Science.gov

Sample records for positional-dependent transcriptional response

  1. Analysis of the response of atomic clusters to static electric fields in terms of position-dependent polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Koblar A.; Yang, Mingli; Jellinek, Julius

    2006-03-01

    To explore in detail the response of atomic clusters to external electric fields, we have developed a method to compute position-dependent polarizabilities (PDP's). The essence of the method is to partition the overall cluster dipole into local, atom-centered contributions. The local moments are naturally decomposed further into charge-transfer and dipole components. This decomposition furnishes added insight into the response behavior of the clusters. By tracking the changes in the local moments with an external field, we arrive at the PDP's. In this talk we will present the details of the method and will compare and contrast different approaches to computing the local moments. We will also discuss results for Nan, Sin and Arn as a function of cluster size. These results show strong qualitative similarities in the response of Nan and Sin clusters, including clear evidence for metallic screening of the cluster interiors.

  2. Position-dependent activity of CELF2 in the regulation of splicing and implications for signal-responsive regulation in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ajith, Sandya; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Cole, Brian S.; Shankarling, Ganesh; Martinez, Nicole M.; Mallory, Michael J.; Lynch, Kristen W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CELF2 is an RNA binding protein that has been implicated in developmental and signal-dependent splicing in the heart, brain and T cells. In the heart, CELF2 expression decreases during development, while in T cells CELF2 expression increases both during development and in response to antigen-induced signaling events. Although hundreds of CELF2-responsive splicing events have been identified in both heart and T cells, the way in which CELF2 functions has not been broadly investigated. Here we use CLIP-Seq to identified physical targets of CELF2 in a cultured human T cell line. By comparing the results with known functional targets of CELF2 splicing regulation from the same cell line we demonstrate a generalizable position-dependence of CELF2 activity that is consistent with previous mechanistic studies of individual CELF2 target genes in heart and brain. Strikingly, this general position-dependence is sufficient to explain the bi-directional activity of CELF2 on 2 T cell targets recently reported. Therefore, we propose that the location of CELF2 binding around an exon is a primary predictor of CELF2 function in a broad range of cellular contexts. PMID:27096301

  3. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Testori, Alessandro

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  4. Reinitiation enhances reliable transcriptional responses in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Chen, Luonan

    2014-01-01

    Gene transcription is a noisy process carried out by the transcription machinery recruited to the promoter. Noise reduction is a fundamental requirement for reliable transcriptional responses which in turn are crucial for signal transduction. Compared with the relatively simple transcription initiation in prokaryotes, eukaryotic transcription is more complex partially owing to its additional reinitiation mechanism. By theoretical analysis, we showed that reinitiation reduces noise in eukaryotic transcription independent of the transcription level. Besides, a higher reinitiation rate enables a stable scaffold complex an advantage in noise reduction. Finally, we showed that the coupling between scaffold formation and transcription can further reduce transcription noise independent of the transcription level. Furthermore, compared with the reinitiation mechanism, the noise reduction effect of the coupling can be of more significance in the case that the transcription level is low and the intrinsic noise dominates. Our results uncover a mechanistic route which eukaryotes may use to facilitate a more reliable response in the noisy transcription process. PMID:24850905

  5. Nickel-responsive transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Musiani, Francesco; Zambelli, Barbara; Bazzani, Micaela; Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient for a large number of living organisms, but it is also a toxic metal ion when it accumulates beyond the sustainable level as it may result if and when its cellular trafficking is not properly governed. Therefore, the homeostasis and metabolism of nickel is tightly regulated through metal-specific protein networks that respond to the available Ni(II) concentration. These are directed by specific nickel sensors, able to couple Ni(II) binding to a change in their DNA binding affinity and/or specificity, thus translating the cellular level of Ni(II) into a modification of the expression of the proteins devoted to modulating nickel uptake, efflux and cellular utilization. This review describes the Ni(II)-dependent transcriptional regulators discovered so far, focusing on their structural features, metal coordination modes and metal binding thermodynamics. Understanding these properties is essential to comprehend how these sensors correlate nickel availability to metal coordination and functional responses. A broad and comparative study, described here, reveals some general traits that characterize the binding stoichiometry and Ni(II) affinity of these metallo-sensors.

  6. Reinitiation enhances reliable transcriptional responses in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Chen, Luonan

    2014-08-06

    Gene transcription is a noisy process carried out by the transcription machinery recruited to the promoter. Noise reduction is a fundamental requirement for reliable transcriptional responses which in turn are crucial for signal transduction. Compared with the relatively simple transcription initiation in prokaryotes, eukaryotic transcription is more complex partially owing to its additional reinitiation mechanism. By theoretical analysis, we showed that reinitiation reduces noise in eukaryotic transcription independent of the transcription level. Besides, a higher reinitiation rate enables a stable scaffold complex an advantage in noise reduction. Finally, we showed that the coupling between scaffold formation and transcription can further reduce transcription noise independent of the transcription level. Furthermore, compared with the reinitiation mechanism, the noise reduction effect of the coupling can be of more significance in the case that the transcription level is low and the intrinsic noise dominates. Our results uncover a mechanistic route which eukaryotes may use to facilitate a more reliable response in the noisy transcription process. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptional control of plant defence responses.

    PubMed

    Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana

    2014-08-01

    Mounting of efficient plant defence responses depends on the ability to trigger a rapid defence reaction after recognition of the invading microbe. Activation of plant resistance is achieved by modulation of the activity of multiple transcriptional regulators, both DNA-binding transcription factors and their regulatory proteins, that are able to reprogram transcription in the plant cell towards the activation of defence signalling. Here we provide an overview of recent developments on the transcriptional control of plant defence responses and discuss defence-related hormone signalling, the role of WRKY transcription factors during the regulation of plant responses to pathogens, nuclear functions of plant immune receptor proteins, as well as varied ways by which microbial effectors subvert plant transcriptional reprogramming to promote disease.

  8. Position-Dependent Cardiovascular Response and Time-Motion Analysis During Training Drills and Friendly Matches in Elite Male Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ronda, Lorena; Ric, Angel; Llabres-Torres, Ivan; de Las Heras, Bernat; Schelling I Del Alcazar, Xavi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure differences in the cardiovascular workload (heart rate [HR]) and time-motion demands between positional groups, during numerous basketball training drills, and compare the results with in-game competition demands. A convenience sample of 14 top-level professional basketball players from the same club (Spanish First Division, ACB) participated in the study. A total of 146 basketball exercises per player (performed over an 8-week period in 32 team training sessions throughout the competitive season) and 7 friendly matches (FM) played during the preparatory phase were analyzed. The results reveal that HRavg and HRpeak were the highest in FM (158 ± 10; 198 ± 9 b · min(-1), respectively). Time-motion analysis showed 1v1 to be the most demanding drill (53 ± 8 and 46 ± 12 movements per minute for full and half court, respectively). During FM, players performed 33 ± 7 movements per minute. Positional differences exist for both HR and time-motion demands, ranging from moderate to very large for all basketball drills compared with FM. Constraints such as number of players, court size, work-to-rest ratios, and coach intervention are key factors influencing cardiovascular responses and time-motion demands during basketball training sessions. These results demonstrate that systematic monitoring of the physical demands and physiological responses during training and competition can inform and potentially improve coaching strategy, basketball-specific training drills, and ultimately, match performance.

  9. DNA damage response and transcription.

    PubMed

    Lagerwerf, Saskia; Vrouwe, Mischa G; Overmeer, René M; Fousteri, Maria I; Mullenders, Leon H F

    2011-07-15

    A network of DNA damage surveillance systems is triggered by sensing of DNA lesions and the initiation of a signal transduction cascade that activates genome-protection pathways including nucleotide excision repair (NER). NER operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and post-incision complexes. Recent work identifies RPA as a key regulator of the transition from dual incision to repair-synthesis in UV-irradiated non-cycling cells, thereby averting the generation of unprocessed repair intermediates. These intermediates could lead to recombinogenic events and trigger a persistent ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling. It is now evident that DNA damage signaling is not limited to NER proficient cells. ATR-dependent checkpoint activation also occurs in UV-exposed non-cycling repair deficient cells coinciding with the formation of endonuclease APE1-mediated DNA strand breaks. In addition, the encounter of elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPIIo) with DNA damage lesions and its persistent stalling provides a strong DNA damage signaling leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and increased mutagenesis. The mechanism underlying the strong and strand specific induction of UV-induced mutations in NER deficient cells has been recently resolved by the finding that gene transcription itself increases UV-induced mutagenesis in a strand specific manner via increased deamination of cytosines. The cell removes the RNAPIIo-blocking DNA lesions by transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER) without displacement of the DNA damage stalled RNAPIIo. Deficiency in TC-NER associates with mutations in the CSA and CSB genes giving rise to the rare human disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS). CSB functions as a repair coupling factor to attract NER proteins, chromatin remodelers and the CSA-E3-ubiquitin ligase complex to the stalled RNAPIIo; CSA is dispensable for attraction of NER proteins, yet in cooperation with CSB is required to recruit XAB2, the nucleosomal binding protein HMGN1

  10. Transcriptional response of Enterococcus faecalis to sunlight.

    PubMed

    Sassoubre, Lauren M; Ramsey, Matthew M; Gilmore, Michael S; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2014-01-05

    Microarrays were used to investigate the transcriptional response of Enterococcus faecalis to photostress. E. faecalis are Gram-positive bacteria used as indicators of water quality and have been shown to vary diurnally in response to sunlight. E. faecalis in filtered seawater microcosms were exposed to artificial sunlight for 12h and then placed in the dark for 12h. Transcript abundance was measured at 0, 2, 6, 12, and 24h in the sunlit microcosm and a dark control using microarrays. Culturable E. faecalis concentrations decreased 6-7 orders of magnitude within the first 6h of light exposure. After 12h in the dark, no evidence of dark-repair was observed. Expression data collected after 12h of sunlight exposure revealed a difference in transcript abundance in the light relative to dark microcosms for 35 unique ORFs, 33 ORFs showed increased transcript abundance and 2 ORFs showed reduced transcript abundance. A majority (51%) of the ORFs with increased transcript abundance in the sunlit relative to dark microcosms encoded hypothetical proteins; others were associated with protein synthesis, oxidative stress and DNA repair. Results suggest that E. faecalis exposed to sunlight actively transcribe RNA in response to photostress.

  11. Transcriptional responses in a Drosophila defensive symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Phineas T; Leong, Jong S; Koop, Ben F; Perlman, Steve J

    2014-03-01

    Inherited symbionts are ubiquitous in insects and can have important consequences for the fitness of their hosts. Many inherited symbionts defend their hosts against parasites or other natural enemies; however, the means by which most symbionts confer protection is virtually unknown. We examine the mechanisms of defence in a recently discovered case of symbiont-mediated protection, where the bacterial symbiont Spiroplasma defends the fly Drosophila neotestacea from a virulent nematode parasite, Howardula aoronymphium. Using quantitative PCR of Spiroplasma infection intensities and whole transcriptome sequencing, we attempt to distinguish between the following modes of defence: symbiont-parasite competition, host immune priming and the production of toxic factors by Spiroplasma. Our findings do not support a model of exploitative competition between Howardula and Spiroplasma to mediate defence, nor do we find strong support for host immune priming during Spiroplasma infection. Interestingly, we recovered sequence for putative toxins encoded by Spiroplasma, including a novel putative ribosome-inactivating protein, transcripts of which are up-regulated in response to nematode exposure. Protection via the production of toxins may be a widely used and important mechanism in heritable defensive symbioses in insects.

  12. Comparing structural and transcriptional drug networks reveals signatures of drug activity and toxicity in transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Sirci, Francesco; Napolitano, Francesco; Pisonero-Vaquero, Sandra; Carrella, Diego; Medina, Diego L; di Bernardo, Diego

    2017-01-01

    We performed an integrated analysis of drug chemical structures and drug-induced transcriptional responses. We demonstrated that a network representing three-dimensional structural similarities among 5452 compounds can be used to automatically group together drugs with similar scaffolds, physicochemical parameters and mode-of-action. We compared the structural network to a network representing transcriptional similarities among a subset of 1309 drugs for which transcriptional response were available in the Connectivity Map data set. Analysis of structurally similar, but transcriptionally different drugs sharing the same MOA enabled us to detect and remove weak and noisy transcriptional responses, greatly enhancing the reliability of transcription-based approaches to drug discovery and drug repositioning. Cardiac glycosides exhibited the strongest transcriptional responses with a significant induction of pathways related to epigenetic regulation, which suggests an epigenetic mechanism of action for these drugs. Drug classes with the weakest transcriptional responses tended to induce expression of cytochrome P450 enzymes, hinting at drug-induced drug resistance. Analysis of transcriptionally similar, but structurally different drugs with unrelated MOA, led us to the identification of a 'toxic' transcriptional signature indicative of lysosomal stress (lysosomotropism) and lipid accumulation (phospholipidosis) partially masking the target-specific transcriptional effects of these drugs. We found that this transcriptional signature is shared by 258 compounds and it is associated to the activation of the transcription factor TFEB, a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy. Finally, we built a predictive Random Forest model of these 258 compounds based on 128 physicochemical parameters, which should help in the early identification of potentially toxic drug candidates.

  13. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  14. Transcriptional response of nitrifying communities to wetting of dry soil.

    PubMed

    Placella, Sarah A; Firestone, Mary K

    2013-05-01

    The first rainfall following a severe dry period provides an abrupt water potential change that is both an acute physiological stress and a defined stimulus for the reawakening of soil microbial communities. We followed the responses of indigenous communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria to the addition of water to laboratory incubations of soils taken from two California annual grasslands following a typically dry Mediterranean summer. By quantifying transcripts for a subunit of bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenases (amoA) and a bacterial nitrite oxidoreductase (nxrA) in soil from 15 min to 72 h after water addition, we identified transcriptional response patterns for each of these three groups of nitrifiers. An increase in quantity of bacterial amoA transcripts was detectable within 1 h of wet-up and continued until the size of the ammonium pool began to decrease, reflecting a possible role of transcription in upregulation of nitrification after drought-induced stasis. In one soil, the pulse of amoA transcription lasted for less than 24 h, demonstrating the transience of transcriptional pools and the tight coupling of transcription to the local soil environment. Analysis of 16S rRNA using a high-density microarray suggested that nitrite-oxidizing Nitrobacter spp. respond in tandem with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria while nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospina spp. and Nitrospira bacteria may not. Archaeal ammonia oxidizers may respond slightly later than bacterial ammonia oxidizers but may maintain elevated transcription longer. Despite months of desiccation-induced inactivation, we found rapid transcriptional response by all three groups of soil nitrifiers.

  15. Untangling the brain's neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative transcriptional responses

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Karpagam; Friedman, Brad A.; Larson, Jessica L.; Lauffer, Benjamin E.; Goldstein, Leonard D.; Appling, Laurie L.; Borneo, Jovencio; Poon, Chungkee; Ho, Terence; Cai, Fang; Steiner, Pascal; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Modrusan, Zora; Kaminker, Joshua S.; Hansen, David V.

    2016-01-01

    A common approach to understanding neurodegenerative disease is comparing gene expression in diseased versus healthy tissues. We illustrate that expression profiles derived from whole tissue RNA highly reflect the degenerating tissues' altered cellular composition, not necessarily transcriptional regulation. To accurately understand transcriptional changes that accompany neuropathology, we acutely purify neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single adult mouse brains and analyse their transcriptomes by RNA sequencing. Using peripheral endotoxemia to establish the method, we reveal highly specific transcriptional responses and altered RNA processing in each cell type, with Tnfr1 required for the astrocytic response. Extending the method to an Alzheimer's disease model, we confirm that transcriptomic changes observed in whole tissue are driven primarily by cell type composition, not transcriptional regulation, and identify hundreds of cell type-specific changes undetected in whole tissue RNA. Applying similar methods to additional models and patient tissues will transform our understanding of aberrant gene expression in neurological disease. PMID:27097852

  16. Host Transcriptional Response to Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Emily; Connor, John H

    2017-09-20

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a serious illness that causes severe disease in humans and non-human primates (NHPs) and has mortality rates up to 90%. EVD is caused by the Ebolavirus and currently there are no licensed therapeutics or vaccines to treat EVD. Due to its high mortality rates and potential as a bioterrorist weapon, a better understanding of the disease is of high priority. Multiparametric analysis techniques allow for a more complete understanding of a disease and the host response. Analysis of RNA species present in a sample can lead to a greater understanding of activation or suppression of different states of the immune response. Transcriptomic analyses such as microarrays and RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have been important tools to better understand the global gene expression response to EVD. In this review, we outline the current knowledge gained by transcriptomic analysis of EVD.

  17. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems.

  18. Age-specific transcriptional response to stroke.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Matthias W; Guenther, Madlen; Jaenisch, Nadine; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Kohl, Matthias; Witte, Otto W; Frahm, Christiane

    2014-07-01

    Increased age is a major risk factor for stroke incidence and post-ischemic mortality. To develop age-adjusted therapeutic interventions, a clear understanding of the complexity of age-related post-ischemic mechanisms is essential. Transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery--a model that closely resembles human stroke--was used to induce cerebral infarction in mice of 4 different ages (2, 9, 15, 24 months). By using Illumina cDNA microarrays and quantitative PCR we detected a distinct age-dependent response to stroke involving 350 differentially expressed genes. Our analyses also identified 327 differentially expressed genes that responded to stroke in an age-independent manner. These genes are involved in different aspects of the inflammatory and immune response, oxidative stress, cell cycle activation and/or DNA repair, apoptosis, cytoskeleton reorganization and/or astrogliosis, synaptic plasticity and/or neurotransmission, and depressive disorders and/or dopamine-, serotonin-, GABA-signaling. In agreement with our earlier work, aged brains displayed an attenuated inflammatory and immune response (Sieber et al., 2011) and a reduced impairment of post-stroke synaptic plasticity. Our data also revealed a distinct age-related susceptibility for post-ischemic depression, the most common neuropsychiatric consequence of stroke, which has a major influence on functional outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intergenic transcription through a polycomb group response element counteracts silencing.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Prestel, Matthias; Paro, Renato

    2005-03-15

    Polycomb group response elements (PREs) mediate the mitotic inheritance of gene expression programs and thus maintain determined cell fates. By default, PREs silence associated genes via the targeting of Polycomb group (PcG) complexes. Upon an activating signal, however, PREs recruit counteracting trithorax group (trxG) proteins, which in turn maintain target genes in a transcriptionally active state. Using a transgenic reporter system, we show that the switch from the silenced to the activated state of a PRE requires noncoding transcription. Continuous transcription through the PRE induced by an actin promoter prevents the establishment of PcG-mediated silencing. The maintenance of epigenetic activation requires transcription through the PRE to proceed at least until embryogenesis is completed. At the homeotic bithorax complex of Drosophila, intergenic PRE transcripts can be detected not only during embryogenesis, but also at late larval stages, suggesting that transcription through endogenous PREs is required continuously as an anti-silencing mechanism to prevent the access of repressive PcG complexes to the chromatin. Furthermore, all other PREs outside the homeotic complex we tested were found to be transcribed in the same tissue as the mRNA of the corresponding target gene, suggesting that anti-silencing by transcription is a fundamental aspect of the cellular memory system.

  20. Global expression analysis of the fibroblast transcriptional response to TGFbeta.

    PubMed

    Gardner, H; Strehlow, D; Bradley, L; Widom, R; Farina, A; de Fougerolles, A; Peyman, J; Koteliansky, V; Korn, J H

    2004-01-01

    Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGFbeta) is the predominant cytokine in all forms of fibrotic reactions. As well as being secreted by immune modulators of fibrosis such as macrophages, it is involved in an autocrine feedback loop of fibroblast stimulation whose regulation is still poorly understood. We wished to gain some insight into the mechanisms of the fibroblast response to TGFbeta. We undertook an exhaustive transcript profiling experiment using a widely validated restriction enzyme based method for identifying differentially expressed genes (GeneCalling). Transcriptional responses throughout a 24-hour time course were examined at multiple time points and classified. By 24 hours of TGF treatment over 1000 bands, representing a large number of transcripts, were down- or upregulated greater than 2-fold. All of the known genes responsive to TGFbeta, such as collagen and connective tissue growth factor, were upregulated. This encyclopedic method revealed many unknown transcriptional responses to TGFbeta including the upregulation of a variety of less expected cytoskeletal and matrix components, as well as interactions between the TGFbeta and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) pathways and alterations in cell death-related pathways. These may in part explain the idiosyncratic responses of mesenchymal cells to TGFbeta.

  1. Transcriptional responses of human epidermal keratinocytes to Oncostatin-M.

    PubMed

    Finelt, Nika; Gazel, Alix; Gorelick, Steven; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2005-08-21

    Oncostatin-M (OsM) plays an important role in inflammatory and oncogenic processes in skin, including psoriasis and Kaposi sarcoma. However, the molecular responses to OsM in keratinocytes have not been explored in depth. Here we show the results of transcriptional profiling in OsM-treated primary human epidermal keratinocytes, using high-density DNA microarrays. We find that OsM strongly and specifically affects the expression of many genes, in particular those involved with innate immunity, angiogenesis, adhesion, motility, tissue remodeling, cell cycle and transcription. The timing of the responses to OsM comprises two waves, early at 1h, and late at 48 h, with much fewer genes regulated in the intervening time points. Secreted cytokines and growth factors and their receptors, as well as nuclear transcription factors, are primary targets of OsM regulation, and these, in turn, effect the secondary changes.

  2. Transcriptional networks in the nitrate response of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Elena A; Álvarez, José M; Moyano, Tomás C; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen is an essential macronutrient for plants and its availability is a key determinant of plant growth and development and crop yield. Besides their nutritional role, N nutrients and metabolites are signals that activate signaling pathways that modulate many plant processes. Because the most abundant inorganic N source for plants in agronomic soils is nitrate, much of the work to understand plant N-signaling has focused on this nutrient. Over the last years, several studies defined a comprehensive catalog of nitrate-responsive genes, involved in nitrate transport, metabolism and a variety of other processes. Despite significant progress in recent years, primarily using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, the molecular mechanisms by which nitrate elicits changes in transcript abundance are still not fully understood. Here we highlight recent advancements in identifying key transcription factors and transcriptional mechanisms that orchestrate the gene expression response to changes in nitrate availability in A. thaliana.

  3. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF MOUSE EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transcriptional responses of mouse embryo cultures exposed to bromochloroacetic acid

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductive Tox...

  4. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF MOUSE EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transcriptional responses of mouse embryo cultures exposed to bromochloroacetic acid

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductive Tox...

  5. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  6. Transcriptional responses to hyperplastic MRL signalling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dodgson, Lauren; Mason, David; Falciani, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has implicated the actin cytoskeleton in tissue size control and tumourigenesis, but how changes in actin dynamics contribute to hyperplastic growth is still unclear. Overexpression of Pico, the only Drosophila Mig-10/RIAM/Lamellipodin adapter protein family member, has been linked to tissue overgrowth via its effect on the myocardin-related transcription factor (Mrtf), an F-actin sensor capable of activating serum response factor (SRF). Transcriptional changes induced by acute Mrtf/SRF signalling have been largely linked to actin biosynthesis and cytoskeletal regulation. However, by RNA profiling, we find that the common response to chronic mrtf and pico overexpression in wing discs was upregulation of ribosome protein and mitochondrial genes, which are conserved targets for Mrtf/SRF and are known growth drivers. Consistent with their ability to induce a common transcriptional response and activate SRF signalling in vitro, we found that both pico and mrtf stimulate expression of an SRF-responsive reporter gene in wing discs. In a functional genetic screen, we also identified deterin, which encodes Drosophila Survivin, as a putative Mrtf/SRF target that is necessary for pico-mediated tissue overgrowth by suppressing proliferation-associated cell death. Taken together, our findings raise the possibility that distinct targets of Mrtf/SRF may be transcriptionally induced depending on the duration of upstream signalling. PMID:28148822

  7. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  8. The Role of the Transcriptional Response to DNA Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Herlihy, Anna E; de Bruin, Robertus A M

    2017-03-02

    During DNA replication many factors can result in DNA replication stress. The DNA replication stress checkpoint prevents the accumulation of replication stress-induced DNA damage and the potential ensuing genome instability. A critical role for post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, in the replication stress checkpoint response has been well established. However, recent work has revealed an important role for transcription in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. In this review, we will provide an overview of current knowledge of the cellular response to DNA replication stress with a specific focus on the DNA replication stress checkpoint transcriptional response and its role in the prevention of replication stress-induced DNA damage.

  9. The Role of the Transcriptional Response to DNA Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    Herlihy, Anna E.; de Bruin, Robertus A.M.

    2017-01-01

    During DNA replication many factors can result in DNA replication stress. The DNA replication stress checkpoint prevents the accumulation of replication stress-induced DNA damage and the potential ensuing genome instability. A critical role for post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, in the replication stress checkpoint response has been well established. However, recent work has revealed an important role for transcription in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. In this review, we will provide an overview of current knowledge of the cellular response to DNA replication stress with a specific focus on the DNA replication stress checkpoint transcriptional response and its role in the prevention of replication stress-induced DNA damage. PMID:28257104

  10. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the ionizing radiation response by ATM and p53

    PubMed Central

    Venkata Narayanan, Ishwarya; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Bedi, Karan; Berg, Nathan; Ljungman, Emily A.; Francia, Sofia; Veloso, Artur; Magnuson, Brian; di Fagagna, Fabrizio d’Adda; Wilson, Thomas E.; Ljungman, Mats

    2017-01-01

    In response to ionizing radiation (IR), cells activate a DNA damage response (DDR) pathway to re-program gene expression. Previous studies using total cellular RNA analyses have shown that the stress kinase ATM and the transcription factor p53 are integral components required for induction of IR-induced gene expression. These studies did not distinguish between changes in RNA synthesis and RNA turnover and did not address the role of enhancer elements in DDR-mediated transcriptional regulation. To determine the contribution of synthesis and degradation of RNA and monitor the activity of enhancer elements following exposure to IR, we used the recently developed Bru-seq, BruChase-seq and BruUV-seq techniques. Our results show that ATM and p53 regulate both RNA synthesis and stability as well as enhancer element activity following exposure to IR. Importantly, many genes in the p53-signaling pathway were coordinately up-regulated by both increased synthesis and RNA stability while down-regulated genes were suppressed either by reduced synthesis or stability. Our study is the first of its kind that independently assessed the effects of ionizing radiation on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in normal human cells. PMID:28256581

  11. Transcriptional response to 131I exposure of rat thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Rudqvist, Nils; Spetz, Johan; Schüler, Emil; Parris, Toshima Z; Langen, Britta; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Humans are exposed to 131I in medical diagnostics and treatment but also from nuclear accidents, and better knowledge of the molecular response in thyroid is needed. The aim of the study was to examine the transcriptional response in thyroid tissue 24 h after 131I administration in rats. The exposure levels were chosen to simulate both the clinical situation and the case of nuclear fallout. Thirty-six male rats were i.v. injected with 0-4700 kBq 131I, and killed at 24 h after injection (Dthyroid = 0.0058-3.0 Gy). Total RNA was extracted from individual thyroid tissue samples and mRNA levels were determined using oligonucleotide microarray technique. Differentially expressed transcripts were determined using Nexus Expression 3.0. Hierarchical clustering was performed in the R statistical computing environment. Pathway analysis was performed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool and the Gene Ontology database. T4 and TSH plasma concentrations were measured using ELISA. Totally, 429 differentially regulated transcripts were identified. Downregulation of thyroid hormone biosynthesis associated genes (e.g. thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase, the sodium-iodine symporter) was identified in some groups, and an impact on thyroid function was supported by the pathway analysis. Recurring downregulation of Dbp and Slc47a2 was found. Dbp exhibited a pattern with monotonous reduction of downregulation with absorbed dose at 0.0058-0.22 Gy. T4 plasma levels were increased and decreased in rats whose thyroids were exposed to 0.057 and 0.22 Gy, respectively. Different amounts of injected 131I gave distinct transcriptional responses in the rat thyroid. Transcriptional response related to thyroid function and changes in T4 plasma levels were found already at very low absorbed doses to thyroid.

  12. Transcriptional response to 131I exposure of rat thyroid gland

    PubMed Central

    Spetz, Johan; Schüler, Emil; Parris, Toshima Z.; Langen, Britta; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Humans are exposed to 131I in medical diagnostics and treatment but also from nuclear accidents, and better knowledge of the molecular response in thyroid is needed. The aim of the study was to examine the transcriptional response in thyroid tissue 24 h after 131I administration in rats. The exposure levels were chosen to simulate both the clinical situation and the case of nuclear fallout. Thirty-six male rats were i.v. injected with 0–4700 kBq 131I, and killed at 24 h after injection (Dthyroid = 0.0058–3.0 Gy). Total RNA was extracted from individual thyroid tissue samples and mRNA levels were determined using oligonucleotide microarray technique. Differentially expressed transcripts were determined using Nexus Expression 3.0. Hierarchical clustering was performed in the R statistical computing environment. Pathway analysis was performed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool and the Gene Ontology database. T4 and TSH plasma concentrations were measured using ELISA. Totally, 429 differentially regulated transcripts were identified. Downregulation of thyroid hormone biosynthesis associated genes (e.g. thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase, the sodium-iodine symporter) was identified in some groups, and an impact on thyroid function was supported by the pathway analysis. Recurring downregulation of Dbp and Slc47a2 was found. Dbp exhibited a pattern with monotonous reduction of downregulation with absorbed dose at 0.0058–0.22 Gy. T4 plasma levels were increased and decreased in rats whose thyroids were exposed to 0.057 and 0.22 Gy, respectively. Different amounts of injected 131I gave distinct transcriptional responses in the rat thyroid. Transcriptional response related to thyroid function and changes in T4 plasma levels were found already at very low absorbed doses to thyroid. PMID:28222107

  13. A transcription factor hierarchy defines an environmental stress response network.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Wise, Aaron; Castanon, Rosa; Nery, Joseph R; Chen, Huaming; Watanabe, Marina; Thomas, Jerushah; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-11-04

    Environmental stresses are universally encountered by microbes, plants, and animals. Yet systematic studies of stress-responsive transcription factor (TF) networks in multicellular organisms have been limited. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) influences the expression of thousands of genes, allowing us to characterize complex stress-responsive regulatory networks. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, we identified genome-wide targets of 21 ABA-related TFs to construct a comprehensive regulatory network in Arabidopsis thaliana Determinants of dynamic TF binding and a hierarchy among TFs were defined, illuminating the relationship between differential gene expression patterns and ABA pathway feedback regulation. By extrapolating regulatory characteristics of observed canonical ABA pathway components, we identified a new family of transcriptional regulators modulating ABA and salt responsiveness and demonstrated their utility to modulate plant resilience to osmotic stress. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Transcriptional responses in Honey Bee larvae infected with chalkbrood fungus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diseases and other stress factors working synergistically weaken honey bee health and may play a major role in the losses of bee populations in recent years. Among a large number of bee diseases, chalkbrood has been on the rise. We present here the experimental identification of honey bee genes that are differentially expressed in response to infection of honey bee larvae with the chalkbrood fungus, Ascosphaera apis. Results We used cDNA-AFLP ®Technology to profile transcripts in infected and uninfected bee larvae. From 64 primer combinations, over 7,400 transcriptionally-derived fragments were obtained A total of 98 reproducible polymorphic cDNA-AFLP fragments were excised and sequenced, followed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of these and additional samples. We have identified a number of differentially-regulated transcripts that are implicated in general mechanisms of stress adaptation, including energy metabolism and protein transport. One of the most interesting differentially-regulated transcripts is for a chitinase-like enzyme that may be linked to anti-fungal activities in the honey bee larvae, similarly to gut and fat-body specific chitinases found in mosquitoes and the red flour beetle. Surprisingly, we did not find many components of the well-characterized NF-κB intracellular signaling pathways to be differentially-regulated using the cDNA-AFLP approach. Therefore, utilizing qRT-PCR, we probed some of the immune related genes to determine whether the lack of up-regulation of their transcripts in our analysis can be attributed to lack of immune activation or to limitations of the cDNA-AFLP approach. Conclusions Using a combination of cDNA-AFLP and qRT-PCR analyses, we were able to determine several key transcriptional events that constitute the overall effort in the honey bee larvae to fight natural fungal infection. Honey bee transcripts identified in this study are involved in critical functions related to

  15. Plant MYB Transcription Factors: Their Role in Drought Response Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Baldoni, Elena; Genga, Annamaria; Cominelli, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is one of the major causes of poor plant performance and limited crop yields worldwide and it is the single most common cause of severe food shortage in developing countries. Several molecular networks involved in stress perception, signal transduction and stress responses in plants have been elucidated so far. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling. In recent years, different MYB transcription factors, mainly in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. but also in some crops, have been characterized for their involvement in drought response. For some of them there is evidence supporting a specific role in response to water stress, such as the regulation of stomatal movement, the control of suberin and cuticular waxes synthesis and the regulation of flower development. Moreover, some of these genes have also been characterized for their involvement in other abiotic or biotic stresses, an important feature considering that in nature, plants are often simultaneously subjected to multiple rather than single environmental perturbations. This review summarizes recent studies highlighting the role of the MYB family of transcription factors in the adaptive responses to drought stress. The practical application value of MYBs in crop improvement, such as stress tolerance engineering, is also discussed. PMID:26184177

  16. Predictive models of spatial transcriptional response to high salinity.

    PubMed

    Uygun, Sahra; Seddon, Alexander E; Azodi, Christina B; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2017-04-03

    Plants are exposed to a variety of environmental conditions, and their ability to respond to environment variation depends on the proper regulation of gene expression in an organ, tissue, and cell type specific manner. Although our knowledge is accumulating on how stress responses are regulated, a genome-wide model of how plant transcription factors (TFs) and cis-regulatory elements (CREs) control spatially specific stress response has yet to emerge. Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model, we identified a set of 1,894 putative CREs (pCREs) that are associated with high salinity (salt) up-regulated genes in the root or the shoot. These pCREs led to computational models that can better predict salt up-regulated genes in root and shoot compared to models based on known TF binding motifs. In addition, we incorporated TF binding sites identified via large-scale in vitro assays, chromatin accessibility, evolutionary conservation and pCRE combinatorial relations in machine learning models, and found that only consideration of pCRE combinations led to better performance in salt up-regulation prediction in root and shoot. Our results suggest that the plant organ transcriptional response to high salinity is regulated by a core set of pCREs and provide a genome-wide view on the cis-regulatory code of plant spatial transcriptional responses to environmental stress.

  17. Plant MYB Transcription Factors: Their Role in Drought Response Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baldoni, Elena; Genga, Annamaria; Cominelli, Eleonora

    2015-07-13

    Water scarcity is one of the major causes of poor plant performance and limited crop yields worldwide and it is the single most common cause of severe food shortage in developing countries. Several molecular networks involved in stress perception, signal transduction and stress responses in plants have been elucidated so far. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling. In recent years, different MYB transcription factors, mainly in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. but also in some crops, have been characterized for their involvement in drought response. For some of them there is evidence supporting a specific role in response to water stress, such as the regulation of stomatal movement, the control of suberin and cuticular waxes synthesis and the regulation of flower development. Moreover, some of these genes have also been characterized for their involvement in other abiotic or biotic stresses, an important feature considering that in nature, plants are often simultaneously subjected to multiple rather than single environmental perturbations. This review summarizes recent studies highlighting the role of the MYB family of transcription factors in the adaptive responses to drought stress. The practical application value of MYBs in crop improvement, such as stress tolerance engineering, is also discussed.

  18. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP–RNA complexes known as “riboclusters.” These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  19. Transcriptional Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Response to Lima Bean Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sufang; Wei, Jianing; Kang, Le

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure of plants to herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) alters their resistance to herbivores. However, the whole-genome transcriptional responses of treated plants remain unknown, and the signal pathways that produce HIPVs are also unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Time course patterns of the gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to Lima bean volatiles were examined using Affymetrix ATH1 genome arrays. Results showed that A. thaliana received and responded to leafminer-induced volatiles from Lima beans through up-regulation of genes related to the ethylene (ET) and jasmonic acid pathways. Time course analysis revealed strong and partly qualitative differences in the responses between exposure at 24 and that at 48 h. Further experiments using either A. thaliana ET mutant ein2-1 or A. thaliana jasmonic acid mutant coi1-2 indicated that both pathways are involved in the volatile response process but that the ET pathway is indispensable for detecting volatiles. Moreover, transcriptional comparisons showed that plant responses to larval feeding do not merely magnify the volatile response process. Finally, (Z)-3-hexen-ol, ocimene, (3E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, and (3E,7E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene triggered responses in A. thaliana similar to those induced by the entire suite of Lima bean volatiles after 24 and 48 h. Conclusions/Significance This study shows that the transcriptional responses of plants to HIPVs become stronger as treatment time increases and that ET signals are critical during this process. PMID:22558246

  20. Position-dependent, hyperexcitable patellar reflex dynamics in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chung-Yong; Guo, Xin; Ren, Yupeng; Kang, Sang Hoon; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2013-02-01

    To quantify tendon tap response (TTR) properties and their position dependence using multiple neuromechanical parameters, and to analyze correlations among neuromechanical and clinical measures. Hyperexcitable dynamics of TTR were investigated in a case-control manner. An instrumented hammer was used to induce the patellar deep tendon reflex (DTR), with reflex-mediated electromyography and torque responses measured across a range of knee flexion. Research laboratory in a rehabilitation hospital. Chronic hemiplegic stroke survivors (n=9) and healthy subjects (n=13). Not applicable. Neuromechanical measures (system gain, contraction rate, half-relaxation rate, reflex loop delay, peak reflex torque, peak reflex electromyography, and reflex threshold in tapping force) were measured to characterize neuromuscular properties of patellar TTR. Clinical measurements were taken using the DTR scale and the Modified Ashworth Scale. The system gain, contraction rate, half-relaxation rate, and peak reflex-mediated torque in the stroke group were generally higher, whereas the reflex threshold in the stroke group was significantly lower than their counterparts in the control group across 45° to 90° of knee flexion (P<.05). The 4 parameters were significantly higher at 60° and 75° of flexion than at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 90°, and their correlations with the 2 clinical scales at 60°, 75°, and 90° of flexion were also significantly higher than those at 15°, 30°, and 45° (P<.05). The results showed hyperexcitability of TTR in stroke, quantified using a number of neuromechanical measures. Those measures peak around 60° to 75° of knee flexion and were correlated with clinical scales. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Retinoid-Responsive Transcriptional Changes in Epidermal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, Agata; Vouthounis, Constantinos; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    Retinoids (RA) have been used as therapeutic agents for numerous skin diseases, from psoriasis to acne and wrinkles. While RA is known to inhibit keratinocyte differentiation, the molecular effects of RA in epidermis have not been comprehensively defined. To identify the transcriptional targets of RA in primary human epidermal keratinocytes, we compared the transcriptional profiles of cells grown in the presence or absence of all-trans retinoic acid for 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 hours, using large DNA microarrays. As expected, RA suppresses the protein markers of cornification; however the genes responsible for biosynthesis of epidermal lipids, long-chain fatty acids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids, are also suppressed. Importantly, the pathways of RA synthesis, esterification and metabolism are activated by RA; therefore, RA regulates its own bioavailability. Unexpectedly, RA regulates many genes associated with the cell cycle and programmed cell death. This led us to reveal novel effects of RA on keratinocyte proliferation and apoptosis. The response to RA is very fast: 315 genes were regulated already after 1 h. More than one-third of RA-regulated genes function in signal transduction and regulation of transcription. Using in silico analysis, we identified a set of over-represented transcription factor binding sites in the RA-regulated genes. Many psoriasis-related genes are regulated by RA, some induced, others suppressed. These results comprehensively document the transcriptional changes caused by RA in keratinocytes, add new insights into the molecular mechanism influenced by RA in the epidermis and demonstrate the hypothesis-generating power of DNA microarray analysis. PMID:19388012

  2. How calmodulin binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) mediate auxin responses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is an adaptive feature of all organisms, which, in land plants, entails changes in orientation of growth (tropism), patterns of development, organ architecture, timing of developmental processes and resource allocation. However, little is known about the molecular components that integrate exogenous environmental cues with internal hormonal signaling pathways. This addendum describes a role for calcium-regulated calmodulin-binding transcription 1 (CAMTA1) in auxin signaling and stress responses. We discuss possible mechanisms that may underlie this role of CAMTA1, and speculate on the more general roles of CAMTAs in auxin responses and phenotypic plasticity. PMID:20930517

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of the Immune Response to Marburg Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Judy; Caballero, Ignacio S.; Garamszegi, Sara; Malhotra, Shikha; Lin, Kenny; Hensley, Lisa; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marburg virus is a genetically simple RNA virus that causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The mechanism of pathogenesis of the infection is not well understood, but it is well accepted that pathogenesis is appreciably driven by a hyperactive immune response. To better understand the overall response to Marburg virus challenge, we undertook a transcriptomic analysis of immune cells circulating in the blood following aerosol exposure of rhesus macaques to a lethal dose of Marburg virus. Using two-color microarrays, we analyzed the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were collected throughout the course of infection from 1 to 9 days postexposure, representing the full course of the infection. The response followed a 3-stage induction (early infection, 1 to 3 days postexposure; midinfection, 5 days postexposure; late infection, 7 to 9 days postexposure) that was led by a robust innate immune response. The host response to aerosolized Marburg virus was evident at 1 day postexposure. Analysis of cytokine transcripts that were overexpressed during infection indicated that previously unanalyzed cytokines are likely induced in response to exposure to Marburg virus and further suggested that the early immune response is skewed toward a Th2 response that would hamper the development of an effective antiviral immune response early in disease. Late infection events included the upregulation of coagulation-associated factors. These findings demonstrate very early host responses to Marburg virus infection and provide a rich data set for identification of factors expressed throughout the course of infection that can be investigated as markers of infection and targets for therapy. IMPORTANCE Marburg virus causes a severe infection that is associated with high mortality and hemorrhage. The disease is associated with an immune response that contributes to the lethality of the disease. In this study, we investigated how the

  4. Torsion effects on a relativistic position-dependent mass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitória, R. L. L.; Bakke, K.

    2016-12-01

    We analyse a relativistic scalar particle with a position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation by showing that relativistic bound states solutions can be achieved. Further, we consider the presence of the Coulomb potential and analyse the relativistic position-dependent mass system subject to the Coulomb potential in the spacetime with a space-like dislocation. We also show that a new set of relativistic bound states solutions can be obtained, where there also exists the influence of torsion of the relativistic energy levels. Finally, we investigate an analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect for bound states in this position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation.

  5. Transcriptional response to hypoxia in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Camilo, César M; Gomes, Suely L

    2010-06-01

    Global gene expression analysis was carried out with Blastocladiella emersonii cells subjected to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) using cDNA microarrays. In experiments of gradual hypoxia (gradual decrease in dissolved oxygen) and direct hypoxia (direct decrease in dissolved oxygen), about 650 differentially expressed genes were observed. A total of 534 genes were affected directly or indirectly by oxygen availability, as they showed recovery to normal expression levels or a tendency to recover when cells were reoxygenated. In addition to modulating many genes with no putative assigned function, B. emersonii cells respond to hypoxia by readjusting the expression levels of genes responsible for energy production and consumption. At least transcriptionally, this fungus seems to favor anaerobic metabolism through the upregulation of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase and the downregulation of most genes coding for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Furthermore, genes involved in energy-costly processes, like protein synthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, protein folding, and transport, had their expression profiles predominantly downregulated during oxygen deprivation, indicating an energy-saving effort. Data also revealed similarities between the transcriptional profiles of cells under hypoxia and under iron(II) deprivation, suggesting that Fe(2+) ion could have a role in oxygen sensing and/or response to hypoxia in B. emersonii. Additionally, treatment of fungal cells prior to hypoxia with the antibiotic geldanamycin, which negatively affects the stability of mammalian hypoxia transcription factor HIF-1alpha, caused a significant decrease in the levels of certain upregulated hypoxic genes.

  6. Transcriptional profiles of Treponema denticola in response to environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    McHardy, Ian; Keegan, Caroline; Sim, Jee-Hyun; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2010-10-27

    The periodontal pathogen T. denticola resides in a stressful environment rife with challenges, the human oral cavity. Knowledge of the stress response capabilities of this invasive spirochete is currently very limited. Whole genome expression profiles in response to different suspected stresses including heat shock, osmotic downshift, oxygen and blood exposure were examined. Most of the genes predicted to encode conserved heat shock proteins (HSPs) were found to be induced under heat and oxygen stress. Several of these HSPs also seem to be important for survival in hypotonic solutions and blood. In addition to HSPs, differential regulation of many genes encoding metabolic proteins, hypothetical proteins, transcriptional regulators and transporters was observed in patterns that could betoken functional associations. In summary, stress responses in T. denticola exhibit many similarities to the corresponding stress responses in other organisms but also employ unique components including the induction of hypothetical proteins.

  7. In vitro squelching of activated transcription by serum response factor: evidence for a common coactivator used by multiple transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Prywes, R; Zhu, H

    1992-01-01

    Low amounts of serum response factor (SRF) activate transcription in vitro from a fos promoter construct containing an SRF binding site. Using this human HeLa cell-derived in vitro transcription system, we have found that high amounts of SRF inhibited, or 'squelched', transcription from this construct. Transcription from several other promoters activated by different gene-specific factors, including CREB and the acidic activator VP16, was also inhibited by high amounts of SRF. Basal transcription, from TATA-only promoters, however, was not inhibited. These results suggest that SRF binds to a common factor(s) (termed coactivator) required for activated transcription by a diverse group of transcriptional activators. Inhibition of transcription by SRF could be blocked by a double stranded oligonucleotide containing an SRF binding site. Mutations in SRF which abolished its DNA binding activity also reduced its ability to inhibit transcription. In addition, a C-terminal truncation of SRF which reduced its ability to activate transcription also reduced SRF's ability to inhibit transcription. These results suggest that activation and inhibition of transcription may be mediated by SRF binding to the same factor and that SRF can only bind to this factor when SRF is bound to plasmid DNA. Images PMID:1531519

  8. Developmental-stage-dependent transcriptional response to leukaemic oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Assi, Salam A.; Tsoulaki, Olga; Gilmour, Jane; Lacaud, Georges; Bonifer, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterized by a block in myeloid differentiation the stage of which is dependent on the nature of the transforming oncogene and the developmental stage of the oncogenic hit. This is also true for the t(8;21) translocation that gives rise to the RUNX1-ETO fusion protein and initiates the most common form of human AML. Here we study the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells expressing an inducible RUNX1-ETO gene into blood cells as a model, combined with genome-wide analyses of transcription factor binding and gene expression. RUNX1-ETO interferes with both the activating and repressive function of its normal counterpart, RUNX1, at early and late stages of blood cell development. However, the response of the transcriptional network to RUNX1-ETO expression is developmental stage specific, highlighting the molecular mechanisms determining specific target cell expansion after an oncogenic hit. PMID:26018585

  9. Role of Estrogen Response Element in the Human Prolactin Gene: Transcriptional Response and Timing.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Anne V; Adamson, Antony D; Dunham, Lee S S; Semprini, Sabrina; Spiller, David G; McNeilly, Alan S; Mullins, John J; Davis, Julian R E; White, Michael R H

    2016-02-01

    The use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) reporter constructs in molecular physiology enables the inclusion of large sections of flanking DNA, likely to contain regulatory elements and enhancers regions that contribute to the transcriptional output of a gene. Using BAC recombineering, we have manipulated a 160-kb human prolactin luciferase (hPRL-Luc) BAC construct and mutated the previously defined proximal estrogen response element (ERE) located -1189 bp relative to the transcription start site, to assess its involvement in the estrogen responsiveness of the entire hPRL locus. We found that GH3 cell lines stably expressing Luc under control of the ERE-mutated hPRL promoter (ERE-Mut) displayed a dramatically reduced transcriptional response to 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment compared with cells expressing Luc from the wild-type (WT) ERE hPRL-Luc promoter (ERE-WT). The -1189 ERE controls not only the response to E2 treatment but also the acute transcriptional response to TNFα, which was abolished in ERE-Mut cells. ERE-WT cells displayed a biphasic transcriptional response after TNFα treatment, the acute phase of which was blocked after treatment with the estrogen receptor antagonist 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen. Unexpectedly, we show the oscillatory characteristics of hPRL promoter activity in individual living cells were unaffected by disruption of this crucial response element, real-time bioluminescence imaging showed that transcription cycles were maintained, with similar cycle lengths, in ERE-WT and ERE-Mut cells. These data suggest the -1189 ERE is the dominant response element involved in the hPRL transcriptional response to both E2 and TNFα and, crucially, that cycles of hPRL promoter activity are independent of estrogen receptor binding.

  10. Acetaminophen Modulates the Transcriptional Response to Recombinant Interferon-β

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Flaman, Anathea S.; Prasad, Shiv S.; Gravel, Caroline; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-β treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP), interferon-β (IFN-β) or a combination of IFN-β+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-β. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IκBK/NF-κB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. Conclusions/Significance A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-β+APAP relative to IFN-β treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-β treatment. PMID:20544007

  11. Deciphering transcriptional regulations coordinating the response to environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Vicente; Aravena, Andrés; Guziolowski, Carito; Eveillard, Damien; Siegel, Anne; Maass, Alejandro

    2016-01-16

    Gene co-expression evidenced as a response to environmental changes has shown that transcriptional activity is coordinated, which pinpoints the role of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs). Nevertheless, the prediction of TRNs based on the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) with binding sites (BSs) generally produces an over-estimation of the observable TF/BS relations within the network and therefore many of the predicted relations are spurious. We present LOMBARDE, a bioinformatics method that extracts from a TRN determined from a set of predicted TF/BS affinities a subnetwork explaining a given set of observed co-expressions by choosing the TFs and BSs most likely to be involved in the co-regulation. LOMBARDE solves an optimization problem which selects confident paths within a given TRN that join a putative common regulator with two co-expressed genes via regulatory cascades. To evaluate the method, we used public data of Escherichia coli to produce a regulatory network that explained almost all observed co-expressions while using only 19 % of the input TF/BS affinities but including about 66 % of the independent experimentally validated regulations in the input data. When all known validated TF/BS affinities were integrated into the input data the precision of LOMBARDE increased significantly. The topological characteristics of the subnetwork that was obtained were similar to the characteristics described for known validated TRNs. LOMBARDE provides a useful modeling scheme for deciphering the regulatory mechanisms that underlie the phenotypic responses of an organism to environmental challenges. The method can become a reliable tool for further research on genome-scale transcriptional regulation studies.

  12. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to As (V) stress

    PubMed Central

    Abercrombie, Jason M; Halfhill, Matthew D; Ranjan, Priya; Rao, Murali R; Saxton, Arnold M; Yuan, Joshua S; Stewart, C Neal

    2008-01-01

    Background Arsenic is toxic to plants and a common environmental pollutant. There is a strong chemical similarity between arsenate [As (V)] and phosphate (Pi). Whole genome oligonucleotide microarrays were employed to investigate the transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to As (V) stress. Results Antioxidant-related genes (i.e. coding for superoxide dismutases and peroxidases) play prominent roles in response to arsenate. The microarray experiment revealed induction of chloroplast Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) (at2g28190), Cu/Zn SOD (at1g08830), as well as an SOD copper chaperone (at1g12520). On the other hand, Fe SODs were strongly repressed in response to As (V) stress. Non-parametric rank product statistics were used to detect differentially expressed genes. Arsenate stress resulted in the repression of numerous genes known to be induced by phosphate starvation. These observations were confirmed with qRT-PCR and SOD activity assays. Conclusion Microarray data suggest that As (V) induces genes involved in response to oxidative stress and represses transcription of genes induced by phosphate starvation. This study implicates As (V) as a phosphate mimic in the cell by repressing genes normally induced when available phosphate is scarce. Most importantly, these data reveal that arsenate stress affects the expression of several genes with little or unknown biological functions, thereby providing new putative gene targets for future research. PMID:18684332

  13. Calnexin controls the STAT3-mediated transcriptional response to EGF.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Asvin K K; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2013-08-08

    Calnexin is a well-characterized transmembrane chaperone involved in the folding of newly synthesized glycoproteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, we reveal a previously unrecognized function of calnexin in regulating the transcriptional response downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF), the product of a well-known human oncogene. We find that cell stimulation with EGF leads to the caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the calnexin cytoplasmic domain, preferentially at ER-mitochondria interaction sites. The released fragment translocates into the nucleus, binds to PIAS3--a natural inhibitor of activated STAT3--and, thus, acts as an enhancer of the STAT3-mediated transcriptional response to EGF. Also, we reveal the unsuspected capacity of calnexin to sense ER stress and, in response, prevent the EGF-induced processing of its cytosolic domain. Thus, cells integrate the health status of the ER to determine the amplitude of their response to EGF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Information-Optimal Transcriptional Response to Oscillatory Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugler, Andrew; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Wiggins, Chris H.

    2010-07-01

    Intracellular transmission of information via chemical and transcriptional networks is thwarted by a physical limitation: The finite copy number of the constituent chemical species introduces unavoidable intrinsic noise. Here we solve for the complete probabilistic description of the intrinsically noisy response to an oscillatory driving signal. We derive and numerically verify a number of simple scaling laws. Unlike in the case of measuring a static quantity, response to an oscillatory signal can exhibit a resonant frequency which maximizes information transmission. Furthermore, we show that the optimal regulatory design is dependent on biophysical constraints (i.e., the allowed copy number and response time). The resulting phase diagram illustrates under what conditions threshold regulation outperforms linear regulation.

  15. A position-dependent silencer plays a major role in repressing. alpha. -fetoprotein expression in human hepatoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, Hidekazu; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Miyao, Yasuyoshi; Tjong, Kuokoewang; Chan, J.; Tamaoki, Taiki )

    1991-12-01

    A large percentage of human hepatomas produce {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP), but the levels of AFP expression vary greatly among hepatomas. To understand the molecular basis for this variation. The authors analyzed transcriptional regulatory activities associated with the 5{prime}-flanking region of the AFP gene in two human hepatoma cell lines, HuH-7 and huH-1/cl-2, which produce a high and a low level of AFP, respectively. They found that the low level of AFP production in huH-1/cl-2 is due to the action of at least two silencer regions located between the enhancer and the promoter of the AFP gene. In contrast, no silencer activity is expressed in HuH-7. They identified 5{prime}-CTTCATAACTAATACTT-3{prime} to be a core sequence responsible for the negative regulatory activity. This sequence is repeated four times in a strong, distal silencer region, Sd, whereas one copy is present in a weak, proximal silencer region, Sp. The silencer reduces transcriptional initiation by blocking enhancer activation of the AFP promoter in a position-dependent manner. The silencer functions in the presence of positive transcription factors and may play a key role in developmental repression as well as variable expression of the AFP gene in hepatomas.

  16. Transcriptional profiling of Giardia intestinalis in response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ma'ayeh, Showgy Y; Knörr, Livia; Svärd, Staffan G

    2015-12-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a microaerophilic parasite that infects the human upper small intestine, an environment that is fairly aerobic with reactive oxygen species being produced to fight off the parasite. It is quite perplexing how Giardia, lacking conventional eukaryotic antioxidant machinery (e.g. catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase), can cope with the oxidative stress in this environment. We used transcriptomics (RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR) to study giardial gene expression changes in response to oxygen (O2; 1h) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 150 μM, 500 μM and 1mM for 1h). The results showed phenotypic and transcriptional differences between Giardia isolates of different genotypes (WB, assemblage A and GS, assemblage B), with GS being more tolerant to H2O2 and exhibiting higher basic transcript levels of antioxidant genes (e.g. NADH oxidase lateral transfer candidate, peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1) and thioredoxin (Trx)-like proteins). Cysteine is a major antioxidant in Giardia and its role in oxidative defense could be highlighted here by the up-regulation of gene transcripts encoding the cysteine-rich variable surface proteins (VSPs) and high cysteine membrane proteins (HCMPs). Genes in the thioredoxin system (Prx1, Trx and Trx reductase) occupied a central role in the gene expression response to oxidative stress, together with genes encoding metabolic (NADPH-producing enzymes, glutathione and glycerol biosynthetic enzymes) and O2-consuming nitric oxide detoxification enzymes (e.g. nitroreductase, flavohemoprotein and a flavodiiron protein). This study reveals the intricate network of genes associated with the oxidative stress response in Giardia, and provides a stepping-stone towards future studies at the protein level.

  17. WRKY Transcription Factors: Molecular Regulation and Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Phukan, Ujjal J.; Jeena, Gajendra S.; Shukla, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants in their natural habitat have to face multiple stresses simultaneously. Evolutionary adaptation of developmental, physiological, and biochemical parameters give advantage over a single window of stress but not multiple. On the other hand transcription factors like WRKY can regulate diverse responses through a complicated network of genes. So molecular orchestration of WRKYs in plant may provide the most anticipated outcome of simultaneous multiple responses. Activation or repression through W-box and W-box like sequences is regulated at transcriptional, translational, and domain level. Because of the tight regulation involved in specific recognition and binding of WRKYs to downstream promoters, they have become promising candidate for crop improvement. Epigenetic, retrograde and proteasome mediated regulation enable WRKYs to attain the dynamic cellular homeostatic reprograming. Overexpression of several WRKYs face the paradox of having several beneficial affects but with some unwanted traits. These overexpression-associated undesirable phenotypes need to be identified and removed for proper growth, development and yeild. Taken together, we have highlighted the diverse regulation and multiple stress response of WRKYs in plants along with the future prospects in this field of research. PMID:27375634

  18. Antiviral response dictated by choreographed cascade of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zaslavsky, Elena; Hershberg, Uri; Seto, Jeremy; Pham, Alissa M.; Marquez, Susanna; Duke, Jamie L.; Wetmur, James G.; tenOever, Benjamin R.; Sealfon, Stuart C.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    The dendritic cell (DC) is a master regulator of immune responses. Pathogenic viruses subvert normal immune function in DCs through the expression of immune antagonists. Understanding how these antagonists interact with the host immune system requires knowledge of the underlying genetic regulatory network that operates during an uninhibited antiviral response. In order to isolate and identify this network, we studied DCs infected with Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), which is able to stimulate innate immunity and DC maturation through activation of RIG-I signaling, but lacks the ability to evade the human interferon response. To analyze this experimental model, we developed a new approach integrating genome-wide expression kinetics and time-dependent promoter analysis. We found that the genetic program underlying the antiviral cell-state transition during the first 18-hours post-infection could be explained by a single convergent regulatory network. Gene expression changes were driven by a step-wise multi-factor cascading control mechanism, where the specific transcription factors controlling expression changed over time. Within this network, most individual genes are regulated by multiple factors, indicating robustness against virus-encoded immune evasion genes. In addition to effectively recapitulating current biological knowledge, we predicted, and validated experimentally, antiviral roles for several novel transcription factors. More generally, our results show how a genetic program can be temporally controlled through a single regulatory network to achieve the large-scale genetic reprogramming characteristic of cell state transitions. PMID:20164420

  19. Phosphorus stress in common bean: root transcript and metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Georgina; Ramírez, Mario; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Tesfaye, Mesfin; Graham, Michelle A; Czechowski, Tomasz; Schlereth, Armin; Wandrey, Maren; Erban, Alexander; Cheung, Foo; Wu, Hank C; Lara, Miguel; Town, Christopher D; Kopka, Joachim; Udvardi, Michael K; Vance, Carroll P

    2007-06-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element for plant growth. Crop production of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), the most important legume for human consumption, is often limited by low P in the soil. Functional genomics were used to investigate global gene expression and metabolic responses of bean plants grown under P-deficient and P-sufficient conditions. P-deficient plants showed enhanced root to shoot ratio accompanied by reduced leaf area and net photosynthesis rates. Transcript profiling was performed through hybridization of nylon filter arrays spotted with cDNAs of 2,212 unigenes from a P deficiency root cDNA library. A total of 126 genes, representing different functional categories, showed significant differential expression in response to P: 62% of these were induced in P-deficient roots. A set of 372 bean transcription factor (TF) genes, coding for proteins with Inter-Pro domains characteristic or diagnostic for TF, were identified from The Institute of Genomic Research/Dana Farber Cancer Institute Common Bean Gene Index. Using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis, 17 TF genes were differentially expressed in P-deficient roots; four TF genes, including MYB TFs, were induced. Nonbiased metabolite profiling was used to assess the degree to which changes in gene expression in P-deficient roots affect overall metabolism. Stress-related metabolites such as polyols accumulated in P-deficient roots as well as sugars, which are known to be essential for P stress gene induction. Candidate genes have been identified that may contribute to root adaptation to P deficiency and be useful for improvement of common bean.

