Science.gov

Sample records for positive co-operative activity

  1. Fostering Positive Peer Relations in the Primary Classroom through Circle Time and Co-Operative Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mary, Latisha

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of co-operative games and circle time activities in fostering positive peer relations in two French Primary classrooms (N = 40). It presents French teachers' and pupils' perceptions of a set of co-operative games and circle time activities implemented within a year long study on personal,…

  2. Active and inactive enhancers co-operate to exert localized and long-range control of gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Proudhon, Charlotte; Snetkova, Valentina; Raviram, Ramya; Lobry, Camille; Badri, Sana; Jiang, Tingting; Hao, Bingtao; Trimarchi, Thomas; Kluger, Yuval; Aifantis, Iannis; Bonneau, Richard; Skok, Jane A

    2016-01-01

    V(D)J recombination relies on the presence of proximal enhancers that activate the antigen receptor (AgR) loci in a lineage and stage specific manner. Unexpectedly we find that both active and inactive AgR enhancers co-operate to disseminate their effects in a localized and long-range manner. Here we demonstrate the importance of short-range contacts between active enhancers that constitute an Igk super-enhancer in B cells. Deletion of one element reduces the interaction frequency between other enhancers in the hub, which compromises the transcriptional output of each component. We further establish that in T cells long-range contact and co-operation between the inactive Igk enhancer, MiEκ and the active Tcrb enhancer, Eβ, alters enrichment of CBFβ binding in a manner that impacts Tcrb recombination. These findings underline the complexities of enhancer regulation and point to a role for localized and long-range enhancer-sharing between active and inactive elements in lineage and stage specific control. PMID:27239026

  3. Co-operation with another player in a financially rewarded guessing game activates regions implicated in theory of mind.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rebecca; Völlm, Birgit; Drury, Andrew; McKie, Shane; Richardson, Paul; Deakin, J F William

    2006-01-01

    Functional imaging studies have identified a network of brain regions associated with theory of mind (ToM); the attribution of mental states to other people. Similar regions have also been observed in studies where people play games that involve either competing or co-operating with another person. Such games are thought to place implicit demands on ToM processes. Co-operation with others has also been shown to elicit brain responses in areas associated with the processing of reward, suggesting that co-operation is an intrinsically rewarding process. In this study, we used a factorial design to assess the interaction between co-operation and the availability of financial rewards in a guessing game. Twelve subjects were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they performed a guessing game with and without co-operation, and under both these conditions with and without financial reward. The main effect of co-operation was associated with neural responses in theory of mind regions, while the main effect of financial reward was associated with neural responses in reward regions. Critically the response to reward in medial orbitofrontal cortex was significantly enhanced when subjects were co-operating. This suggests that rewards achieved through co-operation are more valuable than rewards achieved alone.

  4. [Positive Activities Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This packet contains four pamphlets that are part of a campaign to encourage adults to provide and promote positive activities for youth and to serve as role models for young people. "Positive Activities: A Campaign for Youth" includes information on what positive activities are, how to get involved in helping to provide positive activities for…

  5. Co-Operative Education or Co-Operative Placement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, C. R.

    The Co-operative Education Department at Mohawk College is designed to extend the academic learning process into the workplace through on-the-job learning experiences which enhance the students' vocational maturation and personal development, and are integrated with the learning objectives of the program. The department offers paid, supervised…

  6. It All Began with Raiffeisen: Co-operatives as Instruments of Self-Help and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nover, Kurt

    1986-01-01

    The rural and manufacturing co-operatives and credit co-operatives in the Federal Republic of Germany have succeeded in continuously expanding and consolidating their position within the framework of the country's market economy. As the biggest organizations of medium-size enterprises, the co-operatives have adapted to the new circumstances…

  7. The Co-Operative: Good with Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Max

    2015-01-01

    The article is a summary of a small-scale research project which considers the formation of Co-operative Trust Schools. This was carried out in 2013 at a time when the number of schools becoming Academies and Trust Schools through the Co-operative College was burgeoning. Through questionnaire, interview, documentary analysis and exploration of…

  8. Women and International Intellectual Co-Operation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    The article explores ways in which intellectual co-operation at the League of Nations [SDN] provided a space for the engagement of culturally elite women in intellectual co-operation circles in Geneva, Paris and a range of national contexts stretching across Europe, Latin America and Asia. It discusses the language of the "international mind" and…

  9. Making Co-Operative Ideas Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Reddish Vale Technology College was the first co-operative trust in England. The democratic and co-operative nature of the experiment mean that students have gained a greater voice in the organisation of the school. As a result, new social enterprises, environmental interventions, connections with the community and with the wider co-operative…

  10. [SUPPORT, CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMMES, PRAGMATIC CODE OF ETHICS: A CLINICAL APPROACH OF EXECUTIVE TRAINING].

    PubMed

    Cabaret, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at introducing an educational sequence completed at l'Institut de Formation des Cadres de Santé (IFCS) at the CHRU in Lille in France, entitled "training project and educational project" present in the "training duties" module whose goal is to generate students'knowledge through co-operative education programmes. By creating this innovative sequence, the educational aim is to use the Institut ground as a ground of learning, associated with the various internship grounds, in order to get the most of co-operative education programmes. Besides, in a pragmatic code of ethics in training, the teaching staff draw their inspiration from a clinical approach of executive training: they regard students as true protagonists in a co-operative plan created for them, wishing to design it with them using their words. Thus, students are brought to criticize the IFCS educational project and debate it with the trainers who have built it. Each partner tries to understand the Other, being aware of their being different. By contributing every year to rewriting the educational project which directly concerns them, students build their professional positions as health executives. They play an active role in co-operative education programmes just like IFCS outside partners. PMID:27305794

  11. [SUPPORT, CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMMES, PRAGMATIC CODE OF ETHICS: A CLINICAL APPROACH OF EXECUTIVE TRAINING].

    PubMed

    Cabaret, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at introducing an educational sequence completed at l'Institut de Formation des Cadres de Santé (IFCS) at the CHRU in Lille in France, entitled "training project and educational project" present in the "training duties" module whose goal is to generate students'knowledge through co-operative education programmes. By creating this innovative sequence, the educational aim is to use the Institut ground as a ground of learning, associated with the various internship grounds, in order to get the most of co-operative education programmes. Besides, in a pragmatic code of ethics in training, the teaching staff draw their inspiration from a clinical approach of executive training: they regard students as true protagonists in a co-operative plan created for them, wishing to design it with them using their words. Thus, students are brought to criticize the IFCS educational project and debate it with the trainers who have built it. Each partner tries to understand the Other, being aware of their being different. By contributing every year to rewriting the educational project which directly concerns them, students build their professional positions as health executives. They play an active role in co-operative education programmes just like IFCS outside partners.

