protocol of cervical MRI, TCD and BAEP has superiorities to assess “isolated” vertigo. PMID:25197392

  9. Vertigo/dizziness as a Drugs’ adverse reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chimirri, Serafina; Aiello, Rossana; Mazzitello, Carmela; Mumoli, Laura; Palleria, Caterina; Altomonte, Mariolina; Citraro, Rita; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Vertigo, dizziness, and nausea encompass a spectrum of balance-related symptoms caused by a variety of etiologies. Balance is affected by many systems: Proprioceptive pathways and visual, cerebellar, vestibulocochlear, and vascular / vasovagal systems. Vertigo is a subtype of dizziness, in which a subject, as a result to a dysfunction of the vestibular system, improperly experiments the perception of motion. The most useful clinical subdivision is to categorize vertigo into true vertigo and pseudovertigo, whereas from a pathophysiological point of view, vertigo can be classified into central, peripheral, and psychogenic. It is not easy to identify the cause of vertigo since the patients often are not able to precisely describe their symptoms. An impressive list of drugs may cause vertigo or dizziness. Materials and Methods: The aim of the present study was to analyze the data extracted from the reporting cards of the ADRs (adverse drug reactions), received at our Pharmacovigilance Regional Center (Calabria, Italy) in 2012. In particular, the data concerning the occurrence of vertigo and dizziness, after taking certain classes of drugs, have been considered. Results: Our results show that, among the side-effects of different classes of drugs such as anti-convulsants, anti-hypertensives, antibiotics, anti-depressants, anti-psychotics, and anti-inflammatory, also vertigo or dizziness are included. Conclusions: Spontaneous reports of vertigo or dizziness, as side-effect of certain drugs, received at our Pharmacovigilance Center, represented the 5% of all reports in 2012. Considering the high incidence of such an ADR for several drugs’ classes, it can be speculated that under-reporting also affect vertigo and dizziness. Despite the fact that these ADRs might not represent a direct threaten for life, indirectly they can cause secondary damage to patients such as falls, fractures etc. Balance should be accurately monitored during drug use and particularly

  10. Time course of episodes of definitive vertigo in Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garrigues, Herminio; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A; Perez, Paz; Sanz, Ricardo; Orts, Miguel; Marco, Jaime; Barona, Rafael; Tapia, Mari C; Aran, Ismael; Cenjor, Carlos; Perez, Nicolas; Morera, Constantino; Ramirez, Rafael

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the frequency and duration of episodes of definitive vertigo in Ménière's disease. Prospective longitudinal study. Multiple tertiary referral centers. Five hundred ten individuals from 8 hospitals that met the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery diagnostic criteria for definitive Ménière's disease. Conservative treatment. Frequency and duration of episodes of definitive vertigo during follow-up. Ménière's disease affects both sexes and both ears equally, with onset generally in the fourth decade of life. The number of episodes of vertigo is greater in the first few years of the disease. Although episodes of vertigo that last longer than 6 hours are less frequent than shorter episodes, they occur with similar frequency throughout the natural course of the disease. The percentage of patients without episodes of vertigo increases as the disease progresses, and 70% of patients who did not have an episode of vertigo for 1 year will continue to be free of episodes during the following year. Thus, there is a relationship between the frequency of episodes in consecutive years, although this association decreases rapidly as the number of years increases. The frequency of definitive episodes of vertigo in Ménière's disease decreased during follow-up, and many individuals reached a steady-state phase free of vertigo.

  11. Benign paroxysmal vertigo, and Bárány's caloric reactions.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2007-01-01

    The Nobel Prize winner Robert Bárány described benign positional vertigo and related it to the otoliths in 1921. Dix and Hallpike further elucidated this clinically distinctive, common disorder in 1952. The displacement of otoliths from the utricle or saccule into one of the semicircular canals later proved to be the underlying mechanism, described by Schuknecht and utilised therapeutically by Semont and Epley.

  12. Does the longus colli have an effect on cervical vertigo?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Pan, Fu-Min; Yong, Zhi-Yao; Ba, Zhao-yu; Wang, Shan-Jin; Liu, Zheng; Zhao, Wei-dong; Wu, De-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the longus colli muscles in cervical vertigo. We retrospectively analyzed 116 adult patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) during 2014 in our department. Patients were assigned to the vertigo group or the nonvertigo group. Demographic data were recorded. Inner distance and cross-sectional area (CSA) of longus colli were measured using coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The vertigo group (n = 44) and the nonvertigo group (n = 72) were similar in demographic data. Mean preoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was higher in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group (P = 0.037), but no difference postoperatively. Mean JOA scores increased significantly postoperatively in both groups (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001). The mean vertigo score decreased significantly from pre- to postoperatively in the vertigo group (P = 0.023). The mean preoperative Cobb angle was significantly smaller in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group (P <0.001), but no significant difference postoperatively. After ACDF, the mean Cobb angle increased significantly in the vertigo group (P <0.001). The instability rates of C3/4 and C4/5 were significantly higher in the vertigo group (P <0.001 and P <0.001). The inner distance of longus colli was significantly shorter (P = 0.032 and P = 0.026) and CSA significantly smaller (P = 0.041 and P = 0.035), at C3/4 and C4/5 in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group. Mean Miyazaki scores were significantly higher in the vertigo group at C3/4 and C4/5 (P = 0.044 and P = 0.037). Moreover, a shorter inner distance and smaller CSA were related to a higher Miyazaki score. Inner distance and cross-sectional area (CSA) of longus colli are associated closely with cervical vertigo. Shorter inner distance and smaller CSA of the longus colli muscles might be risk factors for cervical vertigo. ACDF

  13. Probable Correlation between Temporomandibular Dysfunction and Vertigo in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Meneses-Barrivieira, Caroline Luiz; Melo, Juliana Jandre; Macedo, Julya; Bruniera, Juliana Ribeiro Zuculin; Gorres, Vanessa Cristina; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) covers a variety of clinical problems, and some epidemiologic studies have tried to indicate mechanisms of interaction and association between vertigo and TMD, but this topic still is controversial. Objective To assess the presence of vertigo in elderly patients associated with TMD. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with the inclusion of elderly individuals who lived independently. TMD was assessed by dental evaluation and vertigo was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square and relative risk. Results There was a significant association (p = 0.0256) between the TMD and vertigo (odds ratio = 2.3793). Conclusion These results highlighted the importance of identifying risk factors for vertigo that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential to prevent future episodes, as well as managing the process of rehabilitation of elderly patients in general. PMID:25992063

  14. [Thinking about vertigo effectiveness evaluation methods in clinical research of Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-mei; Li, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Vertigo is a kind of patients' subjective feelings. The severity of vertigo is closely related to many factors. But we are short of a well accepted quantitative evaluation method capable of accurately and comprehensively evaluating vertigo in clinics. Reducing the onset of vertigo, enhancing the re- covery of equilibrium function, and improving the quality of life of vertigo patients should be taken as the focus of evaluating therapeutic effects. As for establishing a Chinese medical effectiveness evaluation system for vertigo, we believe we should distinguish different "diseases". We could roughly identify it as systemic vertigo and non-systemic vertigo. For systemic vertigo, the efficacy of vertigo could be comprehensively evaluated by UCLA vertigo questionnaire or dizziness handicap inventory combined with equilibrium function testing indices. But for non-systemic vertigo, the efficacy of vertigo could be comprehensively evaluated by taking UCLA vertigo questionnaire or dizziness handicap inventory as main efficacy indices. Secondly, we should analyze different reasons for vertigo, choose symptoms and signs in line with vertigo features as well as with Chinese medical theories, and formulate corresponding syndrome effectiveness standards according to different diseases. We should not simply take syndrome diagnosis standards as efficacy evaluation standards.

  15. Vertebrobasilar system computed tomographic angiography in central vertigo.

    PubMed

    Paşaoğlu, Lale

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of vertigo in the population is 20% to 30% and one-fourth of the cases are related to central causes. The aim of this study was to evaluate computed tomography angiography (CTA) findings of the vertebrobasilar system in central vertigo without stroke.CTA and magnetic resonance images of patients with vertigo were retrospectively evaluated. One hundred twenty-nine patients suspected of having central vertigo according to history, physical examination, and otological and neurological tests without signs of infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were included in the study. The control group included 120 patients with similar vascular disease risk factors but without vertigo. Vertebral and basilar artery diameters, hypoplasias, exit-site variations of vertebral artery, vertebrobasilar tortuosity, and stenosis of ≥50% detected on CTA were recorded for all patients. Independent-samples t test was used in variables with normal distribution, and Mann-Whitney U test in non-normal distribution. The difference of categorical variable distribution according to groups was analyzed with χ and/or Fisher exact test.Vertebral artery hypoplasia and ≥50% stenosis were seen more often in the vertigo group (P = 0.000, <0.001). Overall 78 (60.5%) vertigo patients had ≥50% stenosis, 54 (69.2%) had stenosis at V1 segment, 9 (11.5%) at V2 segment, 2 (2.5%) at V3 segment, and 13 (16.6%) at V4 segment. Both vertigo and control groups had similar basilar artery hypoplasia and ≥50% stenosis rates (P = 0.800, >0.05).CTA may be helpful to clarify the association between abnormal CTA findings of vertebral arteries and central vertigo.This article reveals the opportunity to diagnose posterior circulation abnormalities causing central vertigo with a feasible method such as CTA.

  16. Vertebrobasilar system computed tomographic angiography in central vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Paşaoğlu, Lale

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of vertigo in the population is 20% to 30% and one-fourth of the cases are related to central causes. The aim of this study was to evaluate computed tomography angiography (CTA) findings of the vertebrobasilar system in central vertigo without stroke. CTA and magnetic resonance images of patients with vertigo were retrospectively evaluated. One hundred twenty-nine patients suspected of having central vertigo according to history, physical examination, and otological and neurological tests without signs of infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were included in the study. The control group included 120 patients with similar vascular disease risk factors but without vertigo. Vertebral and basilar artery diameters, hypoplasias, exit-site variations of vertebral artery, vertebrobasilar tortuosity, and stenosis of ≥50% detected on CTA were recorded for all patients. Independent-samples t test was used in variables with normal distribution, and Mann–Whitney U test in non-normal distribution. The difference of categorical variable distribution according to groups was analyzed with χ2 and/or Fisher exact test. Vertebral artery hypoplasia and ≥50% stenosis were seen more often in the vertigo group (P = 0.000, <0.001). Overall 78 (60.5%) vertigo patients had ≥50% stenosis, 54 (69.2%) had stenosis at V1 segment, 9 (11.5%) at V2 segment, 2 (2.5%) at V3 segment, and 13 (16.6%) at V4 segment. Both vertigo and control groups had similar basilar artery hypoplasia and ≥50% stenosis rates (P = 0.800, >0.05). CTA may be helpful to clarify the association between abnormal CTA findings of vertebral arteries and central vertigo. This article reveals the opportunity to diagnose posterior circulation abnormalities causing central vertigo with a feasible method such as CTA. PMID:28328808

  17. True Vertigo Patients in Emergency Department; an Epidemiologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Shahrami, Ali; Norouzi, Mehdi; Kariman, Hamid; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vertigo prevalence is estimated to be 1.8% among young adults and more than 30% in the elderly. 13-38% of the referrals of patients over 65 years old in America are due to vertigo. Vertigo does not increase the risk of mortality but it can affect the patient’s quality of life. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the epidemiologic characteristics of vertigo patients referred to the emergency department (ED). Methods: In this 6-month retrospective cross-sectional study, the profiles of all vertigo patients referred to the ED of Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from October 2013 to March 2014 were evaluated. Demographic data and baseline characteristics of the patients were recorded and then patients were divided into central and peripheral vertigo. The correlation of history and clinical examination with vertigo type was evaluated and screening performance characteristics of history and clinical examination in differentiating central and peripheral vertigo were determined. Results: 379 patients with the mean age of 50.69 ± 11.94 years (minimum 18 and maximum 86) were enrolled (58.13% female). There was no sex difference in vertigo incidence (p = 0.756). A significant correlation existed between older age and increase in frequency of central cases (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected between the treatment protocols regarding ED length of stay (p = 0.72). There was a significant overlap between the initial diagnosis and the final decision based on imaging and neurologist’s final opinion (p < 0.001). In the end, 361 (95.3%) patients were discharged from ED, while 18 were disposed to the neurology ward. No case of mortality was reported. Conclusion: Sensitivity and specificity of history and clinical examination in differentiating central and peripheral vertigo were 99 (95% CI: 57-99) and 99 (95% CI: 97-99), respectively PMID:26862546

  18. Did Vertigo Kill America's Forgotten Astronaut?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendrick, Gregg A.; Merlin, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    On November 15, 1967, U.S. Air Force test pilot Major Michael J. Adams was killed while flying the X-15 rocket-propelled research vehicle in a parabolic spaceflight profile. This flight was part of a joint effort with NASA. An electrical short in one of the experiments aboard the vehicle caused electrical transients, resulting in excessive workload by the pilot. At altitude Major Adams inappropriately initiated a flat spin that led to a series of unusual aircraft attitudes upon atmospheric re-entry, ultimately causing structural failure of the airframe. Major Adams was known to experience vertigo (i.e. spatial disorientation) while flying the X-15, but all X-15 pilots most likely experienced vertigo (i.e. somatogravic, or "Pitch-Up", illusion) as a normal physiologic response to the accelerative forces involved. Major Adams probably experienced vertigo to a greater degree than did others, since prior aeromedical testing for astronaut selection at Brooks AFB revealed that he had an unusually high degree of labyrinthine sensitivity. Subsequent analysis reveals that after engine burnout, and through the zenith of the flight profile, he likely experienced the oculoagravic ("Elevator") illusion. Nonetheless, painstaking investigation after the mishap revealed that spatial disorientation (Type II, Recognized) was NOT the cause, but rather, a contributing factor. The cause was in fact the misinterpretation of a dual-use flight instrument (i.e. Loss of Mode Awareness), resulting in confusion between yaw and roll indications, with subsequent flight control input that was inappropriate. Because of the altitude achieved on this flight, Major Adams was awarded Astronaut wings posthumously. Understanding the potential for spatial disorientation, particularly the oculoagravic illusion, associated with parabolic spaceflight profiles, and understanding the importance of maintaining mode awareness in the context of automated cockpit design, are two lessons that have direct

  19. Vertigo with a Vestibular Dysfunction in Children During Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Dzięciołowska-Baran, E A; Gawlikowska-Sroka, A

    2015-01-01

    Sudden balance disorders with violent vegetative symptoms (nausea and vomiting) pose a diagnostic and therapeutic problem. In children vertigo/dizziness with symptoms of vestibular dysfunction is rare, but as vascular etiology is unlikely in children such symptoms arouse concern. This article presents two cases of this type of vertigo. The patients were two boys (6 and 9 years old). They came down with similar symptoms: sudden dizziness, disabled walking, nausea and vomiting, spontaneous nystagmus, and a positive Romberg test. The onset of the balance disorder was preceded by respiratory infection: common cold with symptoms of inflammation of the mucous membrane in the nose and throat. Laboratory tests revealed increased levels of C-reactive protein only in the older boy. Neuroinfection and a displacement process were ruled out. Videonystagmography revealed vestibular dysfunction and vestibular neuronitis on the left side.

  20. Isolation: analysis and properties of three bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPP-II, BPP-III, and BPP-V) from Bothrops neuwiedi venom.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, L A; Galle, A; Raida, M; Schrader, M; Lebrun, I; Habermehl, G

    1998-04-01

    In the course of systematic investigations on low-molecular-weight compounds from the venom of Crotalidae and Viperidae, we have isolated and characterized at least three bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPP-II, BPP-III, and BPP-V) from Bothrops neuwiedi venom by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 M, Sephadex G-10 followed by HPLC. The peptides showed bradykinin-potentiating action on isolated guinea-pig ileum, for which the BPP-V was more active than of BPP-II, and BPP-III, rat arterial blood pressure, and a relevant angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) competitive inhibiting activity. The kinetic studies showed a Ki of the order of 9.7 x 10(-3) microM to BPP-II, 7 x 10(-3) microM to BPP-III, and 3.3 x 10(-3) microM to BPP-V. The amino acid sequence of the BPP-III has been determined to be pGlu-Gly-Gly-Trp-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly-Pro-Glu-Ile-Pro-Pro, and the amino acid compositions of the BPP-II and BPP-V by amino acid analysis were 2Glu-2Gly-1Arg-4Pro-1Ile and 2Glu-2Gly-1Ser-3Pro-2Val-1Ile, with molecular weight of 1372, 1046, and 1078, respectively.

  1. Acute Diagnosis and Management of Stroke Presenting Dizziness or Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-08-01

    Stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum frequently presents acute vestibular syndrome. Although vascular vertigo is known to usually accompany other neurologic symptoms and signs, isolated vertigo from small infarcts involving the cerebellum or brainstem has been increasingly recognized. Bedside neuro-otologic examination can reliably differentiate acute vestibular syndrome due to stroke from more benign inner ear disease. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss may herald impending infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Accurate identification of isolated vascular vertigo is very important because misdiagnosis of acute stroke may result in significant morbidity and mortality.

  2. [Vestibular neuritis: treatment and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Reinhard, A; Maire, R

    2013-10-02

    Vestibular neuritis is a sudden unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit of unknown origin without associated hearing loss. It is the second cause of peripheral vertigo after Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV). The etiology remains unclear and some treatments are still controversial. The prognosis is good. The differential diagnosis of the disease mainly includes an acute vertigo of central origin. This article summarizes the management and prognosis of vestibular neuritis.

  3. Benign paroxysmal vertigo in childhood: a migraine equivalent.

    PubMed

    Mira, E; Piacentino, G; Lanzi, G; Balottin, U; Fazzi, E

    1984-01-01

    The two main problems in defining and classifying the syndrome of benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV) in childhood are the vestibular function pattern and the relationship between BPV and migraine. 13 children suffering from this syndrome were submitted to complete otoneurological examination, including caloric and rotational labyrinthine stimulation with ENG recording, and to headache provocation tests with nitroglycerin, histamine and fenfluramine. Vestibular responses were normal in all except 2 cases which presented signs of central vestibular impairment at the level of the vestibulocerebellar pathways. Headache provocation tests were positive in 9 out of 10 children, and in 4 cases they induced a typical vertiginous attack instead of headache. In addition, several children had a positive family history for migraine, headache was frequently associated with the crisis and other signs of a 'periodic syndrome' (motion sickness, cyclic vomiting, abdominal pain) were present, unrelated to vertiginous attacks. During the follow-up period, some children responded positively to migraine treatment. BPV, like paroxysmal torticollis in infancy and the signs of the periodic syndrome, can be considered a migraine equivalent or a migraine precursor and could be due to the same vascular and/or biochemical mechanisms responsible for the migraine. In children, for anatomical or developmental reasons, these mechanisms could selectively affect parts of the brain stem, including the vestibular nuclei and vestibulocerebellar pathways.

  4. [Validation of the German version of the Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire (VHQ) in patients with vestibular vertigo syndromes or somatoform vertigo and dizziness].

    PubMed

    Tschan, Regine; Wiltink, Jörg; Best, Christoph; Beutel, Manfred; Dieterich, Marianne; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret

    2010-01-01

    The Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire (VHQ) by Yardley (1992) assesses physical and psychosocial impairments of vertigo or dizziness. Our study examines the structure, reliability, and aspects of validity of the German version of the VHQ. 98 vestibular vertigo syndromes vs. 90 patients with somatoform vertigo and dizziness were evaluated with the VHQ, symptom severity (VSS), distress (GSI), anxiety and depression (HADS), catastrophizing beliefs (ACQ), fear of body sensations (BSQ), and quality of life (SF-36). For diagnostic classification detailed clinical neurological, neuro-otological and psychosomatic testing were conducted. Principal components analysis identified two factors, which could be confirmed by confirmatory factor analyses: 'handicapped activity'(VHQ-ACT) and 'anxiety' (VHQ-ANX). The VHQ had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: 0.92). Test-retest reliability was r = 0.80. We noted close relations between the VHQ, the VSS and measures of emotional distress as aspects of good construct validity. Together with the VSS, the VHQ completes a comprehensive diagnostic screening tool for vertigo or dizziness.

  5. Paraneoplastic vertigo as the presenting symptom of a testicular seminoma

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Andrea; Greer, Emma B; Wong, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Vertigo is a common presenting symptom, but rarely may be caused by a malignancy. We present a case of a 44-year-old man who presented with nystagmus and vertigo precipitated by movement, with accompanying nausea and weight loss. Diagnostic workup revealed a right testicular mass that was resected and found to be a seminoma. The patient's symptoms resolved after surgical resection and treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:25378115

  6. [Neuritis vestibularis can be a cause of vertigo among children].

    PubMed

    Warner, Tine Caroc; Login, Elke; Petersen, Anita

    2014-10-27

    Neuritis vestibularis (NV) as a cause of vertigo is common among adults but very rare among children and is often underrecognized and underdiagnosed. Viral infection is suspected to be the most common cause and symptoms are sudden onset of vertigo, nausea, vomiting, impaired balance and horizontal nystagmus. This case report describes a three-year-old boy diagnosed with NV. To our knowledge it is the first case diagnosed in Denmark.

  7. Vertigo/dizziness in pediatric emergency department: Five years' experience.

    PubMed

    Raucci, Umberto; Vanacore, Nicola; Paolino, Maria Chiara; Silenzi, Romina; Mariani, Rosanna; Urbano, Antonella; Reale, Antonino; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2016-05-01

    Vertigo/Dizziness in childhood is not a rare cause of visits to the emergency department (ED). We analyzed a selected group with vertigo/dizziness to identify signs and symptoms that may help to guide the diagnostic approach and management. A total of 616 children admitted for vertigo to the ED over a five-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Their medical history, clinical characteristics, laboratory and neuroimaging tests, final diagnoses and management were analyzed. Migraine and syncope were the most frequent causes. Two patients were affected by life-threatening cardiac syncope, while structural life-threatening central nervous system diseases were found in 15 patients, none of whom presented with vertigo as an isolated clinical finding. Most cases of vertigo/dizziness in childhood that consist mainly of migraine and syncope are of benign origin. The prompt identification of neurological or cardiological signs or symptoms associated with vertigo in children is mandatory to rule out life-threatening conditions. © International Headache Society 2015.

  8. New treatment of vertigo caused by jugular bulb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hitier, Martin; Barbier, Charlotte; Marie-Aude, Thenint; Moreau, Sylvain; Courtheoux, Patrick; Patron, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Jugular bulb abnormalities can induce tinnitus, hearing loss, or vertigo. Vertigo can be very disabling and may need surgical treatments with risk of hearing loss, major bleeding or facial palsy. Hence, we have developed a new treatment for vertigo caused by jugular bulb anomalies, using an endovascular technique. Three patients presented with severe vertigos mostly induced by high venous pressure. One patient showed downbeat vertical nystagmus during the Valsalva maneuver. The temporal-bone computed tomography scan showed a high rising jugular bulb or a jugular bulb diverticulum with dehiscence and compression of the vestibular aqueduct in all cases. We plugged the upper part of the bulb with coils, and we used a stent to maintain the coils and preserving the venous permeability. After 12- to 24-month follow-up, those patients experienced no more vertigo, allowing return to work. The 3-month arteriographs showed good permeability of the sigmoid sinus and jugular bulb through the stent, with complete obstruction of the upper part of the bulb in all cases. Disabling vertigo induced by jugular bulb abnormalities can be effectively treated by an endovascular technique. This technique is minimally invasive with a probable greater benefit/risk ratio compare with surgery. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. [The clinical features of migraine-associated vertigo].