  20. Early Transcriptional Response of Soybean Contrasting Accessions to Root Dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Neto, José Ribamar Costa; Pandolfi, Valesca; Guimaraes, Francismar Corrêa Marcelino; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Romero, Cynara; Silva, Roberta Lane de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Abdelnoor, Ricardo Vilela; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Kido, Ederson Akio

    2013-01-01

    Drought is a significant constraint to yield increase in soybean. The early perception of water deprivation is critical for recruitment of genes that promote plant tolerance. DeepSuperSAGE libraries, including one control and a bulk of six stress times imposed (from 25 to 150 min of root dehydration) for drought-tolerant and sensitive soybean accessions, allowed to identify new molecular targets for drought tolerance. The survey uncovered 120,770 unique transcripts expressed by the contrasting accessions. Of these, 57,610 aligned with known cDNA sequences, allowing the annotation of 32,373 unitags. A total of 1,127 unitags were up-regulated only in the tolerant accession, whereas 1,557 were up-regulated in both as compared to their controls. An expression profile concerning the most representative Gene Ontology (GO) categories for the tolerant accession revealed the expression “protein binding” as the most represented for “Molecular Function”, whereas CDPK and CBL were the most up-regulated protein families in this category. Furthermore, particular genes expressed different isoforms according to the accession, showing the potential to operate in the distinction of physiological behaviors. Besides, heat maps comprising GO categories related to abiotic stress response and the unitags regulation observed in the expression contrasts covering tolerant and sensitive accessions, revealed the unitags potential for plant breeding. Candidate genes related to “hormone response” (LOX, ERF1b, XET), “water response” (PUB, BMY), “salt stress response” (WRKY, MYB) and “oxidative stress response” (PER) figured among the most promising molecular targets. Additionally, nine transcripts (HMGR, XET, WRKY20, RAP2-4, EREBP, NAC3, PER, GPX5 and BMY) validated by RT-qPCR (four different time points) confirmed their differential expression and pointed that already after 25 minutes a transcriptional reorganization started in response to the new condition, with

  1. Limited transcriptional responses of Rickettsia rickettsii exposed to environmental stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Damon W; Clark, Tina R; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Hackstadt, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Rickettsiae are strict obligate intracellular pathogens that alternate between arthropod and mammalian hosts in a zoonotic cycle. Typically, pathogenic bacteria that cycle between environmental sources and mammalian hosts adapt to the respective environments by coordinately regulating gene expression such that genes essential for survival and virulence are expressed only upon infection of mammals. Temperature is a common environmental signal for upregulation of virulence gene expression although other factors may also play a role. We examined the transcriptional responses of Rickettsia rickettsii, the agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, to a variety of environmental signals expected to be encountered during its life cycle. R. rickettsii exposed to differences in growth temperature (25 degrees C vs. 37 degrees C), iron limitation, and host cell species displayed nominal changes in gene expression under any of these conditions with only 0, 5, or 7 genes, respectively, changing more than 3-fold in expression levels. R. rickettsii is not totally devoid of ability to respond to temperature shifts as cold shock (37 degrees C vs. 4 degrees C) induced a change greater than 3-fold in up to 56 genes. Rickettsiae continuously occupy a relatively stable environment which is the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Because of their obligate intracellular character, rickettsiae are believed to be undergoing reductive evolution to a minimal genome. We propose that their relatively constant environmental niche has led to a minimal requirement for R. rickettsii to respond to environmental changes with a consequent deletion of non-essential transcriptional response regulators. A minimal number of predicted transcriptional regulators in the R. rickettsii genome is consistent with this hypothesis.

  2. Limited Transcriptional Responses of Rickettsia rickettsii Exposed to Environmental Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Damon W.; Clark, Tina R.; Sturdevant, Daniel E.; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Hackstadt, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Rickettsiae are strict obligate intracellular pathogens that alternate between arthropod and mammalian hosts in a zoonotic cycle. Typically, pathogenic bacteria that cycle between environmental sources and mammalian hosts adapt to the respective environments by coordinately regulating gene expression such that genes essential for survival and virulence are expressed only upon infection of mammals. Temperature is a common environmental signal for upregulation of virulence gene expression although other factors may also play a role. We examined the transcriptional responses of Rickettsia rickettsii, the agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, to a variety of environmental signals expected to be encountered during its life cycle. R. rickettsii exposed to differences in growth temperature (25°C vs. 37°C), iron limitation, and host cell species displayed nominal changes in gene expression under any of these conditions with only 0, 5, or 7 genes, respectively, changing more than 3-fold in expression levels. R. rickettsii is not totally devoid of ability to respond to temperature shifts as cold shock (37°C vs. 4°C) induced a change greater than 3-fold in up to 56 genes. Rickettsiae continuously occupy a relatively stable environment which is the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Because of their obligate intracellular character, rickettsiae are believed to be undergoing reductive evolution to a minimal genome. We propose that their relatively constant environmental niche has led to a minimal requirement for R. rickettsii to respond to environmental changes with a consequent deletion of non-essential transcriptional response regulators. A minimal number of predicted transcriptional regulators in the R. rickettsii genome is consistent with this hypothesis. PMID:19440298

  3. Transcriptional Response of Pasteurella multocida to Nutrient Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Paustian, Michael L.; May, Barbara J.; Kapur, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria often encounter environments where nutrient availability is limited, and they must adapt accordingly. To identify Pasteurella multocida genes that are differentially expressed during nutrient limitation, we utilized whole-genome microarrays to compare levels of gene expression during growth in rich and minimal media. Our analysis showed that the levels of expression of a total of 669 genes, representing approximately one-third of the genome, were detectably altered over the course of the experiment. A large number (n = 439) of genes, including those involved in energy metabolism, transport, protein synthesis, and binding, were expressed at higher levels in rich medium, suggesting that, upon exposure to a rich environment, P. multocida immediately begins to turn on many energy-intensive biosynthetic pathways or, conversely, turns these genes off when it is exposed to a nutrient-deficient environment. Genes with increased expression in minimal medium (n = 230) included those encoding amino acid biosynthesis and transport systems, outer membrane proteins, and heat shock proteins. Importantly, our analysis also identified a large number (n = 164) of genes with unknown functions whose expression was altered during nutrient limitation. Overall, the results of our study show that a wide repertoire of genes, many of which have yet to be functionally classified, undergo transcriptional regulation in P. multocida in response to growth in minimal medium and provide a strong foundation to investigate the transcriptional response of this multispecies pathogen to growth in a nutrient-limited environment. PMID:12057970

  4. Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to desiccation and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jatinder; Kumar, Deept; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Singhal, Vibha; Jervis, Jody; Garst, James F; Slaughter, Stephen M; DeSantis, Andrea M; Potts, Malcolm; Helm, Richard F

    2005-12-01

    A transcriptional analysis of the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4743 to controlled air-drying (desiccation) and subsequent rehydration under minimal glucose conditions was performed. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle was observed to increase during drying and remained in this state during the rehydration phase. When the BY4743 expression profile for the dried sample was compared to that of a commercially prepared dry active yeast, strikingly similar expression changes were observed. The fact that these two samples, dried by different means, possessed very similar transcriptional profiles supports the hypothesis that the response to desiccation is a coordinated event independent of the particular conditions involved in water removal. Similarities between "stationary-phase-essential genes" and those upregulated during desiccation were also noted, suggesting commonalities in different routes to reduced metabolic states. Trends in extracellular and intracellular glucose and trehalose levels suggested that the cells were in a "holding pattern" during the rehydration phase, a concept that was reinforced by cell cycle analyses. Application of a "redescription mining" algorithm suggested that sulfur metabolism is important for cell survival during desiccation and rehydration.

  5. Post-fasting olfactory, transcriptional, and feeding responses in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Farhadian, Shelli F; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Cho, Christine E; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2012-01-18

    The sensation of hunger after a period of fasting and of satiety after eating is crucial to behavioral regulation of food intake, but the biological mechanisms regulating these sensations are incompletely understood. We studied the behavioral and physiological adaptations to fasting in the vinegar fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Here we show that both male and female flies increased their rate of food intake transiently in the post-fasted state. Although the basal feeding rate was higher in females than males, the magnitude of the post-fasting feeding response was the same in both sexes. Flies returned to a stable baseline feeding rate within 12 h after return to food for males and 24 h for females. This modulation in feeding was accompanied by a significant increase in the size of the crop organ of the digestive system, suggesting that fasted flies responded both by increasing their food intake and storing reserve food in their crop. Flies demonstrated increased behavioral attraction to an attractive odor when food-deprived. Expression profiling of head, body, and chemosensory tissues by microarray analysis revealed 415 genes regulated by fasting after 24 h and 723 genes after 48 h, with downregulated genes outnumbering upregulated genes in each tissue and fasting time point. These transcriptional changes showed rich temporal dynamics and affected genes across multiple functional gene ontology categories. These observations suggest that a coordinated transcriptional response to internal physiological state may regulate both ingestive behaviors and chemosensory perception of food. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Post-fasting olfactory, transcriptional, and feeding responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Farhadian, Shelli F.; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Cho, Christine E.; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2011-01-01

    The sensation of hunger after a period of fasting and of satiety after eating is crucial to behavioral regulation of food intake, but the biological mechanisms regulating these sensations are incompletely understood. We studied the behavioral and physiological adaptation to fasting in the vinegar fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Here we show that both male and female flies increased their rate of food intake transiently in the post-fasted state. Although the basal feeding rate was higher in females than males, the magnitude of the post-fasting feeding response was the same in both sexes. Flies returned to a stable baseline feeding rate within 12 hr after return to food for males and 24 hr for females. This modulation in feeding was accompanied by a significant increase in the size of the crop organ of the digestive system, suggesting that fasted flies responded both by increasing their food intake and storing reserve food in their crop. Flies demonstrated increased behavioral attraction to an attractive odor when food-deprived. Expression profiling of head, body, and chemosensory tissues by microarray analysis revealed 415 genes regulated by fasting after 24 hr and 723 genes after 48 hr, with downregulated genes outnumbering upregulated genes in each tissue and fasting time point. These transcriptional changes showed rich temporal dynamics and affected genes across multiple functional gene ontology categories. These observations suggest that a coordinated transcriptional response to internal physiological state may regulate both ingestive behaviors and chemosensory perception of food. PMID:21945372

  7. Transcriptional Response of Escherichia coli to External Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Transcriptional response of Escherichia coli to extracellular zinc was studied using DNA microarray and S1 mapping assays. Addition of external zinc induced the expression of zinc exporter ZntA and inhibited the expression of zinc importer ZnuC. In the continuous presence of zinc, ZnuC repression took place at lower zinc concentrations than ZntA induction. The microarray assay indicated that the addition of excess external zinc induces the expression of many genes that are organized in the regulon for cysteine biosynthesis, implying that cysteine plays a role in transient trapping of free zinc for maintenance of zinc homeostasis. Besides the RpoE regulon, other genes were also induced by zinc, suggesting that periplasmic proteins denatured by zinc induce the genes for protein repair. The microarray data of the newly identified zinc-responsive promoters were confirmed by S1 mapping. PMID:16159766

  8. Frequency Modulated Translocational Oscillations of Nrf2 Mediate the Antioxidant Response Element Cytoprotective Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingzhan; Momiji, Hiroshi; Rabbani, Naila; Barker, Guy; Bretschneider, Till; Shmygol, Anatoly; Rand, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Stress responsive signaling coordinated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) provides an adaptive response for protection of cells against toxic insults, oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Nrf2 regulates a battery of protective genes by binding to regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). The aim of this study was to examine how Nrf2 signals cell stress status and regulates transcription to maintain homeostasis. Results: In live cell microscopy we observed that Nrf2 undergoes autonomous translocational frequency-modulated oscillations between cytoplasm and nucleus. Oscillations occurred in quiescence and when cells were stimulated at physiological levels of activators, they decrease in period and amplitude and then evoke a cytoprotective transcriptional response. We propose a mechanism whereby oscillations are produced by negative feedback involving successive de-phosphorylation and phosphorylation steps. Nrf2 was inactivated in the nucleus and reactivated on return to the cytoplasm. Increased frequency of Nrf2 on return to the cytoplasm with increased reactivation or refresh-rate under stress conditions activated the transcriptional response mediating cytoprotective effects. The serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5, member of the Nrf2 interactome, was a key regulatory component. Innovation: We found that Nrf2 is activated in cells without change in total cellular Nrf2 protein concentration. Regulation of ARE-linked protective gene transcription occurs rather through translocational oscillations of Nrf2. We discovered cytoplasmic refresh rate of Nrf2 is important in maintaining and regulating the transcriptional response and links stress challenge to increased cytoplasmic surveillance. We found silencing and inhibition of PGAM5 provides potent activation of Nrf2. Conclusion: Frequency modulated translocational oscillations of Nrf2 mediate the ARE-linked cytoprotective transcriptional response. Antioxid. Redox

  9. Subwavelength optical lattices induced by position-dependent dark states

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Evers, Joerg; Kiffner, Martin; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2011-05-15

    A method for the generation of subwavelength optical lattices based on multilevel dark states is proposed. The dark state is formed by a suitable combination of standing wave light fields, leading to position-dependent populations of the ground states. An additional field coupling dispersively to one of the ground states translates this position dependence into a subwavelength optical potential. We provide two semiclassical approaches to understand the involved physics, and demonstrate that they lead to identical results in a certain meaningful limit. Then we apply a Monte Carlo simulation technique to study the full quantum dynamics of the subwavelength trapping. Finally, we discuss the relevant time scales for the trapping, optimum conditions, and possible implementations.

  10. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90–300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  11. Dissecting the transcriptional response to elicitors in Vitis vinifera cells.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Lorena; Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Bru, Roque; Martínez-Zapater, José M; Lijavetzky, Diego; Pedreño, María A

    2014-01-01

    The high effectiveness of cyclic oligosaccharides like cyclodextrins in the production of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cell cultures is enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate. In order to dissect the basis of the interactions among the elicitation responses triggered by these two compounds, a transcriptional analysis of grapevine cell cultures treated with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate separately or in combination was carried out. The results showed that the activation of genes encoding enzymes from phenylpropanoid and stilbene biosynthesis induced by cyclodextrins alone was partially enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate, which correlated with their effects on trans-resveratrol production. In addition, protein translation and cell cycle regulation were more highly repressed in cells treated with cyclodextrins than in those treated with methyl jasmonate, and this response was enhanced in the combined treatment. Ethylene signalling was activated by all treatments, while jasmonate signalling and salicylic acid conjugation were activated only in the presence of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, respectively. Moreover, the combined treatment resulted in a crosstalk between the signalling cascades activated by cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate, which, in turn, provoked the activation of additional regulatory pathways involving the up-regulation of MYB15, NAC and WRKY transcription factors, protein kinases and calcium signal transducers. All these results suggest that both elicitors cause an activation of the secondary metabolism in detriment of basic cell processes like the primary metabolism or cell division. Crosstalk between cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate-induced signalling provokes an intensification of these responses resulting in a greater trans-resveratrol production.

  12. Dissecting the Transcriptional Response to Elicitors in Vitis vinifera Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Bru, Roque; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Lijavetzky, Diego; Pedreño, María A.

    2014-01-01

    The high effectiveness of cyclic oligosaccharides like cyclodextrins in the production of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cell cultures is enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate. In order to dissect the basis of the interactions among the elicitation responses triggered by these two compounds, a transcriptional analysis of grapevine cell cultures treated with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate separately or in combination was carried out. The results showed that the activation of genes encoding enzymes from phenylpropanoid and stilbene biosynthesis induced by cyclodextrins alone was partially enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate, which correlated with their effects on trans-resveratrol production. In addition, protein translation and cell cycle regulation were more highly repressed in cells treated with cyclodextrins than in those treated with methyl jasmonate, and this response was enhanced in the combined treatment. Ethylene signalling was activated by all treatments, while jasmonate signalling and salicylic acid conjugation were activated only in the presence of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, respectively. Moreover, the combined treatment resulted in a crosstalk between the signalling cascades activated by cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate, which, in turn, provoked the activation of additional regulatory pathways involving the up-regulation of MYB15, NAC and WRKY transcription factors, protein kinases and calcium signal transducers. All these results suggest that both elicitors cause an activation of the secondary metabolism in detriment of basic cell processes like the primary metabolism or cell division. Crosstalk between cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate-induced signalling provokes an intensification of these responses resulting in a greater trans-resveratrol production. PMID:25314001

  13. Computational discovery of transcription factors associated with drug response

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, C; Cairns, J; Wang, L; Sinha, S

    2016-01-01

    This study integrates gene expression, genotype and drug response data in lymphoblastoid cell lines with transcription factor (TF)-binding sites from ENCODE (Encyclopedia of Genomic Elements) in a novel methodology that elucidates regulatory contexts associated with cytotoxicity. The method, GENMi (Gene Expression iN the Middle), postulates that single-nucleotide polymorphisms within TF-binding sites putatively modulate its regulatory activity, and the resulting variation in gene expression leads to variation in drug response. Analysis of 161 TFs and 24 treatments revealed 334 significantly associated TF–treatment pairs. Investigation of 20 selected pairs yielded literature support for 13 of these associations, often from studies where perturbation of the TF expression changes drug response. Experimental validation of significant GENMi associations in taxanes and anthracyclines across two triple-negative breast cancer cell lines corroborates our findings. The method is shown to be more sensitive than an alternative, genome-wide association study-based approach that does not use gene expression. These results demonstrate the utility of GENMi in identifying TFs that influence drug response and provide a number of candidates for further testing. PMID:26503816

  14. Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses from copepod hosts.

    PubMed

    Almada, Amalia A; Tarrant, Ann M

    2016-06-01

    Copepods are abundant crustaceans that harbor diverse bacterial communities, yet the nature of their interactions with microbiota are poorly understood. Here, we report that Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses in the estuarine copepod Eurytemora affinis We pre-treated E. affinis with an antibiotic cocktail and exposed them to either a zooplankton specialist (Vibrio sp. F10 9ZB36) or a free-living species (Vibrio ordalii 12B09) for 24 h. We then identified via RNA-Seq a total of 78 genes that were differentially expressed following Vibrio exposure, including homologs of C-type lectins, chitin-binding proteins and saposins. The response differed between the two Vibrio treatments, with the greatest changes elicited upon inoculation with V. sp. F10 We suggest that these differentially regulated genes play important roles in cuticle integrity, the innate immune response, and general stress response, and that their expression may enable E. affinis to recognize and regulate symbiotic vibrios. We further report that V. sp. F10 culturability is specifically altered upon colonization of E. affinis These findings suggest that rather than acting as passive environmental vectors, copepods discriminately interact with vibrios, which may ultimately impact the abundance and activity of copepod-associated bacteria.

  15. The transcriptional response to tumorigenic polarity loss in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Brandon D; Nellimoottil, Tittu T; Boileau, Ryan M; Classen, Anne K; Bilder, David

    2015-02-26

    Loss of polarity correlates with progression of epithelial cancers, but how plasma membrane misorganization drives oncogenic transcriptional events remains unclear. The polarity regulators of the Drosophila Scribble (Scrib) module are potent tumor suppressors and provide a model for mechanistic investigation. RNA profiling of Scrib mutant tumors reveals multiple signatures of neoplasia, including altered metabolism and dedifferentiation. Prominent among these is upregulation of cytokine-like Unpaired (Upd) ligands, which drive tumor overgrowth. We identified a polarity-responsive enhancer in upd3, which is activated in a coincident manner by both JNK-dependent Fos and aPKC-mediated Yki transcription. This enhancer, and Scrib mutant overgrowth in general, are also sensitive to activity of the Polycomb Group (PcG), suggesting that PcG attenuation upon polarity loss potentiates select targets for activation by JNK and Yki. Our results link epithelial organization to signaling and epigenetic regulators that control tissue repair programs, and provide insight into why epithelial polarity is tumor-suppressive.

  16. Transcriptional response to petiole heat girdling in cassava.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Zehong; Ma, Fangfang; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Allen, Doug K; Brutnell, Thomas P; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming; Li, Pinghua

    2015-02-12

    To examine the interactions of starch and sugar metabolism on photosynthesis in cassava, a heat-girdling treatment was applied to petioles of cassava leaves at the end of the light cycle to inhibit starch remobilization during the night. The inhibition of starch remobilization caused significant starch accumulation at the beginning of the light cycle, inhibited photosynthesis, and affected intracellular sugar levels. RNA-seq analysis of heat-treated and control plants revealed significantly decreased expression of genes related to photosynthesis, as well as N-metabolism and chlorophyll biosynthesis. However, expression of genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondria electron transport components, and flavonoid biosynthetic pathway enzymes were induced. These studies reveal a dynamic transcriptional response to perturbation of sink demand in a single leaf, and provide useful information for understanding the regulations of cassava under sink or source limitation.

  17. Transcriptional response to petiole heat girdling in cassava

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Zehong; Ma, Fangfang; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Allen, Doug K.; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming; Li, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    To examine the interactions of starch and sugar metabolism on photosynthesis in cassava, a heat-girdling treatment was applied to petioles of cassava leaves at the end of the light cycle to inhibit starch remobilization during the night. The inhibition of starch remobilization caused significant starch accumulation at the beginning of the light cycle, inhibited photosynthesis, and affected intracellular sugar levels. RNA-seq analysis of heat-treated and control plants revealed significantly decreased expression of genes related to photosynthesis, as well as N-metabolism and chlorophyll biosynthesis. However, expression of genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondria electron transport components, and flavonoid biosynthetic pathway enzymes were induced. These studies reveal a dynamic transcriptional response to perturbation of sink demand in a single leaf, and provide useful information for understanding the regulations of cassava under sink or source limitation. PMID:25672661

  18. Transcriptional and Phenotypic Responses of Listeria monocytogenes to Chlorine Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Pleitner, Aaron M.; Trinetta, Valentina; Morgan, Mark T.; Linton, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Significant food-borne disease outbreaks have occurred from consumption of ready-to-eat foods, including produce, contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Challenging food matrices (e.g., cantaloupe, sprouts) with limited processing steps postharvest to reduce pathogen loads have underscored a need for new mitigation strategies. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is increasingly being used in produce and other food systems to reduce food-borne pathogen levels. The goal of this study was to characterize the transcriptional response and survival of L. monocytogenes 10403S exposed to ClO2. The transcriptional profile of log-phase cells exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 for 15 min was defined by whole-genome microarray. A total of 340 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Among the differentially expressed genes, 223 were upregulated (fold change ≥ 1.5; adjusted P value < 0.05) in role categories responsible for protein fate, cellular processes, and energy metabolism. There were 113 and 16 genes differentially expressed belonging to regulatory networks of σB and CtsR, respectively. We assessed L. monocytogenes 10403S survival after exposure to 100, 300, and 500 mg/liter aqueous ClO2 in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth; there was a significant difference between cells exposed to 500 mg/liter ClO2 and those exposed to all other conditions over time (P value < 0.05). Isogenic ΔsigB and ΔctsR mutants exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 were more sensitive to ClO2 than the wild type under the same conditions. These results provide an initial insight into the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes employs to survive sublethal ClO2 and further our understanding of the inactivation mechanisms of this increasingly used sanitizer. PMID:24610841

  19. Transcriptional and phenotypic responses of Listeria monocytogenes to chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Pleitner, Aaron M; Trinetta, Valentina; Morgan, Mark T; Linton, Richard L; Oliver, Haley F

    2014-05-01

    Significant food-borne disease outbreaks have occurred from consumption of ready-to-eat foods, including produce, contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Challenging food matrices (e.g., cantaloupe, sprouts) with limited processing steps postharvest to reduce pathogen loads have underscored a need for new mitigation strategies. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is increasingly being used in produce and other food systems to reduce food-borne pathogen levels. The goal of this study was to characterize the transcriptional response and survival of L. monocytogenes 10403S exposed to ClO2. The transcriptional profile of log-phase cells exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 for 15 min was defined by whole-genome microarray. A total of 340 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Among the differentially expressed genes, 223 were upregulated (fold change ≥ 1.5; adjusted P value < 0.05) in role categories responsible for protein fate, cellular processes, and energy metabolism. There were 113 and 16 genes differentially expressed belonging to regulatory networks of σ(B) and CtsR, respectively. We assessed L. monocytogenes 10403S survival after exposure to 100, 300, and 500 mg/liter aqueous ClO2 in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth; there was a significant difference between cells exposed to 500 mg/liter ClO2 and those exposed to all other conditions over time (P value < 0.05). Isogenic ΔsigB and ΔctsR mutants exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 were more sensitive to ClO2 than the wild type under the same conditions. These results provide an initial insight into the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes employs to survive sublethal ClO2 and further our understanding of the inactivation mechanisms of this increasingly used sanitizer.

  20. The Transcriptional Response to Nonself in the Fungus Podospora anserina

    PubMed Central

    Bidard, Frédérique; Clavé, Corinne; Saupe, Sven J.

    2013-01-01

    In fungi, heterokaryon incompatibility is a nonself recognition process occurring when filaments of different isolates of the same species fuse. Compatibility is controlled by so-called het loci and fusion of strains of unlike het genotype triggers a complex incompatibility reaction that leads to the death of the fusion cell. Herein, we analyze the transcriptional changes during the incompatibility reaction in Podospora anserina. The incompatibility response was found to be associated with a massive transcriptional reprogramming: 2231 genes were up-regulated by a factor 2 or more during incompatibility. In turn, 2441 genes were down-regulated. HET, NACHT, and HeLo domains previously found to be involved in the control of heterokaryon incompatibility were enriched in the up-regulated gene set. In addition, incompatibility was characterized by an up-regulation of proteolytic and other hydrolytic activities, of secondary metabolism clusters and toxins and effector-like proteins. The up-regulated set was found to be enriched for proteins lacking orthologs in other species and chromosomal distribution of the up-regulated genes was uneven with up-regulated genes residing preferentially in genomic islands and on chromosomes IV and V. There was a significant overlap between regulated genes during incompatibility in P. anserina and Neurospora crassa, indicating similarities in the incompatibility responses in these two species. Globally, this study illustrates that the expression changes occurring during cell fusion incompatibility in P. anserina are in several aspects reminiscent of those described in host-pathogen or symbiotic interactions in other fungal species. PMID:23589521

  1. Systematic tests for position-dependent additive shear bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uitert, Edo; Schneider, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We present new tests to identify stationary position-dependent additive shear biases in weak gravitational lensing data sets. These tests are important diagnostics for currently ongoing and planned cosmic shear surveys, as such biases induce coherent shear patterns that can mimic and potentially bias the cosmic shear signal. The central idea of these tests is to determine the average ellipticity of all galaxies with shape measurements in a grid in the pixel plane. The distribution of the absolute values of these averaged ellipticities can be compared to randomised catalogues; a difference points to systematics in the data. In addition, we introduce a method to quantify the spatial correlation of the additive bias, which suppresses the contribution from cosmic shear and therefore eases the identification of a position-dependent additive shear bias in the data. We apply these tests to the publicly available shear catalogues from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) and the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and find evidence for a small but non-negligible residual additive bias at small scales. As this residual bias is smaller than the error on the shear correlation signal at those scales, it is highly unlikely that it causes a significant bias in the published cosmic shear results of CFHTLenS. In CFHTLenS, the amplitude of this systematic signal is consistent with zero in fields where the number of stars used to model the point spread function (PSF) is higher than average, suggesting that the position-dependent additive shear bias originates from undersampled PSF variations across the image.

  2. Coherent States of Position-Dependent Mass Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehdashti, Shahram; Mahdifar, Ali; Wang, Huaping

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study Gazeau-Klauder and displacement-type coherent states of two-dimensional position-dependent mass oscillators, which is called Λ-dependent oscillators and Λ can be interpreted as the curvatures of the spherical and the hyperbolic spaces, on which oscillators are constrained. In addition, we consider the effect of Λ parameter on the physical properties of these coherent states, including minimized Heisenberg uncertainty relation and Mandel's Q parameter. We also elaborate the relation between the curvature of the physical space and the curvature of the Λ-dependent coherent state manifold.

  3. ATM modulates transcription in response to histone deacetylase inhibition as part of its DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Ryoung; Choi, Jae Duk; Park, Mi Ae; Jeong, Gajin; Cho, Hyeseong; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2010-03-31

    Chromatin structure has a crucial role in a diversity of physiological processes, including development, differentiation and stress responses, via regulation of transcription, DNA replication and DNA damage repair. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors regulate chromatin structure and activate the DNA damage checkpoint pathway involving Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Herein, we investigated the impact of histone acetylation/deacetylation modification on the ATM-mediated transcriptional modulation to provide a better understanding of the transcriptional function of ATM. The prototype HDAC inhibitor trichostain A (TSA) reprograms expression of the myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL1) and Gadd45 genes via the ATM-mediated signal pathway. Transcription of MCL1 and Gadd45alpha is enhanced following TSA treatment in ATM(+) cells, but not in isogenic ATM(-) or kinase-dead ATM expressing cells, in the ATM-activated E2F1 or BRCA1- dependent manner, respectively. These findings suggest that ATM and its kinase activity are essential for the TSA-induced regulation of gene expression. In summary, ATM controls the transcriptional upregulation of MCL1 and Gadd45 through the activation of the ATM-mediated signal pathway in response to HDAC inhibition. These findings are important in helping to design combinatory treatment schedules for anticancer radio- or chemo-therapy with HDAC inhibitors.

  4. Transcriptional Responses of Treponema denticola to Other Oral Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Simanian, Emil J.; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-01-01

    an in-depth understanding of the transcriptional responses triggered by contact-dependent interactions between microorganisms inhabiting the periodontal pocket. PMID:24505483

  5. Genome-wide transcription responses to synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sprung, Carl N; Yang, Yuqing; Forrester, Helen B; Li, Jason; Zaitseva, Marina; Cann, Leonie; Restall, Tina; Anderson, Robin L; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Rogers, Peter A W

    2012-10-01

    The majority of cancer patients achieve benefit from radiotherapy. A significant limitation of radiotherapy is its relatively low therapeutic index, defined as the maximum radiation dose that causes acceptable normal tissue damage to the minimum dose required to achieve tumor control. Recently, a new radiotherapy modality using synchrotron-generated X-ray microbeam radiotherapy has been demonstrated in animal models to ablate tumors with concurrent sparing of normal tissue. Very little work has been undertaken into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that differentiate microbeam radiotherapy from broad beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the whole genome transcriptional response of in vivo microbeam radiotherapy versus broad beam irradiated tumors. We hypothesized that gene expression changes after microbeam radiotherapy are different from those seen after broad beam. We found that in EMT6.5 tumors at 4-48 h postirradiation, microbeam radiotherapy differentially regulates a number of genes, including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen gene family members, and other immunity-related genes including Ciita, Ifng, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, Indo and Ubd when compared to broad beam. Our findings demonstrate molecular differences in the tumor response to microbeam versus broad beam irradiation and these differences provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of microbeam radiotherapy and broad beam.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of foam cells in response to hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Goo, Young-Hwa; Yechoor, Vijay K; Paul, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a main risk factor for atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophages, or foam cells, take-up and process lipoprotein particles deposited in arteries, and store much of the cholesterol carried by these particles in their cytoplasm. However, the effects of exposure to different cholesterol levels on foam cells remain poorly understood. Given the remarkable plasticity of macrophages in response to environmental variables, studies on macrophage biology should ideally be performed in the environment where they exert their physiological functions, namely atherosclerotic lesions in the case of foam cells. We used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse, to study in vivo the transcriptional response of foam cells to short- and long-term elevations in plasma cholesterol, induced by feeding mice a western type diet. The microarray data sets from this study have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession number GSE70619. Here we provide detailed information on the experimental set-up, on the isolation of RNA by laser capture microdissection, and on the methodology used for RNA amplification and analysis by microarray and quantitative real-time PCR.

  7. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C.; Selfridge, Andrew C.; Keogh, Ciara E.; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C.; Nolan, Karen A.; Rocha, Liliane M. A.; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J.; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  8. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Martin, Bronwen; Chadwick, Wayne; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Becker, Kevin G.; WoodIII, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Maudsley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db) and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6) animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds. PMID:22934110

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the stress response by mTOR.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, Jose; Ortells, M Carmen; Tejedor, Sonia; Buxadé, Maria; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation that integrates inputs from growth factor receptors, nutrient availability, intracellular ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate), and a variety of stressors. Since early works in the mid-1990s uncovered the role of mTOR in stimulating protein translation, this kinase has emerged as a rather multifaceted regulator of numerous processes. Whereas mTOR is generally activated by growth- and proliferation-stimulating signals, its activity can be reduced and even suppressed when cells are exposed to a variety of stress conditions. However, cells can also adapt to stress while maintaining their growth capacity and mTOR function. Despite knowledge accumulated on how stress represses mTOR, less is known about mTOR influencing stress responses. In this review, we discuss the capability of mTOR, in particular mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), to activate stress-responsive transcription factors, and we outline open questions for future investigation.

  10. Global transcriptional response of Lactobacillus reuteri to the sourdough environment.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Eric; Britton, Robert A; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Hertel, Christian

    2008-10-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is a lactic acid bacterium that is highly adapted to the sourdough environment. It is a dominant member of industrial type II sourdoughs, and is also able to colonize the intestinal tract of mammals, including humans, and birds. In this study, the transcriptional response of L. reuteri ATCC 55730 was investigated during sourdough fermentation by using whole-genome microarrays. Significant changes of mRNA levels were found for 101 genes involved in diverse cellular processes, such as carbohydrate and energy metabolism, cell envelope biosynthesis, exopolysaccharide production, stress responses, signal transduction and cobalamin biosynthesis. The results showed extensive changes of the organism's gene expression during growth in sourdough as compared with growth in chemically defined medium, and, thus, revealed pathways involved in the adaptation of L. reuteri to the ecological niche of sourdough. The utilization of starch and non-starch carbohydrates, the remodelling of the cell wall, characterized by reduced D-alanylation, and increased amounts of cell wall-associated polysaccharides, as well as the regulatory function of two component systems for cell wall biogenesis and metabolism were suggested by the gene expression data as being important for growth in sourdough. The impact of several L. reuteri genes for effective growth in sourdough was shown by implementation of mutant strains in sourdough fermentation. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular fundamentals of L. reuteri's ecological competitiveness, and provides a basis for further exploration of genetic traits involved in adaptation to the food environment.

  11. Strain specific transcriptional response in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains a significant health problem worldwide with a third of the world population infected and nearly nine million new cases claiming 1.1 million deaths every year. The outcome following infection by Mtb is determined by a complex and dynamic host-pathogen interaction in which the phenotype of the pathogen and the immune status of the host play a role. However, the molecular mechanism by which Mtb strains induce different responses during intracellular infection of the host macrophage is not fully understood. To explore the early molecular events triggered upon Mtb infection of macrophages, we studied the transcriptional responses of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) to infection with two clinical Mtb strains, CDC1551 and HN878. These strains have previously been shown to differ in their virulence/immunogenicity in the mouse and rabbit models of pulmonary TB. Results In spite of similar intracellular growth rates, we observed that compared to HN878, infection by CDC1551 of BMM was associated with an increased global transcriptome, up-regulation of a specific early (6 hours) immune response network and significantly elevated nitric oxide production. In contrast, at 24 hours post-infection of BMM by HN878, more host genes involved in lipid metabolism, including cholesterol metabolism and prostaglandin synthesis were up-regulated, compared to infection with CDC1551. In association with the differences in the macrophage responses to infection with the 2 Mtb strains, intracellular CDC1551 expressed higher levels of stress response genes than did HN878. Conclusions In association with the early and more robust macrophage activation, intracellular CDC1551 cells were exposed to a higher level of stress leading to increased up-regulation of the bacterial stress response genes. In contrast, sub-optimal activation of macrophages and induction of a dysregulated host cell

  12. Transcriptional Responses of Olive Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) to Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinwei; You, Feng; Wang, Qian; Weng, Shenda; Liu, Hui; Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Pei-Jun; Tan, Xungang

    2014-01-01

    The olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is an economically important flatfish in marine aquaculture with a broad thermal tolerance ranging from 14 to 23°C. Cold-tolerant flounder that can survive during the winter season at a temperature of less than 14°C might facilitate the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the response to cold stress. In this study, the transcriptional response of flounder to cold stress (0.7±0.05°C) was characterized using RNA sequencing. Transcriptome sequencing was performed using the Illumina MiSeq platform for the cold-tolerant (CT) group, which survived under the cold stress; the cold-sensitive (CS) group, which could barely survive at the low temperature; and control group, which was not subjected to cold treatment. In all, 29,021 unigenes were generated. Compared with the unigene expression profile of the control group, 410 unigenes were up-regulated and 255 unigenes were down-regulated in the CT group, whereas 593 unigenes were up-regulated and 289 unigenes were down-regulated in the CS group. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses revealed that signal transduction, lipid metabolism, digestive system, and signaling molecules and interaction were the most highly enriched pathways for the genes that were differentially expressed under cold stress. All these pathways could be assigned to the following four biological functions for flounder that can survive under cold stress: signal response to cold stress, cell repair/regeneration, energy production, and cell membrane construction and fluidity. PMID:25279944

  13. The transcriptional response of Escherichia coli to recombinant protein insolubility.

    PubMed

    Smith, Harold E

    2007-03-01

    Bacterial production of recombinant proteins offers several advantages over alternative expression methods and remains the system of choice for many structural genomics projects. However, a large percentage of targets accumulate as insoluble inclusion bodies rather than soluble protein, creating a significant bottleneck in the protein production pipeline. Numerous strategies have been reported that can improve in vivo protein solubility, but most do not scale easily for high-throughput expression screening. To understand better the host cell response to the accumulation of insoluble protein, we determined genome-wide changes in bacterial gene expression upon induction of either soluble or insoluble target proteins. By comparing transcriptional profiles for multiple examples from the soluble or insoluble class, we identified a pattern of gene expression that correlates strongly with protein solubility. Direct targets of the sigma32 heat shock sigma factor, which includes genes involved in protein folding and degradation, were highly expressed in response to induction of insoluble protein. This same group of genes was also upregulated by insoluble protein accumulation under a different growth regime, indicating that sigma32-mediated gene expression is a general response to protein insolubility. This knowledge provides a starting point for the rational design of growth parameters and host strains with improved protein solubility characteristics. Summary Problems with protein solubility are frequently encountered when recombinant proteins are expressed in E. coli. The bacterial host responds to this problem by increasing expression of the protein folding machinery via the heat shock sigma factor sigma32. Manipulation of the sigma32 regulon might provide a general mechanism for improving recombinant protein solubility.

  14. Global transcriptional response of Nitrosomonas europaea to chloroform and chloromethane.

    PubMed

    Gvakharia, Barbara O; Permina, Elizabeth A; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Bottomley, Peter J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Arp, Daniel J

    2007-05-01

    Upon exposure of Nitrosomonas europaea to chloroform (7 microM, 1 h), transcripts for 175 of 2,460 genes were found at higher levels in treated cells than in untreated cells and transcripts for 501 genes were found at lower levels. With chloromethane (3.2 mM, 1 h), transcripts for 67 genes were at higher levels and transcripts for 148 genes were at lower levels. Transcripts for 37 genes were at higher levels following both treatments and included genes for heat shock proteins, sigma-factors of the extracytoplasmic function subfamily, and toxin-antitoxin loci. N. europaea has higher levels of transcripts for a variety of defense genes when exposed to chloroform or chloromethane.

  15. Dynamic Mechanism for the Transcription Apparatus Orchestrating Reliable Responses to Activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaolai; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2012-05-01

    The transcription apparatus (TA) is a huge molecular machine. It detects the time-varying concentrations of transcriptional activators and initiates mRNA transcripts at appropriate rates. Based on the general structural organizations of the TA, we propose how the TA dynamically orchestrates transcriptional responses. The activators rapidly cycle in and out of a clamp-like space temporarily formed between the enhancer and the Mediator, with the concentration of activators encoded as their temporal occupancy rate (RTOR) within the space. The entry of activators into this space induces allostery in the Mediator, resulting in a facilitated circumstance for transcriptional reinitiation. The reinitiation rate is much larger than the cycling rate of activators, thereby RTOR guiding the amount of transcripts. Based on this mechanism, stochastic simulations can qualitatively reproduce and interpret multiple features of gene expression, e.g., transcriptional bursting is not mere noise as traditionally believed, but rather the basis of reliable transcriptional responses.

  16. Genome-wide transcriptional responses of Nitrosomonas europaea to zinc.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunhwa; Ely, Roger L

    2008-06-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea, a Gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph, participates in global nitrogen cycling by carrying out nitrification and derives energy for growth through oxidation of ammonia. In this work, the physiological, proteomic, and transcriptional responses of N. europaea to zinc stress were studied. The nitrite production rate and ammonia-dependent oxygen uptake rate of the cells exposed to 3.4 microM ZnCl2 decreased about 61 and 69% within 30 min, respectively. Two proteins were notably up regulated in zinc treatment and the mRNA levels of their encoding genes started to increase by 1 h after the addition of zinc. A total of 27 genes were up regulated and 30 genes were down regulated. Up-regulated genes included mercury resistance genes (merTPCAD), inorganic ion transport genes, oxidative stress genes, toxin-antitoxin genes, and two-component signal transduction systems genes. merTPCAD was the highest up-regulated operon (46-fold). Down-regulated genes included the RubisCO operon (cbbO), biosynthesis (mrsA), and amino acid transporter.

  17. Transcriptional response to stress is pre-wired by promoter and enhancer architecture.

    PubMed

    Vihervaara, Anniina; Mahat, Dig Bijay; Guertin, Michael J; Chu, Tinyi; Danko, Charles G; Lis, John T; Sistonen, Lea

    2017-08-15

    Programs of gene expression are executed by a battery of transcription factors that coordinate divergent transcription from a pair of tightly linked core initiation regions of promoters and enhancers. Here, to investigate how divergent transcription is reprogrammed upon stress, we measured nascent RNA synthesis at nucleotide-resolution, and profiled histone H4 acetylation in human cells. Our results globally show that the release of promoter-proximal paused RNA polymerase into elongation functions as a critical switch at which a gene's response to stress is determined. Highly transcribed and highly inducible genes display strong transcriptional directionality and selective assembly of general transcription factors on the core sense promoter. Heat-induced transcription at enhancers, instead, correlates with prior binding of cell-type, sequence-specific transcription factors. Activated Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) binds to transcription-primed promoters and enhancers, and CTCF-occupied, non-transcribed chromatin. These results reveal chromatin architectural features that orient transcription at divergent regulatory elements and prime transcriptional responses genome-wide.Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) is a regulator of stress-induced transcription. Here, the authors investigate changes to transcription and chromatin organization upon stress and find that activated HSF1 binds to transcription-primed promoters and enhancers, and to CTCF occupied, untranscribed chromatin.

  18. Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses to Carbon Starvation in Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Casaletti, Luciana; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Paracoccidioides comprises human thermal dimorphic fungi, which cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important mycosis in Latin America. Adaptation to environmental conditions is key to fungal survival during human host infection. The adaptability of carbon metabolism is a vital fitness attribute during pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings The fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides spp. is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, in the human host. In this study, a comprehensive response of Paracoccidioides, Pb01, under carbon starvation was investigated using high-resolution transcriptomic (RNAseq) and proteomic (NanoUPLC-MSE) approaches. A total of 1,063 transcripts and 421 proteins were differentially regulated, providing a global view of metabolic reprogramming during carbon starvation. The main changes were those related to cells shifting to gluconeogenesis and ethanol production, supported by the degradation of amino acids and fatty acids and by the modulation of the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic cycles. This proposed carbon flow hypothesis was supported by gene and protein expression profiles assessed using qRT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, as well as using enzymatic, cell dry weight and fungus-macrophage interaction assays. The carbon source provides a survival advantage to Paracoccidioides inside macrophages. Conclusions/Significance For a complete understanding of the physiological processes in an organism, the integration of approaches addressing different levels of regulation is important. To the best of our knowledge, this report presents the first description of the responses of Paracoccidioides spp. to host-like conditions using large-scale expression approaches. The alternative metabolic pathways that could be adopted by the organism during carbon starvation can be important for a better understanding of the fungal adaptation to the host, because systems for detecting and responding

  19. Direct transcriptional activation of BT genes by NLP transcription factors is a key component of the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Konishi, Mineko; Yoshioka, Nozomi; Sasaki, Yuki; Maeda, Haruna; Ishida, Tetsuya; Kato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Junji; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-29

    Nitrate modulates growth and development, functioning as a nutrient signal in plants. Although many changes in physiological processes in response to nitrate have been well characterized as nitrate responses, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrate response are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that NLP transcription factors, which are key regulators of the nitrate response, directly activate the nitrate-inducible expression of BT1 and BT2 encoding putative scaffold proteins with a plant-specific domain structure in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, the 35S promoter-driven expression of BT2 partially rescued growth inhibition caused by reductions in NLP activity in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, simultaneous disruption of BT1 and BT2 affected nitrate-dependent lateral root development. These results suggest that direct activation of BT1 and BT2 by NLP transcriptional activators is a key component of the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

  20. Transcriptional analysis of the acid tolerance response in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Martín-Galiano, Antonio J; Overweg, Karin; Ferrándiz, Maria J; Reuter, Mark; Wells, Jerry M; de la Campa, Adela G

    2005-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in humans, faces a range of potentially acidic conditions in the middle and late stages of growth in vitro, in diverse human fluids during the infection process, and in biofilms present in the nasopharynx of carriers. S. pneumoniae was shown to develop a weak acid tolerance response (ATR), where cells previously exposed to sublethal pHs (5.8-6.6) showed an increased survival rate of up to one order of magnitude after challenge at the lethal pH (4.4, survival rate of 10(-4)). Moreover, the survival after challenge of stationary phase cells at pH 4.4 was three orders of magnitude higher than that of cells taken from the exponential phase, due to the production of lactic acid during growth and increasing acidification of the growth medium until stationary phase. Global expression analysis after short-term (5, 15 and 30 min, the adaptation phase) and long-term (the maintenance phase) acidic shock (pH 6.0) was performed by microarray experiments, and the results were validated by real-time RT-PCR. Out of a total of 126 genes responding to acidification, 59 and 37 were specific to the adaptation phase and maintenance phase, respectively, and 30 were common to both periods. In the adaptation phase, both up- and down-regulation of gene transcripts was observed (38 and 21 genes, respectively), whereas in the maintenance phase most of the affected genes were down-regulated (34 out of 37). Genes involved in protein fate (including those involved in the protection of the protein native structure) and transport (including transporters of manganese and iron) were overrepresented among the genes affected by acidification, 8.7 and 24.6 % of the acid-responsive genes compared to 2.8 % and 9.6 % of the genome complement, respectively. Cross-regulation with the response to oxidative and osmotic stress was observed. Potential regulatory motifs involved in the ATR were identified in the promoter regions of

  1. Controlling stimulated coherent spectroscopy and microscopy by a position-dependent phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chao-Yu; Hsu, Julie; Mukamel, Shaul; Potma, Eric O.

    2013-03-01

    We study the role of geometry-dependent phase shifts of the optical electric field in stimulated coherent spectroscopy, a special class of heterodyne optical spectroscopy techniques. We generalize the theoretical description of stimulated spectroscopy to include spatial phase effects, and study the measured material response for several representative excitation and detection configurations. Using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy as an example, we show that different components of the material response are measured by varying the position of the object in focus. We discuss the implications of the position-dependent phase in stimulated coherent microscopy and point out a detection configuration in which its effects are minimized.

  2. Loneliness, eudaimonia, and the human conserved transcriptional response to adversity

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Levine, Morgan E.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Ma, Jeffrey; Weir, David R.; Crimmins, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic social adversity activates a conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) marked by increased expression of pro-inflammatory genes and decreased expression of antiviral- and antibody-related genes. Recent findings suggest that some psychological resilience factors may help buffer CTRA activation, but the relative impact of resilience and adversity factors remains poorly understood. Here we examined the relative strength of CTRA association for the two best-established psychological correlates of CTRA gene expression – the risk factor of perceived social isolation (loneliness) and the resilience factor of eudaimonic well-being (purpose and meaning in life). Methods Peripheral blood samples and validated measures of loneliness and eudaimonic well-being were analyzed in 108 community-dwelling older adults participating in the longitudinal US Health and Retirement Study (56% female, mean age 73). Mixed effect linear model analyses quantified the strength of association between CTRA gene expression and measures of loneliness and eudaimonic well-being in separate and joint analyses. Results As in previous studies, separate analyses found CTRA gene expression to be up-regulated in association with loneliness and down-regulated in association with eudaimonic well-being. In joint analyses, effects of loneliness were completely abrogated whereas eudaimonic well-being continued to associate with CTRA down-regulation. Similar eudaimonia-dominant effects were observed for positive and negative affect, optimism and pessimism, and anxiety symptoms. All results were independent of demographic and behavioral health risk factors. Conclusions Eudaimonic well-being may have the potential to compensate for the adverse impact of loneliness on CTRA gene expression. Findings suggest a novel approach to targeting the health risks associated with social isolation by promoting purpose and meaning in life. PMID:26246388

  3. Default risk modeling with position-dependent killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Yuri A.

    2013-04-01

    Diffusion in a linear potential in the presence of position-dependent killing is used to mimic a default process. Different assumptions regarding transport coefficients, initial conditions, and elasticity of the killing measure lead to diverse models of bankruptcy. One “stylized fact” is fundamental for our consideration: empirically default is a rather rare event, especially in the investment grade categories of credit ratings. Hence, the action of killing may be considered as a small parameter. In a number of special cases we derive closed-form expressions for the entire term structure of the cumulative probability of default, its hazard rate, and intensity. Comparison with historical data on aggregate global corporate defaults confirms the validity of the perturbation method for estimations of long-term probability of default for companies with high credit quality. On a single company level, we implement the derived formulas to estimate the one-year likelihood of default of Enron on a daily basis from August 2000 to August 2001, three months before its default, and compare the obtained results with forecasts of traditional structural models.

  4. Position-dependent mass quantum Hamiltonians: general approach and duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rego-Monteiro, M. A.; Rodrigues, Ligia M. C. S.; Curado, E. M. F.

    2016-03-01

    We analyze a general family of position-dependent mass (PDM) quantum Hamiltonians which are not self-adjoint and include, as particular cases, some Hamiltonians obtained in phenomenological approaches to condensed matter physics. We build a general family of self-adjoint Hamiltonians which are quantum mechanically equivalent to the non-self-adjoint proposed ones. Inspired by the probability density of the problem, we construct an ansatz for the solutions of the family of self-adjoint Hamiltonians. We use this ansatz to map the solutions of the time independent Schrödinger equations generated by the non-self-adjoint Hamiltonians into the Hilbert space of the solutions of the respective dual self-adjoint Hamiltonians. This mapping depends on both the PDM and on a function of position satisfying a condition that assures the existence of a consistent continuity equation. We identify the non-self-adjoint Hamiltonians here studied with a very general family of Hamiltonians proposed in a seminal article of Harrison (1961 Phys. Rev. 123 85) to describe varying band structures in different types of metals. Therefore, we have self-adjoint Hamiltonians that correspond to the non-self-adjoint ones found in Harrison’s article.

  5. The Genetic Architecture of the Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response to ER Stress in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Clement Y; Wang, Xu; Riccardi, David; Wolfner, Mariana F.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurs when misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER. The cellular response to ER stress involves complex transcriptional and translational changes, important to the survival of the cell. ER stress is a primary cause and a modifier of many human diseases. A first step to understanding how the ER stress response impacts human disease is to determine how the transcriptional response to ER stress varies among individuals. The genetic diversity of the eight mouse Collaborative Cross (CC) founder strains allowed us to determine how genetic variation impacts the ER stress transcriptional response. We used tunicamycin, a drug commonly used to induce ER stress, to elicit an ER stress response in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from the CC founder strains and measured their transcriptional responses. We identified hundreds of genes that differed in response to ER stress across these genetically diverse strains. Strikingly, inflammatory response genes differed most between strains; major canonical ER stress response genes showed relatively invariant responses across strains. To uncover the genetic architecture underlying these strain differences in ER stress response, we measured the transcriptional response to ER stress in MEFs derived from a subset of F1 crosses between the CC founder strains. We found a unique layer of regulatory variation that is only detectable under ER stress conditions. Over 80% of the regulatory variation under ER stress derives from cis-regulatory differences. This is the first study to characterize the genetic variation in ER stress transcriptional response in the laboratory mouse. Our findings indicate that the ER stress transcriptional response is highly variable among strains and arises from genetic variation in individual downstream response genes, rather than major signaling transcription factors. These results have important implications for understanding how genetic variation impacts the ER stress

  6. Two recently duplicated maize NAC transcription factor paralogs are induced in response to Colletotrichum graminicola infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background NAC transcription factors belong to a large family of plant-specific transcription factors with more than 100 family members in monocot and dicot species. To date, the majority of the studied NAC proteins are involved in the response to abiotic stress, to biotic stress and in the regulation of developmental processes. Maize NAC transcription factors involved in the biotic stress response have not yet been identified. Results We have found that two NAC transcription factors, ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, are transcriptionally induced both during the initial biotrophic as well as the ensuing necrotrophic colonization of maize leaves by the hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus C. graminicola. ZmNAC41 transcripts were also induced upon infection with C. graminicola mutants that are defective in host penetration, while the induction of ZmNAC100 did not occur in such interactions. While ZmNAC41 transcripts accumulated specifically in response to jasmonate (JA), ZmNAC100 transcripts were also induced by the salicylic acid analog 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA). To assess the phylogenetic relation of ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, we studied the family of maize NAC transcription factors based on the recently annotated B73 genome information. We identified 116 maize NAC transcription factor genes that clustered into 12 clades. ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100 both belong to clade G and appear to have arisen by a recent gene duplication event. Including four other defence-related NAC transcription factors of maize and functionally characterized Arabidopsis and rice NAC transcription factors, we observed an enrichment of NAC transcription factors involved in host defense regulation in clade G. In silico analyses identified putative binding elements for the defence-induced ERF, Myc2, TGA and WRKY transcription factors in the promoters of four out of the six defence-related maize NAC transcription factors, while one of the analysed maize NAC did not contain any of these potential binding sites

  7. Two recently duplicated maize NAC transcription factor paralogs are induced in response to Colletotrichum graminicola infection.

    PubMed

    Voitsik, Anna-Maria; Muench, Steffen; Deising, Holger B; Voll, Lars M

    2013-05-29

    NAC transcription factors belong to a large family of plant-specific transcription factors with more than 100 family members in monocot and dicot species. To date, the majority of the studied NAC proteins are involved in the response to abiotic stress, to biotic stress and in the regulation of developmental processes. Maize NAC transcription factors involved in the biotic stress response have not yet been identified. We have found that two NAC transcription factors, ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, are transcriptionally induced both during the initial biotrophic as well as the ensuing necrotrophic colonization of maize leaves by the hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus C. graminicola. ZmNAC41 transcripts were also induced upon infection with C. graminicola mutants that are defective in host penetration, while the induction of ZmNAC100 did not occur in such interactions. While ZmNAC41 transcripts accumulated specifically in response to jasmonate (JA), ZmNAC100 transcripts were also induced by the salicylic acid analog 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA).To assess the phylogenetic relation of ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, we studied the family of maize NAC transcription factors based on the recently annotated B73 genome information. We identified 116 maize NAC transcription factor genes that clustered into 12 clades. ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100 both belong to clade G and appear to have arisen by a recent gene duplication event. Including four other defence-related NAC transcription factors of maize and functionally characterized Arabidopsis and rice NAC transcription factors, we observed an enrichment of NAC transcription factors involved in host defense regulation in clade G. In silico analyses identified putative binding elements for the defence-induced ERF, Myc2, TGA and WRKY transcription factors in the promoters of four out of the six defence-related maize NAC transcription factors, while one of the analysed maize NAC did not contain any of these potential binding sites. Our study provides a

  8. Genome scale transcriptional response diversity among ten ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana during heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh D.; Mundy, John; Bones, Atle M.

    2013-01-01

    In the scenario of global warming and climate change, heat stress is a serious threat to crop production worldwide. Being sessile, plants cannot escape from heat. Plants have developed various adaptive mechanisms to survive heat stress. Several studies have focused on diversity of heat tolerance levels in divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, but comprehensive genome scale understanding of heat stress response in plants is still lacking. Here we report the genome scale transcript responses to heat stress of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes (Col, Ler, C24, Cvi, Kas1, An1, Sha, Kyo2, Eri, and Kond) originated from different geographical locations. During the experiment, A. thaliana plants were subjected to heat stress (38°C) and transcript responses were monitored using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. The responses of A. thaliana ecotypes exhibited considerable variation in the transcript abundance levels. In total, 3644 transcripts were significantly heat regulated (p < 0.01) in the 10 ecotypes, including 244 transcription factors and 203 transposable elements. By employing a systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA), we have constructed an in silico transcript regulatory network model for 35 heat responsive transcription factors during cellular responses to heat stress in A. thaliana. The computed activities of the 35 transcription factors showed ecotype specific responses to the heat treatment. PMID:24409190

  9. Genome scale transcriptional response diversity among ten ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh D; Mundy, John; Bones, Atle M

    2013-01-01

    In the scenario of global warming and climate change, heat stress is a serious threat to crop production worldwide. Being sessile, plants cannot escape from heat. Plants have developed various adaptive mechanisms to survive heat stress. Several studies have focused on diversity of heat tolerance levels in divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, but comprehensive genome scale understanding of heat stress response in plants is still lacking. Here we report the genome scale transcript responses to heat stress of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes (Col, Ler, C24, Cvi, Kas1, An1, Sha, Kyo2, Eri, and Kond) originated from different geographical locations. During the experiment, A. thaliana plants were subjected to heat stress (38°C) and transcript responses were monitored using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. The responses of A. thaliana ecotypes exhibited considerable variation in the transcript abundance levels. In total, 3644 transcripts were significantly heat regulated (p < 0.01) in the 10 ecotypes, including 244 transcription factors and 203 transposable elements. By employing a systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA), we have constructed an in silico transcript regulatory network model for 35 heat responsive transcription factors during cellular responses to heat stress in A. thaliana. The computed activities of the 35 transcription factors showed ecotype specific responses to the heat treatment.

  10. The Transcriptional Cascade in the Heat Stress Response of Arabidopsis Is Strictly Regulated at the Level of Transcription Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Ohama, Naohiko; Kusakabe, Kazuya; Mizoi, Junya; Zhao, Huimei; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinya; Takahashi, Fuminori; Ishida, Tetsuya; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Group A1 heat shock transcription factors (HsfA1s) are the master regulators of the heat stress response (HSR) in plants. Upon heat shock, HsfA1s trigger a transcriptional cascade that is composed of many transcription factors. Despite the importance of HsfA1s and their downstream transcriptional cascade in the acquisition of thermotolerance in plants, the molecular basis of their activation remains poorly understood. Here, domain analysis of HsfA1d, one of several HsfA1s in Arabidopsis thaliana, demonstrated that the central region of HsfA1d is a key regulatory domain that represses HsfA1d transactivation activity through interaction with HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN70 (HSP70) and HSP90. We designated this region as the temperature-dependent repression (TDR) domain. We found that HSP70 dissociates from HsfA1d in response to heat shock and that the dissociation is likely regulated by an as yet unknown activation mechanism, such as HsfA1d phosphorylation. Overexpression of constitutively active HsfA1d that lacked the TDR domain induced expression of heat shock proteins in the absence of heat stress, thereby conferring potent thermotolerance on the overexpressors. However, transcriptome analysis of the overexpressors demonstrated that the constitutively active HsfA1d could not trigger the complete transcriptional cascade under normal conditions, thereby indicating that other factors are necessary to fully induce the HSR. These complex regulatory mechanisms related to the transcriptional cascade may enable plants to respond resiliently to various heat stress conditions.

  11. Transcription Factor Functional Protein-Protein Interactions in Plant Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Murilo S.; Dadalto, Silvana P.; Gonçalves, Amanda B.; de Souza, Gilza B.; Barros, Vanessa A.; Fietto, Luciano G.