  12. Reasons to Co-Operate: Co-Operative Solutions for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The NASUWT's landmark agreement with the Schools Co-operative Society has provided a new spur to co-operation, collaboration and collegiality in schools. Against a background of rapid and radical changes to the education landscape, co-operative schools are viewed by many as a means to maintaining public service ethos and values in education.…

  13. Co-operativity in a nanocrystalline solid-state transition.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah L; Smith, Jeremy G; Behl, Mayank; Jain, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    Co-operativity is a remarkable phenomenon mostly seen in biology, where initial reaction events significantly alter the propensity of subsequent reaction events, giving rise to a nonlinear tightly regulated synergistic response. Here we have found unique evidence of atomic level co-operativity in an inorganic material. A thousand-atom nanocrystal (NC) of the inorganic solid cadmium selenide exhibits strong positive co-operativity in its reaction with copper ions. A NC doped with a few copper impurities becomes highly prone to be doped even further, driving an abrupt transition of the entire NC to the copper selenide phase, as manifested by a strongly sigmoidal response in optical spectroscopy and electron diffraction measurements. The examples presented here suggest that cooperative phenomena may have an important role in the solid state, especially in the nucleation of new chemical phases, crystal growth, and other materials' transformations.

  14. Analysis and Prospects of European Co-Operation in the Field of Regional Planning. Activity Report of the Committee of Senior Officials 1976-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    To guide future work, to provide an overall view of the program of technical cooperation in regional planning, and to form a basis for a Conference Ministerial Resolution, the report outlines the activities of the Committee of Senior Officials (CSO) of the Council of Europe's Conference of Ministers Responsible for Regional Planning during…

  15. Connected Learning in Co-Operative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeela

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative research study explored the experiences of students who had attended a co operative (co-op) education program, with a focus on what makes the experience meaningful to them. Utilizing a basic interpretive research design, students who graduated from a co-op program were interviewed using an open-ended interview protocol. Both male…

  16. Quorum sensing protects bacterial co-operation from exploitation by cheats

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Richard C; McNally, Luke; Popat, Roman; Brown, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell–cell communication system found in many bacterial species, commonly controlling secreted co-operative traits, including extracellular digestive enzymes. We show that the canonical QS regulatory architecture allows bacteria to sense the genotypic composition of high-density populations, and limit co-operative investments to social environments enriched for co-operators. Using high-density populations of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa we map per-capita signal and co-operative enzyme investment in the wild type as a function of the frequency of non-responder cheats. We demonstrate mathematically and experimentally that the observed response rule of ‘co-operate when surrounded by co-operators' allows bacteria to match their investment in co-operation to the composition of the group, therefore allowing the maintenance of co-operation at lower levels of population structuring (that is, lower relatedness). Similar behavioural responses have been described in vertebrates under the banner of ‘generalised reciprocity'. Our results suggest that mechanisms of reciprocity are not confined to taxa with advanced cognition, and can be implemented at the cellular level via positive feedback circuits. PMID:26744811

  17. Co-Operation: The Antidote to Isolated Misery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This is a case study demonstrating the impact the co-operative movement has had on one co-operative school in south-west England. Lipson Co-operative Academy in Plymouth was one of the first schools to convert to become a co-operative school in 2009. The article has been co-written by members of the Academy and focuses on three transformational…

  18. Student Activities Can Generate Positive PR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armistead, Lew

    1985-01-01

    To counter negative news about education it is important to make sure that positive school activities receive their fair share of exposure in the news media. Presents tips on how to generate positive public relations. Includes a list of newsworthy activities ideas. (MD)

  19. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Mark S.; Gray, Casey; Babcock, Shawna; Barnes, Joel; Costas Bradstreet, Christa; Carr, Dawn; Chabot, Guylaine; Choquette, Louise; Chorney, David; Collyer, Cam; Herrington, Susan; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Larouche, Richard; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Simon, Brenda; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3–12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N = 9) and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N = 17), and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N = 1908). More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: “Access to active play in nature and outdoors—with its risks— is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children’s opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings—at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature.” The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development. PMID:26062040

  20. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mark S; Gray, Casey; Babcock, Shawna; Barnes, Joel; Bradstreet, Christa Costas; Carr, Dawn; Chabot, Guylaine; Choquette, Louise; Chorney, David; Collyer, Cam; Herrington, Susan; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Larouche, Richard; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Simon, Brenda; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-06-08

    A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3-12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N=9) and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N=17), and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N=1908). More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: "Access to active play in nature and outdoors--with its risks--is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children's opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings--at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature." The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development.

  1. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mark S; Gray, Casey; Babcock, Shawna; Barnes, Joel; Bradstreet, Christa Costas; Carr, Dawn; Chabot, Guylaine; Choquette, Louise; Chorney, David; Collyer, Cam; Herrington, Susan; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Larouche, Richard; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Simon, Brenda; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-06-01

    A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3-12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N=9) and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N=17), and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N=1908). More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: "Access to active play in nature and outdoors--with its risks--is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children's opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings--at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature." The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development. PMID:26062040

  2. Discursive Positionings and Emotions in Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling is suggested as an activity through which students engage in meaningful mathematics. In the current research, the modelling activity of a group of four seventh-grade students was analysed using the discursive analysis framework. The research findings show that the positionings and emotions of the group members during their…

  3. Discursive positionings and emotions in modelling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling is suggested as an activity through which students engage in meaningful mathematics. In the current research, the modelling activity of a group of four seventh-grade students was analysed using the discursive analysis framework. The research findings show that the positionings and emotions of the group members during their participation in the modelling activity changed as the activity proceeded. Overall, it can be said that three of the four group members acted as insiders, while the fourth acted as an outsider, and only, towards the end of the group's work on the activity, he acted as an insider. Moreover, the research findings point at four factors that affected the group members' positionings and emotions during the modelling activity: the member's characteristics, the member's history of learning experiences, the activity characteristics and the modelling phases. Furthermore, the different positionings of the group members in the different modelling phases were accompanied by different emotions experienced by them, where being an insider and a collaborator resulted in positive emotions, while being an outsider resulted in negative emotions.

  4. Are University Co-Operative Education Students Safe? Perceptions of Risk to Students on Work Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhook, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    As students venture off campus for university-sponsored activities, are they at risk, given that universities are better able to control risk factors on campus than they can for their off-campus activities? Co-operative education is a formalized and longstanding academic program that often sees students spend upwards of a third of their time off…

  5. Benzoyl peroxide interferes with metabolic co-operation between cultured human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, N.J.; Parkinson, E.K.; Emmerson, A.

    1984-03-01

    The ability of benzoyl peroxide to inhibit metabolic co-operation in rodent cell cultures may be relevant to its recently reported tumour promoting activity in mouse epidermis. We show here that non-toxic doses of this compound reduce metabolic co-operation between human epidermal keratinocytes to approximately 30% of that found in controls. The doses of benzoyl peroxide used did not affect keratinocyte morphology or their rate of attachment to the culture substratum. These results could be important as benzoyl peroxide is widely used in industry.

  6. [Sex role orientation and interdisciplinary co-operation].