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Tsutsumi, Tomoko; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2013-08-01

    Migraine-associated vertigo (MAV) is proposed as a new clinical entity on the basis of the assumption that the typical migraine and vertigo or dizziness have a common pathophysiology. Some of the patients with recurrent vertigo syndromes with unknown pathology may have MAV. We performed a retrospective study to clarify the clinical characteristics of MAV in the Japanese population. The following were considered as diagnostic criteria: (1) recurrent vestibular symptoms, (2) migraine headache as defined by the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria, (3) at least one instance of synchronization of a vertiginous attack with a migraine headache, (4) no associated unilateral hearing loss, and (5) absence of other diseases that may have caused vertiginous attacks. Of 552 patients with dizziness or vertigo, 46 (8.3%) were diagnosed as having MAV. A typical feature of this clinical entity is that migraine occurs before the onset of vertigo in women aged 30-40 years. Usually the attacks occur once in a year for 1 to 10 years. An attack lasts for 1-24 h and presents as vertigo and unsteadiness with simultaneous headache. The presence of hearing loss presents an important clinical dilemma. Whether the condition in patients experiencing hearing loss should be defined as MAV or not is still a matter for discussion.

  10. Phobic postural vertigo treated with autogenic training: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Nakai, Kimiko; Kunihiro, Takanobu; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from dizziness due to vertigo are commonly encountered in the department of otolaryngology. If various clinical examinations do not reveal any objective findings, then the patients are referred to the department of internal medicine or psychiatry. In many cases, the diagnosis is psychological dizziness. Phobic postural vertigo, which was first reported by Brandt T et al in 1994, is supposed to be a type of psychological dizziness. The diagnosis is based on 6 characteristics proposed by Brandt et al. Patients are usually treated with conventional medical therapy, but some cases may be refractory to such a therapy. Psychotherapy is recommended in some cases; however, psychotherapy including autogenic training, which can be used for general relaxation, is not widely accepted. This paper describes the successful administration of autogenic training in a patient suffering from phobic postural vertigo. Case presentation We present a case of a patient who suffered from phobic postural vertigo. A 37-year-old female complained of dizziness. She had started experiencing dizziness almost 3 years She was intractable to many sort of conventional therapy. In the end, her symptom disappeared after introduction of autogenic training. Conclusion Autogenic training can be a viable and acceptable treatment option for phobic postural vertigo patients who fail to respond to other therapies. This case emphasizes the importance of autogenic training as a method to control symptom of phobic postural vertigo. PMID:18826607

  11. Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Vertigo Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-10

    ISS037-E-028591 (10 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio (left) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, both Expedition 38 flight engineers, work in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  12. Diagnostic value of S100B protein in the differential diagnosis of acute vertigo in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Aslı Gülfer; Yılmaz, Serkan; Yaka, Elif; Pekdemir, Murat; Sarısoy, Hasan Tahsin; Çekmen, Mustafa Baki; Yüksel, Melih

    2014-07-01

    Vertigo is a common presenting complaint resulting from central or peripheral etiologies. Because central causes may be life-threatening, ascertaining the nature of the vertigo is crucial in the emergency department (ED). With a broad range of potential etiologies, distinguishing central causes from benign peripheral causes is a diagnostic challenge. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the recommended neuroimaging method when clinical findings are ambiguous. However, MRI scanning for every patient with an uncertain diagnosis may not be efficient or possible. Therefore, to improve ED resource utilization for patients with vertigo, there is a need to identify the subset most likely to have MRI abnormalities. It has previously been shown that S100B protein provides a useful serum marker of stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. This study evaluated whether S100B levels could predict central causes of vertigo as identified by cranial MRI in the ED. This prospective, observational study was conducted with adult patients with acute-onset vertigo (within 6 hours) in the ED of a teaching hospital in Kocaeli, Turkey. Patients with nausea or dizziness complaints without previously known vertigo or cranial pathology, and who agreed to participate in the study, were included. Patients with trauma or with neurologic findings that developed concurrent with their symptoms were excluded. Serum levels of S100B were measured with an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay kit. All subjects underwent cranial MRI. The predictors of positive MRI results were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Sensitivity and specificity of S100B​ levels for identifying subjects with central causes of vertigo on MRI were calculated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of the 82 subjects included in the study, 48 (58.5%) were female, and the mean (±SD) age was 51 (±16) years. Thirty-one (37.8%) subjects had positive MRI results. Median (with

  13. Comparison of the therapeutic efficacy of intravenous dimenhydrinate and intravenous piracetam in patients with vertigo: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Avcu, Nazire; Yaka, Elif; Yılmaz, Serkan; Pekdemir, Murat

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to compare the therapeutic efficacy of dimenhydrinate and piracetam in patients with vertigo. A blinded, parallel group, superiority, randomised clinical trial was carried out on patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with vertigo. Healthy adult patients presenting to the ED with undifferentiated vertigo were included in the study. The efficacy of intravenous dimenhydrinate (100 mg) and intravenous piracetam (2000 mg) for reducing the intensity of vertigo was compared in two randomised treatment groups using a 10-point numeric rating scale (NRS). The determination of NRS scores was performed at presentation and at the 30th minute of presentation, after the study drug was implemented, both in immobile and ambulatory positions. The primary outcome variable was reduction in vertigo intensity documented on the NRS at the 30th minute after medication administration, analysed by intention to treat. A total of 94 patients were included in the randomisation (n=47 in both groups). The baseline NRS scores were 7.55±2.00 in the dimenhydrinate group and 8.19±1.79 in the piracetam group. The changes from baseline for dimenhydrinate and piracetam were 2.92±3.11 and 3.75±3.40 (difference -0.83 (95% CI -2.23 to 0.57)) in the immobile position and were 2.04±3.07 and 2.72±2.91 (difference -0.68 (95% CI -2.03 to 0.67)) in the ambulatory position. Rescue medication need was similar in both treatment groups (p=0.330), and only one adverse reaction was reported. We found no evidence of a difference between dimenhydrinate and piracetam in relieving the symptoms of vertigo. Clinical Trials Registration ID: NCT01890538. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Why acute unilateral vestibular cortex lesions mostly manifest without vertigo.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-04-21

    The aim of the current study was, first, to determine the critical causative vestibular areas that in exceptional cases manifest with transient vertigo or dizziness in acute strokes of the middle cerebral artery, and second, to try to explain why in most cases unilateral lesions of these areas manifest without vertigo. We determined the ischemic areas of the 10 published cases by overlapping the CT/MRI lesions and attributed them to the temporoparietal vestibular network. These overlap areas were located either in the posterior retroinsular cortex (n = 8), i.e., the parieto-insular vestibular cortex, or the separate parietal vestibular cortex (n = 2). Thus, rare vestibular cortical vertigo is mostly elicited by acute lesions of the core region of the retroinsular vestibular network. However, the more interesting question is related to the lack of cortical vertigo when this area is affected. We propose a concept to explain how the unaffected opposite hemisphere can suppress vertigo. This is based on visual-vestibular interaction for motion perception and orientation. It is the hemisphere in which vestibular and visual inputs are in agreement, which is the more reliable and determines the global perception of body orientation and motion. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. [Trimetazidine versus betahistine in vestibular vertigo. A double blind study].

    PubMed

    Kluyskens, P; Lambert, P; D'Hooge, D

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of trimetazidine (60 mg/day) in vertigo was compared with that of betahistine (24 mg/day) in a three-month double-blind study. Included in the study were only patients with peripheral vertigo associated or not with tinnitus or hearing loss, and excluded were those presenting with symptoms related to retrocochlear or central disease. Out of the 40 patients enrolled, 20 suffered from Meniere's disease; 4 patients either dropped out of the study or were non-compliant to therapy and could not be taken into account in the final analysis, which bore on 36 patients (18 treated by trimetazidine and 18 with betahistine). There were no dropouts in the Meniere's disease subgroup (10 receiving trimetazidine and 10 receiving betahistine). Results revealed a better response to therapy with trimetazidine in patients suffering from vertigo, and this was particularly true of the Meniere's disease subgroup (p less than 0.025). Moreover, in the latter subgroup, all patients treated with trimetazidine fully recovered from vertigo spells, while these disappeared completely only in 4 of the patients administered betahistine (p less than 0.005). There was no noticeable difference between the two treatment groups as regards the evolution of the accompanying symptoms and the audiometric or vestibular test results. Clinical acceptability was equally excellent in both treatment groups. Overall, this study allowed to confirm the therapeutical efficacy of trimetazidine in the management of vertigo, as well as establishing the clinical advantage of trimetazidine over betahistine in patients suffering from Meniere's disease.

  16. Benign recurrent vertigo--true or artificial diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Kentala, E; Pyykkö, I

    1997-01-01

    The etiology of many diseases involving vertigo is still unknown although the same etiologic factors have been suggested for several diseases. In most cases the diseases are diagnosed on the basis of exclusion-other possible causes being ruled out before the diagnosis can be confirmed. Benign recurrent vertigo (BRV) has been defined as spells of vertigo characteristic of Menieres disease without auditory or clinical neurologic symptoms and signs. The etiology of this condition is also unknown. BRV has been linked to migraine and viral diseases. In a prospective study we collected the clinical history and the signs and results of neurotologic and audiologic tests from 33 patients with a BRV diagnosis. The clinical characteristics truly mimicked the vertigo seen in Menieres disease. The concept of vestibular Menieres disease is not widely accepted, and without auditory signs BRV is the only diagnosis that can be given to these patients. In other studies up to 25% of the patients initially diagnosed with BRV subsequently developed another peripheral vestibular disorder. Until the etiology of diseases involving vertigo is more clearly understood, artificial diagnoses like BRV, must be accepted.

  17. [Preliminary application of video head impulse test in the diagnosis of vertigo].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmei; Chen, Siqi; Zhong, Zhen; Chen, Li; Wu, Yuanding; Zhao, Guiping; Liu, Yuhe

    2015-06-01

    To investigate clinical application of head impulse test with video recording eye movements in the diagnosis of vertigo. The video head impulse test(vHIT) was used to measure the eye saccades and velocity gain in 95 patients with vertigo which were divided into two groups, peripheral vertigo (47 cases) and central vertigo(48 cases); the characteristics of eye saccades and velocity gain of six semicircular canals in different patients with vertigo were analyzed, and were compared between the two groups. The vHIT result in patients with peripheral vertigo: in 22 patients (23 affected ears) with Meniere's disease, 21 ears were abnormal (91. 3%); the vHIT results in 4 patients with vestibular schwannoma, 2 patients with vestibular neuritis, 5 patients with delayed endolymphatic hydrops, 6 patients with sudden hearing loss accompanied vertigo, and 8 patients with vestibular dysfunction, were abnormal with correct saccades and/or lower velocity gain of vHIT. The abnormal vHIT results were also found in 35 of 48 patients (72. 9%) with central vertigo, which including posterior cerebral circulation ischemia(7 patients), cerebral infarction/stroke(6 patients), and dizziness with vertigo(17 patients) and others(18 patients). Abnormal rate of vHIT in patients with peripheral vertigo was 95. 7% (45/47), which was significantly higher than that (72. 9%) in patients with central vertigo. It is easy to perform the vHIT which without adverse reactions. We can record high-frequency characteristics of vestibular-ocular reflex among six semicircular canals through vHIT. The vHIT results which show the function of vestibular ocular reflex in different diseases with vertigo, can help discriminate peripheral vertigo from central vertigo, and it is a practical assessment method for vertigo.

  18. [Emergency care of vertigo patients: suggestions for efficient management].

    PubMed

    Kogashiwa, Yasunao; Takei, Yasuhiko; Matsuda, Takeaki; Karaho, Takehiro; Morita, Masahiro; Kohno, Naoyuki

    2009-10-01

    Some diseases in which persons show vertigo or dizziness may be life-threatening, regardless of symptom severity, and require careful attention. These include diseases of the inner ear, central nervous system, and cardiovascular manifestation. In May 2006, a group in charge of primary emergency consultation began work enabling physicians to treat vertigo patients more efficiently and safely, as detailed in this report. Of the 173 persons with vertigo hospitalized from January 2004 to March 2008, six had cerebrovascular manifestations clarified only after hospitalization, underscoring the importance of careful examination, especially of those 75 years of age older, having continuous headache, having severe trunk ataxia despite apparently mild eye nystagmus, or reporting a history of high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or ischemic heart disease.

  19. [Management of patients with the cardinal symptom dizziness or vertigo].

    PubMed

    Rieger, A; Mansmann, U; Maier, W; Seitz, L; Brandt, T; Strupp, M; Bayer, O

    2014-06-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are common symptoms leading patients to consult a physician. The nationally representative "2003 Health Survey" depicts the epidemiology of the symptoms vertigo and dizziness across all of Germany. A breakdown of the data by region is not available. Routine data of the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians accounting centre ("Kassenärztliche Vereinigung Bayerns", KVB) from 2008 were analysed using multilevel models to investigate individual and regional factors and the relevance of nonspecific regional heterogeneity. Altogether, 866,086 of 9,269,729 (9.34%) inhabitants received an ambulatory diagnosis of vertigo or dizziness, including 1.77 times as many women as men. Visits to the doctor because of vertigo or dizziness increased with age. After adjustments for age and sex, a North-South divide and a higher prevalence in the urban centres were apparent within Bavaria. The majority of patients were seen by their GP and nearby doctors. This held especially true for women. Also older patients were less likely to go to specialists further afield. This analysis of the KVB data of patients with vertigo or dizziness underlines the central role that is played by GPs in diagnosis and treatment. In order to correctly diagnose the underlying causes, treat patients or send them to specialists effectively, all doctors need to be trained about this relevant clinical symptom. The insufficient representation of clinically established vertigo disorders by the ICD-10 was problematic. The most frequently coded diagnosis was N95.1 "postmenopausal dizziness". © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. [Assessment of driving in patients with vertigo and dizziness].

    PubMed

    von Brevern, M; von Stuckrad-Barre, S; Fetter, M

    2014-07-01

    The driving performance of patients with dizziness and vertigo has gained only minor attention so far. Patients with permanent vestibular loss or with episodic vestibular symptoms can experience difficulties in driving a motor vehicle. The presence of a chronic or episodic syndrome presenting with dizziness and/or vertigo does not automatically exclude the ability to drive. Assessment of driving performance should consider the degree of the deficits and compensation in chronic dysfunction and the severity and frequency of attacks, prodromes and triggers of symptoms in episodic disorders.

  1. [Chronic dizziness and vertigo from a neurologists' perspective].

    PubMed

    Obermann, M

    2013-02-01

    Dizziness and vertigo are among the most common symptoms in neurology and medicine in general. The differential diagnosis may be simplified by systematic and careful assessment of presenting symptoms. The most common conditions associated with vertigo and dizziness can be diagnosed by patient history and physical examination alone. Extensive apparative diagnostic work-up is seldomly required and often not helpful. The majority of these disorders can be well treated and have an excellent prognosis, when diagnosed adequately and within a reasonable time frame to prevent the development of chronic disease.

  2. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  3. Some Considerations of Vertigo based on Experience

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Isidore

    1928-01-01

    Our only direct intimation of the existence of space is the sensation of vertigo, when through our cortical centres we become conscious of the fact that we are surrounded by a “blank” space in which motion is apparent, i.e., the relative condition of our body to the things around us seems to be altered. A precise account of the “nerve-cycle” and of its exact relation to the sympathic and parasympathic—in a word, to the autonomous vegetative—system and to the endocrine system, is at present impossible. We have known since the time of the classic investigations of Flourens, Breuer, Mach, Crum Brown, and their followers—especially Sherrington—that the nature of these things is highly complicated. Simple mechanical theories are useless, even for teaching purposes, as they are more or less fictitious and often incomplete. The path of nervous action is through the ear, cerebellum, brain stem, cerebrum, medulla oblongata, spinal cord, and autonomous nervous system, to the different parts of the periphery, and there are also mutual connexions with the endocrine glands. Mention is made of the influence of constitution (i.e., inheritance, “the natural endowment”), and also of the conditional disposition, temper, training, in a word all external and internal stimuli. Again, the various reflexes, the numerous aggregations of ganglia, indicating a certain autonomy of function, constitute a great problem for future clinical observation. The mechanism of adaptation and compensation by which extensive injury may sometimes be counterbalanced, also enters into the question, as do the varying collateral paths, the synergetic action of different and sometimes very distant organs and so forth. Again, we have to think of the ratio of irritability and fatiguability, a significant factor in causation. Syphilis, arthritis, alcoholism, nicotine-poisoning, anæmia, leukæmia, tumours, and—especially—catarrh, are most important causes. PMID:19986527

  4. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and video head impulse test in patients with vertigo, dizziness and imbalance.

    PubMed

    Skorić, Magdalena Krbot; Adamec, Ivan; Pavičić, Tin; Pavlović, Ivan; Ruška, Berislav; Crnošija, Luka; Habek, Mario

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) and video head impulse test (vHIT) results in patients presenting with vertigo and dizziness. We retrospectively analyzed data of all patients with the chief complaint of vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance that underwent VEMP and vHIT from January 2015 to January 2016. A total of 117 patients (73 females, mean age 53.92±16.76) fulfilled inclusion criteria: group 1 included patients with the final diagnosis of vestibular neuritis (VN) (N=31 (16 right and 15 left VN)), group 2 included patients with the final diagnosis of vertigo of central origin (N=23) and group 3 included patients with the final diagnosis of unspecified dizziness (N=63). There was significant correlation between oVEMP asymmetry and asymmetry of the lateral canals 60ms gains on vHIT (r=0.225, p=0.026). Significant correlation between oVEMP and vHIT asymmetry was present in VN patients (r=0.749, p<0.001), while no correlation was found in the groups 2 and 3. oVEMP and vHIT lateral canals asymmetries were significantly greater in patients with vestibular neuritis. Furthermore, positive correlations of oVEMP amplitudes with 60ms gain of the lateral semicircular canal and slope of the anterior semicircular canal on vHIT, and cVEMP with slope of the posterior semicircular canal on the vHIT were found. These changes were significantly more pronounced in patients with vestibular neuritis. In conclusion, VEMPs and vHIT data should be used complementarily; asymmetry on both tests strongly supports peripheral vestibular system involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Wallenberg Syndrome: An Exceptional Cause of Acute Vertigo in Children.

    PubMed

    Ehresmann, Aude Ménétrey; Van, Hélène Cao; Merlini, Laura; Fluss, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of acute vertigo in childhood is often challenging, but fortunately a central cause is rarely identified. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy who developed, after a mild head trauma, a rotary vertigo associated with nausea and vomiting. A posttraumatic peripheral vestibular dysfunction was first suspected but not confirmed by an otoneurological evaluation. When subtle neurological signs were elicited, a brain magnetic resonance imaging was promptly requested. This showed a small infarct on the lateral posterior left part of the medulla oblongata of the brainstem, typical of Wallenberg syndrome. Vascular imaging was normal and no defined etiology was found. The child was started on prophylactic acetylsalicylic acid. The rapid disappearance of vertigo was noted. On follow-up at 6 months, there has been no recurrence and neurological examination was fully normal. Our case extends the differential diagnosis of acute vertigo in childhood that rarely includes the possibility of a brainstem infarct whose recognition through appropriate clinical examination is nevertheless capital for appropriate investigations and management. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Vertigo in Children and Adolescents: Characteristics and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Maayan; Cohen-Kerem, Raanan; Kaminer, Margalit; Shupak, Avi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the characteristics and outcome of vertigo in a pediatric population. Patients. All children and adolescents presenting with vertigo to a tertiary otoneurology clinic between the years 2003–2010 were included in the study. Results. Thirty-seven patients with a mean age of 14 years were evaluated. The most common etiology was migraine-associated vertigo (MAV) followed by acute labyrinthitis/neuritis and psychogenic dizziness. Ten patients (27%) had pathological findings on the otoneurological examination. Abnormal findings were documented in sixteen of the twenty-three (70%) completed electronystagmography evaluations. Twenty patients (54%) were referred to treatment by other disciplines than otology/otoneurology. A follow-up questionnaire was filled by twenty six (70%) of the study participants. While all patients diagnosed with MAV had continuous symptoms, most other patients had complete resolution. Conclusions. Various etiologies of vertigo may present with similar symptoms and signs in the pediatric patient. Yet, variable clinical courses should be anticipated, depending on the specific etiology. This is the reason why treatment and follow up should be specifically tailored for each case according to the diagnosis. Close collaboration with other medical disciplines is often required to reach the correct diagnosis and treatment while avoiding unnecessary laboratory examinations. PMID:22272166

  7. Clinical and electrographic findings in epileptic vertigo and dizziness

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Han; Robinson, Karen A.; Kaplan, Peter W.; Newman-Toker, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Seizures can cause vestibular symptoms, even without obvious epileptic features. We sought to characterize epileptic vertigo or dizziness (EVD) to improve differentiation from nonepileptic causes, particularly when vestibular symptoms are the sole manifestation. Methods: We conducted a systematic review with electronic (Medline) and manual search for English-language studies (1955–2014). Two independent reviewers selected studies. Study/patient characteristics were abstracted. We defined 3 study population types: (1) seizures, some experiencing vertigo/dizziness (disease cohort); (2) vertigo/dizziness, some due to seizures (symptom cohort); (3) vertigo/dizziness due to seizures in all patients (EVD-only cohort). Results: We identified 84 studies describing 11,354 patients (disease cohort = 8,129; symptom cohort = 2,965; EVD-only cohort = 260). Among 1,055 EVD patients in whom a distinction could be made, non-isolated EVD was present in 8.5%, isolated EVD in 0.8%. Thorough diagnostic workups (ictal EEG, vestibular testing, and brain MRI to exclude other causes) were rare (<0.1%). Ictal EEG was reported in 487 (4.3%), formal neuro-otologic assessment in 1,107 (9.7%). Localized EEG abnormalities (n = 350) were most frequently temporal (79.8%) and uncommonly parietal (11.8%). Duration of episodic vestibular symptoms varied, but was very brief (<30 seconds) in 69.6% of isolated EVD and 6.9% of non-isolated EVD. Conclusions: Non-isolated EVD is much more prevalent than isolated EVD, which appears to be rare. Diagnostic evaluations for EVD are often incomplete. EVD is primarily associated with temporal lobe seizures; whether this reflects greater epidemiologic prevalence of temporal lobe seizures or a tighter association with dizziness/vertigo presentations than with other brain regions remains unknown. Consistent with clinical wisdom, isolated EVD spells often last just seconds, although many patients experience longer spells. PMID:25795644

  8. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy presenting with vertigo and muscle weakness in a male pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroe; Nishizato, Chizuru; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Hiziri; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Kosuge, Hiroshi; Ozasa, Shiro; Nomura, Keiko; Kimura, Shigemi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an anti-thyroid antibody-positive autoimmune encephalopathy. We herein report the case of a 13-year-old male patient with subacute vertigo, muscle weakness in the extremities and gait disturbance who was diagnosed with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. He showed no severe impairment of consciousness and no seizures, and there were no abnormalities on the brain MRI. However, epileptic spike and wave complexes were observed on an electroencephalogram, and a decline in blood flow was diffusely observed on brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography). His thyroid function was normal, but he was positive for anti-thyroid antibodies, such as anti-TPO (thyroid peroxidase) antibodies. He was also positive for serum anti-NAE (NH2-terminal alpha-enolase) antibodies. Systemic corticosteroid therapy and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy were effective, greatly improving his quality of life.