    2014-01-01

    Responses to biotic stress in plants lead to dramatic reprogramming of gene expression, favoring stress responses at the expense of normal cellular functions. Transcription factors are master regulators of gene expression at the transcriptional level, and controlling the activity of these factors alters the transcriptome of the plant, leading to metabolic and phenotypic changes in response to stress. The functional analysis of interactions between transcription factors and other proteins is very important for elucidating the role of these transcriptional regulators in different signaling cascades. In this review, we present an overview of protein-protein interactions for the six major families of transcription factors involved in plant defense: basic leucine zipper containing domain proteins (bZIP), amino-acid sequence WRKYGQK (WRKY), myelocytomatosis related proteins (MYC), myeloblastosis related proteins (MYB), APETALA2/ ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING FACTORS (AP2/EREBP) and no apical meristem (NAM), Arabidopsis transcription activation factor (ATAF), and cup-shaped cotyledon (CUC) (NAC). We describe the interaction partners of these transcription factors as molecular responses during pathogen attack and the key components of signal transduction pathways that take place during plant defense responses. These interactions determine the activation or repression of response pathways and are crucial to understanding the regulatory networks that modulate plant defense responses. PMID:28250372

  12. Enhanceosomes as integrators of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and other transcription factors in the hypoxic transcriptional response.

    PubMed

    Pawlus, Matthew R; Hu, Cheng-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Hypoxia is a prevalent attribute of the solid tumor microenvironment that promotes the expression of genes through posttranslational modifications and stabilization of alpha subunits (HIF1α and HIF2α) of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Despite significant similarities, HIF1 (HIF1α/ARNT) and HIF2 (HIF2α/ARNT) activate common as well as unique target genes and exhibit different functions in cancer biology. More surprisingly, accumulating data indicates that the HIF1- and/or HIF2-mediated hypoxia responses can be oncogenic as well as tumor suppressive. While the role of HIF in the hypoxia response is well established, recent data support the concept that HIF is necessary, but not sufficient for the hypoxic response. Other transcription factors that are activated by hypoxia are also required for the HIF-mediated hypoxia response. HIFs, other transcription factors, co-factors and RNA poll II recruited by HIF and other transcription factors form multifactorial enhanceosome complexes on the promoters of HIF target genes to activate hypoxia inducible genes. Importantly, HIF1 or HIF2 requires distinct partners in activating HIF1 or HIF2 target genes. Because HIF enhanceosome formation is required for the gene activation and distinct functions of HIF1 and HIF2 in tumor biology, disruption of the HIF1 or HIF2 specific enhanceosome complex may prove to be a beneficial strategy in tumor treatment in which tumor growth is specifically dependent upon HIF1 or HIF2 activity.

  13. Temporal kinetics of the transcriptional response to carbon depletion and sucrose readdition in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Sarah Jane; Yadav, Umesh Prasad; Klie, Sebastian; Morcuende, Rosa; Usadel, Björn; Lunn, John Edward; Stitt, Mark

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether the transcriptional response to carbon (C) depletion and sucrose resupply depends on the duration and severity of the C depletion, Arabidopsis seedlings were grown in liquid culture and harvested 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after removing sucrose from the medium and 30 min after resupplying sucrose at each time. Expression profiling revealed early transcriptional inhibition of cell wall synthesis and remodelling of signalling, followed by induction of C recycling and photosynthesis and general inhibition of growth. The temporal sequence differed from the published response to progressive exhaustion of C during a night and extended night in vegetatively growing plants. The response to sucrose readdition was conserved across the C-depletion time course. Intriguingly, the vast majority of rapidly responding transcripts decreased rather than increased. The majority of transcripts that respond rapidly to sucrose and many transcripts that respond during C depletion also decrease after treating seedlings with the transcriptional inhibitor cordycepin A. Comparison with published responses to overexpression of otsA, AKIN10 and bZIP11 revealed that many genes that respond to C depletion, and especially sucrose resupply, respond to one or more of these C-signalling components. Thus, multiple factors contribute to C responsiveness, including many signalling components, transcriptional regulation and transcript turnover. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Direct measurement of transcription rates reveals multiple mechanisms for configuration of the Arabidopsis ambient temperature response.

    PubMed

    Sidaway-Lee, Kate; Costa, Maria J; Rand, David A; Finkenstadt, Bärbel; Penfield, Steven

    2014-03-03

    Sensing and responding to ambient temperature is important for controlling growth and development of many organisms, in part by regulating mRNA levels. mRNA abundance can change with temperature, but it is unclear whether this results from changes in transcription or decay rates, and whether passive or active temperature regulation is involved. Using a base analog labelling method, we directly measured the temperature coefficient, Q10, of mRNA synthesis and degradation rates of the Arabidopsis transcriptome. We show that for most genes, transcript levels are buffered against passive increases in transcription rates by balancing passive increases in the rate of decay. Strikingly, for temperature-responsive transcripts, increasing temperature raises transcript abundance primarily by promoting faster transcription relative to decay and not vice versa, suggesting a global transcriptional process exists that controls mRNA abundance by temperature. This is partly accounted for by gene body H2A.Z which is associated with low transcription rate Q10, but is also influenced by other marks and transcription factor activities. Our data show that less frequent chromatin states can produce temperature responses simply by virtue of their rarity and the difference between their thermal properties and those of the most common states, and underline the advantages of directly measuring transcription rate changes in dynamic systems, rather than inferring rates from changes in mRNA abundance.

  15. Training response of mitochondrial transcription factors in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Norrbom, J; Wallman, S E; Gustafsson, T; Rundqvist, H; Jansson, E; Sundberg, C J

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is essential for physical performance and health. Aerobic fitness is positively associated with mitochondrial (mt) biogenesis in muscle cells through partly unknown regulatory mechanisms. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of exercise and training status on key mt transcription factors in relation to oxidative capacity in human skeletal muscle. The basal mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factors B1 (TFB1M) or B2 (TFB2M), and mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF), were measured in a cross-sectional study with elite athletes (EA) and moderately active (MA) and the basal mRNA levels of these factors were measured during a 10-day endurance training programme with (R-leg) and without (NR-leg) restricted blood flow to the working leg. TFAM protein expression was significantly higher in the EA than in the MA, while protein levels of TFB1M and TFB2M were not different between the groups. There was no difference between EA and MA, or any effect with training on TFAM mRNA levels. However, the mRNA levels of TFB1M, TFB2M and mTERF were higher in EA compared with MA. For TFB1M and TFB2M, the mRNA expression was increased in the R-leg after 10 days of training, but not in the NR-leg. mTERF mRNA levels were higher in EA compared with MA. This study further establishes that TFAM protein levels are higher in conditions with enhanced oxidative capacity. The mRNA levels of TFB1M and TFB2M are influenced by endurance training, possibly suggesting a role for these factors in the regulation of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.

  16. Partially phosphorylated Pho4 activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Springer, Michael; Wykoff, Dennis D; Miller, Nicole; O'Shea, Erin K

    2003-11-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin-CDK complex Pho80-Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80-Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80-Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs.

  17. Partially Phosphorylated Pho4 Activates Transcription of a Subset of Phosphate-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin–CDK complex Pho80–Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80–Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80–Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs. PMID:14624238

  18. Blurring the line between the DNA damage response and transcription: the importance of chromatin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Adam, Salomé; Polo, Sophie E

    2014-11-15

    DNA damage interferes with the progression of transcription machineries. A tight coordination of transcription with signaling and repair of DNA damage is thus critical for safeguarding genome function. This coordination involves modulations of chromatin organization. Here, we focus on the central role of chromatin dynamics, in conjunction with DNA Damage Response (DDR) factors, in controlling transcription inhibition and restart at sites of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Recent work has identified chromatin modifiers and histone chaperones as key regulators of transcriptional activity in damaged chromatin regions. Conversely, the transcriptional state of chromatin before DNA damage influences both DNA damage signaling and repair. We discuss the importance of chromatin plasticity in coordinating the interplay between the DDR and transcription, with major implications for cell fate maintenance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  20. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  1. Analysis of global transcriptional responses of chicken following primary and secondary Eimeria acervulina infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Characterization of host transcriptional responses during coccidia infections can provide new clues for the development of alternative disease control strategies against these complex protozoan pathogens. In the current study, we compared chicken duodenal transcriptome profiles following primary and...

  2. INO80-dependent regression of ecdysone-induced transcriptional responses regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Sarah D; Ihry, Robert J; Gruetzmacher, Kelly M; Bashirullah, Arash

    2014-03-15

    Sequential pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone regulate the major developmental transitions in Drosophila, and the duration of each developmental stage is determined by the length of time between ecdysone pulses. Ecdysone regulates biological responses by directly initiating target gene transcription. In turn, these transcriptional responses are known to be self-limiting, with mechanisms in place to ensure regression of hormone-dependent transcription. However, the biological significance of these transcriptional repression mechanisms remains unclear. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein INO80 facilitates transcriptional repression of ecdysone-regulated genes during prepupal development. In ino80 mutant animals, inefficient repression of transcriptional responses to the late larval ecdysone pulse delays the onset of the subsequent prepupal ecdysone pulse, resulting in a significantly longer prepupal stage. Conversely, increased expression of ino80 is sufficient to shorten the prepupal stage by increasing the rate of transcriptional repression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing the rate of regression of the mid-prepupal competence factor βFTZ-F1 is sufficient to determine the timing of head eversion and thus the duration of prepupal development. Although ino80 is conserved from yeast to humans, this study represents the first characterization of a bona fide ino80 mutation in any metazoan, raising the possibility that the functions of ino80 in transcriptional repression and developmental timing are evolutionarily conserved.

  3. Structure and properties of transcriptional networks driving selenite stress response in yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Salin, Hélène; Fardeau, Vivienne; Piccini, Eugenia; Lelandais, Gaelle; Tanty, Véronique; Lemoine, Sophie; Jacq, Claude; Devaux, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    Background Stress responses provide valuable models for deciphering the transcriptional networks controlling the adaptation of the cell to its environment. We analyzed the transcriptome response of yeast to toxic concentrations of selenite. We used gene network mapping tools to identify functional pathways and transcription factors involved in this response. We then used chromatin immunoprecipitation and knock-out experiments to investigate the role of some of these regulators and the regulatory connections between them. Results Selenite rapidly activates a battery of transcriptional circuits, including iron deprivation, oxidative stress and protein degradation responses. The mRNA levels of several transcriptional regulators are themselves regulated. We demonstrate the existence of a positive transcriptional loop connecting the regulator of proteasome expression, Rpn4p, to the pleiotropic drug response factor, Pdr1p. We also provide evidence for the involvement of this regulatory module in the oxidative stress response controlled by the Yap1p transcription factor and its conservation in the pathogenic yeast C. glabrata. In addition, we show that the drug resistance regulator gene YRR1 and the iron homeostasis regulator gene AFT2 are both directly regulated by Yap1p. Conclusion This work depicted a highly interconnected and complex transcriptional network involved in the adaptation of yeast genome expression to the presence of selenite in its chemical environment. It revealed the transcriptional regulation of PDR1 by Rpn4p, proposed a new role for the pleiotropic drug resistance network in stress response and demonstrated a direct regulatory connection between oxidative stress response and iron homeostasis. PMID:18627600

  4. Transcriptional responses to teflubenzuron exposure in European lobster (Homarus gammarus).

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Samuelsen, Ole B; Agnalt, Ann-Lisbeth; Lunestad, Bjørn T

    2015-10-01

    Increasing use of pharmaceutical drugs to delouse farmed salmon raises environmental concerns. This study describes an experiment carried out to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the antiparasitic drug teflubenzuron on a non-target species, the European lobster. Juvenile lobsters (10.3±0.9 mm carapace length) were fed two environmentally relevant doses of teflubenzuron, corresponding to 5 and 20% of a standard salmon medication (10 mg/kg day), termed low and high dose in this study. After 114 days of dietary exposure, whole-animal accumulation of teflubenzuron was determined. One claw from each animal was collected for transcriptional analysis. Overall, exposed animals showed low cumulative mortality. Six animals, two from the low dose treatment and four from the high dose, showed exoskeletal abnormalities (claw deformities or stiff walking legs). Residual levels of teflubenzuron in juvenile lobster were 2.7-fold higher in the high dose (282 ng/g) compared to the low dose treatment (103 ng/g). The transcriptional examination showed significant effects of teflubenzuron on 21 out of 39 studied genes. At the transcriptional level, environmentally relevant levels of the anti-salmon lice drug impacted genes linked to drug detoxification (cyp3a, cyp6a2, cyp302a, sult1b1, abcc4), cellular stress (hsp70, hsp90, chh), oxidative stress (cat, gpx3) and DNA damage (p53), as well as molting and exoskeleton regulation (chi3l1, ecr, jhl1, chs1, ctbs, gap65, jhel-ces1) in claw tissue (muscle and exoskeleton). In conclusion, teflubenzuron at sub-lethal levels can affect many molecular mechanisms in European lobster claws.

  5. Characterization of the rapid transcriptional response to long-term sensitization training in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Herdegen, Samantha; Holmes, Geraldine; Cyriac, Ashly; Calin-Jageman, Irina E.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    We used a custom-designed microarray and quantitative PCR to characterize the rapid transcriptional response to long-term sensitization training in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Aplysia were exposed to repeated noxious shocks to one side of the body, a procedure known to induce a longlasting, transcription-dependent increase in reflex responsiveness that is restricted to the side of training. One hour after training, pleural ganglia from the trained and untrained sides of the body were harvested; these ganglia contain the sensory nociceptors which help mediate the expression of longterm sensitization memory. Microarray analysis from 8 biological replicates suggests that long-term sensitization training rapidly regulates at least 81 transcripts. We used qPCR to test a subset of these transcripts and found that 83% were confirmed in the same samples, and 86% of these were again confirmed in an independent sample. Thus, our new microarray design shows strong convergent and predictive validity for analyzing the transcriptional correlates of memory in Aplysia. Fully validated transcripts include some previously identified as regulated in this paradigm (ApC/EBP and ApEgr) but also include novel findings. Specifically, we show that long-term sensitization training rapidly upregulates the expression of transcripts which may encode Aplysia homologs of a C/EBPγ transcription factor, a glycine transporter (GlyT2), and a vacuolar-protein-sorting-associated protein (VPS36). PMID:25117657

  6. Characterization of the rapid transcriptional response to long-term sensitization training in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Herdegen, Samantha; Holmes, Geraldine; Cyriac, Ashly; Calin-Jageman, Irina E; Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    We used a custom-designed microarray and quantitative PCR to characterize the rapid transcriptional response to long-term sensitization training in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Aplysia were exposed to repeated noxious shocks to one side of the body, a procedure known to induce a long-lasting, transcription-dependent increase in reflex responsiveness that is restricted to the side of training. One hour after training, pleural ganglia from the trained and untrained sides of the body were harvested; these ganglia contain the sensory nociceptors which help mediate the expression of long-term sensitization memory. Microarray analysis from 8 biological replicates suggests that long-term sensitization training rapidly regulates at least 81 transcripts. We used qPCR to test a subset of these transcripts and found that 83% were confirmed in the same samples, and 86% of these were again confirmed in an independent sample. Thus, our new microarray design shows strong convergent and predictive validity for analyzing the transcriptional correlates of memory in Aplysia. Fully validated transcripts include some previously identified as regulated in this paradigm (ApC/EBP and ApEgr) but also include novel findings. Specifically, we show that long-term sensitization training rapidly up-regulates the expression of transcripts which may encode Aplysia homologs of a C/EBPγ transcription factor, a glycine transporter (GlyT2), and a vacuolar-protein-sorting-associated protein (VPS36). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptional profile of immediate response to ionizing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Rouchka, Eric C; Flight, Robert M; Fasciotto, Brigitte H; Estrada, Rosendo; Eaton, John W; Patibandla, Phani K; Waigel, Sabine J; Li, Dazhuo; Kirtley, John K; Sethu, Palaniappan; Keynton, Robert S

    2016-03-01

    Astronauts participating in long duration space missions are likely to be exposed to ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy particles. Previously proposed gene biomarkers for radiation exposure include phosphorylated H2A Histone Family, Member X (γH2AX), Tumor Protein 53 (TP53), and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A). However, transcripts of these genes may not be the most suitable biomarkers for radiation exposure due to a lack of sensitivity or specificity. As part of a larger effort to develop lab-on-a-chip methods for detecting radiation exposure events using blood samples, we designed a dose-course microarray study in order to determine coding and non-coding RNA transcripts undergoing differential expression immediately following radiation exposure. The main goal was to elicit a small set of sensitive and specific radiation exposure biomarkers at low, medium, and high levels of ionizing radiation exposure. Four separate levels of radiation were considered: 0 Gray (Gy) control; 0.3 Gy; 1.5 Gy; and 3.0 Gy with four replicates at each radiation level. This report includes raw gene expression data files from the resulting microarray experiments from all three radiation levels ranging from a lower, typical exposure than an astronaut might see (0.3 Gy) to high, potentially lethal, levels of radiation (3.0 Gy). The data described here is available in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), accession GSE64375.

  8. Hepcidin mediates transcriptional changes that modulate acute cytokine-induced inflammatory responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    De Domenico, Ivana; Zhang, Tian Y.; Koening, Curry L.; Branch, Ryan W.; London, Nyall; Lo, Eric; Daynes, Raymond A.; Kushner, James P.; Li, Dean; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that regulates iron homeostasis and acts as an antimicrobial peptide. It is expressed and secreted by a variety of cell types in response to iron loading and inflammation. Hepcidin mediates iron homeostasis by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin, inducing its internalization and degradation via activation of the protein kinase Jak2 and the subsequent phosphorylation of ferroportin. Here we have shown that hepcidin-activated Jak2 also phosphorylates the transcription factor Stat3, resulting in a transcriptional response. Hepcidin treatment of ferroportin-expressing mouse macrophages showed changes in mRNA expression levels of a wide variety of genes. The changes in transcript levels for half of these genes were a direct effect of hepcidin, as shown by cycloheximide insensitivity, and dependent on the presence of Stat3. Hepcidin-mediated transcriptional changes modulated LPS-induced transcription in both cultured macrophages and in vivo mouse models, as demonstrated by suppression of IL-6 and TNF-α transcript and secreted protein. Hepcidin-mediated transcription in mice also suppressed toxicity and morbidity due to single doses of LPS, poly(I:C), and turpentine, which is used to model chronic inflammatory disease. Most notably, we demonstrated that hepcidin pretreatment protected mice from a lethal dose of LPS and that hepcidin-knockout mice could be rescued from LPS toxicity by injection of hepcidin. The results of our study suggest a new function for hepcidin in modulating acute inflammatory responses. PMID:20530874

  9. AP2/ERF family transcription factors in plant abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Mizoi, Junya; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2012-02-01

    In terrestrial environments, temperature and water conditions are highly variable, and extreme temperatures and water conditions affect the survival, growth and reproduction of plants. To protect cells and sustain growth under such conditions of abiotic stress, plants respond to unfavourable changes in their environments in developmental, physiological and biochemical ways. These responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors. The AP2/ERF family is a large family of plant-specific transcription factors that share a well-conserved DNA-binding domain. This transcription factor family includes DRE-binding proteins (DREBs), which activate the expression of abiotic stress-responsive genes via specific binding to the dehydration-responsive element/C-repeat (DRE/CRT) cis-acting element in their promoters. In this review, we discuss the functions of the AP2/ERF-type transcription factors in plant abiotic stress responses, with special emphasis on the regulations and functions of two major types of DREBs, DREB1/CBF and DREB2. In addition, we summarise the involvement of other AP2/ERF-type transcription factors in abiotic stress responses, which has recently become clear. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress.

  10. Transcriptome profiling revealed novel transcriptional regulators in maize responses to Ostrinia furnacalis and jasmonic acid

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shouzhen; Liang, Haisheng; Xin, Hongjia; Gao, Hongjiang; Huang, Dafang

    2017-01-01

    Chewing insects cause severe yield losses in crop production worldwide. Crop plants counteract chewing insects by transcriptionally promoting a repertoire of defense gene products that are either toxic to, or attractive to the natural enemies of, pest insects. However, the complexity of the transcriptional reprogramming in plant defense response against chewing insects is still not well understood. In this study, the genome-wide early responses in maize seedlings to Asian corn borer (ACB, Ostrinia furnacalis) and also to jasmonic acid(JA), the pivotal phytohormone controlling plant defense response against herbivory, were transcriptionally profiled by RNA-Seq. Clustering of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) along with functional enrichment analysis revealed important biological processes regulated in response to ACB infestation and/or jasmonic acid. Moreover, DEGs with distinct expression patterns were differentially enriched with diverse families of cis-elements on their promoters. Multiple inventories of differentially expressed transcription factors (DETFs) in each DEG group were also analyzed. A transient expression assay using transfected maize protoplastswas established to examine the potential roles of DETFs in maize defense response and JA signaling, and this was used to show that ZmNAC60, an ACB- and JA-inducible DETF, represented a novel positive regulator of JA and defense pathway genes. This study provided a comprehensive transcriptional picture for the early dynamics of maize defense responses and JA signaling, and the identification of DETFs offered potential targets for further functional genomics investigation of master regulators in maize defense responses against herbivory. PMID:28520800

  11. Transcriptome profiling revealed novel transcriptional regulators in maize responses to Ostrinia furnacalis and jasmonic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai; Li, Shengyan; Teng, Shouzhen; Liang, Haisheng; Xin, Hongjia; Gao, Hongjiang; Huang, Dafang; Lang, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    Chewing insects cause severe yield losses in crop production worldwide. Crop plants counteract chewing insects by transcriptionally promoting a repertoire of defense gene products that are either toxic to, or attractive to the natural enemies of, pest insects. However, the complexity of the transcriptional reprogramming in plant defense response against chewing insects is still not well understood. In this study, the genome-wide early responses in maize seedlings to Asian corn borer (ACB, Ostrinia furnacalis) and also to jasmonic acid(JA), the pivotal phytohormone controlling plant defense response against herbivory, were transcriptionally profiled by RNA-Seq. Clustering of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) along with functional enrichment analysis revealed important biological processes regulated in response to ACB infestation and/or jasmonic acid. Moreover, DEGs with distinct expression patterns were differentially enriched with diverse families of cis-elements on their promoters. Multiple inventories of differentially expressed transcription factors (DETFs) in each DEG group were also analyzed. A transient expression assay using transfected maize protoplastswas established to examine the potential roles of DETFs in maize defense response and JA signaling, and this was used to show that ZmNAC60, an ACB- and JA-inducible DETF, represented a novel positive regulator of JA and defense pathway genes. This study provided a comprehensive transcriptional picture for the early dynamics of maize defense responses and JA signaling, and the identification of DETFs offered potential targets for further functional genomics investigation of master regulators in maize defense responses against herbivory.

  12. Transcriptional regulatory networks in cellular responses and tolerance to dehydration and cold stresses.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    Plant growth and productivity are greatly affected by environmental stresses such as drought, high salinity, and low temperature. Expression of a variety of genes is induced by these stresses in various plants. The products of these genes function not only in stress tolerance but also in stress response. In the signal transduction network from perception of stress signals to stress-responsive gene expression, various transcription factors and cis-acting elements in the stress-responsive promoters function for plant adaptation to environmental stresses. Recent progress has been made in analyzing the complex cascades of gene expression in drought and cold stress responses, especially in identifying specificity and cross talk in stress signaling. In this review article, we highlight transcriptional regulation of gene expression in response to drought and cold stresses, with particular emphasis on the role of transcription factors and cis-acting elements in stress-inducible promoters.

  13. The transcription factor, the Cdk, its cyclin and their regulator: directing the transcriptional response to a nutritional signal.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, K; Fisher, F; McAndrew, P C; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex prevents transcription of PHO5 by inhibiting the ability of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor Pho4 to activate transcription in response to high phosphate conditions. In low phosphate the Pho80-Pho85 complex is inactivated and Pho4 is then able to activate the acid phosphatase gene PHO5. We show here that Pho4 and the homeobox protein Pho2 interact in vivo and act cooperatively to activate the PHO5 UAS, with interaction being regulated by the phosphate switch. In addition, we also demonstrate that an additional factor, Pho81, interacts in high phosphate with both the Pho80 cyclin and with Pho4. In low phosphate, Pho80 and Pho81 dissociate from Pho4, but retain the ability to interact with each other. The evidence presented here supports the idea that Pho81 acts as a phosphate-sensitive trigger that regulates the ability of the Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex to bind Pho4, while DNA binding by Pho4 is dependent on the phosphate-sensitive interaction with Pho2. Images PMID:7957107

  14. Role of TATA-element in transcription from glucocorticoid receptor-responsive model promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, S; Schatt, M D; Rusconi, S

    1990-01-01

    Transcription activation properties of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) on minimal, TATA-box containing or depleted promoters have been tested. We show that a cluster of Glucocorticoid Responsive Elements (GRE), upon activation by the GR, is sufficient to mediate abundant RNA-polymerase II transcription. We find that in absence of a bona fide TATA-element transcription initiates at a distance of 45-55bp from the activated GRE cluster with a marked preference for sequences homologous to the initiator element (Inr). Analyzing defined, bi-directional transcription units we demonstrate that the apparent reduction of specific transcription in strong, TATA-depleted promoters, is mainly due to loss of short-range promoter polarization. The implications for long-range promoter/enhancer communication mechanisms are also discussed. Images PMID:2402438

  15. Priming of transcriptional memory responses via the chromatin accessibility landscape in T cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wen Juan; Hardy, Kristine; Sutton, Christopher R; McCuaig, Robert; Li, Jasmine; Dunn, Jenny; Tan, Abel; Brezar, Vedran; Morris, Melanie; Denyer, Gareth; Lee, Sau Kuen; Turner, Stephen J; Seddiki, Nabila; Smith, Corey; Khanna, Rajiv; Rao, Sudha

    2017-03-20

    Memory T cells exhibit transcriptional memory and "remember" their previous pathogenic encounter to increase transcription on re-infection. However, how this transcriptional priming response is regulated is unknown. Here we performed global FAIRE-seq profiling of chromatin accessibility in a human T cell transcriptional memory model. Primary activation induced persistent accessibility changes, and secondary activation induced secondary-specific opening of previously less accessible regions associated with enhanced expression of memory-responsive genes. Increased accessibility occurred largely in distal regulatory regions and was associated with increased histone acetylation and relative H3.3 deposition. The enhanced re-stimulation response was linked to the strength of initial PKC-induced signalling, and PKC-sensitive increases in accessibility upon initial stimulation showed higher accessibility on re-stimulation. While accessibility maintenance was associated with ETS-1, accessibility at re-stimulation-specific regions was linked to NFAT, especially in combination with ETS-1, EGR, GATA, NFκB, and NR4A. Furthermore, NFATC1 was directly regulated by ETS-1 at an enhancer region. In contrast to the factors that increased accessibility, signalling from bHLH and ZEB family members enhanced decreased accessibility upon re-stimulation. Interplay between distal regulatory elements, accessibility, and the combined action of sequence-specific transcription factors allows transcriptional memory-responsive genes to "remember" their initial environmental encounter.

  16. Copper-inducible transcription: regulation by metal- and oxidative stress-responsive pathways.

    PubMed

    Mattie, Michael D; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2004-02-01

    Although copper is an essential metal, it is capable of catalyzing the formation of reactive oxygen species that can cause intracellular oxidative damage. We investigated the hypothesis that metal- and oxidative stress-responsive signal transduction pathways mediate the cellular and molecular responses associated with copper exposure. Transient transfection assays using COS-7 cells and mouse metallothionein-I (MT-I) or rat NAD(P)H:oxidoreductase 1-based reporter genes demonstrate that copper activates transcription via metal and antioxidant response elements. Concomitant with copper exposures is a decrease in the level of total glutathione and an increase in oxidized glutathione. Depletion of glutathione, before copper exposure, increases metal- and oxidative stress-inducible transcription and cytotoxicity. Pretreatment with the reactive oxygen scavengers aspirin or vitamin E provides partial protection against copper toxicity and reduces inducible transcription. Experiments using signal transduction inhibitors and a metal transcription factor (MTF)-1 null cell line demonstrate that copper-inducible MT-I transcription is regulated by protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and requires MTF-1. The results of these studies indicate that copper activates transcription through both metal- and oxidative stress-responsive signal transduction pathways.

  17. Priming of transcriptional memory responses via the chromatin accessibility landscape in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wen Juan; Hardy, Kristine; Sutton, Christopher R.; McCuaig, Robert; Li, Jasmine; Dunn, Jenny; Tan, Abel; Brezar, Vedran; Morris, Melanie; Denyer, Gareth; Lee, Sau Kuen; Turner, Stephen J.; Seddiki, Nabila; Smith, Corey; Khanna, Rajiv; Rao, Sudha

    2017-01-01

    Memory T cells exhibit transcriptional memory and “remember” their previous pathogenic encounter to increase transcription on re-infection. However, how this transcriptional priming response is regulated is unknown. Here we performed global FAIRE-seq profiling of chromatin accessibility in a human T cell transcriptional memory model. Primary activation induced persistent accessibility changes, and secondary activation induced secondary-specific opening of previously less accessible regions associated with enhanced expression of memory-responsive genes. Increased accessibility occurred largely in distal regulatory regions and was associated with increased histone acetylation and relative H3.3 deposition. The enhanced re-stimulation response was linked to the strength of initial PKC-induced signalling, and PKC-sensitive increases in accessibility upon initial stimulation showed higher accessibility on re-stimulation. While accessibility maintenance was associated with ETS-1, accessibility at re-stimulation-specific regions was linked to NFAT, especially in combination with ETS-1, EGR, GATA, NFκB, and NR4A. Furthermore, NFATC1 was directly regulated by ETS-1 at an enhancer region. In contrast to the factors that increased accessibility, signalling from bHLH and ZEB family members enhanced decreased accessibility upon re-stimulation. Interplay between distal regulatory elements, accessibility, and the combined action of sequence-specific transcription factors allows transcriptional memory-responsive genes to “remember” their initial environmental encounter. PMID:28317936

  18. The Candida albicans transcription factor Cas5 couples stress responses, drug resistance and cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jinglin L; Qin, Longguang; Miao, Zhengqiang; Grys, Ben T; Diaz, Jacinto De La Cruz; Ting, Kenneth; Krieger, Jonathan R; Tong, Jiefei; Tan, Kaeling; Leach, Michelle D; Ketela, Troy; Moran, Michael F; Krysan, Damian J; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J; Selmecki, Anna; Ho Wong, Koon; Robbins, Nicole; Cowen, Leah E

    2017-09-11

    The capacity to coordinate environmental sensing with initiation of cellular responses underpins microbial survival and is crucial for virulence and stress responses in microbial pathogens. Here we define circuitry that enables the fungal pathogen Candida albicans to couple cell cycle dynamics with responses to cell wall stress induced by echinocandins, a front-line class of antifungal drugs. We discover that the C. albicans transcription factor Cas5 is crucial for proper cell cycle dynamics and responses to echinocandins, which inhibit β-1,3-glucan synthesis. Cas5 has distinct transcriptional targets under basal and stress conditions, is activated by the phosphatase Glc7, and can regulate the expression of target genes in concert with the transcriptional regulators Swi4 and Swi6. Thus, we illuminate a mechanism of transcriptional control that couples cell wall integrity with cell cycle regulation, and uncover circuitry governing antifungal drug resistance.Cas5 is a transcriptional regulator of responses to cell wall stress in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Here, Xie et al. show that Cas5 also modulates cell cycle dynamics and responses to antifungal drugs.

  19. Unique features of the transcriptional response to model aneuploidy in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneuploidy, a karyotype deviating from multiples of a haploid chromosome set, affects the physiology of eukaryotes. In humans, aneuploidy is linked to pathological defects such as developmental abnormalities, mental retardation or cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. There are many different types and origins of aneuploidy, but whether there is a uniform cellular response to aneuploidy in human cells has not been addressed so far. Results Here we evaluate the transcription profiles of eleven trisomic and tetrasomic cell lines and two cell lines with complex aneuploid karyotypes. We identify a characteristic aneuploidy response pattern defined by upregulation of genes linked to endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and lysosomes, and downregulation of DNA replication, transcription as well as ribosomes. Strikingly, complex aneuploidy elicits the same transcriptional changes as trisomy. To uncover the triggers of the response, we compared the profiles with transcription changes in human cells subjected to stress conditions. Interestingly, we found an overlap only with the response to treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Finally, we identified 23 genes whose expression is significantly altered in all aneuploids and which may thus serve as aneuploidy markers. Conclusions Our analysis shows that despite the variability in chromosome content, aneuploidy triggers uniform transcriptional response in human cells. A common response independent of the type of aneuploidy might be exploited as a novel target for cancer therapy. Moreover, the potential aneuploidy markers identified in our analysis might represent novel biomarkers to assess the malignant potential of a tumor. PMID:24548329

  20. Senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew S; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana M; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A T; Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J; Lavin, Martin F; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) has been linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here we identified a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells that had undergone depletion of SETX and SETX-deficient cells derived from patients with AOA2 had higher expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection than did wild-type cells. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at genes stimulated after a virus is sensed and thus controls the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of various RNA viruses (e.g., influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link among inborn errors in SETX, susceptibility to infection and the development of neurologic disorders.

  1. Synergistic enhansons located within an acute phase responsive enhancer modulate glucocorticoid induction of angiotensinogen gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Brasier, A R; Ron, D; Tate, J E; Habener, J F

    1990-12-01

    The hepatic transcription of the angiotensinogen gene is regulated by both glucocorticoids and cytokines generated as products of the acute phase reaction. We have identified a multimodular enhancer in the 5'-flanking region of the rat angiotensinogen gene that mediates these responses and consists of an acute phase response element (APRE) flanked on both sides by adjacent glucocorticoid response element consensus motifs (GREs). Induction of transcription by the cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) is glucocorticoid dependent and mediated through the APRE. The APRE binds in a mutually exclusive manner a cytokine/phorbol ester-inducible protein (BPi), indistinguishable from nuclear factor kB, and a family of constitutive liver proteins (BPcs) related to the heat-stable transcription factor C/EBP. Using mutated 5'-flanking sequences of the angiotensinogen gene fused to a firefly luciferase reporter gene transfected into hepatoblastoma (HepG2) cells, we have mapped enhanson sequences required for the transcriptional response to glucocorticoids. Two functionally distinct GREs are identified by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis, both of which mediate glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription in vivo. Glucocorticoid-induced transcription mediated by the angiotensinogen gene enhancer is, furthermore, dependent on the occupancy of the APRE by either the BPi or a member of the BPc family because a mutant APRE that binds neither BPi nor BPc exhibits an attenuated glucocorticoid responsiveness. Mutant APREs that permit exclusive binding of either BPi or BPc synergistically transmit the glucocorticoid response mediated by one or the other of the adjacent GREs. Thus, the induction of angiotensinogen gene transcription involves interaction between the glucocorticoid receptor and either one of the APRE-binding proteins: either the cytokine-inducible NFkB or the constitutive family of C/EBP-like proteins, bound to adjacent enhansons in a mutually synergistic enhancer complex.

  2. Transcriptional Response of Respiratory Epithelium to Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Masashi; Martins, Andrew J; Shallom, Shamira; Kamenyeva, Olena; Kashyap, Anuj; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Kabat, Juraj; Olivier, Kenneth N; Zelazny, Adrian M; Tsang, John S; Holland, Steven M

    2017-09-15

    The incidence of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease is increasing, but host responses in respiratory epithelium infected with NTM are not fully understood. We aimed to identify infection-relevant gene expression signatures of NTM infection of the respiratory epithelium. We infected air-liquid interface (ALI) primary respiratory epithelial cell cultures with Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAC) or Mycobacterium abscessuss subsp. abscessuss (MAB). We used cells from 4 different donors to obtain generalizable data. The differentiated respiratory epithelial cells at ALI were infected with MAC or MAB at MOI of 100:1 or 1000:1, and RNA-seq was performed at days 1 and 3 after infection. In response to infection we found downregulation of ciliary genes but upregulation of genes associated with cytokine/chemokine, such as IL-32, and cholesterol biosynthesis. Inflammatory response genes tended to be more upregulated by MAB than MAC infection. Primary respiratory epithelial cell infection with NTM at ALI identified ciliary function, cholesterol biosynthesis, and cytokine/chemokine production as major host responses to infection. Some of these pathways may be amenable to therapeutic manipulation.

  3. Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the plasma membrane-perturbing compound chitosan.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Anna; Boorsma, Andre; Brul, Stanley; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Klis, Frans M

    2005-04-01

    Chitosan is a plasma membrane-perturbing compound consisting of linear chains of beta-1,4-linked glucosamine residues, which at acidic pHs become positively charged. It is extensively used as an antimicrobial compound, yet its mode of action is still unresolved. Chitosan strongly affected the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and two human-pathogenic yeasts, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Microarray analysis of yeast cells treated with sublethal concentrations of chitosan revealed induction of the environmental stress response and three more major transcriptional responses. The first was a rapid and stable Cin5p-mediated response. Cin5p/Yap4p is a transcription factor involved in various stress responses. Deletion of CIN5 led to increased chitosan sensitivity. The second was a Crz1p-mediated response, which is delayed compared to the Cin5p response. Crz1p is a transcription factor of the calcineurin pathway. Cells deleted for CRZ1 or treated with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 became hypersensitive to chitosan, supporting the notion that the Crz1p-controlled response offers protection against chitosan. The third was a strong Rlm1p-mediated response which ran parallel in time with the Crz1p-regulated response. Rlm1p is a transcription factor of the cell wall integrity pathway, which is activated by cell wall stress. Importantly, chitosan-treated cells became more resistant to beta-1,3-glucanase, which is a well-known response to cell wall stress. We propose that the transcriptional response to chitosan may be representative of other plasma membrane-perturbing compounds.

  4. Transcriptional Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the Plasma Membrane-Perturbing Compound Chitosan

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewska, Anna; Boorsma, Andre; Brul, Stanley; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; Klis, Frans M.

    2005-01-01

    Chitosan is a plasma membrane-perturbing compound consisting of linear chains of β-1,4-linked glucosamine residues, which at acidic pHs become positively charged. It is extensively used as an antimicrobial compound, yet its mode of action is still unresolved. Chitosan strongly affected the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and two human-pathogenic yeasts, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Microarray analysis of yeast cells treated with sublethal concentrations of chitosan revealed induction of the environmental stress response and three more major transcriptional responses. The first was a rapid and stable Cin5p-mediated response. Cin5p/Yap4p is a transcription factor involved in various stress responses. Deletion of CIN5 led to increased chitosan sensitivity. The second was a Crz1p-mediated response, which is delayed compared to the Cin5p response. Crz1p is a transcription factor of the calcineurin pathway. Cells deleted for CRZ1 or treated with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 became hypersensitive to chitosan, supporting the notion that the Crz1p-controlled response offers protection against chitosan. The third was a strong Rlm1p-mediated response which ran parallel in time with the Crz1p-regulated response. Rlm1p is a transcription factor of the cell wall integrity pathway, which is activated by cell wall stress. Importantly, chitosan-treated cells became more resistant to β-1,3-glucanase, which is a well-known response to cell wall stress. We propose that the transcriptional response to chitosan may be representative of other plasma membrane-perturbing compounds. PMID:15821130

  5. Genome-wide transcriptional responses to a lipid hydroperoxide: adaptation occurs without induction of oxidant defenses.

    PubMed

    Alic, Nazif; Felder, Thomas; Temple, Mark D; Gloeckner, Christian; Higgins, Vincent J; Briza, Peter; Dawes, Ian W

    2004-07-01

    Free radicals can initiate the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in cells through the process of lipid peroxidation. The genome-wide transcriptional changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after treatment with the toxic lipid peroxidation product linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LoaOOH) were identified. High-dose treatment led to a switch in transcription from biosynthetic to protective functions. This response encompassed a set of genes stimulated predominantly by LoaOOH, and not by other oxidants or heat shock, which contained components of the pleiotropic drug resistance system. The dose dependence of the transcriptional response revealed that large and widespread changes occur only in response to higher doses. Pretreatment of cells with sublethal doses of LoaOOH induces resistance to an otherwise lethal dose through the process of adaptation. Adaptive doses elicited a more subtle transcriptional response affecting metabolic functions, including an increase in the capacity for detoxification and downregulation of the rate of protein synthesis. Surprisingly, the cellular response to adaptive doses did not include induction of oxidative-stress defense enzymes nor of transcripts involved in general cellular defense systems.

  6. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-05-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes.

  7. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-01-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes. PMID:26387537

  8. Transcription Factor ADS-4 Regulates Adaptive Responses and Resistance to Antifungal Azole Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kangji; Zhang, Zhenying; Chen, Xi; Sun, Xianyun

    2015-01-01

    Azoles are commonly used as antifungal drugs or pesticides to control fungal infections in medicine and agriculture. Fungi adapt to azole stress by rapidly activating the transcription of a number of genes, and transcriptional increases in some azole-responsive genes can elevate azole resistance. The regulatory mechanisms that control transcriptional responses to azole stress in filamentous fungi are not well understood. This study identified a bZIP transcription factor, ADS-4 (antifungal drug sensitive-4), as a new regulator of adaptive responses and resistance to antifungal azoles. Transcription of ads-4 in Neurospora crassa cells increased when they were subjected to ketoconazole treatment, whereas the deletion of ads-4 resulted in hypersensitivity to ketoconazole and fluconazole. In contrast, the overexpression of ads-4 increased resistance to fluconazole and ketoconazole in N. crassa. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis, followed by quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR confirmation, showed that ADS-4 positively regulated the transcriptional responses of at least six genes to ketoconazole stress in N. crassa. The gene products of four ADS-4-regulated genes are known contributors to azole resistance, including the major efflux pump CDR4 (Pdr5p ortholog), an ABC multidrug transporter (NcAbcB), sterol C-22 desaturase (ERG5), and a lipid transporter (NcRTA2) that is involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance. Deletion of the ads-4-homologous gene Afads-4 in Aspergillus fumigatus caused hypersensitivity to itraconazole and ketoconazole, which suggested that ADS-4 is a functionally conserved regulator of adaptive responses to azoles. This study provides important information on a new azole resistance factor that could be targeted by a new range of antifungal pesticides and drugs. PMID:26100701

  9. Transcription factor ADS-4 regulates adaptive responses and resistance to antifungal azole stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangji; Zhang, Zhenying; Chen, Xi; Sun, Xianyun; Jin, Cheng; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Shaojie

    2015-09-01

    Azoles are commonly used as antifungal drugs or pesticides to control fungal infections in medicine and agriculture. Fungi adapt to azole stress by rapidly activating the transcription of a number of genes, and transcriptional increases in some azole-responsive genes can elevate azole resistance. The regulatory mechanisms that control transcriptional responses to azole stress in filamentous fungi are not well understood. This study identified a bZIP transcription factor, ADS-4 (antifungal drug sensitive-4), as a new regulator of adaptive responses and resistance to antifungal azoles. Transcription of ads-4 in Neurospora crassa cells increased when they were subjected to ketoconazole treatment, whereas the deletion of ads-4 resulted in hypersensitivity to ketoconazole and fluconazole. In contrast, the overexpression of ads-4 increased resistance to fluconazole and ketoconazole in N. crassa. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis, followed by quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR confirmation, showed that ADS-4 positively regulated the transcriptional responses of at least six genes to ketoconazole stress in N. crassa. The gene products of four ADS-4-regulated genes are known contributors to azole resistance, including the major efflux pump CDR4 (Pdr5p ortholog), an ABC multidrug transporter (NcAbcB), sterol C-22 desaturase (ERG5), and a lipid transporter (NcRTA2) that is involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance. Deletion of the ads-4-homologous gene Afads-4 in Aspergillus fumigatus caused hypersensitivity to itraconazole and ketoconazole, which suggested that ADS-4 is a functionally conserved regulator of adaptive responses to azoles. This study provides important information on a new azole resistance factor that could be targeted by a new range of antifungal pesticides and drugs. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Bidirectional coupling of splicing and ATM signaling in response to transcription-blocking DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Tresini, Maria; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In response to DNA damage cells activate intricate protein networks to ensure genomic fidelity and tissue homeostasis. DNA damage response signaling pathways coordinate these networks and determine cellular fates, in part, by modulating RNA metabolism. Here we discuss a replication-independent pathway activated by transcription-blocking DNA lesions, which utilizes the ATM signaling kinase to regulate spliceosome function in a reciprocal manner. We present a model according to which, displacement of co-transcriptional spliceosomes from lesion-arrested RNA polymerases, culminates in R-loop formation and non-canonical ATM activation. ATM signals in a feed-forward fashion to further impede spliceosome organization and regulates UV-induced gene expression and alternative splicing genome-wide. This reciprocal coupling between ATM and the spliceosome highlights the importance of ATM signaling in the cellular response to transcription-blocking lesions and supports a key role of the splicing machinery in this process. PMID:26913497

  11. Foxa2 integrates the transcriptional response of the hepatocyte to fasting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Rubins, Nir E; Ahima, Rexford S; Greenbaum, Linda E; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2005-08-01

    Survival during prolonged food deprivation depends on the activation of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Inappropriate regulation of this process is a hallmark of diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Activation of the genes encoding gluconeogenic enzymes is mediated by hormone-responsive transcription factors such as the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Here we show using cell-type-specific gene ablation that the winged helix transcription factor Foxa2 is required for activation of the hepatic gluconeogenic program during fasting. Specifically, Foxa2 promotes gene activation both by cyclic AMP, the second messenger for glucagon, and glucocorticoids. Foxa2 mediates these effects by enabling recruitment of CREB and GR to their respective target sites in chromatin. We conclude that Foxa2 is required for execution of the hepatic gluconeogenic program by integrating the transcriptional response of the hepatocyte to hormonal stimulation.

  12. A Genomic Response to the Yeast Transcription Factor GAL4 in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanling; Lehmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The yeast transcription factor GAL4 is widely used in Drosophila genetics to misexpress genes that are under control of the yeast upstream activator sequence (UAS). Here we show that high levels of GAL4 change the expression of many Drosophila genes in a UAS-independent manner, including genes that encode components of important signaling pathways. We find that at least part of the genomic response to GAL4 appears to be caused by effects of GAL4 on stress and immune response pathways. Finally, using the transcription factor Senseless as an example, we demonstrate how an interaction between GAL4 and a GAL4-driven protein can impede the use of the GAL4/UAS system in experiments aimed at determining the transcriptional response to a misexpressed gene. PMID:18820459

  13. GATA transcription factors as tissue-specific master regulators for induced responses

    PubMed Central

    Block, Dena Hs; Shapira, Michael

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors play important roles in directing developmental genetic programs and cell differentiation, and are conserved in animals, plants and fungi. C. elegans has 11 GATA-type transcription factors that orchestrate development of the gut, epidermis and vulva. However, the expression of certain GATA proteins persists into adulthood, where their function is less understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates contributions of 2 terminal differentiation GATA transcription factors, ELT-2 and ELT-3, to epithelial immune responses in the adult intestine and epidermis (hypodermis), respectively. Involvement in other stress responses has also been documented. We recently showed that ELT-2 acted as a tissue-specific master regulator, cooperating with 2 transcription factors activated by the p38 pathway, ATF-7 and SKN-1, to control immune responses in the adult C. elegans intestine. Here, we discuss the broader implications of these findings for understanding the involvement of GATA transcription factors in adult stress responses, and draw parallels between ELT-2 and ELT-3 to speculate that the latter may fulfill similar tissue-specific functions in the epidermis. PMID:27123374

  14. GATA transcription factors as tissue-specific master regulators for induced responses.

    PubMed

    Block, Dena Hs; Shapira, Michael

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors play important roles in directing developmental genetic programs and cell differentiation, and are conserved in animals, plants and fungi. C. elegans has 11 GATA-type transcription factors that orchestrate development of the gut, epidermis and vulva. However, the expression of certain GATA proteins persists into adulthood, where their function is less understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates contributions of 2 terminal differentiation GATA transcription factors, ELT-2 and ELT-3, to epithelial immune responses in the adult intestine and epidermis (hypodermis), respectively. Involvement in other stress responses has also been documented. We recently showed that ELT-2 acted as a tissue-specific master regulator, cooperating with 2 transcription factors activated by the p38 pathway, ATF-7 and SKN-1, to control immune responses in the adult C. elegans intestine. Here, we discuss the broader implications of these findings for understanding the involvement of GATA transcription factors in adult stress responses, and draw parallels between ELT-2 and ELT-3 to speculate that the latter may fulfill similar tissue-specific functions in the epidermis.

  15. HSF transcription factor family, heat shock response, and protein intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Westerheide, Sandy D; Raynes, Rachel; Powell, Chase; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are highly abundant in all kingdoms of life, and several protein functional classes, such as transcription factors, transcriptional regulators, hub and scaffold proteins, signaling proteins, and chaperones are especially enriched in intrinsic disorder. One of the unique cellular reactions to protein damaging stress is the so-called heat shock response that results in the upregulation of heat shock proteins including molecular chaperones. This molecular protective mechanism is conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and allows an organism to respond to various proteotoxic stressors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, exposure to heavy metals, and drugs. The heat shock response- related proteins can be expressed during normal conditions (e.g., during the cell growth and development) or can be induced by various pathological conditions, such as infection, inflammation, and protein conformation diseases. The initiation of the heat shock response is manifested by the activation of the heat shock transcription factors HSF 1, part of a family of related HSF transcription factors. This review analyzes the abundance and functional roles of intrinsic disorder in various heat shock transcription factors and clearly shows that the heat shock response requires HSF flexibility to be more efficient. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers

  16. Transcriptional 'memory' of a stress: transient chromatin and memory (epigenetic) marks at stress-response genes.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Zoya

    2015-07-01

    Drought, salinity, extreme temperature variations, pathogen and herbivory attacks are recurring environmental stresses experienced by plants throughout their life. To survive repeated stresses, plants provide responses that may be different from their response during the first encounter with the stress. A different response to a similar stress represents the concept of 'stress memory'. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular and gene/genome levels is thought to increase survival chances by improving the plant's tolerance/avoidance abilities. Ultimately, stress memory may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. At the molecular level, the concept of stress memory indicates that the mechanisms responsible for memory-type transcription during repeated stresses are not based on repetitive activation of the same response pathways activated by the first stress. Some recent advances in the search for transcription 'memory factors' are discussed with an emphasis on super-induced dehydration stress memory response genes in Arabidopsis.

  17. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to chewing and sucking insect herbivores

    DOE PAGES

    Appel, Heidi M.; Fescemyer, Howard; Ehlting, Juergen; ...

    2014-11-14

    We tested the hypothesis that Arabidopsis can recognize and respond differentially to insect species at the transcriptional level using a genome wide microarray. Transcriptional reprogramming was characterized using co-expression analysis in damaged and undamaged leaves at two times in response to mechanical wounding and four insect species. In all, 2778 (10.6%) of annotated genes on the array were differentially expressed in at least one treatment. Responses differed mainly between aphid and caterpillar and sampling times. Responses to aphids and caterpillars shared only 10% of up-regulated and 8% of down-regulated genes. Responses to two caterpillars shared 21 and 12% of up-more » and down-regulated genes, whereas responses to the two aphids shared only 7 and 4% of up-regulated and down-regulated genes. Overlap in genes expressed between 6 and 24 h was 3–15%, and depended on the insect species. Responses in attacked and unattacked leaves differed at 6 h but converged by 24 h. Genes responding to the insects are also responsive to many stressors and included primary metabolism. Aphids down-regulated amino acid catabolism; caterpillars stimulated production of amino acids involved in glucosinolate synthesis. Co-expression analysis revealed 17 response networks. Transcription factors were a major portion of differentially expressed genes throughout and responsive genes shared most of the known or postulated binding sites. However, cis-element composition of genes down regulated by the aphid M. persicae was unique, as were those of genes down-regulated by caterpillars. As many as 20 cis-elements were over-represented in one or more treatments, including some from well-characterized classes and others as yet uncharacterized. We suggest that transcriptional changes elicited by wounding and insects are heavily influenced by transcription factors and involve both enrichment of a common set of cis-elements and a unique enrichment of a few cis-elements in responding

  18. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to chewing and sucking insect herbivores

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Heidi M.; Fescemyer, Howard; Ehlting, Juergen; Weston, David; Rehrig, Erin; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bohlmann, Joerg; Schultz, Jack

    2014-11-14

    We tested the hypothesis that Arabidopsis can recognize and respond differentially to insect species at the transcriptional level using a genome wide microarray. Transcriptional reprogramming was characterized using co-expression analysis in damaged and undamaged leaves at two times in response to mechanical wounding and four insect species. In all, 2778 (10.6%) of annotated genes on the array were differentially expressed in at least one treatment. Responses differed mainly between aphid and caterpillar and sampling times. Responses to aphids and caterpillars shared only 10% of up-regulated and 8% of down-regulated genes. Responses to two caterpillars shared 21 and 12% of up- and down-regulated genes, whereas responses to the two aphids shared only 7 and 4% of up-regulated and down-regulated genes. Overlap in genes expressed between 6 and 24 h was 3–15%, and depended on the insect species. Responses in attacked and unattacked leaves differed at 6 h but converged by 24 h. Genes responding to the insects are also responsive to many stressors and included primary metabolism. Aphids down-regulated amino acid catabolism; caterpillars stimulated production of amino acids involved in glucosinolate synthesis. Co-expression analysis revealed 17 response networks. Transcription factors were a major portion of differentially expressed genes throughout and responsive genes shared most of the known or postulated binding sites. However, cis-element composition of genes down regulated by the aphid M. persicae was unique, as were those of genes down-regulated by caterpillars. As many as 20 cis-elements were over-represented in one or more treatments, including some from well-characterized classes and others as yet uncharacterized. We suggest that transcriptional changes elicited by wounding and insects are heavily influenced by transcription factors and involve both enrichment of a common set of cis-elements and a unique enrichment of a few cis-elements in responding genes.

  19. Divergent Transcriptional Responses to Physiological and Xenobiotic Stress in Giardia duodenalis

    PubMed Central

    McConville, Malcolm J.; Baker, Louise; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Emery, Samantha J.; Svärd, Staffan G.; Gasser, Robin B.; Jex, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how parasites respond to stress can help to identify essential biological processes. Giardia duodenalis is a parasitic protist that infects the human gastrointestinal tract and causes 200 to 300 million cases of diarrhea annually. Metronidazole, a major antigiardial drug, is thought to cause oxidative damage within the infective trophozoite form. However, treatment efficacy is suboptimal, due partly to metronidazole-resistant infections. To elucidate conserved and stress-specific responses, we calibrated sublethal metronidazole, hydrogen peroxide, and thermal stresses to exert approximately equal pressure on trophozoite growth and compared transcriptional responses after 24 h of exposure. We identified 252 genes that were differentially transcribed in response to all three stressors, including glycolytic and DNA repair enzymes, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, high-cysteine membrane proteins, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) synthetase, and histone modification enzymes. Transcriptional responses appeared to diverge according to physiological or xenobiotic stress. Downregulation of the antioxidant system and α-giardins was observed only under metronidazole-induced stress, whereas upregulation of GARP-like transcription factors and their subordinate genes was observed in response to hydrogen peroxide and thermal stressors. Limited evidence was found in support of stress-specific response elements upstream of differentially transcribed genes; however, antisense derepression and differential regulation of RNA interference machinery suggest multiple epigenetic mechanisms of transcriptional control. PMID:27458219

  20. Evidence that a transcription factor regulatory network coordinates oxidative stress response and secondary metabolism in aspergilli

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Yong; Roze, Ludmila V; Wee, Josephine; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    The mycotoxin aflatoxin is a secondary metabolite and potent human carcinogen. We investigated one mechanism that links stress response with coordinate activation of genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus parasiticus. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that AtfB, a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, is a master co-regulator that binds promoters of early (fas-1), middle (ver-1), and late (omtA) aflatoxin biosynthetic genes as well as stress-response genes (mycelia-specific cat1 and mitochondria-specific Mn sod) at cAMP response element motifs. A novel conserved motif 5′-T/GNT/CAAG CCNNG/AA/GC/ANT/C-3′ was identified in promoters of the aflatoxin biosynthetic and stress-response genes. A search for transcription factors identified SrrA as a transcription factor that could bind to the motif. Moreover, we also identified a STRE motif (5′-CCCCT-3′) in promoters of aflatoxin biosynthetic and stress-response genes, and competition EMSA suggested that MsnA binds to this motif. Our study for the first time provides strong evidence to suggest that at least four transcription factors (AtfB, SrrA, AP-1, and MsnA) participate in a regulatory network that induces aflatoxin biosynthesis as part of the cellular response to oxidative stress in A. parasiticus. PMID:23281343

  1. Roles of NAC transcription factors in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Sharoni, Akhter M; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2013-09-03

    NAC transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants, and members of the NAC gene family have been suggested to play important roles in the regulation of the transcriptional reprogramming associated with plant stress responses. A phylogenetic analysis of NAC genes, with a focus on rice and Arabidopsis, was performed. Herein, we present an overview of the regulation of the stress responsive NAC SNAC/(IX) group of genes that are implicated in the resistance to different stresses. SNAC factors have important roles for the control of biotic and abiotic stresses tolerance and that their overexpression can improve stress tolerance via biotechnological approaches. We also review the recent progress in elucidating the roles of NAC transcription factors in plant biotic and abiotic stresses. Modification of the expression pattern of transcription factor genes and/or changes in their activity contribute to the elaboration of various signaling pathways and regulatory networks. However, a single NAC gene often responds to several stress factors, and their protein products may participate in the regulation of several seemingly disparate processes as negative or positive regulators. Additionally, the NAC proteins function via auto-regulation or cross-regulation is extensively found among NAC genes. These observations assist in the understanding of the complex mechanisms of signaling and transcriptional reprogramming controlled by NAC proteins.

  2. Roles of NAC transcription factors in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Sharoni, Akhter M.; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2013-01-01

    NAC transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants, and members of the NAC gene family have been suggested to play important roles in the regulation of the transcriptional reprogramming associated with plant stress responses. A phylogenetic analysis of NAC genes, with a focus on rice and Arabidopsis, was performed. Herein, we present an overview of the regulation of the stress responsive NAC SNAC/(IX) group of genes that are implicated in the resistance to different stresses. SNAC factors have important roles for the control of biotic and abiotic stresses tolerance and that their overexpression can improve stress tolerance via biotechnological approaches. We also review the recent progress in elucidating the roles of NAC transcription factors in plant biotic and abiotic stresses. Modification of the expression pattern of transcription factor genes and/or changes in their activity contribute to the elaboration of various signaling pathways and regulatory networks. However, a single NAC gene often responds to several stress factors, and their protein products may participate in the regulation of several seemingly disparate processes as negative or positive regulators. Additionally, the NAC proteins function via auto-regulation or cross-regulation is extensively found among NAC genes. These observations assist in the understanding of the complex mechanisms of signaling and transcriptional reprogramming controlled by NAC proteins. PMID:24058359

  3. Juvenile hormone regulation of an insect gene: a specific transcription factor and a DNA response element.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Saleh, D S; Wyatt, G R

    1996-08-30

    We have used locust fat body nuclear protein extracts and upstream DNA of the juvenile hormone (JH)-inducible locust gene, jhp21, to examine the regulation of specific transcription by JH. Promoter activity was assayed with G-free cassette reporter constructs. Nuclear extracts from adult female fat body, previously exposed to JH or an analog, actively transcribe from the jhp21 promoter and a control adenovirus major late (AdML) promoter, whereas extracts from JH-deprived female fat body, or other tissues, transcribe strongly from the AdML promoter but weakly or not at all from the jhp21 promoter. Transcription is enhanced by sequences between -140 and -211 nt from the jhp21 transcription start point (tsp), which include a CAAT box, and also by sequences between -1056 and -1200. A 15-nt partially palindromic sequence element found at -1152, resembling known hormone response elements, was shown to stimulate transcription when restored to truncated jhp21 DNA. Two very similar sequences occur further upstream. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), the same sequence element was shown to specifically bind a protein that was present in nuclear extracts from JH-exposed, but not from JH-deprived, fat body. Several lines of evidence suggest that the DNA element may be a JH response element (JHRE). The JH-induced protein that binds to it appears to be a transcription factor that activates the initiation of JH target gene (jhp21) transcription, and could be a JH receptor.

  4. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G.; Zeef, Leo A. H.; Donaldson, Ian J.; Ashe, Hilary L.

    2016-01-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates. PMID:27379389

  5. PTRF/Cavin-1 promotes efficient ribosomal RNA transcription in response to metabolic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Libin; Pilch, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA transcription mediated by RNA polymerase I represents the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis. In eukaryotic cells, nutrients and growth factors regulate ribosomal RNA transcription through various key factors coupled to cell growth. We show here in mature adipocytes, ribosomal transcription can be acutely regulated in response to metabolic challenges. This acute response is mediated by PTRF (polymerase I transcription and release factor, also known as cavin-1), which has previously been shown to play a critical role in caveolae formation. The caveolae–independent rDNA transcriptional role of PTRF not only explains the lipodystrophy phenotype observed in PTRF deficient mice and humans, but also highlights its crucial physiological role in maintaining adipocyte allostasis. Multiple post-translational modifications of PTRF provide mechanistic bases for its regulation. The role of PTRF in ribosomal transcriptional efficiency is likely relevant to many additional physiological situations of cell growth and organismal metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17508.001 PMID:27528195

  6. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Lisa; Pinheiro, Marco T; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G; Zeef, Leo A H; Donaldson, Ian J; Ashe, Hilary L

    2016-07-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates.