    PubMed

    Kada, Olivia; Brunner, Eva; Maier, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Interdisciplinary collaboration between nurses and physicians contributes to optimal patient outcomes. Both insufficient knowledge of each other's roles and competencies and the power position of physicians impede nurse-physician collaboration. Health care managers play an important role in the promotion of nurse-physician collaboration. Leadership is associated with masculine traits, but female attributes are crucial in social relationships. Austrian health care management students (n=141, response rate: 93 %) rated themselves, the typical nurse and the typical physician with respect to masculine and feminine traits using the Bem sex-role-inventory (BSRI). The respondents saw themselves as equally masculine and feminine (androgynous self-concept); nurses were rated as significantly more masculine than feminine, whereas physicians were described as masculine sex-typed and significantly less feminine than nurses. For health care managers who also have to promote interdisciplinary collaboration an androgynous self-concept can be regarded as advantageous. They need to reflect on their ideas about nurses and physicians in order to manage the challenge of promoting interprofessional co-operation.

  7. Council for Cultural Co-Operation and Cultural Fund. Annual Report 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    This document is a report on the activities of the Council for Cultural Co-Operation (CCC) and Cultural Fund for 1972. The CCC is briefly defined as being designed to reinforce educational and cultural cooperation among the 21 countries of the CCC, especially in matters of research, information, and documentation. The document is composed of…

  8. Positive and Transformative Technologies for Active Ageing.

    PubMed

    Riva, Giuseppe; Villani, Daniela; Cipresso, Pietro; Repetto, Claudia; Triberti, Stefano; Di Lernia, Daniele; Chirico, Alice; Serino, Silvia; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Due to advances in treatment and people's living longer, chronic diseases are becoming more common among our population. This is a leading contributor to the increasing burden on our current healthcare system. To reduce this burden and sufficiently meet the needs of this growing segment of the population, healthcare organizations must encourage the elderly to take a more active role in caring for their own health and well-being. Technology may offer a solution to this shortcoming. "Positive Technology" focuses on the use of technology for improving the quality of our personal experience, and it suggests specific strategies for modifying/improving each of the different dimensions involved - Emotional Quality (affect regulation); Engagement/Actualization (presence and flow); Connectdness (collective intentions and networked flow) - and for generating motivation and engagement in the process. "Transformative Technology" are technologically-mediated experiences that support positive, enduring transformation of the self-world. The transformative content is delivered through a set of experiential affordances, which are stimuli designed to elicit emotional and cognitive involvement in the designed experience: (i) emotional affordances; (ii) epistemic affordances. The paper discusses discuss the possible role of positive and transormative technologies for healthy living and active ageing by presenting different practical applications of this approach recently developed by our team. PMID:27046597

  9. Chromosome positioning from activity-based segregation.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Nirmalendu; Sengupta, Surajit; Menon, Gautam I

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomes within eukaryotic cell nuclei at interphase are not positioned at random, since gene-rich chromosomes are predominantly found towards the interior of the cell nucleus across a number of cell types. The physical mechanisms that could drive and maintain the spatial segregation of chromosomes based on gene density are unknown. Here, we identify a mechanism for such segregation, showing that the territorial organization of chromosomes, another central feature of nuclear organization, emerges naturally from our model. Our computer simulations indicate that gene density-dependent radial segregation of chromosomes arises as a robust consequence of differences in non-equilibrium activity across chromosomes. Arguing that such differences originate in the inhomogeneous distribution of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and transcription machinery on each chromosome, we show that a variety of non-random positional distributions emerge through the interplay of such activity, nuclear shape and specific interactions of chromosomes with the nuclear envelope. Results from our model are in reasonable agreement with experimental data and we make a number of predictions that can be tested in experiments. PMID:24459132

  10. Cyberethics and co-operation in the information society.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Christian; Bichler, Robert M; Raffl, Celina

    2009-12-01

    The task of this paper is to ground the notion of cyberethics of co-operation. The evolution of modern society has resulted in a shift from industrial society towards informational capitalism. This transformation is a multidimensional shift that affects all aspects of society. Hence also the ethical system of society is penetrated by the emergence of the knowledge society and ethical guidelines for the information age are needed. Ethical issues and conflicts in the knowledge society are connected to topics of ecological and social sustainability. For information ethics and cyberethics, the sustainable design of society, social, and socio-technological systems is important. In this context the notions of sustainability and co-operation are discussed. Based on these categories, the approach of cyberethics of co-operation can be theoretically grounded. PMID:19440854

  11. SMEs and their co-operation with academia.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Jean Michel; Strömqvist, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Co-operation between SMEs and Academia can be a win-win situation when each partner understands the constraints of the other. SMEs are often leaders in innovation; therefore more ready to share interest in research. They are flexible and dynamic. They need a short feed-back to sustain their co-operation. Academia is often more long-term oriented and more question- than answer-oriented. A code of conduct can ease the relationship because it can anticipate the potential problems.

  12. Supersurveillance, Democracy, and Co-Operation--The Challenge for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schostak, John

    2014-01-01

    The paper explores pedagogies of surveillance and counter pedagogies of radical democracy and co-operative practice and their implications for continuing professional development (CPD). Teachers have had to respond to an increasing naturalisation of surveillance in schools. However, this naturalisation can be countered by drawing upon the emergent…

  13. Impact of Co-Operative Learning Strategies in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singaravelu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The study illuminates the effectiveness of Co-operative Learning Strategies in learning English Grammar for the learners at secondary level. Cooperative Learning is particularly beneficial for any student learning as a second language. It promotes peer interaction, which helps the development of language and the learning of concepts with content.…

  14. Co-Operative Training in the Sheffield Forging Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give details of an operation carried out in Sheffield to increase the recruitment of young men into the steel forging industry. Design/methodology/approach: The Sheffield Forges Co-operative Training Scheme was designed to encourage boys to enter the forging industry and to provide them with training and…

  15. Securing co-operation from persons supplying statistical data

    PubMed Central

    Aubenque, M. J.; Blaikley, R. M.; Harris, F. Fraser; Lal, R. B.; Neurdenburg, M. G.; Hernández, R. de Shelly

    1954-01-01

    Securing the co-operation of persons supplying information required for medical statistics is essentially a problem in human relations, and an understanding of the motivations, attitudes, and behaviour of the respondents is necessary. Before any new statistical survey is undertaken, it is suggested by Aubenque and Harris that a preliminary review be made so that the maximum use is made of existing information. Care should also be taken not to burden respondents with an overloaded questionnaire. Aubenque and Harris recommend simplified reporting. Complete population coverage is not necessary. Neurdenburg suggests that the co-operation and support of such organizations as medical associations and social security boards are important and that propaganda should be directed specifically to the groups whose co-operation is sought. Informal personal contacts are valuable and desirable, according to Blaikley, but may have adverse effects if the right kind of approach is not made. Financial payments as an incentive in securing co-operation are opposed by Neurdenburg, who proposes that only postage-free envelopes or similar small favours be granted. Blaikley and Harris, on the other hand, express the view that financial incentives may do much to gain the support of those required to furnish data; there are, however, other incentives, and full use should be made of the natural inclinations of respondents. Compulsion may be necessary in certain instances, but administrative rather than statutory measures should be adopted. Penalties, according to Aubenque, should be inflicted only when justified by imperative health requirements. The results of surveys should be made available as soon as possible to those who co-operated, and Aubenque and Harris point out that they should also be of practical value to the suppliers of the information. Greater co-operation can be secured from medical persons who have an understanding of the statistical principles involved; Aubenque and

  16. Interdisciplinary Co-operation (Part II of "Language Learning: Individual Needs, Interdisciplinary Co-operation, Bi- and Multilingualism").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    The following papers on interdisciplinary cooperation in second language instruction are included: (1) "Language Teaching: Possibilities for Interdisciplinary Co-operation," by James E. Alatis; (2) "L'insegnamento della letteratura italiana (The Teaching of Italian Literature)," by Ezio Raimondi; (3) "Objective Evaluation and Transparency," by…

  17. Vitrification assistance program: international co-operation on vitrification technology

    SciTech Connect

    Penrice, Ch.; McGowan, B.; Garth, B.; Reed, J.; Prod'homme, A.; Sartelet, S.; Guerif, H.N.; Hollebecque, J.F.; Flament, T.; Prod'homme, A.