  9. Fluctuant, progressive hearing loss associated with Menière like vertigo in three patients with the Pendred syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stinckens, C; Huygen, P L; Joosten, F B; Van Camp, G; Otten, B; Cremers, C W

    2001-12-01

    To evaluate vestibular and long-term audiometric findings in patients with Pendred syndrome. Retrospective analysis of long-term clinical data. University hospital department. Three patients with Pendred syndrome caused by a mutation in the SLC26A4 gene. Perchlorate discharge test, mutation analysis of the SLC26A4 gene, MR imaging of temporal bones, vestibular function test (in two cases) and serial audiometry. A saturation hyperbola with onset age was fitted to the audiometric threshold-on-age data using a nonlinear regression method. The residues remaining after regression were analyzed in a correlation analysis to detect significant ipsilateral or contralateral cofluctuation. All three patients had a mutation in the SLC26A4 gene and bilateral enlarged vestibular aqueduct; two of them had a positive perchlorate discharge test but in one of two siblings this test was negative. Hearing loss was significantly progressive with significant ipsilateral and contralateral cofluctuation in all evaluable cases, combined with episodes of Menière like vertigo in two cases. The episodes of vertigo are as seen in Menière disease. One case had unilateral caloric areflexia and one had bilateral vestibular hyporeflexia, proven to be progressive in a repeat examination. Patients with Pendred syndrome may exhibit progressive and fluctuant hearing loss with episodes of vertigo.

  10. Dizziness Handicap Inventory and Visual Vertigo Analog Scale in Vestibular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Grigol, Thaís Alvares de Abreu e Silva; Silva, Adriana Marques; Ferreira, Maristela Mian; Manso, Andrea; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms among the population, producing numerous consequences for individual's quality of life. There are some questionnaires that can trace the patient's profile and quality of life impairment from dizziness, including the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Visual Vertigo Analogue Scale (VVAS). Objective  This study aims to correlate the results of the DHI and VVAS in patients with vestibular dysfunction. Methods  This is a retrospective study of medical records of patients treated in a medical school between 2006 and 2012. Results of the DHI and EVA were collected and subjected to statistical analysis using Pearson's correlation test with p < 0.001. The significance level adopted for the statistical tests was p ≤ 0.05. Results  A total of 91 records were included in this study, 72 (79.1%) from female and 19 (20.9%) from male patients, aged 23 to 86 years, with a mean age of 52.5 years. The mean score on the DHI total was 43.9 and 5.2 points for the EVA. The result of Pearson's correlation test was 0.54. Conclusion  Self-perceived dizziness measured with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory has a regular and positive correlation with the Visual Vertigo Analog Scale in patients with vestibular dysfunction. The clinical trial is registered under number UTN U1111–1170–5065. PMID:27413406

  11. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Fukuda, Takehiko; Shirota, Shiho; Sawai, Yachiyo; Murai, Takayuki; Fujita, Nobuya; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a condition that increases the risk of coronary artery disease and cerebral infarction. We determined the prevalence of MetS in vertigo patients and clinically investigated the association between MetS and vertigo. Study Design Case-control study Methods The subjects were 333 patients, including 107 males and 226 females, who presented with vertigo as a primary symptom. MetS was diagnosed according to the International Diabetes Federation definition, which is based on waist circumference, blood serum levels, and blood pressure. Results MetS was detected in 53 (15.9%) of 333 vertigo patients, including 24 males (22.4%) and 29 females (12.8%); i.e., the frequency of MetS was significantly higher among the male patients than the female patients. The overall prevalence of MetS (15.9%) among vertigo patients did not differ from that observed among general adults in previous Japanese surveillance studies; however, MetS was significantly more common among the vertigo patients in males than general adult males. The prevalence of MetS was also examined in five types of vertigo, Concomitant MetS was noted in many males with vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) and isolated vertigo of unknown etiology. Conclusion It was suggested that MetS is involved in the development of vertigo in males. MetS might be a risk factor for vascular vertigo such as VBI in males. The high frequency of MetS among males with vertigo of unknown etiology suggested that the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome is involved in this type of isolated vertigo. PMID:24312461

  12. [Analysis of the data of patients presenting for emergency treatment with vertigo].

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba; Nagy, Ferenc; Drubits, Katalin; Lelovics, Zsuzsanna; Varga Györfi, Krisztina; Oláh, Tibor

    2014-05-30

    Analyzing the medical record data of patients with the main symptom of vertigo in "Kaposi M6r" Hospital's Emergency Department. Retrospective evaluation of patients's medical history with vertigo related diagnoses according to BNO classification. In the year of 2010, 18 000 patients were presented to ED. In 471 cases the symptoms were vertigo related which makes up 3% of the total. Almost half, 46% of these patients were brought in by ambulance medical car. The ratio of women was twice as high as of the men. One fifth, 19% of patients with vertigo gained admission to the ward and 81% of them were discharged in 24 hours. According to the interviews, 4 types of vertigo have been identified: "whirling style" vertigo in 37% of the cases, dizziness in 33% of the cases, presyncope in 12% and "light headedness" in 9%. The remaining 9% couldn't be classified. Vertigo is common presenting symptom in emergency department, however it rarely indicates severe condition. The diagnostic value of vertigo classification based on history and brain CT result in identifying the severity of the background condition is questionable. We found that in recognizing the cases which need prompt intervention, thorough neurological examination and the clarification of the vertigo's circumstances proved to be helpful.

  13. Characteristics of vertigo and the affected vestibular nerve systems in idiopathic bilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Chisato; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kamogashira, Teru; Egami, Naoya; Sugasawa, Keiko; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Vertigo attacks in IBV patients involving both the superior and inferior vestibular nerve systems were significantly more severe than vertigo attacks in patients with selective involvement of the inferior vestibular nerve system alone. To investigate the relationship between the frequency and duration of vertigo and the affected vestibular nerve system in idiopathic bilateral vestibulopathy (IBV). This study categorized 44 IBV patients into the following three sub-groups according to the affected vestibular nerve system: superior, inferior, and mixed type. These patients were also categorized into the following three sub-groups according to their clinical time course: progressive type showing no episodes of vertigo, sequential type showing recurrent vertigo attacks and single-attack type showing a single episode of vertigo. Ten, 11 and 23 patients were classified as the superior, the inferior, and the mixed type, respectively. Seventeen, 23, and four patients were classified as the progressive, the sequential, and the single-attack type, respectively. For the patients having one or more vertigo attacks, the duration of the vertigo attack was longer than 24 h in 69% of the mixed type, and the duration of vertigo in the mixed type was significantly longer than that in the inferior type (p < 0.05).

  14. [Vertigo in the Emergency Department: new bedside tests].

    PubMed

    Tamás, T László; Garai, Tibor; Tompos, Tamás; Szirmai, Ágnes

    2016-03-13

    According to international statistics, the first examination of 25% of patients with vertigo is carried out in Emergency Departments. The most important task of the examining physician is to diagnose life threatening pathologic processes. One of the most difficult otoneurological diagnostic challange in Emergency Departments is to differentiate between dangerous posterior scale stroke presenting with isolated vertigo and the benign vestibular neuritis.These two disorders can be safely differentiated using fast, non-invasive, evidence based bedside tests which have been introduced in the past few years. 35% of stroke cases mimicking vestibular neuritis (pseudoneuritis) are misdiagnosed at the Emergency Department, and 40% of these cases develop complications. During the first 48 hours, sensitivity for stroke of the new test that is based on the malfunction of the oculomotor system is better than the diffusion-weighted cranial magnetic resonance imaging. Using special test glasses each component of the new test can be made objective and repeatable.

  15. Persistent vertigo and dizziness after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fife, Terry D; Kalra, Deepak

    2015-04-01

    Vertigo, dizziness, and disequilibrium are common symptoms following concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Dizziness and vertigo may be the result of trauma to the peripheral vestibular system or the central nervous system, or, in some cases, may be due to anxiety, depression, or posttraumatic stress disorder; these mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. While most peripheral vestibular disorders can be identified by testing and examination, those without inner-ear causes that have persisting complaints of dizziness and motion sickness are more difficult to understand and to manage. Some of these patients exhibit features compatible with vestibular migraine and may be treated successfully with migraine-preventative medications. This paper reviews the nonotogenic causes of persisting dizziness, the possible mechanisms, and the pathophysiology, as a framework for patient management and for future research.

  16. Vertigo with sudden hearing loss: audio-vestibular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Jacob M; Taylor, Rachael L; Young, Allison S; McGarvie, Leigh A; Flanagan, Sean; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2016-10-01

    Acute vertigo with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a rare clinical emergency. Here, we report the audio-vestibular test profiles of 27 subjects who presented with these symptoms. The vestibular test battery consisted of a three-dimensional video head impulse test (vHIT) of semicircular canal function and recording ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP, cVEMP) to test otolith dysfunction. Unlike vestibular neuritis, where the horizontal and anterior canals with utricular function are more frequently impaired, 74 % of subjects with vertigo and SSNHL demonstrated impairment of the posterior canal gain (0.45 ± 0.20). Only 41 % showed impairment of the horizontal canal gains (0.78 ± 0.27) and 30 % of the anterior canal gains (0.79 ± 0.26), while 38 % of oVEMPs [asymmetry ratio (AR) = 41.0 ± 41.3 %] and 33 % of cVEMPs (AR = 47.3 ± 41.2 %) were significantly asymmetrical. Twenty-three subjects were diagnosed with labyrinthitis/labyrinthine infarction in the absence of evidence for an underlying pathology. Four subjects had a definitive diagnosis [Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, vestibular schwannoma, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction, and traction injury]. Ischemia involving the common-cochlear or vestibulo-cochlear branches of the labyrinthine artery could be the simplest explanation for vertigo with SSNHL. Audio-vestibular tests did not provide easy separation between ischaemic and non-ischaemic causes of vertigo with SSNHL.

  17. [Vertigo induced by noise or pressure to the left ear].

    PubMed

    Seidel, D U; Dülks, A; Remmert, S

    2011-06-01

    A 49-year-old male patient presented with recently acquired vertigo induced by noise or pressure to the left ear. With appropriate stimulation, oscillopsia with a rotatory component could be reproduced in videooculography. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) showed increased amplitudes and a lowered threshold on the left side. CT of the petrous bone showed a bony dehiscence of the left superior semicircular canal. Conservative therapy was initiated as a first step.

  18. On the Vertigo Due to Static Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Mian, Omar S.; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Glover, Paul M.; Day, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo is sometimes experienced in and around MRI scanners. Mechanisms involving stimulation of the vestibular system by movement in magnetic fields or magnetic field spatial gradients have been proposed. However, it was recently shown that vestibular-dependent ocular nystagmus is evoked when stationary in homogenous static magnetic fields. The proposed mechanism involves Lorentz forces acting on endolymph to deflect semicircular canal (SCC) cupulae. To investigate whether vertigo arises from a similar mechanism we recorded qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo and 2D eye movements from supine healthy adults (n = 25) deprived of vision while pushed into the 7T static field of an MRI scanner. Exposures were variable and included up to 135s stationary at 7T. Nystagmus was mainly horizontal, persisted during long-exposures with partial decline, and reversed upon withdrawal. The dominant vertiginous perception with the head facing up was rotation in the horizontal plane (85% incidence) with a consistent direction across participants. With the head turned 90 degrees in yaw the perception did not transform into equivalent vertical plane rotation, indicating a context-dependency of the perception. During long exposures, illusory rotation lasted on average 50 s, including 42 s whilst stationary at 7T. Upon withdrawal, perception re-emerged and reversed, lasting on average 30 s. Onset fields for nystagmus and perception were significantly correlated (p<.05). Although perception did not persist as long as nystagmus, this is a known feature of continuous SSC stimulation. These observations, and others in the paper, are compatible with magnetic-field evoked-vertigo and nystagmus sharing a common mechanism. With this interpretation, response decay and reversal upon withdrawal from the field, are due to adaptation to continuous vestibular input. Although the study does not entirely exclude the possibility of mechanisms involving transient vestibular stimulation

  19. On the vertigo due to static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mian, Omar S; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Glover, Paul M; Day, Brian L

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo is sometimes experienced in and around MRI scanners. Mechanisms involving stimulation of the vestibular system by movement in magnetic fields or magnetic field spatial gradients have been proposed. However, it was recently shown that vestibular-dependent ocular nystagmus is evoked when stationary in homogenous static magnetic fields. The proposed mechanism involves Lorentz forces acting on endolymph to deflect semicircular canal (SCC) cupulae. To investigate whether vertigo arises from a similar mechanism we recorded qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo and 2D eye movements from supine healthy adults (n = 25) deprived of vision while pushed into the 7T static field of an MRI scanner. Exposures were variable and included up to 135s stationary at 7T. Nystagmus was mainly horizontal, persisted during long-exposures with partial decline, and reversed upon withdrawal. The dominant vertiginous perception with the head facing up was rotation in the horizontal plane (85% incidence) with a consistent direction across participants. With the head turned 90 degrees in yaw the perception did not transform into equivalent vertical plane rotation, indicating a context-dependency of the perception. During long exposures, illusory rotation lasted on average 50 s, including 42 s whilst stationary at 7T. Upon withdrawal, perception re-emerged and reversed, lasting on average 30 s. Onset fields for nystagmus and perception were significantly correlated (p<.05). Although perception did not persist as long as nystagmus, this is a known feature of continuous SSC stimulation. These observations, and others in the paper, are compatible with magnetic-field evoked-vertigo and nystagmus sharing a common mechanism. With this interpretation, response decay and reversal upon withdrawal from the field, are due to adaptation to continuous vestibular input. Although the study does not entirely exclude the possibility of mechanisms involving transient vestibular stimulation

  20. Recent advances in orthostatic hypotension presenting orthostatic dizziness or vertigo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2015-11-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH), a proxy for sympathetic adrenergic failure, is the most incapacitating sign of autonomic failure. Orthostatic dizziness (OD) is known to be the most common symptom of OH. However, recent studies have demonstrated that 30-39 % of patients with OH experienced rotatory vertigo during upright posture (i.e., orthostatic vertigo, OV), which challenges the dogma that OH induces dizziness and not vertigo. A recent population-based study on spontaneously occurring OD across a wide age range showed that the one-year and lifetime prevalence of OD was 10.9 and 12.5 %, respectively. Approximately 83 % of patients with OD had at least one abnormal autonomic function test result. So far, 11 subtypes of OD have been proposed according to the pattern of autonomic dysfunction, and generalized autonomic failure of sympathetic adrenergic and parasympathetic cardiovagal functions was the most common type. Four different patterns of OH, such as classic, delayed, early, and transient type have been found in patients with OD. The head-up tilt test and Valsalva maneuver should be performed for a comprehensive evaluation of sympathetic adrenergic failure in patients with OD/OV. This review summarizes current advances in OH presenting OD/OV, with a particular focus on the autonomic dysfunction associated with OD.

  1. Vertigo in virtual reality with haptics: case report.

    PubMed

    Viirre, Erik; Ellisman, Mark

    2003-08-01

    A researcher was working with a desktop virtual environment system. The system was displaying vector fields of a cyclonic weather system, and the system incorporated a haptic display of the forces in the cyclonic field. As the subject viewed the rotating cyclone field, they would move a handle "through" the representation of the moving winds and "feel" the forces buffeting the handle as it moved. Stopping after using the system for about 10 min, the user experienced an immediate sensation of postural instability for several minutes. Several hours later, there was the onset of vertigo with head turns. This vertigo lasted several hours and was accompanied with nausea and motion illusions that exacerbated by head movements. Symptoms persisted mildly the next day and were still present the third and fourth day, but by then were only provoked by head movements. There were no accompanying symptoms or history to suggest an inner ear disorder. Physical examination of inner ear and associated neurologic function was normal. No other users of this system have reported similar symptoms. This case suggests that some individuals may be susceptible to the interaction of displays with motion and movement forces and as a result experience motion illusions. Operators of such systems should be aware of this potential and minimize exposure if vertigo occurs.

  2. [Somatic symptoms in those hospitalized for dizziness or vertigo].

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Tsutumi, Tomoko; Arai, Motohiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-09-01

    Anxiety and depression greatly affect the prognosis of and burden on subjects seen for dizziness or vertigo, who usually report multiple somatic symptoms. We studied the prevalence of these symptoms in 145 subjects hospitalized for dizziness or vertigo and taking part in 4-day group vestibular rehabilitation. Questionnaires given to determine the prevalence of somatic symptoms assessed headache, insomnia, diarrhea, constipation, stomachache, chest pain, palpitations, dyspnea, general fatigue, and stress. Quantitation used aerical rating scale (NRS). Anxiety and depression were assessed using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Disability due to dizziness was assessed using the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI). We conducted correlational analysis between dizziness and somatic symptoms. The top four average NRS scores for somatic symptoms were dizziness at 3.5 +/- 2.8, general fatigue at 2.8 +/- 2.6, insomnia at 2.4 +/- 2.6, and headache at 1.8 +/- 2.3. These symptoms resembled those reported for subjects with anxiety and depression. The correlation between headache and dizziness NRS scores was R = 0.48 (P < 0.0001). The total HADS score was 13.9 +/- 8.1 points (anxiety 7.2 +/- 4.3, depression 6.7 +/- 4.3). The average DHI score was 36.3 +/- 24.1 points. These results indicate that those with dizziness reported several somatic symptoms related to anxiety and depression attributable to dizziness. This underscores the need to treat these somatic symptoms when treating subjects seen chiefly dizziness or vertigo.

  3. [Vertigo/dizziness and syncope from a neurological perspective].

    PubMed

    Machetanz, J

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo/dizziness and syncope are among the most frequent clinical entities encountered in neurology. In patients with presumed syncope, it is important to distinguish it from neurological and psychiatric diseases causing a transient loss of consciousness due to another etiology. Moreover, central nervous disorders of autonomic blood pressure regulation as well as affections of the peripheral autonomic nerves can be responsible for the onset of real syncope. This is particularly relevant in recurrent syncope. Vertigo occurs in the context of temporary disorders, relatively harmless diseases associated with chronic impairment, as well as in acute life-threatening states. Patient history and clinical examination play an important role in classifying these symptoms. It is of crucial importance in this context, e.g., to establish whether the patient is experiencing an initial manifestation or whether such episodes have been known to occur recurrently over a longer period of time, as well as how long the episodes last. Clinical investigations include a differential examination of the oculomotor system with particular regard to nystagmus. The present article outlines the main underlying neurological diseases associated with syncope and vertigo, their relevant differential diagnoses as well as practical approaches to their treatment.

  4. Metabolic disorders in vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, H; Doroszewska, G

    2001-01-01

    Vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss are common complaints among populations of industrial countries, especially in persons older than 40 years. Numerous agents are known to incite vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss, among them hyperinsulinemia, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we proposed to assess the occurrence of hyperinsulinemia, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia in patients suffering from vertigo, tinnitus, or hearing loss of unknown origin. Results of various tests in 48 patients were compared to those in 31 control subjects. Assessments of body mass index, blood pressure, and laryngological, audiometric, and electronystagmographic parameters were performed in all study participants. An oral glucose tolerance test was used to evaluate insulin levels, and lipoprotein phenotyping served to determine cholesterol, triglyceride, and lipoprotein levels. Patients were found to be significantly more overweight (on the basis of body mass index) than were the control subjects. Hypertension was more common among patients than controls, but the difference was significant only between the men in the two groups. Disturbances of glucose metabolism were found in 27.1% of patients but in only 9.7% of controls. Diabetes mellitus was not present in any controls but was identified in four patients. Hyperinsulinemia was almost twice as common in patients as in controls. Only the occurrence of hyperlipoproteinemia seemed not to differ between patients and control subjects. We conclude that such disturbances of glucose metabolism as diabetes mellitus and hyperinsulinemia may be responsible for inner ear diseases, whereas the role of disturbances of lipid metabolism remains vague.

  5. Betahistine treatment in managing vertigo and improving vestibular compensation: clarification.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) is currently used in the management of vertigo and vestibular pathologies with different aetiologies. The main goal of this review is to clarify the mechanisms of action of this drug, responsible for the symptomatic relief of vertigo and the improvement of vestibular compensation. The review starts with a brief summary recalling the role of histamine as a neuromodulator/neurotransmitter in the control of the vestibular functions, and the role of the histaminergic system in vestibular compensation. Then are presented data recorded in animal models demonstrating that betahistine efficacy can be explained by mechanisms targeting the histamine receptors (HRs) at three different levels: the vascular tree, with an increase of cochlear and vestibular blood flow involving the H1R; the central nervous system, with an increase of histamine turnover implicating the H3R, and the peripheral labyrinth, with a decrease of vestibular input implying the H3R/H4R. Clinical data from vestibular loss patients show the impact of betahistine treatment for the long-term control of vertigo, improvement of balance and quality of life that can be explained by these mechanisms of action. However, two conditions, at least, are required for reaching the betahistine therapeutic effect: the dose and the duration of treatment. Experimental and clinical data supporting these requirements are exposed in the last part of this review.

  6. The translation of the Vertigo Symptom Scale into Afrikaans: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christine; de Wet, Jacques; Gina, Ayanda; Louw, Ladine; Makhoba, Musa; Tacon, Lee

    2011-10-01

    Dizziness is a common clinical problem that is challenging to diagnose and treat. One of a subset of symptoms that fall under the encompassing term of dizziness is vertigo, which is the subjective experience of hallucination of movement, often associated with vestibular disorders. While dizziness has a broad range of causes, the association between vestibular disturbance, and its attendant vertigo, and anxiety is well established. The Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS) is a questionnaire that assesses aspects of vertigo and vertigo-related anxiety. The aim of this study was twofold. In phase 1, a translation of the VSS into Afrikaans was evaluated using the Delphi consensus technique and two panels of participants. Panel 1 comprised first-language Afrikaans speakers who commented on the language, grammar and vocabulary of the items. Panel 2 were bilingual health care practitioners with either a psychology background or a special interest in vertigo. After two rounds of consultation, consensus was achieved and the final translation of the Afrikaans Vertigo Symptom Scale (AVSS) was agreed upon, as well as a list of Afrikaans words descriptive of vertigo. Phase 2 used a descriptive, correlational design. The aim was to pilot the AVSS with a sample of vertiginous and control participants to establish its ability to differentiate between the two groups and to explore experiences of vertigo and anxiety within the two embedded subscales. The results of the pilot study yielded significant statistical differences (p < 0.001) between the groups on both subscales of the tool. Preliminary results suggest that the AVSS is able to identify patients with vertiginous disturbance and anxiety. The AVSS presents with good sensitivity and specificity as measured by the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Afrikaans is the home language of almost 6 million people in South Africa. The translation of the VSS into Afrikaans presents health care professionals with a tool with which to

  7. Early Diagnosis and Management of Acute Vertigo from Vestibular Migraine and Ménière's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry; Kaski, Diego; Lopez-Escamez, Jose Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular migraine is the most common cause of acute episodic vestibular symptoms after benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. In contrast, Ménière's disease is an uncommon disorder. For both conditions, early and accurate diagnosis (or its exclusion) enables the correct management of patients with acute episodic vestibular symptoms. Long-term management of migraine requires changes in lifestyle to avoid triggers of migraine and/or prophylactic drugs if attacks become too frequent. The long-term management of Ménière's disease also involves lifestyle changes (low salt diet), medications (betahistine, steroids), and ablative therapy applied to the diseased ear (eg, intratympanic gentamicin).

  8. Does the longus colli have an effect on cervical vertigo?: A retrospective study of 116 patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Pan, Fu-Min; Yong, Zhi-Yao; Ba, Zhao-Yu; Wang, Shan-Jin; Liu, Zheng; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Wu, De-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the longus colli muscles in cervical vertigo.We retrospectively analyzed 116 adult patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) during 2014 in our department. Patients were assigned to the vertigo group or the nonvertigo group. Demographic data were recorded. Inner distance and cross-sectional area (CSA) of longus colli were measured using coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).The vertigo group (n = 44) and the nonvertigo group (n = 72) were similar in demographic data. Mean preoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was higher in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group (P = 0.037), but no difference postoperatively. Mean JOA scores increased significantly postoperatively in both groups (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001). The mean vertigo score decreased significantly from pre- to postoperatively in the vertigo group (P = 0.023). The mean preoperative Cobb angle was significantly smaller in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group (P <0.001), but no significant difference postoperatively. After ACDF, the mean Cobb angle increased significantly in the vertigo group (P <0.001). The instability rates of C3/4 and C4/5 were significantly higher in the vertigo group (P <0.001 and P <0.001). The inner distance of longus colli was significantly shorter (P = 0.032 and P = 0.026) and CSA significantly smaller (P = 0.041 and P = 0.035), at C3/4 and C4/5 in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group. Mean Miyazaki scores were significantly higher in the vertigo group at C3/4 and C4/5 (P = 0.044 and P = 0.037). Moreover, a shorter inner distance and smaller CSA were related to a higher Miyazaki score.Inner distance and cross-sectional area (CSA) of longus colli are associated closely with cervical vertigo. Shorter inner distance and smaller CSA of the longus colli muscles might be risk factors for cervical vertigo. ACDF provided a

  9. Health-Related Quality of Life of Children/Adolescents with Vertigo: Retrospective Study from the German Center of Vertigo and Balance Disorders.