  7. Repeatability of cortisol stress response in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and transcription differences between individuals with divergent responses

    PubMed Central

    Samaras, A.; Dimitroglou, A.; Sarropoulou, E.; Papaharisis, L.; Kottaras, L.; Pavlidis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the stress responses of organisms is of importance in the performance and welfare of farmed animals, including fish. Especially fish in aquaculture commonly face stressors, and better knowledge of their responses may assist in proper husbandry and selection of breeding stocks. European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), a species with high cortisol concentrations, is of major importance in this respect. The main objectives of the present study were to assess the repeatability and consistency of cortisol stress response and to identify differences in liver transcription profiles of European sea bass individuals, showing a consistent low (LR) or high (HR) cortisol response. The progeny of six full sib families was used, and sampled for plasma cortisol after an acute stress challenge once per month, for four consecutive months. Results suggest that cortisol responsiveness was a repeatable trait with LR and HR fish showing low or high resting, free and post-stress cortisol concentrations respectively. Finally, the liver transcription profiles of LR and HR fish showed some important differences, indicating differential hepatic regulation between these divergent phenotypes. These transcription differences were related to various metabolic and immunological processes, with 169 transcripts being transcribed exclusively in LR fish and 161 exclusively in HR fish. PMID:27703277

  8. A GC-rich element confers epidermal growth factor responsiveness to transcription from the gastrin promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, J L; Demediuk, B; Brand, S J

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha are important determinants of mucosal integrity in the gastrointestinal tract, and they act both directly and indirectly to prevent ulceration in the stomach. Consistent with this physiological role, EGF stimulates transcription of gastrin, a peptide hormone which regulates gastric acid secretion and mucosal growth. EGF stimulation of gastrin transcription is mediated by a GC-rich gastrin EGF response element (gERE) (GGGGCGGGGTGGGGGG) which lies between -54 and -68 in the human gastrin promoter. The gERE sequence also confers weaker responsiveness to phorbol ester stimulation. The gERE sequence differs from previously described EGF response elements. The gERE DNA sequence specifically interacts with a GH4 DNA-binding protein distinct from previously described transcription factors (Egr-1 and AP2) which bind GC-rich sequences and mediate transcriptional activation by growth factors. Furthermore, the gERE element does not bind the Sp1 transcription factor even though the gERE sequence contains a high-affinity Sp1-binding site (GGCGGG). Images PMID:2017173

  9. Characterization of the Pinus massoniana Transcriptional Response to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus Infection Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Kai; Lu, Quan; Liang, Jun; Zhang, Xing-Yao

    2013-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) caused by pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is the most destructive diseases of pine and poses a threat of serious economic losses worldwide. Although several of the mechanisms involved in disease progression have been discovered, the molecular response of Pinus massoniana to PWN infection has not been explored. We constructed four subtractive suppression hybridization cDNA libraries by taking time-course samples from PWN-inoculated Masson pine trees. One-hundred forty-four significantly differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified, and 124 high-quality sequences with transcriptional features were selected for gene ontology (GO) and individual gene analyses. There were marked differences in the types of transcripts, as well as in the timing and levels of transcript expression in the pine trees following PWN inoculation. Genes involved in signal transduction, transcription and translation and secondary metabolism were highly expressed after 24 h and 72 h, while stress response genes were highly expressed only after 72 h. Certain transcripts responding to PWN infection were discriminative; pathogenesis and cell wall-related genes were more abundant, while detoxification or redox process-related genes were less abundant. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the biochemical and physiological responses of pine trees to PWN infection, particularly during the initial stage of infection. PMID:23759987

  10. Characterization of the Pinus massoniana transcriptional response to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus infection using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Kai; Lu, Quan; Liang, Jun; Zhang, Xing-Yao

    2013-05-28

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) caused by pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is the most destructive diseases of pine and poses a threat of serious economic losses worldwide. Although several of the mechanisms involved in disease progression have been discovered, the molecular response of Pinus massoniana to PWN infection has not been explored. We constructed four subtractive suppression hybridization cDNA libraries by taking time-course samples from PWN-inoculated Masson pine trees. One-hundred forty-four significantly differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified, and 124 high-quality sequences with transcriptional features were selected for gene ontology (GO) and individual gene analyses. There were marked differences in the types of transcripts, as well as in the timing and levels of transcript expression in the pine trees following PWN inoculation. Genes involved in signal transduction, transcription and translation and secondary metabolism were highly expressed after 24 h and 72 h, while stress response genes were highly expressed only after 72 h. Certain transcripts responding to PWN infection were discriminative; pathogenesis and cell wall-related genes were more abundant, while detoxification or redox process-related genes were less abundant. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the biochemical and physiological responses of pine trees to PWN infection, particularly during the initial stage of infection.

  11. Modulation of yeast genome expression in response to defective RNA polymerase III-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Conesa, Christine; Ruotolo, Roberta; Soularue, Pascal; Simms, Tiffany A; Donze, David; Sentenac, André; Dieci, Giorgio

    2005-10-01

    We used genome-wide expression analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to explore whether and how the expression of protein-coding, RNA polymerase (Pol) II-transcribed genes is influenced by a decrease in RNA Pol III-dependent transcription. The Pol II transcriptome was characterized in four thermosensitive, slow-growth mutants affected in different components of the RNA Pol III transcription machinery. Unexpectedly, we found only a modest correlation between altered expression of Pol II-transcribed genes and their proximity to class III genes, a result also confirmed by the analysis of single tRNA gene deletants. Instead, the transcriptome of all of the four mutants was characterized by increased expression of genes known to be under the control of the Gcn4p transcriptional activator. Indeed, GCN4 was found to be translationally induced in the mutants, and deleting the GCN4 gene eliminated the response. The Gcn4p-dependent expression changes did not require the Gcn2 protein kinase and could be specifically counteracted by an increased gene dosage of initiator tRNA(Met). Initiator tRNA(Met) depletion thus triggers a GCN4-dependent reprogramming of genome expression in response to decreased Pol III transcription. Such an effect might represent a key element in the coordinated transcriptional response of yeast cells to environmental changes.

  12. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention. PMID:26904076

  13. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  14. Rapid Myeloid Cell Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses to Periodontopathogenic Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Nares, Salvador; Moutsopoulos, Niki M.; Angelov, Nikola; Rangel, Zoila G.; Munson, Peter J.; Sinha, Neha; Wahl, Sharon M.

    2009-01-01

    Long-lived monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) are Toll-like receptor-expressing, antigen-presenting cells derived from a common myeloid lineage that play key roles in innate and adaptive immune responses. Based on immunohistochemical and molecular analyses of inflamed tissues from patients with chronic destructive periodontal disease, these cells, found in the inflammatory infiltrate, may drive the progressive periodontal pathogenesis. To investigate early transcriptional signatures and subsequent proteomic responses to the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, donor-matched human blood monocytes, differentiated DCs, and macrophages were exposed to P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gene expression levels were measured by oligonucleotide microarrays. In addition to striking differences in constitutive transcriptional profiles between these myeloid populations, we identify a P. gingivalis LPS-inducible convergent, transcriptional core response of more than 400 annotated genes/ESTs among these populations, reflected by a shared, but quantitatively distinct, proteomic response. Nonetheless, clear differences emerged between the monocytes, DCs, and macrophages. The finding that long-lived myeloid inflammatory cells, particularly DCs, rapidly and aggressively respond to P. gingivalis LPS by generating chemokines, proteases, and cytokines capable of driving T-helper cell lineage polarization without evidence of corresponding immunosuppressive pathways highlights their prominent role in host defense and progressive tissue pathogenesis. The shared, unique, and/or complementary transcriptional and proteomic profiles may frame the context of the host response to P. gingivalis, contributing to the destructive nature of periodontal inflammation. PMID:19264901

  15. Post-translational modifications of hormone-responsive transcription factors: the next level of regulation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kristine

    2015-08-01

    Plants exhibit a high level of developmental plasticity and growth is responsive to multiple developmental and environmental cues. Hormones are small endogenous signalling molecules which are fundamental to this phenotypic plasticity. Post-translational modifications of proteins are a central feature of the signal transduction pathways that regulate gene transcription in response to hormones. Modifications that affect the function of transcriptional regulators may also serve as a mechanism to incorporate multiple signals, mediate cross-talk, and modulate specific responses. This review discusses recent research that suggests hormone-responsive transcription factors are subject to multiple modifications which imply an additional level of regulation conferred by enzymes that mediate specific modifications, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and S-nitrosylation. These modifications can affect protein stability, sub-cellular localization, interactions with co-repressors and activators, and DNA binding. The focus here is on direct cross-talk involving transcription factors downstream of auxin, brassinosteroid, and gibberellin signalling. However, many of the concepts discussed are more broadly relevant to questions of how plants can modify their growth by regulating subsets of genes in response to multiple cues. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Transcriptional regulatory networks controlling woolliness in peach in response to preharvest gibberellin application and cold storage.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Camila; Tadiello, Alice; Girardi, César L; Chaves, Fábio C; Quecini, Vera; de Oliveira, Antonio Costa; Trainotti, Livio; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor

    2015-11-18

    Postharvest fruit conservation relies on low temperatures and manipulations of hormone metabolism to maintain sensory properties. Peaches are susceptible to chilling injuries, such as 'woolliness' that is caused by juice loss leading to a 'wooly' fruit texture. Application of gibberellic acid at the initial stages of pit hardening impairs woolliness incidence, however the mechanisms controlling the response remain unknown. We have employed genome wide transcriptional profiling to investigate the effects of gibberellic acid application and cold storage on harvested peaches. Approximately half of the investigated genes exhibited significant differential expression in response to the treatments. Cellular and developmental process gene ontologies were overrepresented among the differentially regulated genes, whereas sequences in cell death and immune response categories were underrepresented. Gene set enrichment demonstrated a predominant role of cold storage in repressing the transcription of genes associated to cell wall metabolism. In contrast, genes involved in hormone responses exhibited a more complex transcriptional response, indicating an extensive network of crosstalk between hormone signaling and low temperatures. Time course transcriptional analyses demonstrate the large contribution of gene expression regulation on the biochemical changes leading to woolliness in peach. Overall, our results provide insights on the mechanisms controlling the complex phenotypes associated to postharvest textural changes in peach and suggest that hormone mediated reprogramming previous to pit hardening affects the onset of chilling injuries.

  17. Alu repeats as transcriptional regulatory platforms in macrophage responses to M. tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Bouttier, Manuella; Laperriere, David; Memari, Babak; Mangiapane, Joseph; Fiore, Amanda; Mitchell, Eric; Verway, Mark; Behr, Marcel A.; Sladek, Robert; Barreiro, Luis B.; Mader, Sylvie; White, John H.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the epigenetic regulation of transcriptional response of macrophages during early-stage M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, we performed ChIPseq analysis of H3K4 monomethylation (H3K4me1), a marker of poised or active enhancers. De novo H3K4me1 peaks in infected cells were associated with genes implicated in host defenses and apoptosis. Our analysis revealed that 40% of de novo regions contained human/primate-specific Alu transposable elements, enriched in the AluJ and S subtypes. These contained several transcription factor binding sites, including those for members of the MEF2 and ATF families, and LXR and RAR nuclear receptors, all of which have been implicated in macrophage differentiation, survival, and responses to stress and infection. Combining bioinformatics, molecular genetics, and biochemical approaches, we linked genes adjacent to H3K4me1-associated Alu repeats to macrophage metabolic responses against Mtb infection. In particular, we show that LXRα signaling, which reduced Mtb viability 18-fold by altering cholesterol metabolism and enhancing macrophage apoptosis, can be initiated at response elements present in Alu repeats. These studies decipher the mechanism of early macrophage transcriptional responses to Mtb, highlighting the role of Alu element transposition in shaping human transcription programs during innate immunity. PMID:27604870

  18. A systems biology perspective on the role of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Rushton, Paul J

    2014-02-01

    Drought is one of the major challenges affecting crop productivity and yield. However, water stress responses are notoriously multigenic and quantitative with strong environmental effects on phenotypes. It is also clear that water stress often does not occur alone under field conditions but rather in conjunction with other abiotic stresses such as high temperature and high light intensities. A multidisciplinary approach with successful integration of a whole range of -omics technologies will not only define the system, but also provide new gene targets for both transgenic approaches and marker-assisted selection. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling and some constitute major hubs in the signaling webs. The main transcription factors in this network include MYB, bHLH, bZIP, ERF, NAC, and WRKY transcription factors. The role of WRKY transcription factors in abiotic stress signaling networks is just becoming apparent and systems biology approaches are starting to define their places in the signaling network. Using systems biology approaches, there are now many transcriptomic analyses and promoter analyses that concern WRKY transcription factors. In addition, reports on nuclear proteomics have identified WRKY proteins that are up-regulated at the protein level by water stress. Interactomics has started to identify different classes of WRKY-interacting proteins. What are often lacking are connections between metabolomics, WRKY transcription factors, promoters, biosynthetic pathways, fluxes and downstream responses. As more levels of the system are characterized, a more detailed understanding of the roles of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in crops will be obtained.

  19. Glucose, nitrogen, and phosphate repletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: common transcriptional responses to different nutrient signals.

    PubMed

    Conway, Michael K; Grunwald, Douglas; Heideman, Warren

    2012-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae are able to control growth in response to changes in nutrient availability. The limitation for single macronutrients, including nitrogen (N) and phosphate (P), produces stable arrest in G1/G0. Restoration of the limiting nutrient quickly restores growth. It has been shown that glucose (G) depletion/repletion very rapidly alters the levels of more than 2000 transcripts by at least 2-fold, a large portion of which are involved with either protein production in growth or stress responses in starvation. Although the signals generated by G, N, and P are thought to be quite distinct, we tested the hypothesis that depletion and repletion of any of these three nutrients would affect a common core set of genes as part of a generalized response to conditions that promote growth and quiescence. We found that the response to depletion of G, N, or P produced similar quiescent states with largely similar transcriptomes. As we predicted, repletion of each of the nutrients G, N, or P induced a large (501) common core set of genes and repressed a large (616) common gene set. Each nutrient also produced nutrient-specific transcript changes. The transcriptional responses to each of the three nutrients depended on cAMP and, to a lesser extent, the TOR pathway. All three nutrients stimulated cAMP production within minutes of repletion, and artificially increasing cAMP levels was sufficient to replicate much of the core transcriptional response. The recently identified transceptors Gap1, Mep1, Mep2, and Mep3, as well as Pho84, all played some role in the core transcriptional responses to N or P. As expected, we found some evidence of cross talk between nutrient signals, yet each nutrient sends distinct signals.

  20. Reprogramming of nonfermentative metabolism by stress-responsive transcription factors in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Soontorngun, Nitnipa

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental questions of how cells control growth and respond to stresses have captivated scientists for years. Despite the complexity of these cellular processes, we could approach this puzzle by asking our favorite model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, how it makes a critical decision to either proliferate, to rest in a quiescent state or to program itself to die. This review highlights the essentiality of transcriptional factors in the reprogramming of gene expression as a prime mechanism of cellular stress responses. A whelm of evidence shows that transcriptional factors allow cells to acquire appropriate and unified responses to the transmitted signals. They function to modulate pathway-specific gene expression and organize transcriptomic responses to the altered environments. This review is aimed to summarize current knowledge on the roles of novel and well-known yeast transcription factors in the control of growth and stress responses during glucose deprivation as a prototypical case study. The scope includes stress sensing, transcription factors' identity, gene regulation and proposed crosstalks between pathways, associated with stress responses. A complex commander system of multiple stress-responsive transcription factors, observed here and elsewhere, indicates that regulation of glucose starvation/diauxic shift is a highly sophisticated and well-controlled process, involving elaborative networks of different kinase/target proteins. Using S. cerevisiae as a model, basic genetic research studies on gene identification have once again proved to be essential in the comprehension of molecular basis of cellular stress responses. Insights into this fundamental and highly conserved phenomenon will endow important prospective impacts on biotechnological applications and healthcare improvement.

  1. [Kinetics of heat shock response upon disfunction of general transcription factor (HSF)].

    PubMed

    Funikov, S Iu; Garbuz, D G; Zatsepina, O G

    2014-01-01

    The heat shock transcription factor (HSF) is a universal activator of hsp gene expression in eukaryotes. A temperature sensitive Drosophila melanogaster strain (hsf4) with a mutation in the hsfgene was originally described as a strain lacking the transcription of hsp genes in response to heat shock. Our results demonstrated that physiological function of HSF4 is not fully abrogated after heat exposure and is able to recover even after severe heat stress, causing the induction of hsp gene expression. We have studied the kinetics of accumulation and degradation of hsp gene products at transcriptional and translational levels and shown that induction of hsp genes, particularly hsp68, in mutant strain is weaker than that in the wild type. Thus, despite the fact that the HSF4 causes a delayed ac- tivation of hsp, response to heat shock in hsf4 strain remains defective.

  2. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-10-22

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines.

  3. A Conserved Structural Module Regulates Transcriptional Responses to Diverse Stress Signals in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Greenwell, Roger; Anthony, Jennifer R.; Wang, Sheng; Lim, Lionel; Das, Kalyan; Sofia, Heidi J.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Darst, Seth A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A transcriptional response to singlet oxygen in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is controlled by the group IV σ factor σE and its cognate anti-σ ChrR. Crystal structures of the σE/ChrR complex reveal a modular, two-domain architecture for ChrR. The ChrR N-terminal anti-σ domain (ASD) binds a Zn2+ ion, contacts σE, and is sufficient to inhibit σE-dependent transcription. The ChrR C-terminal domain adopts a cupin fold, can coordinate an additional Zn2+, and is required for the transcriptional response to singlet oxygen. Structure-based sequence analyses predict that the ASD defines a common structural fold among predicted group IV antiσs. These ASDs are fused to diverse C-terminal domains that are likely involved in responding to specific environmental signals that control the activity of their cognate σ factor. PMID:17803943

  4. MUTATIONAL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF SAMMONELLA TO MX: CORRELATION OF MUTATIONAL DOSE RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured the mutational and transcriptional response of Salmonella TA 100 to 3 concentrations of a drinking water mutagen -chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy2(5H)-furanone (MX). The mutagenicity of MX in strain TA100 was evaluated in a 30min suspension assay, and the mutageni...

  5. MUTATIONAL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF SALMONELLA TO MX: CORRELATION OF MUTATIONAL DOSE RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured the mutational and transcriptional response of Salmonella TA100 to 3 concentrations of the drinking water mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy2(5H)-furanone (MX). The mutagenicity of MX in strain TA100 was evaluated in a 30min suspension assay, and the mutage...

  6. MUTATIONAL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF SALMONELLA TO MX: CORRELATION OF MUTATIONAL DOSE RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured the mutational and transcriptional response of Salmonella TA100 to 3 concentrations of the drinking water mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy2(5H)-furanone (MX). The mutagenicity of MX in strain TA100 was evaluated in a 30min suspension assay, and the mutage...

  7. MUTATIONAL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF SAMMONELLA TO MX: CORRELATION OF MUTATIONAL DOSE RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured the mutational and transcriptional response of Salmonella TA 100 to 3 concentrations of a drinking water mutagen -chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy2(5H)-furanone (MX). The mutagenicity of MX in strain TA100 was evaluated in a 30min suspension assay, and the mutageni...

  8. Bombyx mori Transcription Factors: Genome-Wide Identification, Expression Profiles and Response to Pathogens by Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lulin; Cheng, Tingcai; Xu, Pingzhen; Fang, Ting; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors are present in all living organisms, and play vital roles in a wide range of biological processes. Studies of transcription factors will help reveal the complex regulation mechanism of organisms. So far, hundreds of domains have been identified that show transcription factor activity. Here, 281 reported transcription factor domains were used as seeds to search the transcription factors in genomes of Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) and four other model insects. Overall, 666 transcription factors including 36 basal factors and 630 other factors were identified in B. mori genome, which accounted for 4.56% of its genome. The silkworm transcription factors' expression profiles were investigated in relation to multiple tissues, developmental stages, sexual dimorphism, and responses to oral infection by pathogens and direct bacterial injection. These all provided rich clues for revealing the transcriptional regulation mechanism of silkworm organ differentiation, growth and development, sexual dimorphism, and response to pathogen infection. PMID:22943524

  9. Transcriptional Dynamics Reveal Critical Roles for Non-coding RNAs in the Immediate-Early Response

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M. N.; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O.; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M.; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset. PMID:25885578

  10. Transcriptional dynamics reveal critical roles for non-coding RNAs in the immediate-early response.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M N; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A

    2015-04-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset.

  11. The transcriptional response of microbial communities in thawing Alaskan permafrost soils

    PubMed Central

    Coolen, Marco J. L.; Orsi, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Thawing of permafrost soils is expected to stimulate microbial decomposition and respiration of sequestered carbon. This could, in turn, increase atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and create a positive feedback to climate warming. Recent metagenomic studies suggest that permafrost has a large metabolic potential for carbon processing, including pathways for fermentation and methanogenesis. Here, we performed a pilot study using ultrahigh throughput Illumina HiSeq sequencing of reverse transcribed messenger RNA to obtain a detailed overview of active metabolic pathways and responsible organisms in up to 70 cm deep permafrost soils at a moist acidic tundra location in Arctic Alaska. The transcriptional response of the permafrost microbial community was compared before and after 11 days of thaw. In general, the transcriptional profile under frozen conditions suggests a dominance of stress responses, survival strategies, and maintenance processes, whereas upon thaw a rapid enzymatic response to decomposing soil organic matter (SOM) was observed. Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, ascomycete fungi, and methanogens were responsible for largest transcriptional response upon thaw. Transcripts indicative of heterotrophic methanogenic pathways utilizing acetate, methanol, and methylamine were found predominantly in the permafrost table after thaw. Furthermore, transcripts involved in acetogenesis were expressed exclusively after thaw suggesting that acetogenic bacteria are a potential source of acetate for acetoclastic methanogenesis in freshly thawed permafrost. Metatranscriptomics is shown here to be a useful approach for inferring the activity of permafrost microbes that has potential to improve our understanding of permafrost SOM bioavailability and biogeochemical mechanisms contributing to greenhouse gas emissions as a result of permafrost thaw. PMID:25852660

  12. The transcriptional response of microbial communities in thawing Alaskan permafrost soils.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Marco J L; Orsi, William D

    2015-01-01

    Thawing of permafrost soils is expected to stimulate microbial decomposition and respiration of sequestered carbon. This could, in turn, increase atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and create a positive feedback to climate warming. Recent metagenomic studies suggest that permafrost has a large metabolic potential for carbon processing, including pathways for fermentation and methanogenesis. Here, we performed a pilot study using ultrahigh throughput Illumina HiSeq sequencing of reverse transcribed messenger RNA to obtain a detailed overview of active metabolic pathways and responsible organisms in up to 70 cm deep permafrost soils at a moist acidic tundra location in Arctic Alaska. The transcriptional response of the permafrost microbial community was compared before and after 11 days of thaw. In general, the transcriptional profile under frozen conditions suggests a dominance of stress responses, survival strategies, and maintenance processes, whereas upon thaw a rapid enzymatic response to decomposing soil organic matter (SOM) was observed. Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, ascomycete fungi, and methanogens were responsible for largest transcriptional response upon thaw. Transcripts indicative of heterotrophic methanogenic pathways utilizing acetate, methanol, and methylamine were found predominantly in the permafrost table after thaw. Furthermore, transcripts involved in acetogenesis were expressed exclusively after thaw suggesting that acetogenic bacteria are a potential source of acetate for acetoclastic methanogenesis in freshly thawed permafrost. Metatranscriptomics is shown here to be a useful approach for inferring the activity of permafrost microbes that has potential to improve our understanding of permafrost SOM bioavailability and biogeochemical mechanisms contributing to greenhouse gas emissions as a result of permafrost thaw.

  13. Toward understanding transcriptional regulatory networks in abiotic stress responses and tolerance in rice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stress causes loss of crop production. Under abiotic stress conditions, expression of many genes is induced, and their products have important roles in stress responses and tolerance. Progress has been made in understanding the biological roles of regulons in abiotic stress responses in rice. A number of transcription factors (TFs) regulate stress-responsive gene expression. OsDREB1s and OsDREB2s were identified as abiotic-stress responsive TFs that belong to the AP2/ERF family. Similar to Arabidopsis, these DREB regulons were most likely not involved in the abscisic acid (ABA) pathway. OsAREBs such as OsAREB1 were identified as key components in ABA-dependent transcriptional networks in rice. OsNAC/SNACs including OsNAC6 were characterized as factors that regulate expression of genes important for abiotic stress responses in rice. Here, we review on the rice abiotic-stress responses mediated by transcriptional networks, with the main focus on TFs that function in abiotic stress responses and confer stress tolerance in rice. PMID:24764506

  14. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Ortells, M Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Ortells, M. Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R.; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses. PMID:22287635

  16. Resection is responsible for loss of transcription around a double-strand break in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Manfrini, Nicola; Clerici, Michela; Wery, Maxime; Colombo, Chiara Vittoria; Descrimes, Marc; Morillon, Antonin; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2015-07-31

    Emerging evidence indicate that the mammalian checkpoint kinase ATM induces transcriptional silencing in cis to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through a poorly understood mechanism. Here we show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae a single DSB causes transcriptional inhibition of proximal genes independently of Tel1/ATM and Mec1/ATR. Since the DSB ends undergo nucleolytic degradation (resection) of their 5'-ending strands, we investigated the contribution of resection in this DSB-induced transcriptional inhibition. We discovered that resection-defective mutants fail to stop transcription around a DSB, and the extent of this failure correlates with the severity of the resection defect. Furthermore, Rad9 and generation of γH2A reduce this DSB-induced transcriptional inhibition by counteracting DSB resection. Therefore, the conversion of the DSB ends from double-stranded to single-stranded DNA, which is necessary to initiate DSB repair by homologous recombination, is responsible for loss of transcription around a DSB in S. cerevisiae.

  17. Distinct transcriptional responses of RNA polymerases I, II and III to aptamers that bind TBP

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaochun; Shi, Hua; Lis, John T.

    2005-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a general factor that is involved in transcription by all three types of nuclear RNA polymerase. To delineate the roles played by the DNA-binding surface of TBP in these transcription reactions, we used a set of RNA aptamers directed against TBP and examined their ability to perturb transcription in vitro by the different RNA polymerases. Distinct responses to the TBP aptamers were observed for transcription by different types of polymerase at either the initiation, reinitiation or both stages of the transcription cycle. We further probed the TBP interactions in the TFIIIB•DNA complex to elucidate the mechanism for the different sensitivity of Pol III dependent transcription before and after preinitiation complex (PIC) formation. Lastly, the aptamers were employed to measure the time required for Pol III PIC formation in vitro. This approach can be generalized to define the involvement of a particular region on the surface of a protein at particular stages in a biological process. PMID:15701755

  18. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  19. Root-specific transcript profiling of contrasting rice genotypes in response to salinity stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elevated salinity imposes osmotic and ion toxicity stresses on living cells and requires a multitude of responses in order to enable plant survival. Building on earlier work profiling transcript levels in rice (Oryza sativa) shoots of FL478, a salt-tolerant indica recombinant inbred line, and IR29, ...

  20. Transcriptional responses to fluctuating thermal regimes underpinning differences in survival in the solitary bee Megachile rotundata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transcriptional responses of insects to long-term, ecologically relevant temperature stress are poorly understood. Long-term exposure to low temperatures, commonly referred to as chilling, can lead to physiological effects collectively known as chill injury. Periodically increasing temperatures ...

  1. ALTERED TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF MOUSE EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BISINDOLYLMALEIMIDE (BIS L)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered transcriptional responses in mouse embryos exposed to bisindolylmaleimide I (Bis I) in whole embryo culture

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid*, Maria R. Blanton*and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, ...

  2. Ultrastructural and Transcriptional Changes in Response to Dietary Lectins in the Hessian Fly Larval Midgut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The midgut is a major interface between phytophagous insects and their host plants. Here we report on ultrastructural and transcriptional changes in response to dietary lectins introduced into the host plant during the 1st instar in the Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), larval midgut. Resul...

  3. ALTERED TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF MOUSE EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BISINDOLYLMALEIMIDE (BIS L)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered transcriptional responses in mouse embryos exposed to bisindolylmaleimide I (Bis I) in whole embryo culture

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid*, Maria R. Blanton*and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, ...

  4. Transcriptional analysis of the innate immune response using the avian innate immunity microarray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The avian innate immunity microarray (AIIM) is a genomics tool designed to study the transcriptional activity of the avian immune response (Cytogenet. Genome Res. 117:139-145, 2007). It is an avian cDNA microarray representing 4,959 avian genes spotted in triplicate. The AIIM contains 25 avian int...

  5. Transcription of interferon stimulated genes in response to Porcine rubulavirus infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Ocelotl, María del Rosario; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Santos-López, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (PoRV) is an emerging virus causing meningo-encephalitis and reproductive failures in pigs. Little is known about the pathogenesis and immune evasion of this virus; therefore research on the mechanisms underlying tissue damage during infection is essential. To explore these mechanisms, the effect of PoRV on the transcription of interferon (IFN) pathway members was analyzed in vitro by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Ten TCID50 of PoRV stimulated transcription of IFNα, IFNβ, STAT1, STAT2, p48 and OAS genes in neuroblastoma cells, whereas infection with 100 TCID50 did not stimulate transcription levels more than non-infected cells. When the cells were primed with IFNα, infection with 1 TCDI50 of PoRV sufficed to stimulate the transcription of the same genes, but 10 and 100 TCID50 did not modify the transcription level of those genes as compared with non-infected and primed controls. MxA gene transcription was observed only when the cells were primed with IFNα and stimulated with 10 TCID50, whereas 100 TCID50 of PoRV did not modify the MxA transcription level as compared to non-infected and primed cells. Our results show that PoRV replication at low titers stimulates the expression of IFN-responsive genes in neuroblastoma cells, and suggest that replication of PoRV at higher titers inhibits the transcription of several members of the IFN pathway. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of PoRV. PMID:24031738

  6. Transcription of interferon stimulated genes in response to Porcine rubulavirus infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Flores-Ocelotl, María Del Rosario; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Santos-López, Gerardo

    2011-07-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (PoRV) is an emerging virus causing meningo-encephalitis and reproductive failures in pigs. Little is known about the pathogenesis and immune evasion of this virus; therefore research on the mechanisms underlying tissue damage during infection is essential. To explore these mechanisms, the effect of PoRV on the transcription of interferon (IFN) pathway members was analyzed in vitro by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Ten TCID50 of PoRV stimulated transcription of IFNα, IFNβ, STAT1, STAT2, p48 and OAS genes in neuroblastoma cells, whereas infection with 100 TCID50 did not stimulate transcription levels more than non-infected cells. When the cells were primed with IFNα, infection with 1 TCDI50 of PoRV sufficed to stimulate the transcription of the same genes, but 10 and 100 TCID50 did not modify the transcription level of those genes as compared with non-infected and primed controls. MxA gene transcription was observed only when the cells were primed with IFNα and stimulated with 10 TCID50, whereas 100 TCID50 of PoRV did not modify the MxA transcription level as compared to non-infected and primed cells. Our results show that PoRV replication at low titers stimulates the expression of IFN-responsive genes in neuroblastoma cells, and suggest that replication of PoRV at higher titers inhibits the transcription of several members of the IFN pathway. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of PoRV.

  7. Analysis of the transcriptional responses in inflorescence buds of Jatropha curcas exposed to cytokinin treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao-Sheng; Pan, Bang-Zhen; Wang, Gui-Juan; Ni, Jun; Niu, Longjian; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2014-11-30

    Jatropha curcas L. is a potential biofuel plant. Application of exogenous cytokinin (6-benzyladenine, BA) on its inflorescence buds can significantly increase the number of female flowers, thereby improving seed yield. To investigate which genes and signal pathways are involved in the response to cytokinin in J. curcas inflorescence buds, we monitored transcriptional activity in inflorescences at 0, 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after BA treatment using a microarray. We detected 5,555 differentially expressed transcripts over the course of the experiment, which could be grouped into 12 distinct temporal expression patterns. We also identified 31 and 131 transcripts in J. curcas whose homologs in model plants function in flowering and phytohormonal signaling pathways, respectively. According to the transcriptional analysis of genes involved in flower development, we hypothesized that BA treatment delays floral organ formation by inhibiting the transcription of the A, B and E classes of floral organ-identity genes, which would allow more time to generate more floral primordia in inflorescence meristems, thereby enhancing inflorescence branching and significantly increasing flower number per inflorescence. BA treatment might also play an important role in maintaining the flowering signals by activating the transcription of GIGANTEA (GI) and inactivating the transcription of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) and TERMINAL FLOWER 1b (TFL1b). In addition, exogenous cytokinin treatment could regulate the expression of genes involved in the metabolism and signaling of other phytohormones, indicating that cytokinin and other phytohormones jointly regulate flower development in J. curcas inflorescence buds. Our study provides a framework to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying changes in flowering traits in response to cytokinin treatment in J. curcas inflorescence buds. The results provide valuable information related to the mechanisms of cross-talk among

  8. Morphological, biochemical, transcriptional and epigenetic responses to fasting and refeeding in intestine of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, Keiji; Okada, Reiko; Ishihara, Akinori; Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are able to survive for several months without food. However, it is unclear what molecular mechanisms underlie their survival. To characterize the intestinal responses to fasting and refeeding, we investigated morphological, biochemical, transcriptional and epigenetic changes in the intestine from adult male Xenopus laevis. Frogs were fed for 22 days, fasted for 22 days, or fasted for 21 days and refed for 1 day. Fasting reduced, and refeeding recovered partially or fully, morphological parameters (wet weight of the intestine, circumference of the epithelial layer and number of troughs in a villus-trough unit), activities of digestive enzymes and plasma biochemical parameters (glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol and free fatty acids). Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed overall suppression of the transcript levels by fasting, with various recovery rates on refeeding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on the selected genes whose transcript levels declined with fasting and recovered quickly with refeeding, showed several euchromatin marks in histone (acetylation and methylation) and RNA polymerase II modifications (phosphorylation) with fasting, and returned to the feeding levels by refeeding. The mRNA levels of these genes responded to fasting and refeeding to greater extents than did the pre-mRNA levels, suggesting the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation. Our results demonstrate that the X. laevis intestine may undergo overall metabolic suppression at least at the transcriptional level to save energy during fasting and quickly recovered to moderate nutritional deficiency by refeeding, and suggest that these dietary responses of the intestine are epigenetically and post-transcriptionally regulated.

  9. A Homeostatic Shift Facilitates Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteostasis through Transcriptional Integration of Proteostatic Stress Response Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsujita, Tadayuki; Kobayashi, Eri H.; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Nakayama, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eukaryotic cells maintain protein homeostasis through the activity of multiple basal and inducible systems, which function in concert to allow cells to adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions. Although the transcriptional programs regulating individual pathways have been studied in detail, it is not known how the different pathways are transcriptionally integrated such that a deficiency in one pathway can be compensated by a change in an auxiliary response. One such pathway that plays an essential role in many proteostasis responses is the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which functions to degrade damaged, unfolded, or short half-life proteins. Transcriptional regulation of the proteasome is mediated by the transcription factor Nrf1. Using a conditional knockout mouse model, we found that Nrf1 regulates protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through transcriptional regulation of the ER stress sensor ATF6. In Nrf1 conditional-knockout mice, a reduction in proteasome activity is accompanied by an ATF6-dependent downregulation of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation machinery, which reduces the substrate burden on the proteasome. This indicates that Nrf1 regulates a homeostatic shift through which proteostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm are coregulated based on a cell's ability to degrade proteins. PMID:27920251

  10. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1.

  11. The elongation factor Spt5 facilitates transcription initiation for rapid induction of inflammatory-response genes

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Gil; Bahat, Anat; Dikstein, Rivka

    2016-01-01

    A subset of inflammatory-response NF-κB target genes is activated immediately following pro-inflammatory signal. Here we followed the kinetics of primary transcript accumulation after NF-κB activation when the elongation factor Spt5 is knocked down. While elongation rate is unchanged, the transcript synthesis at the 5′-end and at the earliest time points is delayed and reduced, suggesting an unexpected role in early transcription. Investigating the underlying mechanism reveals that the induced TFIID–promoter association is practically abolished by Spt5 depletion. This effect is associated with a decrease in promoter-proximal H3K4me3 and H4K5Ac histone modifications that are differentially required for rapid transcriptional induction. In contrast, the displacement of TFIIE and Mediator, which occurs during promoter escape, is attenuated in the absence of Spt5. Our findings are consistent with a central role of Spt5 in maintenance of TFIID–promoter association and promoter escape to support rapid transcriptional induction and re-initiation of inflammatory-response genes. PMID:27180651

  12. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1. PMID:26149570

  13. Transcriptional responses in male Japanese medaka exposed to antiandrogens and antiandrogen/androgen mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liwei; Peng, Tao; Liu, Fang; Ren, Lin; Peng, Zuhua; Ji, Guorong; Zhou, Yinfang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of androgenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in water is thought to be linked to deviation from normal male developmental and reproductive functions in exposed aquatic organisms. Because aquatic environments represent a chemically complex medium, the combined effects of androgenic EDCs require urgent attention. In the present study, the effects of two model androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, flutamide (FLU), and vinclozolin (VIN), were first determined individually in male Japanese medaka using the transcriptional response for genes associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The fish were further exposed to binary mixtures of VIN and 17β-trenbolone (TRE, AR agonist) to confirm the theoretical opposing effects of the AR antagonist and agonist. The results showed that exposure to FLU or VIN alone induced very similar transcriptional responses, demonstrating that gene transcription analysis could be successfully employed in identifying the action of single chemicals. For example, both exposures increased the transcription of cyp17b but decreased that of cyp19b in the gonad, demonstrating the compensatory response for AR blockage. However, in the case of exposure to mixtures, although the joint antagonistic action of TRE and VIN affected the most genes, the transcription profiles after exposure to mixtures were not consistent with expectations based on the results for individual chemicals, such as hepatic vtg, and star or cyp19a in gonads. Therefore, the limitation of gene transcription analyses in exposures to mixtures, as well as the potential for the extrapolation of single chemicals, should be considered in future studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1591-1599, 2016.

  14. Exposure to 4100K fluorescent light elicits sex specific transcriptional responses in Xiphophorus maculatus skin.

    PubMed

    Boswell, William T; Boswell, Mikki; Walter, Dylan J; Navarro, Kaela L; Chang, Jordan; Lu, Yuan; Savage, Markita G; Shen, Jianjun; Walter, Ronald B

    2017-09-29

    It has been reported that exposure to artificial light may affect oxygen intake, heart rate, absorption of vitamins and minerals, and behavioral responses in humans. We have reported specific gene expression responses in the skin of Xiphophorus fish after exposure to ultraviolet light (UV), as well as, both broad spectrum and narrow waveband visible light. In regard to fluorescent light (FL), we have shown that male X. maculatus exposed to 4100K FL (i.e. "cool white") rapidly suppress transcription of many genes involved with DNA replication and repair, chromosomal segregation, and cell cycle progression in skin. We have also detailed sex specific transcriptional responses of Xiphophorus skin after exposure to UVB. However, investigation of gender differences in global gene expression response after exposure to 4100K FL has not been reported, despite common use of this FL source for residential, commercial, and animal facility illumination. Here, we compare RNA-Seq results analyzed to assess changes in the global transcription profiles of female and male X. maculatus skin in response to 4100K FL exposure. Our results suggest 4100K FL exposure incites a sex-biased genetic response including up-modulation of inflammation in females and down modulation of DNA repair/replication in males. In addition, we identify clusters of genes that become oppositely modulated in males and females after FL exposure that are principally involved in cell death and cell proliferation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Position-dependent repression and promotion of DQB1 intron 3 splicing by GGGG motifs.

    PubMed

    Královicová, Jana; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2006-02-15

    Alternative splicing of HLA-DQB1 exon 4 is allele-dependent and results in variable expression of soluble DQbeta. We have recently shown that differential inclusion of this exon in mature transcripts is largely due to intron 3 variants in the branch point sequence (BPS) and polypyrimidine tract. To identify additional regulatory cis-elements that contribute to haplotype-specific splicing of DQB1, we systematically examined the effect of guanosine (G) repeats on intron 3 removal. We found that the GGG or GGGG repeats generally improved splicing of DQB1 intron 3, except for those that were adjacent to the 5' splice site where they had the opposite effect. The most prominent splicing enhancement was conferred by GGGG motifs arranged in tandem upstream of the BPS. Replacement of a G-rich segment just 5' of the BPS with a series of random sequences markedly repressed splicing, whereas substitutions of a segment further upstream that lacked the G-rich elements and had the same size did not result in comparable splicing inhibition. Systematic mutagenesis of both suprabranch guanosine quadruplets (G(4)) revealed a key role of central G residues in splicing enhancement, whereas cytosines in these positions had the most prominent repressive effects. Together, these results show a significant role of tandem G(4)NG(4) structures in splicing of both complete and truncated DQB1 intron 3, support position dependency of G repeats in splicing promotion and inhibition, and identify positively and negatively acting sequences that contribute to the haplotype-specific DQB1 expression.

  16. Cytokinin Response Factor 5 has transcriptional activity governed by its C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Striberny, Bernd; Melton, Anthony E; Schwacke, Rainer; Krause, Kirsten; Fischer, Karsten; Goertzen, Leslie R; Rashotte, Aaron M

    2017-02-01

    Cytokinin Response Factors (CRFs) are AP2/ERF transcription factors involved in cytokinin signal transduction. CRF proteins consist of a N-terminal dimerization domain (CRF domain), an AP2 DNA-binding domain, and a clade-specific C-terminal region of unknown function. Using a series of sequential deletions in yeast-2-hybrid assays, we provide evidence that the C-terminal region of Arabidopsis CRF5 can confer transactivation activity. Although comparative analyses identified evolutionarily conserved protein sequence within the C-terminal region, deletion experiments suggest that this transactivation domain has a partially redundant modular structure required for activation of target gene transcription.

  17. Chk2 regulates transcription-independent p53-mediated apoptosis in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Chen; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Motoyama, Noboru . E-mail: motoyama@nils.go.jp

    2005-07-29

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a central role in the induction of apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. The protein kinase Chk2 is an important regulator of p53 function in mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Cells derived from Chk2-deficient mice are resistant to the induction of apoptosis by IR, and this resistance has been thought to be a result of the defective transcriptional activation of p53 target genes. It was recently shown, however, that p53 itself and histone H1.2 translocate to mitochondria and thereby induces apoptosis in a transcription-independent manner in response to IR. We have now examined whether Chk2 also regulates the transcription-independent induction of apoptosis by p53 and histone H1.2. The reduced ability of IR to induce p53 stabilization in Chk2-deficient thymocytes was associated with a marked impairment of p53 and histone H1 translocation to mitochondria. These results suggest that Chk2 regulates the transcription-independent mechanism of p53-mediated apoptosis by inducing stabilization of p53 in response to IR.

  18. Transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to deltamethrin, alone or in combination with azamethiphos.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Ørnsrud, Robin; Lunestad, Bjørn Tore; Steine, Nils; Fredriksen, Børge Nilsen

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fish farmers have applied a combination of deltamethrin and azamethiphos in high-concentration and short-duration immersion treatment to improve protection against sea-lice (Lepeophtheirus sp.). In this work we aimed to study the effects of deltamethrin, alone or in combination with azamethiphos, on the transcription of stress and detoxification marker genes. Atlantic salmon kept at 12°C (one group was also kept at 4-5°C) were treated with deltamethrin alone or in combination with azamethiphos for a total of 40min, and gill and liver tissue harvested for transcriptional analysis 2 and 24h post treatment. No lethality was observed during the experiment. The result showed that deltamethrin, alone or in combination with azamethiphos, affected the transcriptional levels of several oxidative stress markers, including MnSOD (SOD2) and HSP70 (HSPA8) in the liver, and GPX1, CAT, MnSOD, HSP70 and GSTP1 in the gills. Significant responses for CASP3B, BCLX, IGFBP1B and ATP1A1 (Na-K-ATPase a1b) by some of the treatments suggest that the pharmaceutical drugs may affect apoptosis, growth and ion regulation mechanisms. In fish kept at 4-5°C, different effects were observed, suggesting a temperature-dependent response. In conclusion, the observed responses indicate that short-term exposure to deltamethrin has a profound effect on transcription of the evaluated markers in gills and liver of fish. Co-treatment with azamethiphos appears to have small mitigating effects on the transcriptional response caused by deltamethrin exposure alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene length may contribute to graded transcriptional responses in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Peter; Mizutani, Claudia M.; Kosman, David; MacKay, Danielle L.; Belu, Mirela; Hermann, Anita; McGinnis, William; Bier, Ethan; Hwa, Terence

    2011-01-01

    An important question in developmental biology is how relatively shallow gradients of morphogens can reliably establish a series of distinct transcriptional readouts. Current models emphasize interactions between transcription factors binding in distinct modes to cis-acting sequences of target genes. Another recent idea is that the cis-acting interactions may amplify preexisting biases or prepatterns to establish robust transcriptional responses. In this study, we examine the possible contribution of one such source of prepattern, namely gene length. We developed quantitative imaging tools to measure gene expression levels for several loci at a time on a single-cell basis and applied these quantitative imaging tools to dissect the establishment of a gene expression border separating the mesoderm and neuroectoderm in the early Drosophila embryo. We first characterized the formation of a transient ventral-to-dorsal gradient of the Snail (Sna) repressor and then examined the relationship between this gradient and repression of neural target genes in the mesoderm. We found that neural genes are repressed in a nested pattern within a zone of the mesoderm abutting the neuroectoderm, where Sna levels are graded. While several factors may contribute to the transient graded response to the Sna gradient, our analysis suggests that gene length may play an important, albeit transient, role in establishing these distinct transcriptional responses. One prediction of the gene-length-dependent transcriptional patterning model is that the co-regulated genes knirps (a short gene) and knirps-related (a long gene) should be transiently expressed in domains of differing widths, which we confirmed experimentally. These findings suggest that gene length may contribute to establishing graded responses to morphogen gradients by providing transient prepatterns that are subsequently amplified and stabilized by traditional cis-regulatory interactions. PMID:21920356

  20. Post-transcriptional gene regulation of salinity and drought responses by plant microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A; Reyes, José L

    2010-04-01

    In the past few years, factors involved in abscisic acid signalling have been isolated and recognized as elements related to RNA metabolism, suggesting that post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is required for abiotic stress responses. Some of these factors can be linked to the biogenesis of microRNAs (miRNAs), small RNA molecules that are important regulators of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by repressing mRNA expression. Here, we review the role of miRNAs in stress responses, highlighting recent advances in elucidating the role of individual miRNAs and efforts to identify stress-responsive miRNAs at a genome-wide level in different model plants. Complete understanding of miRNA action depends on the identification of its target transcripts, and recent developments in miRNA research indicate that they will be uncovered in the near future.

  1. Innate immune responses: Crosstalk of signaling and regulation of gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Bo; Tien Po; Shu Hongbing . E-mail: shuh@whu.edu.cn

    2006-08-15

    Innate immune responses to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses are triggered by recognition of specific structures of invading pathogens called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that are located at plasma membrane or inside cells. Stimulation of different PAMPs activates Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent and -independent signaling pathways that lead to activation of transcription factors nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B), interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF3/7) and/or activator protein-1 (AP-1), which collaborate to induce transcription of a large number of downstream genes. This review focuses on the rapid progress that has recently improved our understanding of the crosstalk among the pathways and the precise regulation of transcription of the downstream genes.

  2. Discovery of a Regulatory Motif for Human Satellite DNA Transcription in Response to BATF2 Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuejia; Huang, Wenqiu; Zhang, Chenguang; Niu, Jing; Ding, Wei

    2016-03-01

    One of the basic leucine zipper transcription factors, BATF2, has been found to suppress cancer growth and migration. However, little is known about the genes downstream of BATF2. HeLa cells were stably transfected with BATF2, then chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing was employed to identify the DNA motifs responsive to BATF2. Comprehensive bioinformatics analyses indicated that the most significant motif discovered as TTCCATT[CT]GATTCCATTC[AG]AT was primarily distributed among the chromosome centromere regions and mostly within human type II satellite DNA. Such motifs were able to prime the transcription of type II satellite DNA in a directional and asymmetrical manner. Consistently, satellite II transcription was up-regulated in BATF2-overexpressing cells. The present study provides insight into understanding the role of BATF2 in tumours and the importance of satellite DNA in the maintenance of genomic stability. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Capsicum annuum WRKY transcription factor d (CaWRKYd) regulates hypersensitive response and defense response upon Tobacco mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Huh, Sung Un; Choi, La Mee; Lee, Gil-Je; Kim, Young Jin; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-12-01

    WRKY transcription factors regulate biotic, abiotic, and developmental processes. In terms of plant defense, WRKY factors have important roles as positive and negative regulators via transcriptional regulation or protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the characterization of the gene encoding Capsicum annuum WRKY transcription factor d (CaWRKYd) isolated from microarray analysis in the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-P(0)-inoculated hot pepper plants. CaWRKYd belongs to the WRKY IIa group, a very small clade in the WRKY subfamily, and WRKY IIa group has positive/negative regulatory roles in Arabidopsis and rice. CaWRKYd transcripts were induced by various plant defense-related hormone treatments and TMV-P(0) inoculation. Silencing of CaWRKYd affected TMV-P(0)-mediated hypersensitive response (HR) cell death and accumulation of TMV-P(0) coat protein in local and systemic leaves. Furthermore, expression of some pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and HR-related genes was reduced in the CaWRKYd-silenced plants compared with TRV2 vector control plants upon TMV-P(0) inoculation. CaWRKYd was confirmed to bind to the W-box. Thus CaWRKYd is a newly identified Capsicum annuum WRKY transcription factor that appears to be involved in TMV-P(0)-mediated HR cell death by regulating downstream gene expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Global transcription profiling reveals comprehensive insights into hypoxic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenglong; Vantoai, Tara; Moy, Linda P; Bock, Geoffrey; Linford, Lara D; Quackenbush, John

    2005-03-01

    Plants have evolved adaptation mechanisms to sense oxygen deficiency in their environments and make coordinated physiological and structural adjustments to enhance their hypoxic tolerance. To gain insight into how plants respond to low-oxygen stress, gene expression profiling using whole-genome DNA amplicon microarrays was carried out at seven time points over 24 h, in wild-type and transgenic P(SAG12):ipt Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Transcript levels of genes involved in glycolysis and fermentation pathways, ethylene synthesis and perception, calcium signaling, nitrogen utilization, trehalose metabolism, and alkaloid synthesis were significantly altered in response to oxygen limitation. Analysis based on gene ontology assignments suggested a significant down-regulation of genes whose functions are associated with cell walls, nucleosome structures, water channels, and ion transporters and a significant up-regulation of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, protein kinase activity, and auxin responses under conditions of oxygen shortage. Promoter analysis on a cluster of up-regulated genes revealed a significant overrepresentation of the AtMYB2-binding motif (GT motif), a sugar response element-like motif, and a G-box-related sequence, and also identified several putative anaerobic response elements. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions using 29 selected genes independently verified the microarray results. This study represents one of the most comprehensive analyses conducted to date investigating hypoxia-responsive transcriptional networks in plants.

  5. Transcript response of soft coral (Scleronephthya gracillimum) on exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seonock; Lee, Aekyung; Denis, Vianney; Chen, Chaolun A; Yum, Seungshic

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the most persistent organic pollutants in worldwide aquatic environments. The extensive isolation of genes responsive to PAH pollution in soft coral (Scleronephthya gracillimum) is described herein. Soft coral colonies were exposed to 100 μg/L of a standard mixture of PAHs. Gene candidates with transcript levels that changed in response to PAH exposure were identified by differential display polymerase chain reaction (DD-PCR). There were 37 types of candidate genes identified, of which 20 were upregulated in expression and 17 were downregulated. The functions of the genes identified included oxidative stress response, ribosomal structure maintenance, molecular chaperone activity, protein kinase activation and tumorigenesis, defense mechanisms, transcription, and other biological responses. mRNA quantification was carried out using real-time quantitative PCR in eight selected genes: cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, protein disulfide isomerase, ribosomal protein L6, ral guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator-like 1, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 4, peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) metallopeptidase protein, and eukaryotic initiation factor 4 gamma 3. Changes in transcript levels were consistent with DD-PCR results. The gene candidates isolated in this study were differentially expressed and therefore have potential as molecular biomarkers for understanding coral responses to environmental stressors.

  6. Genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with an altered redox metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bro, Christoffer; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-02-05

    The genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deleted in GDH1 that encodes a NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was compared to a wild-type strain under anaerobic steady-state conditions. The GDH1-deleted strain has a significantly reduced NADPH requirement, and therefore, an altered redox metabolism. Identification of genes with significantly changed expression using a t-test and a Bonferroni correction yielded only 16 transcripts when accepting two false-positives, and 7 of these were Open Reading Frames (ORFs) with unknown function. Among the 16 transcripts the only one with a direct link to redox metabolism was GND1, encoding phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. To extract additional information we analyzed the transcription data for a gene subset consisting of all known genes encoding metabolic enzymes that use NAD(+) or NADP(+). The subset was analyzed for genes with significantly changed expression again with a t-test and correction for multiple testing. This approach was found to enrich the analysis since GND1, ZWF1 and ALD6, encoding the most important enzymes for regeneration of NADPH under anaerobic conditions, were down-regulated together with eight other genes encoding NADP(H)-dependent enzymes. This indicates a possible common redox-dependent regulation of these genes. Furthermore, we showed that it might be necessary to analyze the expression of a subset of genes to extract all available information from global transcription analysis.

  7. The NAC family transcription factor OsNAP confers abiotic stress response through the ABA pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Wang, Yaofeng; Lv, Bo; Li, Jie; Luo, Liqiong; Lu, Songchong; Zhang, Xuan; Ma, Hong; Ming, Feng

    2014-03-01

    Plants respond to environmental stresses by altering gene expression, and several genes have been found to mediate stress-induced expression, but many additional factors are yet to be identified. OsNAP is a member of the NAC transcription factor family; it is localized in the nucleus, and shows transcriptional activator activity in yeast. Analysis of the OsNAP transcript levels in rice showed that this gene was significantly induced by ABA and abiotic stresses, including high salinity, drought and low temperature. Rice plants overexpressing OsNAP did not show growth retardation, but showed a significantly reduced rate of water loss, enhanced tolerance to high salinity, drought and low temperature at the vegetative stage, and improved yield under drought stress at the flowering stage. Microarray analysis of transgenic plants overexpressing OsNAP revealed that many stress-related genes were up-regulated, including OsPP2C06/OsABI2, OsPP2C09, OsPP2C68 and OsSalT, and some genes coding for stress-related transcription factors (OsDREB1A, OsMYB2, OsAP37 and OsAP59). Our data suggest that OsNAP functions as a transcriptional activator that plays a role in mediating abiotic stress responses in rice.

  8. A non canonical subtilase attenuates the transcriptional activation of defence responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Irene; Buscaill, Pierre; Audran, Corinne; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Rivas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Proteases play crucial physiological functions in all organisms by controlling the lifetime of proteins. Here, we identified an atypical protease of the subtilase family [SBT5.2(b)] that attenuates the transcriptional activation of plant defence independently of its protease activity. The SBT5.2 gene produces two distinct transcripts encoding a canonical secreted subtilase [SBT5.2(a)] and an intracellular protein [SBT5.2(b)]. Concomitant to SBT5.2(a) downregulation, SBT5.2(b) expression is induced after bacterial inoculation. SBT5.2(b) localizes to endosomes where it interacts with and retains the defence-related transcription factor MYB30. Nuclear exclusion of MYB30 results in its reduced transcriptional activation and, thus, suppressed resistance. sbt5.2 mutants, with abolished SBT5.2(a) and SBT5.2(b) expression, display enhanced defence that is suppressed in a myb30 mutant background. Moreover, overexpression of SBT5.2(b), but not SBT5.2(a), in sbt5.2 plants reverts the phenotypes displayed by sbt5.2 mutants. Overall, we uncover a regulatory mode of the transcriptional activation of defence responses previously undescribed in eukaryotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19755.001 PMID:27685353

  9. A non canonical subtilase attenuates the transcriptional activation of defence responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Irene; Buscaill, Pierre; Audran, Corinne; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Rivas, Susana

    2016-09-29

    Proteases play crucial physiological functions in all organisms by controlling the lifetime of proteins. Here, we identified an atypical protease of the subtilase family [SBT5.2(b)] that attenuates the transcriptional activation of plant defence independently of its protease activity. The SBT5.2 gene produces two distinct transcripts encoding a canonical secreted subtilase [SBT5.2(a)] and an intracellular protein [SBT5.2(b)]. Concomitant to SBT5.2(a) downregulation, SBT5.2(b) expression is induced after bacterial inoculation. SBT5.2(b) localizes to endosomes where it interacts with and retains the defence-related transcription factor MYB30. Nuclear exclusion of MYB30 results in its reduced transcriptional activation and, thus, suppressed resistance. sbt5.2 mutants, with abolished SBT5.2(a) and SBT5.2(b) expression, display enhanced defence that is suppressed in a myb30 mutant background. Moreover, overexpression of SBT5.2(b), but not SBT5.2(a), in sbt5.2 plants reverts the phenotypes displayed by sbt5.2 mutants. Overall, we uncover a regulatory mode of the transcriptional activation of defence responses previously undescribed in eukaryotes.

  10. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  11. Multiple transcription factor codes activate epidermal wound-response genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joseph C; Juarez, Michelle T; Kim, Myungjin; Drivenes, Øyvind; McGinnis, William

    2009-02-17

    Wounds in Drosophila and mouse embryos induce similar genetic pathways to repair epidermal barriers. However, the transcription factors that transduce wound signals to repair epidermal barriers are largely unknown. We characterize the transcriptional regulatory enhancers of 4 genes-Ddc, ple, msn, and kkv-that are rapidly activated in epidermal cells surrounding wounds in late Drosophila embryos and early larvae. These epidermal wound enhancers all contain evolutionarily conserved sequences matching binding sites for JUN/FOS and GRH transcription factors, but vary widely in trans- and cis-requirements for these inputs and their binding sites. We propose that the combination of GRH and FOS is part of an ancient wound-response pathway still used in vertebrates and invertebrates, but that other mechanisms have evolved that result in similar transcriptional output. A common, but largely untested assumption of bioinformatic analyses of gene regulatory networks is that transcription units activated in the same spatial and temporal patterns will require the same cis-regulatory codes. Our results indicate that this is an overly simplistic view.

  12. A Trihelix DNA Binding Protein Counterbalances Hypoxia-Responsive Transcriptional Activation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule–insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein–protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  13. Whole-genome transcriptional and physiological responses of Nitrosomonas europaea to cyanide: identification of cyanide stress response genes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunhwa; Ely, Roger L

    2009-04-15

    Nitrosomonas europaea (ATCC 19718) is one of several nitrifying species that participate in the biological removal of nitrogen from wastewater by oxidizing ammonia to nitrite, the first step in nitrification. Because nitrification is quite sensitive to cyanide, a compound often encountered in wastewater treatment plants, we characterized the physiological and transcriptional responses of N. europaea cells to cyanide. The cells were extremely sensitive to low concentrations of cyanide, with NO-(2)production and ammonia-dependent oxygen uptake rates decreasing by 50% within 30 min of exposure to 1 microM NaCN. Whole-genome transcriptional responses of cells exposed to 1 microM NaCN were examined using Affymetrix microarrays to identify stress-induced genes. The transcript levels of 35 genes increased more than 2-fold while transcript levels of 29 genes decreased more than 20-fold. A gene cluster that included moeZ (NE2353), encoding a rhodanese homologue and thought to be involved in detoxification of cyanide, showed the highest up-regulation (7-fold). The down-regulated genes included genes encoding proteins involved in the sulfate reduction pathway, signal transduction mechanisms, carbohydrate transport, energy production, coenzyme metabolism, and amino acid transport.