    2008-07-01

    With 10 vitrification lines in operation (3 on WVP in Sellafield, 1 on AVM in Marcoule and 6 on AVH in La Hague), Sellafield Ltd and Areva NC benefit from the most in-depth experience worldwide in the vitrification of highly active liquors within a framework of commercial operations. Based on the two-step process design, using a calciner and an induction-heated hot melter, which was initially deployed in Marcoule in 1978, core vitrification equipment has been continuously improved by the independent development programmes of the two companies. In March 2005, Sellafield Ltd and Areva NC signed the Vitrification Assistance Program (hereafter referred to as VAP); a co-operative project lasting 4 years during which Areva NC is to share some areas of their experience and expertise with Sellafield Ltd. Now at the halfway point of this project, this paper summarises the work performed by the VAP team to date, highlighting the early benefits and lessons learned. The following points will be developed: - Equipment delivery and preparation for implementation on WVP - Training organization and dissemination to WVP teams - Lessons learned from the early changes implemented in operations (Calciner, Melter, Dust Scrubber and Primary off gas system), and initial feedback from the first campaign using a VAP equipped line. In conclusion: The vitrification process and technology implemented at Sellafield and at La Hague, based on the two-step process, have proved to be efficient in treating high active liquor of various types. Ten lines based on this principle have been successfully operated for more than 15 years in France and in the UK. The process has also been demonstrated to be sufficiently versatile to benefit from continuous improvement and development programmes. VAP, as a complete package to support vitrification technology and knowledge transfer from AREVA NC to Sellafield Ltd, has provided the framework for fruitful technical exchanges and discussions between the two

  18. Generalized microscopic reversibility, kinetic co-operativity of enzymes and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, J

    1978-01-01

    Generalized microscopic reversibility implies that the apparent rate of any catalytic process in a complex mechanism is paralleled by substrate desorption in such a way that this ratio is held constant within the reaction mechanism [Whitehead (1976) Biochem. J. 159, 449--456]. The physical and evolutionary significances of this concept, for both polymeric and monomeric enzymes, are discussed. For polymeric enzymes, generalized microscopic reversibility of necessity occurs if, within the same reaction sequence, the substrate stabilizes one type of conformation of the active site only. Generalized microscopic reversibility suppresses the kinetic co-operativity of the slow transition model [Ainslie, Shill & Neet (1972) J. Biol. Chem. 247, 7088--7096]. This situation is obtained if the free-energy difference between the corresponding transition states of the two enzyme forms is held constant along the reaction co-ordinate. This situation implies that the 'extra costs' of energy (required to pass each energy barrier) that are not covered by the corresponding binding energies of the transition states vary in a similar way along the two reaction co-ordinates. The regulatory behaviour of monomeric enzymes is discussed in the light of the concept of 'catalytic perfection' proposed by Albery & Knowles [(1976) Biochemistry 15, 5631--5640]. These authors claim that an enzyme will be catalytically 'perfect' when its catalytic efficiency is maximum. If this situation occurs for a monomeric enzyme obeying either the slow transition or the mnemonical model, it can be shown that the kinetic co-operativity disappears. In other words, kinetic co-operativity of a monomeric enzyme is 'paid for' at the expense of catalytic efficiency, and the monomeric enzyme cannot be simultaneously co-operative and catalytically very efficient. This is precisely what has been found experimentally in a number of cases. PMID:743234

  19. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) recommends that all PK-12 schools implement a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. Schools play an important role in public health, and the physical, mental, and social benefits of regular physical activity for youth are well documented. Leading public health, medical,…

  20. Co-operation between Canada and other countries and territories to promote countermeasures against illicit drug trafficking.

    PubMed

    Stamler, R T; Fahlman, R C; Clement, G W

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the current programme and legislation relating to drug control and co-operation in drug law enforcement between Canada and other countries. The article also outlines the measures proposed by the authors to promote world-wide co-operation in controlling the illicit traffic in drugs. The authors make the following suggestions: in order to prevent individuals involved in organized crime from profiting from their illegal activities, standards for criminal laws should be established at the international level to ensure that no country or territory can be used as a haven for organized crime and profits derived from it; national Governments must ensure that co-operation is extended to all investigations and enquiries concerning organized crime; bilateral and multilateral treaties should be developed and adopted to ensure the exchange of information and mutual co-operation in law enforcement action against organized crime; international co-operation is needed to ensure the effective prosecution of individuals involved in organized international criminal groups and the removal of their illegally accumulated profits, which should result in the dismantling of the illegal organizations to prevent their entrenchment in contemporary societies.

  1. An Effect of the Co-Operative Network Model for Students' Quality in Thai Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanthaphum, Udomsin; Tesaputa, Kowat; Weangsamoot, Visoot

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed: 1) to study the current and desirable states of the co-operative network in developing the learners' quality in Thai primary schools, 2) to develop a model of the co-operative network in developing the learners' quality, and 3) to examine the results of implementation of the co-operative network model in the primary school.…

  2. Establishment and application of SPA-co-operated ELISA for detection of anti-HCV-IgM.

    PubMed

    Li, F H; Guo, L S; Yu, Z Q; Wang, Y K; Qi, J Y; Yuan, X W; Hao, L J

    1993-01-01

    A staphylococcus aureus protein A co-operated ELISA (SPA-ELISA) for the detection of anti-HCV-IgM has been established using HCV antigenic polypeptide, SPA-bearing germs and horseradish peroxidase labelled anti-human IgM. The specificity of SPA-ELISA has been confirmed by some substitution tests, blocking tests and destroying test with 2-mercaptoethanol. The results showed that the rate of anti-HCV-IgG in a group of patients with acute hepatitis and there were significant difference in anti-HCV-IgM was higher than that of anti-HCV-IgM detected rates between patients with acute hepatitis and those with chronic hepatitis (32.26%, P < 0.01). On the other hand, the positive rates of anti-HCV-IgM were 53.66% and 63.41% in transfusion associated hepatitis, 38.10% and 42.86% in sporadic hepatitis, 6.11% and 16.33% in people who have had active social activities, 40.00% and 10.00% in a group of blood donors respectively. Furthermore, taking into account the characteristics of HCV polypeptide used, its easiness of manipulation, and elimination of the interference of anti-HCV-IgG in sera, the new SPA-ELISA is believed to be of practical value in clinical and epidemiological studies of hepatitis C. PMID:7512150