    PubMed

    Deissler, Anna; Albers, Lucia; von Kries, Rüdiger; Weinberger, Raphael; Langhagen, Thyra; Gerstl, Lucia; Heinen, Florian; Jahn, Klaus; Schröder, A Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of vertigo on health-related quality of life (HrQoL) of children/adolescents and to assess if the impact on HrQoL varies by age group, gender, and type of vertigo diagnoses. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical and HrQoL data of children and adolescents referred to the German Center of Vertigo and Balance Disorders (n = 32; male = 17; female = 15; age range: 8-18 years), using the KIDSCREEN-52 questionnaire. For each scale, means of the Z-scores with 95% confidence intervals of the study and norm sample were compared. By nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis statistics differences between diagnostic groups were assessed. To assess the gender- and age-specific impact of vertigo on quality of life, Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used. Results The means of the physical well-being, psychological well-being, autonomy scale, and the general HrQoL index of patients were considerably lower than the means of the norm sample. The physical well-being seemed to be most affected by vertigo. The reduction of HrQoL was not related to gender and vertigo types but seemed to be higher in children suffering from vertigo aged 12 to 18 years than children aged 8 to 11 years. Conclusion These are the first data to demonstrate impaired HrQoL in children with chronic vertigo. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Psychiatric comorbidity and psychosocial impairment among patients with vertigo and dizziness.

    PubMed

    Lahmann, Claas; Henningsen, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael; Jahn, Klaus; Dieterich, Marianne; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Feuerecker, Regina; Dinkel, Andreas; Schmid, Gabriele

    2015-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are often not fully explained by an organic illness, but instead are related to psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to evaluate psychiatric comorbidity and assess psychosocial impairment in a large sample of patients with a wide range of unselected organic and non-organic (ie, medically unexplained) vertigo/dizziness syndromes. This cross-sectional study involved a sample of 547 patients recruited from a specialised interdisciplinary treatment centre for vertigo/dizziness. Diagnostic evaluation included standardised neurological examinations, structured clinical interview for major mental disorders (SCID-I) and self-report questionnaires regarding dizziness, depression, anxiety, somatisation and quality of life. Neurological diagnostic workup revealed organic and non-organic vertigo/dizziness in 80.8% and 19.2% of patients, respectively. In 48.8% of patients, SCID-I led to the diagnosis of a current psychiatric disorder, most frequently anxiety/phobic, somatoform and affective disorders. In the organic vertigo/dizziness group, 42.5% of patients, particularly those with vestibular paroxysmia or vestibular migraine, had a current psychiatric comorbidity. Patients with psychiatric comorbidity reported more vertigo-related handicaps, more depressive, anxiety and somatisation symptoms, and lower psychological quality of life compared with patients without psychiatric comorbidity. Almost half of patients with vertigo/dizziness suffer from a psychiatric comorbidity. These patients show more severe psychosocial impairment compared with patients without psychiatric disorders. The worst combination, in terms of vertigo-related handicaps, is having non-organic vertigo/dizziness and psychiatric comorbidity. This phenomenon should be considered when diagnosing and treating vertigo/dizziness in the early stages of the disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  11. The RAVE/VERTIGO vertex reconstruction toolkit and framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltenberger, W.; Mitaroff, W.; Moser, F.; Pflugfelder, B.; Riedel, H. V.

    2008-07-01

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE1) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO2) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state-of-the-art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available.

  12. Vestibular migraine: the most frequent entity of episodic vertigo.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne; Obermann, Mark; Celebisoy, Nese

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in adults as well as in children. The diagnostic criteria of the consensus document of the International Bárány Society for Neuro-Otology and the International Headache Society (2012) combine the typical signs and symptoms of migraine with the vestibular symptoms lasting 5 min to 72 h and exclusion criteria. Although VM accounts for 7% of patients seen in dizziness clinics and 9% of patients seen in headache clinics it is still underdiagnosed. This review provides an actual overview on the pathophysiology, the clinical characteristics to establish the diagnosis, the differential diagnosis, and the treatment of VM.

  13. Transient Ischemic Attacks Presenting with Dizziness or Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Blum, Christina A; Kasner, Scott E

    2015-08-01

    Dizziness with or without associated neurologic symptoms is the most common symptom of posterior circulation transient ischemic attack (TIA) and can be more frequent before posterior circulation strokes. This entity carries a high risk of recurrent events and should be considered as a potential cause of spontaneous episodic vestibular syndrome. Diagnostic evaluation should include intracranial and extracranial imaging of the vertebral arteries and basilar artery. Aggressive medical management with antiplatelet therapy, statin use, and risk factor modification is the mainstay of treatment. This article highlights the importance of diagnosing, evaluating, and treating posterior circulation TIAs manifesting as dizziness or vertigo.

  14. Vertigo-related cerebral blood flow changes on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feiyan; Li, Zhongshi; Xie, Sheng; Liu, Hui; Wang, Wu

    2014-11-01

    A prospective study using magnetic resonance imaging on a consecutive cohort of patients with cervical vertigo. To quantitatively investigate the cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with cervical vertigo by using 3-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling. Previous studies reported blood flow velocity reduction in posterior circulation during vertigo. However, the detailed information of CBF related to cervical vertigo has not been provided. A total of 33 patients with cervical vertigo and 14 healthy volunteers were recruited in this study. Three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling was performed on each subject to evaluate the CBF before and after the cervical hyperextension-hyperflexion movement tests, which was used to induce cervical vertigo. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to assess the effect of subjects and tests. There were time effects of CBF in the territory of bilateral superior cerebellar artery, bilateral posterior cerebral artery, bilateral middle cerebral artery, and right anterior cerebral artery, but no group effect was observed. The analysis of CBF revealed a significant main effect of tests (P=0.024) and participants (P=0.038) in the dorsal pons. Cervical vertigo onset may be related to CBF reduction in the dorsal pons, which sequentially evokes the vestibular nuclei. 2.

  15. Reduced postural differences between phobic postural vertigo patients and healthy subjects during a postural threat.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Johan; Tjernström, Fredrik; Karlberg, Mikael; Fransson, Per Anders; Magnusson, Måns

    2009-08-01

    Phobic postural vertigo is characterized by subjective imbalance and dizziness while standing or walking, despite normal values for clinical balance tests. Patients with phobic postural vertigo exhibit an increased high-frequency sway in posturographic tests. Their postural sway, however, becomes similar to the sway of healthy subjects during difficult balance tasks. Posturographic recordings of 30 s of quiet stance was compared to recordings of 30 s of quiet stance during a postural threat, which consisted of the knowledge of forthcoming vibratory calf muscle stimulation, in 37 consecutive patients with phobic postural vertigo and 24 healthy subjects. During quiet stance without the threat of forthcoming vibratory stimulation, patients with phobic postural vertigo exhibited a postural sway containing significantly more high-frequency sway than the healthy subjects. During the quiet stance with forthcoming vibratory stimulation, i.e., anticipation of a postural threat, the significant differences between groups disappeared for all variables except sagittal high-frequency sway. During postural threat, healthy subjects seemed to adopt a postural strategy that was similar to that exhibited by phobic postural vertigo patients. The lack of additional effects facing a postural threat among phobic postural vertigo patients may be due to an already maximized postural adaptation. Deviant postural reactions among patients with phobic postural vertigo may be considered as an avoidant postural response due to a constant fear of losing postural control.

  16. [Immediate prediction of recovery, based on emotional impact of vertigo].

    PubMed

    Dal-Lago, Andrés H; Ceballos-Lizarraga, Ricardo; Carmona, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This work presents deeper studies of comorbidity between anxiety and vestibular pathology. The aim of this work was to comprehend the reasons why patients do not feel «fully recovered» even though the treating professionals discharge them. We studied the features of personality that can favour the continuity of the condition. The questionnaire for measuring the emotional impact of vertigo makes it possible to determine if the patient has a psychological style with a tendency to develop pathological anxiety levels. Anxiety is a subjective characteristic determinant in difficulties with medical treatment. The questionnaire was applied to 198 patients in Argentina and Mexico in parallel. Each pathology was treated by standard medical procedures. The study focused on determining the correlation between «feeling fully recovered or not at the end of treatment» and the questionnaire scores obtained before the approach. In more than 80% of cases, high scores (>15 points) on the questionnaire were correlated with the difficulty presented by the patients for full recovery from the pathology after medical treatment. The objective assessments (duration and intensity of symptoms, time of onset of the disease, etc.) do not exactly predict possible difficulties during treatment of vertigo. Consequently, we consider the patient's subjective assessment of how the vestibular pathology affects him or her to be determinant. That key information allows us to predict the course of the illness and the probability of a full recovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A.; Macri, G. F.; Gallo, A.; Fusconi, M.; De Virgilio, A.; Pagliuca, G.; Marinelli, C.; de Vincentiis, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes. PMID:24741601

  18. Predictors of false negative diffusion-weighted MRI in clinically suspected central cause of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Ebru Unal; Akoglu, Haldun; Cimilli Ozturk, Tuba; Onur, Bahaeddin; Eroglu, Serkan Emre; Onur, Ozge; Denizbasi, Arzu

    2017-09-23

    Vertigo is classified as peripheral and central. Differentiation of stroke mimics is the most important diagnostic challenge. There is no clinical guidance for the indications of neuroimaging in isolated vertigo patients. The primary aim of this study is to test the diagnostic value of a DWI-MRI protocol to rule-out a central cause in patients with acute isolated vertigo in the ED. We prospectively enrolled 144 patients who were presented with isolated vertigo to the ED. A detailed neurological examination and maneuvers were performed for differential diagnosis. All patients underwent CT and/or DW-MRI either during ED visit or at the follow-up, if necessary. Out-patient follow-up exams and evaluations were repeated until all patients had a definitive diagnosis. In the study, 137 of the 144 patients completed the follow-up period, and 34 of 137 patients were diagnosed with central vertigo. Six of 34 central vertigo patients had normal DW-MRI findings. One was diagnosed with migraine headache and five with vertebra-basilar insufficiency during the out-patient follow-up. One of the 28 patients with a pathological MRI was diagnosed with mass and the rest was stroke. The utility of DW-MRI in vertigo patients was moderately high (sensitivity: 82%, specificity: 100%). We found that age, history of HT, history of CAD and vertigo unresponsive to ED treatment were significantly associated with a central cause of vertigo. We suggest that unresponsiveness to ED treatment, especially in patients with a history of HT and CAD, should alert physicians for central causes and warrant DW-MRI imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Patients' psychological well-being and resilient coping protect from secondary somatoform vertigo and dizziness (SVD) 1 year after vestibular disease.

    PubMed

    Tschan, Regine; Best, Christoph; Beutel, Manfred E; Knebel, Achim; Wiltink, Jörg; Dieterich, Marianne; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret

    2011-01-01

    Secondary somatoform dizziness and vertigo (SVD) is an underdiagnosed and handicapping psychosomatic disorder, leading to extensive utilization of health care and maladaptive coping. Few long-term follow-up studies have focused on the assessment of risk factors and little is known about protective factors. The aim of this 1-year follow-up study was to identify neurootological patients at risk for the development of secondary SVD with respect to individual psychopathological disposition, subjective well-being and resilient coping. In a prospective interdisciplinary study, we assessed mental disorders in n=59 patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders (n=15 benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, n=15 vestibular neuritis, n=8 Menière's disease, n=24 vestibular migraine) at baseline (T0) and 1 year after admission (T1). Psychosomatic examinations included the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV, the Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS), and a psychometric test battery measuring resilience (RS), sense of coherence (SOC), and satisfaction with life (SWLS). Subjective well-being significantly predicted the development of secondary SVD: Patients with higher scores of RS, SOC, and SWLS at T0 were less likely to acquire secondary SVD at T1. Lifetime mental disorders correlated with a reduced subjective well-being at T0. Patients with mental comorbidity at T0 were generally more at risk for developing secondary SVD at T1. Patients' dispositional psychopathology and subjective well-being play a major predictive role for the long-term prognosis of dizziness and vertigo. To prevent secondary SVD, patients should be screened for risk and preventive factors, and offered psychotherapeutic treatment in case of insufficient coping capacity.

  20. Anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction with sudden deafness and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takenobu; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Doi, Mitsuru; Fukada, Yasuyo; Hayashi, Miwa; Suzuki, Takeo; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    We report a patient with anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction, which manifested as profound deafness, transient vertigo, and minimal cerebellar signs. We suspect that ischaemia of the left internal auditory artery, which originates from the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, caused the deafness and transient vertigo. A small lesion in the middle cerebellar peduncle in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory and no lesion in the dentate nucleus in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory are thought to explain the minimal cerebellar signs despite the relatively large size of the infarction. Thus a relatively large infarction of the vertebral-basilar territory can manifest as sudden deafness with vertigo. Neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, is strongly recommended for patients with sudden deafness and vertigo to exclude infarction of the vertebral-basilar artery territory.

  1. Acute vertigo in an anesthesia provider during exposure to a 3T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Andrew; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Pavlicek, William; Thunberg, Christopher A; Seamans, David

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo induced by exposure to the magnetic field of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is a well-known phenomenon within the radiology community but is not widely appreciated by other clinical specialists. Here, we describe a case of an anesthetist experiencing acute vertigo while providing sedation to a patient undergoing a 3 Tesla MRI scan. After discussing previous reports, and the evidence surrounding MRI-induced vertigo, we review potential etiologies that include the effects of both static and time-varying magnetic fields on the vestibular apparatus. We conclude our review by discussing the occupational standards that exist for MRI exposure and methods to minimize the risks of MRI-induced vertigo for clinicians working in the MRI environment.

  2. The minimal caloric test asymmetric response in vertigo-free migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Maranhão Filho, Péricles; Vincent, Maurice Borges; Luiz, Ronir Raggio

    2016-02-01

    Vertigo symptoms and subclinical vestibular dysfunctions may occur in migraine. The Minimal Caloric Test (MCT), an easy-to-perform, convenient and yet informative procedure was used to test the vestibular function in 30 vertigo-free migraine patients outside attacks and 30 paired controls. Although not statistically significant, a right-to-left nystagmus duration asymmetry greater than 25% was present in both groups. This difference was greater in the patients group, suggesting the presence of subclinical vestibular imbalance in migraine.

  3. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with peripheral vertigo: a prospective controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Isa; Kahraman, Cuneyt; Balikci, Hasan Huseyin; Kucur, Cuneyt; Kahraman, Nilufer Kuzeyli; Ozkaya, Derya Pınar; Oghan, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between peripheral vertigo and inflammation by using the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as an inflammatory marker. We recruited 103 patients with peripheral vertigo (71 women, 32 men; mean age, 39.8 ± 14.7 years) who presented to the Otolaryngology Department of Dumlupinar University Hospital. Vertigo patients with systemic diseases, neurological disorders, malignancy or any inflammatory disease that could alter the NLR were excluded from the study. We also enrolled 103 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (controls; 82 women, 21 men; mean age, 36.7 ± 13.5 years) who underwent routine checkups in our hospital. The vertigo patients underwent full otolaryngologic and neurologic examinations and audiometric tests to rule out any other pathology causing the peripheral vertigo. NLR was calculated in all subjects and was compared between the patient and control groups. There were no significant differences between the study and control groups in terms of lipid profiles, liver-function tests, white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin level, mean platelet volume, and vitamin B12 and folate levels. The mean NLR was significantly higher in the patients than in the controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study, which was the first to investigate the relationship between the NLR and peripheral vertigo, found that the NLR is significantly higher among peripheral vertigo patients than among healthy controls. This result suggests that the NLR is a novel potential marker of stress in peripheral vertigo patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The clinical efficacy of Vertigoheel in the treatment of vertigo of various etiology.

    PubMed

    Morawiec-Bajda, A; Lukomski, M; Latkowski, B

    1993-06-01

    In this paper the authors describe the clinical efficacy in treatment of vertigo of various etiology. A group of 31 patients were treated with Vertigoheel medication: 14 patients suffered from vertebrobasilar arterial insufficiency, 8 patients were diagnosed as Meniere's disease, 5 patients complained of vertigo of traumatic origin and 4 patients suffered from neuronitis vestibularis. The authors found regression of clinical symptoms in the majority of cases in the investigated group who were treated with Vertigoheel.

  5. PubMed Central

    Casani, A.P.; Manfrin, M.; Guidetti, G.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common type of peripheral vertigo. BPPV often relapses after the first episode, with a recurrence rate between 15% and 50%. To date both the aetiopathogenetic processes that lead to otoconia detachment and the factors that make BPPV a relapsing disease are still unclear, but recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible association with cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of the present study (Sesto Senso Survey) was to evaluate in the Italian population through an observational survey, the main demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with BPPV (first episode or recurrent) with particular focus on the potential cardiovascular risk factors. The survey was conducted in 158 vestibology centres across Italy on 2,682 patients (mean age 59.3 ± 15.0 years; 39.1% males and 60.9% females) suffering from BPPV, from January 2013 to December 2014. The results showed a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure (55.8%), hypercholesterolaemia (38.6%) and diabetes (17.7%), as well as a family history of cardiovascular disease (49.4%). A high percentage of patients also had hearing loss (42.9%), tinnitus (41.2%), or both (26.8%). The presence of hypertension, dyslipidaemia and pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidities were significantly related to recurrent BPPV episodes (OR range between 1.84 and 2.31). In addition, the association with diabetes and thyroid/autoimmune disease (OR range between 1.73 and 1.89) was relevant. The survey results confirm the significant association between cardiovascular comorbidities and recurrent BPPV and identify them as a potential important risk factor for recurrence of BPPV in the Italian population, paving the way for the evaluation of new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of this disease. PMID:28872163

  6. Recent Advances in Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke Syndromes Causing Vertigo and Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar ischemic stroke is one of the common causes of vascular vertigo. It usually accompanies other neurological symptoms or signs, but a small infarct in the cerebellum can present with vertigo without other localizing symptoms. Approximately 11 % of the patients with isolated cerebellar infarction simulated acute peripheral vestibulopathy, and most patients had an infarct in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). A head impulse test can differentiate acute isolated vertigo associated with PICA territory cerebellar infarction from more benign disorders involving the inner ear. Acute hearing loss (AHL) of a vascular cause is mostly associated with cerebellar infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), but PICA territory cerebellar infarction rarely causes AHL. To date, at least eight subgroups of AICA territory infarction have been identified according to the pattern of neurotological presentations, among which the most common pattern of audiovestibular dysfunction is the combined loss of auditory and vestibular functions. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss can be the initial symptom of impending posterior circulation ischemic stroke (particularly within the territory of the AICA). Audiovestibular loss from cerebellar infarction has a good long-term outcome than previously thought. Approximately half of patients with superior cerebellar artery territory (SCA) cerebellar infarction experienced true vertigo, suggesting that the vertigo and nystagmus in the SCA territory cerebellar infarctions are more common than previously thought. In this article, recent findings on clinical features of vertigo and hearing loss from cerebellar ischemic stroke syndrome are summarized.

  7. Effect of edaravone on acute brainstem-cerebellar infarction with vertigo and sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuta; Yabe, Takao; Okada, Kazunari; Nakamura, Yuka

    2014-06-01

    We report 2 cases with acute brainstem and brainstem-cerebellar infarction showed improvement of their signs and symptoms after administration of edaravone. Case 1, a 74-year-old woman who experienced sudden vertigo, also had dysarthria and left hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an abnormal region in the right ventrolateral medulla oblongata. The patient's vertigo and hemiplegia improved completely after treatment. Case 2, a 50-year-old man who experienced sudden vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), developed dysarthria after admission. MRI revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed dissection of the basilar artery and occlusion of the right anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient's vertigo and hearing remarkably improved. We have described 2 patients whose early symptoms were vertigo and sudden SNHL, but who were later shown to have ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. Edaravone is neuroprotective drug with free radical-scavenging actions. Free radicals in the ear are responsible for ischemic damage. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, may be useful in the treatment of vertigo and SNHL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for dizziness and vertigo in emergency department: a pilot cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Wen; Lee, Tsung-Chieh; Hsu, Po-Chi; Chen, Chia-Yun; Chang, Shun-Chang; Chiang, John Y; Lo, Lun-Chien

    2015-06-09

    Dizziness and vertigo account for roughly 4% of chief symptoms in the emergency department (ED). Pharmacological therapy is often applied for these symptoms, such as vestibular suppressants, anti-emetics and benzodiazepines. However, every medication is accompanied with unavoidable side-effects. There are several research articles providing evidence of acupuncture treating dizziness and vertigo but few studies of acupuncture as an emergent intervention in ED. We performed a pilot cohort study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in treating patients with dizziness and vertigo in ED. A total of 60 participants, recruited in ED, were divided into acupuncture and control group. Life-threatening conditions or central nervous system disorders were excluded to ensure participants' safety. The clinical effect of treating dizziness and vertigo was evaluated by performing statistical analyses on data collected from questionnaires of Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of dizziness and vertigo, and heart rate variability (HRV). The variation of VAS demonstrated a significant decrease (p-value: 0.001 and p-value: 0.037) between two groups after two different durations: 30 mins and 7 days. The variation of DHI showed no significant difference after 7 days. HRV revealed a significant increase in high frequency (HF) in the acupuncture group. No adverse event was reported in this study. Acupuncture demonstrates a significant immediate effect in reducing discomforts and VAS of both dizziness and vertigo. This study provides clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture to treat dizziness and vertigo in the emergency department. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02358239 . Registered 5 February 2015.

  9. Exposure to MRI-related magnetic fields and vertigo in MRI workers.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Kristel; Portengen, Lützen; Kromhout, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Vertigo has been reported by people working around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners and was found to increase with increasing strength of scanner magnets. This suggests an association with exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and/or motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (TVMF). This study assessed the association between various metrics of shift-long exposure to SMF and TVMF and self-reported vertigo among MRI workers. We analysed 358 shifts from 234 employees at 14 MRI facilities in the Netherlands. Participants used logbooks to report vertigo experienced during the work day at the MRI facility. In addition, personal exposure to SMF and TVMF was measured during the same shifts, using portable magnetic field dosimeters. Vertigo was reported during 22 shifts by 20 participants and was significantly associated with peak and time-weighted average (TWA) metrics of SMF as well as TVMF exposure. Associations were most evident with full-shift TWA TVMF exposure. The probability of vertigo occurrence during a work shift exceeded 5% at peak exposure levels of 409 mT and 477 mT/s and at full-shift TWA levels of 3 mT and 0.6 mT/s. These results confirm the hypothesis that vertigo is associated with exposure to MRI-related SMF and TVMF. Strong correlations between various metrics of shift-long exposure make it difficult to disentangle the effects of SMF and TVMF exposure, or identify the most relevant exposure metric. On the other hand, this also implies that several metrics of shift-long exposure to SMF and TVMF should perform similarly in epidemiological studies on MRI-related vertigo. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. DIZZYNET--a European network initiative for vertigo and balance research: visions and aims.