  14. Firefly luciferase as the reporter for transcriptional response to the environment in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Masashi; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Doi, Shosei; Motoki, Shogo; Niimi, Atsuko; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2013-12-15

    We demonstrate that firefly luciferase is a good reporter in Escherichia coli for transcription dynamics in response to the environment. E. coli strains, carrying a fusion of the promoter of the ycgZ gene and the coding region of the luciferase gene, showed transient bioluminescence on receiving blue light. This response was compromised in mutants lacking known regulators in manners consistent with each regulator's function. We also show that relA, a gene encoding a (p)ppGpp synthetase, affects ycgZ dynamics when nullified. Moreover, two unstable luciferase variants showed improved response dynamics and should be useful to study quick changes of gene expression.

  15. Noise-driven diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots: Role of anisotropy, position-dependent effective mass and position-dependent dielectric screening function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Aindrila; Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-08-01

    We explore Diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. In view of this profiles of DMS have been pursued with variations of geometrical anisotropy and dopant location. We have invoked position-dependent effective mass (PDEM) and position-dependent dielectric screening function (PDDSF) of the system. Presence of noise sometimes suppresses and sometimes amplifies DMS from that of noise-free condition and the extent of suppression/amplification depends on mode of application of noise. It is important to mention that the said suppression/amplification exhibits subtle dependence on use of PDEM, PDDSF and geometrical anisotropy. The study reveals that DMS, or more fundamentally, the effective confinement of LDSS, can be tuned by appropriate mingling of geometrical anisotropy/effective mass/dielectric constant of the system with noise and also on the pathway of application of latter.

  16. Glucocorticoids and protein kinase A coordinately modulate transcription factor recruitment at a glucocorticoid-responsive unit.

    PubMed Central

    Espinás, M L; Roux, J; Pictet, R; Grange, T

    1995-01-01

    The rat tyrosine aminotransferase gene is a model system to study transcriptional regulation by glucocorticoid hormones. We analyzed transcription factor binding to the tyrosine aminotransferase gene glucocorticoid-responsive unit (GRU) at kb -2.5, using in vivo footprinting studies with both dimethyl sulfate and DNase I. At this GRU, glucocorticoid activation triggers a disruption of the nucleosomal structure. We show here that various regulatory pathways affect transcription factor binding to this GRU. The binding differs in two closely related glucocorticoid-responsive hepatoma cell lines. In line H4II, glucocorticoid induction promotes the recruitment of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 (HNF3), presumably through the nucleosomal disruption. However, the footprint of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is not visible, even though a regular but transient interaction of the GR is necessary to maintain HNF3 binding. In contrast, in line FTO2B, HNF3 binds to the GRU in the absence of glucocorticoids and nucleosomal disruption, showing that a "closed" chromatin conformation does not repress the binding of certain transcription factors in a uniform manner. In FTO2B cells, the footprint of the GR is detectable, but this requires the activation of protein kinase A. In addition, protein kinase A stimulation also improves the recruitment of HNF3 independently of glucocorticoids and enhances the glucocorticoid response mediated by this GRU in an HNF3-dependent manner. In conclusion, the differences in the behavior of this regulatory sequence in the two cell lines show that various regulatory pathways are integrated at this GRU through modulation of interrelated events: transcription factor binding to DNA and nucleosomal disruption. PMID:7565684

  17. Cyclic-AMP-responsive transcriptional activation of CREB-327 involves interdependent phosphorylated subdomains.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C Q; Yun, Y D; Hoeffler, J P; Habener, J F

    1990-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-regulated gene expression is mediated by specific phosphoproteins (CREBs) which bind to cAMP-responsive elements of gene promoters. By analyzing the transactivation activities and phosphorylations in vivo of deletion and point mutated chimeric fusion proteins of the placental CREB-327, in which the DNA-binding domain is replaced by the heterologous binding-domain of the yeast transcription factor GAL4, we localized the cAMP-responsive and phosphorylated domain to a minimal-essential sequence module of 46 amino acids (residues 92-137). This serine-rich, multiply-phosphorylated sequence consists of at least three interdependent subdomains required for transcriptional activation. Although phosphorylation of serine-119 by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A is necessary for transcriptional activation, such activation requires both a phosphorylated heptadecapeptide domain located ten residues amino terminal to the serine-119 and an eleven-residue domain carboxyl terminal to the serine-119. Deletion of these two domains does not impair phosphorylation of serine-119. Further, deletion of the carboxyl-terminal domain does not alter phosphorylation of the heptadecapeptide domain. We propose that akin to the phosphorylation-dependent activation of enzymes, the transcriptional transactivation functions of CREB-327 involve a phosphorylation-dependent allosteric conformational mechanism. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2176153

  18. The transcription factor IDEF1 regulates the response to and tolerance of iron deficiency in plants

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Ogo, Yuko; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2007-01-01

    Iron is essential for most living organisms and is often the major limiting nutrient for normal growth. Plants induce iron utilization systems under conditions of low iron availability, but the molecular mechanisms of gene regulation under iron deficiency remain largely unknown. We identified the rice transcription factor IDEF1, which specifically binds the iron deficiency-responsive cis-acting element IDE1. IDEF1 belongs to an uncharacterized branch of the plant-specific transcription factor family ABI3/VP1 and exhibits the sequence recognition property of efficiently binding to the CATGC sequence within IDE1. IDEF1 transcripts are constitutively present in rice roots and leaves. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing IDEF1 under the control of the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter transactivate IDE1-mediated expression only in iron-deficient roots. Transgenic rice plants expressing an introduced IDEF1 exhibit substantial tolerance to iron deficiency in both hydroponic culture and calcareous soil. IDEF1 overexpression leads to the enhanced expression of the iron deficiency-induced transcription factor gene OsIRO2, suggesting the presence of a sequential gene regulatory network. These findings reveal cis element/trans factor interactions that are functionally linked to the iron deficiency response. Manipulation of IDEF1 also provides another approach for producing crops tolerant of iron deficiency to enhance food and biomass production in calcareous soils. PMID:18025467

  19. Sa-Lrp from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is a versatile, glutamine-responsive, and architectural transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Vassart, Amelia; Wolferen, Marleen; Orell, Alvaro; Hong, Ye; Peeters, Eveline; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Charlier, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Sa-Lrp is a member of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-like family of transcriptional regulators in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Previously, we demonstrated the binding of Sa-Lrp to the control region of its own gene in vitro. However, the function and cofactor of Sa-Lrp remained an enigma. In this work, we demonstrate that glutamine is the cofactor of Sa-Lrp by inducing the formation of octamers and increasing the DNA-binding affinity and sequence specificity. In vitro protein-DNA interaction assays indicate that Sa-Lrp binds to promoter regions of genes with a variety of functions including ammonia assimilation, transcriptional control, and UV-induced pili synthesis. DNA binding occurs with a specific affinity for AT-rich binding sites, and the protein induces DNA bending and wrapping upon binding, indicating an architectural role of the regulator. Furthermore, by analyzing an Sa-lrp deletion mutant, we demonstrate that the protein affects transcription of some of the genes of which the promoter region is targeted and that it is an important determinant of the cellular aggregation phenotype. Taking all these results into account, we conclude that Sa-Lrp is a glutamine-responsive global transcriptional regulator with an additional architectural role. PMID:23255531

  20. Sa-Lrp from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is a versatile, glutamine-responsive, and architectural transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Vassart, Amelia; Van Wolferen, Marleen; Orell, Alvaro; Hong, Ye; Peeters, Eveline; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Charlier, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Sa-Lrp is a member of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-like family of transcriptional regulators in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Previously, we demonstrated the binding of Sa-Lrp to the control region of its own gene in vitro. However, the function and cofactor of Sa-Lrp remained an enigma. In this work, we demonstrate that glutamine is the cofactor of Sa-Lrp by inducing the formation of octamers and increasing the DNA-binding affinity and sequence specificity. In vitro protein-DNA interaction assays indicate that Sa-Lrp binds to promoter regions of genes with a variety of functions including ammonia assimilation, transcriptional control, and UV-induced pili synthesis. DNA binding occurs with a specific affinity for AT-rich binding sites, and the protein induces DNA bending and wrapping upon binding, indicating an architectural role of the regulator. Furthermore, by analyzing an Sa-lrp deletion mutant, we demonstrate that the protein affects transcription of some of the genes of which the promoter region is targeted and that it is an important determinant of the cellular aggregation phenotype. Taking all these results into account, we conclude that Sa-Lrp is a glutamine-responsive global transcriptional regulator with an additional architectural role.

  1. The transcription factor IDEF1 regulates the response to and tolerance of iron deficiency in plants.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Ogo, Yuko; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2007-11-27

    Iron is essential for most living organisms and is often the major limiting nutrient for normal growth. Plants induce iron utilization systems under conditions of low iron availability, but the molecular mechanisms of gene regulation under iron deficiency remain largely unknown. We identified the rice transcription factor IDEF1, which specifically binds the iron deficiency-responsive cis-acting element IDE1. IDEF1 belongs to an uncharacterized branch of the plant-specific transcription factor family ABI3/VP1 and exhibits the sequence recognition property of efficiently binding to the CATGC sequence within IDE1. IDEF1 transcripts are constitutively present in rice roots and leaves. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing IDEF1 under the control of the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter transactivate IDE1-mediated expression only in iron-deficient roots. Transgenic rice plants expressing an introduced IDEF1 exhibit substantial tolerance to iron deficiency in both hydroponic culture and calcareous soil. IDEF1 overexpression leads to the enhanced expression of the iron deficiency-induced transcription factor gene OsIRO2, suggesting the presence of a sequential gene regulatory network. These findings reveal cis element/trans factor interactions that are functionally linked to the iron deficiency response. Manipulation of IDEF1 also provides another approach for producing crops tolerant of iron deficiency to enhance food and biomass production in calcareous soils.

  2. Aldosterone-induced osteopontin gene transcription in vascular smooth muscle cells involves glucocorticoid response element.

    PubMed

    Kiyosue, Arihiro; Nagata, Daisuke; Myojo, Masahiro; Sato, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Masao; Satonaka, Hiroshi; Nagai, Ryozo; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2011-12-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is known to be one of the cytokines that is involved in the vascular inflammation caused by aldosterone (Aldo). Previous reports have shown that Aldo increases OPN transcripts, and the mechanisms for this remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated how Aldo increases OPN transcripts in the vascular smooth muscle cells of rats. Aldosterone increased OPN transcripts time-dependently as well as dose-dependently. This increase was diminished by eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist. Luciferase promoter assays showed that the OPN promoter deleted to the -1599 site retained the same promoting ability as the full-length OPN promoter when stimulated by 10(-7) M Aldo, but the promoter deleted to the -1300 site lost the promoting ability. A glucocorticoid response element (GRE) is located in that deleted region. Luciferase assays of a mutated promoter without the GRE lost the luciferase upregulation, although mutated promoters with the deletion of other consensus sites maintained the promoter activity. The binding of the Aldo-MR complex to the GRE fragment was confirmed by an electrophoretic-mobility shift assay. This is the first report showing that Aldo regulates the transcriptional levels of OPN and inflammatory responses in the vasculature through a specific GRE site in the OPN promoter region.

  3. c-Jun targets amino terminus of androgen receptor in regulating androgen-responsive transcription.

    PubMed

    Bubulya, A; Zhou, X F; Shen, X Q; Fisher, C J; Shemshedini, L

    2000-08-01

    The human androgen receptor (hAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-inducible transcription factor. We have previously proposed that c-Jun mediates the transcriptional activity of this receptor. The modular nature of hAR was used in this study to generate several fusions with the heterologous DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor GAL4 in an attempt to identify the c-Jun-responsive domains within the receptor. Our results suggest that the target of c-Jun action is the amino terminus (AB region) of the receptor and that hAR amino acids 502-521 are critical for the c-Jun response. Additionally, amino acids 503-555 were shown to harbor an autonomous transactivation that is stimulated by c-Jun. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transcription intermediary factor-2 (TIF-2), a coactivator that acts on the activation function-2, stimulates the full-length hAR. These results suggest that c-Jun and TIF-2 can work together as coactivators on the hAR by targeting distinct portions of the receptor.

  4. Serum response factor controls transcriptional network regulating epidermal function and hair follicle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Congxing; Hindes, Anna; Burns, Carole J; Koppel, Aaron C; Kiss, Alexi; Yin, Yan; Ma, Liang; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Khnykin, Denis; Jahnsen, Frode L; Crosby, Seth D; Ramanan, Narendrakumar; Efimova, Tatiana

    2013-03-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of growth-related immediate-early, cytoskeletal, and muscle-specific genes to control growth, differentiation, and cytoskeletal integrity in different cell types. To investigate the role for SRF in epidermal development and homeostasis, we conditionally knocked out SRF in epidermal keratinocytes. We report that SRF deletion disrupted epidermal barrier function leading to early postnatal lethality. Mice lacking SRF in epidermis displayed morphogenetic defects, including an eye-open-at-birth phenotype and lack of whiskers. SRF-null skin exhibited abnormal morphology, hyperplasia, aberrant expression of differentiation markers and transcriptional regulators, anomalous actin organization, enhanced inflammation, and retarded hair follicle (HF) development. Transcriptional profiling experiments uncovered profound molecular changes in SRF-null E17.5 epidermis and revealed that many previously identified SRF target CArG box-containing genes were markedly upregulated in SRF-null epidermis, indicating that SRF may function to repress transcription of a subset of its target genes in epidermis. Remarkably, when transplanted onto nude mice, engrafted SRF-null skin lacked hair but displayed normal epidermal architecture with proper expression of differentiation markers, suggesting that although keratinocyte SRF is essential for HF development, a cross-talk between SRF-null keratinocytes and the surrounding microenvironment is likely responsible for the barrier-deficient mutant epidermal phenotype.

  5. Transcriptional responses to loss of RNase H2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Mercedes E.; Kerns, Robnet T.; Wharey, Laura; Gerrish, Kevin E.; Bushel, Pierre R.; Kunkel, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    We report here the transcriptional responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to deletion of the RNH201 gene encoding the catalytic subunit of RNase H2. Deleting RNH201 alters RNA expression of 349 genes by ≥1.5-fold (q-value <0.01), of which 123 are upregulated and 226 are downregulated. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) include those involved in stress responses and genome maintenance, consistent with a role for RNase H2 in removing ribonucleotides incorporated into DNA during replication. Upregulated genes include several that encode subunits of RNA polymerases I and III, and genes involved in ribosomal RNA processing, ribosomal biogenesis and tRNA modification and processing, supporting a role for RNase H2 in resolving R-loops formed during transcription of rRNA and tRNA genes. A role in R-loop resolution is further suggested by a higher average GC-content proximal to the transcription start site of downregulated as compared to upregulated genes. Several DEGs are involved in telomere maintenance, supporting a role for RNase H2 in resolving RNA-DNA hybrids formed at telomeres. A large number of DEGs encode nucleases, helicases and genes involved in response to dsRNA viruses, observations that could be relevant to the nucleic acid species that elicit an innate immune response in RNase H2-defective humans. PMID:23079308

  6. Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to low temperature during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Deed, Rebecca C; Deed, Nathan K; Gardner, Richard C

    2015-04-01

    Although the yeast response to low temperature has industrial significance for baking, lager brewing and white wine fermentation, the molecular response of yeast cells to low temperature remains poorly characterised. Transcriptional changes were quantified in a commercial wine yeast, Enoferm M2, fermented at optimal (25 °C) and low temperature (12.5 °C), at two time points during fermentation of Sauvignon blanc grape juice. The transition from early to mid-late fermentation was notably less severe in the cold than at 25 °C, and the Rim15p-Gis1p pathway was involved in effecting this transition. Genes for three key nutrients were strongly influenced by low temperature fermentation: nitrogen, sulfur and iron/copper, along with changes in the cell wall and stress response. Transcriptional analyses during wine fermentation at 12.5 °C in four F1 hybrids of M2 also highlighted the importance of genes involved in nutrient utilisation and the stress response. We identified transcription factors that may be important for these differences between genetic backgrounds. Since low fermentation temperatures cause fundamental changes in membrane kinetics and cellular metabolism, an understanding of the physiological and genetic limitations on cellular performance will assist breeding of improved industrial strains.

  7. Transcriptional Responses in Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Exposed to Propranolol and Metoprolol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liwei; Liu, Fang; Chen, Haigang; Wang, Sisi; Lin, Xia; Chi, Jian; Zhu, Qing; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-08-01

    β-adrenergic receptor blockers (β-blockers) are widely detected in the aquatic environment; however, the effects of these pharmaceuticals on aquatic organisms remain uncertain. In this study, adult zebrafish were exposed to two different β-blockers, propranolol and metoprolol, for 96 h. After exposure, the transcriptional responses of genes encoding the β-adrenergic receptor (i.e., adrb1, adrb2a, adrb2b, adrb3a and adrb3b), genes involved in detoxification and the stress response (i.e., hsp70, tap, mt1 and mt2), and genes related to the antioxidant system (i.e., cu/zn-sod, mn-sod, cat and gpx) were examined in the brain, liver and gonad. Our results show that both propranolol and metoprolol exposure changes the mRNA level of β-adrenergic receptors, indicating clear pharmacological target engagement of the β-blockers. The transcription of genes related to antioxidant responses and detoxification process were induced, suggesting that β-blocker exposure can activate the detoxification process and result in oxidative stress in fish. Moreover, the transcriptional responses displayed substantial tissue- and gender-specific effects. Considering the environmental concentrations of propranolol and metoprolol, these results suggest that these pharmaceuticals are unlikely to pose a risk to fish. However, the impacts in prolonged exposure, along with other possible side effects due to β-adrenergic receptor blockade, should be further assessed.

  8. A Conserved Transcript Pattern in Response to a Specialist and a Generalist HerbivoreW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Van Poecke, Remco M.P.; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Dicke, Marcel; Farmer, Edward E.

    2004-01-01

    Transcript patterns elicited in response to attack reveal, at the molecular level, how plants respond to aggressors. These patterns are fashioned both by inflicted physical damage as well as by biological components displayed or released by the attacker. Different types of attacking organisms might therefore be expected to elicit different transcription programs in the host. Using a large-scale DNA microarray, we characterized gene expression in damaged as well as in distal Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in response to the specialist insect, Pieris rapae. More than 100 insect-responsive genes potentially involved in defense were identified, including genes involved in pathogenesis, indole glucosinolate metabolism, detoxification and cell survival, and signal transduction. Of these 114 genes, 111 were induced in Pieris feeding, and only three were repressed. Expression patterns in distal leaves were markedly similar to those of local leaves. Analysis of wild-type and jasmonate mutant plants, coupled with jasmonate treatment, showed that between 67 and 84% of Pieris-regulated gene expression was controlled, totally or in part, by the jasmonate pathway. This was correlated with increased larval performance on the coronatine insensitive1 glabrous1 (coi1-1 gl1) mutant. Independent mutations in COI1 and GL1 led to a faster larval weight gain, but the gl1 mutation had relatively little effect on the expression of the insect-responsive genes examined. Finally, we compared transcript patterns in Arabidopis in response to larvae of the specialist P. rapae and to a generalist insect, Spodoptera littoralis. Surprisingly, given the complex nature of insect salivary components and reported differences between species, almost identical transcript profiles were observed. This study also provides a robustly characterized gene set for the further investigation of plant–insect interaction. PMID:15494554

  9. Sex-related differences in murine hepatic transcriptional and proteomic responses to TCDD

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D.; Lee, Jamie; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2015-04-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that produces myriad toxicities in most mammals. In rodents alone, there is a huge divergence in the toxicological response across species, as well as among different strains within a species. But there are also significant differences between males and females animals of a single strain. These differences are inconsistent across model systems: the severity of toxicity is greater in female rats than males, while male mice and guinea pigs are more sensitive than females. Because the specific events that underlie this difference remain unclear, we characterized the hepatic transcriptional response of adult male and female C57BL/6 mice to 500 μg/kg TCDD at multiple time-points. The transcriptional profile diverged significantly between the sexes. Female mice demonstrated a large number of altered transcripts as early as 6 h following treatment, suggesting a large primary response. Conversely, male animals showed the greatest TCDD-mediated response 144 h following exposure, potentially implicating significant secondary responses. Nr1i3 was statistically significantly induced at all time-points in the sensitive male animals. This mRNA encodes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis. Surprisingly though, changes at the protein level (aside from the positive control, CYP1A1) were modest, with only FMO3 showing clear induction, and no genes with sex-differences. Thus, while male and female mice show transcriptional differences in their response to TCDD, their association with TCDD-induced toxicities remains unclear. - Highlights: • Differences exist between the toxicity phenotypes to TCDD in male and female mice. • TCDD-mediated transcriptomic differences were identified between the sexes. • Resistant female mice displayed a large, early-onset, transcriptomic response.

  10. mRNA quality control is bypassed for immediate export of stress-responsive transcripts.

    PubMed

    Zander, Gesa; Hackmann, Alexandra; Bender, Lysann; Becker, Daniel; Lingner, Thomas; Salinas, Gabriela; Krebber, Heike

    2016-12-12

    Cells grow well only in a narrow range of physiological conditions. Surviving extreme conditions requires the instantaneous expression of chaperones that help to overcome stressful situations. To ensure the preferential synthesis of these heat-shock proteins, cells inhibit transcription, pre-mRNA processing and nuclear export of non-heat-shock transcripts, while stress-specific mRNAs are exclusively exported and translated. How cells manage the selective retention of regular transcripts and the simultaneous rapid export of heat-shock mRNAs is largely unknown. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the shuttling RNA adaptor proteins Npl3, Gbp2, Hrb1 and Nab2 are loaded co-transcriptionally onto growing pre-mRNAs. For nuclear export, they recruit the export-receptor heterodimer Mex67-Mtr2 (TAP-p15 in humans). Here we show that cellular stress induces the dissociation of Mex67 and its adaptor proteins from regular mRNAs to prevent general mRNA export. At the same time, heat-shock mRNAs are rapidly exported in association with Mex67, without the need for adapters. The immediate co-transcriptional loading of Mex67 onto heat-shock mRNAs involves Hsf1, a heat-shock transcription factor that binds to heat-shock-promoter elements in stress-responsive genes. An important difference between the export modes is that adaptor-protein-bound mRNAs undergo quality control, whereas stress-specific transcripts do not. In fact, regular mRNAs are converted into uncontrolled stress-responsive transcripts if expressed under the control of a heat-shock promoter, suggesting that whether an mRNA undergoes quality control is encrypted therein. Under normal conditions, Mex67 adaptor proteins are recruited for RNA surveillance, with only quality-controlled mRNAs allowed to associate with Mex67 and leave the nucleus. Thus, at the cost of error-free mRNA formation, heat-shock mRNAs are exported and translated without delay, allowing cells to survive extreme situations.

  11. Functional interaction between responses to lactic acidosis and hypoxia regulates genomic transcriptional outputs

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaohu; Lucas, Joseph E.; Chen, Julia Ling-Yu; LaMonte, Gregory; Wu, Jianli; Wang, Michael Changsheng; Koumenis, Constantinos; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2011-01-01

    Within solid tumor microenvironments, lactic acidosis and hypoxia each have powerful effects on cancer pathophysiology. However, the influence that these processes exert on each other is unknown. Here we report that a significant portion of the transcriptional response to hypoxia elicited in cancer cells is abolished by simultaneous exposure to lactic acidosis. In particular, lactic acidosis abolished stabilization of HIF-1α protein which occurs normally under hypoxic conditions. In contrast, lactic acidosis strongly synergized with hypoxia to activate the unfolded protein response (UPR) and an inflammatory response, displaying a strong similarity to ATF4-driven amino acid deprivation responses (AAR). In certain breast tumors and breast tumor cells examined, an integrative analysis of gene expression and array CGH data revealed DNA copy number alterations at the ATF4 locus, an important activator of the UPR/AAR pathway. In this setting, varying ATF4 levels influenced the survival of cells after exposure to hypoxia and lactic acidosis. Our findings reveal that the condition of lactic acidosis present in solid tumors inhibits canonical hypoxia responses and activates UPR and inflammation responses. Further, they suggest that ATF4 status may be a critical determinant of the ability of cancer cells to adapt to oxygen and acidity fluctuations in the tumor microenvironment, perhaps linking short-term transcriptional responses to long-term selection for copy number alterations in cancer cells. PMID:22135092

  12. Functional analysis of a growth factor-responsive transcription factor complex.

    PubMed

    Hill, C S; Marais, R; John, S; Wynne, J; Dalton, S; Treisman, R

    1993-04-23

    Serum response factor (SRF) forms a ternary complex at the c-fos serum response element (SRE) with an accessory factor, Elk-1. We constructed altered-binding specificity derivatives of SRF and Elk-1 that form a ternary complex at a mutated, inactive SRE; like Elk-1, the Elk-1 variant only binds its target as part of a ternary complex with SRF. Simultaneous expression of these SRF and Elk-1 derivatives restores serum-regulated activity to the mutated SRE in transfected cells. Efficient transcriptional activation is dependent on the regulated phosphorylation of Elk-1 C-terminal MAP kinase sites and requires the C-terminal sequences of SRF as well as SRF sequences that mediate ternary complex formation. These experiments provide direct evidence that SRF and Elk-1 functionally cooperate in the ternary complex at the SRE to regulate transcription.

  13. Microarray analysis reveals overlapping and specific transcriptional responses to different plant hormones in rice

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rohini; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Jain, Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    Hormones exert pleiotropic effects on plant growth and development throughout the life cycle. Many of these effects are mediated at molecular level via altering gene expression. In this study, we investigated the exogenous effect of plant hormones, including auxin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, on the transcription of rice genes at whole genome level using microarray. Our analysis identified a total of 4171 genes involved in several biological processes, whose expression was altered significantly in the presence of different hormones. Further, 28% of these genes exhibited overlapping transcriptional responses in the presence of any two hormones, indicating crosstalk among plant hormones. In addition, we identified genes showing only a particular hormone-specific response, which can be used as hormone-specific markers. The results of this study will facilitate further studies in hormone biology in rice. PMID:22827941

  14. The Transcription Factor Foxo1 Controls Central Memory CD8+ T Cell Responses to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoungjoo V.; Ouyang, Weiming; Liao, Will; Zhang, Michael Q.; Li, Ming O.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Memory T cells protect hosts from pathogen reinfection, but how these cells emerge from a pool of antigen-experienced T cells is unclear. Here we show that mice lacking the transcription factor Foxo1 in activated CD8+ T cells had defective secondary, but not primary, responses to Listeria monocytogenes infection. Compared to short-lived effector T cells, memory precursor T cells expressed higher amounts of Foxo1, which promoted their generation and maintenance. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing experiments revealed the transcription factor Tcf7 and the chemokine receptor Ccr7 as Foxo1-bound target genes, which have critical functions in central memory T cell differentiation and trafficking. These findings demonstrate that Foxo1 is selectively incorporated into the genetic program that regulates memory CD8+ T cell responses to infection. PMID:23932570

  15. Histone ubiquitylation and its roles in transcription and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Meas, Rithy; Mao, Peng

    2015-12-01

    DNA in human cells is constantly assaulted by endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. It is vital for the cell to respond rapidly and precisely to DNA damage to maintain genome integrity and reduce the risk of mutagenesis. Sophisticated reactions occur in chromatin surrounding the damaged site leading to the activation of DNA damage response (DDR), including transcription reprogramming, cell cycle checkpoint, and DNA repair. Histone proteins around the DNA damage play essential roles in DDR, through extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs) by a variety of modifying enzymes. One PTM on histones, mono-ubiquitylation, has emerged as a key player in cellular response to DNA damage. In this review, we will (1) briefly summarize the history of histone H2A and H2B ubiquitylation (H2Aub and H2Bub, respectively), (2) discuss their roles in transcription, and (3) their functions in DDR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modular Transcriptional Networks of the Host Pulmonary Response during Early and Late Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Scicluna, Brendon P; van Lieshout, Miriam H; Blok, Dana C; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-05-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spneu) remains the most lethal bacterial pathogen and the dominant agent of community-acquired pneumonia. Treatment has perennially focused on the use of antibiotics, albeit scrutinized due to the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant Spneu strains. Immunomodulatory strategies have emerged as potential treatment options. Although promising, immunomodulation can lead to improper tissue functions either at steady state or upon infectious challenge. This argues for the availability of tools to enable a detailed assessment of whole pulmonary functions during the course of infection, not only those functions biased to the defense response. Thus, through the use of an unbiased tissue microarray and bioinformatics approach, we aimed to construct a comprehensive map of whole-lung transcriptional activity and cellular pathways during the course of pneumococcal pneumonia. We performed genome-wide transcriptional analysis of whole lungs before and 6 and 48 h after Spneu infection in mice. The 4,000 most variable transcripts across all samples were used to assemble a gene coexpression network comprising 13 intercorrelating modules (clusters of genes). Fifty-four percent of this whole-lung transcriptional network was altered 6 and 48 h after Spneu infection. Canonical signaling pathway analysis uncovered known pathways imparting protection, including IL17A/IL17F signaling and previously undetected mechanisms that included lipid metabolism. Through in silico prediction of cell types, pathways were observed to enrich for distinct cell types such as a novel stromal cell lipid metabolism pathway. These cellular mechanisms were furthermore anchored at functional hub genes of cellular fate, differentiation, growth and transcription. Collectively, we provide a benchmark unsupervised map of whole-lung transcriptional relationships and cellular activity during early and late pneumococcal pneumonia.

  17. A Simple Auxin Transcriptional Response System Regulates Multiple Morphogenetic Processes in the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Flores-Sandoval, Eduardo; Eklund, D Magnus; Bowman, John L

    2015-05-01

    In land plants comparative genomics has revealed that members of basal lineages share a common set of transcription factors with the derived flowering plants, despite sharing few homologous structures. The plant hormone auxin has been implicated in many facets of development in both basal and derived lineages of land plants. We functionally characterized the auxin transcriptional response machinery in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, a member of the basal lineage of extant land plants. All components known from flowering plant systems are present in M. polymorpha, but they exist as single orthologs: a single MpTOPLESS (TPL) corepressor, a single MpTRANSPORT inhibitor response 1 auxin receptor, single orthologs of each class of auxin response factor (ARF; MpARF1, MpARF2, MpARF3), and a single negative regulator auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (MpIAA). Phylogenetic analyses suggest this simple system is the ancestral condition for land plants. We experimentally demonstrate that these genes act in an auxin response pathway--chimeric fusions of the MpTPL corepressor with heterodimerization domains of MpARF1, MpARF2, or their negative regulator, MpIAA, generate auxin insensitive plants that lack the capacity to pattern and transition into mature stages of development. Our results indicate auxin mediated transcriptional regulation acts as a facilitator of branching, differentiation and growth, rather than acting to determine or specify tissues during the haploid stage of the M. polymorpha life cycle. We hypothesize that the ancestral role of auxin is to modulate a balance of differentiated and pluri- or totipotent cell states, whose fates are determined by interactions with combinations of unrelated transcription factors.

  18. A Simple Auxin Transcriptional Response System Regulates Multiple Morphogenetic Processes in the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Sandoval, Eduardo; Eklund, D. Magnus; Bowman, John L.

    2015-01-01

    In land plants comparative genomics has revealed that members of basal lineages share a common set of transcription factors with the derived flowering plants, despite sharing few homologous structures. The plant hormone auxin has been implicated in many facets of development in both basal and derived lineages of land plants. We functionally characterized the auxin transcriptional response machinery in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, a member of the basal lineage of extant land plants. All components known from flowering plant systems are present in M. polymorpha, but they exist as single orthologs: a single MpTOPLESS (TPL) corepressor, a single MpTRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 auxin receptor, single orthologs of each class of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF; MpARF1, MpARF2, MpARF3), and a single negative regulator AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (MpIAA). Phylogenetic analyses suggest this simple system is the ancestral condition for land plants. We experimentally demonstrate that these genes act in an auxin response pathway — chimeric fusions of the MpTPL corepressor with heterodimerization domains of MpARF1, MpARF2, or their negative regulator, MpIAA, generate auxin insensitive plants that lack the capacity to pattern and transition into mature stages of development. Our results indicate auxin mediated transcriptional regulation acts as a facilitator of branching, differentiation and growth, rather than acting to determine or specify tissues during the haploid stage of the M. polymorpha life cycle. We hypothesize that the ancestral role of auxin is to modulate a balance of differentiated and pluri- or totipotent cell states, whose fates are determined by interactions with combinations of unrelated transcription factors. PMID:26020649

  19. A Semi-Supervised Approach for Refining Transcriptional Signatures of Drug Response and Repositioning Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Francesco; Shrestha, Roshan L.; Levin, Nicolas; Boilot, Viviane; Garnett, Mathew J.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Draviam, Viji M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel strategy to identify drug-repositioning opportunities. The starting point of our method is the generation of a signature summarising the consensual transcriptional response of multiple human cell lines to a compound of interest (namely the seed compound). This signature can be derived from data in existing databases, such as the connectivity-map, and it is used at first instance to query a network interlinking all the connectivity-map compounds, based on the similarity of their transcriptional responses. This provides a drug neighbourhood, composed of compounds predicted to share some effects with the seed one. The original signature is then refined by systematically reducing its overlap with the transcriptional responses induced by drugs in this neighbourhood that are known to share a secondary effect with the seed compound. Finally, the drug network is queried again with the resulting refined signatures and the whole process is carried on for a number of iterations. Drugs in the final refined neighbourhood are then predicted to exert the principal mode of action of the seed compound. We illustrate our approach using paclitaxel (a microtubule stabilising agent) as seed compound. Our method predicts that glipizide and splitomicin perturb microtubule function in human cells: a result that could not be obtained through standard signature matching methods. In agreement, we find that glipizide and splitomicin reduce interphase microtubule growth rates and transiently increase the percentage of mitotic cells–consistent with our prediction. Finally, we validated the refined signatures of paclitaxel response by mining a large drug screening dataset, showing that human cancer cell lines whose basal transcriptional profile is anti-correlated to them are significantly more sensitive to paclitaxel and docetaxel. PMID:26452147

  20. Mga2 Transcription Factor Regulates an Oxygen-responsive Lipid Homeostasis Pathway in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Risa; Stewart, Emerson V.; Shao, Wei; Zhao, Shan; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Ejsing, Christer S.; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic lipid synthesis is oxygen-dependent with cholesterol synthesis requiring 11 oxygen molecules and fatty acid desaturation requiring 1 oxygen molecule per double bond. Accordingly, organisms evaluate oxygen availability to control lipid homeostasis. The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipid homeostasis. In mammals, SREBP-2 controls cholesterol biosynthesis, whereas SREBP-1 controls triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the SREBP-2 homolog Sre1 regulates sterol homeostasis in response to changing sterol and oxygen levels. However, notably missing is an SREBP-1 analog that regulates triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis in response to low oxygen. Consistent with this, studies have shown that the Sre1 transcription factor regulates only a fraction of all genes up-regulated under low oxygen. To identify new regulators of low oxygen adaptation, we screened the S. pombe nonessential haploid deletion collection and identified 27 gene deletions sensitive to both low oxygen and cobalt chloride, a hypoxia mimetic. One of these genes, mga2, is a putative transcriptional activator. In the absence of mga2, fission yeast exhibited growth defects under both normoxia and low oxygen conditions. Mga2 transcriptional targets were enriched for lipid metabolism genes, and mga2Δ cells showed disrupted triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis, most notably with an increase in fatty acid saturation. Indeed, addition of exogenous oleic acid to mga2Δ cells rescued the observed growth defects. Together, these results establish Mga2 as a transcriptional regulator of triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis in S. pombe, analogous to mammalian SREBP-1. PMID:27053105

  1. A composite transcriptional signature differentiates responses towards closely related herbicides in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Das, Malay; Reichman, Jay R; Haberer, Georg; Welzl, Gerhard; Aceituno, Felipe F; Mader, Michael T; Watrud, Lidia S; Pfleeger, Thomas G; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Schäffner, Anton R; Olszyk, David M

    2010-03-01

    In this study, genome-wide expression profiling based on Affymetrix ATH1 arrays was used to identify discriminating responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to five herbicides, which contain active ingredients targeting two different branches of amino acid biosynthesis. One herbicide contained glyphosate, which targets 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), while the other four herbicides contain different acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibiting compounds. In contrast to the herbicide containing glyphosate, which affected only a few transcripts, many effects of the ALS inhibiting herbicides were revealed based on transcriptional changes related to ribosome biogenesis and translation, secondary metabolism, cell wall modification and growth. The expression pattern of a set of 101 genes provided a specific, composite signature that was distinct from other major stress responses and differentiated among herbicides targeting the same enzyme (ALS) or containing the same chemical class of active ingredient (sulfonylurea). A set of homologous genes could be identified in Brassica napus that exhibited a similar expression pattern and correctly distinguished exposure to the five herbicides. Our results show the ability of a limited number of genes to classify and differentiate responses to closely related herbicides in A. thaliana and B. napus and the transferability of a complex transcriptional signature across species.

  2. Physiological and Transcriptional Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Zinc Limitation in Chemostat Cultures †

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Raffaele; Hazelwood, Lucie A.; De Hulster, Erik A. F.; Walsh, Michael C.; Knijnenburg, Theo A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Walker, Graeme M.; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional responses of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Zn availability were investigated at a fixed specific growth rate under limiting and abundant Zn concentrations in chemostat culture. To investigate the context dependency of this transcriptional response and eliminate growth rate-dependent variations in transcription, yeast was grown under several chemostat regimens, resulting in various carbon (glucose), nitrogen (ammonium), zinc, and oxygen supplies. A robust set of genes that responded consistently to Zn limitation was identified, and the set enabled the definition of the Zn-specific Zap1p regulon, comprised of 26 genes and characterized by a broader zinc-responsive element consensus (MHHAACCBYNMRGGT) than so far described. Most surprising was the Zn-dependent regulation of genes involved in storage carbohydrate metabolism. Their concerted down-regulation was physiologically relevant as revealed by a substantial decrease in glycogen and trehalose cellular content under Zn limitation. An unexpectedly large number of genes were synergistically or antagonistically regulated by oxygen and Zn availability. This combinatorial regulation suggested a more prominent involvement of Zn in mitochondrial biogenesis and function than hitherto identified. PMID:17933919

  3. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-06-03

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting.

  4. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; D’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting.

  5. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  6. Early transcriptional response to biotic stress in mixed starter fermentations involving Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii.

    PubMed

    Tronchoni, Jordi; Curiel, Jose Antonio; Morales, Pilar; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2017-01-16

    Advances in microbial wine biotechnology have led to the recent commercialization of several non-Saccharomyces starter cultures. These are intended to be used in either simultaneous or sequential inoculation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The different types of microbial interactions that can be stablished during wine fermentation acquire an increased relevance in the context of these mixed-starter fermentations. We analysed the transcriptional response to co-cultivation of S. cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii. The study focused in the initial stages of wine fermentation, before S. cerevisiae completely dominates the mixed cultures. Both species showed a clear response to the presence of each other, even though the portion of the genome showing altered transcription levels was relatively small. Changes in the transcription pattern suggested a stimulation of metabolic activity and growth, as a consequence of the presence of competitors in the same medium. The response of S. cerevisiae seems to take place earlier, as compared to T. delbrueckii. Enhanced glycolytic activity of the mixed culture was confirmed by the CO2 production profile during these early stages of fermentation. Interestingly, HSP12 expression appeared induced by co-cultivation for both of S. cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii in the two time points studied. This might be related with a recently described role of Hsp12 in intercellular communication in yeast. Expression of S. cerevisiae PAU genes was also stimulated in mixed cultures.

  7. GH3-Mediated Auxin Conjugation Can Result in Either Transient or Oscillatory Transcriptional Auxin Responses.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Nathan; Bennett, Malcolm J; King, John R

    2016-02-01

    The conjugation of the phytohormone auxin to amino acids via members of the gene family GH3 is an important component in the auxin-degradation pathway in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, as well as many other plant species. Since the GH3 genes are themselves up-regulated in response to auxin, providing a negative feedback on intracellular auxin levels, it is hypothesised that the GH3s have a role in auxin homoeostasis. To investigate this, we develop a mathematical model of auxin signalling and response that includes the auxin-inducible negative feedback from GH3 on the rate of auxin degradation. In addition, we include a positive feedback on the rate of auxin input via the auxin influx transporter LAX3, shown previously to be expressed in response to auxin and to have an important role during lateral root emergence. In the absence of the LAX3 positive feedback, we show that the GH3 negative feedback suffices to generate a transient transcriptional response to auxin in the shape of damped oscillations of the model system. When LAX3 positive feedback is present, sustained oscillations of the system are possible. Using steady-state analyses, we identify and discuss key parameters affecting the oscillatory behaviour of the model. The transient peak of auxin and subsequent transcriptional response caused by the up-regulation of GH3 represents a possible protective homoeostasis mechanism that may be used by plant cells in response to excess auxin.

  8. Transcriptional profiling of chickpea genes differentially regulated in response to high-salinity, cold and drought

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Nitin L; Ford, Rebecca; Coram, Tristan E; Pang, Edwin CK

    2007-01-01

    Background Cultivated chickpea (Cicer arietinum) has a narrow genetic base making it difficult for breeders to produce new elite cultivars with durable resistance to major biotic and abiotic stresses. As an alternative to genome mapping, microarrays have recently been applied in crop species to identify and assess the function of putative genes thought to be involved in plant abiotic stress and defence responses. In the present study, a cDNA microarray approach was taken in order to determine if the transcription of genes, from a set of previously identified putative stress-responsive genes from chickpea and its close relative Lathyrus sativus, were altered in chickpea by the three abiotic stresses; drought, cold and high-salinity. For this, chickpea genotypes known to be tolerant and susceptible to each abiotic stress were challenged and gene expression in the leaf, root and/or flower tissues was studied. The transcripts that were differentially expressed among stressed and unstressed plants in response to the particular stress were analysed in the context of tolerant/susceptible genotypes. Results The transcriptional change of more than two fold was observed for 109, 210 and 386 genes after drought, cold and high-salinity treatments, respectively. Among these, two, 15 and 30 genes were consensually differentially expressed (DE) between tolerant and susceptible genotypes studied for drought, cold and high-salinity, respectively. The genes that were DE in tolerant and susceptible genotypes under abiotic stresses code for various functional and regulatory proteins. Significant differences in stress responses were observed within and between tolerant and susceptible genotypes highlighting the multiple gene control and complexity of abiotic stress response mechanism in chickpea. Conclusion The annotation of these genes suggests that they may have a role in abiotic stress response and are potential candidates for tolerance/susceptibility. PMID:17764573

  9. Sleep is not just for the brain: transcriptional responses to sleep in peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many have assumed that the primary function of sleep is for the brain. We evaluated the molecular consequences of sleep and sleep deprivation outside the brain, in heart and lung. Using microarrays we compared gene expression in tissue from sleeping and sleep deprived mice euthanized at the same diurnal times. Results In each tissue, nearly two thousand genes demonstrated statistically significant differential expression as a function of sleep/wake behavioral state. To mitigate the influence of an artificial deprivation protocol, we identified a subset of these transcripts as specifically sleep-enhanced or sleep-repressed by requiring that their expression also change over the course of unperturbed sleep. 3% and 6% of the assayed transcripts showed “sleep specific” changes in the lung and heart respectively. Sleep specific transcripts in these tissues demonstrated highly significant overlap and shared temporal dynamics. Markers of cellular stress and the unfolded protein response were reduced during sleep in both tissues. These results mirror previous findings in brain. Sleep-enhanced pathways reflected the unique metabolic functions of each tissue. Transcripts related to carbohydrate and sulfur metabolic processes were enhanced by sleep in the lung, and collectively favor buffering from oxidative stress. DNA repair and protein metabolism annotations were significantly enriched among the sleep-enhanced transcripts in the heart. Our results also suggest that sleep may provide a Zeitgeber, or synchronizing cue, in the lung as a large cluster of transcripts demonstrated systematic changes in inter-animal variability as a function of both sleep duration and circadian time. Conclusion Our data support the notion that the molecular consequences of sleep/wake behavioral state extend beyond the brain to include peripheral tissues. Sleep state induces a highly overlapping response in both heart and lung. We conclude that sleep enhances organ specific

  10. Dose-specific transcriptional responses in thyroid tissue in mice after (131)I administration.

    PubMed

    Rudqvist, Nils; Schüler, Emil; Parris, Toshima Z; Langen, Britta; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2015-03-01

    In the present investigation, microarray analysis was used to monitor transcriptional activity in thyroids in mice 24 h after (131)I exposure. The aims of this study were to 1) assess the transcriptional patterns associated with (131)I exposure in normal mouse thyroid tissue and 2) propose biomarkers for (131)I exposure of the thyroid. Adult BALB/c nude mice were i.v. injected with 13, 130 or 260 kBq of (131)I and killed 24h after injection (absorbed dose to thyroid: 0.85, 8.5, or 17 Gy). Mock-treated mice were used as controls. Total RNA was extracted from thyroids and processed using the Illumina platform. In total, 497, 546, and 90 transcripts were regulated (fold change ≥1.5) in the thyroid after 0.85, 8.5, and 17 Gy, respectively. These were involved in several biological functions, e.g. oxygen access, inflammation and immune response, and apoptosis/anti-apoptosis. Approximately 50% of the involved transcripts at each absorbed dose level were dose-specific, and 18 transcripts were commonly detected at all absorbed dose levels. The Agpat9, Plau, Prf1, and S100a8 gene expression displayed a monotone decrease in regulation with absorbed dose, and further studies need to be performed to evaluate if they may be useful as dose-related biomarkers for 131I exposure. Distinct and substantial differences in gene expression and affected biological functions were detected at the different absorbed dose levels. The transcriptional profiles were specific for the different absorbed dose levels. We propose that the Agpat9, Plau, Prf1, and S100a8 genes might be novel potential absorbed dose-related biomarkers to (131)I exposure of thyroid. During the recent years, genomic techniques have been developed; however, they have not been fully utilized in nuclear medicine and radiation biology. We have used RNA microarrays to investigate genome-wide transcriptional regulations in thyroid tissue in mice after low, intermediate, and high absorbed doses from (131)I exposure in vivo

  11. Characterization of a novel Medicago sativa NAC transcription factor gene involved in response to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Xin

    2013-11-01

    Relying on the regulation of transcription factors, plants resist to various abiotic and biotic stresses. NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2, CUC2) are one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors and known to play important roles in plant development and response to environmental stresses. A new NAC gene was cloned on the basis of 503 bp EST fragment from the SSH cDNA library of Medicago sativa. It was 1,115 bp including an 816 bp ORF and encodes 271 amino acids. A highly conserved region is located from the 7th amino acid to the 315th amino acid in its N-terminal domain. The NAC protein is subcellularly localized in the nucleus of onion epidemical cells and possible functions as a transcription factor. The relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed at different stress time. The results revealed that the transcription expression of NAC gene could be induced by drought, high salinity and ABA. The transgenic Arabidopsis with NAC gene has the drought tolerance better than the wild-type.

  12. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Rita; Schwarz, Christoph; Furtwängler, Katarina; Tarasov, Valery; Wende, Andy; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2010-05-28

    Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F) and lrpA1 (OE2621R), were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  13. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F) and lrpA1 (OE2621R), were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3. PMID:20509863

  14. Tomato Whole Genome Transcriptional Response to Tetranychus urticae Identifies Divergence of Spider Mite-Induced Responses Between Tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Martel, Catherine; Zhurov, Vladimir; Navarro, Marie; Martinez, Manuel; Cazaux, Marc; Auger, Philippe; Migeon, Alain; Santamaria, M Estrella; Wybouw, Nicky; Diaz, Isabel; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Navajas, Maria; Grbic, Miodrag; Grbic, Vojislava

    2015-03-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most significant mite pests in agriculture, feeding on more than 1,100 plant hosts, including model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Here, we describe timecourse tomato transcriptional responses to spider mite feeding and compare them with Arabidopsis in order to determine conserved and divergent defense responses to this pest. To refine the involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in mite-induced responses and to improve tomato Gene Ontology annotations, we analyzed transcriptional changes in the tomato JA-signaling mutant defenseless1 (def-1) upon JA treatment and spider mite herbivory. Overlay of differentially expressed genes (DEG) identified in def-1 onto those from the timecourse experiment established that JA controls expression of the majority of genes differentially regulated by herbivory. Comparison of defense responses between tomato and Arabidopsis highlighted 96 orthologous genes (of 2,133 DEG) that were recruited for defense against spider mites in both species. These genes, involved in biosynthesis of JA, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, and terpenoids, represent the conserved core of induced defenses. The remaining tomato DEG support the establishment of tomato-specific defenses, indicating profound divergence of spider mite-induced responses between tomato and Arabidopsis.

  15. The Transcriptional Response of Caenorhabditis elegans to Ivermectin Exposure Identifies Novel Genes Involved in the Response to Reduced Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Steven T.; Ivens, Al; Butler, Victoria; Ravikumar, Sai P.; Laing, Roz; Woods, Debra J.; Gilleard, John S.

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the transcriptional response of Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to the anthelmintic drug ivermectin (IVM) using whole genome microarrays and real-time QPCR. Our original aim was to identify candidate molecules involved in IVM metabolism and/or excretion. For this reason the IVM tolerant strain, DA1316, was used to minimise transcriptomic changes related to the phenotype of drug exposure. However, unlike equivalent work with benzimidazole drugs, very few of the induced genes were members of xenobiotic metabolising enzyme families. Instead, the transcriptional response was dominated by genes associated with fat mobilization and fatty acid metabolism including catalase, esterase, and fatty acid CoA synthetase genes. This is consistent with the reduction in pharyngeal pumping, and consequential reduction in food intake, upon exposure of DA1316 worms to IVM. Genes with the highest fold change in response to IVM exposure, cyp-37B1, mtl-1 and scl-2, were comparably up-regulated in response to short–term food withdrawal (4 hr) independent of IVM exposure, and GFP reporter constructs confirm their expression in tissues associated with fat storage (intestine and hypodermis). These experiments have serendipitously identified novel genes involved in an early response of C. elegans to reduced food intake and may provide insight into similar processes in higher organisms. PMID:22348077

  16. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor NAC016 Promotes Drought Stress Responses by Repressing AREB1 Transcription through a Trifurcate Feed-Forward Regulatory Loop Involving NAP[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Kim, Ye-Sol; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Drought and other abiotic stresses negatively affect plant growth and development and thus reduce productivity. The plant-specific NAM/ATAF1/2/CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors have important roles in abiotic stress-responsive signaling. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana NAC016 is involved in drought stress responses; nac016 mutants have high drought tolerance, and NAC016-overexpressing (NAC016-OX) plants have low drought tolerance. Using genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis and MEME motif searches, we identified the NAC016-specific binding motif (NAC16BM), GATTGGAT[AT]CA, in the promoters of genes downregulated in nac016-1 mutants. The NAC16BM sequence does not contain the core NAC binding motif CACG (or its reverse complement CGTG). NAC016 directly binds to the NAC16BM in the promoter of ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN1 (AREB1), which encodes a central transcription factor in the stress-responsive abscisic acid signaling pathway and represses AREB1 transcription. We found that knockout mutants of the NAC016 target gene NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI (NAP) also exhibited strong drought tolerance; moreover, NAP binds to the AREB1 promoter and suppresses AREB1 transcription. Taking these results together, we propose that a trifurcate feed-forward pathway involving NAC016, NAP, and AREB1 functions in the drought stress response, in addition to affecting leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. PMID:26059204

  17. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor NAC016 Promotes Drought Stress Responses by Repressing AREB1 Transcription through a Trifurcate Feed-Forward Regulatory Loop Involving NAP.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Kim, Ye-Sol; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-06-01

    Drought and other abiotic stresses negatively affect plant growth and development and thus reduce productivity. The plant-specific NAM/ATAF1/2/CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors have important roles in abiotic stress-responsive signaling. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana NAC016 is involved in drought stress responses; nac016 mutants have high drought tolerance, and NAC016-overexpressing (NAC016-OX) plants have low drought tolerance. Using genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis and MEME motif searches, we identified the NAC016-specific binding motif (NAC16BM), GATTGGAT[AT]CA, in the promoters of genes downregulated in nac016-1 mutants. The NAC16BM sequence does not contain the core NAC binding motif CACG (or its reverse complement CGTG). NAC016 directly binds to the NAC16BM in the promoter of ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN1 (AREB1), which encodes a central transcription factor in the stress-responsive abscisic acid signaling pathway and represses AREB1 transcription. We found that knockout mutants of the NAC016 target gene NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI (NAP) also exhibited strong drought tolerance; moreover, NAP binds to the AREB1 promoter and suppresses AREB1 transcription. Taking these results together, we propose that a trifurcate feed-forward pathway involving NAC016, NAP, and AREB1 functions in the drought stress response, in addition to affecting leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

  18. Adaptation of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator to activate transcription in plants.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Verner, Eva; Salem, Tarek A; Gurley, William B

    2016-02-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator of the VirA/VirG two-component system was adapted to function in tobacco protoplasts. The subcellular localization of VirG and VirA proteins transiently expressed in onion cells was determined using GFP fusions. Preliminary studies using Gal4DBD-VP16 fusions with VirG and Escherichia coli UhpA, and NarL response regulators indicated compatibility of these bacterial proteins with the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus. A strong transcriptional activator based on tandem activation domains from the Drosophila fushi tarazu and Herpes simplex VP16 was created. Selected configurations of the two-site Gal4-vir box GUS reporters were activated by chimeric effectors dependent on either the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain or that of VirG. Transcriptional induction of the GUS reporter was highest for the VirE19-element promoter with both constitutive and wild-type VirG-tandem activation domain effectors. Multiple VirE19 elements increased the reporter activity proportionately, indicating that the VirG DNA binding domain was functional in plants. The VirG constitutive-Q-VP16 effector was more active than the VirG wild-type. In both the constitutive and wild-type forms of VirG, Q-VP16 activated transcription of the GUS reporter best when located at the C-terminus, i.e. juxtaposed to the VirG DNA binding domain. These results demonstrate the possibility of using DNA binding domains from bacterial response regulators and their cognate binding elements in the engineering of plant gene expression.

  19. Two Regulators of Ste12p Inhibit Pheromone-Responsive Transcription by Separate Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Olson, K. Amy; Nelson, Chris; Tai, Georgia; Hung, Wesley; Yong, Carl; Astell, Caroline; Sadowski, Ivan

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Ste12p is responsible for activating genes in response to MAP kinase cascades controlling mating and filamentous growth. Ste12p is negatively regulated by two inhibitor proteins, Dig1p (also called Rst1p) and Dig2p (also called Rst2p). The expression of a C-terminal Ste12p fragment (residues 216 to 688) [Ste12p(216–688)] from a GAL promoter causes FUS1 induction in a strain expressing wild-type STE12, suggesting that this region can cause the activation of endogenous Ste12p. Residues 262 to 594 are sufficient to cause STE12-dependent FUS1 induction when overexpressed, and this region of Ste12p was found to bind Dig1p but not Dig2p in yeast extracts. In contrast, recombinant glutathione S-transferase–Dig2p binds to the Ste12p DNA-binding domain (DBD). Expression of DIG2, but not DIG1, from a GAL promoter inhibits transcriptional activation by an Ste12p DBD-VP16 fusion. Furthermore, disruption of dig1, but not dig2, causes elevated transcriptional activation by a LexA–Ste12p(216–688) fusion. Ste12p has multiple regions within the C terminus (flanking residue 474) that can promote multimerization in vitro, and we demonstrate that these interactions can contribute to the activation of endogenous Ste12p by overproduced C-terminal fragments. These results demonstrate that Dig1p and Dig2p do not function by redundant mechanisms but rather inhibit pheromone-responsive transcription through interactions with separate regions of Ste12p. PMID:10825185

  20. p53 and RAD9, the DNA Damage Response, and Regulation of Transcription Networks.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Howard B; Panigrahi, Sunil K; Hopkins, Kevin M; Wang, Li; Broustas, Constantinos G

    2017-04-01

    The way cells respond to DNA damage is important since inefficient repair or misrepair of lesions can have deleterious consequences, including mutation, genomic instability, neurodegenerative disorders, premature aging, cancer or death. Whether damage occurs spontaneously as a byproduct of normal metabolic processes, or after exposure to exogenous agents, cells muster a coordinated, complex DNA damage response (DDR) to mitigate potential harmful effects. A variety of activities are involved to promote cell survival, and include DNA repair, DNA damage tolerance, as well as transient cell cycle arrest to provide time for repair before entry into critical cell cycle phases, an event that could be lethal if traversal occurs while damage is present. When such damage is prolonged or not repairable, senescence, apoptosis or autophagy is induced. One major level of DDR regulation occurs via the orchestrated transcriptional control of select sets of genes encoding proteins that mediate the response. p53 is a transcription factor that transactivates specific DDR downstream genes through binding DNA consensus sequences usually in or near target gene promoter regions. The profile of p53-regulated genes activated at any given time varies, and is dependent upon type of DNA damage or stress experienced, exact composition of the consensus DNA binding sequence, presence of other DNA binding proteins, as well as cell context. RAD9 is another protein critical for the response of cells to DNA damage, and can also selectively regulate gene transcription. The limited studies addressing the role of RAD9 in transcription regulation indicate that the protein transactivates at least one of its target genes, p21/waf1/cip1, by binding to DNA sequences demonstrated to be a p53 response element. NEIL1 is also regulated by RAD9 through a similar DNA sequence, though not yet directly verified as a bonafide p53 response element. These findings suggest a novel pathway whereby p53 and RAD9 control

  1. Transcriptional Profiling Implicates Novel Interactions between Abiotic Stress and Hormonal Responses in Thellungiella, a Close Relative of Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chui E.; Li, Yong; Labbe, Aurelie; Guevara, David; Nuin, Paulo; Whitty, Brett; Diaz, Claudia; Golding, G. Brian; Gray, Gordon R.; Weretilnyk, Elizabeth A.; Griffith, Marilyn; Moffatt, Barbara A.

    2006-01-01

    Thellungiella, an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana)-related halophyte, is an emerging model species for studies designed to elucidate molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance. Using a cDNA microarray containing 3,628 unique sequences derived from previously described libraries of stress-induced cDNAs of the Yukon ecotype of Thellungiella salsuginea, we obtained transcript profiles of its response to cold, salinity, simulated drought, and rewatering after simulated drought. A total of 154 transcripts were differentially regulated under the conditions studied. Only six of these genes responded to all three stresses of drought, cold, and salinity, indicating a divergence among the end responses triggered by each of these stresses. Unlike in Arabidopsis, there were relatively few transcript changes in response to high salinity in this halophyte. Furthermore, the gene products represented among drought-responsive transcripts in Thellungiella associate a down-regulation of defense-related transcripts with exposure to water deficits. This antagonistic interaction between drought and biotic stress response may demonstrate Thellungiella's ability to respond precisely to environmental stresses, thereby conserving energy and resources and maximizing its survival potential. Intriguingly, changes of transcript abundance in response to cold implicate the involvement of jasmonic acid. While transcripts associated with photosynthetic processes were repressed by cold, physiological responses in plants developed at low temperature suggest a novel mechanism for photosynthetic acclimation. Taken together, our results provide useful starting points for more in-depth analyses of Thellungiella's extreme stress tolerance. PMID:16500996

  2. The Tudor Staphylococcal Nuclease Protein of Entamoeba histolytica Participates in Transcription Regulation and Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Cázares-Apátiga, Javier; Medina-Gómez, Christian; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Calixto-Gálvez, Mercedes; Orozco, Esther; Vázquez-Calzada, Carlos; Martínez-Higuera, Aarón; Rodríguez, Mario A.