  3. Activities for Teaching Positive Psychology: A Guide for Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froh, Jeffrey J., Ed.; Parks, Acacia C., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Positive psychology is a rapidly expanding area of study that is of great interest to students at the graduate, undergraduate, and high school levels. But the field is so broad that teachers who want to cover all the bases when designing a positive psychology course may have difficulty locating and selecting materials. "Activities for Teaching…

  4. Laser optical disk position encoder with active heads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1991-01-01

    An angular position encoder that minimizes the effects of eccentricity and other misalignments between the disk and the read stations by employing heads with beam steering optics that actively track the disk in directions along the disk radius and normal to its surface is discussed. The device adapts features prevalent in optical disk technology to the application of angular position sensing.

  5. Laser optical disk position encoder with active heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    An angular position encoder that minimizes the effects of eccentricity and other misalignments between the disk and the read stations by employing heads with beam steering optics that actively track the disk in directions along the disk radius and normal to its surface is discussed. The device adapts features prevalent in optical disk technology to the application of angular position sensing.

  6. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz, respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  7. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  8. Physical Activity Is Positively Associated with Episodic Memory in Aging.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Scott M; Alosco, Michael L; Hayes, Jasmeet P; Cadden, Margaret; Peterson, Kristina M; Allsup, Kelly; Forman, Daniel E; Sperling, Reisa A; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-11-01

    Aging is associated with performance reductions in executive function and episodic memory, although there is substantial individual variability in cognition among older adults. One factor that may be positively associated with cognition in aging is physical activity. To date, few studies have objectively assessed physical activity in young and older adults, and examined whether physical activity is differentially associated with cognition in aging. Young (n=29, age 18-31 years) and older adults (n=31, ages 55-82 years) completed standardized neuropsychological testing to assess executive function and episodic memory capacities. An experimental face-name relational memory task was administered to augment assessment of episodic memory. Physical activity (total step count and step rate) was objectively assessed using an accelerometer, and hierarchical regressions were used to evaluate relationships between cognition and physical activity. Older adults performed more poorly on tasks of executive function and episodic memory. Physical activity was positively associated with a composite measure of visual episodic memory and face-name memory accuracy in older adults. Physical activity associations with cognition were independent of sedentary behavior, which was negatively correlated with memory performance. Physical activity was not associated with cognitive performance in younger adults. Physical activity is positively associated with episodic memory performance in aging. The relationship appears to be strongest for face-name relational memory and visual episodic memory, likely attributable to the fact that these tasks make strong demands on the hippocampus. The results suggest that physical activity relates to cognition in older, but not younger adults.

  9. 'Part of the solution': Developing sustainable energy through co-operatives and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguid, Fiona C. B.

    After five years of development, WindShare Co-operative in Toronto, Ontario became the first urban wind turbine in North America and the first co-operatively owned and operated wind turbine in Canada. The development of WindShare Co-operative has spurred the growth of a green energy co-operative sector in Ontario. This study, which included 27 interviews and a focus group with members of WindShare Co-operative, focuses on the roles of community-based green energy co-operatives in advancing sustainable energy development and energy literacy. Sustainable energy development is firmly rooted in the triple bottom line of environmental, social and economic success, and green energy co-operatives can be a way to help achieve those successes. Green energy co-operatives are structures for providing renewable energy generation or energy conservation practices, both of which have important environmental impacts regarding climate change and pollution levels. Co-operative structures are supported by processes that include local ownership, democracy, participation, community organizing, learning and social change. These processes have a significant social impact by creating a venue for people to be directly involved in the energy industry, by involving learning through participation in a community-based organization, and by advancing energy literacy within the membership and the general public. In regards to the economic impacts, green energy co-operatives foster a local economy and local investment opportunities, which have repercussions regarding building expertise within Ontario's green energy and co-operative development future, and more generally, captures members' interest because they have a direct stake in the co-operative. This thesis shows that green energy co-operatives, like WindShare, play an important role in advancing sustainable energy development, energy literacy and the triple bottom line. Members of WindShare expressed resounding feelings of pride, efficacy

  10. Surface Support Systems for Co-Operative and Integrated Human/Robotic Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    Human and robotic partnerships to realize space goals can enhance space missions and provide increases in human productivity while decreasing the hazards that the humans are exposed to. For lunar exploration, the harsh environment of the moon and the repetitive nature of the tasks involved with lunar outpost construction, maintenance and operation as well as production tasks associated with in-situ resource utilization, make it highly desirable to use robotic systems in co-operation with human activity. A human lunar outpost is functionally examined and concepts for selected human/robotic tasks are discussed in the context of a lunar outpost which will enable the presence of humans on the moon for extended periods of time.

  11. A position-dependent transcription-activating domain in TFIIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, X; Darby, M K

    1993-01-01

    Transcription of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene by RNA polymerase III requires the gene-specific factor TFIIIA. To identify domains within TFIIIA that are essential for transcriptional activation, we have expressed C-terminal deletion, substitution, and insertion mutants of TFIIIA in bacteria as fusions with maltose-binding protein (MBP). The MBP-TFIIIA fusion protein specifically binds to the 5S RNA gene internal control region and complements transcription in a TFIIIA-depleted oocyte nuclear extract. Random, cassette-mediated mutagenesis of the carboxyl region of TFIIIA, which is not required for promoter binding, has defined a 14-amino-acid region that is critical for transcriptional activation. In contrast to activators of RNA polymerase II, the activity of the TFIIIA activation domain is strikingly sensitive to its position relative to the DNA-binding domain. When the eight amino acids that separate the transcription-activating domain from the last zinc finger are deleted, transcriptional activity is lost. Surprisingly, diverse amino acids can replace these eight amino acids with restoration of full transcriptional activity, suggesting that the length and not the sequence of this region is important. Insertion of amino acids between the zinc finger region and the transcription-activating domain causes a reduction in transcription proportional to the number of amino acids introduced. We propose that to function, the transcription-activating domain of TFIIIA must be correctly positioned at a minimum distance from the DNA-binding domain. Images PMID:8246967

  12. Co-Operative Schools: Building Communities in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodin, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The recent progress of "co-operative schools" both confirms and disrupts many assumptions surrounding contemporary compulsory schooling. The term itself refers to an eclectic array of schools, both primary and secondary, of which there were, by June 2012, almost 300 in England that have adopted co-operative values, in terms of governance, pedagogy…

  13. Co-Operative Problem-Solving at the Royal Docks Community School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This article responds to Henry Tam's article in this issue of FORUM by exploring opportunities for co-operative problem-solving for staff and students of the Royal Docks Community School in the London Borough of Newham. Becoming a co-operative trust helped the school move out of special measures and develop a strategy of participation and…

  14. Climate protection in Germany`s bilateral development co-operation with the People`s Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.