    PubMed

    Zwergal, Andreas; Brandt, Thomas; Magnusson, Mans; Kennard, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Vertigo is one of the most common complaints in medicine. Despite its high prevalence, patients with vertigo often receive either inappropriate or inadequate treatment. The most important reasons for this deplorable situation are insufficient interdisciplinary cooperation, nonexistent standards in diagnostics and therapy, the relatively rare translations of basic science findings to clinical applications, and the scarcity of prospective controlled multicenter clinical trials. To overcome these problems, the German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders (DSGZ) started an initiative to establish a European Network for Vertigo and Balance Research called DIZZYNET. The central aim is to create a platform for collaboration and exchange among scientists, physicians, technicians, and physiotherapists in the fields of basic and translational research, clinical management, clinical trials, rehabilitation, and epidemiology. The network will also promote public awareness and help establish educational standards in the field. The DIZZYNET has the following objectives as regards structure and content: to focus on multidisciplinary translational research in vertigo and balance disorders, to develop interdisciplinary longitudinal and transversal networks for patient care by standardizing and personalizing the management of patients, to increase methodological competence by implementing common standards of practice and quality management, to internationalize the infrastructure for prospective multicenter clinical trials, to increase recruitment capacity for clinical trials, to create a common data base for patients with vertigo and balance disorders, to offer and promote attractive educational and career paths in a network of cooperating institutions. In the long term, the DIZZYNET should serve as an internationally visible network for interdisciplinary and multiprofessional research on vertigo and balance disorders. It ideally should equally attract the afflicted patients and

  11. Long-term outcome of vertigo and dizziness associated disorders following treatment in specialized tertiary care: the Dizziness and Vertigo Registry (DiVeR) Study.

    PubMed

    Obermann, Mark; Bock, Eva; Sabev, Nikolay; Lehmann, Nils; Weber, Ralph; Gerwig, Marcus; Frings, Markus; Arweiler-Harbeck, Diana; Lang, Stephan; Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the long-term outcome of interdisciplinary treatment in a tertiary care neuro-otology institution after 2 years as part of the Dizziness and Vertigo Registry study. Risk factors associated with unfavourable outcome were assessed. 3113 consecutive patients with disorders of vertigo and dizziness were recruited prospectively between March 2010 and February 2012. Patients were clinically assessed and treated according to their diagnosis. Standardized instruments were used at baseline and at 2-year follow-up [Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Quality of Life Questionnaire, General Depression Scale, Stait-Trait Anxiety Index], as well as a custom health-related questionnaire. The primary outcome variable of this observational study was the change in DHI after 2 years. Patients suffered from phobic postural vertigo (23%), benign peripheral paroxysmal vertigo (14.4%), unilateral vestibulopathy (10.5%), central vestibular disorders (8%), Menière's disease (9.8%), vestibular migraine (6.9%), bilateral vestibulopathy (5.5%), and vestibular paroxysmia (3.1%). Mean disease duration was 4.6 ± 6.3 years. 1272 patients were available for follow-up, 1159 completed the DHI score. 72.1% of patients improved in DHI score from baseline to 2 years follow-up. Mean reduction in DHI score was 14 points (p = 0.02). Long-term outcome following diagnosis and treatment in a specialized tertiary care centre is good and persistent after 2 years. Risk factors for an unfavourable outcome were advanced age, severe disability, constant vertigo or dizziness, and concomitant back pain, while depression and anxiety did not contribute to this risk considerably.

  12. Cinnarizine and dimenhydrinate in the treatment of vertigo in medical practice.

    PubMed

    Scholtz, Arne-Wulf; Ilgner, Justus; Loader, Benjamin; Pritschow, Bernd W; Weisshaar, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy and safety of the fixed combination of cinnarizine 20 mg and dimenhydrinate 40 mg in the treatment of vertigo of various origins have been investigated in a prospective, noninterventional study involving private practices throughout Germany. A total of 1275 patients with an average age of 61.2 years participated in the study. The vertigo symptoms, measured by a validated mean vertigo score (primary efficacy endpoint) improved by 61 % in the course of the observational period (median: 6 weeks). Concomitant symptoms frequently associated with vertigo such as nausea, vomiting and tinnitus were also markedly reduced by 84, 85 and 51 %, respectively. Overall efficacy has been rated by the physicians as 'very much improved' or 'much improved' in 95 % of the patients. A total of 47 patients (3.7 %) reported 51 adverse drug reactions (all nonserious). The results indicate a good tolerability and efficacy of the fixed combination of cinnarizine and dimenhydrinate in the treatment of vertigo in daily medical practice, which is in line with previous findings of numerous interventional, randomised, double-blind, controlled clinical trials.

  13. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detects recurrent isolated vertigo caused by cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Li; Luo, Man; Li, Jiaoxing; Li, Weidong; Sheng, Wenli

    2015-06-01

    The etiology of isolated vertigo has been a substantial diagnostic challenge for both neurologists and otolaryngologists. This study was designed to detect recurrent isolated vertigo due to cerebral hypoperfusion using perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (PWI). We recruited isolated vertigo patients whose clinical condition was suspected to be caused by hypodynamics of the brain; these individuals formed the case group. We generated two additional groups: a negative group composed of vertigo patients whose symptoms were caused by problems associated with the ear and a healthy control group. Each subject underwent PWI, and seven regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and mean transit time (MTT) were obtained from each ROI. We further calculated the absolute difference of relative parameter values between two mirrored ROIs. The significant difference in the relative MTT from the mirrored cerebellar ROI (|rMTTleft-right|) of the case group was larger than those from the negative and healthy control groups (p = 0.026 and p = 0.038, respectively). Signal differences in |rrCBVleft-right| and |rrCBFleft-right| were not found among the three groups. In summary, disequilibrium in the rMTT of the bilateral cerebellum in the case group implied that hypoperfusion of the posterior circulation could trigger recurrent isolated vertigo and could be shown efficiently using PWI.

  14. Migraine-associated vertigo: a review of the pathophysiology and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fasunla, Ayotunde James; Ibekwe, Titus Sunday; Nwaorgu, Onyekwere George

    2012-03-01

    The clinical diagnosis of migraine-associated vertigo may be difficult because it shares features with some other clinical conditions. This communication presents a systematic review on the epidemiology and theories of pathophysiology of migraine-associated vertigo and its distinguishing features from peripheral vestibular disorders. We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and Google scholar for all the studies on migraine-associated vertigo published in English language between 1966 and 2010. Their references were also reviewed for completion. Data from the studies were independently extracted and assessed by the three authors using standardized data forms. There was consensus between the authors on the studies in this review that met the criteria. Forty-five studies were identified and independently assessed based on the objectives of the study by the authors. All the studies discussed on the epidemiology of the migraine-associated vertigo, six discussed on the pathophysiology, while differential diagnosis were documented in thirty-two studies. In conclusion, migraine-associated vertigo is a global distinct disease entity that can be clinically distinguished from peripheral vestibular disorders. Abstinence from trigger factors remains imperative in the control, whereas some medications have been found useful in the management.

  15. Hitchcock's "Vertigo": the collapse of a rescue fantasy.

    PubMed

    Berman, E

    1997-10-01

    The author presents an interpretation of Hitchcock's 'Vertigo', focusing on the way in which its protagonist's drama resonates with the analyst's struggle with deep unconscious identifications, with the impossibility of maintaining detached objectivity or guaranteeing one's role as a reparative good object and with the dangers of grandiosity, omniscience and illusory control. The protagonist's 'countertransference love' crystallises around a rescue fantasy in which he is Orpheus striving to bring Eurydice back from Hades, or a Knight determined to behead an obscure Dragon endangering Beauty. Initially these key roles are sharply differentiated, through splitting and disavowal, which deprive the participants of their conflictual three-dimensionality. Eventually, however, the valiant Knight turns out to be as helpless and lonely as his Beauty, and in the final scene as ruthless and lethal as the Dragon. This interpretation is compared to numerous other views of the film offered in the literature. The survey and comparison of the various views leads to fundamental issues in the psychoanalytic study of art. Interpretations can be seen as unavoidably coloured by the (counter)transference of viewers. It is suggested that a film has no hidden true meaning, and a new individual significance emerges in the transitional space opened up by each viewer's encounter with the emotional universe of the film. A defensive emphasis on the pathology of artists and their work may alienate us from art, and blind us to ways in which we could learn from it personally and professionally.

  16. [An updated guide on drugs inducing ototoxicity, tinnitus and vertigo].

    PubMed

    Cianfrone, G; Pace, M; Turchetta, R; Cianfrone, F; Altissimi, G

    2005-10-01

    The argument of the iatrogenic side effects of pharmacological origin that can cause ototoxic effects or only disacustic symptoms like the tinnitus, without consequent degenerative effects, is enlarged in these last years. It is because of the great knowledge based on the careful attention from the pharmaceutical institutions which are responsible for the control of medicines and drugs. In the medical practice and in that specialty field born the need to gather, also in consideration of the possible medico-legal implications, those elements which will suppose the risk of otologic side effects. This will allow the physicians to evaluate the possible clinical advantage of a treatment, in their own field of competence, balancing them with their possible side effects in the otologic field. For this purpose, we have elaborated some updated lists of drugs with possible side effects of ototoxicity, tinnitus and vertigo; furthermore, we considered these drugs as could theoretically have influence on the auditory neurochemical progressing since they have excitatory or inhibitory action on the neurotransmitters and their receptors, but not signaled by the sources of institutional information.

  17. Alternobaric vertigo in sport SCUBA divers and the risk factors.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Cem; Yagiz, Recep; Tas, Abdullah; Adali, Mustafa K; Inan, Nurkan; Koten, Muhsin; Karasalihoglu, Ahmet R

    2003-11-01

    We investigated the eustachian tube function and the incidence of alternobaric vertigo (AV) in 29 sport self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) divers with, or without, some possible risk factors for AV. The divers had normal audiological and otoscopic findings at the pre-dive examination. We used the nine-step inflation/deflation tympanometric test and Toynbee test for evaluation of eustachian tube function, and the Valsalva manoeuvre for patency. Information on divers, their history, and their otolaryngologic examination were obtained in the pre-dive examination. Divers performed 1086 dives (mean 37, range: 3-100) during the observation period. Four divers (14 per cent) experienced AV during five dives (0.46 per cent), (one diver experienced AV two times). It was found that having an otitis media history or eustachian tube dysfunction determined with the nine-step inflation/deflation tympanometric test before diving, or difficulty in clearing ears during diving could be important risk factors for AV in sport SCUBA divers (p <.05). Divers with such findings seem to be more prone to AV and should pay rigorous attention to the precautions for prevention of AV.

  18. [Treatment of vestibular vertigo and Ménière syndrome in outpatient clinics].

    PubMed

    Kostenko, E V; Petrova, L V; Torgovanova, E A; Ganzhula, P A; Lisenker, L N; Otcheskaia, O V; Khozova, A A; Lebedeva, A V; Boĭko, A N

    2012-01-01

    An aim of this study was to assess clinical efficacy and tolerability of tagista in the symptomatic treatment of vestibular vertigo and Ménière syndrome. Thirty-two patients, 16 women and 16 men, aged from 25 to 67 years, were examined. Vertigo was caused by chronic brain ischemia in 17 cases and by the disturbance of blood circulation in the vertebral-basilar system in 14 patients with osteochondrosis of cervical spine. One patient was diagnosed with Ménière syndrome. Tagista was used in dose 24 mg twice a day during 4 weeks in the combination with standard treatment, exercise therapy and stability training. The results revealed a statistically significant effect of the drug on main symptoms (frequency, duration and intensity of vertigo attacks etc) and its good tolerability that allowed to recommend the drug in neurological practice.

  19. Flunarizine in the prophylaxis of migrainous vertigo: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lepcha, Anjali; Amalanathan, Sophia; Augustine, Ann Mary; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Balraj, Achamma

    2014-11-01

    Migrainous vertigo is a common cause of dizziness presenting to an otorhinolaryngology/otoneurology clinic. Although it causes a substantial burden to the individual and society there are no randomized controlled trails on prophylactic medication for this condition. Flunarizine, a calcium channel blocker has been used effectively in both migraine and vestibular conditions. This randomized control trial was undertaken in a tertiary academic referral center to evaluate the efficacy of flunarizine in patients with migrainous vertigo when compared to non-specific vestibular treatment of betahistine and vestibular exercises. The effect of flunarizine on two particularly disabling symptoms of vertigo and headache was studied. A total of 48 patients who were diagnosed with definitive migrainous vertigo completed the study of 12 weeks duration. Patients in arm A received 10-mg flunarizine daily along with betahistine 16 mg and paracetamol 1 gm during episodes, and arm B received only betahistine and paracetamol during episodes. Symptom scores were noted at the start of the study and at the end of 12 weeks. Analysis of the frequency of vertiginous episodes showed a significant difference between arm A and arm B (p = 0.010) and improvement in severity of vertigo between the two groups (p = 0.046). Headache frequency and severity did not improve to a significant degree in arm A as compared to arm B. The main side effects were weight gain and somnolence and this was not significantly different between the two groups. Flunarizine (10 mg) is effective in patients with migrainous vertigo who suffer from considerable vestibular symptoms.

  20. [Characteristics and drug analysis associated with vertigo disease in real world].

    PubMed

    Xie, Qian; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Wei; Zhao, Wei; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2014-09-01

    To explore the characteristics and influenced factors associated with the onset of vertigo disease, analysis of 3 719 cases of hospitalized patients with vertigo disease from the real world. Analysis the date of patients diagnosed with vertigo disease from the hospital information system of 19 grade-III class-A hospital from 2004 to 2011, include general information, the doctor's advice, other diseases combined, diagnostic information and the relationship with the onset of 24 solar terms, and the treatment drugs. The median age of hospitalized patients with vertigo disease was 59, the number of women (65.91%) was more than men (34.09%), manual workers (85.32%) were the majority career, most patients (81.63%) condition were general by the time they were hospital admission, patients more like admitted to neurologist (70.34%) when they first time to outpatient serves, hospitalization days were in 8-14 days (46.65%), 46.04% of the patients in the hospital total cost is in 5 000 RMB to 10 000 RMB, 73.86% of patients paid by National Health Medical Insurance. Hypertension (20.79%) was the most common underlying health problems, The most common syndromes was deficiency of liver-Yin and kidney-Yin(44. 21%) , followed by hyperactivity of liver-yang, disease of phlegm turbidity in mongolia and deficiency of Qi and blood. There were more deficiency syndrome and less excess syndrome. The highest rate of hospital admission solar terms in 2009 was the insects awaken throttle (5.21%), In 2010, the highest rate solar terms of hospital admission was the rain throttle (6.14%). The most frequently used traditional Chinese medicine was gastrodine injection (20.55%), the most frequently used western medicine for betahistine (10.19%), gastrodine injection was the most traditional Chinese medicine that combination with other western medicine. Hypertension was the most underlying health problems in the patients with vertigo disease in the real world, although the mental factors should

  1. Magnetic resonance brain imaging in patients with visual vertigo.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Lea; Osherov, Michael; Berkovitz, Nadav; Beckerman, Inessa; Stryjer, Rafael; Tal, Sigal

    2015-11-01

    Patients with visual vertigo (VV) report dizziness provoked by moving visual surroundings. It has been suggested that these subjects develop a compensation strategy for a vestibulo-proprioceptive deficit and rely excessively on visual input. We have postulated that patients with VV might have brain abnormalities that interfere with appropriate processing of visual stimulation and performed a brain MRI study to verify this hypothesis. Patients with VV of more than 3 months duration were included. They were asked to complete the Situational Characteristic Questionnaire (SCQ) that scores for the symptoms of VV. Dizzy patients without VV served as controls. A brain MRI was performed with a Siemens 1.5 Tesla scanner in patients and controls. Twenty-four patients with VV were included. Their mean SCQ score was 1.45 ± 0.9 (normal 0.16 ± 0.28). In 50% of patients, abnormalities in MRI imaging were found. Thirty-three percent of 27 controls demonstrated an abnormal brain MRI. The two groups were similar in respect to the prevalence of a localized hemispheric or posterior fossa lesion (P = 0.13), but VV patients had more unspecific white matter brain changes than controls (P = 0.009). Patients and controls did not differ in age and gender distribution (P = 0.9) or the history of a neurotological event preceding their symptoms (P = 0.3). Our study suggests that multiple white matter lesions might contribute to occurrence of the phenomenon of VV. Future prospective large-scale studies by specific MR techniques are indicated to validate our preliminary findings and elucidate the pathological mechanism of VV.

  2. [Analyses of clinical features and efficacy of sudden deafness with vertigo and dizziness].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Han, Demin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Yongxin; Gong, Shusheng; Chen, Xiuwu; Meng, Xixi; Tang, Junxiang; Xiang, Jie; Jiang, Xuejun; Yang, Ning; Tian, Ying; Hui, Lian; Feng, Shuai

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics and the effect of drug treatment for sudden hearing loss with vertigo or dizziness. In a prospective, randomized, single blinded randomized multicenter clinical study, patients with sudden deafness, ranging in age from 18 to 65 years old, with a duration less than 2 weeks, and with no any medical treatments were collected. In accordance with the hearing curve, those patients were divided into four types, i.e., low and intermediate frequency descent type; high frequency descent type; fall flat type; and total deafness type. Each type was treated by four different treatment options, according to the unified design of the random table, and randomly selected one of the options for treatment. The efficacy of the patients with sudden deafness with vertigo and dizziness was analyzed statistically after the follow-up for 4 weeks. SPSS 13.0 software was used to analyze the data. In August 2007 to October 2011, 33 hospitals in the country included 1 024 patients with sudden deafness in line with the inclusion criteria, of whom 296 (28.91%) were accompanied by vertigo/dizziness symptoms, 126 were males and 170 were females, with an average age of (41.2 ± 13.5) years old. types of the different audiometric curves of sudden deafness, the occurrence of complete deafness with vertigo/dizziness was the highest (44.93%), followed by flat down type (25.87%), high frequency descent type (21.28%) and low intermediate frequency descent type (18.54%). After the standard treatment, the vertigo and dizziness symptoms of the sudden deafness patients could disappear, and the hearing in each group was obviously improved. The hearing curative effect on patients accompanied by vertigo/dizziness of low frequency and intermediate frequency descent type was the best, and the total efficiency can reach up to 94.74%, with the cure rate of 68.42%; followed by flat type, in which the total effective rate was 80.76%, with the recovery rate of 22.12%; and

  3. Serum protein S100β is a diagnostic biomarker for distinguishing posterior circulation stroke from vertigo of nonvascular causes.

    PubMed

    Purrucker, Jan C; Herrmann, Oliver; Lutsch, Julia K; Zorn, Markus; Schwaninger, Markus; Bruckner, Tom; Auffarth, Gerd U; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    In patients presenting with acute vertigo or dizziness, identifying the posterior fossa stroke as the underlying cause can be a major challenge. We therefore evaluated the serum biomarkers for the differential diagnosis of nonvascular vertigo and posterior circulation stroke. Of a total of 80 patients, 31 patients had an ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation and 12 infratentorial hemorrhage. Findings in these patients were compared with those in 22 patients with vertigo of nonvascular origin and 15 matched control patients without neurological symptoms. Blood samples drawn <24 h after symptom onset were analyzed for S100 calcium-binding protein B (S100β), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Serum levels of S100β were significantly higher in stroke patients than in nonvascular vertigo patients. Serum concentrations of MMP-9 tended to be higher in stroke patients, whereas no significant differences among groups were found for sVCAM-1 and GFAP. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis revealed a sensitivity of 94.4% and a specificity of 31.8% for detecting stroke in patients presenting with vertigo for S100β. S100β may serve as a biomarker for distinguishing between vertigo of vascular causes and nonvascular, acute vertigo. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Lomerizine therapy for the treatment of benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood transitioning into atypical basilar migraine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, YUTA; YABE, TAKAO

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV) of childhood transitioning into basilar migraine (BM) that was effectively treated with lomerizine. A 6-year-old male visited our hospital complaining of repeated attacks of vertigo for 3 months. The patient’s vertigo attacks lasted for several hours and were accompanied by nausea, vomiting, intense fear and loss of consciousness. No nystagmus was observed during the vertigo attacks. Blood tests and imaging examinations revealed no abnormal findings. The results of electronystagmography and the caloric test were unremarkable. Pure-tone audiometry revealed profound right-side sensorineural hearing loss. Among the differential diagnoses, delayed endolymphatic hydrops, epilepsy and BM were considered. Delayed endolymphatic hydrops was considered unlikely since no nystagmus occurred during the vertigo attacks and there was no change in hearing; electroencephalography revealed no epileptic seizure waves. The attacks of vertigo were well-controlled with lomerizine. The patient was diagnosed with BM since the use of lomerizine, an agent for the treatment for migraine, was effective. Since it was reported that BPV is closely related to migraine and the onset of the vertigo attacks was accompanied by a loss of consciousness, we concluded that this patient had BM transitioning from BPV. PMID:23837033

  5. Incidence and localizing value of vertigo and dizziness in patients with epilepsy: Video-EEG monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-10-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are common neurological complaints that have long been associated with epilepsy. However, studies of patients with epileptic vertigo or dizziness with concurrent EEG monitoring are scarce. We performed the present study to investigate the incidence and localizing value of vertigo and dizziness in patients with epilepsy who had confirmation of EEG changes via video-EEG monitoring. Data of aura and clinical seizure episodes of 831 consecutive patients who underwent video-EEG monitoring were analyzed retrospectively. Out of 831 patients, 40 patients (4.8%) experienced vertigo or dizziness as aura (mean age, 32.8±11.8years), all of whom had partial seizures. Eight had mesial temporal, 20 had lateral temporal, four had frontal, one had parietal, and seven had occipital lobe onset seizures. An intracranial EEG with cortical stimulation study was performed in seven patients, and the area of stimulation-induced vertigo or dizziness coincided with the ictal onset area in only one patient. Our study showed that vertigo or dizziness is a common aura in patients with epilepsy, and that the temporal lobe is the most frequent ictal onset area in these patients. However, it can be suggested that the symptomatogenic area in patients with epileptic vertigo and dizziness may not coincide with the ictal onset area.

  6. Effectiveness of betahistine (48 mg/day) in patients with vestibular vertigo during routine practice: The VIRTUOSO study.

    PubMed

    Parfenov, Vladimir A; Golyk, Volodymyr A; Matsnev, Eduard I; Morozova, Svetlana V; Melnikov, Oleg A; Antonenko, Ludmila M; Sigaleva, Elena E; Situkho, Maksym I; Asaulenko, Olena I; Popovych, Vasyl I; Zamergrad, Maxim V

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular vertigo is associated with substantially reduced quality of life. Betahistine is effective in improving vertigo-associated symptoms, with longer treatment periods leading to greater improvements; however, it is not known whether these effects persist after treatment cessation. VIRTUOSO was a prospective, multinational, non-comparative, post-marketing observational programme investigating the effectiveness of betahistine (48 mg/day) and the course of vertigo after the discontinuation of treatment. Patients with vestibular vertigo who were prescribed 48 mg/day betahistine were enrolled in Russia and Ukraine. Treatment duration was up to 2 months, and patients were followed up for 2 months after discontinuation of betahistine. Efficacy endpoints included clinical response (assessed by change in vertigo severity), monthly attack frequency, and physician and patient grading of overall clinical response and improvement of vertigo-associated symptoms. Overall, 309 patients were enrolled and 305 completed the study. Clinical response was rated as good, very good or excellent in 74.1% of patients at end of treatment, with vertigo severity significantly decreased from baseline (p < 0.001). Monthly vertigo attack frequency decreased significantly during the 2 months of treatment (p < 0.001 from baseline) and further decreased during the 2-month follow-up (p < 0.001 from end of treatment). Overall, clinical response was graded as good or excellent by 94.4% of physicians and 95.4% of patients. Clinical improvement was considered either good or excellent by 82.6-90.5% of physicians and patients for nausea, vomiting and faintness. Only one adverse event was reported, with no serious adverse events. Our findings suggest that betahistine (48 mg/day) therapy is effective in treating vertigo in routine clinical settings. The observed effects persisted for 2 months after treatment cessation, suggesting that betahistine may facilitate lasting vestibular compensation.