    2017-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoa parasite responsible of human amoebiasis, disease that causes from 40,000 to 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. However, few are known about the expression regulation of molecules involved in its pathogenicity. Transcription of some virulence-related genes is positively controlled by the cis-regulatory element named URE1. Previously we identified the transcription factor that binds to URE1, which displayed a nuclear and cytoplasmic localization. This protein belongs to the Tudor Staphyococcal nuclease (TSN) family, which in other systems participates in virtually all pathways of gene expression, suggesting that this amoebic transcription factor (EhTSN; former EhURE1BP) could also play multiple functions in E. histolytica. The aim of this study was to identify the possible cellular events where EhTSN is involved. Here, we found that EhTSN in nucleus is located in euchromatin and close to, but not into, heterochromatin. We also showed the association of EhTSN with proteins involved in transcription and that the knockdown of EhTSN provokes a diminishing in the mRNA level of the EhRabB gene, which in its promoter region contains the URE1 motif, confirming that EhTSN participates in transcription regulation. In cytoplasm, this protein was found linked to the membrane of small vesicles and to plasma membrane. Through pull-down assays and mass spectrometry we identity thirty two candidate proteins to interact with EhTSN. These proteins participate in transcription, metabolism, signaling, and stress response, among other cellular processes. Interaction of EhTSN with some candidate proteins involved in metabolism, and signaling was validated by co-immunoprecipitation or co-localization. Finally we showed the co-localization of EhTSN and HSP70 in putative stress granules during heat shock and that the knockdown of EhTSN increases the cell death during heat shock treatment, reinforcing the hypothesis that EhTSN has a role during stress

  3. Comprehensive analysis suggests overlapping expression of rice ONAC transcription factors in abiotic and biotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming; Li, Dayong

    2015-02-17

    NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC) transcription factors comprise a large plant-specific gene family that contains more than 149 members in rice. Extensive studies have revealed that NAC transcription factors not only play important roles in plant growth and development, but also have functions in regulation of responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, biological functions for most of the members in the NAC family remain unknown. In this study, microarray data analyses revealed that a total of 63 ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression patterns in rice under various abiotic (salt, drought, and cold) and biotic (infection by fungal, bacterial, viral pathogens, and parasitic plants) stresses. Thirty-eight ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression in response to any two abiotic stresses, among which 16 of 30 selected ONAC genes were upregulated in response to exogenous ABA. Sixty-five ONAC genes showed overlapping expression patterns in response to any two biotic stresses. Results from the present study suggested that members of the ONAC genes with overlapping expression pattern may have pleiotropic biological functions in regulation of defense response against different abiotic and biotic stresses, which provide clues for further functional analysis of the ONAC genes in stress tolerance and pathogen resistance.

  4. Comprehensive Analysis Suggests Overlapping Expression of Rice ONAC Transcription Factors in Abiotic and Biotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lijun; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming; Li, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC) transcription factors comprise a large plant-specific gene family that contains more than 149 members in rice. Extensive studies have revealed that NAC transcription factors not only play important roles in plant growth and development, but also have functions in regulation of responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, biological functions for most of the members in the NAC family remain unknown. In this study, microarray data analyses revealed that a total of 63 ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression patterns in rice under various abiotic (salt, drought, and cold) and biotic (infection by fungal, bacterial, viral pathogens, and parasitic plants) stresses. Thirty-eight ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression in response to any two abiotic stresses, among which 16 of 30 selected ONAC genes were upregulated in response to exogenous ABA. Sixty-five ONAC genes showed overlapping expression patterns in response to any two biotic stresses. Results from the present study suggested that members of the ONAC genes with overlapping expression pattern may have pleiotropic biological functions in regulation of defense response against different abiotic and biotic stresses, which provide clues for further functional analysis of the ONAC genes in stress tolerance and pathogen resistance. PMID:25690040

  5. ABA-mediated transcriptional regulation in response to osmotic stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yasunari; Fujita, Miki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2011-07-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a pivotal role in a variety of developmental processes and adaptive stress responses to environmental stimuli in plants. Cellular dehydration during the seed maturation and vegetative growth stages induces an increase in endogenous ABA levels, which control many dehydration-responsive genes. In Arabidopsis plants, ABA regulates nearly 10% of the protein-coding genes, a much higher percentage than other plant hormones. Expression of the genes is mainly regulated by two different families of bZIP transcription factors (TFs), ABI5 in the seeds and AREB/ABFs in the vegetative stage, in an ABA-responsive-element (ABRE) dependent manner. The SnRK2-AREB/ABF pathway governs the majority of ABA-mediated ABRE-dependent gene expression in response to osmotic stress during the vegetative stage. In addition to osmotic stress, the circadian clock and light conditions also appear to participate in the regulation of ABA-mediated gene expression, likely conferring versatile tolerance and repressing growth under stress conditions. Moreover, various other TFs belonging to several classes, including AP2/ERF, MYB, NAC, and HD-ZF, have been reported to engage in ABA-mediated gene expression. This review mainly focuses on the transcriptional regulation of ABA-mediated gene expression in response to osmotic stress during the vegetative growth stage in Arabidopsis.

  6. Lytic infection of Lactococcus lactis by bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 triggers alternative transcriptional host responses.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Zomer, Aldert; Mahony, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-08-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed throughout lytic infection. Whole-genome microarrays performed at various time points postinfection demonstrated a rather modest impact on host transcription. The majority of changes in the host transcriptome occur during late infection stages; few changes in host gene transcription occur during the immediate and early infection stages. Alterations in the L. lactis UC509.9 transcriptome during lytic infection appear to be phage specific, with relatively few differentially transcribed genes shared between cells infected with Tuc2009 and those infected with c2. Despite the apparent lack of a coordinated general phage response, three themes common to both infections were noted: alternative transcription of genes involved in catabolic flux and energy production, differential transcription of genes involved in cell wall modification, and differential transcription of genes involved in the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The transcriptional profiles of both bacteriophages during lytic infection generally correlated with the findings of previous studies and allowed the confirmation of previously predicted promoter sequences. In addition, the host transcriptional response to lysogenization with Tuc2009 was monitored along with tiling array analysis of Tuc2009 in the lysogenic state. Analysis identified 44 host genes with altered transcription during lysogeny, 36 of which displayed levels of transcription significantly reduced from those for uninfected cells.

  7. Factors that influence the response of the LysR type transcriptional regulators to aromatic compounds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The transcriptional regulators DntR, NagR and NtdR have a high sequence identity and belong to the large family of LysR type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs). These three regulators are all involved in regulation of genes identified in pathways for degradation of aromatic compounds. They activate the transcription of these genes in the presence of an inducer, but the inducer specificity profiles are different. Results The results from this study show that NtdR has the broadest inducer specificity, responding to several nitro-aromatic compounds. Mutational studies of residues that differ between DntR, NagR and NtdR suggest that a number of specific residues are involved in the broader inducer specificity of NtdR when compared to DntR and NagR. The inducer response was also investigated as a function of the experimental conditions and a number of parameters such as the growth media, plasmid arrangement of the LTTR-encoding genes, promoter and gfp reporter gene, and the presence of a His6-tag were shown to affect the inducer response in E.coli DH5α. Furthermore, the response upon addition of both salicylate and 4-nitrobenzoate to the growth media was larger than the sum of responses upon addition of each of the compounds, which suggests the presence of a secondary binding site, as previously reported for other LTTRs. Conclusions Optimization of the growth conditions and gene arrangement resulted in improved responses to nitro-aromatic inducers. The data also suggests the presence of a previously unknown secondary binding site in DntR, analogous to that of BenM. PMID:21884597

  8. Endothelial Inflammatory Transcriptional Responses Induced by Plasma Following Inhalation of Diesel Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Ronnebaum, Sarah M.; Madden, Michael; Channell, Meghan M.; Campen, Matthew J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Air pollution, especially emissions derived from traffic sources, is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it remains unclear how inhaled factors drive extrapulmonary pathology. Objectives Previously, we found that canonical inflammatory response transcripts were elevated in cultured endothelial cells treated with plasma obtained after exposure compared with pre-exposure samples or filtered air (sham) exposures. While the findings confirmed the presence of bioactive factor(s) in the plasma after diesel inhalation, we wanted to better examine the complete genomic response to investigate 1) major responsive transcripts and 2) collected response pathways and ontogeny that may help to refine this method and inform the pathogenesis. Methods We assayed endothelial RNA with gene expression microarrays, examining the responses of cultured endothelial cells to plasma obtained from 6 healthy human subjects exposed to 100 μg/m3 diesel exhaust or filtered air for 2 h on separate occasions. In addition to pre-exposure baseline samples, we investigated samples obtained immediately-post and 24h-post exposure. Results Microarray analysis of the coronary artery endothelial cells challenged with plasma identified 855 probes that changed over time following diesel exhaust exposure. Over-representation analysis identified inflammatory cytokine pathways were upregulated both at the 2 and 24 h condition. Novel pathways related to FOX transcription factors and secreted extracellular factors were also identified in the microarray analysis. Conclusions These outcomes are consistent with our recent findings that plasma contains bioactive and inflammatory factors following pollutant inhalation. The specific study design implicates a novel pathway related to inflammatory blood borne components that may drive the extrapulmonary toxicity of ambient air pollutants. PMID:25942053

  9. Identification of the transcriptional response of human intestinal mucosa to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Troost, Freddy J; van Baarlen, Peter; Lindsey, Patrick; Kodde, Andrea; de Vos, Willem M; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert-Jan M

    2008-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge on the extent and dynamics of the mucosal response to commensal and probiotic species in the human intestinal lumen. This study aimed to identify the acute, time-dependent responses of intestinal mucosa to commensal Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in vivo in two placebo-controlled human intervention studies in healthy volunteers. Transcriptional changes in duodenal mucosa upon continuous intraduodenal infusion of L. plantarum WCFS1 for one- and six h, respectively, were studied using oro- and nasogastric intubations with dedicated orogastric catheters and tissue sampling by standard flexible gastroduodenoscopy. Results One- and six-h exposure of small intestinal mucosa to L. plantarum WCFS1 induced differential expression of 669 and 424 gene reporters, respectively. While short-term exposure to L. plantarum WCFS1 inhibited fatty acid metabolism and cell cycle progression, cells switched to a more proliferative phase after prolonged exposure with an overall expression profile characterized by upregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism, cellular growth and development. Cell death and immune responses were triggered, but cell death-executing genes or inflammatory signals were not expressed. Proteome analysis showed differential expression of several proteins. Only the microsomal protein 'microsomal triglyceride transfer protein' was regulated on both the transcriptional and the protein level in all subjects. Conclusion Overall, this study showed that intestinal exposure to L. plantarum WCFS1 induced consistent, time-dependent transcriptional responses in healthy intestinal mucosa. This extensive exploration of the human response to L. plantarum WCFS1 could eventually provide molecular support for specific or probiotic activity of this strain or species, and exemplifies the strength of the applied technology to identify the potential bio-activity of microbes in the human intestine. PMID:18681965

  10. Physiological and transcriptional responses to high temperature in Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis C1.

    PubMed

    Panyakampol, Jaruta; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Sutheeworapong, Sawannee; Chaijaruwanich, Jeerayut; Senachak, Jittisak; Siangdung, Wipawan; Jeamton, Wattana; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Paithoonrangsarid, Kalyanee

    2015-03-01

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a well-known commercial cyanobacterium that is used as a food and in feed supplements. In this study, we examined the physiological changes and whole-genome expression in A. platensis C1 exposed to high temperature. We found that photosynthetic activity was significantly decreased after the temperature was shifted from 35°C to 42°C for 2 h. A reduction in biomass production and protein content, concomitant with the accumulation of carbohydrate content, was observed after prolonged exposure to high temperatures for 24 h. Moreover, the results of the expression profiling in response to high temperature at the designated time points (8 h) revealed two distinct phases of the responses. The first was the immediate response phase, in which the transcript levels of genes involved in different mechanisms, including genes for heat shock proteins; genes involved in signal transduction and carbon and nitrogen metabolism; and genes encoding inorganic ion transporters for magnesium, nitrite and nitrate, were either transiently induced or repressed by the high temperature. In the second phase, the long-term response phase, both the induction and repression of the expression of genes with important roles in translation and photosynthesis were observed. Taken together, the results of our physiological and transcriptional studies suggest that dynamic changes in the transcriptional profiles of these thermal-responsive genes might play a role in maintaining cell homeostasis under high temperatures, as reflected in the growth and biochemical composition, particularly the protein and carbohydrate content, of A. platensis C1.

  11. Transcription profile of DNA damage response genes at G₀ lymphocytes exposed to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Divyalakshmi; Shelke, Shridevi; Mani Vannan, A; Toprani, Sneh; Jain, Vinay; Das, Birajalaxmi; Seshadri, M

    2012-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a plethora of DNA damages in human cells which may alter the level of mRNA expression. We have analyzed mRNA expression profile of DNA damage response genes involved in G(0)/G(1) check point pathway in whole blood to assess their radio-adaptive response, if any, to gamma radiation. Blood samples were collected from twenty-five random, normal, and healthy male donors with written informed consent and irradiated at doses between 0.1 and 2.0 Gy (0.7 Gy/min). DNA strand breaks were studied using comet assay, whereas DNA double-strand breaks were visualized using γH2AX as a biomarker. Dose response if any, at transcriptional level was studied for all these dose groups at 1 and 5-h post-irradiation. Adaptive response at transcriptional level was studied at three different priming doses (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 Gy) separately followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4 h. For both the experiments, total RNA was isolated from PBMCs obtained from irradiated whole blood and reverse transcribed to cDNA. The level of mRNA expression of ATM, ATR, GADD45A, CDKN1A, P53, CDK2, MDM2, and Cyclin E was studied using real-time quantitative PCR. A significant dose-dependant increase in the percentage of DNA damage in tail was observed using comet assay. Similarly, increased number of foci was observed at γH2AX with increasing dose. At transcriptional level, a significant dose-dependent up-regulation at GADD45A, CDKN1A, and P53 genes up to 1.0 Gy was observed at 5-h post-irradiation (P ≤ 0.05). Radio-adaptive response at mRNA expression level was observed at CDK2, Cyclin E, and P53, whereas ATM, ATR, GADD45A, MDM2, ATM, and ATR have not shown any radio-adaptive changes in the expression profile. DNA damage response genes involved in G(0)/G(1) checkpoint pathway has important implications in terms of radiosensitivity in vivo and changes in the transcriptional profile might throw some new insights to understand the mechanism of adaptive response.

  12. The Legume miR1514a modulates a NAC transcription factor transcript to trigger phasiRNA formation in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Valencia, Guadalupe; Palomar, Miguel; Covarrubias, Alejandra A; Reyes, José L

    2016-10-07

    Recent studies have identified microRNAs as post-transcriptional regulators involved in stress responses. miR1514a is a legume microRNA that is induced in response to drought stress in Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) and shows differential accumulation levels in roots during water deficit in two cultivars with different drought tolerance phenotypes. A recent degradome analysis revealed that miR1514a targets the transcripts of two NAC transcription factors (TFs), Phvul.010g121000 and Phvul.010g120700. Furthermore, expression studies and small RNA-seq data indicate that only Phvul.010g120700 generates phasiRNAs, which also accumulate under water deficit conditions. To confirm these results, we over-expressed miR1514a in transgenic hairy roots, and observed a reduced accumulation of Phvul.010g120700 and an increase in NAC-derived phasiRNAs; inhibition of miR1514a activity resulted in the opposite effect. Moreover, we determined that a NAC-derived phasiRNA associates with ARGONAUTE 1 (AGO1), suggesting that it is functional. In addition, a transcriptome analysis of transgenic hairy roots with reduced miR1514a levels revealed several differentially expressed transcripts, mainly involved in metabolism and stress responses, suggesting they are regulated by the NAC TF and/or by phasiRNAs. This work therefore demonstrates the participation of miR1514 in the regulation of a NAC transcription factor transcript through phasiRNA production during the plant response to water deficit.

  13. The legume miR1514a modulates a NAC transcription factor transcript to trigger phasiRNA formation in response to drought

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Valencia, Guadalupe; Palomar, Miguel; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have identified microRNAs as post-transcriptional regulators involved in stress responses. miR1514a is a legume microRNA that is induced in response to drought stress in Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) and shows differential accumulation levels in roots during water deficit in two cultivars with different drought tolerance phenotypes. A recent degradome analysis revealed that miR1514a targets the transcripts of two NAC transcription factors (TFs), Phvul.010g121000 and Phvul.010g120700. Furthermore, expression studies and small RNA-seq data indicate that only Phvul.010g120700 generates phasiRNAs, which also accumulate under water deficit conditions. To confirm these results, we over-expressed miR1514a in transgenic hairy roots, and observed a reduced accumulation of Phvul.010g120700 and an increase in NAC-derived phasiRNAs; inhibition of miR1514a activity resulted in the opposite effect. Moreover, we determined that a NAC-derived phasiRNA associates with ARGONAUTE 1 (AGO1), suggesting that it is functional. In addition, a transcriptome analysis of transgenic hairy roots with reduced miR1514a levels revealed several differentially expressed transcripts, mainly involved in metabolism and stress responses, suggesting they are regulated by the NAC TF and/or by phasiRNAs. This work therefore demonstrates the participation of miR1514 in the regulation of a NAC transcription factor transcript through phasiRNA production during the plant response to water deficit. PMID:28338719

  14. TCP Transcription Factors at the Interface between Environmental Challenges and the Plant’s Growth Responses

    PubMed Central

    Danisman, Selahattin

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile and as such their reactions to environmental challenges differ from those of mobile organisms. Many adaptions involve growth responses and hence, growth regulation is one of the most crucial biological processes for plant survival and fitness. The plant-specific TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1, CYCLOIDEA, PCF1 (TCP) transcription factor family is involved in plant development from cradle to grave, i.e., from seed germination throughout vegetative development until the formation of flowers and fruits. TCP transcription factors have an evolutionary conserved role as regulators in a variety of plant species, including orchids, tomatoes, peas, poplar, cotton, rice and the model plant Arabidopsis. Early TCP research focused on the regulatory functions of TCPs in the development of diverse organs via the cell cycle. Later research uncovered that TCP transcription factors are not static developmental regulators but crucial growth regulators that translate diverse endogenous and environmental signals into growth responses best fitted to ensure plant fitness and health. I will recapitulate the research on TCPs in this review focusing on two topics: the discovery of TCPs and the elucidation of their evolutionarily conserved roles across the plant kingdom, and the variety of signals, both endogenous (circadian clock, plant hormones) and environmental (pathogens, light, nutrients), TCPs respond to in the course of their developmental roles. PMID:28066483

  15. A Conserved Structural Module Regulates Transcriptional Responses to Diverse Stress Signals in Eubacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell,E.; Greenwell, R.; Anthony, J.; Wang, S.; Lim, L.; Das, K.; Sofia, H.; Donohue, T.; Darst, S.

    2007-01-01

    A transcriptional response to singlet oxygen in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is controlled by the group IV {sigma} factor {sigma}{sup E} and its cognate anti-{sigma} ChrR. Crystal structures of the {sigma}{sup E}/ChrR complex reveal a modular, two-domain architecture for ChrR. The ChrR N-terminal anti-{sigma} domain (ASD) binds a Zn{sup 2+} ion, contacts {sigma}{sup E}, and is sufficient to inhibit {sigma}{sup E}-dependent transcription. The ChrR C-terminal domain adopts a cupin fold, can coordinate an additional Zn{sup 2+}, and is required for the transcriptional response to singlet oxygen. Structure-based sequence analyses predict that the ASD defines a common structural fold among predicted group IV anti-{sigma}s. These ASDs are fused to diverse C-terminal domains that are likely involved in responding to specific environmental signals that control the activity of their cognate {sigma} factor.

  16. The plant RWP-RK transcription factors: key regulators of nitrogen responses and of gametophyte development.

    PubMed

    Chardin, Camille; Girin, Thomas; Roudier, François; Meyer, Christian; Krapp, Anne

    2014-10-01

    The plant specific RWP-RK family of transcription factors, initially identified in legumes and Chlamydomonas, are found in all vascular plants, green algae, and slime molds. These proteins possess a characteristic RWP-RK motif, which mediates DNA binding. Based on phylogenetic and domain analyses, we classified the RWP-RK proteins of six different species in two subfamilies: the NIN-like proteins (NLPs), which carry an additional PB1 domain at their C-terminus, and the RWP-RK domain proteins (RKDs), which are divided into three subgroups. Although, the functional analysis of this family is still in its infancy, several RWP-RK proteins have a key role in regulating responses to nitrogen availability. The nodulation-specific NIN proteins are involved in nodule organogenesis and rhizobial infection under nitrogen starvation conditions. Arabidopsis NLP7 in particular is a major player in the primary nitrate response. Several RKDs act as transcription factors involved in egg cell specification and differentiation or gametogenesis in algae, the latter modulated by nitrogen availability. Further studies are required to extend the general picture of the functional role of these exciting transcription factors.

  17. Anatomical, physiological and transcriptional responses of two contrasting poplar genotypes to drought and re-watering.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu; Jia, Jingbo; Zhang, Chao; Li, Hong; Liu, Tongxian; Jiang, Xiangning; Polle, Andrea; Peng, Changhui; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2014-08-01

    Populus × euramericana (Pe) displays higher stable carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) and intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi) than Populus cathayana (Pc) under unlimited water conditions, rendering us to hypothesize that Pe is better acclimated to water deficiency than Pc. To examine this hypothesis, saplings of Pc and Pe were exposed to drought and subsequently re-watered. Pc and Pe exhibited distinct anatomical, physiological and transcriptional responses in acclimation to drought and re-watering, mainly due to stronger responsiveness of transcriptional regulation of genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), higher starch accumulation, δ(13)C, stable nitrogen isotope composition (δ(15)N) and WUEi , and lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and scavenging in Pe. In acclimation to drought, both poplar genotypes demonstrated altered anatomical properties, declined height growth, differential expression of PIPs, activation of ABA signaling pathway, decreased total soluble sugars and starch, increased δ(13)C, δ(15)N and WUEi , and shifted homeostasis of ROS production and scavenging, and these changes can be recovered upon re-watering. These data indicate that Pe is more tolerant to drought than Pc, and that anatomical, physiological and transcriptional acclimation to drought and re-watering is essential for poplars to survive and grow under projected dry climate scenarios in the future. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  18. TCP Transcription Factors at the Interface between Environmental Challenges and the Plant's Growth Responses.

    PubMed

    Danisman, Selahattin

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile and as such their reactions to environmental challenges differ from those of mobile organisms. Many adaptions involve growth responses and hence, growth regulation is one of the most crucial biological processes for plant survival and fitness. The plant-specific TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1, CYCLOIDEA, PCF1 (TCP) transcription factor family is involved in plant development from cradle to grave, i.e., from seed germination throughout vegetative development until the formation of flowers and fruits. TCP transcription factors have an evolutionary conserved role as regulators in a variety of plant species, including orchids, tomatoes, peas, poplar, cotton, rice and the model plant Arabidopsis. Early TCP research focused on the regulatory functions of TCPs in the development of diverse organs via the cell cycle. Later research uncovered that TCP transcription factors are not static developmental regulators but crucial growth regulators that translate diverse endogenous and environmental signals into growth responses best fitted to ensure plant fitness and health. I will recapitulate the research on TCPs in this review focusing on two topics: the discovery of TCPs and the elucidation of their evolutionarily conserved roles across the plant kingdom, and the variety of signals, both endogenous (circadian clock, plant hormones) and environmental (pathogens, light, nutrients), TCPs respond to in the course of their developmental roles.

  19. Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia in the Aquatic Fungus Blastocladiella emersonii▿†

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, César M.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2010-01-01

    Global gene expression analysis was carried out with Blastocladiella emersonii cells subjected to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) using cDNA microarrays. In experiments of gradual hypoxia (gradual decrease in dissolved oxygen) and direct hypoxia (direct decrease in dissolved oxygen), about 650 differentially expressed genes were observed. A total of 534 genes were affected directly or indirectly by oxygen availability, as they showed recovery to normal expression levels or a tendency to recover when cells were reoxygenated. In addition to modulating many genes with no putative assigned function, B. emersonii cells respond to hypoxia by readjusting the expression levels of genes responsible for energy production and consumption. At least transcriptionally, this fungus seems to favor anaerobic metabolism through the upregulation of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase and the downregulation of most genes coding for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Furthermore, genes involved in energy-costly processes, like protein synthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, protein folding, and transport, had their expression profiles predominantly downregulated during oxygen deprivation, indicating an energy-saving effort. Data also revealed similarities between the transcriptional profiles of cells under hypoxia and under iron(II) deprivation, suggesting that Fe2+ ion could have a role in oxygen sensing and/or response to hypoxia in B. emersonii. Additionally, treatment of fungal cells prior to hypoxia with the antibiotic geldanamycin, which negatively affects the stability of mammalian hypoxia transcription factor HIF-1α, caused a significant decrease in the levels of certain upregulated hypoxic genes. PMID:20418381

  20. The metal-responsive transcription factor-1 contributes to HIF-1 activation during hypoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Brian J. . E-mail: brian.murphy@sri.com; Sato, Barbara G.; Dalton, Timothy P.; Laderoute, Keith R.

    2005-11-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the major transcriptional regulator of the mammalian cellular response to low oxygen (hypoxia), is embedded within a complex network of signaling pathways. We have been investigating the importance of another stress-responsive transcription factor, MTF-1, for the adaptation of cells to hypoxia. This article reports that MTF-1 plays a central role in hypoxic cells by contributing to HIF-1 activity. Loss of MTF-1 in transformed Mtf1 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) results in an attenuation of nuclear HIF-1{alpha} protein accumulation, HIF-1 transcriptional activity, and expression of an established HIF-1 target gene, glucose transporter-1 (Glut1). Mtf1 null (Mtf1 KO) MEFs also have constitutively higher levels of both glutathione (GSH) and the rate-limiting enzyme involved in GSH synthesis-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit-than wild type cells. The altered cellular redox state arising from increased GSH may perturb oxygen-sensing mechanisms in hypoxic Mtf1 KO cells and decrease the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. Together, these novel findings define a role for MTF-1 in the regulation of HIF-1 activity.

  1. Transcriptional response of Citrus aurantifolia to infection by Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Gandía, Mónica; Conesa, Ana; Ancillo, Gema; Gadea, José; Forment, Javier; Pallás, Vicente; Flores, Ricardo; Duran-Vila, Nuria; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2007-10-25

    Changes in gene expression of Mexican lime plants in response to infection with a severe (T305) or a mild (T385) isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were analyzed using a cDNA microarray containing 12,672 probes to 6875 different citrus genes. Statistically significant (P<0.01) expression changes of 334 genes were detected in response to infection with isolate T305, whereas infection with T385 induced no significant change. Induced genes included 145 without significant similarity with known sequences and 189 that were classified in seven functional categories. Genes related with response to stress and defense were the main category and included 28% of the genes induced. Selected transcription changes detected by microarray analysis were confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Changes detected in the transcriptome upon infecting lime with T305 may be associated either with symptom expression, with a strain-specific defense mechanism, or with a general response to stress.

  2. Transcriptome-wide identification of Camellia sinensis WRKY transcription factors in response to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Jun; Li, Xing-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Hui; Wang, Yong-Xin; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] is a leaf-type healthy non-alcoholic beverage crop, which has been widely introduced worldwide. Tea is rich in various secondary metabolites, which are important for human health. However, varied climate and complex geography have posed challenges for tea plant survival. The WRKY gene family in plants is a large transcription factor family that is involved in biological processes related to stress defenses, development, and metabolite synthesis. Therefore, identification and analysis of WRKY family transcription factors in tea plant have a profound significance. In the present study, 50 putative C. sinensis WRKY proteins (CsWRKYs) with complete WRKY domain were identified and divided into three Groups (Group I-III) on the basis of phylogenetic analysis results. The distribution of WRKY family transcription factors among plantae, fungi, and protozoa showed that the number of WRKY genes increased in higher plant, whereas the number of these genes did not correspond to the evolutionary relationships of different species. Structural feature and annotation analysis results showed that CsWRKY proteins contained WRKYGQK/WRKYGKK domains and C2H2/C2HC-type zinc-finger structure: D-X18-R-X1-Y-X2-C-X4-7-C-X23-H motif; CsWRKY proteins may be associated with the biological processes of abiotic and biotic stresses, tissue development, and hormone and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Temperature stresses suggested that the candidate CsWRKY genes were involved in responses to extreme temperatures. The current study established an extensive overview of the WRKY family transcription factors in tea plant. This study also provided a global survey of CsWRKY transcription factors and a foundation of future functional identification and molecular breeding.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of the stress-responsive light harvesting complex genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Shinichiro; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Minagawa, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Dissipating excess energy of light is critical for photosynthetic organisms to keep the photosynthetic apparatus functional and less harmful under stressful environmental conditions. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, efficient energy dissipation is achieved by a process called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), in which a distinct member of light harvesting complex, LHCSR, is known to play a key role. Although it has been known that two very closely related genes (LHCSR3.1 and LHCSR3.2) encoding LHCSR3 protein and another paralogous gene LHCSR1 are present in the C. reinhardtii genome, it is unclear how these isoforms are differentiated in terms of transcriptional regulation and functionalization. Here, we show that transcripts of both of the isoforms, LHCSR3.1 and LHCSR3.2, are accumulated under high light stress. Reexamination of the genomic sequence and gene models along with survey of sequence motifs suggested that these two isoforms shared an almost identical but still distinct promoter sequence and a completely identical polypeptide sequence, with more divergent 3'-untranscribed regions. Transcriptional induction under high light condition of both isoforms was suppressed by treatment with a photosystem II inhibitor, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), and a calmodulin inhibitor W7. Despite a similar response to high light, the inhibitory effects of DCMU and W7 to the LHCSR1 transcript accumulation were limited compared to LHCSR3 genes. These results suggest that the transcription of LHCSR paralogs in C. reinhardtii are regulated by light signal and differentially modulated via photosynthetic electron transfer and calmodulin-mediated calcium signaling pathway(s). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The estrogen receptor-α-induced microRNA signature regulates itself and its transcriptional response

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Leandro; Giamas, Georgios; Jacob, Jimmy; Coombes, R. Charles; Lucchesi, Walter; Thiruchelvam, Paul; Barton, Geraint; Jiao, Long R.; Wait, Robin; Waxman, Jonathan; Hannon, Gregory J.; Stebbing, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Following estrogenic activation, the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) directly regulates the transcription of target genes via DNA binding. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) modulated by ERα have the potential to fine tune these regulatory systems and also provide an alternate mechanism that could impact on estrogen-dependent developmental and pathological systems. Through a microarray approach, we identify the subset of microRNAs (miRNAs) modulated by ERα, which include upregulation of miRNAs derived from the processing of the paralogous primary transcripts (pri-) mir-17–92 and mir-106a-363. Characterization of the mir-17–92 locus confirms that the ERα target protein c-MYC binds its promoter in an estrogen-dependent manner. We observe that levels of pri-mir-17–92 increase earlier than the mature miRNAs derived from it, implicating precursor cleavage modulation after transcription. Pri-mir-17–92 is immediately cleaved by DROSHA to pre-miR-18a, indicating that its regulation occurs during the formation of the mature molecule from the precursor. The clinical implications of this novel regulatory system were confirmed by demonstrating that pre-miR-18a was significantly upregulated in ERα-positive compared to ERα-negative breast cancers. Mechanistically, miRNAs derived from these paralogous pri-miRNAs (miR-18a, miR-19b, and miR-20b) target and downregulate ERα, while a subset of pri-miRNA-derived miRNAs inhibit protein translation of the ERα transcriptional p160 coactivator, AIB1. Therefore, different subsets of miRNAs identified act as part of a negative autoregulatory feedback loop. We propose that ERα, c-MYC, and miRNA transcriptional programs invoke a sophisticated network of interactions able to provide the wide range of coordinated cellular responses to estrogen. PMID:19706389

  5. kMEn: analyzing noisy and bidirectional transcriptional pathway responses in single subjects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qike; Schissler, A. Grant; Gardeux, Vincent; Berghout, Joanne; Achour, Ikbel; Kenost, Colleen

    2017-01-01

    Motivation Understanding dynamic, patient-level transcriptomic response to therapy is an important step forward for precision medicine. However, conventional transcriptome analysis aims to discover cohort-level change, lacking the capacity to unveil patient-specific response to therapy. To address this gap, we previously developed two N-of-1-pathways methods, Wilcoxon and Mahalanobis distance, to detect unidirectionally responsive transcripts within a pathway using a pair of samples from a single subject. Yet, these methods cannot recognize bidirectionally (up and down) responsive pathways. Further, our previous approaches have not been assessed in presence of background noise and are not designed to identify differentially expressed mRNAs between two samples of a patient taken in different contexts (e.g. cancer vs non cancer), which we termed responsive transcripts (RTs). Methods We propose a new N-of-1-pathways method, k-Means Enrichment (kMEn), that detects bidirection-ally responsive pathways, despite background noise, using a pair of transcriptomes from a single patient. kMEn identifies transcripts responsive to the stimulus through k-means clustering and then tests for an over-representation of the responsive genes within each pathway. The pathways identified by kMEn are mechanistically interpretable pathways significantly responding to a stimulus. Results In ~9000 simulations varying six parameters, superior performance of kMEn over previous single-subject methods is evident by: i) improved precision-recall at various levels of bidirectional response and ii) lower rates of false positives (1-specificity) when more than 10% of genes in the genome are differentially expressed (background noise). In a clinical proof-of-concept, personal treatment-specific pathways identified by kMEn correlate with therapeutic response (p-value<0.01). Conclusion Through improved single-subject transcriptome dynamics of bidirectionally-regulated signals, kMEn provides a novel

  6. A Novel Peroxisome Proliferator Response Element Modulates Hepatic Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Transcription in Response to PPARδ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Vikram R.; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    The hepatic expression of LDLR gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative PPAR-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at −768 to −752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin mediated transactivation. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression. PMID:26443862

  7. A novel peroxisome proliferator response element modulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor gene transcription in response to PPARδ activation.

    PubMed

    Shende, Vikram R; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-12-15

    The hepatic expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at -768 to -752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin (RSV)-mediated transactivation. EMSA and ChIP assay further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression.

  8. Measurement of the position-dependent electrophoretic force on DNA in a glass nanocapillary.

    PubMed

    Bulushev, Roman D; Steinbock, Lorenz J; Khlybov, Sergey; Steinbock, Julian F; Keyser, Ulrich F; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2014-11-12

    The electrophoretic force on a single DNA molecule inside a glass nanocapillary depends on the opening size and varies with the distance along the symmetrical axis of the nanocapillary. Using optical tweezers and DNA-coated beads, we measured the stalling forces and mapped the position-dependent force profiles acting on DNA inside nanocapillaries of different sizes. We showed that the stalling force is higher in nanocapillaries of smaller diameters. The position-dependent force profiles strongly depend on the size of the nanocapillary opening, and for openings smaller than 20 nm, the profiles resemble the behavior observed in solid-state nanopores. To characterize the position-dependent force profiles in nanocapillaries of different sizes, we used a model that combines information from both analytical approximations and numerical calculations.

  9. Escape process in systems characterized by stable noises and position-dependent resting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokowski, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic systems characterized by a random driving in a form of the general stable noise are considered. The particle experiences long rests due to the traps the density of which is position dependent and obeys a power-law form attributed to the underlying self-similar structure. Both the one- and two-dimensional cases are analyzed. The random walk description involves a position-dependent waiting time distribution. On the other hand, the stochastic dynamics is formulated in terms of the subordination technique where the random time generator is position dependent. The first passage time problem is addressed by evaluating a first passage time density distribution and an escape rate. The influence of the medium nonhomogeneity on those quantities is demonstrated; moreover, the dependence of the escape rate on the stability index and the memory parameter is evaluated. Results indicate essential differences between the Gaussian case and the case involving Lévy flights.

  10. Genome-wide transcriptional response of Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis to infection with the deadly chytrid fungus.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Poorten, Thomas J; Settles, Matthew; Murdoch, Gordon K; Robert, Jacques; Maddox, Nicole; Eisen, Michael B

    2009-08-04

    Emerging infectious diseases are of great concern for both wildlife and humans. Several highly virulent fungal pathogens have recently been discovered in natural populations, highlighting the need for a better understanding of fungal-vertebrate host-pathogen interactions. Because most fungal pathogens are not fatal in the absence of other predisposing conditions, host-pathogen dynamics for deadly fungal pathogens are of particular interest. The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (hereafter Bd) infects hundreds of species of frogs in the wild. It is found worldwide and is a significant contributor to the current global amphibian decline. However, the mechanism by which Bd causes death in amphibians, and the response of the host to Bd infection, remain largely unknown. Here we use whole-genome microarrays to monitor the transcriptional responses to Bd infection in the model frog species, Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis, which is susceptible to chytridiomycosis. To elucidate the immune response to Bd and evaluate the physiological effects of chytridiomycosis, we measured gene expression changes in several tissues (liver, skin, spleen) following exposure to Bd. We detected a strong transcriptional response for genes involved in physiological processes that can help explain some clinical symptoms of chytridiomycosis at the organismal level. However, we detected surprisingly little evidence of an immune response to Bd exposure, suggesting that this susceptible species may not be mounting efficient innate and adaptive immune responses against Bd. The weak immune response may be partially explained by the thermal conditions of the experiment, which were optimal for Bd growth. However, many immune genes exhibited decreased expression in Bd-exposed frogs compared to control frogs, suggesting a more complex effect of Bd on the immune system than simple temperature-mediated immune suppression. This study generates important baseline data for ongoing efforts to

  11. Transcriptional response to mitochondrial protease IMMP2L knockdown in human primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gokoolparsadh, Akira; Fang, Zhiming; Braidy, Nady; Lin, Peijie; Pardy, Christopher J; Eapen, Valsamma; Clarke, Raymond; Voineagu, Irina

    2017-01-22

    IMMP2L encodes the inner membrane peptidase subunit 2, a mitochondrial protease involved in cleaving the space-sorting signals of mitochondrial membrane proteins. IMMP2L has been implicated in Tourette syndrome, but how its dysfunction contributes to the neurodevelopmental phenotype remains unclear. Here we show that IMMP2L transcription requires Topoisomerase I in human primary astrocytes, and characterize the downstream effects of IMMP2L knockdown on gene expression. We demonstrate that IMMP2L knockdown leads to dysregulation of genes involved in central nervous system development. We also find that the transcriptional response to IMMP2L knockdown partially overlaps the one induced by mitochondrial complex III inhibition. Overall, these data bring further insight into the molecular consequences of IMMP2L dysfunction in the brain. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcriptional response of Choristoneura fumiferana to sublethal exposure of Cry1Ab protoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Meunier, L; Préfontaine, G; Van Munster, M; Brousseau, R; Masson, L

    2006-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a microbial control agent active against Choristoneura fumiferana, a lepidopteran defoliator of North American forests. Although the B. thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protoxins have a relatively narrow host range, there is concern about their impact on non-target species where intoxication effects may not be overt. Larval toxicity effects can be assessed at the molecular level by determining altered transcriptional profiles in response to sublethal protoxin exposure in sensitive insects. Subtraction hybridization libraries were created using two larval populations, control and protoxin-fed and were characterized by sequencing 1091 clones. Differential mRNA expression of selected clones, as measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, identified a number of metabolic and stress-related genes that were either transcriptionally enhanced or repressed after protoxin exposure.

  13. Genetic background of enhanced radioresistance in an anhydrobiotic insect: transcriptional response to ionizing radiations and desiccation.

    PubMed

    Ryabova, Alina; Mukae, Kyosuke; Cherkasov, Alexander; Cornette, Richard; Shagimardanova, Elena; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Okuda, Takashi; Kikawada, Takahiro; Gusev, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    It is assumed that resistance to ionizing radiation, as well as cross-resistance to other abiotic stresses, is a side effect of the evolutionary-based adaptation of anhydrobiotic animals to dehydration stress. Larvae of Polypedilum vanderplanki can withstand prolonged desiccation as well as high doses of ionizing radiation exposure. For a further understanding of the mechanisms of cross-tolerance to both types of stress exposure, we profiled genome-wide mRNA expression patterns using microarray techniques on the chironomid larvae collected at different stages of desiccation and after exposure to two types of ionizing radiation-70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He) and the same dose of low-LET radiation (gamma rays). In expression profiles, a wide transcriptional response to desiccation stress that much exceeded the amount of up-regulated transcripts to irradiation exposure was observed. An extensive group of coincidently up-regulated overlapped transcripts in response to desiccation and ionizing radiation was found. Among this, overlapped set of transcripts was indicated anhydrobiosis-related genes: antioxidants, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, and heat-shock proteins. The most overexpressed group was that of protein-L-isoaspartate/D-aspartate O-methyltransferase (PIMT), while probes, corresponding to LEA proteins, were the most represented. Performed functional analysis showed strongly enriched gene ontology terms associated with protein methylation. In addition, active processes of DNA repair were detected. We assume that the cross-tolerance of the sleeping chironomid to both desiccation and irradiation exposure comes from a complex mechanism of adaptation to anhydrobiosis.

  14. Alternate splicing of transcripts shape macrophage response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Kalam, Haroon; Fontana, Mary F.

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming of macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is widely studied; however, the significance of alternate splicing (AS) in shaping cellular responses to mycobacterial infections is not yet appreciated. Alternate splicing can influence transcript stability or structure, function and localization of corresponding proteins thereby altering protein stoichiometry and physiological consequences. Using comprehensive analysis of a time-series RNA-seq data obtained from human macrophages infected with virulent or avirulent strains of Mtb, we show extensive remodeling of alternate splicing in macrophage transcriptome. The global nature of this regulation was evident since genes belonging to functional classes like trafficking, immune response, autophagy, redox and metabolism showed marked departure in the pattern of splicing in the infected macrophages. The systemic perturbation of splicing machinery in the infected macrophages was apparent as genes involved at different stages of spliceosome assembly were also regulated at the splicing level. Curiously there was a considerable increase in the expression of truncated/non-translatable variants of several genes, specifically upon virulent infections. Increased expression of truncated transcripts correlated with a decline in the corresponding protein levels. We verified the physiological relevance for one such candidate gene RAB8B; whose truncated variant gets enriched in H37Rv infected cells. Upon tweaking relative abundance of longer or shorter variants of RAB8B transcripts by specialized transduction, mycobacterial targeting to lysosomes could be promoted or blocked respectively, which also resulted in corresponding changes in the bacterial survival. Our results show RAB8B recruitment to the mycobacterial phagosomes is required for phagosome maturation. Thus the abundance of truncated RAB8B variant helps virulent Mtb survival by limiting the RAB8B levels in the cells, a mechanism

  15. Global transcriptional response of Staphylococcus aureus to rhein, a natural plant product.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu; Xiang, Hua; Fan, Junwen; Wang, Dacheng; Yang, Feng; Guo, Na; Jin, Qi; Deng, Xuming

    2008-06-30

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most important pathogens in humans and animals, multiply resistant strains are increasingly widespread, new agents are needed for the treatment of S. aureus. Rhein (RH), a natural plant product, has been reported to have potential antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, but the response mechanisms of S. aureus to RH are still poorly understood. RH showed good in vitro antibacterial activity against all 21 tested S. aureus strains in this experiment. We performed commercial Affymetrix GeneChips to determine the overall transcriptional response of S. aureus ATCC25923 triggered by the treatment of subinhibitory concentrations of RH at one time point 45 min. A total of 88 genes were identified to be differentially regulated by RH. Of these, 28 transporter genes were differentially regulated by RH; RH stress elevated the transcription of genes (srtB and isdABCDEFGI) encoding iron-regulated surface determinants system and genes (nrdIEF and nrdDG) involved in ribonucleotide reductase systems; but RH repressed genes (pflAB, nirBDR, narGH, ldh1, COL-SA0660, COL-SA2363 and COL-SA2386) responsible for anaerobic respiration and fermentation. To our knowledge, this genome-wide transcriptomics approach revealed first insights into the response of S. aureus to RH challenge.

  16. Noise and interlocking signaling pathways promote distinct transcription factor dynamics in response to different stresses

    PubMed Central

    Petrenko, Natalia; Chereji, Raˇzvan V.; McClean, Megan N.; Morozov, Alexandre V.; Broach, James R.

    2013-01-01

    All cells perceive and respond to environmental stresses through elaborate stress-sensing networks. Yeast cells sense stress through diverse signaling pathways that converge on the transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4, which respond by initiating rapid, idiosyncratic cycles into and out of the nucleus. To understand the role of Msn2/4 nuclear localization dynamics, we combined time-lapse studies of Msn2-GFP localization in living cells with computational modeling of stress-sensing signaling networks. We find that several signaling pathways, including Ras/protein kinase A, AMP-activated kinase, the high-osmolarity response mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and protein phosphatase 1, regulate activation of Msn2 in distinct ways in response to different stresses. Moreover, we find that bursts of nuclear localization elicit a more robust transcriptional response than does sustained nuclear localization. Using stochastic modeling, we reproduce in silico the responses of Msn2 to different stresses, and demonstrate that bursts of localization arise from noise in the signaling pathways amplified by the small number of Msn2 molecules in the cell. This noise imparts diverse behaviors to genetically identical cells, allowing cell populations to “hedge their bets” in responding to an uncertain future, and to balance growth and survival in an unpredictable environment. PMID:23615444

  17. Noise and interlocking signaling pathways promote distinct transcription factor dynamics in response to different stresses.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Natalia; Chereji, Razvan V; McClean, Megan N; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R

    2013-06-01

    All cells perceive and respond to environmental stresses through elaborate stress-sensing networks. Yeast cells sense stress through diverse signaling pathways that converge on the transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4, which respond by initiating rapid, idiosyncratic cycles into and out of the nucleus. To understand the role of Msn2/4 nuclear localization dynamics, we combined time-lapse studies of Msn2-GFP localization in living cells with computational modeling of stress-sensing signaling networks. We find that several signaling pathways, including Ras/protein kinase A, AMP-activated kinase, the high-osmolarity response mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and protein phosphatase 1, regulate activation of Msn2 in distinct ways in response to different stresses. Moreover, we find that bursts of nuclear localization elicit a more robust transcriptional response than does sustained nuclear localization. Using stochastic modeling, we reproduce in silico the responses of Msn2 to different stresses, and demonstrate that bursts of localization arise from noise in the signaling pathways amplified by the small number of Msn2 molecules in the cell. This noise imparts diverse behaviors to genetically identical cells, allowing cell populations to "hedge their bets" in responding to an uncertain future, and to balance growth and survival in an unpredictable environment.

  18. Time-of-Day Dictates Transcriptional Inflammatory Responses to Cytotoxic Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Borniger, Jeremy C.; Walker II, William H.; Gaudier-Diaz, Monica M.; Stegman, Curtis J.; Zhang, Ning; Hollyfield, Jennifer L.; Nelson, Randy J.; DeVries, A. Courtney

    2017-01-01

    Many cytotoxic chemotherapeutics elicit a proinflammatory response which is often associated with chemotherapy-induced behavioral alterations. The immune system is under circadian influence; time-of-day may alter inflammatory responses to chemotherapeutics. We tested this hypothesis by administering cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin (Cyclo/Dox), a common treatment for breast cancer, to female BALB/c mice near the beginning of the light or dark phase. Mice were injected intravenously with Cyclo/Dox or the vehicle two hours after lights on (zeitgeber time (ZT2), or two hours after lights off (ZT14). Tissue was collected 1, 3, 9, and 24 hours later. Mice injected with Cyclo/Dox at ZT2 lost more body mass than mice injected at ZT14. Cyclo/Dox injected at ZT2 increased the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes within the spleen; this was not evident among mice treated at ZT14. Transcription of enzymes within the liver responsible for converting Cyclo/Dox into their toxic metabolites increased among mice injected at ZT2; furthermore, transcription of these enzymes correlated with splenic pro-inflammatory gene expression when treatment occurred at ZT2 but not ZT14. The pattern was reversed in the brain; pro-inflammatory gene expression increased among mice injected at ZT14. These data suggest that inflammatory responses to chemotherapy depend on time-of-day and are tissue specific. PMID:28117419

  19. On the construction of coherent states of position dependent mass Schroedinger equation endowed with effective potential

    SciTech Connect

    Chithiika Ruby, V.; Senthilvelan, M.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm to construct coherent states for an exactly solvable position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We use point canonical transformation method and obtain ground state eigenfunction of the position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We fix the ladder operators in the deformed form and obtain explicit expression of the deformed superpotential in terms of mass distribution and its derivative. We also prove that these deformed operators lead to minimum uncertainty relations. Further, we illustrate our algorithm with two examples, in which the coherent states given for the second example are new.

  20. Conserved Transcriptional Responses to Nutrient Stress in Bloom-Forming Algae.

    PubMed

    Harke, Matthew J; Juhl, Andrew R; Haley, Sheean T; Alexander, Harriet; Dyhrman, Sonya T

    2017-01-01

    The concentration and composition of bioavailable nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in the upper ocean shape eukaryotic phytoplankton communities and influence their physiological responses. Phytoplankton are known to exhibit similar physiological responses to limiting N and P conditions such as decreased growth rates, chlorosis, and increased assimilation of N and P. Are these responses similar at the molecular level across multiple species? To interrogate this question, five species from biogeochemically important, bloom-forming taxa (Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta, and Haptophyta) were grown under similar low N, low P, and replete nutrient conditions to identify transcriptional patterns and associated changes in biochemical pools related to N and P stress. Metabolic profiles, revealed through the transcriptomes of these taxa, clustered together based on species rather than nutrient stressor, suggesting that the global metabolic response to nutrient stresses was largely, but not exclusively, species-specific. Nutrient stress led to few transcriptional changes in the two dinoflagellates, consistent with other research. An orthologous group analysis examined functionally conserved (i.e., similarly changed) responses to nutrient stress and therefore focused on the diatom and haptophytes. Most conserved ortholog changes were specific to a single nutrient treatment, but a small number of orthologs were similarly changed under both N and P stress in 2 or more species. Many of these orthologs were related to photosynthesis and may represent generalized stress responses. A greater number of orthologs were conserved across more than one species under low P compared to low N. Screening the conserved orthologs for functions related to N and P metabolism revealed increased relative abundance of orthologs for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and amino acid transporters under N stress, and increased relative abundance of orthologs related to acquisition of inorganic and organic P

  1. The Pho4 transcription factor mediates the response to arsenate and arsenite in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Urrialde, Verónica; Prieto, Daniel; Pla, Jesús; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    Arsenate (As (V)) is the dominant form of the toxic metalloid arsenic (As). Microorganisms have consequently developed mechanisms to detoxify and tolerate this kind of compounds. In the present work, we have explored the arsenate sensing and signaling mechanisms in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Although mutants impaired in the Hog1 or Mkc1-mediated pathways did not show significant sensitivity to this compound, both Hog1 and Mkc1 became phosphorylated upon addition of sodium arsenate to growing cells. Hog1 phosphorylation upon arsenate challenge was shown to be Ssk1-dependent. A screening designed for the identification of transcription factors involved in the arsenate response identified Pho4, a transcription factor of the myc-family, as pho4 mutants were susceptible to As (V). The expression of PHO4 was shortly induced in the presence of sodium arsenate in a Hog1-independent manner. Pho4 level affects Hog1 phosphorylation upon As (V) challenge, suggesting an indirect relationship between Pho4 activity and signaling in C. albicans. Pho4 also mediates the response to arsenite as revealed by the fact that pho4 defective mutants are sensitive to arsenite and Pho4 becomes phosphorylated upon sodium arsenite addition. Arsenite also triggers Hog1 phosphorylation by a process that is, in this case, independent of the Ssk1 kinase. These results indicate that the HOG pathway mediates the response to arsenate and arsenite in C. albicans and that the Pho4 transcription factor can differentiate among As (III), As (V) and Pi, triggering presumably specific responses. PMID:25717325

  2. Environmentally driven transcriptional regulation in a table top coral: the response to a midday low tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Jones, L.; Palumbi, S.

    2016-02-01

    Corals living in back-reef environments regularly experience fluctuations in temperature, pH, and oxygen, yet we do not know what physiological mechanisms allow them to deal with this variation. The back-reef around Ofu Island in American Samoa can have daily temperature fluctuations of up to 6°C and pH can vary by 0.58 units within a day. We used transcriptomics to monitor coral physiology in the reef as the tide changed environmental conditions from day to day. We sampled three colonies of Acropora hyacinthus once a day for 17 consecutive days. Transcriptomes for each day were sequenced and we identified modules of co-expressed genes in the host and symbiont. There are large portions of the A. hyacinthus and Symbiodinium transcriptomes that are co-regulated and stable though time regardless of environment, and have expression level differences between colonies. Interestingly, transcription of these modules is more stable in the host than in the symbiont. We also see transcriptional variability from day-to-day in A. hyacinthus and Symbiodinium. We looked for strong associations between module expression patterns and changes in the environment. One coral transcriptional module had a very significant relationship to temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen saturation. At the same time, some Symbiodinium genes showed a response to environmental shifts; however, even though coral expression was more stable than Symbiodinium expression across most of the transcriptome, the coral response to the environment was greater than the Symbiodinium response. By looking at gene expression at short temporal scales, we see that corals have quick transcriptomic reactions to tidally driven environmental shifts—demonstrating they are highly responsive to their environment and may be stressed by temporary extremes.

  3. Depletion of yeast PDK1 orthologs triggers a stress-like transcriptional response.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Ferrer-Dalmau, Jofre; Bahí, Anna; Boleda, Martí; Biondi, Ricardo M; Casamayor, Antonio

    2015-09-21

    Pkh proteins are the PDK1 orthologs in S. cerevisiae. They have redundant and essential activity and are responsible for the phosphorylation of several members of the AGC family of protein kinases. Pkh proteins have been involved in several cellular functions, including cell wall integrity and endocytosis. However the global expression changes caused by their depletion are still unknown. A doxycycline-repressible tetO7 promoter driving the expression of PKH2 in cells carrying deletions of the PKH1 and PKH3 genes allowed us to progressively deplete cells from Pkh proteins when treated with doxycycline. Global gene expression analysis indicate that depletion of Pkh results in the up-regulation of genes involved in the accumulation of glycogen and also of those related to stress responses. Moreover, genes involved in the ion transport were quickly down-regulated when the levels of Pkh decreased. The reduction in the mRNA levels required for protein translation, however, was only observed after longer doxycycline treatment (24 h). We uncovered that Pkh is important for the proper transcriptional response to heat shock, and is mostly required for the effects driven by the transcription factors Hsf1 and Msn2/Msn4, but is not required for down-regulation of the mRNA coding for ribosomal proteins. By using the tetO7 promoter we elucidated for the first time the transcriptomic changes directly or indirectly caused by progressive depletion of Pkh. Furthermore, this system enabled the characterization of the transcriptional response triggered by heat shock in wild-type and Pkh-depleted cells, showing that about 40 % of the observed expression changes were, to some degree, dependent on Pkh.

  4. Transcriptional and antagonistic responses of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to phylogenetically different bacterial competitors

    PubMed Central

    Garbeva, Paolina; Silby, Mark W; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Levy, Stuart B; Boer, Wietse de

    2011-01-01

    The ability of soil bacteria to successfully compete with a range of other microbial species is crucial for their growth and survival in the nutrient-limited soil environment. In the present work, we studied the behavior and transcriptional responses of soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf0-1 on nutrient-poor agar to confrontation with strains of three phylogenetically different bacterial genera, that is, Bacillus, Brevundimonas and Pedobacter. Competition for nutrients was apparent as all three bacterial genera had a negative effect on the density of P. fluorescens Pf0-1; this effect was most strong during the interaction with Bacillus. Microarray-based analyses indicated strong differences in the transcriptional responses of Pf0-1 to the different competitors. There was higher similarity in the gene expression response of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 to the Gram-negative bacteria as compared with the Gram-positive strain. The Gram-negative strains did also trigger the production of an unknown broad-spectrum antibiotic in Pf0-1. More detailed analysis indicated that expression of specific Pf0-1 genes involved in signal transduction and secondary metabolite production was strongly affected by the competitors' identity, suggesting that Pf0-1 can distinguish among different competitors and fine-tune its competitive strategies. The results presented here demonstrate that P. fluorescens Pf0-1 shows a species-specific transcriptional and metabolic response to bacterial competitors and provide new leads in the identification of specific cues in bacteria–bacteria interactions and of novel competitive strategies, antimicrobial traits and genes. PMID:21228890

  5. The transcriptional regulatory network in the drought response and its crosstalk in abiotic stress responses including drought, cold, and heat

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Drought negatively impacts plant growth and the productivity of crops around the world. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in the drought response is important for improvement of drought tolerance using molecular techniques. In plants, abscisic acid (ABA) is accumulated under osmotic stress conditions caused by drought, and has a key role in stress responses and tolerance. Comprehensive molecular analyses have shown that ABA regulates the expression of many genes under osmotic stress conditions, and the ABA-responsive element (ABRE) is the major cis-element for ABA-responsive gene expression. Transcription factors (TFs) are master regulators of gene expression. ABRE-binding protein and ABRE-binding factor TFs control gene expression in an ABA-dependent manner. SNF1-related protein kinases 2, group A 2C-type protein phosphatases, and ABA receptors were shown to control the ABA signaling pathway. ABA-independent signaling pathways such as dehydration-responsive element-binding protein TFs and NAC TFs are also involved in stress responses including drought, heat, and cold. Recent studies have suggested that there are interactions between the major ABA signaling pathway and other signaling factors in stress responses. The important roles of these TFs in crosstalk among abiotic stress responses will be discussed. Control of ABA or stress signaling factor expression can improve tolerance to environmental stresses. Recent studies using crops have shown that stress-specific overexpression of TFs improves drought tolerance and grain yield compared with controls in the field. PMID:24904597

  6. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula under salt stress identified a novel CBF transcription factor MtCBF4 that plays an important role in abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Salt stress hinders the growth of plants and reduces crop production worldwide. However, different plant species might possess different adaptive mechanisms to mitigate salt stress. We conducted a detailed pathway analysis of transcriptional dynamics in the roots of Medicago truncatula seedlings under salt stress and selected a transcription factor gene, MtCBF4, for experimental validation. Results A microarray experiment was conducted using root samples collected 6, 24, and 48 h after application of 180 mM NaCl. Analysis of 11 statistically significant expression profiles revealed different behaviors between primary and secondary metabolism pathways in response to external stress. Secondary metabolism that helps to maintain osmotic balance was induced. One of the highly induced transcription factor genes was successfully cloned, and was named MtCBF4. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MtCBF4, which belongs to the AP2-EREBP transcription factor family, is a novel member of the CBF transcription factor in M. truncatula. MtCBF4 is shown to be a nuclear-localized protein. Expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula was induced by most of the abiotic stresses, including salt, drought, cold, and abscisic acid, suggesting crosstalk between these abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis over-expressing MtCBF4 enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress, and activated expression of downstream genes that contain DRE elements. Over-expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula also enhanced salt tolerance and induced expression level of corresponding downstream genes. Conclusion Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis revealed complex mechanisms exist in plants in response to salt stress. The novel transcription factor gene MtCBF4 identified here played an important role in response to abiotic stresses, indicating that it might be a good candidate gene for genetic improvement to produce stress-tolerant plants. PMID:21718548

  7. DNA distortion accompanies transcriptional activation by the metal-responsive gene-regulatory protein MerR

    SciTech Connect

    Frantz, B.; O'Halloran, T.V. )

    1990-05-22

    Transcriptional regulation of the bacterial mercuric ion resistance operon (mer) in response to nanomolar concentrations of mercuric ion is achieved by the allosterically modulated transcriptional activator protein MerR. The authors now show that mercuric ion modification of MerR activates transcription, facilitating the conversion of an RNA polymerase complex with the mer promoter from the closed conformation to the strand-separated, transcriptionally competent open complex. An Hg-MerR-induced structural alteration at the center of the promoter has been detected in the presence or absence of RNA polymerase by use of chemical nucleases sensitive to variations in DNA secondary structure. This hypersensitivity correlates directly with transcriptional activation, lending further support to a previous proposal that a protein-induced distortion in local DNA structure can be the key step in an allosterically modulated transcription activation mechanism.