    1996-12-31

    For globally sustainable development to be achieved, three concerns are central: productive economic growth, social justice and ecological sustainability. Development co-operation supports the realisation of these three goals in partner countries by helping to alleviate poverty, promote economic growth through private-sector development and protect vital natural resources. The aim of globally sustainable development can only be achieved if industrial countries too implement necessary reforms and structural adjustments at every level. Co-operation efforts with partners must therefore be complemented by coherent policies at home. This is a matter of credibility, but also of developmental far-sightedness. Internal reforms in the industrial countries secure financial leeway for their providing foreign assistance in the longer term. Environmental and resource protection as a focal point of Germany`s development co-operation with the PRC aims to preserve vital natural resources, shape economic development in their partner countries in an ecologically sound manner and put China in a position to participate in global endeavours to protect the environment. Climate protection measures figure prominently in this area. This is justified given China`s share of global CO{sub 2} emissions and the potential for energy-saving measures and measures to increase power intensity. This potential is derived primarily from the possibility of using energy-efficient technologies, increasing the relatively low energy prices and making use of renewable sources of energy.

  15. Co-operation processes in dynamic environment management: evolution through training experienced pilots in flying a highly automated aircraft.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, J

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic environment management (process control, aircraft piloting, etc.) increasingly implies collective work components. Pragmatic purposes as well as epistemological interests raise important questions on collective activities at work. In particular, linked to the technological evolution in flight management, the role of the 'collective fact' appears as a key point in reliability. Beyond the development of individual competencies, the quality of the 'distributed' crew activity has to be questioned. This paper presents an empirical study about how experienced pilots co-ordinate their information and actions during the last period of training on a highly automated cockpit. A task of disturbance management (engine fire during takeoff) is chosen as amplifying cognitive requirements. Analysis focuses on the transitions between the main task and the incident to be managed. Crew performance and co-operation between two pilots are compared in three occurrences of the same task: the results are coherent with the hypothesis of a parallel evolution of the crew performance and its internal co-operation, and show that prescribed explicit co-operation is more present on action than on information about the 'state of the world'. Methodological issues are discussed about the possible effects of the specific situation of training, and about the psychological meaning of the results. PMID:11540153

  16. Physical Activity Is Positively Associated with Episodic Memory in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Scott M.; Alosco, Michael L.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Cadden, Margaret; Peterson, Kristina M.; Allsup, Kelly; Forman, Daniel E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with performance reductions in executive function and episodic memory, although there is substantial individual variability in cognition among older adults. One factor that may be positively associated with cognition in aging is physical activity. To date, few studies have objectively assessed physical activity in young and older adults, and examined whether physical activity is differentially associated with cognition in aging. Young (n = 29, age 18–31 years) and older adults (n = 31, ages 55–82 years) completed standardized neuropsychological testing to assess executive function and episodic memory capacities. An experimental face-name relational memory task was administered to augment assessment of episodic memory. Physical activity (total step count and step rate) was objectively assessed using an accelerometer, and hierarchical regressions were used to evaluate relationships between cognition and physical activity. Older adults performed more poorly on tasks of executive function and episodic memory. Physical activity was positively associated with a composite measure of visual episodic memory and face-name memory accuracy in older adults. Physical activity associations with cognition were independent of sedentary behavior, which was negatively correlated with memory performance. Physical activity was not associated with cognitive performance in younger adults. Physical activity is positively associated with episodic memory performance in aging. The relationship appears to be strongest for face-name relational memory and visual episodic memory, likely attributable to the fact that these tasks make strong demands on the hippocampus. The results suggest that physical activity relates to cognition in older, but not younger adults. PMID:26581790

  17. Active diffusion positions the nucleus in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Ahmed, Wylie W; Bussonnier, Matthias; Mailly, Philippe; Betz, Timo; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2015-04-01

    In somatic cells, the position of the cell centroid is dictated by the centrosome. The centrosome is instrumental in nucleus positioning, the two structures being physically connected. Mouse oocytes have no centrosomes, yet harbour centrally located nuclei. We demonstrate how oocytes define their geometric centre in the absence of centrosomes. Using live imaging of oocytes, knockout for the formin 2 actin nucleator, with off-centred nuclei, together with optical trapping and modelling, we discover an unprecedented mode of nucleus positioning. We document how active diffusion of actin-coated vesicles, driven by myosin Vb, generates a pressure gradient and a propulsion force sufficient to move the oocyte nucleus. It promotes fluidization of the cytoplasm, contributing to nucleus directional movement towards the centre. Our results highlight the potential of active diffusion, a prominent source of intracellular transport, able to move large organelles such as nuclei, providing in vivo evidence of its biological function.

  18. Laser optical disk position encoder with active heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1992-04-01

    An angular position encoder is provided that minimizes the effects of eccentricity and other misalignments between the disk and the read stations by employing heads which incorporate beam steering optics with the ability to actively track the disk in directions along the disk radius and normal to its surface. The device adapts features prevalent in optical disk technology toward the application of angular position sensing. A reflective disk and the principles of interferometry are employed. The servo-controlled steering optics move so as to acquire a track on the disk lying at a predetermined radius and distance below the head, and then adjust position and orientation in order to maintain the view of the disk track as required. Thus, the device is actively self-aligning.

  19. Laser optical disk position encoder with active heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1990-03-01

    An angular position encoder is provided that minimizes the effects of eccentricity and other misalignments between the disk and the read stations by employing heads which incorporate beam steering optics with the ability to actively track the disk in directions along the disk radius and normal to its surface. The device adapts features prevalent in optical disk technology toward the application of angular position sensing. A reflective disk and the principles of interferometry are employed. The servo-controlled steering optics move so as to acquire a track on the disk lying at a predetermined radius and distance below the head, and then adjust position and orientation in order to maintain the view of the disk track as required. Thus, the device is actively self-aligning.

  20. Draft position paper on knowledge management in space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Jeanne; Moura, Denis

    2003-01-01

    As other fields of industry, space activities are facing the challenge of Knowledge Management and the International Academy of Astronautics decided to settle in 2002 a Study Group to analyse the problem and issue general guidelines. This communication presents the draft position paper of this group in view to be discussed during the 2003 IAF Congress.

  1. Positive Technology for Healthy Living and Active Ageing.

    PubMed

    Riva, Giuseppe; Gaggioli, Andrea; Villani, Daniela; Cipresso, Pietro; Repetto, Claudia; Serino, Silvia; Triberti, Stefano; Brivio, Eleonora; Galimberti, Carlo; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies are widely and rapidly spreading in people's daily lives. But what is the possible role of the mass proliferation of digital devices in supporting healthy living and active ageing? Are they useful in fostering personal growth and individual integration of the elderly, by promoting satisfaction, opportunities for action, and self-expression? Rather, do they enhance automation, impose constraints on personal initiative, and result in compulsive consumption of information? In this chapter, we suggest that possible answers to these questions will be offered by the "Positive Technology" approach, i.e., the scientific and applied approach to using technology so that it improves the quality of our personal experiences through its structuring, augmentation, and/or replacement. First, we suggest that it is possible to use technology to manipulate the quality of experience with the goal of increasing wellness and generating strengths and resilience in individuals, organizations, and society. Then, we classify positive technologies according to their effects on these three features of personal experience - Hedonic: technologies used to induce positive and pleasant experiences; Eudaimonic: technologies used to support individuals in reaching engaging and self-actualizing experiences; Social/Interpersonal: technologies used to support and improve the connectedness between individuals, groups, and organizations. Finally, we discuss the possible role of positive technologies for healthy living and active ageing by presenting different practical applications of this approach.