  7. Effectiveness of betahistine (48 mg/day) in patients with vestibular vertigo during routine practice: The VIRTUOSO study

    PubMed Central

    Parfenov, Vladimir A.; Golyk, Volodymyr A.; Matsnev, Eduard I.; Morozova, Svetlana V.; Melnikov, Oleg A.; Antonenko, Ludmila M.; Sigaleva, Elena E.; Situkho, Maksym I.; Asaulenko, Olena I.; Popovych, Vasyl I.; Zamergrad, Maxim V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Vestibular vertigo is associated with substantially reduced quality of life. Betahistine is effective in improving vertigo-associated symptoms, with longer treatment periods leading to greater improvements; however, it is not known whether these effects persist after treatment cessation. Methods VIRTUOSO was a prospective, multinational, non-comparative, post-marketing observational programme investigating the effectiveness of betahistine (48 mg/day) and the course of vertigo after the discontinuation of treatment. Patients with vestibular vertigo who were prescribed 48 mg/day betahistine were enrolled in Russia and Ukraine. Treatment duration was up to 2 months, and patients were followed up for 2 months after discontinuation of betahistine. Efficacy endpoints included clinical response (assessed by change in vertigo severity), monthly attack frequency, and physician and patient grading of overall clinical response and improvement of vertigo-associated symptoms. Results Overall, 309 patients were enrolled and 305 completed the study. Clinical response was rated as good, very good or excellent in 74.1% of patients at end of treatment, with vertigo severity significantly decreased from baseline (p < 0.001). Monthly vertigo attack frequency decreased significantly during the 2 months of treatment (p < 0.001 from baseline) and further decreased during the 2-month follow-up (p < 0.001 from end of treatment). Overall, clinical response was graded as good or excellent by 94.4% of physicians and 95.4% of patients. Clinical improvement was considered either good or excellent by 82.6–90.5% of physicians and patients for nausea, vomiting and faintness. Only one adverse event was reported, with no serious adverse events. Conclusion Our findings suggest that betahistine (48 mg/day) therapy is effective in treating vertigo in routine clinical settings. The observed effects persisted for 2 months after treatment cessation, suggesting that betahistine may facilitate

  8. [A Retrospective Series of 77 Pediatric Patients with Vertigo at a National Center for Child Health and Development].

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Suzuki, Noriomi; Hara, Mariko; Tsuchihashi, Nana; Morimoto, Noriko

    2015-07-01

    The evaluation and management of vertigo in children varies among institutional and medical specialties. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of vertigo in children presenting at a national pediatric center. Patients < 16 years old presenting with vertigo to the department of otolaryngology at a national center for child health and development from April 2004 to October 2009 were included (N = 77; 42 males and 35 females; average age, 8.7 ± 3.4 years) in this study. The most common diagnoses were vestibular migraine (VM; N = 21), benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV; N =16), unilateral vestibulopathy (N = 12), and psychogenic vertigo (N = 8). Significant differences were observed in the frequency of the diagnoses between children aged older and younger than 7 years: BPV was most common in children < 7 years of age (p < 0.01) and VM was most common in ≥ 27 years of age (p < 0.05). Because obtaining adequate information from children for making a correct diagnosis is sometimes difficult, acquiring sufficient information from the parents is important. In addition, getting the parents to record the nystagmus during a vertigo attack with a digital camera or cellular phone can be useful because observing the nystagmus recorded on the video is helpful for making a diagnosis. Furthermore, the parents are participating in their child's care by attempting to record the attack, strengthening the relationship between the parents and the child. The incidence of psychogenic vertigo is low (less than 10%). Therefore, although physicians have recently tended to define the disorder as psychogenic when no objective abnormality is found in a patient, making a diagnosis of psychogenic vertigo is not recommended. Because vertigo can sometimes make a child anxious, delivering the correct diagnosis and treatment at the early stage is important for preventing anxiety in affected children.

  9. The methodology of Dynamic Uncertain Causality Graph for intelligent diagnosis of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunling; Wang, Yanjun; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Ningyu

    2014-01-01

    Vertigo is a common complaint with many potential causes involving otology, neurology and general medicine, and it is fairly difficult to distinguish the vertiginous disorders from each other accurately even for experienced physicians. Based on comprehensive investigations to relevant characteristics of vertigo, we propose a diagnostic modeling and reasoning methodology using Dynamic Uncertain Causality Graph. The symptoms, signs, findings of examinations, medical histories, etiology and pathogenesis, and so on, are incorporated in the diagnostic model. A modularized modeling scheme is presented to reduce the difficulty in model construction, providing multiple perspectives and arbitrary granularity for disease causality representations. We resort to the "chaining" inference algorithm and weighted logic operation mechanism, which guarantee the exactness and efficiency of diagnostic reasoning under situations of incomplete and uncertain information. Moreover, the causal insights into underlying interactions among diseases and symptoms intuitively demonstrate the reasoning process in a graphical manner. These solutions make the conclusions and advices more explicable and convincing, further increasing the objectivity of clinical decision-making. Verification experiments and empirical evaluations are performed with clinical vertigo cases. The results reveal that, even with incomplete observations, this methodology achieves encouraging diagnostic accuracy and effectiveness. This study provides a promising assistance tool for physicians in diagnosis of vertigo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of vertebrobasilar insufficiency--associated vertigo with a fixed combination of cinnarizine and dimenhydrinate.

    PubMed

    Otto, Volker; Fischer, Bernhard; Schwarz, Mario; Baumann, Wolfgang; Preibisch-Effenberger, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients suffering from vertigo associated with vertebrobasilar insufficiency participated in our prospective, single-center, double-blind, comparative study. Patients were randomly allocated to treatment with placebo; betahistine (12 mg betahistine dimesylate, one tablet three times daily); or the fixed combination of 20 mg cinnarizine and 40 mg dimenhydrinate (one tablet three times daily) for 4 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was the decrease of the mean vertigo score (S(M)), which was based on the patients' assessments of 12 individual vertigo symptoms after 4 weeks of treatment. Patients treated with the fixed combination showed significantly greater reductions of S(M) as compared to patients receiving placebo (p < .001) or the reference therapy betahistine (p < .01). The vestibulospinal parameter lateral sway (Unterberger's test) improved to a significantly greater extent in patients taking the fixed combination as compared to those receiving placebo (p < .001). No serious adverse event was reported in any therapy group. The tolerability of the fixed combination was judged as very good or good by 91% (betahistine, 73%; placebo, 82%). In conclusion, the fixed combination proved to be statistically more effective than the common antivertiginous drug betahistine in reducing vertebrobasilar insufficiency-associated vertigo symptoms.

  11. Medial Cranial Fossa Meningioma Diagnosed as Mixed Anxiety Disorder with Dissociative Symptoms and Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Emin Mehmet; Evrensel, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors of the meninges that may stay clinically silent or present first with psychiatric symptoms only. We present a case of medial cranial fossa meningioma that was first diagnosed as mixed anxiety disorder with dissociative symptoms and vertigo. In light of the intact neurological and vestibular system examination, our patient's vertigo and depersonalization were firstly addressed as psychosomatic symptoms of the psychiatric syndrome. Despite decreased anxiety and improved mood, dissociative symptoms and vertigo were resistant to treatment which prompted further research yielding a left hemisphere localized meningioma. Resection of meningioma resulted in full remission of the patient proving it to be responsible for the etiology of the psychiatric syndrome and vertigo. We suggest that brain imaging should be performed for patients with late-onset (>50 years) psychiatric symptoms and those with treatment resistance. It is important to keep in mind always that medically unexplained symptoms may become explicable with detailed assessment and regular follow-up of the patient. PMID:27651969

  12. [Characteristics of acupoint selection of acupuncture-moxibustion for vertigo in history: a data mining research].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Shou, Yi-Xia; Ren, Yu-Lan; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2014-05-01

    The data mining technique is adopted to analyze characteristics and rules of acupoint and meridian selection of acupuncture-moxibustion for treatment of vertigo at different time periods in the ancient. The data is collected from literature regarding acupuncture-moxibustion from the pre-Qin period to the end of Qing Dynasty, so as to establish a clinical literature database of ancient acupuncture-moxibustion for treatment of vertigo. Data mining method is applied to analyze the commonly used meridians, acupoints and special acupoints in different dynasties, also possible rules are explored. Totally 82 pieces of prescription of acupuncture-moxibustion for treatment of vertigo are included. In the history the leading selection of acupoitns are Fengchi (GB 20), Hegu (LI 4), Shangxing (GV 23) and Jiexi (ST 41) while that of meridians are mainly three yang meridians of foot and the Governor Vessel, especially the acupoints on the Bladder Meridian of foot yangming had the highest utilization rate, accounting for 23.04%. The acupoint selection is characterized by special acupoint, accounting for 80.6%, among which the crossing points are the most common choice. Distal-proximal acupoints combination is the most frequent method. The results indicate that the ancient acupuncture-moxibustion for treatment of vertigo focused on acupoints in the yang meridians, and the specific acupoints play an essential role in prescription; also the principle of syndrome differentiation and selecting acupoints along the meridians could be seen.

  13. Video Head Impulse Test for Early Diagnosis of Vestibular Neuritis Among Acute Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qiongfeng; Zhang, Lisan; Hong, Wenke; Yang, Yi; Chen, Zhaoying; Lu, Peilin; Zhang, Dan; Hu, Xingyue

    2017-09-01

    This study assesses the value of the video head impulse test (vHIT) for early diagnosis of vestibular neuritis (VN) among acute vertigo. Thirty-three cases of vestibular neuritis (VN), 96 patients with other acute vertigo (AV), and 50 cases of normal controls used vHIT to quantitatively test a pair of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflection (VOR) gains, two pairs of vertical VOR gains, and the corresponding three pairs of VOR gain asymmetry. The peculiarity of VOR gains in VN and the differences between VN and other AV, normal controls by vHIT, were collected and analyzed. There were statistically significant differences in the three pairs of VOR gains asymmetry between VN and other AV, and normal controls (P<0.01). The sensitivity was 87.9% and specificity was 94.3% in differentiating VN from normal and other acute vertigo by vHIT. This study shows vHIT has advantages in the diagnosis of VN in acute vertigo with good sensitivity and specificity and indicates a widespread clinical application.

  14. Vertigo in childhood: proposal for a diagnostic algorithm based upon clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Casani, A P; Dallan, I; Navari, E; Sellari Franceschini, S; Cerchiai, N

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse, after clinical experience with a series of patients with established diagnoses and review of the literature, all relevant anamnestic features in order to build a simple diagnostic algorithm for vertigo in childhood. This study is a retrospective chart review. A series of 37 children underwent complete clinical and instrumental vestibular examination. Only neurological disorders or genetic diseases represented exclusion criteria. All diagnoses were reviewed after applying the most recent diagnostic guidelines. In our experience, the most common aetiology for dizziness is vestibular migraine (38%), followed by acute labyrinthitis/neuritis (16%) and somatoform vertigo (16%). Benign paroxysmal vertigo was diagnosed in 4 patients (11%) and paroxysmal torticollis was diagnosed in a 1-year-old child. In 8% (3 patients) of cases, the dizziness had a post-traumatic origin: 1 canalolithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal and 2 labyrinthine concussions, respectively. Menière's disease was diagnosed in 2 cases. A bilateral vestibular failure of unknown origin caused chronic dizziness in 1 patient. In conclusion, this algorithm could represent a good tool for guiding clinical suspicion to correct diagnostic assessment in dizzy children where no neurological findings are detectable. The algorithm has just a few simple steps, based mainly on two aspects to be investigated early: temporal features of vertigo and presence of hearing impairment. A different algorithm has been proposed for cases in which a traumatic origin is suspected.

  15. Vestibular vertigo and comorbid cognitive and psychiatric impairment: the 2008 National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Robin T; Semenov, Yevgeniy R; du Lac, Sascha; Hoffman, Howard J; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    Patients with vestibular disease have been observed to have concomitant cognitive and psychiatric dysfunction. We evaluated the association between vestibular vertigo, cognitive impairment and psychiatric conditions in a nationally representative sample of US adults. We performed a cross-sectional analysis using the 2008 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which included a Balance and Dizziness Supplement, and questions about cognitive function and psychiatric comorbidity. We evaluated the association between vestibular vertigo, cognitive impairment (memory loss, difficulty concentrating, confusion) and psychiatric diagnoses (depression, anxiety and panic disorder). We observed an 8.4% 1-year prevalence of vestibular vertigo among US adults. In adjusted analyses, individuals with vestibular vertigo had an eightfold increased odds of 'serious difficulty concentrating or remembering' (OR 8.3, 95% CI 4.8 to 14.6) and a fourfold increased odds of activity limitation due to difficulty remembering or confusion (OR 3.9, 95% CI 3.1 to 5.0) relative to the rest of the US adults. Individuals with vestibular vertigo also had a threefold increased odds of depression (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.9 to 3.9), anxiety (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.8 to 3.6) and panic disorder (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.9 to 4.0). Our findings indicate that vestibular impairment is associated with increased risk of cognitive and psychiatric comorbidity. The vestibular system is anatomically connected with widespread regions of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. Loss of vestibular inputs may lead to impairment of these cognitive and affective circuits. Further longitudinal research is required to determine if these associations are causal. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Clinical and electrographic findings in epileptic vertigo and dizziness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tarnutzer, Alexander A; Lee, Seung-Han; Robinson, Karen A; Kaplan, Peter W; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-04-14

    Seizures can cause vestibular symptoms, even without obvious epileptic features. We sought to characterize epileptic vertigo or dizziness (EVD) to improve differentiation from nonepileptic causes, particularly when vestibular symptoms are the sole manifestation. We conducted a systematic review with electronic (Medline) and manual search for English-language studies (1955-2014). Two independent reviewers selected studies. Study/patient characteristics were abstracted. We defined 3 study population types: (1) seizures, some experiencing vertigo/dizziness (disease cohort); (2) vertigo/dizziness, some due to seizures (symptom cohort); (3) vertigo/dizziness due to seizures in all patients (EVD-only cohort). We identified 84 studies describing 11,354 patients (disease cohort = 8,129; symptom cohort = 2,965; EVD-only cohort = 260). Among 1,055 EVD patients in whom a distinction could be made, non-isolated EVD was present in 8.5%, isolated EVD in 0.8%. Thorough diagnostic workups (ictal EEG, vestibular testing, and brain MRI to exclude other causes) were rare (<0.1%). Ictal EEG was reported in 487 (4.3%), formal neuro-otologic assessment in 1,107 (9.7%). Localized EEG abnormalities (n = 350) were most frequently temporal (79.8%) and uncommonly parietal (11.8%). Duration of episodic vestibular symptoms varied, but was very brief (<30 seconds) in 69.6% of isolated EVD and 6.9% of non-isolated EVD. Non-isolated EVD is much more prevalent than isolated EVD, which appears to be rare. Diagnostic evaluations for EVD are often incomplete. EVD is primarily associated with temporal lobe seizures; whether this reflects greater epidemiologic prevalence of temporal lobe seizures or a tighter association with dizziness/vertigo presentations than with other brain regions remains unknown. Consistent with clinical wisdom, isolated EVD spells often last just seconds, although many patients experience longer spells. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Histamine Antagonists for Treatment of Peripheral Vertigo: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Amini, Afshin; Heidari, Kamran; Kariman, Hamid; Taghizadeh, Mehrdad; Hatamabadi, Hamidreza; Shahrami, Ali; Derakhshanfar, Hojat; Asadollahi, Shadi

    2015-08-01

    Vertigo, the hallucination of movement of oneself or one's surroundings, can have substantial adverse effects on the quality of life of affected patients. It is essential to decrease the frequency, severity, and duration of vertigo attacks using effective medications with minimal debilitating adverse effects. We performed a meta-analysis of available clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy of histamine antagonists in the treatment of vertigo compared to the rate of resolution in untreated control groups. A systematic search of articles in any language from January 1970 to March 2015 was performed through the following databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, the Excerpta Medica Database, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Google. Randomized controlled trials comparing each kind of antihistamine to untreated control participants in the treatment of vertigo (blinded/unblinded) were screened for inclusion. Three reviewers separately performed data extraction from the included trials using a standard data abstraction form. Three other researchers read the final list of all articles retained. Discrepancies were settled by mutual consensus between the authors. Random effects models were applied to estimate the pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using the Review Manager software. The evaluation of publication bias was performed by Egger's test and Begg's funnel plot. We identified 13 eligible citations. The pooled OR was 5.370, 95% CI (3.263-8.839), and I2=56.0%, with no obvious evidence of publication bias. Our results provide clarification of the effectiveness of several categories of histamine antagonists compared with placebos in controlling peripheral vertigo.

  18. Role of ocular VEMP test in assessing the occurrence of vertigo in otosclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuei-You; Young, Yi-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study adopted an inner ear test battery comprising audiometry, caloric test, ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) test and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) test to find the factors related to the occurrence of vertigo in patients with otosclerosis. Fifty otosclerosis patients comprising 27 patients with vertigo (Group A) and 23 patients without vertigo/dizziness (Group B) were enrolled. Each patient underwent otoscopy, image study, audiometry, caloric test, and oVEMP and cVEMP tests via bone vibration stimuli. The sequence of inner ear deficits in Group A was in the order from oVEMP test (84%), cVEMP test (51%), caloric test (38%) and mean bone-conducted (BC) hearing threshold (14%), exhibiting a significantly declining trend (p<0.001). The rate of inner ear dysfunction in Group B also declined significantly but in a different order - cVEMP test (55%), oVEMP test (52%), mean BC hearing threshold (33%), and caloric test (18%). Comparison between the two groups revealed a significant difference in the oVEMP test results (p<0.01), but not in the results of the BC hearing threshold, caloric test or cVEMP test (p>0.05). Further, no significant differences existed between the BC hearing threshold and vestibular function test results. Otosclerosis patients with vertigo have more frequent abnormalities of oVEMPs to impulsive stimulation than do those without, consistent with more frequent abnormalities of the utricle. Abnormalities of oVEMPs and cVEMPs are more frequent than for caloric testing and BC hearing thresholds. The relative frequency of abnormalities may reflect the degree of pathological involvement of the utricle, saccule, semicircular canals and cochlea in otosclerosis patients with vertigo. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Increased Risk of Vascular Events in Emergency Room Patients Discharged Home with Diagnosis of Dizziness or Vertigo: A 3-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Su, Yu-Chieh; Chiu, Brian C-H; Su, Yung-Cheng; Lee, Yi-Da; Chou, Pesus

    2012-01-01

    Background Dizziness and vertigo symptoms are commonly seen in emergency room (ER). However, these patients are often discharged without a definite diagnosis. Conflicting data regarding the vascular event risk among the dizziness or vertigo patients have been reported. This study aims to determine the risk of developing stroke or cardiovascular events in ER patients discharged home with a diagnosis of dizziness or vertigo. Methodology A total of 25,757 subjects with at least one ER visit in 2004 were identified. Of those, 1,118 patients were discharged home with a diagnosis of vertigo or dizziness. A Cox proportional hazard model was performed to compare the three-year vascular event-free survival rates between the dizziness/vertigo patients and those without dizziness/vertigo after adjusting for confounding and risk factors. Results We identified 52 (4.7%) vascular events in patients with dizziness/vertigo and 454 (1.8%) vascular events in patients without dizziness/vertigo. ER patients discharged home with a diagnosis of vertigo or dizziness had 2-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35–2.96; p<0.001) higher risk of stroke or cardiovascular events after adjusting for patient characteristics, co-morbidities, urbanization level of residence, individual socio-economic status, and initially taking medications after the onset of dizziness or vertigo during the first year. Conclusions ER patients discharged home with a diagnosis of dizziness or vertigo were at a increased risk of developing subsequent vascular events than those without dizziness/vertigo after the onset of dizziness or vertigo. Further studies are warranted for developing better diagnostic and follow-up strategies in increased risk patients. PMID:22558272

  20. Vestibular rehabilitation: rationale and indications.

    PubMed

    Cabrera Kang, Christian M; Tusa, Ronald J

    2013-07-01

    Treatment options of the patient with dizziness include medication, rehabilitation with physical therapy, surgery, counseling, and reassurance. Here the authors discuss vestibular rehabilitation for patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), unilateral vestibular loss or hypofunction, and bilateral vestibular loss/hypofunction. They describe the different mechanisms for recovery with vestibular rehabilitation, the exercises that are used, and which ones are best. An exhaustive literature review on clinical outcomes with the best research publications for BPPV, unilateral vestibular loss/hypofunction, and bilateral vestibular loss/hypofunction is presented. For BPPV, the authors also summarize the evidence-based review practice parameters published in Neurology by Fife et al. (2008) and review all relevant articles published since then.

  1. [Diagnosis and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in common clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, N V; Zamergrad, M V; Parfenov, V A; Antonenko, L M

    2017-01-01

    Цель исследования. Анализ врачебной практики ведения пациентов с доброкачественным пароксизмальным позиционным головокружением (ДППГ). Материалы и методы. Обследовали 33 пациентов (5 мужчин и 28 женщин, средний возраст 58 лет) с ДППГ, направленных на консультацию в лечебно-диагностическое отделение Клиники нервных болезней Первого МГМУ им. И.М. Сеченова по поводу головокружения. Анализировали информацию о течении заболевания до обращения в клинику: давность головокружения, его характер и провоцирующие факторы, установлены ранее диагнозы, назначенное лечение и его эффективность, сопутствующие заболевания. Результаты. ДППГ не было своевременно диагностировано в 93,9% случаев. В качестве причины головокружения чаще всего ошибочно предполагались цереброваскулярные заболевания (66,6%) и патология шейного отдела позвоночника (15,1%). Ни одному пациенту на этапе первичного обследования не проводились позиционные тесты (отоневрологическое обследование), составляющие основу диагностики ДППГ. Вместо этого в 90,3% случаев назначалось инструментальное обследование: магнитно-резонансная томография головного мозга, рентгенография шейного одела позвоночника, ультразвуковое дуплексное сканирование брахиоцефальных артерий. Неэффективная диагностика приводила к выбору неоптимальной тактики лечения: вместо лечебных репозиционных маневров (РМ) пациентам назначалась медикаментозная терапия: в 84,8% случаев — различные вазоактивные средства, в 12% — ноотропные препараты и хондропротекторы, в 9,1% — миорелаксанты. После выявления ДППГ всем пациентам проведен лечебный РМ, что привело к регрессу симптомов заболевания. Наблюдение пациентов в течение года показало стойкий терапевтический эффект РМ. Заключение. Недостаточно эффективная и своевременная диагностика ДППГ отражает плохую осведомленность врачей о том, что ДППГ наиболее частая причина вестибулярного головокружения. Переоценивается роль сосудистых и цервикогенных факторов в развитии головокружения. Большинство пациентов с ДППГ проходят необоснованные обследования и получают неэффективное лечение. Необходимы повышение информированности врачей о ДППГ, создание специализированных центров по ведению пациентов с головокружением.

  2. Case reports on two patients with episodic vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss and migraine responding to prophylactic drugs for migraine. Menière's disease or migraine-associated vertigo?