  8. A Role for Iron-Sulfur Clusters in the Regulation of Transcription Factor Yap5-dependent High Iron Transcriptional Responses in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangtao; Miao, Ren; Bertram, Sophie; Jia, Xuan; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Yeast respond to increased cytosolic iron by activating the transcription factor Yap5 increasing transcription of CCC1, which encodes a vacuolar iron importer. Using a genetic screen to identify genes involved in Yap5 iron sensing, we discovered that a mutation in SSQ1, which encodes a mitochondrial chaperone involved in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, prevented expression of Yap5 target genes. We demonstrated that mutation or reduced expression of other genes involved in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster synthesis (YFH1, ISU1) prevented induction of the Yap5 response. We took advantage of the iron-dependent catalytic activity of Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase expressed in yeast to measure changes in cytosolic iron. We determined that reductions in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis did not affect the activity of cytosolic gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase. We show that loss of activity of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly complex proteins or deletion of cytosolic glutaredoxins did not reduce expression of Yap5 target genes. These results suggest that the high iron transcriptional response, as well as the low iron transcriptional response, senses iron-sulfur clusters. PMID:22915593

  9. Myonuclear transcription is responsive to mechanical load and DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; Patel, Rooshil M; McClintock, Timothy S; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A; McCarthy, John J

    2016-03-01

    Myofibers increase size and DNA content in response to a hypertrophic stimulus, thus providing a physiological model with which to study how these factors affect global transcription. Using 5-ethynyl uridine (EU) to metabolically label nascent RNA, we measured a sevenfold increase in myofiber transcription during early hypertrophy before a change in cell size and DNA content. The typical increase in myofiber DNA content observed at the later stage of hypertrophy was associated with a significant decrease in the percentage of EU-positive myonuclei; however, when DNA content was held constant by preventing myonuclear accretion via satellite cell depletion, both the number of transcriptionally active myonuclei and the amount of RNA generated by each myonucleus increased. During late hypertrophy, transcription did not scale with cell size, as smaller myofibers (<1000 μm(2)) demonstrated the highest transcriptional activity. Finally, transcription was primarily responsible for changes in the expression of genes known to regulate myofiber size. These findings show that resident myonuclei possess a significant reserve capacity to up-regulate transcription during hypertrophy and that myofiber transcription is responsive to DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy. © 2016 Kirby et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Myonuclear transcription is responsive to mechanical load and DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Tyler J.; Patel, Rooshil M.; McClintock, Timothy S.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.; McCarthy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Myofibers increase size and DNA content in response to a hypertrophic stimulus, thus providing a physiological model with which to study how these factors affect global transcription. Using 5-ethynyl uridine (EU) to metabolically label nascent RNA, we measured a sevenfold increase in myofiber transcription during early hypertrophy before a change in cell size and DNA content. The typical increase in myofiber DNA content observed at the later stage of hypertrophy was associated with a significant decrease in the percentage of EU-positive myonuclei; however, when DNA content was held constant by preventing myonuclear accretion via satellite cell depletion, both the number of transcriptionally active myonuclei and the amount of RNA generated by each myonucleus increased. During late hypertrophy, transcription did not scale with cell size, as smaller myofibers (<1000 μm2) demonstrated the highest transcriptional activity. Finally, transcription was primarily responsible for changes in the expression of genes known to regulate myofiber size. These findings show that resident myonuclei possess a significant reserve capacity to up-regulate transcription during hypertrophy and that myofiber transcription is responsive to DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy. PMID:26764089

  11. Global transcriptional profiles of the copper responses in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquin; López-Maury, Luis; Florencio, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential element involved in fundamental processes like respiration and photosynthesis. However, it becomes toxic at high concentration, which has forced organisms to control its cellular concentration. We have recently described a copper resistance system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is mediated by the two-component system, CopRS, a RND metal transport system, CopBAC and a protein of unknown function, CopM. Here, we report the transcriptional responses to copper additions at non-toxic (0.3 µM) and toxic concentrations (3 µM) in the wild type and in the copper sensitive copR mutant strain. While 0.3 µM copper slightly stimulated metabolism and promoted the exchange between cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin as soluble electron carriers, the addition of 3 µM copper catalyzed the formation of ROS, led to a general stress response and induced expression of Fe-S cluster biogenesis genes. According to this, a double mutant strain copRsufR, which expresses constitutively the sufBCDS operon, tolerated higher copper concentration than the copR mutant strain, suggesting that Fe-S clusters are direct targets of copper toxicity in Synechocystis. In addition we have also demonstrated that InrS, a nickel binding transcriptional repressor that belong to the CsoR family of transcriptional factor, was involved in heavy metal homeostasis, including copper, in Synechocystis. Finally, global gene expression analysis of the copR mutant strain suggested that CopRS only controls the expression of copMRS and copBAC operons in response to copper.

  12. Genome-wide transcriptional and physiological responses of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to paraquat-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Donati, Andrew J; Jeon, Jeong-Min; Sangurdekar, Dipen; So, Jae-Seong; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2011-06-01

    The rhizobial bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum functions as a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of the soybean plant (Glycine max). Plants are capable of producing an oxidative burst, a rapid proliferation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as a defense mechanism against pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria. Therefore, B. japonicum must be able to resist such a defense mechanism to initiate nodulation. In this study, paraquat, a known superoxide radical-inducing agent, was used to investigate this response. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles were created for both prolonged exposure (PE) and fulminant shock (FS) conditions. These profiles revealed that 190 and 86 genes were up- and downregulated for the former condition, and that 299 and 105 genes were up- and downregulated for the latter condition, respectively (>2.0-fold; P < 0.05). Many genes within putative operons for F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase, chemotaxis, transport, and ribosomal proteins were upregulated during PE. The transcriptional profile for the FS condition strangely resembled that of a bacteroid condition, including the FixK(2) transcription factor and most of its response elements. However, genes encoding canonical ROS scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, were not detected, suggesting constitutive expression of those genes by endogenous ROS. Various physiological tests, including exopolysaccharide (EPS), cellular protein, and motility characterization, were performed to corroborate the gene expression data. The results suggest that B. japonicum responds to tolerable oxidative stress during PE through enhanced motility, increased translational activity, and EPS production, in addition to the expression of genes involved in global stress responses, such as chaperones and sigma factors.

  13. Transcription factor assisted loading and enhancer dynamics dictate the hepatic fasting response

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ido; Baek, Songjoon; Presman, Diego M.; Paakinaho, Ville; Swinstead, Erin E.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2017-01-01

    Fasting elicits transcriptional programs in hepatocytes leading to glucose and ketone production. This transcriptional program is regulated by many transcription factors (TFs). To understand how this complex network regulates the metabolic response to fasting, we aimed at isolating the enhancers and TFs dictating it. Measuring chromatin accessibility revealed that fasting massively reorganizes liver chromatin, exposing numerous fasting-induced enhancers. By utilizing computational methods in combination with dissecting enhancer features and TF cistromes, we implicated four key TFs regulating the fasting response: glucocorticoid receptor (GR), cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA), and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (CEBPB). These TFs regulate fuel production by two distinctly operating modules, each controlling a separate metabolic pathway. The gluconeogenic module operates through assisted loading, whereby GR doubles the number of sites occupied by CREB1 as well as enhances CREB1 binding intensity and increases accessibility of CREB1 binding sites. Importantly, this GR-assisted CREB1 binding was enhancer-selective and did not affect all CREB1-bound enhancers. Single-molecule tracking revealed that GR increases the number and DNA residence time of a portion of chromatin-bound CREB1 molecules. These events collectively result in rapid synergistic gene expression and higher hepatic glucose production. Conversely, the ketogenic module operates via a GR-induced TF cascade, whereby PPARA levels are increased following GR activation, facilitating gradual enhancer maturation next to PPARA target genes and delayed ketogenic gene expression. Our findings reveal a complex network of enhancers and TFs that dynamically cooperate to restore homeostasis upon fasting. PMID:28031249

  14. Tissue contaminants and associated transcriptional response in trout liver from high elevation lakes of Washington.

    PubMed

    Moran, Patrick W; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Black, Robert W; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2007-09-15

    The consistent cold temperatures and large amount of precipitation in the Olympic and Cascade ranges of Washington State are thought to enhance atmospheric deposition of contaminants. However, little is known about contaminant levels in organisms residing in these remote high elevation lakes. We measured total mercury and 28 organochlorine compounds in trout collected from 14 remote lakes in the Olympic, Mt. Rainer, and North Cascades National Parks. Mercury was detected in trout from all lakes sampled (15 to 262 microg/kg ww), while two organochlorines, total polychlorinated biphenyls (tPCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), were also detected in these fish tissues (<25 microg/kg ww). In sediments, organochlorine levels were below detection, while median total and methyl mercury were 30.4 and 0.34 microg/kg dry weight (ww), respectively. Using fish from two lakes, representing different contaminant loading levels (Wilcox lake: high; Skymo lake: low), we examined transcriptional response in the liver using a custom-made low-density targeted rainbow trout cDNA microarray. We detected significant differences in liver transcriptional response, including significant changes in metabolic, endocrine, and immune-related genes, in fish collected from Wilcox Lake compared to Skymo Lake. Overall, our results suggest that local urban areas contribute to the observed contaminant patterns in these high elevation lakes, while the transcriptional changes point to a biological response associated with exposure to these contaminants in fish. Specifically, the gene expression pattern leads us to hypothesize a role for mercury in disrupting the metabolic and reproductive pathways in fish from high elevation lakes in western Washington.

  15. Expression profile of CBF-like transcriptional factor genes from Eucalyptus in response to cold.

    PubMed

    El Kayal, Walid; Navarro, Marie; Marque, Gilles; Keller, Guylaine; Marque, Christiane; Teulieres, Chantal

    2006-01-01

    Two CBF (CRT/DRE-binding factor) homologues isolated from Eucalyptus gunnii were designated EguCBF1a and EguCBF1b and belong to a gene family which includes at least five members. Both promoter and coding sequences were found to exhibit the main characteristics of a CBF transcription activator gene and, as expected, the corresponding protein targeted the nucleus. Gene expression was quantitatively analysed using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after a short exposure to different environmental conditions or along a two-step cold acclimation programme with either short or long daylengths. A very strong and fast response to cold was observed, with dark conditions and cold intensity (down to 0 degrees C) having a positive effect on the magnitude of induction. The two genes under study exhibited several similar features such as light response. However, interestingly, their regulation by cold proved differential and complementary as EguCBF1a was more transiently induced by a direct and intense exposure while EguCBF1b responded to milder treatments and exhibited a longer (i.e. which started earlier and finished later) time course. During acclimation, the short daylength positively affected the freezing tolerance in the same way as it positively affected the CBF transcript accumulation, suggesting a potential involvement of these genes in the adaptive response. Although very quick after the first signal, the up-regulation of the two EguCBF1 genes unexpectedly lasted throughout the chilling culture, and new inductions were seen during the thermoperiod transitions. Using a quantitative and highly sensitive measurement of gene expression combined with the application of a cold treatment consistent with natural environmental conditions, this study provides new information on the regulation of CBF-like genes by cold in planta.

  16. Global Transcriptional Profiles of the Copper Responses in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquin; López-Maury, Luis; Florencio, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential element involved in fundamental processes like respiration and photosynthesis. However, it becomes toxic at high concentration, which has forced organisms to control its cellular concentration. We have recently described a copper resistance system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is mediated by the two-component system, CopRS, a RND metal transport system, CopBAC and a protein of unknown function, CopM. Here, we report the transcriptional responses to copper additions at non-toxic (0.3 µM) and toxic concentrations (3 µM) in the wild type and in the copper sensitive copR mutant strain. While 0.3 µM copper slightly stimulated metabolism and promoted the exchange between cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin as soluble electron carriers, the addition of 3 µM copper catalyzed the formation of ROS, led to a general stress response and induced expression of Fe-S cluster biogenesis genes. According to this, a double mutant strain copRsufR, which expresses constitutively the sufBCDS operon, tolerated higher copper concentration than the copR mutant strain, suggesting that Fe-S clusters are direct targets of copper toxicity in Synechocystis. In addition we have also demonstrated that InrS, a nickel binding transcriptional repressor that belong to the CsoR family of transcriptional factor, was involved in heavy metal homeostasis, including copper, in Synechocystis. Finally, global gene expression analysis of the copR mutant strain suggested that CopRS only controls the expression of copMRS and copBAC operons in response to copper. PMID:25268225

  17. Interacting TCP and NLP transcription factors control plant responses to nitrate availability.

    PubMed

    Guan, Peizhu; Ripoll, Juan-José; Wang, Renhou; Vuong, Lam; Bailey-Steinitz, Lindsay J; Ye, Dening; Crawford, Nigel M

    2017-02-28

    Plants have evolved adaptive strategies that involve transcriptional networks to cope with and survive environmental challenges. Key transcriptional regulators that mediate responses to environmental fluctuations in nitrate have been identified; however, little is known about how these regulators interact to orchestrate nitrogen (N) responses and cell-cycle regulation. Here we report that teosinte branched1/cycloidea/proliferating cell factor1-20 (TCP20) and NIN-like protein (NLP) transcription factors NLP6 and NLP7, which act as activators of nitrate assimilatory genes, bind to adjacent sites in the upstream promoter region of the nitrate reductase gene, NIA1, and physically interact under continuous nitrate and N-starvation conditions. Regions of these proteins necessary for these interactions were found to include the type I/II Phox and Bem1p (PB1) domains of NLP6&7, a protein-interaction module conserved in animals for nutrient signaling, and the histidine- and glutamine-rich domain of TCP20, which is conserved across plant species. Under N starvation, TCP20-NLP6&7 heterodimers accumulate in the nucleus, and this coincides with TCP20 and NLP6&7-dependent up-regulation of nitrate assimilation and signaling genes and down-regulation of the G2/M cell-cycle marker gene, CYCB1;1 TCP20 and NLP6&7 also support root meristem growth under N starvation. These findings provide insights into how plants coordinate responses to nitrate availability, linking nitrate assimilation and signaling with cell-cycle progression.

  18. Structurally Distinct Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Induce Differential Transcriptional Responses in Developing Zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Britton; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn V.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC-MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures.

  19. Translational Identification of Transcriptional Signatures of Major Depression and Antidepressant Response.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Mylène; Bergon, Aurélie; Le Guisquet, Anne-Marie; Leman, Samuel; Consoloni, Julia-Lou; Fernandez-Nunez, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Marie-Noëlle; El-Hage, Wissam; Belzeaux, Raoul; Belzung, Catherine; Ibrahim, El Chérif

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent mental illness whose therapy management remains uncertain, with more than 20% of patients who do not achieve response to antidepressants. Therefore, identification of reliable biomarkers to predict response to treatment will greatly improve MDD patient medical care. Due to the inaccessibility and lack of brain tissues from living MDD patients to study depression, researches using animal models have been useful in improving sensitivity and specificity of identifying biomarkers. In the current study, we used the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) model and correlated stress-induced depressive-like behavior (n = 8 unstressed vs. 8 stressed mice) as well as the fluoxetine-induced recovery (n = 8 stressed and fluoxetine-treated mice vs. 8 unstressed and fluoxetine-treated mice) with transcriptional signatures obtained by genome-wide microarray profiling from whole blood, dentate gyrus (DG), and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Hierarchical clustering and rank-rank hypergeometric overlap (RRHO) procedures allowed us to identify gene transcripts with variations that correlate with behavioral profiles. As a translational validation, some of those transcripts were assayed by RT-qPCR with blood samples from 10 severe major depressive episode (MDE) patients and 10 healthy controls over the course of 30 weeks and four visits. Repeated-measures ANOVAs revealed candidate trait biomarkers (ARHGEF1, CMAS, IGHMBP2, PABPN1 and TBC1D10C), whereas univariate linear regression analyses uncovered candidates state biomarkers (CENPO, FUS and NUBP1), as well as prediction biomarkers predictive of antidepressant response (CENPO, NUBP1). These data suggest that such a translational approach may offer new leads for clinically valid panels of biomarkers for MDD.

  20. Wheat drought-responsive WXPL transcription factors regulate cuticle biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Huihui; Luang, Sukanya; Li, Yuan; Bazanova, Natalia; Borisjuk, Nikolai; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2017-02-04

    The cuticle forms a hydrophobic waxy layer that covers plant organs and provides protection from biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcription of genes responsible for cuticle formation is regulated by several types of transcription factors (TFs). Five orthologous to WAX PRODUCTION (WXP1 and WXP2) genes from Medicago truncatula were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from flag leaves and spikes of drought tolerant wheat (Triticum aestivum, breeding line RAC875) and designated TaWXP-like (TaWXPL) genes. Tissue-specific and drought-responsive expression of TaWXPL1D and TaWXPL2B was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR in two Australian wheat genotypes, RAC875 and Kukri, with contrasting glaucousness and drought tolerance. Rapid dehydration and/or slowly developing cyclic drought induced specific expression patterns of WXPL genes in flag leaves of the two cultivars RAC875 and Kukri. TaWXPL1D and TaWXPL2B proteins acted as transcriptional activators in yeast and in wheat cell cultures, and conserved sequences in their activation domains were localised at their C-termini. The involvement of wheat WXPL TFs in regulation of cuticle biosynthesis was confirmed by transient expression in wheat cells, using the promoters of wheat genes encoding two cuticle biosynthetic enzymes, the 3-ketoacyl-CoA-synthetase and the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase. Using the yeast 1-hybrid (Y1H) assay we also demonstrated the differential binding preferences of TaWXPL1D and TaWXPL2B towards three stress-related DNA cis-elements. Protein structural determinants underlying binding selectivity were revealed using comparative 3D molecular modelling of AP2 domains in complex with cis-elements. A scheme is proposed, which links the roles of WXPL and cuticle-related MYB TFs in regulation of genes responsible for the synthesis of cuticle components.

  1. Tissue contaminants and associated transcriptional response in trout liver from high elevation lakes of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, P.W.; Aluru, N.; Black, R.W.; Vijayan, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The consistent cold temperatures and large amount of precipitation in the Olympic and Cascade ranges of Washington State are thought to enhance atmospheric deposition of contaminants. However, little is known about contaminant levels in organisms residing in these remote high elevation lakes. We measured total mercury and 28 organochlorine compounds in trout collected from 14 remote lakes in the Olympic, Mt. Rainer, and North Cascades National Parks. Mercury was detected in trout from all lakes sampled (15 to 262 ??g/kg ww), while two organochlorines, total polychlorinated biphenyls (tPCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), were also detected in these fish tissues (<25 ??g/kg ww). In sediments, organochlorine levels were below detection, while median total and methyl mercury were 30.4 and 0.34 ??g/ kg dry weight (ww), respectively. Using fish from two lakes, representing different contaminant loading levels (Wilcox lake: high; Skymo lake: low), we examined transcriptional response in the liver using a custom-made low-density targeted rainbow trout cDNA microarray. We detected significant differences in liver transcriptional response, including significant changes in metabolic, endocrine, and immune-related genes, in fish collected from Wilcox Lake compared to Skymo Lake. Overall, our results suggest that local urban areas contribute to the observed contaminant patterns in these high elevation lakes, while the transcriptional changes point to a biological response associated with exposure to these contaminants in fish. Specifically, the gene expression pattern leads us to hypothesize a role for mercury in disrupting the metabolic and reproductive pathways in fish from high elevation lakes in western Washington. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  2. Translational Identification of Transcriptional Signatures of Major Depression and Antidepressant Response

    PubMed Central

    Hervé, Mylène; Bergon, Aurélie; Le Guisquet, Anne-Marie; Leman, Samuel; Consoloni, Julia-Lou; Fernandez-Nunez, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Marie-Noëlle; El-Hage, Wissam; Belzeaux, Raoul; Belzung, Catherine; Ibrahim, El Chérif

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent mental illness whose therapy management remains uncertain, with more than 20% of patients who do not achieve response to antidepressants. Therefore, identification of reliable biomarkers to predict response to treatment will greatly improve MDD patient medical care. Due to the inaccessibility and lack of brain tissues from living MDD patients to study depression, researches using animal models have been useful in improving sensitivity and specificity of identifying biomarkers. In the current study, we used the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) model and correlated stress-induced depressive-like behavior (n = 8 unstressed vs. 8 stressed mice) as well as the fluoxetine-induced recovery (n = 8 stressed and fluoxetine-treated mice vs. 8 unstressed and fluoxetine-treated mice) with transcriptional signatures obtained by genome-wide microarray profiling from whole blood, dentate gyrus (DG), and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Hierarchical clustering and rank-rank hypergeometric overlap (RRHO) procedures allowed us to identify gene transcripts with variations that correlate with behavioral profiles. As a translational validation, some of those transcripts were assayed by RT-qPCR with blood samples from 10 severe major depressive episode (MDE) patients and 10 healthy controls over the course of 30 weeks and four visits. Repeated-measures ANOVAs revealed candidate trait biomarkers (ARHGEF1, CMAS, IGHMBP2, PABPN1 and TBC1D10C), whereas univariate linear regression analyses uncovered candidates state biomarkers (CENPO, FUS and NUBP1), as well as prediction biomarkers predictive of antidepressant response (CENPO, NUBP1). These data suggest that such a translational approach may offer new leads for clinically valid panels of biomarkers for MDD. PMID:28848385

  3. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Wilson, Glenn; Corvi, Margaret M.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and-independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 hours post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC-MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. PMID:23656968

  4. Transcriptional regulation of brain gene expression in response to a territorial intrusion

    PubMed Central

    Sanogo, Yibayiri O.; Band, Mark; Blatti, Charles; Sinha, Saurabh; Bell, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behaviour associated with territorial defence is widespread and has fitness consequences. However, excess aggression can interfere with other important biological functions such as immunity and energy homeostasis. How the expression of complex behaviours such as aggression is regulated in the brain has long intrigued ethologists, but has only recently become amenable for molecular dissection in non-model organisms. We investigated the transcriptomic response to territorial intrusion in four brain regions in breeding male threespined sticklebacks using expression microarrays and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Each region of the brain had a distinct genomic response to a territorial challenge. We identified a set of genes that were upregulated in the diencephalon and downregulated in the cerebellum and the brain stem. Cis-regulatory network analysis suggested transcription factors that regulated or co-regulated genes that were consistently regulated in all brain regions and others that regulated gene expression in opposing directions across brain regions. Our results support the hypothesis that territorial animals respond to social challenges via transcriptional regulation of genes in different brain regions. Finally, we found a remarkably close association between gene expression and aggressive behaviour at the individual level. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms in the brain that underlie the response to social challenges. PMID:23097509

  5. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Stress-Induced Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Taymaz-Nikerel, Hilal; Cankorur-Cetinkaya, Ayca; Kirdar, Betul

    2016-01-01

    Cells respond to environmental and/or genetic perturbations in order to survive and proliferate. Characterization of the changes after various stimuli at different -omics levels is crucial to comprehend the adaptation of cells to the changing conditions. Genome-wide quantification and analysis of transcript levels, the genes affected by perturbations, extends our understanding of cellular metabolism by pointing out the mechanisms that play role in sensing the stress caused by those perturbations and related signaling pathways, and in this way guides us to achieve endeavors, such as rational engineering of cells or interpretation of disease mechanisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system has been studied in response to different perturbations and corresponding transcriptional profiles were followed either statically or/and dynamically, short and long term. This review focuses on response of yeast cells to diverse stress inducing perturbations, including nutritional changes, ionic stress, salt stress, oxidative stress, osmotic shock, and to genetic interventions such as deletion and overexpression of genes. It is aimed to conclude on common regulatory phenomena that allow yeast to organize its transcriptomic response after any perturbation under different external conditions. PMID:26925399

  6. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William; Evans, Jodi F

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  7. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:28191017

  8. The transcriptional regulator of the chaperone response HSF1 controls hepatic bioenergetics and protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiongjie; Pang, Junfeng

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic energy reprogramming facilitates adaptations to a variety of stress conditions and cellular dysfunction, but how the energetic demands are monitored and met in response to physiological stimuli remains elusive. Our data support a model demonstrating that heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), a master transcriptional regulator of the chaperone response, has been coopted from its role as a critical protein quality-control regulator to having a central role in systemic energy sensing and for metabolic adaptation to nutrient availability. We found that in the absence of HSF1, levels of NAD+ and ATP are not efficiently sustained in hepatic cells, largely because of transcriptional repression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in the NAD+ salvage pathway. Mechanistically, the defect in NAD+ and ATP synthesis linked to a loss of NAD+-dependent deacetylase activity, increased protein acetylation, and impaired mitochondrial integrity. Remarkably, the drop in ATP level caused by HSF1 loss invoked an adaptive response featuring the inhibition of energetically demanding processes, including gluconeogenesis, translation, and lipid synthesis. Our work identifies HSF1 as a central regulator of cellular bioenergetics and protein homeostasis that benefits malignant cell progression and exacerbates development of metabolic diseases. PMID:28183717

  9. Transcriptional responses of Medicago truncatula upon sulfur deficiency stress and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, Daniel; Mongelard, Gaëlle; van Tuinen, Diederik; Gutierrez, Laurent; Casieri, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur plays an essential role in plants' growth and development and in their response to various abiotic and biotic stresses despite its leachability and its very low abundance in the only form that plant roots can uptake (sulfate). It is part of amino acids, glutathione (GSH), thiols of proteins and peptides, membrane sulfolipids, cell walls and secondary products, so reduced availability can drastically alter plant growth and development. The nutritional benefits of symbiotic interactions can help the plant in case of S deficiency. In particular the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) interaction improves N, P, and S plant nutrition, but the mechanisms behind these exchanges are not fully known yet. Although the transcriptional changes in the leguminous model plant Medicago truncatula have been already assessed in several biotic and/or abiotic conditions, S deficiency has not been considered so far. The aim of this work is to get a first overview on S-deficiency responses in the leaf and root tissues of plants interacting with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. Several hundred genes displayed significantly different transcript accumulation levels. Annotation and GO ID association were used to identify biological processes and molecular functions affected by sulfur starvation. Beside the beneficial effects of AM interaction, plants were greatly affected by the nutritional status, showing various differences in their transcriptomic footprints. Several pathways in which S plays an important role appeared to be differentially affected according to mycorrhizal status, with a generally reduced responsiveness to S deficiency in mycorrhized plants. PMID:25520732

  10. Transcriptional responses of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to increased environmental osmolality caused by salt or urea.

    PubMed

    Withman, Benjamin; Gunasekera, Thusitha S; Beesetty, Pavani; Agans, Richard; Paliy, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common causative agent of urinary tract infections in humans. The majority of urinary infections develop via ascending route through the urethra, where bacterial cells come in contact with human urine prior to reaching the bladder or kidneys. Since urine contains significant amounts of inorganic ions and urea, it imposes osmotic and denaturing stresses on bacterial cells. In this study, we determined the transcriptional adaptive responses of UPEC strain CFT073 to the presence of 0.3 M NaCl or 0.6 M urea in the growth medium. The cell responses to these two osmolytes were drastically different. Although most of the genes of the osmotically inducible regulon were overexpressed in medium with salt, urea failed to stimulate osmotic stress response. At the same time, UPEC colonization genes encoding type 1 and F1C fimbriae and capsule biosynthesis were transcriptionally induced in the presence of urea but did not respond to increased salt concentration. We speculate that urea can potentially be sensed by uropathogenic bacteria to initiate infection program. In addition, several molecular chaperone genes were overexpressed in the presence of urea, whereas adding NaCl to the medium led to an upregulation of a number of anaerobic metabolism pathways.

  11. Transcriptional Responses of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli to Increased Environmental Osmolality Caused by Salt or Urea

    PubMed Central

    Withman, Benjamin; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Beesetty, Pavani; Agans, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common causative agent of urinary tract infections in humans. The majority of urinary infections develop via ascending route through the urethra, where bacterial cells come in contact with human urine prior to reaching the bladder or kidneys. Since urine contains significant amounts of inorganic ions and urea, it imposes osmotic and denaturing stresses on bacterial cells. In this study, we determined the transcriptional adaptive responses of UPEC strain CFT073 to the presence of 0.3 M NaCl or 0.6 M urea in the growth medium. The cell responses to these two osmolytes were drastically different. Although most of the genes of the osmotically inducible regulon were overexpressed in medium with salt, urea failed to stimulate osmotic stress response. At the same time, UPEC colonization genes encoding type 1 and F1C fimbriae and capsule biosynthesis were transcriptionally induced in the presence of urea but did not respond to increased salt concentration. We speculate that urea can potentially be sensed by uropathogenic bacteria to initiate infection program. In addition, several molecular chaperone genes were overexpressed in the presence of urea, whereas adding NaCl to the medium led to an upregulation of a number of anaerobic metabolism pathways. PMID:23090957

  12. Transcriptional profiling of Petunia seedlings reveals candidate regulators of the cold stress response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Ning, Luyun; Zhang, Junwei; Bao, Manzhu; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Petunias are important ornamentals with the capacity for cold acclimation. So far, there is limited information concerning gene regulation and signaling pathways associated with the cold stress response in petunias. A custom-designed petunia microarray representing 24816 genes was used to perform transcriptome profiling in petunia seedlings subjected to cold at 2°C for 0.5 h, 2 h, 24 h, and 5 d. A total of 2071 transcripts displayed differential expression patterns under cold stress, of which 1149 were up-regulated and 922 were down-regulated. Gene ontology enrichment analysis demarcated related biological processes, suggesting a possible link between flavonoid metabolism and plant adaptation to low temperatures. Many novel stress-responsive regulators were revealed, suggesting that diverse regulatory pathways may exist in petunias in addition to the well-characterized CBF pathway. The expression changes of selected genes under cold and other abiotic stress conditions were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, weighted gene co-expression network analysis divided the petunia genes on the array into 65 modules that showed high co-expression and identified stress-specific hub genes with high connectivity. Our identification of these transcriptional responses and groups of differentially expressed regulators will facilitate the functional dissection of the molecular mechanism in petunias responding to environment stresses and extend our ability to improve cold tolerance in plants. PMID:25784921

  13. Comparison of the transcriptional responses induced by acute morphine, methadone and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Belkaï, Emilie; Crété, Dominique; Courtin, Cindie; Noble, Florence; Marie-Claire, Cynthia

    2013-07-05

    Despite their widespread use in opioid maintenance treatment and pain management, little is known about the intracellular effectors of methadone and buprenorphine and the transcriptional responses they induce. We therefore studied the acute effects of these two opioids in rats, comparing our observations with those for the reference molecule, morphine. We determined the analgesic ED50 of the three molecules in the tail flick test, to ensure that transcriptional effects were compared between doses of equivalent analgesic effect. We analysed changes in gene expression over time in three cerebral structures involved in several opioid behaviours-the dorsal striatum, thalamus and nucleus accumbens-by real-time quantitative PCR. We analysed the expression of genes encoding proteins of the endogenous opioid system in parallel with that of Fos, a marker of neuronal activation. The acute transcriptional effects of methadone resembled those of morphine more closely than did those of buprenorphine, in terms of kinetics and intensities. Our results provide the first evidence that these two drugs widely used in pain management and opioid maintenance treatment can disturb the regulation of endogenous opioid system genes and induce molecular outcomes different from those observed with morphine.

  14. Uncoupling RARA transcriptional activation and degradation clarifies the bases for APL response to therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ablain, Julien; Leiva, Magdalena; Peres, Laurent; Fonsart, Julien; Anthony, Elodie

    2013-01-01

    In PML/RARA-driven acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), retinoic acid (RA) induces leukemia cell differentiation and transiently clears the disease. Molecularly, RA activates PML/RARA-dependent transcription and also initiates its proteasome-mediated degradation. In contrast, arsenic, the other potent anti-APL therapy, only induces PML/RARA degradation by specifically targeting its PML moiety. The respective contributions of RA-triggered transcriptional activation and proteolysis to clinical response remain disputed. Here, we identify synthetic retinoids that potently activate RARA- or PML/RARA-dependent transcription, but fail to down-regulate RARA or PML/RARA protein levels. Similar to RA, these uncoupled retinoids elicit terminal differentiation, but unexpectedly fail to impair leukemia-initiating activity of PML/RARA-transformed cells ex vivo or in vivo. Accordingly, the survival benefit conferred by uncoupled retinoids in APL mice is dramatically lower than the one provided by RA. Differentiated APL blasts sorted from uncoupled retinoid–treated mice retain PML/RARA expression and reinitiate APL in secondary transplants. Thus, differentiation is insufficient for APL eradication, whereas PML/RARA loss is essential. These observations unify the modes of action of RA and arsenic and shed light on the potency of their combination in mice or patients. PMID:23509325

  15. Transcriptional Response to Acute Thermal Exposure in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Determined by RNAseq

    PubMed Central

    Tomalty, Katharine M. H.; Meek, Mariah H.; Stephens, Molly R.; Rincón, Gonzalo; Fangue, Nann A.; May, Bernie P.; Baerwald, Melinda R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal exposure is a serious and growing challenge facing fish species worldwide. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) living in the southern portion of their native range are particularly likely to encounter warmer water due to a confluence of factors. River alterations have increased the likelihood that juveniles will be exposed to warm water temperatures during their freshwater life stage, which can negatively impact survival, growth, and development and pose a threat to dwindling salmon populations. To better understand how acute thermal exposure affects the biology of salmon, we performed a transcriptional analysis of gill tissue from Chinook salmon juveniles reared at 12° and exposed acutely to water temperatures ranging from ideal to potentially lethal (12° to 25°). Reverse-transcribed RNA libraries were sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform and a de novo reference transcriptome was created. Differentially expressed transcripts were annotated using Blast2GO and relevant gene clusters were identified. In addition to a high degree of downregulation of a wide range of genes, we found upregulation of genes involved in protein folding/rescue, protein degradation, cell death, oxidative stress, metabolism, inflammation/immunity, transcription/translation, ion transport, cell cycle/growth, cell signaling, cellular trafficking, and structure/cytoskeleton. These results demonstrate the complex multi-modal cellular response to thermal stress in juvenile salmon. PMID:25911227

  16. Uncoupling RARA transcriptional activation and degradation clarifies the bases for APL response to therapies.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Leiva, Magdalena; Peres, Laurent; Fonsart, Julien; Anthony, Elodie; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-04-08

    In PML/RARA-driven acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), retinoic acid (RA) induces leukemia cell differentiation and transiently clears the disease. Molecularly, RA activates PML/RARA-dependent transcription and also initiates its proteasome-mediated degradation. In contrast, arsenic, the other potent anti-APL therapy, only induces PML/RARA degradation by specifically targeting its PML moiety. The respective contributions of RA-triggered transcriptional activation and proteolysis to clinical response remain disputed. Here, we identify synthetic retinoids that potently activate RARA- or PML/RARA-dependent transcription, but fail to down-regulate RARA or PML/RARA protein levels. Similar to RA, these uncoupled retinoids elicit terminal differentiation, but unexpectedly fail to impair leukemia-initiating activity of PML/RARA-transformed cells ex vivo or in vivo. Accordingly, the survival benefit conferred by uncoupled retinoids in APL mice is dramatically lower than the one provided by RA. Differentiated APL blasts sorted from uncoupled retinoid-treated mice retain PML/RARA expression and reinitiate APL in secondary transplants. Thus, differentiation is insufficient for APL eradication, whereas PML/RARA loss is essential. These observations unify the modes of action of RA and arsenic and shed light on the potency of their combination in mice or patients.

  17. Lassa and Marburg viruses elicit distinct host transcriptional responses early after infection.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Ignacio S; Yen, Judy Y; Hensley, Lisa E; Honko, Anna N; Goff, Arthur J; Connor, John H

    2014-11-06

    Lassa virus and Marburg virus are two causative agents of viral hemorrhagic fever. Their diagnosis is difficult because patients infected with either pathogen present similar nonspecific symptoms early after infection. Current diagnostic tests are based on detecting viral proteins or nucleic acids in the blood, but these cannot be found during the early stages of disease, before the virus starts replicating in the blood. Using the transcriptional response of the host during infection can lead to earlier diagnoses compared to those of traditional methods. In this study, we use RNA sequencing to obtain a high-resolution view of the in vivo transcriptional dynamics of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) throughout both types of infection. We report a subset of host mRNAs, including heat-shock proteins like HSPA1B, immunoglobulins like IGJ, and cell adhesion molecules like SIGLEC1, whose differences in expression are strong enough to distinguish Lassa infection from Marburg infection in non-human primates. We have validated these infection-specific expression differences by using microarrays on a larger set of samples, and by quantifying the expression of individual genes using RT-PCR. These results suggest that host transcriptional signatures are correlated with specific viral infections, and that they can be used to identify highly pathogenic viruses during the early stages of disease, before standard detection methods become effective.

  18. Genomic redistribution of GR monomers and dimers mediates transcriptional response to exogenous glucocorticoid in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee-Woong; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Rauch, Alexander; Weiner, Juliane; Hübner, Sabine; Hübner, Norbert; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lazar, Mitchell A; Tuckermann, Jan; Steger, David J

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly prescribed drugs, but their anti-inflammatory benefits are mitigated by metabolic side effects. Their transcriptional effects, including tissue-specific gene activation and repression, are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is known to bind as a homodimer to a palindromic DNA sequence. Using ChIP-exo in mouse liver under endogenous corticosterone exposure, we report here that monomeric GR interaction with a half-site motif is more prevalent than homodimer binding. Monomers colocalize with lineage-determining transcription factors in both liver and primary macrophages, and the GR half-site motif drives transcription, suggesting that monomeric binding is fundamental to GR's tissue-specific functions. In response to exogenous GC in vivo, GR dimers assemble on chromatin near ligand-activated genes, concomitant with monomer evacuation of sites near repressed genes. Thus, pharmacological GCs mediate gene expression by favoring GR homodimer occupancy at classic palindromic sites at the expense of monomeric binding. The findings have important implications for improving therapies that target GR.

  19. Pokemon (FBI-1) interacts with Smad4 to repress TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Chuanfu; Mei, Zhu; Wang, Yue; Bi, Mingjun; Shan, Dapeng; Meredith, Alex; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2015-03-01

    Pokemon, an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ and Krüppel) family. Smad4, a key component of TGF-β pathway, plays an essential role in TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses. In this study, we show that Pokemon can interact directly with Smad4 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Pokemon decreases TGF-β-induced transcriptional activities, whereas knockdown of Pokemon increases these activities. Interestingly, Pokemon does not affect activation of Smad2/3, formation of Smads complex, or DNA binding activity of Smad4. TGF-β1 treatment increases the interaction between Pokemon and Smad4, and also enhances the recruitment of Pokemon to Smad4-DNA complex. In addition, we also find that Pokemon recruits HDAC1 to Smad4 complex but decreases the interaction between Smad4 and p300/CBP. Taken together, all these data suggest that Pokemon is a new partner of Smad4 and plays a negative role in TGF-β pathway.

  20. Transcriptional response of bathypelagic marine bacterioplankton to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Adam R; Sharma, Shalabh; Tringe, Susannah G; Martin, Jeffrey; Joye, Samantha B; Moran, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout released a massive amount of oil and gas into the deep ocean between April and July 2010, stimulating microbial blooms of petroleum-degrading bacteria. To understand the metabolic response of marine microorganisms, we sequenced ∼66 million community transcripts that revealed the identity of metabolically active microbes and their roles in petroleum consumption. Reads were assigned to reference genes from ∼2700 bacterial and archaeal taxa, but most assignments (39%) were to just six genomes representing predominantly methane- and petroleum-degrading Gammaproteobacteria. Specific pathways for the degradation of alkanes, aromatic compounds and methane emerged from the metatranscriptomes, with some transcripts assigned to methane monooxygenases representing highly divergent homologs that may degrade either methane or short alkanes. The microbial community in the plume was less taxonomically and functionally diverse than the unexposed community below the plume; this was due primarily to decreased species evenness resulting from Gammaproteobacteria blooms. Surprisingly, a number of taxa (related to SAR11, Nitrosopumilus and Bacteroides, among others) contributed equal numbers of transcripts per liter in both the unexposed and plume samples, suggesting that some groups were unaffected by the petroleum inputs and blooms of degrader taxa, and may be important for re-establishing the pre-spill microbial community structure. PMID:23902988

  1. Transcriptional response of bathypelagic marine bacterioplankton to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Adam R; Sharma, Shalabh; Tringe, Susannah G; Martin, Jeffrey; Joye, Samantha B; Moran, Mary Ann

    2013-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout released a massive amount of oil and gas into the deep ocean between April and July 2010, stimulating microbial blooms of petroleum-degrading bacteria. To understand the metabolic response of marine microorganisms, we sequenced ≈ 66 million community transcripts that revealed the identity of metabolically active microbes and their roles in petroleum consumption. Reads were assigned to reference genes from ≈ 2700 bacterial and archaeal taxa, but most assignments (39%) were to just six genomes representing predominantly methane- and petroleum-degrading Gammaproteobacteria. Specific pathways for the degradation of alkanes, aromatic compounds and methane emerged from the metatranscriptomes, with some transcripts assigned to methane monooxygenases representing highly divergent homologs that may degrade either methane or short alkanes. The microbial community in the plume was less taxonomically and functionally diverse than the unexposed community below the plume; this was due primarily to decreased species evenness resulting from Gammaproteobacteria blooms. Surprisingly, a number of taxa (related to SAR11, Nitrosopumilus and Bacteroides, among others) contributed equal numbers of transcripts per liter in both the unexposed and plume samples, suggesting that some groups were unaffected by the petroleum inputs and blooms of degrader taxa, and may be important for re-establishing the pre-spill microbial community structure.

  2. Transcription-Replication Conflict Orientation Modulates R-Loop Levels and Activates Distinct DNA Damage Responses.

    PubMed

    Hamperl, Stephan; Bocek, Michael J; Saldivar, Joshua C; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2017-08-10

    Conflicts between transcription and replication are a potent source of DNA damage. Co-transcriptional R-loops could aggravate such conflicts by creating an additional barrier to replication fork progression. Here, we use a defined episomal system to investigate how conflict orientation and R-loop formation influence genome stability in human cells. R-loops, but not normal transcription complexes, induce DNA breaks and orientation-specific DNA damage responses during conflicts with replication forks. Unexpectedly, the replisome acts as an orientation-dependent regulator of R-loop levels, reducing R-loops in the co-directional (CD) orientation but promoting their formation in the head-on (HO) orientation. Replication stress and deregulated origin firing increase the number of HO collisions leading to genome-destabilizing R-loops. Our findings connect DNA replication to R-loop homeostasis and suggest a mechanistic basis for genome instability resulting from deregulated DNA replication, observed in cancer and other disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptional response of lignin-degrading enzymes to 17α-ethinyloestradiol in two white rots

    PubMed Central

    Přenosilová, L; Křesinová, Z; Amemori, A Slavíková; Cajthaml, T; Svobodová, K

    2013-01-01

    Fungal, ligninolytic enzymes have attracted a great attention for their bioremediation capabilities. A deficient knowledge of regulation of enzyme production, however, hinders the use of ligninolytic fungi in bioremediation applications. In this work, a transcriptional analyses of laccase and manganese peroxidase (MnP) production by two white rots was combined with determination of pI of the enzymes and the evaluation of 17α-ethinyloestradiol (EE2) degradation to study regulation mechanisms used by fungi during EE2 degradation. In the cultures of Trametes versicolor the addition of EE2 caused an increase in laccase activity with a maximum of 34.2 ± 6.7 U g−1 of dry mycelia that was observed after 2 days of cultivation. It corresponded to a 4.9 times higher transcription levels of a laccase-encoding gene (lacB) that were detected in the cultures at the same time. Simultaneously, pI values of the fungal laccases were altered in response to the EE2 treatment. Like T. versicolor, Irpex lacteus was also able to remove 10 mg l−1 EE2 within 3 days of cultivation. While an increase to I. lacteus MnP activity and MnP gene transcription levels was observed at the later phase of the cultivation. It suggests another metabolic role of MnP but EE2 degradation. PMID:23170978

  4. Identification, classification, and transcription profiles of the B-type response regulator family in pear

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ling; Qian, Minjie; Zhong, Linbing; Teng, Yuanwen

    2017-01-01

    Type-B response regulators (B-RRs) are transcription factors that function in the final step of two-component signaling systems. In model plants, B-RRs have been shown to play important roles in cytokinin signal transduction. However, the functions of B-RRs in pear have not been well studied. In this report, we conducted a genome-wide analysis and identified 11 putative genes encoding B-PpRR proteins based on the published genome sequence of Pyrus bretschneideri. A phylogenetic tree of the B-PpRR family was constructed, and the motif distribution, chromosome localization, and gene structure of B-PpRR family genes were determined. Gene transcript profiles, which were determined from transcriptome data, indicated that B-PpRR genes potentially function during pear fruit development, bud dormancy, and light/hormone-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Treatment of the fruitlets of ‘Cuiguan’ pear (Pyrus pyrifolia), which never accumulates anthocyanin, with the cytokinin N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)- N′-phenylurea (CPPU) clearly induced anthocyanin accumulation. Anthocyanins accumulated in the skin of fruitlets by 16 days after CPPU treatment, along with the significant activation of most anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. Analyses of B-PpRR transcript levels suggested that B-PpRR genes mediated this accumulation of anthocyanins. These findings enrich our understanding of the function of B-PpRR genes in the physiological processes of pear. PMID:28207822

  5. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Carbon Starvation in Nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Onur; Wels, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (μ = 0.0001 h−1) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a recovery period of another 24 h by reinitiating the medium supply to the retentostat culture. During starvation, the viability of the culture was largely retained, and the expression of genes involved in transcription and translational machineries, cell division, and cell membrane energy metabolism was strongly repressed. Expression of these genes was largely recovered following the reinitiation of the medium supply. Starvation triggered the elevated expression of genes associated with synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, histidine, purine, and riboflavin. The expression of these biosynthesis genes was found to remain at an elevated level after reinitiation of the medium supply. In addition, starvation induced the complete gene set predicted to be involved in natural competence in L. lactis KF147, and the elevated expression of these genes was sustained during the subsequent recovery period, but our attempts to experimentally demonstrate natural transformation in these cells failed. Mining the starvation response gene set identified a conserved cis-acting element that resembles the lactococcal CodY motif in the upstream regions of genes associated with transcription and translational machineries, purine biosynthesis, and natural transformation in L. lactis, suggesting a role for CodY in the observed transcriptome adaptations to starvation in nongrowing cells. PMID:25636846

  6. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S. A.; Yassin, Marwa A.; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway. PMID:26633307

  7. The Complex Transcriptional Response of Acaryochloris marina to Different Oxygen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Prieto, Miguel A.; Lin, Yuankui; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Ancient oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes produced oxygen as a waste product, but existed for a long time under an oxygen-free (anoxic) atmosphere, before an oxic atmosphere emerged. The change in oxygen levels in the atmosphere influenced the chemistry and structure of many enzymes that contained prosthetic groups that were inactivated by oxygen. In the genome of Acaryochloris marina, multiple gene copies exist for proteins that are normally encoded by a single gene copy in other cyanobacteria. Using high throughput RNA sequencing to profile transcriptome responses from cells grown under microoxic and hyperoxic conditions, we detected 8446 transcripts out of the 8462 annotated genes in the Cyanobase database. Two-thirds of the 50 most abundant transcripts are key proteins in photosynthesis. Microoxic conditions negatively affected the levels of expression of genes encoding photosynthetic complexes, with the exception of some subunits. In addition to the known regulation of the multiple copies of psbA, we detected a similar transcriptional pattern for psbJ and psbU, which might play a key role in the altered components of photosystem II. Furthermore, regulation of genes encoding proteins important for reactive oxygen species-scavenging is discussed at genome level, including, for the first time, specific small RNAs having possible regulatory roles under varying oxygen levels. PMID:27974439

  8. Cloning and transcriptional regulation of genes responsible for synthesis of gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guichao; Yu, Robert K

    2008-04-01

    Ganglioside synthases are glycosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of glycoconjugates. A number of ganglioside synthase genes have been cloned and characterized. They are classified into different families of glycosyltransferases based on similarities of their amino acid sequences. Tissue-specific expression of these genes has been analyzed by hybridization using cDNA fragments. Enzymatic characterization with the expressed recombinant enzymes showed these enzymes differ in their donor and acceptor substrate specificities and other biochemical parameters. In vitro enzymatic analysis also showed that one linkage can be synthesized by multiple enzymes and one enzyme may be responsible for synthesis of multiple gangliosides. Following the cloning of the ganglioside synthase genes, the promoters of the key synthase genes in the ganglioside biosynthetic pathway have been cloned and analyzed. All of the promoters are TATA-less, lacking a CCAAT box but containing GC-rich boxes, characteristic of the house-keeping genes, although transcription of ganglioside synthase genes is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. A set of cis-acting elements and transcription factors, including Sp1, AP2, and CREB, function in the proximal promoters. Negative-regulatory regions have also been defined in most of the promoters. We present here an overview of these genes and their transcriptional regulation.

  9. Transcriptional Responses Associated with Virulence and Defence in the Interaction between Heterobasidion annosum s.s. and Norway Spruce.

    PubMed

    Lundén, Karl; Danielsson, Marie; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Ihrmark, Katarina; Nemesio Gorriz, Miguel; Stenlid, Jan; Asiegbu, Frederick O; Elfstrand, Malin

    2015-01-01

    Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato is a serious pathogen causing root and stem rot to conifers in the northern hemisphere and rendering the timber defective for sawing and pulping. In this study we applied next-generation sequencing to i) identify transcriptional responses unique to Heterobasidion-inoculated Norway spruce and ii) investigate the H. annosum transcripts to identify putative virulence factors. To address these objectives we wounded or inoculated 30-year-old Norway spruce clones with H. annosum and 454-sequenced the transcriptome of the interaction at 0, 5 and 15 days post inoculation. The 491,860 high-quality reads were de novo assembled and the relative expression was analysed. Overall, very few H. annosum transcripts were represented in our dataset. Three delta-12 fatty acid desaturase transcripts and one Clavaminate synthase-like transcript, both associated with virulence in other pathosystems, were found among the significantly induced transcripts. The analysis of the Norway spruce transcriptional responses produced a handful of differentially expressed transcripts. Most of these transcripts originated from genes known to respond to H. annosum. However, three genes that had not previously been reported to respond to H. annosum showed specific induction to inoculation: an oxophytodienoic acid-reductase (OPR), a beta-glucosidase and a germin-like protein (GLP2) gene. Even in a small data set like ours, five novel highly expressed Norway spruce transcripts without significant alignment to any previously annotated protein in Genbank but present in the P. abies (v1.0) gene catalogue were identified. Their expression pattern suggests a role in defence. Therefore a more complete survey of the transcriptional responses in the interactions between Norway spruce and its major pathogen H. annosum would probably provide a better understanding of gymnosperm defence than accumulated until now.

  10. Transcriptional profiling of the LPS induced NF-κB response in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Omar; Bolshakov, Viacheslav N; Raines, Stephanie; Newham, Peter; Perkins, Neil D

    2007-01-01

    Background Exposure of macrophages to bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) results in activation of the NF-κB transcription factor, which orchestrates a gene expression programme that underpins the macrophage-dependent immune response. These changes include the induction or repression of a wide range of genes that regulate inflammation, cell proliferation, migration and cell survival. This process is tightly regulated and loss of control is associated with conditions such as septic shock, inflammatory diseases and cancer. To study this response, it is important to have in vitro model systems that reflect the behaviour of cells in vivo. In addition, it is necessary to understand the natural differences that can occur between individuals. In this report, we have investigated and compared the LPS response in macrophage derived cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) derived macrophages. Results Gene expression profiles were determined following LPS treatment of THP-1 cells for 1 and 4 hours. LPS significantly induced or repressed 72 out of 465 genes selected as being known or putative NF-κB target genes, which exhibited 4 temporal patterns of expression. Results for 34 of these genes, including several genes not previously identified as LPS target genes, were validated using real time PCR. A high correlation between microarray and real time PCR data was found. Significantly, the LPS induced expression profile of THP-1 cells, as determined using real time PCR, was found to be very similar to that of human PBMC derived macrophages. Interestingly, some differences were observed in the LPS response between the two donor PBMC macrophage populations. Surprisingly, we found that the LPS response in U937 cells was dramatically different to both THP-1 and PBMC derived macrophages. Conclusion This study revealed a dynamic and diverse transcriptional response to LPS in macrophages, involving both the induction and repression of gene expression in

  11. Transcriptional Profiling of Murine Organ Genes in Response to Infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames Spores

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Scott T.; Yeager, Linsey A.; Lawrence, William S.; Ponce, Cindy; Galindo, Cristi L.; Garner, Harold R.; Baze, Wallace B.; Suarez, Giovanni; Peterson, Johnny W.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2008-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the gram positive, spore-forming etiological agent of anthrax, an affliction studied because of its importance as a potential bioweapon. Although in vitro transcriptional responses of macrophages to either spore or anthrax toxins have been previously reported, little is known regarding the impact of infection on gene expression in host tissues. We infected Swiss-Webster mice intranasally with 5 LD50 of B. anthracis virulent Ames spores and observed the global transcriptional profiles of various tissues over a 48 hr time period. RNA was extracted from spleen, lung, and heart tissues of infected and control mice and examined by Affymetrix GeneChip analysis. Approximately 580 host genes were significantly over or under expressed among the lung, spleen, and heart tissues at 8 hr and 48 hr time points. Expression of genes encoding for surfactant and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presentation was diminished during the early phase of infection in lungs. By 48 hr, a significant number of genes were modulated in the heart, including up-regulation of calcium-binding related gene expression, and down-regulation of multiple genes related to cell adhesion, formation of the extracellular matrix, and the cell cytoskeleton. Interestingly, the spleen 8 hr post-infection showed striking increases in the expression of genes that encode hydrolytic enzymes, and these levels remained elevated throughout infection. Further, genes involving antigen presentation and interferon responses were down-regulated in the spleen at 8 hr. In late stages of infection, splenic genes related to the inflammatory response were up-regulated. This study is the first to describe the in vivo global transcriptional response of multiple organs during inhalational anthrax. Although numerous genes related to the host immunological response and certain protection mechanisms were up-regulated in these organs, a vast list of genes important for fully developing and maintaining this

  12. Isospectral Trigonometric Pöschl-Teller Potentials with Position Dependent Mass Generated by Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Cruz, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work a position dependent mass Hamiltonian with the same spectrum of the trigonometric Pöschl-Teller one was constructed by means of the underlying potential algebra. The corresponding wave functions are determined by using the factorization method. A new family of isospectral potentials are constructed by applying a Darboux transformation. An example is presented in order to illustrate the formalism.

  13. Breeding response of transcript profiling in developing seeds of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaping; Wu, Gang; Cao, Yinglong; Wu, Yuhua; Xiao, Ling; Li, Xiaodan; Lu, Changming

    2009-05-24

    The upgrading of rapeseed cultivars has resulted in a substantial improvement in yield and quality in China over the past 30 years. With the selective pressure against fatty acid composition and oil content, high erucic acid- and low oil-content cultivars have been replaced by low erucic acid- and high oil-content cultivars. The high erucic acid cultivar Zhongyou 821 and its descendent, low erucic acid cultivar Zhongshuang 9, are representatives of two generations of the most outstanding Chinese rapeseed cultivars (B. napus) developed the past 2 decades. This paper compares the transcriptional profiles of Zhongshuang 9 and Zhongyou 821 for 32 genes that are principally involved in lipid biosynthesis during seed development in order to elucidate how the transcriptional profiles of these genes responded to quality improvement over the past 20 years. Comparison of the cultivar Zhongyou 821 with its descendent, Zhongshuang 9, shows that the transcriptional levels of seven of the 32 genes were upregulated by 30% to 109%, including FAD3, ACCase, FAE1, GKTP, Caleosin, GAPDH, and PEPC. Of the 32 genes, 10 (KAS3, beta-CT, BcRK6, P450, FatA, Oleosin, FAD6, FatB, alpha-CT and SUC1) were downregulated by at least 20% and most by 50%. The Napin gene alone accounted for over 75% of total transcription from all 32 genes assessed in both cultivars. Most of the genes showed significant correlation with fatty acid accumulation, but the correlation in ZS9 was significantly different from that in ZY821. Higher KCR2 activity is associated with higher C16:0, C18:0, and C18:2 in both cultivars, lower C22:1 and total fatty acid content in ZY821, and lower 18:1 in ZS9. This paper illustrates the response of the transcription levels of 32 genes to breeding in developing rapeseed seeds. Both cultivars showed similar transcription profiles, with the Napin gene predominantly transcribed. Selective pressure for zero erucic acid, low glucosinolate, high oleic acid and high oil content, as well

  14. Breeding response of transcript profiling in developing seeds of Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yaping; Wu, Gang; Cao, Yinglong; Wu, Yuhua; Xiao, Ling; Li, Xiaodan; Lu, Changming

    2009-01-01

    Background The upgrading of rapeseed cultivars has resulted in a substantial improvement in yield and quality in China over the past 30 years. With the selective pressure against fatty acid composition and oil content, high erucic acid- and low oil-content cultivars have been replaced by low erucic acid- and high oil-content cultivars. The high erucic acid cultivar Zhongyou 821 and its descendent, low erucic acid cultivar Zhongshuang 9, are representatives of two generations of the most outstanding Chinese rapeseed cultivars (B. napus) developed the past 2 decades. This paper compares the transcriptional profiles of Zhongshuang 9 and Zhongyou 821 for 32 genes that are principally involved in lipid biosynthesis during seed development in order to elucidate how the transcriptional profiles of these genes responded to quality improvement over the past 20 years. Results Comparison of the cultivar Zhongyou 821 with its descendent, Zhongshuang 9, shows that the transcriptional levels of seven of the 32 genes were upregulated by 30% to 109%, including FAD3, ACCase, FAE1, GKTP, Caleosin, GAPDH, and PEPC. Of the 32 genes, 10 (KAS3, β-CT, BcRK6, P450, FatA, Oleosin, FAD6, FatB, α-CT and SUC1) were downregulated by at least 20% and most by 50%. The Napin gene alone accounted for over 75% of total transcription from all 32 genes assessed in both cultivars. Most of the genes showed significant correlation with fatty acid accumulation, but the correlation in ZS9 was significantly different from that in ZY821. Higher KCR2 activity is associated with higher C16:0, C18:0, and C18:2 in both cultivars, lower C22:1 and total fatty acid content in ZY821, and lower 18:1 in ZS9. Conclusion This paper illustrates the response of the transcription levels of 32 genes to breeding in developing rapeseed seeds. Both cultivars showed similar transcription profiles, with the Napin gene predominantly transcribed. Selective pressure for zero erucic acid, low glucosinolate, high oleic acid and

  15. Transcriptional response to West Nile virus infection in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeister, Erik K.; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.

    2017-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a widespread arbovirus that imposes a significant cost to both human and wildlife health. WNV exists in a bird-mosquito transmission cycle in which passerine birds act as the primary reservoir host. As a public health concern, the mammalian immune response to WNV has been studied in detail. Little, however, is known about the avian immune response to WNV. Avian taxa show variable susceptibility to WNV and what drives this variation is unknown. Thus, to study the immune response to WNV in birds, we experimentally infected captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Zebra finches provide a useful model, as like many natural avian hosts they are moderately susceptible to WNV and thus provide sufficient viremia to infect mosquitoes. We performed RNAseq in spleen tissue during peak viremia to provide an overview of the transcriptional response. In general, we find strong parallels with the mammalian immune response to WNV, including upregulation of five genes in the Rig-I-like receptor signalling pathway, and offer insights into avian-specific responses. Together with complementary immunological assays, we provide a model of the avian immune response to WNV and set the stage for future comparative studies among variably susceptible populations and species. PMID:28680683

  16. Analysis of Transcriptional Regulation of Tetracycline Responsive Genes in Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Canhui; Kelen, Patrick Vander; Ghedin, Elodie; Lustigman, Sara; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    The Wolbachia endosymbiont of the human filarial parasites is necessary for parasite reproduction, making it an attractive chemotherapeutic target. Previous studies have demonstrated that mRNA levels of several nuclearly encoded genes are altered as a result of exposure to antibiotics that eliminate the endosymbiont, suggesting that they may be involved in maintaining the parasite-endosymbiont relationship. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the increase in mRNA levels of certain nuclearly encoded genes of Brugia malayi in response to tetracycline treatment involved specific regulatory elements present in the promoters of these genes. The promoters of three such genes (BmRPL13, BmRPS4 and BmHSP70) were tested for tetracycline responsiveness utilizing a homologous transient transcription system. Reporter gene expression driven by all three promoters was up-regulated in transfected embryos exposed to tetracycline. Substitution mutagenesis was employed to map the cis-acting elements responsible for this response in the BmHSP70 promoter. Tetracycline responsiveness was found to be distinct from the cis-acting elements involved in regulating the stress response from the BmHSP70 promoter; rather, tetracycline responsiveness was mediated by a TATAA-box like element. This study represents the first demonstration of small molecule-mediated gene regulation of a native B. malayi promoter. PMID:21944995

  17. Transcriptional response to West Nile virus infection in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhouse, Daniel J.; Hofmeister, Erik K.; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.

    2017-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a widespread arbovirus that imposes a significant cost to both human and wildlife health. WNV exists in a bird-mosquito transmission cycle in which passerine birds act as the primary reservoir host. As a public health concern, the mammalian immune response to WNV has been studied in detail. Little, however, is known about the avian immune response to WNV. Avian taxa show variable susceptibility to WNV and what drives this variation is unknown. Thus, to study the immune response to WNV in birds, we experimentally infected captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Zebra finches provide a useful model, as like many natural avian hosts they are moderately susceptible to WNV and thus provide sufficient viremia to infect mosquitoes. We performed RNAseq in spleen tissue during peak viremia to provide an overview of the transcriptional response. In general, we find strong parallels with the mammalian immune response to WNV, including upregulation of five genes in the Rig-I-like receptor signalling pathway, and offer insights into avian-specific responses. Together with complementary immunological assays, we provide a model of the avian immune response to WNV and set the stage for future comparative studies among variably susceptible populations and species.