  2. Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Baudry, Michelle

    2000-12-05

    A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

  3. EMG activity during positive-pressure treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Iain; Seeley, Matthew Kirk; Hopkins, Jon Ty; Carr, Cameron; Franson, Jared Judd

    2014-06-01

    Success has been demonstrated in rehabilitation from certain injuries while using positive-pressure treadmills. However, certain injuries progress even with the lighter vertical loads. Our purpose was to investigate changes in muscle activation for various lower limb muscles while running on a positive-pressure treadmill at different amounts of body weight support. We hypothesized that some muscles would show decreases in activation with greater body weight support while others would not. Eleven collegiate distance runners were recruited. EMG amplitude was measured over 12 lower limb muscles. After a short warm-up, subjects ran at 100%, 80%, 60%, and 40% of their body weight for two minutes each. EMG amplitudes were recorded during the final 30s of each stage. Most muscles demonstrated lower amplitudes as body weight was supported. For the hip adductors during the swing phase and the hamstrings during stance, no significant trend appeared. Positive-pressure treadmills may be useful interventions for certain injuries. However, some injuries, such as hip adductor and hamstring tendonitis or strains may require alternative cross-training to relieve stress on those areas. Runners should be careful in determining how much body weight should be supported for various injuries to return to normal activity in the shortest possible time. PMID:24613660

  4. EMG activity during positive-pressure treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Iain; Seeley, Matthew Kirk; Hopkins, Jon Ty; Carr, Cameron; Franson, Jared Judd

    2014-06-01

    Success has been demonstrated in rehabilitation from certain injuries while using positive-pressure treadmills. However, certain injuries progress even with the lighter vertical loads. Our purpose was to investigate changes in muscle activation for various lower limb muscles while running on a positive-pressure treadmill at different amounts of body weight support. We hypothesized that some muscles would show decreases in activation with greater body weight support while others would not. Eleven collegiate distance runners were recruited. EMG amplitude was measured over 12 lower limb muscles. After a short warm-up, subjects ran at 100%, 80%, 60%, and 40% of their body weight for two minutes each. EMG amplitudes were recorded during the final 30s of each stage. Most muscles demonstrated lower amplitudes as body weight was supported. For the hip adductors during the swing phase and the hamstrings during stance, no significant trend appeared. Positive-pressure treadmills may be useful interventions for certain injuries. However, some injuries, such as hip adductor and hamstring tendonitis or strains may require alternative cross-training to relieve stress on those areas. Runners should be careful in determining how much body weight should be supported for various injuries to return to normal activity in the shortest possible time.

  5. Dynamic positioning system based on active disturbance rejection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhengling; Guo, Chen; Fan, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    A dynamically positioned vessel, by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the certifying class societies (DNV, ABS, LR, etc.), is defined as a vessel that maintains its position and heading (fixed location or pre-determined track) exclusively by means of active thrusters. The development of control technology promotes the upgrading of dynamic positioning (DP) systems. Today there are two different DP systems solutions available on the market: DP system based on PID regulator and that based on model-based control. Both systems have limited disturbance rejection capability due to their design principle. In this paper, a new DP system solution is proposed based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) technology. This technology is composed of Tracking-Differentiator (TD), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Nonlinear Feedback Combination. On one hand, both TD and ESO can act as filters and can be used in place of conventional filters; on the other hand, the total disturbance of the system can be estimated and compensated by ESO, which therefore enhances the system's disturbance rejection capability. This technology's advantages over other methods lie in two aspects: 1) This method itself can not only achieve control objectives but also filter noisy measurements without other specialized filters; 2) This method offers a new useful approach to suppress the ocean disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Conjugation position of quercetin glucuronides and effect on biological activity.

    PubMed

    Day, A J; Bao, Y; Morgan, M R; Williamson, G

    2000-12-15

    Quercetin glycosides are common dietary antioxidants. In general, however, potential biological effects of the circulating plasma metabolites (e.g., glucuronide conjugates) have not been measured. We have determined the rate of glucuronidation of quercetin at each position on the polyphenol ring by human liver cell-free extracts containing UDP-glucuronosyltransferases. The apparent affinity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase followed the order 4'- > 3'- > 7- > 3, although the apparent maximum rate of formation was for the 7-position. The 5-position did not appear to be a site for conjugation. After isolation of individual glucuronides, the inhibition of xanthine oxidase and lipoxygenase were assessed. The K(i) for the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by quercetin glucuronides followed the order 4'- > 3'- > 7- > 3-, with quercetin-4'-glucuronide a particularly potent inhibitor (K(i) = 0. 25 microM). The glucuronides, with the exception of quercetin-3-glucuronide, were also inhibitors of lipoxygenase. Quercetin glucuronides are metabolites of quercetin in humans, and these compounds can retain some biological activity depending on conjugation position at expected plasma concentrations. PMID:11118813

  7. Mitral valve repair for active culture positive infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Doukas, G; Oc, M; Alexiou, C; Sosnowski, A W; Samani, N J; Spyt, T J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical and echocardiographic outcome after mitral valve (MV) repair for active culture positive infective MV endocarditis. Patients and methods Between 1996 and 2004, 36 patients (mean (SD) age 53 (18) years) with positive blood culture up to three weeks before surgery (or positive culture of material removed at operation) and intraoperative evidence of endocarditis underwent MV repair. Staphylococci and streptococci were the most common pathogens. All patients had moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (MR). Mean New York Heart Association (NYHA) class was 2.3 (1.0). Follow up was complete (mean 38 (19) months). Results Operative mortality was 2.8% (one patient). At follow up, endocarditis has not recurred. One patient developed severe recurrent MR and underwent valve replacement and one patient had moderate MR. There were two late deaths, both non‐cardiac. Kaplan‐Meier five year freedom from recurrent moderate to severe MR, freedom from repeat operation, and survival were 94 (4)%, 97 (3)%, and 93 (5)%, respectively. At the most recent review the mean NYHA class was 1.17 (0.3) (p < 0.0001). At the latest echocardiographic evaluation, left atrial diameters, left ventricular end diastolic diameter, and MV diameter were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) compared with preoperative values. Conclusions MV repair for active culture positive endocarditis is associated with low operative mortality and provides satisfactory freedom from recurrent infection, freedom from repeat operation, and survival. Hence, every effort should be made to repair infected MVs and valves should be replaced only when repair is not possible. PMID:15951395

  8. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  9. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  10. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Richard

    1994-08-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  11. OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development): A Guide to Publications and Data Available in the Libraries of Duke University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basefsky, Stuart, Comp.