    PubMed

    Teggi, R; Fabiano, B; Recanati, P; Limardo, P; Bussi, M

    2010-08-01

    Recent reports have focused on a possible association between migraine and Menière's disease; patients suffering from Menière's disease present a higher rate of migraine. In some cases, the clinical features of migraine-associated vertigo may mimic the presentation of Menière's disease. The present report focuses on two cases of females with recurrent episodes of rotational vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss and tinnitus lasting from a few minutes to several hours; both cases also presented migrainous attacks. As a result of repeated cochleovestibular attacks, both patients presented a permanent low frequency sensorineural hearing loss. Preventive therapies for Menière's disease did not reduce vertigo attacks, while topiramate and acetylsalicylic acid treatment resulted in a significant reduction of both migraine and vertigo. Both the diagnosis of Menière's disease and of migraine-associated vertigo rely on clinical history and both disorders lack a specific diagnostic test. In the early stages, differential diagnosis between Menière's disease and migraine-associated vertigo is often very difficult; previous investigations focused on the possibility that subjects with migraine may experience all symptoms of Menière's disease, including sensorineural fluctuating hearing loss. In conclusion, a trial with prophylactic drug treatment for migraine might be suggested in patients with clear symptoms of migraine and recurrent cochleovestibular disorders.

  3. Effect of head pitch and roll orientations on magnetically induced vertigo.

    PubMed

    Mian, Omar S; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Glover, Paul M; Day, Brian L

    2016-02-15

    Lying supine in a strong magnetic field, such as in magnetic resonance imaging scanners, can induce a perception of whole-body rotation. The leading hypothesis to explain this invokes a Lorentz force mechanism acting on vestibular endolymph that acts to stimulate semicircular canals. The hypothesis predicts that the perception of whole-body rotation will depend on head orientation in the field. Results showed that the direction and magnitude of apparent whole-body rotation while stationary in a 7 T magnetic field is influenced by head orientation. The data are compatible with the Lorentz force hypothesis of magnetic vestibular stimulation and furthermore demonstrate the operation of a spatial transformation process from head-referenced vestibular signals to Earth-referenced body motion. High strength static magnetic fields are known to induce vertigo, believed to be via stimulation of the vestibular system. The leading hypothesis (Lorentz forces) predicts that the induced vertigo should depend on the orientation of the magnetic field relative to the head. In this study we examined the effect of static head pitch (-80 to +40 deg; 12 participants) and roll (-40 to +40 deg; 11 participants) on qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo experienced in the dark by healthy humans when exposed to the static uniform magnetic field inside a 7 T MRI scanner. Three participants were additionally examined at 180 deg pitch and roll orientations. The effect of roll orientation on horizontal and vertical nystagmus was also measured and was found to affect only the vertical component. Vertigo was most discomforting when head pitch was around 60 deg extension and was mildest when it was around 20 deg flexion. Quantitative analysis of vertigo focused on the induced perception of horizontal-plane rotation reported online with the aid of hand-held switches. Head orientation had effects on both the magnitude and the direction of this perceived rotation. The data suggest

  4. [Height-induced vertigo and its medical interpretation: Goethe and the Strassburger Münster].

    PubMed

    Jagella, C

    2000-02-19

    An analysis combining medicine and literature challenges the methodology of both disciplines. This essay on the vertigo Goethe suffered on the tower of the Strasbourg Minster attempts to trace the vicissitudes of interpreting an emblem, like vertigo, burdened by cultural meaning and implications. Thus, Goethe's own report of this event 40 years after the fact, in his "Dichtung und Wahrheit", has to be related to another, hidden chronology of vertigo and fear in his account which, at first glance, conveys quite different implications. The first part of this paper refers to a medical interpretation of Goethe's dread of high places and his way of coping with it which, today, could be defined as a typical example of a behaviourist approach. In the second part, Goethe's vertigo is linked to psychoanalytic, literary, and historical reflections on the meanings of symptoms we connect today with medical terms like anxiety, phobia, and vertigo. Goethe's vertigo is shown as a complex problem--not only for himself but also for its interpreters: on the one hand, it tells its own story-within-a-story; on the other, it depends on the tools it was written with. Traditional approaches of medical history try to find symptoms and traces of diseases known to us today in literary texts, an approach which is as dubious as taking today's tools of medical analysis, such as psychoanalytic terms and concepts, to explain specific phenomena in literature without first carefully analysing these methods themselves, and only then subjecting the text to an analysis based on them. Nevertheless, this essay does not contest the justification of interpreting literary texts in the light of today's medical knowledge, but postulates that it should be clear which type of medical knowledge is applied. It is quite possible to read Goethe's account only as an old tale of acrophobia, but how will this help us? It seems more interesting to look at the link between the feeling of dizziness he experienced on

  5. TiTrATE: A Novel Approach to Diagnosing Acute Dizziness and Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Toker, David E.; Edlow, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing dizziness can be challenging, and the consequences of missing dangerous causes such as stroke can be substantial. Most physicians use a diagnostic paradigm developed over 40 years ago that focuses on the type of dizziness (e.g., vertigo vs. non-vertigo), but this approach is flawed. In this article we propose a new paradigm based on symptom timing, triggers, and targeted bedside eye examinations (‘TiTrATE’). Using timing and triggers, patients with recent-onset dizziness will fall into one of four major ‘syndrome’ categories (triggered episodic, spontaneous episodic, post-exposure acute, and spontaneous acute), each with its own differential diagnosis and set of targeted examination techniques that help clinicians make a specific diagnosis. Following an evidence-based approach such as this could help reduce the frequency of misdiagnosis of serious causes of dizziness. PMID:26231273

  6. [Combined intratympanic and intravenous dexomethasone to control vertigo in Meniere disease].

    PubMed

    García-Purriños, F J; Ferri, E; Rosell, A; Calvo, J

    2005-02-01

    To verify the result in the use of intratympanic corticosteroids, combined with intravenous, in patients with Meniere disease (MD). Ten patients with vertigo due to MD in stages 4-5 or 6 were included in the study. Combined intratympanic and intravenous dexamethasone was infiltrated. The number of episodes among the months 18 and 24 of treatment, comparing them with the number of episodes 6 months before treatment (according to the norms of the American committee for the hearing and the equilibrium, 1995) are studied. All patients improved significantly. In one of them treatment was repeated after 6 months. A number of patients with hearing improvement were observed. The use of combined dexamethasone may be useful to control vertigo due to MD, to avoid or to be a prior step to other more aggressive treatments.

  7. Vertebral Artery Hypoplasia and Posterior Circulation Infarction in Patients with Isolated Vertigo with Stroke Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao Pei; Lu, Gui Feng; Zhang, Jie Wen; Zhang, Shu Ling; Ma, Qian Kun; Yin, Suo

    2017-02-01

    We aimed in this study to investigate the prevalence of vertebral artery hypoplasia (VAH) in a population with isolated vertigo in association with stroke risk factors, to determine whether VAH is an independent risk factor for posterior circulation infarction (PCI). We sequentially enrolled 245 patients with isolated vertigo with at least 1 vascular risk factor, who were divided into PCI and non-PCI groups, according to present signs of acute infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. All patients underwent magnetic resonance angiography and cervical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to screen for VAH. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the significant risk factors for PCI. VAH was found in 64 of 245 patients (26%). VAH (odds ratio [OR] = 2.70, 95%confidence interval [CI] 1.17-6.23, P = .020), median stenosis of the posterior circulation (OR = 7.09, 95%CI = 2.54-19.79, P < .001), and diabetes mellitus (OR = 3.13, 95%CI 1.38-7.12, P = .006) were independent risk factors for PCI. The predominant Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtype in our patients with isolated vertigo with PCI complicated by VAH was mainly small-artery occlusion. Our findings suggest that VAH is an independent risk factor for PCI in patients with isolated vertigo with confirmed risk from stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Curative effect and mechanism of radiofrequency ablation nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical vertigo.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Xin-Mei; Huang, Ming-Guang; Chen, Wei; Song, Yang; Du, Qing-Jun; Wu, Yu-Ning; Yang, Ruo-Bin

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the curative effects and mechanism of radiofrequency ablation nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical vertigo. A total of 27 patients diagnosed with cervical vertigo from January 2012 to October 2014 received treatment of radiofrequency ablation nucleoplasty. The narrow-side vertebral artery diameters were examined by using Philips 1.5-T body dual-gradient MRI system. The haemodynamic parameters were detected by using transcranial Doppler sonography. Both of the vertebral artery diameters and haemodynamic parameters were recorded and compared before and after treatment. The curative effects in early post-operative application were evaluated according to the Nagashima standards. Radiofrequency ablation nucleoplasty was performed in a total of 59 cervical discs in 27 patients. The average operation time was 42.7 min, and the symptoms of 92.6% patients were alleviated after radiofrequency ablation nucleoplasty post-operation application. There was no significant difference in the narrow-side vertebral artery diameters before and after treatment in both Group A (p = 0.12) and Group B (p = 0.48); however, the blood flow velocity was significantly higher than that before treatment in both Group A (p = 0.01) and Group B (p = 0.03), respectively. Radiofrequency ablation nucleoplasty improves the blood flow in the narrow-side vertebral artery and illustrates the therapeutic effect on cervical vertigo in patients who have no direct compression of the vertebral artery. Advances in knowledge: Radiofrequency intradiscal nucleoplasty can be used as a minimally invasive procedure for treating cervical vertigo.

  9. Development of the Persian version of the Vertigo Symptom Scale: Validity and reliability.

    PubMed

    Kamalvand, Atefeh; Ghahraman, Mansoureh Adel; Jalaie, Shohreh

    2017-01-01

    Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS) is a proper instrument for assessing the patient status, clarifying the symptoms, and examining the relative impact of the vertigo and anxiety on reported handicap. Our aim is the translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the VSS into Persian language (VSS-P) and investigating its validity and reliability in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. VSS was translated into Persian. Cross-cultural adaptation was carried out on 101 patients with peripheral vestibular disorders and 34 participants with no history of vertigo. They completed the Persian versions of VSS, dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), and Beck anxiety inventory (BAI). Internal, discriminant, and convergent validities, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability were determined. The VSS-P showed good face validity. Internal validity was confirmed and demonstrated the presence of two vertigo (VSS-VER) and autonomic-anxiety (VSS-AA) subscales. Significant difference between the median scores for patient and healthy groups was reported in discriminate validity (P <0.001). Convergent validity revealed high correlation between both BAI and DHI with VSS-P. There was a high test-retest reliability; with intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.89, 0.86, and 0.91 for VSS-AA, VER, and VSS-P, respectively. The internal consistency was good with Cronbach's alpha 0.90 for VER subscale, 0.86 for VSS-AA subscale, and 0.92 for the overall VSS-P. The Persian version of the VSS could be used clinically as a valid and reliable tool. Thus, it is a key instrument to focus on the symptoms associated with dizziness.

  10. [The evaluation of the efficiency of kinesitherapy in the patients with mixed-type vertigo].

    PubMed

    Bielińska, Marzena; Zielińska-Bliźniewska, Hanna; Pietkiewicz, Piotr; Olszewski, Jurek

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of kinesitherapy in the patients with mixed-type vertigo. The study was conducted on a randomized group of 35 patients, 21 women and 14 men aged 24-75 years (mean age 42.5 years), who were treated at the Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology Medical University Teaching Hospital in Lodz for mixed-type vertigo. The inclusion criteria were an interview, physical and otorhinolaryngological examinations, laboratory investigations, complete audiological and otoneurological examinations, including BERA and VNG, USG examination of the blood vessels to the cranium, and CT of the cervical spine. Each patient underwent an individually selected set of habituation exercises, corrective exercises for posture and its orientation in space through 2 months. The efficiency of the implemented therapy was evaluated after two weeks, one month and two months with the use of the complete videonystagmographic test and Silvoniemi's criteria. The mean excitability of the labyrinths was 25.38 degrees/s before rehabilitation and 22.26 degrees/s after rehabilitation, absolute directional preponderance was 7.62 degrees/s and 1.92 degrees/s respectively, relative directional preponderance was 31.36 degrees/s and 12.57 degrees/s, and unilateral deficit 32.12 degrees/s and 14.34 degrees/s. The subjective evaluation of the vertigo intensification based on the 5 stages of Silvoniemi's scale indicates that the mean point-based evaluation reported by the patients at the beginning of the therapy was 3.85 points, whereas after the therapy was 2.91 points after two weeks, 2.35 points after one month, and 1.2 points after two months. Kinesitherapy is an alternative and very effective method for treating mixed-type vertigo. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o.

  11. Puerarin and betahistine treatment of vertebrobasilar ischemia vertigo: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YAN-YAN; CHEN, WEN; ZHANG, QING; LI, HUI; ZHANG, YE-WEN; KANG, QIAN; LAN, YI; WU, QING

    2016-01-01

    The present meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of puerarin co-treatment with betahistine in treating vertebrobasilar ischemia (VBI) vertigo. A total of 6 medical databases were searched, identifying randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of VBI vertigo performed until August 2014 that investigated a combined treatment of puerarin with betahistine or with other conventional drugs. The quality of the literature was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias, and Rev Man 5.0 software was used for statistical analysis and evaluation. The present study included 7 RCTs, involving a total of 664 subjects, and revealed a statistically significant increase in efficacy between the control and the experimental group (odds ratio [OR], 4.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05 to 8.15). The average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries increased following treatment with puerarin and betahistine compared with that of the control groups (OR, 7.59; 95% CI, 6.19 to 9.00); however, no difference was detected between these groups in the average flow velocity within the left vertebral artery (OR, 6.17; 95% CI, 5.22 to 7.13). The frequency of adverse reactions in the experimental group was lower (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.32 to 1.77) compared with the control group. Combined puerarin and betahistine regimens were more effective in treating VBI vertigo compared with other, conventional drugs; effectively alleviating the associated symptoms, including dizziness and increased average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries, without causing an increased number of serious side effects. However, the efficacy and safety of puerarin and betahistine use in treating VBI vertigo requires additional investigation. PMID:26998036

  12. Puerarin and betahistine treatment of vertebrobasilar ischemia vertigo: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Qing; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ye-Wen; Kang, Qian; Lan, Y I; Wu, Qing

    2016-03-01

    The present meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of puerarin co-treatment with betahistine in treating vertebrobasilar ischemia (VBI) vertigo. A total of 6 medical databases were searched, identifying randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of VBI vertigo performed until August 2014 that investigated a combined treatment of puerarin with betahistine or with other conventional drugs. The quality of the literature was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias, and Rev Man 5.0 software was used for statistical analysis and evaluation. The present study included 7 RCTs, involving a total of 664 subjects, and revealed a statistically significant increase in efficacy between the control and the experimental group (odds ratio [OR], 4.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05 to 8.15). The average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries increased following treatment with puerarin and betahistine compared with that of the control groups (OR, 7.59; 95% CI, 6.19 to 9.00); however, no difference was detected between these groups in the average flow velocity within the left vertebral artery (OR, 6.17; 95% CI, 5.22 to 7.13). The frequency of adverse reactions in the experimental group was lower (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.32 to 1.77) compared with the control group. Combined puerarin and betahistine regimens were more effective in treating VBI vertigo compared with other, conventional drugs; effectively alleviating the associated symptoms, including dizziness and increased average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries, without causing an increased number of serious side effects. However, the efficacy and safety of puerarin and betahistine use in treating VBI vertigo requires additional investigation.

  13. Safety of different acupuncture manipulations for posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xiao-feng; Deng, Shi-zhe; He, Si; Huang, Ling-hui; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-hong

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture at Fengchi (GB20) in the posterior neck improves vertigo. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal epidural hematoma have been reported to occur after acupuncture in the posterior neck. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the safety of acupuncture at Fengchi. Laboratory tests and adverse event reports were used to evaluate the safety of different acupuncture manipulations for the treatment of posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. A total of 136 patients were randomly assigned to four groups. Verum acupuncture was conducted with different needle insertion directions (contralateral paropia or prominentia laryngea) and different needle twisting frequencies (60 or 120 times/minute) at Fengchi and matching acupoints (for example, Zhongwan [CV12], Qihai [CV6], Zusanli [ST36], and Fenglong [ST40]). The patients received 14 treatments over 3–4 weeks. Routine blood analysis, hepatic and renal function tests, urine and feces tests and electrocardiography were performed before the first treatment session and after the final session. Adverse events were recorded after every session. Of the 136 patients, 120 completed the study. There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment test results in any of the groups. Only five patients suffered from minor adverse events (needling pain, slight hematoma and transient chest tightness). No serious adverse events were found. Our results indicate that a 14-session course of needling at Fengchi is relatively safe for treating posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. PMID:27651774

  14. Falls and fear of falling in vertigo and balance disorders: A controlled cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Schlick, Cornelia; Schniepp, Roman; Loidl, Verena; Wuehr, Max; Hesselbarth, Kristin; Jahn, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most prevalent symptoms in neurologic disorders. Although many of these patients suffer from postural instability and gait disturbances, there is only limited data on their risk of falling. We conducted a controlled cross-sectional study at the tertiary care outpatient clinic of the German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders using a self-administered questionnaire to assess falls, fall-related injuries, and fear of falling. The recruitment period was 6 months. A total of 569 patients (mean age 59.6 ± 17.1 years, 55% females) and 100 healthy participants were included (response rate > 90%). Dizzy patients with central balance disorders (Parkinsonian, cerebellar, and brainstem oculomotor syndromes) had the highest fall rates (> 50% recurrent fallers, odds ratio > 10). The rate of recurrent fallers was 30% in bilateral vestibular failure and peripheral neuropathy (odds ratio > 5). Patients with functional dizziness (somatoform or phobic vertigo) were concerned about falling but did not fall more often than healthy controls (odds ratio 0.87). Falls are common in patients presenting to a dizziness unit. Those with central syndromes are at risk of recurrent and injurious falling. Fall rates and fear of falling should be assessed in balance disorders and used to guide the regimen of rehabilitation therapy. The identification of risk factors would help provide protective measures to these groups of patients.

  15. AICA syndrome with facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Ikegami-Takada, Tomoko; Izumikawa, Masahiko; Doi, Tadashi; Takada, Yohei; Tomoda, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of infarction of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) with peripheral facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss. A 39-year-old female presented with vertigo and sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness of the right ear. An audiogram revealed a severe hearing loss at all tested frequencies in the right ear. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the left side was also observed. Otoneurological examinations showed sensorineural hearing loss of the right ear and horizontal and rotatory gaze nystagmus toward the left side, and a caloric reflex test demonstrated canal paresis. Initially, we diagnosed the patient for sudden deafness with vertigo. However, right peripheral facial palsy appeared 2 days later. An eye tracking test (ETT) and optokinetic pattern test (OKP) showed centralis abnormality. The patient's brain was examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angioglaphy (MRA) and showed an infarction localized in the pons and cerebellum. MRI and MRA revealed infarction of the right cerebellar hemisphere indicating occlusion of the AICA. Consequently, the patient was diagnosed with AICA syndrome but demonstrated regression following steroid and edaravone treatment. We suggest that performing MRI and MRA in the early stage of AICA syndrome is important for distinguishing cerebellar infarction resulting from vestibular disease.

  16. Persistence of symptoms in primary somatoform vertigo and dizziness: a disorder "lost" in health care?

    PubMed

    Tschan, Regine; Best, Christoph; Wiltink, Jörg; Beutel, Manfred E; Dieterich, Marianne; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a 3-year follow-up of primary somatoform vertigo and dizziness (SVD) regarding health care use and treatment. Ninety-two patients with dizziness underwent detailed vestibular neurophysiological testing and a Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Psychometric assessments comprised the Vertigo Symptom Scale, the Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire, the SCL-90-R, and the Short-Form-36 Health Survey. At the 3-year follow-up, 65 patients with primary SVD (anxiety, n = 29; depression, n = 14; somatoform disorders, n = 22) were reassessed (70.7% response). The patients improved in symptom severity (p < 0.05), handicap (p < 0.01), and physical quality of life (QoL; p < 0.05) but showed no change in emotional distress. A total of 63.1% (of n = 65) had ongoing SVD. A total of 69.2% (of n = 65) received different forms of treatments. A total of 46.1% (of n = 65) searched redundant medical diagnostic procedures. The patients with decreased coping capacity over time obtained the best prognosis. Primary SVD is an ineffectively treated disorder. Recommendations for specific complaint-oriented psychotherapy programs were given.

  17. Safety of different acupuncture manipulations for posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Shi-Zhe; He, Si; Huang, Ling-Hui; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture at Fengchi (GB20) in the posterior neck improves vertigo. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal epidural hematoma have been reported to occur after acupuncture in the posterior neck. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the safety of acupuncture at Fengchi. Laboratory tests and adverse event reports were used to evaluate the safety of different acupuncture manipulations for the treatment of posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. A total of 136 patients were randomly assigned to four groups. Verum acupuncture was conducted with different needle insertion directions (contralateral paropia or prominentia laryngea) and different needle twisting frequencies (60 or 120 times/minute) at Fengchi and matching acupoints (for example, Zhongwan [CV12], Qihai [CV6], Zusanli [ST36], and Fenglong [ST40]). The patients received 14 treatments over 3-4 weeks. Routine blood analysis, hepatic and renal function tests, urine and feces tests and electrocardiography were performed before the first treatment session and after the final session. Adverse events were recorded after every session. Of the 136 patients, 120 completed the study. There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment test results in any of the groups. Only five patients suffered from minor adverse events (needling pain, slight hematoma and transient chest tightness). No serious adverse events were found. Our results indicate that a 14-session course of needling at Fengchi is relatively safe for treating posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo.

  18. Burden of disability attributable to vertigo and dizziness in the aged: results from the KORA-Age study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Martin; Strobl, Ralf; Jahn, Klaus; Linkohr, Birgit; Peters, Annette; Grill, Eva

    2014-10-01

    Complaints of vertigo and dizziness are common in primary care in the aged. They can be caused by distinct vestibular disorders, but can also be a symptom in other conditions like non-vestibular sensory loss, vascular encephalopathy or anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the specific contribution of vertigo and dizziness to the total burden of disability in aged persons when controlling for the presence of other health conditions. Data originate from the MONICA/KORA study, a population-based cohort. Survivors of the original cohorts who were 65 years and older were examined by telephone interview in 2009. Disability was assessed with the Health Assessment Questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders and additive regression to estimate the contribution of vertigo and dizziness to disability prevalence. Adjusted for age, sex and other chronic conditions, vertigo and dizziness were associated with disability (odds ratio 1.66, 95% confidence intervals 1.40-1.98). In both men and women between 65 and 79 years, vertigo and dizziness were among the strongest contributors to the burden of disability with a prevalence of 10.5% (6.6 to 15.1) in men and 9.0% (5.7 to 13.0) in women. In men, this effect is stable across all age-groups, whereas it decreases with age in women. Vertigo and dizziness independently and relevantly contribute to population-attributable disability in the aged. They are not inevitable consequences of ageing but arise from distinct disease entities. Careful management of vertigo and dizziness might increase population health and reduce disability. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  19. A Case of Linear Scleroderma Involving Cerebellum with Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eui Je; Lee, Dong Won; Park, Chul Won

    2012-01-01

    Linear scleroderma is a kind of disease that can cause complication of the central nervous system. Sometimes, ipsilateral intracerebral or white matter lesions in the brain magnetic resonance imaging are noted. Nystagmus is important for the differential diagnosis of dizziness. Positional nystagmus was classified into regular direction nystagmus, direction changing positional nystagmus (DCPN) and irregular nystagmus by their character. DCPN is defined as a nystagmus that changes its direction with different head and body positions, and it can be the sign of lesion in the central vestibular system. Recently, we experienced a 17-year-old woman who had a scalp linear scleroderma, treated for about 10 years and showed DCPN induced by positional nystagmus test. We report a case of linear scleroderma accompanied by cerebellar lesion with a brief review of literature. PMID:24653878

  20. [Evaluation of the injured range of vestibular superior and inferior nerves in sudden deafness patients with vertigo using video head impulse test].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lingxiao; Chen, Taisheng; Xu, Kaixu; Wang, Wei; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Qiang; Wen, Chao; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Hui; Ma, Yuanxu; Lin, Peng

    2015-09-01

    To discuss the video head impulse tests (vHIT) application values in assessment of the vestibular nerves, function in sudden deafness patients with vertigo. There were 60 cases (120 ears) of healthy volunteers as control group, and 182 cases (182 ears) of sudden deafness with vertigo patients as study group. The study group received vHIT and caloric test, and the control group received vHIT. Functions of vestibular superior and inferior nerves were analyzed by the gains of vHIT and the nystagmus, s unilateral weakness of caloric test, with SPSS17.0 software. The values of vHIT-G of the six semicircular canals in the control group were normal distribution and no statistical significance among them (F = 0.005, P = 1.000). The vHIT-G averages of both sides of anterior, horizontal and posterior semicircular canals were (15.20 ± 11.00) %, (15.30 ± 13.30) %, and (15.15 ± 14.72) % respectively. In the study group, the vHIT-G of the affected side were (21.73 ± 14.84) %, (21.20 ± 28.24) %, and (19.22 ± 23.50) %, with normal distribution, and in which statistical significance was detected comparing with those in the control group (P < 0.05). The positive rates were 26.9% (49/182) in vHIT, 70.3% (128/182) in caloric test. Significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between vHIT and caloric test examined by chi-square test. According to the results of vHIT, there were 15 cases (8.2%) damaged vestibular superior and inferior nerves areas, 19 cases (10.4%) damaged the superior vestibular nerve area, and 15 cases (8.2%) damaged the inferior vestibular nerve area. In combination with caloric test results, it was shown that there were 29 cases (15.9%) damaged vestibular superior and inferior nerves areas, 101 cases (55.5%) damaged the superior vestibular nerve area, and 1 case (0.5%) damaged the inferior vestibular nerve area. vHIT can assess the function of six semicircular canals and illustrate high frequency of vestibular nerves. Caloric test combined with vHIT have

  1. 75 FR 21050 - V-GPO, Inc., Valesc Holdings, Inc., Venture Stores, Inc., Vertigo Theme Parks, Inc. (f/k/a Snap2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION V-GPO, Inc., Valesc Holdings, Inc., Venture Stores, Inc., Vertigo Theme Parks, Inc. (f/k/a Snap2... concerning the securities of Vertigo Theme Parks, Inc. (f/k/a Snap2 Corp.) because it has not filed any...