  18. Transcriptional responses to glucose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains lacking a functional protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Livas, Daniela; Almering, Marinka Jh; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T; Gancedo, Juana M

    2011-08-09

    The pattern of gene transcripts in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strongly affected by the presence of glucose. An increased activity of protein kinase A (PKA), triggered by a rise in the intracellular concentration of cAMP, can account for many of the effects of glucose on transcription. In S. cerevisiae three genes, TPK1, TPK2, and TPK3, encode catalytic subunits of PKA. The lack of viability of tpk1 tpk2 tpk3 triple mutants may be suppressed by mutations such as yak1 or msn2/msn4. To investigate the requirement for PKA in glucose control of gene expression, we have compared the effects of glucose on global transcription in a wild-type strain and in two strains devoid of PKA activity, tpk1 tpk2 tpk3 yak1 and tpk1 tpk2 tpk3 msn2 msn4. We have identified different classes of genes that can be induced -or repressed- by glucose in the absence of PKA. Representative examples are genes required for glucose utilization and genes involved in the metabolism of other carbon sources, respectively. Among the genes responding to glucose in strains devoid of PKA some are also controlled by a redundant signalling pathway involving PKA activation, while others are not affected when PKA is activated through an increase in cAMP concentration. On the other hand, among genes that do not respond to glucose in the absence of PKA, some give a full response to increased cAMP levels, even in the absence of glucose, while others appear to require the cooperation of different signalling pathways. We show also that, for a number of genes controlled by glucose through a PKA-dependent pathway, the changes in mRNA levels are transient. We found that, in cells grown in gluconeogenic conditions, expression of a small number of genes, mainly connected with the response to stress, is reduced in the strains lacking PKA. In S. cerevisiae, the transcriptional responses to glucose are triggered by a variety of pathways, alone or in combination, in which PKA is often involved. Redundant

  19. BZR1 is a transcriptional repressor with dual roles in brassinosteroid homeostasis and growth responses

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Xian; Gendron, Joshua M.; Sun, Yu; Gampala, Srinivas S. L.; Gendron, Nathan; Sun, Catherine Qing; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) homeostasis and signaling are crucial for normal growth and development of plants. BR signaling through cell-surface receptor kinases and intracellular components leads to dephosphorylation and accumulation of the nuclear protein BZR1. How BR signaling regulates gene expression, however, remains unknown. Here we show that BZR1 is a transcriptional repressor that has a previously unknown DNA binding domain and binds directly to the promoters of feedback-regulated BR biosynthetic genes. Microarray analyses identified additional potential targets of BZR1 and illustrated, together with physiological studies, that BZR1 coordinates BR homeostasis and signaling by playing dual roles in regulating BR biosynthesis and downstream growth responses. PMID:15681342

  20. Tissue- and environmental response-specific expression of 10 PP2C transcripts in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, S; Koga, R; Bohnert, H J; Fukuhara, T

    1999-03-01

    Ten transcripts (Mpc1-10) homologous to protein phosphatases of the 2C family have been isolated from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (common ice plant). Transcripts range in size from 1.6 to 2.6 kb, and encode proteins whose catalytic domains are between 24% and 62% identical to that of the Arabidopsis PP2C, ABI1. Transcript expression is tissue specific. Two isoforms are present only in roots (Mpc1 and Mpc5), three in young leaves (Mpc6, 8 and 9), two in old leaves (Mpc6 and Mpc8), and two in post-flowering leaves (Mpc8 and Mpc9). Mpc2 is strongly expressed in roots and also in seeds, meristematic tissues and mature flowers. Mpc3 is specific for leaf meristems, and Mpc4 is found in root and leaf meristems. Mpc7 is restricted to meristematic tissues. Mpc10 is only present in mature flowers. Mpc2 (in roots and leaves), Mpc5 (in roots) and Mpc8 (weakly in leaves) are induced by salinity stress and drought conditions with different kinetics in different tissues, but other Mpcs are downregulated by stress. Cold stress (4 degrees C) leads to a decline in Mpc5 and Mp6, but low temperature provoked a long-term (days) increase in Mpc2 levels in leaves and a transient increase (less than 24 h) in roots. Four full-length transcripts have been obtained. In each case, after over-expression in E. coli, the isolated proteins exhibited (Mg2+-dependent, okadeic acid-insensitive) protein phosphatase activity, although activity against 32P-phosphocasein varied among different PP2Cs. Determination of tissue developmental and stress response specificity of PP2C will facilitate functional studies of signal-transducing enzymes in this halophytic organism.

  1. Extensive transcriptional response associated with seasonal plasticity of butterfly wing patterns

    PubMed Central

    DANIELS, EMILY V.; MURAD, RABI; MORTAZAVI, ALI; REED, ROBERT D.

    2015-01-01

    In the eastern United States, the buckeye butterfly, Junonia coenia, shows seasonal wing colour plasticity where adults emerging in the spring are tan, while those emerging in the autumn are dark red. This variation can be artificially induced in laboratory colonies, thus making J. coenia a useful model system to examine the mechanistic basis of plasticity. To better understand the developmental basis of seasonal plasticity, we used RNA-seq to quantify transcription profiles associated with development of alternative seasonal wing morphs. Depending on the developmental stage, between 547 and 1420 transfrags were significantly differentially expressed between morphs. These extensive differences in gene expression stand in contrast to the much smaller numbers of differentially expressed transcripts identified in previous studies of genetic wing pattern variation in other species and suggest that environmentally induced phenotypic shifts arise from very broad systemic processes. Analyses of candidate endocrine and pigmentation transcripts revealed notable genes upregulated in the red morph, including several ecdysone-associated genes, and cinnabar, an ommochrome pigmentation gene implicated in colour pattern variation in other butterflies. We also found multiple melanin-related transcripts strongly upregulated in the red morph, including tan and yellow-family genes, leading us to speculate that dark red pigmentation in autumn J. coenia may involve nonommochrome pigments. While we identified several endocrine and pigmentation genes as obvious candidates for seasonal colour morph differentiation, we speculate that the majority of observed expression differences were due to thermal stress response. The buckeye transcriptome provides a basis for further developmental studies of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25369871

  2. Transcriptional responses in eastern honeybees (Apis cerana) infected with mites, Varroa destructor.

    PubMed

    Ji, T; Yin, L; Liu, Z; Liang, Q; Luo, Y; Shen, J; Shen, F

    2014-10-31

    The Varroa destructor mite has become the greatest threat to Apis mellifera health worldwide, but rarely causes serious damage to its native host Apis cerana. Understanding the resistance mechanisms of eastern bees against Varroa mites will help researchers determine how to protect other species from this organism. The A. cerana genome has not been previously sequenced; hence, here we sequenced the A. cerana nurse workers transcriptome and monitored the differential gene expression of A. cerana bees challenged by V. destructor. Using de novo transcriptome assembly, we obtained 91,172 unigenes (transcripts) for A. cerana. Differences in gene expression levels between the unchallenged (Con) and challenged (Con2) samples were estimated, and a total of 36,691 transcripts showed a 2-fold difference (at least) between the 2 libraries. A total of 272 differentially expressed genes showed differences greater than 15-fold, and 265 unigenes were present at higher levels in Con2 than in Con. Among the upregulated unigenes in the Con2 colony, genes related to skeletal muscle movement (troponin and calcium-transporting ATPase), olfactory sensitivity (odorant binding proteins, and Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule gene) and transcription factors (cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein and transcription factor mblk-1) appeared to be involved in Varroa resistance. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to validate these differentially expressed genes screened by the sequencing approach, and sufficient consistency was observed between the two methods. These findings strongly support that hygienic and grooming behaviors play important roles in Varroa resistance.

  3. Colonic transcriptional response to 1α,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 in African- and European-Americans.

    PubMed

    Alleyne, Dereck; Witonsky, David B; Mapes, Brandon; Nakagome, Shigeki; Sommars, Meredith; Hong, Ellie; Muckala, Katy A; Di Rienzo, Anna; Kupfer, Sonia S

    2017-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a significant health burden especially among African Americans (AA). Epidemiological studies have correlated low serum vitamin D with CRC risk, and, while hypovitaminosis D is more common and more severe in AA, the mechanisms by which vitamin D modulates CRC risk and how these differ by race are not well understood. Active vitamin D (1α,25(OH)2D3) has chemoprotective effects primarily through transcriptional regulation of target genes in the colon. We hypothesized that transcriptional response to 1α,25(OH)2D3 differs between AA and European Americans (EA) irrespective of serum vitamin D and that regulatory variants could impact transcriptional response. We treated ex vivo colon cultures from 34 healthy subjects (16 AA and 18 EA) with 0.1μM 1α,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle control for 6h and performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling. We found 8 genes with significant differences in transcriptional response to 1α,25(OH)2D3 between AA and EA with definitive replication of inter-ethnic differences for uridine phosphorylase 1 (UPP1) and zinc finger-SWIM containing 4 (ZSWIM4). We performed expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping and identified response cis-eQTLs for ZSWIM4 as well as for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), the latter of which showed a trend toward significant inter-ethnic differences in transcriptional response. Allele frequency differences of eQTLs for ZSWIM4 and HDAC3 accounted for observed transcriptional differences between populations. Taken together, our results demonstrate that transcriptional response to 1α,25(OH)2D3 differs between AA and EA independent of serum 25(OH)D levels. We provide evidence in support of a genetic regulatory mechanism underlying transcriptional differences between populations for ZSWIM4 and HDAC3. Further work is needed to elucidate how response eQTLs modify vitamin D response and whether genotype and/or transcriptional response correlate with chemopreventive effects. Relevant biomarkers

  4. De Novo Transcriptional Analysis of Alfalfa in Response to Saline-Alkaline Stress

    PubMed Central

    An, Yi-Min; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Ying-Rui; Shu, Yong-Jun; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saline-alkaline stress, caused by high levels of harmful carbonate salts and high soil pH, is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity. Alfalfa is a widely cultivated perennial forage legume with some tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, especially to saline-alkaline stress. To elucidate the mechanism underlying plant saline-alkaline tolerance, we conducted transcriptome analysis of whole alfalfa seedlings treated with saline-alkaline solutions for 0 day (control), 1 day (short-term treatment), and 7 days (long-term treatment) using ion torrent sequencing technology. A transcriptome database dataset of 53,853 unigenes was generated, and 2,286 and 2,233 genes were differentially expressed in the short-term and long-term treatment, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed 14 highly enriched pathways and demonstrated the differential response of metabolic pathways between the short-term and long-term treatment. The expression levels of 109 and 96 transcription factors were significantly altered significantly after 1 day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Specific responses of peroxidase, flavonoids, and the light pathway component indicated that the antioxidant capacity was one of the central mechanisms of saline-alkaline stress tolerance response in alfalfa. Among the 18 differentially expressed genes examined by real time PCR, the expression levels of eight genes, including inositol transporter, DNA binding protein, raffinose synthase, ferritin, aldo/keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, xyloglucan endotrans glucosylase, and a NAC transcription factor, exhibited different patterns in response to saline and alkaline stress. The expression levels of the NAC transcription factor and glutathione S-transferase were altered significantly under saline stress and saline-alkaline stress; they were upregulated under saline-alkaline stress and downregulated under salt stress. Physiology assays showed an increased concentration of reactive oxygen

  5. De Novo Transcriptional Analysis of Alfalfa in Response to Saline-Alkaline Stress.

    PubMed

    An, Yi-Min; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Ying-Rui; Shu, Yong-Jun; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saline-alkaline stress, caused by high levels of harmful carbonate salts and high soil pH, is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity. Alfalfa is a widely cultivated perennial forage legume with some tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, especially to saline-alkaline stress. To elucidate the mechanism underlying plant saline-alkaline tolerance, we conducted transcriptome analysis of whole alfalfa seedlings treated with saline-alkaline solutions for 0 day (control), 1 day (short-term treatment), and 7 days (long-term treatment) using ion torrent sequencing technology. A transcriptome database dataset of 53,853 unigenes was generated, and 2,286 and 2,233 genes were differentially expressed in the short-term and long-term treatment, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed 14 highly enriched pathways and demonstrated the differential response of metabolic pathways between the short-term and long-term treatment. The expression levels of 109 and 96 transcription factors were significantly altered significantly after 1 day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Specific responses of peroxidase, flavonoids, and the light pathway component indicated that the antioxidant capacity was one of the central mechanisms of saline-alkaline stress tolerance response in alfalfa. Among the 18 differentially expressed genes examined by real time PCR, the expression levels of eight genes, including inositol transporter, DNA binding protein, raffinose synthase, ferritin, aldo/keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, xyloglucan endotrans glucosylase, and a NAC transcription factor, exhibited different patterns in response to saline and alkaline stress. The expression levels of the NAC transcription factor and glutathione S-transferase were altered significantly under saline stress and saline-alkaline stress; they were upregulated under saline-alkaline stress and downregulated under salt stress. Physiology assays showed an increased concentration of reactive oxygen

  6. Transcriptional and physiological responses of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to desiccation-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Cytryn, Eddie J; Sangurdekar, Dipen P; Streeter, John G; Franck, William L; Chang, Woo-Suk; Stacey, Gary; Emerich, David W; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2007-10-01

    The growth and persistence of rhizobia and bradyrhizobia in soils are negatively impacted by drought conditions. In this study, we used genome-wide transcriptional analyses to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the response of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to drought. Desiccation of cells resulted in the differential expression of 15 to 20% of the 8,453 [corrected] B. japonicum open reading frames, with considerable differentiation between early (after 4 h) and late (after 24 and 72 h) expressed genes. While 225 genes were universally up-regulated at all three incubation times in response to desiccation, an additional 43 and 403 up-regulated genes were common to the 4/24- and 24/72-h incubation times, respectively. Desiccating conditions resulted in the significant induction (>2.0-fold) of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthetase (otsA), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (otsB), and trehalose synthase (treS) genes, which encode two of the three trehalose synthesis pathways found in B. japonicum. Gene induction was correlated with an elevated intracellular concentration of trehalose and increased activity of trehalose-6-phosphate synthetase, collectively supporting the hypothesis that this disaccharide plays a prominent and important role in promoting desiccation tolerance in B. japonicum. Microarray data also indicated that sigma(54)- and sigma(24)-associated transcriptional regulators and genes encoding isocitrate lyase, oxidative stress responses, the synthesis and transport of exopolysaccharides, heat shock response proteins, enzymes for the modification and repair of nucleic acids, and the synthesis of pili and flagella are also involved in the response of B. japonicum to desiccation. Polyethylene glycol-generated osmotic stress induced significantly fewer genes than those transcriptionally activated by desiccation. However, 67 genes were commonly induced under both conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that B. japonicum directly responds to desiccation

  7. Responses of human cells to ZnO nanoparticles: a gene transcription study.

    PubMed

    Moos, Philip J; Olszewski, Kyle; Honeggar, Matthew; Cassidy, Pamela; Leachman, Sancy; Woessner, David; Cutler, N Shane; Veranth, John M

    2011-11-01

    The gene transcript profile responses to metal oxide nanoparticles was studied using human cell lines derived from the colon and skin tumors. Much of the research on nanoparticle toxicology has focused on models of inhalation and intact skin exposure, and effects of ingestion exposure and application to diseased skin are relatively unknown. Powders of nominally nanosized SiO2, TiO2, ZnO and Fe2O3 were chosen because these substances are widely used in consumer products. The four oxides were evaluated using colon-derived cell lines, RKO and CaCo-2, and ZnO and TiO2 were evaluated further using skin-derived cell lines HaCaT and SK Mel-28. ZnO induced the most notable gene transcription changes, even though this material was applied at the lowest concentration. Nano-sized and conventional ZnO induced similar responses suggesting common mechanisms of action. The results showed neither a non-specific response pattern common to all substances nor synergy of the particles with TNF-α cotreatment. The response to ZnO was not consistent with a pronounced proinflammatory signature, but involved changes in metal metabolism, chaperonin proteins, and protein folding genes. This response was observed in all cell lines when ZnO was in contact with the human cells. When the cells were exposed to soluble Zn, the genes involved in metal metabolism were induced but the genes involved in protein refoldling were unaffected. This provides some of the first data on the effects of commercial metal oxide nanoparticles on human colon-derived and skin-derived cells.

  8. Spatial dissection of the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptional response to downy mildew using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Coker, Timothy L. R.; Cevik, Volkan; Beynon, Jim L.; Gifford, Miriam L.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gene expression form a crucial part of the plant response to infection. In the last decade, whole-leaf expression profiling has played a valuable role in identifying genes and processes that contribute to the interactions between the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and a diverse range of pathogens. However, with some pathogens such as downy mildew caused by the biotrophic oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa), whole-leaf profiling may fail to capture the complete Arabidopsis response encompassing responses of non-infected as well as infected cells within the leaf. Highly localized expression changes that occur in infected cells may be diluted by the comparative abundance of non-infected cells. Furthermore, local and systemic Hpa responses of a differing nature may become conflated. To address this we applied the technique of Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS), typically used for analyzing plant abiotic responses, to the study of plant-pathogen interactions. We isolated haustoriated (Hpa-proximal) and non-haustoriated (Hpa-distal) cells from infected seedling samples using FACS, and measured global gene expression. When compared with an uninfected control, 278 transcripts were identified as significantly differentially expressed, the vast majority of which were differentially expressed specifically in Hpa-proximal cells. By comparing our data to previous, whole organ studies, we discovered many highly locally regulated genes that can be implicated as novel in the Hpa response, and that were uncovered for the first time using our sensitive FACS technique. PMID:26217372

  9. Transcriptional response of Mexican axolotls to Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV) infection.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Jennifer D; Storfer, Andrew; Page, Robert B; Beachy, Christopher K; Voss, S Randal

    2008-10-20

    Very little is known about the immunological responses of amphibians to pathogens that are causing global population declines. We used a custom microarray gene chip to characterize gene expression responses of axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) to an emerging viral pathogen, Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV). At 0, 24, 72, and 144 hours post-infection, spleen and lung samples were removed for estimation of host mRNA abundance and viral load. A total of 158 up-regulated and 105 down-regulated genes were identified across all time points using statistical and fold level criteria. The presumptive functions of these genes suggest a robust innate immune and antiviral gene expression response is initiated by A. mexicanum as early as 24 hours after ATV infection. At 24 hours, we observed transcript abundance changes for genes that are associated with phagocytosis and cytokine signaling, complement, and other general immune and defense responses. By 144 hours, we observed gene expression changes indicating host-mediated cell death, inflammation, and cytotoxicity. Although A. mexicanum appears to mount a robust innate immune response, we did not observe gene expression changes indicative of lymphocyte proliferation in the spleen, which is associated with clearance of Frog 3 iridovirus in adult Xenopus. We speculate that ATV may be especially lethal to A. mexicanum and related tiger salamanders because they lack proliferative lymphocyte responses that are needed to clear highly virulent iridoviruses. Genes identified from this study provide important new resources to investigate ATV disease pathology and host-pathogen dynamics in natural populations.

  10. ATM-Mediated Transcriptional and Developmental Responses to γ-rays in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pichon, Olivier; Fochesato, Sylvain; Ortet, Philippe; Montané, Marie-Hélène

    2007-01-01

    ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated) is an essential checkpoint kinase that signals DNA double-strand breaks in eukaryotes. Its depletion causes meiotic and somatic defects in Arabidopsis and progressive motor impairment accompanied by several cell deficiencies in patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT). To obtain a comprehensive view of the ATM pathway in plants, we performed a time-course analysis of seedling responses by combining confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of root development and genome-wide expression profiling of wild-type (WT) and homozygous ATM-deficient mutants challenged with a dose of γ-rays (IR) that is sublethal for WT plants. Early morphologic defects in meristematic stem cells indicated that AtATM, an Arabidopsis homolog of the human ATM gene, is essential for maintaining the quiescent center and controlling the differentiation of initial cells after exposure to IR. Results of several microarray experiments performed with whole seedlings and roots up to 5 h post-IR were compiled in a single table, which was used to import gene information and extract gene sets. Sequence and function homology searches; import of spatio-temporal, cell cycling, and mutant-constitutive expression characteristics; and a simplified functional classification system were used to identify novel genes in all functional classes. The hundreds of radiomodulated genes identified were not a random collection, but belonged to functional pathways such as those of the cell cycle; cell death and repair; DNA replication, repair, and recombination; and transcription; translation; and signaling, indicating the strong cell reprogramming and double-strand break abrogation functions of ATM checkpoints. Accordingly, genes in all functional classes were either down or up-regulated concomitantly with downregulation of chromatin deacetylases or upregulation of acetylases and methylases, respectively. Determining the early transcriptional indicators of prolonged S-G2 phases that

  11. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC–MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. - Highlights: • Defined global mRNA expression

  12. ATM-mediated transcriptional and developmental responses to gamma-rays in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ricaud, Lilian; Proux, Caroline; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pichon, Olivier; Fochesato, Sylvain; Ortet, Philippe; Montané, Marie-Hélène

    2007-05-09

    ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated) is an essential checkpoint kinase that signals DNA double-strand breaks in eukaryotes. Its depletion causes meiotic and somatic defects in Arabidopsis and progressive motor impairment accompanied by several cell deficiencies in patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT). To obtain a comprehensive view of the ATM pathway in plants, we performed a time-course analysis of seedling responses by combining confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of root development and genome-wide expression profiling of wild-type (WT) and homozygous ATM-deficient mutants challenged with a dose of gamma-rays (IR) that is sublethal for WT plants. Early morphologic defects in meristematic stem cells indicated that AtATM, an Arabidopsis homolog of the human ATM gene, is essential for maintaining the quiescent center and controlling the differentiation of initial cells after exposure to IR. Results of several microarray experiments performed with whole seedlings and roots up to 5 h post-IR were compiled in a single table, which was used to import gene information and extract gene sets. Sequence and function homology searches; import of spatio-temporal, cell cycling, and mutant-constitutive expression characteristics; and a simplified functional classification system were used to identify novel genes in all functional classes. The hundreds of radiomodulated genes identified were not a random collection, but belonged to functional pathways such as those of the cell cycle; cell death and repair; DNA replication, repair, and recombination; and transcription; translation; and signaling, indicating the strong cell reprogramming and double-strand break abrogation functions of ATM checkpoints. Accordingly, genes in all functional classes were either down or up-regulated concomitantly with downregulation of chromatin deacetylases or upregulation of acetylases and methylases, respectively. Determining the early transcriptional indicators of prolonged S-G2 phases

  13. Interaction of the RcsB Response Regulator with Auxiliary Transcription Regulators in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Pannen, Derk; Fabisch, Maria; Gausling, Lisa; Schnetz, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The Rcs phosphorelay is a two-component signal transduction system that is induced by cell envelope stress. RcsB, the response regulator of this signaling system, is a pleiotropic transcription regulator, which is involved in the control of various stress responses, cell division, motility, and biofilm formation. RcsB regulates transcription either as a homodimer or together with auxiliary regulators, such as RcsA, BglJ, and GadE in Escherichia coli. In this study, we show that RcsB in addition forms heterodimers with MatA (also known as EcpR) and with DctR. Our data suggest that the MatA-dependent transcription regulation is mediated by the MatA-RcsB heterodimer and is independent of RcsB phosphorylation. Furthermore, we analyzed the relevance of amino acid residues of the active quintet of conserved residues, and of surface-exposed residues for activity of RcsB. The data suggest that the activity of the phosphorylation-dependent dimers, such as RcsA-RcsB and RcsB-RcsB, is affected by mutation of residues in the vicinity of the phosphorylation site, suggesting that a phosphorylation-induced structural change modulates their activity. In contrast, the phosphorylation-independent heterodimers BglJ-RcsB and MatA-RcsB are affected by only very few mutations. Heterodimerization of RcsB with various auxiliary regulators and their differential dependence on phosphorylation add an additional level of control to the Rcs system that is operating at the output level. PMID:26635367

  14. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair.

    PubMed

    Reumann, Marie K; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Stephen B; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1(-/-) mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1(-/-) mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1(-/-) callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair.

  15. A conserved structural module regulates transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Greenwell, Roger S.; Anthony, Jennifer R.; Wang, Sheng; Lim, Lee; Das, Kakoli; Sofia, Heidi J.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Darst, Seth A.

    2007-09-07

    In Rhodbacter sphaeroides, transcriptional response to singlet oxygen is controlled by the ECF (extracytoplasmic function) transcription factor, σΕ. ECF σ’s comprise the largest and most divergent group of the σ70-family members and are negatively regulated by their cognate anti-σ factor. Here, we determine the crystal structure of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides ECF σ factor, σE, in an inhibitory complex with its anti-σ, ChrR. The structure reveals that ChrR is composed of two structural domains separated by a flexible linker. The N-terminal domain sterically occludes the two primary binding determinants on σE for core RNA polymerase and is thus referred to as the ASD (anti-σ domain). Genetic and biochemical characterization of the two domains show that the ASD is sufficient to inhibit σE dependant transcription and the C-terminal domain is required for response to singlet oxygen and the release of σE from the ASD. In addition, structural and sequence analyses of the ASD of ChrR and other ECF anti-σ’s, reveal that the N-terminal domain of different groups of ECF anti-σ’s share a common structural fold with some sequence similarity. Bioinformatics studies show that the ASD occurs in as many as one third of ECF anti-σ’s, many of which have diverse C-terminal domains. The conserved ASD are sometimes fused to diverse C-terminal domains. These studies reveal that the ASD class of anti-σ’s are extraordinarily diverse, based on the type of σΕ factors they are associated with and the C-terminal domains to which they are linked.

  16. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Reumann, Marie K.; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Steven B.; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1−/− mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1−/− mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1−/− callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair. PMID:21726677

  17. Ecological and Transcriptional Responses of Anode-Respiring Communities to Nitrate in a Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Varun N; Butler, Caitlyn S

    2017-05-02

    A poorly understood phenomenon with a potentially significant impact on electron recovery is competition in microbial fuel cells (MFC) between anode-respiring bacteria and microorganisms that use other electron acceptors. Nitrate is a constituent of different wastewaters and can act as a competing electron acceptor in the anode. Studies investigating the impact of competition on population dynamics in mixed communities in the anode are lacking. Here, we investigated the impact of nitrate at different C/N ratios of 1.8, 3.7, and 7.4 mg C/mg N on the electrochemical performance and the biofilm community in mixed-culture chemostat MFCs. The electrochemical performance of the MFC was not affected under electron donor non-limiting conditions, 7.4 mg C/mg N. At lower C/N, electron donor limiting and ratio electron recovery were significantly affected. The electrochemical performance recovered upon removal of nitrate at 3.7 mg C/mg N but did not at 1.8 mg C/mg N. Microbial community analysis showed a decrease in Deltaproteobacteria accompanied by an increase in Betaproteobacteria in response to nitrate at low C/N ratios and no significant changes at 7.4 mg C/mg N. Transcriptional analysis showed increased transcription of nirK and nirS genes during nitrate flux, suggesting that denitrification to N2 and not facultative nitrate reduction by Geobacter spp. might be the primary response to perturbation with nitrate.

  18. A Transcriptional “Scream” Early Response of E. coli Prey to Predatory Invasion by Bdellovibrio

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Carey; Ivanov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We have transcriptionally profiled the genes differentially expressed in E. coli prey cells when predatorily attacked by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus just prior to prey cell killing. This is a brief, approximately 20–25 min period when the prey cell is still alive but contains a Bdellovibrio cell in its periplasm or attached to and penetrating its outer membrane. Total RNA was harvested and labelled 15 min after initiating a semi-synchronous infection with an excess of Bdellovibrio preying upon E. coli and hybridised to a macroarray spotted with all predicted ORFs of E. coli. SAM analysis and t-tests were performed on the resulting data and 126 E. coli genes were found to be significantly differentially regulated by the prey upon attack by Bdellovibrio. The results were confirmed by QRT-PCR. Amongst the prey genes upregulated were a variety of general stress response genes, potentially “selfish” genes within or near prophages and transposable elements, and genes responding to damage in the periplasm and osmotic stress. Essentially, the presence of the invading Bdellovibrio and the resulting damage to the prey cell elicited a small “transcriptional scream”, but seemingly no specific defensive mechanism with which to counter the Bdellovibrio attack. This supports other studies which do not find Bdellovibrio resistance responses in prey, and bodes well for its use as a “living antibiotic”. PMID:20024656

  19. A transcriptional "Scream" early response of E. coli prey to predatory invasion by Bdellovibrio.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carey; Ivanov, Pavel; Sockett, Renee Elizabeth

    2010-06-01

    We have transcriptionally profiled the genes differentially expressed in E. coli prey cells when predatorily attacked by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus just prior to prey cell killing. This is a brief, approximately 20-25 min period when the prey cell is still alive but contains a Bdellovibrio cell in its periplasm or attached to and penetrating its outer membrane. Total RNA was harvested and labelled 15 min after initiating a semi-synchronous infection with an excess of Bdellovibrio preying upon E. coli and hybridised to a macroarray spotted with all predicted ORFs of E. coli. SAM analysis and t-tests were performed on the resulting data and 126 E. coli genes were found to be significantly differentially regulated by the prey upon attack by Bdellovibrio. The results were confirmed by QRT-PCR. Amongst the prey genes upregulated were a variety of general stress response genes, potentially "selfish" genes within or near prophages and transposable elements, and genes responding to damage in the periplasm and osmotic stress. Essentially, the presence of the invading Bdellovibrio and the resulting damage to the prey cell elicited a small "transcriptional scream", but seemingly no specific defensive mechanism with which to counter the Bdellovibrio attack. This supports other studies which do not find Bdellovibrio resistance responses in prey, and bodes well for its use as a "living antibiotic".

  20. Transcriptional and computational study of expansins differentially expressed in response to inclination in radiata pine.

    PubMed

    Mateluna, Patricio; Valenzuela-Riffo, Felipe; Morales-Quintana, Luis; Herrera, Raúl; Ramos, Patricio

    2017-03-09

    Plants have the ability to reorient their vertical growth when exposed to inclination. This response can be as quick as 2 h in inclined young pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) seedlings, with over accumulation of lignin observed after 9 days s. Several studies have identified expansins involved in cell expansion among other developmental processes in plants. Six putative expansin genes were identified in cDNA libraries isolated from inclined pine stems. A differential transcript abundance was observed by qPCR analysis over a time course of inclination. Five genes changed their transcript accumulation in both stem sides in a spatial and temporal manner compared with non-inclined stem. To compare these expansin genes, and to suggest a possible mechanism of action at molecular level, the structures of the predicted proteins were built by comparative modeling methodology. An open groove on the surface of the proteins composed of conserved zresidues was observed. Using a cellulose polymer as ligand the protein-ligand interaction was evaluated, with the results showing differences in the protein-ligand interaction mode. Differences in the binding energy interaction can be explained by changes in some residues that generate differences in electrostatic surface in the open groove region, supporting the participation of six members of multifamily proteins in this specific process. The data suggests participation of different expansin proteins in the dissembling and remodeling of the complex cell wall matrix during the reorientation response to inclination.

  1. Transcriptional responses of Norway spruce (Picea abies) inner sapwood against Heterobasidion parviporum.

    PubMed

    Oliva, J; Rommel, S; Fossdal, C G; Hietala, A M; Nemesio-Gorriz, M; Solheim, H; Elfstrand, M

    2015-09-01

    The white-rot fungus Heterobasidion parviporum Niemelä & Korhonen establishes a necrotrophic interaction with Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H.Karst.) causing root and butt rot and growth losses in living trees. The interaction occurs first with the bark and the outer sapwood, as the pathogen enters the tree via wounds or root-to-root contacts. Later, when the fungus reaches the heartwood, it spreads therein creating a decay column, and the interaction mainly occurs in the inner sapwood where the tree creates a reaction zone. While bark and outer sapwood interactions are well studied, little is known about the nature of the transcriptional responses leading to the creation of a reaction zone. In this study, we sampled bark and sapwood both proximal and distal to the reaction zone in artificially inoculated and naturally infected trees. We quantified gene expression levels of candidate genes in secondary metabolite, hormone biosynthesis and signalling pathways using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. An up-regulation of mainly the phenylpropanoid pathway and jasmonic acid biosynthesis was found at the inoculation site, when inoculations were compared with wounding. We found that transcriptional responses in inner sapwood were similar to those reported upon infection through the bark. Our data suggest that the defence mechanism is induced due to direct fungal contact irrespective of the tissue type. Understanding the nature of these interactions is important when considering tree breeding-based resistance strategies to reduce the spread of the pathogen between and within trees.

  2. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Regulates AP-1 Dependent Transcriptional Response to Minimally Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp; Almazan, Felicidad; Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turns it into an endogenous ligand recognized by pattern-recognition receptors. We have demonstrated that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) binds to CD14 and mediates TLR4/MD-2-dependent responses in macrophages, many of which are MyD88-independent. We have also demonstrated that the mmLDL activation leads to recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to TLR4 and TLR4 and Syk phosphorylation. In this study, we produced a macrophage-specific Syk knockout mouse and used primary Syk−/− macrophages in our studies. We demonstrated that Syk mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, which in turn phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively, as assessed by an in vitro kinase assay. c-Jun phosphorylation was also mediated by IKKε. c-Jun and c-Fos bound to consensus DNA sites and thereby completed an AP-1 transcriptional complex and induced expression of CXCL2 and IL-6. These results suggest that Syk plays a key role in TLR4-mediated macrophage responses to host-generated ligands, like mmLDL, with subsequent activation of an AP-1 transcription program. PMID:22384232

  3. ROLE OF HEPATOCYTE NUCLEAR FACTOR 4α IN CONTROLLING COPPER-RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min Ok; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous global transcriptome and interactome analyses of copper-treated HepG2 cells identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) as a potential master regulator of copper-responsive transcription. Copper exposure caused a decrease in the expression of HNF4α at both mRNA and protein levels, which was accompanied by a decrease in the level of HNF4α binding to its consensus DNA binding sequence. qRT-PCR and RNAi studies demonstrated that changes in HNF4α expression ultimately affected the expressions of its down-stream target genes. Analysis of up-stream regulators of HNF4α expression, including p53 and ATF3, showed that copper caused an increase in the steady-state level of these proteins. These results support a model for copper-responsive transcription in which the metal affects ATF3 expression, and stabilizes p53 resulting in the down-regulation of HNF4α expression. Additionally, copper may directly affect p53 protein levels. The suppression of HNF4α activity may contribute to the molecular mechanism underlying the physiological and toxicological consequences of copper toxicity in hepatic-derived cells. PMID:20875833

  4. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A; Gwerder, Myriam; Gutsche, Katrin; Altmeyer, Matthias; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Toledo, Luis I; Fink, Daniel; Rask, Maj-Britt; Grøfte, Merete; Lukas, Claudia; Nielsen, Michael L; Smerdon, Stephen J; Lukas, Jiri; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in-trans signaling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient recruitment of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein 1 (NBS1), a central regulator of DNA damage responses, into the nucleoli. We further identified TCOF1-Treacle, a nucleolar factor implicated in ribosome biogenesis and mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, as an interaction partner of NBS1, and demonstrate that NBS1 translocation and accumulation in the nucleoli is Treacle-dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that Treacle-mediated NBS1 recruitment into the nucleoli regulates rRNA silencing in-trans in the presence of distant chromosome breaks. PMID:25064736

  5. Severe acute dehydration in a desert rodent elicits a transcriptional response that effectively prevents kidney injury.

    PubMed

    MacManes, Matthew David

    2017-08-01

    Animals living in desert environments are forced to survive despite severe heat, intense solar radiation, and both acute and chronic dehydration. These animals have evolved phenotypes that effectively address these environmental stressors. To begin to understand the ways in which the desert-adapted rodent Peromyscus eremicus survives, reproductively mature adults were subjected to 72 h of water deprivation, during which they lost, on average, 23% of their body weight. The animals reacted via a series of changes in the kidney, which included modulating expression of genes responsible for reducing the rate of transcription and maintaining water and salt balance. Extracellular matrix turnover appeared to be decreased, and apoptosis was limited. In contrast to the canonical human response, serum creatinine and other biomarkers of kidney injury were not elevated, suggesting that changes in gene expression related to acute dehydration may effectively prohibit widespread kidney damage in the cactus mouse. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. DNA phosphorothioate modifications influence the global transcriptional response and protect DNA from double-stranded breaks

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Rui; Wu, Xiaolin; He, Wei; Liu, Zhenhua; Wu, Shuangju; Chen, Chao; Chen, Si; Xiang, Qianrong; Deng, Zixin; Liang, Dequan; Chen, Shi; Wang, Lianrong

    2014-01-01

    The modification of DNA by phosphorothioate (PT) occurs when the non-bridging oxygen in the sugar-phosphate backbone of DNA is replaced with sulfur. This DNA backbone modification was recently discovered and is governed by the dndABCDE genes in a diverse group of bacteria and archaea. However, the biological function of DNA PT modifications is poorly understood. In this study, we employed the RNA-seq analysis to characterize the global transcriptional changes in response to PT modifications. Our results show that DNA without PT protection is susceptible to DNA damage caused by the dndFGHI gene products. The DNA double-stranded breaks then trigger the SOS response, cell filamentation and prophage induction. Heterologous expression of dndBCDE conferring DNA PT modifications at GPSA and GPST prevented the damage in Salmonella enterica. Our data provide insights into the physiological role of the DNA PT system. PMID:25319634

  7. Sugar sweet springtails: on the transcriptional response of Folsomia candida (Collembola) to desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, M J T N; Roelofs, D; Nota, B; Ylstra, B; Holmstrup, M

    2009-11-01

    Several species of Collembola survive stressful desiccating conditions by absorbing water vapour from the environment. To obtain insight into the transcriptomic responses underlying this 'water vapour absorption' mechanism we subjected Folsomia candida (Collembola) to transcriptome profiling. We show that ecologically relevant desiccation stress leads to strong time-dependent transcriptomic changes. Exposure of F. candida to 98.2% relative humidity over an interval of 174 h resulted in a high number of gene transcripts being differentially expressed (up to 41%; P-value < 0.05). Additional Gene Ontology analyses suggest that carbohydrate transport, sugar catabolism and cuticle maintenance are biological processes involved in combating desiccation. However, many additional pathways seem to be affected; additional experiments are needed to elucidate which responses are primarily linked to desiccation resistance.

  8. A cellular defense pathway regulating transcription through poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Vispé, Stéphane; Yung, Tetsu M. C.; Ritchot, Janelle; Serizawa, Hiroaki; Satoh, Masahiko S.

    2000-01-01

    DNA damage is known to trigger key cellular defense pathways such as those involved in DNA repair. Here we provide evidence for a previously unrecognized pathway regulating transcription in response to DNA damage and show that this regulation is mediated by the abundant nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase reduced the rate of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, suggesting that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase negatively regulates transcription, possibly through the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase–RNA complexes. In damaged cells, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase binds to DNA breaks and automodifies itself in the presence of NAD+, resulting in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inactivation. We found that automodification of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in response to DNA damage resulted in the up-regulation of transcription, presumably because automodified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase molecules were released from transcripts, thereby relieving the block on transcription. Because agents that damage DNA damage RNA as well, up-regulation of RNA synthesis in response to DNA damage may provide cells with a mechanism to compensate for the loss of damaged transcripts and may be critical for cell survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:10944198

  9. A cellular defense pathway regulating transcription through poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Vispe, S; Yung, T M; Ritchot, J; Serizawa, H; Satoh, M S

    2000-08-29

    DNA damage is known to trigger key cellular defense pathways such as those involved in DNA repair. Here we provide evidence for a previously unrecognized pathway regulating transcription in response to DNA damage and show that this regulation is mediated by the abundant nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase reduced the rate of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, suggesting that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase negatively regulates transcription, possibly through the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-RNA complexes. In damaged cells, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase binds to DNA breaks and automodifies itself in the presence of NAD(+), resulting in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inactivation. We found that automodification of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in response to DNA damage resulted in the up-regulation of transcription, presumably because automodified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase molecules were released from transcripts, thereby relieving the block on transcription. Because agents that damage DNA damage RNA as well, up-regulation of RNA synthesis in response to DNA damage may provide cells with a mechanism to compensate for the loss of damaged transcripts and may be critical for cell survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents.

  10. Transcriptional Analysis of Lactobacillus brevis to N-Butanol and Ferulic Acid Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, James; Kao, Katy C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The presence of anti-microbial phenolic compounds, such as the model compound ferulic acid, in biomass hydrolysates pose significant challenges to the widespread use of biomass in conjunction with whole cell biocatalysis or fermentation. Currently, these inhibitory compounds must be removed through additional downstream processing or sufficiently diluted to create environments suitable for most industrially important microbial strains. Simultaneously, product toxicity must also be overcome to allow for efficient production of next generation biofuels such as n-butanol, isopropanol, and others from these low cost feedstocks. Methodology and Principal Findings This study explores the high ferulic acid and n-butanol tolerance in Lactobacillus brevis, a lactic acid bacterium often found in fermentation processes, by global transcriptional response analysis. The transcriptional profile of L. brevis reveals that the presence of ferulic acid triggers the expression of currently uncharacterized membrane proteins, possibly in an effort to counteract ferulic acid induced changes in membrane fluidity and ion leakage. In contrast to the ferulic acid stress response, n-butanol challenges to growing cultures primarily induce genes within the fatty acid synthesis pathway and reduced the proportion of 19∶1 cyclopropane fatty acid within the L. brevis membrane. Both inhibitors also triggered generalized stress responses. Separate attempts to alter flux through the Escherichia coli fatty acid synthesis by overexpressing acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunits and deleting cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (cfa) both failed to improve n-butanol tolerance in E. coli, indicating that additional components of the stress response are required to confer n-butanol resistance. Conclusions Several promising routes for understanding both ferulic acid and n-butanol tolerance have been identified from L. brevis gene expression data. These insights may be used to guide further engineering of

  11. Identification of HNF-4α as a key transcription factor to promote ChREBP expression in response to glucose

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jian; Feng, Ming; Dong, Weibing; Zhu, Yemin; Li, Yakui; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Lifang; Li, Minle; Lu, Ying; Chen, Hanbei; Liu, Xing; Lu, Yan; Sun, Haipeng; Tong, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) promotes glycolysis and lipogenesis in metabolic tissues and cancer cells. ChREBP-α and ChREBP-β, two isoforms of ChREBP transcribed from different promoters, are both transcriptionally induced by glucose. However, the mechanism by which glucose increases ChREBP mRNA levels remains unclear. Here we report that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF-4α) is a key transcription factor for glucose-induced ChREBP-α and ChREBP-β expression. Ectopic HNF-4α expression increased ChREBP transcription while knockdown of HNF-4α greatly reduced ChREBP mRNA levels in liver cancer cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. HNF-4α not only directly bound to an E-box-containing region in intron 12 of the ChREBP gene, but also promoted ChREBP-β transcription by directly binding to two DR1 sites and one E-box-containing site of the ChREBP-β promoter. Moreover, HNF-4α interacted with ChREBP-α and synergistically promoted ChREBP-β transcription. Functionally, HNF-4α suppression reduced glucose-dependent ChREBP induction. Increased nuclear abundance of HNF-4α and its binding to cis-elements of ChREBP gene in response to glucose contributed to glucose-responsive ChREBP transcription. Taken together, our results not only revealed the novel mechanism by which HNF-4α promoted ChREBP transcription in response to glucose, but also demonstrated that ChREBP-α and HNF-4α synergistically increased ChREBP-β transcription. PMID:27029511

  12. Role of a TPA-responsive element in hepcidin transcription induced by the bone morphogenetic protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Yohei; Murakami, Masaru; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2015-10-16

    Systemic iron balance is governed by the liver-derived peptide hormone hepcidin. The transcription of hepcidin is primarily regulated by the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and inflammatory cytokine pathways through the BMP-response element (BMP-RE) and STAT-binding site, respectively. In addition to these elements, we previously identified a TPA-responsive element (TRE) in the hepcidin promoter and showed that it mediated the transcriptional activation of hepcidin through activator protein (AP)-1 induced by serum. In the present study, we examined the role of TRE in the BMP-induced transcription of hepcidin in HepG2 liver cells. The serum treatment increased the basal transcription of hepcidin; however, responsiveness to the expression of ALK3(QD), a constitutively active BMP type I receptor, was unaffected. Consistent with these results, mutations in TRE in the hepcidin promoter decreased basal transcription, whereas responsiveness to the expression of ALK3(QD) remained unchanged. HepG2 cells significantly expressed AP-1 components in the basal state, whereas BMP did not up-regulate the expression of these components. The expression of c-fos enhanced the basal transcription of hepcidin as well as ALK3(QD)-mediated hepcidin transcription, whereas that of dominant-negative c-fos decreased hepcidin transcription. The results of the present study suggested that the cis-elements of the hepcidin promoter, BMP-RE and TRE, individually transmitted BMP-mediated and AP-1-mediated signals, respectively, whereas transcription was synergistically increased by the stimulation of BMP-RE and TRE.

  13. The yeast Snt2 protein coordinates the transcriptional response to hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsey A; Ueberheide, Beatrix M; Dewell, Scott; Chait, Brian T; Zheng, Deyou; Allis, C David

    2013-10-01

    Regulation of gene expression is a vital part of the cellular stress response, yet the full set of proteins that orchestrate this regulation remains unknown. Snt2 is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein whose function has not been well characterized that was recently shown to associate with Ecm5 and the Rpd3 deacetylase. Here, we confirm that Snt2, Ecm5, and Rpd3 physically associate. We then demonstrate that cells lacking Rpd3 or Snt2 are resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidative stress and use chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) to show that Snt2 and Ecm5 recruit Rpd3 to a small number of promoters and in response to H2O2, colocalize independently of Rpd3 to the promoters of stress response genes. By integrating ChIP-seq and expression analyses, we identify target genes that require Snt2 for proper expression after H2O2. Finally, we show that cells lacking Snt2 are also resistant to nutrient stress imparted by the TOR (target of rapamycin) pathway inhibitor rapamycin and identify a common set of genes targeted by Snt2 and Ecm5 in response to both H2O2 and rapamycin. Our results establish a function for Snt2 in regulating transcription in response to oxidative stress and suggest Snt2 may also function in multiple stress pathways.

  14. The mef/elf4 transcription factor fine tunes the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Sashida, Goro; Bae, Narae; Di Giandomenico, Silvana; Asai, Takashi; Gurvich, Nadia; Bazzoli, Elena; Liu, Yan; Huang, Gang; Zhao, Xinyang; Menendez, Silvia; Nimer, Stephen D

    2011-07-15

    The ATM kinase plays a critical role in initiating the DNA damage response that is triggered by genotoxic stresses capable of inducing DNA double-strand breaks. Here, we show that ELF4/MEF, a member of the ETS family of transcription factors, contributes to the persistence of γH2AX DNA damage foci and promotes the DNA damage response leading to the induction of apoptosis. Conversely, the absence of ELF4 promotes the faster repair of damaged DNA and more rapid disappearance of γH2AX foci in response to γ-irradiation, leading to a radio-resistant phenotype despite normal ATM phosphorylation. Following γ-irradiation, ATM phosphorylates ELF4, leading to its degradation; a mutant form of ELF4 that cannot be phosphorylated by ATM persists following γ-irradiation, delaying the resolution of γH2AX foci and triggering an excessive DNA damage response. Thus, although ELF4 promotes the phosphorylation of H2AX by ATM, its activity must be dampened by ATM-dependent phosphorylation and degradation to avoid an excessive DNA damage response.

  15. Global transcriptional, physiological, and metabolite analyses of the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris hildenborough to salt adaptation.

    PubMed

    He, Zhili; Zhou, Aifen; Baidoo, Edward; He, Qiang; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Benke, Peter; Phan, Richard; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hemme, Christopher L; Huang, Katherine; Alm, Eric J; Fields, Matthew W; Wall, Judy; Stahl, David; Hazen, Terry C; Keasling, Jay D; Arkin, Adam P; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-03-01

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by performing physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. Salt adaptation was reflected by increased expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). The expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell growth, and phage structures was decreased. Transcriptome profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation were compared with transcriptome profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure). Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine accumulated under salt adaptation conditions, suggesting that these amino acids may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. Addition of amino acids (glutamate, alanine, and tryptophan) or yeast extract to the growth medium relieved salt-related growth inhibition. A conceptual model that links the observed results to currently available knowledge is proposed to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl levels.

  16. Response of swine spleen to Streptococcus suis infection revealed by transcription analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Astract Background Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2), a major swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent, has greatly challenged global public health. Systematical information about host immune response to the infection is important for understanding the molecular mechanism of diseases. Results 104 and 129 unique genes were significantly up-regulated and down-regulated in the spleens of pigs infected with SS2 (WT). The up-regulated genes were principally related to immune response, such as genes involved in inflammatory response; acute-phase/immune response; cell adhesion and response to stress. The down-regulated genes were mainly involved in transcription, transport, material and energy metabolism which were representative of the reduced vital activity of SS2-influenced cells. Only a few genes showed significantly differential expression when comparing avirulent isogenic strain (ΔHP0197) with mock-infected samples. Conclusions Our findings indicated that highly pathogenic SS2 could persistently induce cytokines mainly by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) pathway, and the phagocytosis-resistant bacteria could induce high level of cytokines and secrete toxins to destroy deep tissues, and cause meningitis, septicaemia, pneumonia, endocarditis, and arthritis. PMID:20937098

  17. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J.; Gray, Jason D.; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K.; Seifert, Erin L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism’s multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal–medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  18. Different STAT transcription complexes drive early and delayed responses to type I Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Plumlee, Courtney R.; Perry, Stuart; Gu, Ai Di; Lee, Carolyn; Shresta, Sujan; Decker, Thomas; Schindler, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Interferons, which transduce pivotal signals through signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)1 and Stat2, effectively suppress the replication of Legionella pneumophila in primary murine macrophages. Whereas the ability of IFN-γ to impede L. pneumophila growth is fully dependent on Stat1, IFN-α/β unexpectedly suppresses L. pneumophila growth in both Stat1 and Stat2 deficient macrophages. New studies demonstrating that the robust response to IFN-α/β is lost in Stat1-Stat2 double knockout macrophages, suggest that Stat1 and Stat2 are functionally redundant in their ability to direct an innate response towards L. pneumophila. Since the ability of IFN-α/β to signal through Stat1-dependent complexes (i.e., Stat1-Stat1 and Stat1-Stat2 dimers) has been well characterized, the current studies focus on how Stat2 is able to direct a potent response to IFN-α/β in the absence of Stat1. These studies reveal that IFN-α/β is able to drive the formation of a Stat2 and IRF9 complex that drives the expression of a subset of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs), but with substantially delayed kinetics. These observations raise the possibility that this pathway evolved in response to microbes that have devised strategies to subvert Stat1 dependent responses. PMID:26019270

  19. Analysis of the Small RNA Transcriptional Response in Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus after Antimicrobial Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Beaume, Marie; Harrison, Paul F.; Hernandez, David; Schrenzel, Jacques; Seemann, Torsten; Francois, Patrice; Stinear, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    The critical role of noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) in the bacterial response to changing conditions is increasingly recognized. However, a specific role for sRNAs during antibiotic exposure has not been investigated in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we used Illumina RNA-Seq to examine the sRNA response of multiresistant sequence type 239 (ST239) S. aureus after exposure to four antibiotics (vancomycin, linezolid, ceftobiprole, and tigecycline) representing the major classes of antimicrobials used to treat methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. We identified 409 potential sRNAs and then compared global sRNA and mRNA expression profiles at 2 and 6 h, without antibiotic exposure and after exposure to each antibiotic, for a vancomycin-susceptible strain (JKD6009) and a vancomycin-intermediate strain (JKD6008). Exploration of this data set by multivariate analysis using a novel implementation of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) revealed very different responses for mRNA and sRNA. Where mRNA responses clustered with strain or growth phase conditions, the sRNA responses were predominantly linked to antibiotic exposure, including sRNA responses that were specific for particular antibiotics. A remarkable feature of the antimicrobial response was the prominence of antisense sRNAs to genes encoding proteins involved in protein synthesis and ribosomal function. This study has defined a large sRNA repertoire in epidemic ST239 MRSA and shown for the first time that a subset of sRNAs are part of a coordinated transcriptional response to specific antimicrobial exposures in S. aureus. These data provide a framework for interrogating the role of staphylococcal sRNAs in antimicrobial resistance and exploring new avenues for sRNA-based antimicrobial therapies. PMID:23733475

  20. Transcriptional Profiling of the Circulating Immune Response to Lassa Virus in an Aerosol Model of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Honko, Anna N.; Garamszegi, Sara; Caballero, Ignacio S.; Johnson, Joshua C.; Mucker, Eric M.; Trefry, John C.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Connor, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a significant human pathogen that is endemic to several countries in West Africa. Infection with LASV leads to the development of hemorrhagic fever in a significant number of cases, and it is estimated that thousands die each year from the disease. Little is known about the complex immune mechanisms governing the response to LASV or the genetic determinants of susceptibility and resistance to infection. In the study presented here, we have used a whole-genome, microarray-based approach to determine the temporal host response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of non-human primates (NHP) following aerosol exposure to LASV. Sequential sampling over the entire disease course showed that there are strong transcriptional changes of the immune response to LASV exposure, including the early induction of interferon-responsive genes and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. However, this increase in early innate responses was coupled with a lack of pro-inflammatory cytokine response in LASV exposed NHPs. There was a distinct lack of cytokines such as IL1β and IL23α, while immunosuppressive cytokines such as IL27 and IL6 were upregulated. Comparison of IRF/STAT1-stimulated gene expression with the viral load in LASV exposed NHPs suggests that mRNA expression significantly precedes viremia, and thus might be used for early diagnostics of the disease. Our results provide a transcriptomic survey of the circulating immune response to hemorrhagic LASV exposure and provide a foundation for biomarker identification to allow clinical diagnosis of LASV infection through analysis of the host response. PMID:23638192

  1. Transcriptional profiling of the circulating immune response to lassa virus in an aerosol model of exposure.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Shikha; Yen, Judy Y; Honko, Anna N; Garamszegi, Sara; Caballero, Ignacio S; Johnson, Joshua C; Mucker, Eric M; Trefry, John C; Hensley, Lisa E; Connor, John H

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a significant human pathogen that is endemic to several countries in West Africa. Infection with LASV leads to the development of hemorrhagic fever in a significant number of cases, and it is estimated that thousands die each year from the disease. Little is known about the complex immune mechanisms governing the response to LASV or the genetic determinants of susceptibility and resistance to infection. In the study presented here, we have used a whole-genome, microarray-based approach to determine the temporal host response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of non-human primates (NHP) following aerosol exposure to LASV. Sequential sampling over the entire disease course showed that there are strong transcriptional changes of the immune response to LASV exposure, including the early induction of interferon-responsive genes and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. However, this increase in early innate responses was coupled with a lack of pro-inflammatory cytokine response in LASV exposed NHPs. There was a distinct lack of cytokines such as IL1β and IL23α, while immunosuppressive cytokines such as IL27 and IL6 were upregulated. Comparison of IRF/STAT1-stimulated gene expression with the viral load in LASV exposed NHPs suggests that mRNA expression significantly precedes viremia, and thus might be used for early diagnostics of the disease. Our results provide a transcriptomic survey of the circulating immune response to hemorrhagic LASV exposure and provide a foundation for biomarker identification to allow clinical diagnosis of LASV infection through analysis of the host response.

  2. Bovine and human cathelicidin cationic host defense peptides similarly suppress transcriptional responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Mookherjee, Neeloffer; Wilson, Heather L; Doria, Silvana; Popowych, Yurij; Falsafi, Reza; Yu, Jie Jessie; Li, Yuexin; Veatch, Sarah; Roche, Fiona M; Brown, Kelly L; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Hokamp, Karsten; Potter, Andy; Babiuk, Lorne A; Griebel, Philip J; Hancock, Robert E W

    2006-12-01

    Genomic approaches can be exploited to expose the complexities and conservation of biological systems such as the immune network across various mammalian species. In this study, temporal transcriptional expression profiles were analyzed in human and bovine monocytic cells in response to the TLR-4 agonist, LPS, in the presence or absence of their respective host defense peptides. The cathelicidin peptides, human LL-37 and bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-27 (BMAP-27), are homologs, yet they have diverged notably in terms of sequence similarity. In spite of their low sequence similarities, both of these cathelicidin peptides demonstrated potent, antiendotoxin activity in monocytic cells at low, physiologically relevant concentrations. Microarray studies indicated that 10 ng/ml LPS led to the up-regulation of 125 genes in human monocytes, 106 of which were suppressed in the presence of 5 mug/ml of the human peptide LL-37. To confirm and extend these data, temporal transcriptional responses to LPS were assessed in the presence or absence of the species-specific host defense peptides by quantitative real-time PCR. The transcriptional trends of 20 LPS-induced genes were analyzed in bovine and human monocytic cells. These studies demonstrated conserved trends of gene responses in that both peptides were able to profoundly suppress many LPS-induced genes. Consistent with this, the human and bovine peptides suppressed LPS-induced translocation of NF-kappaB subunits p50 and p65 into the nucleus of monocytic cells. However, there were also distinct differences in responses to LPS and the peptides; for example, treatment with 5 mug/ml BMAP-27 alone tended to influence gene expression (RELA, TNF-alpha-induced protein 2, MAPK phosphatase 1/dual specificity phosphatase 1, IkappaBkappaB, NFkappaBIL1, TNF receptor-associated factor 2) to a greater extent than did the same amount of human LL-37. We hypothesize that the immunomodulatory effects of the species-specific host

  3. Transcriptional response of soybean to thiamethoxam seed treatment in the presence and absence of drought stress.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Mitchell D; Enders, Laramy S; Donze-Reiner, Teresa J; Baxendale, Frederick P; Siegfried, Blair D; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M

    2014-12-03

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are widely known for their broad-spectrum control of arthropod pests. Recently, their effects on plant physiological mechanisms have been characterized as producing a stress shield, which is predicted to enhance tolerance to adverse conditions. Here we investigate the molecular underpinnings of the stress shield concept using the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam in two separate experiments that compare gene expression. We hypothesized that the application of a thiamethoxam seed treatment to soybean would alter the expression of genes involved in plant defensive pathways and general stress response in later vegetative growth. First, we used next-generation sequencing to examine the broad scale transcriptional effects of the thiamethoxam seed treatment at three vegetative stages in soybean. Second, we selected ten target genes associated with plant defense pathways in soybean and examined the interactive effects of thiamethoxam seed treatment and drought stress on expression using qRT-PCR. Direct comparison of thiamethoxam-treated and untreated soybeans revealed minor transcriptional differences. However, when examined across vegetative stages, the thiamethoxam seed treatment induced substantial transcriptional changes that were not observed in untreated plants. Genes associated with photosynthesis, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, development of the cell wall and membrane organization were uniquely upregulated between vegetative stages in thiamethoxam-treated plants. In addition, several genes associated with phytohormone and oxidative stress responses were downregulated between vegetative stages. When we examined the expression of a subset of ten genes associated with plant defense and stress response, the application of thiamethoxam was found to interact with drought stress by enhancing or repressing expression. In drought stressed plants, thiamethoxam induced (upregulated) expression of a thiamine biosynthetic enzyme (THIZ2) and gibberellin

  4. The transcriptional regulatory network mediated by banana (Musa acuminata) dehydration-responsive element binding (MaDREB) transcription factors in fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jian-Fei; Chen, Jian-Ye; Liu, Xun-Cheng; Han, Yan-Chao; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Shan, Wei; Tang, Yang; Wu, Ke-Qiang; He, Jun-Xian; Lu, Wang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex, genetically programmed process involving the action of critical transcription factors (TFs). Despite the established significance of dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) TFs in plant abiotic stress responses, the involvement of DREBs in fruit ripening is yet to be determined. Here, we identified four genes encoding ripening-regulated DREB TFs in banana (Musa acuminata), MaDREB1, MaDREB2, MaDREB3, and MaDREB4, and demonstrated that they play regulatory roles in fruit ripening. We showed that MaDREB1-MaDREB4 are nucleus-localized, induced by ethylene and encompass transcriptional activation activities. We performed a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) experiment for MaDREB2 and identified 697 genomic regions as potential targets of MaDREB2. MaDREB2 binds to hundreds of loci with diverse functions and its binding sites are distributed in the promoter regions proximal to the transcriptional start site (TSS). Most of the MaDREB2-binding targets contain the conserved (A/G)CC(G/C)AC motif and MaDREB2 appears to directly regulate the expression of a number of genes