  2. PubMed Central

    DE STEFANO, A.; COSTANTINO, C.; RANDO, D.; GIGLIONE, M.; STAGNO, R.; BENNICI, E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY This prospective study was designed to evaluate the differences between immediate and delayed canal re-entry of otoliths after therapeutic manoeuvres in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). A total of 196 patients with BPPV were visited and 127 matched our inclusion criteria. The mean age was 54.74 years. The horizontal semicircular canal (HSC) was involved in 30 cases and the posterior semicircular canal (PSC) in 97 patients. Patients with hearing loss in the ear affected by BPPV have a more recurrent form, compared to those with normal hearing. An immediate canal re-entry was recorded in 3 patients with HSC BPPV, all with geotropic nystagmus. In 7 patients with PSC BPPV, the immediate canal re-entry was detected and the delayed form was noted in 5 patients. The patients with the delayed canal re-entry underwent more than 2 previous manoeuvres. The canal re-entry was not related to the manoeuvre performed. The timing of the Dix-Hallpike test to verify the resolution of the BPPV had a significant role in immediate canal re-entry. A recurrence in the follow-up at least one month after treatment was recorded in 20 patients and was more frequent in patients that had canal re-entry. The canal re-entry or canal switch is a clinical entity that should be kept in mind of the neurotologist when approaching BPPV patients. It is important to distinguish it from recurrence when delayed and from manoeuvre failure when immediate. The timing of manoeuvre performing, in particular the final verification test after therapeutic sessions, is important to prevent the immediate reflux of particles into canals. PMID:26019396

  3. Meta-analysis of clinical studies with betahistine in Ménière's disease and vestibular vertigo.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Jozef J P

    2014-05-01

    We present a meta-analysis of 12 double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical studies with betahistine in patients suffering from vestibular vertigo or Ménière's disease, based on both published and unpublished data. The clinical endpoint we used was the investigator's overall opinion on the response to treatment of the vertigo symptoms, after at least 1 month of treatment. We introduce a new effect parameter, the odds of a favorable treatment outcome, with the odds ratio as measure to compare the responses of betahistine and placebo patients. For each study a separate odds ratio was estimated (the study-specific odds ratio). All but one of the study-specific odds ratios were >1.0, meaning that with the new effect parameter there was evidence of an effect of betahistine on vertigo symptoms in 11 of the 12 studies. Four of the 12 studies showed a statistically significant effect in favor of betahistine compared to placebo. The meta-analytical (i.e., average) odds ratio was 2.58 (95% confidence interval 1.67-3.99), a statistically significant result. This means that on average, the likelihood of a favorable outcome is almost two times higher for patients treated with betahistine than for placebo-treated patients. Sub-analyses conducted for patients with Ménière's disease on one hand and with vestibular vertigo on the other hand also yielded statistically significant results. For Ménière's disease, the meta-analytical odds ratio was 3.37 (95% CI 2.14-5.29); for vestibular vertigo, the odds ratio was 2.23 (95% CI 1.20-4.14). Our meta-analysis supports the therapeutic benefit of betahistine on vertiginous symptoms in both Ménière's disease and vestibular vertigo.

  4. Missed strokes using computed tomography imaging in patients with vertigo: population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Keerat; Austin, Peter C; Kapral, Moira K; Lu, Hong; Atzema, Clare L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the proportion of emergency department (ED) patients with a diagnosis of peripheral vertigo who received computed tomography (CT) head imaging in the ED and to examine whether strokes were missed using CT imaging. This population-based retrospective cohort study assessed patients who were discharged from an ED in Ontario, Canada, with a diagnosis of peripheral vertigo, April 2006 to March 2011. Patients who received CT imaging (exposed) were matched by propensity score methods to patients who did not (unexposed). If performed, CT imaging was presumed to be negative for stroke because brain stem/cerebellar stroke would result in hospitalization. We compared the incidence of stroke within 30, 90, and 365 days subsequent to ED discharge between groups, to determine whether the exposed group had a higher frequency of early strokes than the matched unexposed group. Among 41 794 qualifying patients, 8596 (20.6%) received ED head CT imaging, and 99.8% of these patients were able to be matched to a control. Among exposed patients, 25 (0.29%) were hospitalized for stroke within 30 days when compared with 11 (0.13%) among matched nonexposed patients. The relative risk of a 30- and 90-day stroke among exposed versus unexposed patients was 2.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.12-4.62) and 1.94 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.43), respectively. There was no difference between groups at 1 year. Strokes occurred at a median of 32.0 days (interquartile range, 4.0-33.0 days) in exposed patients, compared with 105 days (interquartile range, 11.5-204.5) in unexposed patients. One fifth of patients diagnosed with peripheral vertigo in Ontario received imaging that is not recommended in guidelines, and that imaging was associated with missed strokes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. [The significance of directional preponderance in the evaluation of vestibular function in patients with vertigo].

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhou, Y J; Yu, J; Gu, J

    2017-03-07

    Objective: To analyze the relationship between directional preponderance (DP), spontaneous nystagmus(SN) and vestibular disorders, and to investigate the significance of DP in directing peripheral vestibular function in patients with vertigo. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 394 cases diagnosed with peripheral vestibular disease accompanied by vertigo from March 2012 to June 2014 in the Outpatient Department of the Eye & ENT Hospital of Fudan University. Results of static and dynamic posture equilibrium tests, SN, unilateral weakness(UW), and DP in videonystagmography(VNG) were analyzed and compared. Results: The mean interval time between the last vertigo attack and examination in patients with SN or DP in caloric test were 4.4 d and 7.3 d respectively, and those without SN or DP were 18.3 d and 17.5 d respectively. The patients were divided into two groups according to DP results of caloric test. DP-normal group had 203 cases and DP-abnormal group had 191 cases. Spontaneous nystagmus was presented in 44 cases in the DP-normal group (21.67%) and four in the DP-abnormal group (2.09%). A significant difference was found between the two groups (χ(2)=35.27, P=0.000). Deficiency of vestibular function was noted in 165 cases in the DP-normal group (81.28%) and 123 (64.40%) in the DP-abnormal group in static and dynamic posture equilibrium tests. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (χ(2)=14.26, P=0.000). Conclusion: Compared with DP-normal patients, DP-abnormal patients are more likely to have spontaneous nystagmus and balance disorders due to vestibular dysfunction.

  6. Vestibular system changes in sudden deafness with and without vertigo: a human temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Taro; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Morita, Norimasa; Terao, Kyoichi; Sato, Teruyuki; Suzuki, Mamoru; Paparella, Michael M

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the vestibular system changes in sudden deafness with vertigo (SDwV) and sudden deafness without vertigo (SDwoV) and the cause of persistent canal paresis (CP) in SDwV patients. Retrospective study. Four temporal bones from the affected ear in 4 patients with unilateral sudden deafness (SD), 2 SDwV and 2 SDwoV, were selected. Four contralateral temporal bones with normal-hearing ears were defined as the control. Morphologic findings of the labyrinth, the number of Scarpa's ganglion cells, and the density of vestibular hair cells were investigated in all temporal bones. Clinical data and the results of vestibular tests of 11 patients with unilateral SD, as a separate group, also were investigated. Atrophic change of the organ of Corti, tectorial membrane, and stria vascularis in cochlea, and deposits and atrophic otoconial membrane in vestibular sense organs were seen on affected ears more than control ears. The density of Type I hair cells seemed to decrease on the saccular macula and the posterior semicircular canal crista on affected ears, and there was no remarkable difference between SDwV and SDwoV. In 1 patient with SDwoV who died 10 months after the onset of SD, there were large amount of deposits on the cupula, the atrophied otoconial membrane was peeling off from the saccular macula, and the saccular membrane collapsed to the saccular macula in the affected ear. In the clinical data, all SDwV who were examined within 2 years from the onset had CP, and all SDwV had profound hearing loss. There is no remarkable difference between SDwV and SDwoV in the number of Scarpa's ganglion cells and the density of vestibular hair cells. The damage of the extracellular superstructure is seen in SD with or without vertigo. The damage of extracellular superstructure is potentially one of the causes of persistent CP in patients with SD.

  7. [Vertigo and vertical nystagmus associated with intrathecal morphine administration and resolution by naloxone].

    PubMed

    De All, Jorge; Repetto, María Fernanda; Tagliapietra, Valeria; Risso, Jorge; Chirio, Fernando; Gnocchi, César

    2011-01-01

    Combined regional anesthesia is frequently used as a tool for management of postoperative pain. The profile of side effects of the opioids used via this route is similar to those occurring after systemic administration. The onset of vertigo with vertical nystagmus is an adverse effect rarely described after the use of intrathecal, epidural or intravenous morphine. We report the case of a patient who presented this complication in the postoperative period of a partial nephrectomy, after the administration of intrathecal morphine, with complete resolution by intravenous naloxone.

  8. Vertigo in elderly patients: a review of 164 cases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mangabeira Albernaz, Pedro Luiz

    2014-08-01

    The author conducted a study to identify and categorize those vestibular disorders that were the most common among elderly patients at his private clinic over a 20-year period. He reviewed the records of 735 patients aged 65 to 90 years. The most common diagnosis was vertigo and/or disequilibrium, which occurred in 164 patients (22.3%). Of this group, 121 patients (73.8%) had a peripheral vestibular disorder and 43 (26.2%) had a central vestibular disorder. The characteristics of these cases are discussed.

  9. [Epilepsy, vertigo, dizziness, headache, emesis as neurological manifestation in a Giteleman's Sindrome case].

    PubMed

    Delsere, Mirco; Campogiani, Vincenzo; Carletti, Vincenzo; Mancini, Stefania; Piccinini, Nadia; Castelli, Paolo; Sopranzi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a woman presenting the recent onset of multiple seizure and epilepsy episodes combined with other neurological symptoms (e.g. vertigo, dizziness, vomiting, headache). She was resistant to antiepileptic and symptomatic therapy, having been first admitted to the neurology ward and subsequently to the general medicine ward. In this case, several patient assessments and imaging exams were not conclusive evidence of specific etiopathogenesis, or definitive neurological illness; however, the patient showed laboratory indexes compatible with Gitelmans Syndrome. The correction of the electrolytic imbalances of tubulopathy (including low magnesium and potassium levels) led to the progressive improvement of clinical manifestations and the eventual interruption of the antiepileptic therapy.

  10. [Observation of therapeutic effects on cervical vertigo treated with different methods].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ping; Cai, Jun; Gan, Xia-Man

    2011-05-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of routine acupuncture, the electroacupuncture and the combined therapy of electroacupuncture and acupoint injection. Ninety-one cases were randomly divided into a routine acupuncture group (30 cases), an electroacupuncture group (31 cases), and a combined therapy of electroacupuncture and acupoint injection group (30 cases). Zusanli (ST 36), Fengchi (GB 20), Anmian (Extra), Taiyang (EX-HN 5), Hegu (LI 4), Yintang (EX-HN 3), Baihui (GV 20) and Sishengcong (EX-HN 1) were selected among 3 groups. Even manipulation was applied in routine acupuncture group; G 6805 electroacupuncture apparatus was added in electroacupuncture group; in combined therapy of electroacupuncture and acupoint injection group, electroacupuncture was applied, besides, Vitamin B12 0.5 mg and 0.2%/ Lidocaine 2 mL were injected at Fengchi (GB 20) and Anmian (Extra). Twenty treatments were given in 4 weeks. The changes of average blood flow of vertebral artery and basilar artery before and after treatment were observed and graded by the cervical vertigo syndrome and function score; the therapeutic effects were evaluated as well. The average blood flow of vertebral artery and basilar artery, and the cervical vertigo syndrome and function score were improved in 3 groups (all P < 0.01), in which, it was more obvious in combined therapy of electroacupuncture and acupoint injection group than in others (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), and it in electroacupuncture group was superior to that in routine acupuncture group (P < 0.05). The effective rate was 63.3% (19/30) in routine acupuncture group, 80.6% (25/31) in electroacupuncture group and 90.3% (28/30) in combined therapy of electroacupuncture and acupoint injection group, indicating the significant differences among them (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The routine acupuncture, electroacupuncture, and combined therapy of electroacupuncture and acupoint injection are effective for cervical vertigo; the combined therapy is the best, and

  11. Persistent Down-Beating Torsional Positional Nystagmus: Posterior Semicircular Canal Light Cupula?

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy with rotatory positional vertigo and nausea, particularly when lying down, visited our clinic. Initially, we observed vertical/torsional (downward/leftward) nystagmus in the supine position, and it did not diminish. In the sitting position, nystagmus was not provoked. Neurological examinations were normal. We speculated that persistent torsional down-beating nystagmus was caused by the light cupula of the posterior semicircular canal. This case provides novel insights into the light cupula pathophysiology. PMID:27668113

  12. STEADFAST: Psychotherapeutic Intervention Improves Postural Strategy of Somatoform Vertigo and Dizziness

    PubMed Central

    Best, Christoph; Tschan, Regine; Stieber, Nikola; Beutel, Manfred E.; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Patients with somatoform vertigo and dizziness (SVD) disorders often report instability of stance or gait and fear of falling. Posturographic measurements indeed indicated a pathological postural strategy. Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psychotherapeutic and psychoeducational short-term intervention (PTI) using static posturography and psychometric examination. Seventeen SVD patients took part in the study. The effects of PTI on SVD were evaluated with quantitative static posturography. As primary endpoint a quotient characterizing the relation between horizontal and vertical sway was calculated (Q H/V), reflecting the individual postural strategy. Results of static posturography were compared to those of age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (n = 28); baseline measurements were compared to results after PTI. The secondary endpoint was the participation-limiting consequences of SVD as measured by the Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire (VHQ). Compared to the healthy volunteers, the patients with SVD showed a postural strategy characterized by stiffening-up that resulted in a significantly reduced body sway quotient before PTI (patients: Q H/V = 0.31 versus controls: Q H/V = 0.38; p = 0.022). After PTI the postural behavior normalized, and psychological distress was reduced. PTI therefore appears to modify pathological balance behaviour. The postural strategy of patients with SVD possibly results from anxious anticipatory cocontraction of the antigravity muscles. PMID:26843786

  13. The Association Between Vestibular Physical Examination, Vertigo Questionnaires, and the Electronystagmography in Patients With Vestibular Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gofrit, Shany G; Mayler, Yulia; Eliashar, Ron; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Ilan, Ophir; Gross, Menachem

    2017-04-01

    Dizziness makes up a diagnostic and treatment challenge. The diagnostic accuracy of the medical history and vestibular physical examination in cases of vestibular symptoms is not clear. The aim of this study is to determine the association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and electronystagmography (ENG) test in patients with vestibular symptoms. This is a prospective study of 135 adults with vestibular symptoms. The subjects underwent targeted physical examination and filled vestibular questionnaires, including the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), before ENG testing. The results of the physical examination and questionnaires were compared with the final ENG findings. Of patients who had normal ENG results, 32.1% (17/52) showed abnormal physical examination, and 48.8% (40/82) of the patient who had normal physical examination showed abnormal ENG results ( P = .46). Among patients with severe disability by DHI, 46.4% (13/28) had an abnormal ENG, and 42.9% (12/28) had a normal ENG ( P = .39). This study did not demonstrate association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and ENG results. Although history (augmented by questionnaires) and physical examination are the initial steps in the evaluation of vertigo, the current study suggests that they should be complemented by objective testing for evaluation of inner ear origin of vertigo.

  14. Microcirculatory effects of a homeopathic preparation in patients with mild vertigo: an intravital microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Klopp, R; Niemer, W; Weiser, M

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the homeopathic preparation Vertigoheel on variables related to microcirculation were investigated using vital microscopy techniques in patients with vestibular vertigo. In a non-randomized, open study, 16 patients given Vertigoheel were compared with 16 untreated patients. Measurements were carried out in two areas (defined by selecting 60 blood-cell perfused nodal points of arterioles, venules, and capillaries with a mean diameter > or = 40 microm): the cuticulum/subcuticulum of the inside left lower arm and an area 5 mm behind the left earlobe. After 12 weeks of treatment, patients receiving the homeopathic preparation exhibited an increased number of nodal points, increased flow rates of erythrocytes in both arterioles and venules, increased vasomotion, and a slight reduction in hematocrit vs. baseline. None of these changes were observed in the control group and the differences between treatment groups were statistically significant. Partial oxygen pressure increased significantly in the Vertigoheel group compared with the control group. In addition, in Vertigoheel patients, significantly increased numbers of cell-wall adhering leucocytes were observed, accompanied by increased local concentrations of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1. The microcirculatory changes were associated with a reduction in the severity of vertigo in the actively treated patients, both as assessed by the treating physician and by the patients themselves. The data support a pharmacological effect on microcirculation from the treatment.

  15. STEADFAST: Psychotherapeutic Intervention Improves Postural Strategy of Somatoform Vertigo and Dizziness.

    PubMed

    Best, Christoph; Tschan, Regine; Stieber, Nikola; Beutel, Manfred E; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Patients with somatoform vertigo and dizziness (SVD) disorders often report instability of stance or gait and fear of falling. Posturographic measurements indeed indicated a pathological postural strategy. Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psychotherapeutic and psychoeducational short-term intervention (PTI) using static posturography and psychometric examination. Seventeen SVD patients took part in the study. The effects of PTI on SVD were evaluated with quantitative static posturography. As primary endpoint a quotient characterizing the relation between horizontal and vertical sway was calculated (Q H/V ), reflecting the individual postural strategy. Results of static posturography were compared to those of age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (n = 28); baseline measurements were compared to results after PTI. The secondary endpoint was the participation-limiting consequences of SVD as measured by the Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire (VHQ). Compared to the healthy volunteers, the patients with SVD showed a postural strategy characterized by stiffening-up that resulted in a significantly reduced body sway quotient before PTI (patients: Q H/V = 0.31 versus controls: Q H/V = 0.38; p = 0.022). After PTI the postural behavior normalized, and psychological distress was reduced. PTI therefore appears to modify pathological balance behaviour. The postural strategy of patients with SVD possibly results from anxious anticipatory cocontraction of the antigravity muscles.

  16. Autonomic failure mimicing dopamine agonist induced vertigo in a patient with macroprolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Seiler, L; Braune, S; Borm, K; Magerkurth, C; Talazko, J; Peters, T; Reincke, M

    2002-10-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with general fatigue, increasing adynamia, weakness, vertigo and recurrent syncope. Six weeks earlier the diagnosis of a macroprolactinoma had been established based on a greatly elevated prolactin concentration (161 170 micro U/l) and MR-evidence of a 3.5 cm measuring pituitary mass. The patient had been started on cabergoline (1.5 mg weekly). Orthostatic hypotension due to the dopamine agonist was considered very likely and carbergoline therapy was stopped. However, there was no relief of the symptoms and further syncopes followed. Testing of blood pressure and heart rate regulation, selective testing of postganglionic cardiac neurons with [ 123 J] metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy provided evidence of grossly impaired neurogenic cardiovascular regulation due to failure of postganglionic efferent sympathetic activity. This is characteristic for pure autonomic failure. The patient was treated symptomatically with high fluid intake, compression stockings, fludrohydrocortisone (0.1 mg o.d.s.), piroxicam (20 mg o.d.s.) and etilephrin (10 mg q.d.s.), which enabled him to cope with daily activities without syncope. This case shows that vertigo in a patient with macroprolactinoma is not always related to drug therapy but may be related to other causes.

  17. Betahistine in the treatment of vertigo. History and clinical implications of recent pharmacological researches.

    PubMed

    Mira, E

    2001-06-01

    A short profile of betahistine and its activity in treatment of Menière's disease and other forms of peripheral vertigo is presented. The clinical efficacy of betahistine is documented by a series of more than twenty controlled clinical studies, performed in the years 1966-2000. Basic researches initially proved that bethaistine acts trough a vasodilating action on inner ear and cerebral blood flow (Suga and Snow, 1969; Martinez, 1972). In the following years this activity was confirmed using the modern laser doppler flowmetry technique (Laurikainen et al, 1998). Further recent studies proved that betahistine acts on the central vestibular histaminergic system as a weak H1 agonist and a strong H3 antagonist (Arrang et al., 1985), improving the process of vestibular compensation (Tighilet et al., 1995) as well as on peripheral labyrinthine receptors, reducing the spontaneous firing rate but not the activity induced by thermal or mechanical stimulation (Botta et al., 1998). More than forty years after its discovery, this series of studies carried out in the second half of the 90s leads to the conclusion that betahistine is a drug which maintains its scientific interest and its pharmacological potential in the treatment of vertigo.

  18. Histamine and betahistine in the treatment of vertigo: elucidation of mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Lacour, M; Sterkers, O

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide clinicians with a picture of the mechanisms by which: histamine and histaminergic agonists act on the vestibular system both peripherally and centrally; and histaminergic agonists and antagonists interfere with the recovery process after peripheral vestibular lesion. We have focused on betahistine, a structural analogue of histamine with weak histamine H(1) receptor agonist and more potent H(3) receptor antagonist properties, to review the currently available data on the role of the histaminergic system in the recovery process after peripheral vestibular deficits and the effects of histamine analogues in the clinical treatment of vertigo. This review provides new insights into the basic mechanisms by which betahistine improves vestibular compensation in animal models of unilateral vestibular dysfunction, and elucidates particularly the mechanisms of action of this substance at the level of the CNS. It is proposed that betahistine may reduce peripherally the asymmetric functioning of the sensory vestibular organs in addition to increasing vestibulocochlear blood flow by antagonising local H(3) heteroreceptors. Betahistine acts centrally by enhancing histamine synthesis within tuberomammillary nuclei of th