    Designed to make Duke University's collection of OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) publications and data more readily accessible, this guide is divided into the following sections: Introduction to OECD and Its Publications; General References about OECD and Its Activities; Indexes and Other Sources for Accessing OECD…

  12. Conseil de la Cooperation Culturelle et Fonds Culturel. Rapport Annuel 1972. (Council for Cultural Co-operation and Cultural Fund. Annual Report 1972.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    This document is a report on the activities of the Council for Cultural Co-Operation (CCC) and Cultural Fund for 1972. The CCC is briefly defined as being designed to reinforce educational and cultural cooperation among the 21 countries of the CCC, especially in matters of research, information, and documentation. The document is composed of…

  13. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) α subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  14. pH-induced kinetic co-operativity of a thylakoid-bound polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Valero, E; García-Carmona, F

    1992-01-01

    A study of the catecholase activity of a latent plant polyphenol oxidase, extracted and purified from the chloroplast membranes of grapes (Vitis vinifera cv. Airen), revealed for the first time a lag phase above pH 5.0, whereas a steady-state rate was reached immediately when pH values were lower, thus suggesting the hysteretic nature of the enzyme. During steady state, the enzyme showed negative co-operativity concomitant with the presence of the lag period, and followed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics under more acid pH conditions. Statistical analysis of these data showed a minimal value for the extreme Hill coefficient of 0.54 at pH 6.0. This kinetic behaviour of polyphenol oxidase has been interpreted in terms of the pH-induced 'slow' transition mechanism reported by Ricard, Noat & Nari [(1984) Eur. J. Biochem. 145, 311-317] in which the conformational change does not affect the active site of the enzyme. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1530593

  15. European tendencies and co-operation in the field of ITS systems - national achievements and challenges in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenbach, Ágnes

    2016-06-01

    The article presents the role of intelligent transport systems/services related to the implementation of the essential European and Hungarian transport policy objectives. The `ITS Directive' will provide a framework for the tasks/works to be performed in the forthcoming years within the priority areas of ITS. The European Commission published regulations / specifications for the priority actions in the form of delegated acts defining the tasks/responsibilities of Member States. Regional/European co-operation for Hungary started after the EU-accession of the country. Hungary was an active partner within the European CONNECT and EasyWay projects, currently Hungary is a member of the CROCODILE consortium.

  16. Co-operative inhibitory effects of hydrogen peroxide and iodine against bacterial and yeast species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen peroxide and iodine are powerful antimicrobials widely used as antiseptics and disinfectants. Their antimicrobial properties are known to be enhanced by combining them with other compounds. We studied co-operative inhibitory activities (synergism, additive effects and modes of growth inhibition) of hydrogen peroxide and iodine used concurrently against 3 bacterial and 16 yeast species. Results Synergistic or additive inhibitory effects were shown for hydrogen peroxide and iodine mixtures against all 19 species used in the study. Both biocides were mostly cidal individually and in mixtures against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Both compounds manifested static inhibitory effects individually, but their mixtures were synergistically cidal for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherihia coli. Cells of S. cerevisiae treated with hydrogen peroxide and iodine-hydrogen peroxide mixture produced increased numbers of respiratory deficient mutants indicating genotoxic effects. Conclusion Iodine and hydrogen peroxide used concurrently interact synergistically or additively against a range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. The study provides an insight as to how these traditional antimicrobials could be used more effectively for disinfection and antisepsis. In addition, a simple approach is proposed for scoring genotoxicity of different biocides by using the budding yeast system. PMID:23856115

  17. South Asian co-operation in population programmes.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M A

    1989-12-01

    Efforts by governments of South Asian countries to improve the economic growth and welfare of the people are being negated by high fertility. In some countries, the expenditures on health programs have increased and the programs have expanded rapidly without any concomitant improvement in efficiency or cost-effectiveness. This highlights the urgency of tackling the problems of not only population growth but also of managing population programs. There are similarities as well as differences in the management of population programs in the South Asian countries. Bangladesh has a population policy with a strong political will behind it. It also has a sound administrative structure and organization. Some areas that need attention are building up the operational relationship between health and family planning personnel, improved infrastructure development, more community involvement, and better evaluation. Some states in India have shown outstanding success in population programs, and some have successfully experimented with beyond family planning methods. A greater awareness of family planning among health staff, a solid information base for decision making, and management training for medical officers and staff are also needed. Pakistan's population program has had uneven results in the past, but it has now developed multi-sectoral components in decentralized field activities, involvement of local organizations and leaders, and better information, education, and social marketing, but it still needs to plan for evaluation and strengthen management training. Of the South Asian countries, Sri Lanka, with a high level of literacy and health care, has shown the best achievement in its social sector. The coverage through the maternal and child health service delivery system has been commendable with 94% of deliveries through institutions. Regional meetings have identified program management problem areas in 1) planning, control, and coordination of program implementation, 2

  18. South Asian co-operation in population programmes.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M A

    1989-12-01

    Efforts by governments of South Asian countries to improve the economic growth and welfare of the people are being negated by high fertility. In some countries, the expenditures on health programs have increased and the programs have expanded rapidly without any concomitant improvement in efficiency or cost-effectiveness. This highlights the urgency of tackling the problems of not only population growth but also of managing population programs. There are similarities as well as differences in the management of population programs in the South Asian countries. Bangladesh has a population policy with a strong political will behind it. It also has a sound administrative structure and organization. Some areas that need attention are building up the operational relationship between health and family planning personnel, improved infrastructure development, more community involvement, and better evaluation. Some states in India have shown outstanding success in population programs, and some have successfully experimented with beyond family planning methods. A greater awareness of family planning among health staff, a solid information base for decision making, and management training for medical officers and staff are also needed. Pakistan's population program has had uneven results in the past, but it has now developed multi-sectoral components in decentralized field activities, involvement of local organizations and leaders, and better information, education, and social marketing, but it still needs to plan for evaluation and strengthen management training. Of the South Asian countries, Sri Lanka, with a high level of literacy and health care, has shown the best achievement in its social sector. The coverage through the maternal and child health service delivery system has been commendable with 94% of deliveries through institutions. Regional meetings have identified program management problem areas in 1) planning, control, and coordination of program implementation, 2

  19. Novel co-operation between eotaxin and substance-P in inducing eosinophil-derived neurotoxin release.

    PubMed Central

    El-Shazly, A; Ishikawa, T

    1999-01-01

    Eosinophils, chemokines, and neuropeptides are thought to play effector roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases such as rhinitis. Eotaxin is a novel C-C chemokine with a potent and relatively specific eosinophil chemoattractant activity that binds selectively to CCR3 receptor, however, its activity in inducing eosinophil granules proteins release is poorly characterized. This study was performed to determine whether eotaxin primes eosinophil exocytosis and whether this co-operates with the sensory neuroimmune-axis. In the present communication, we show that 10 ng/ml eotaxin primed normal human eosinophil for exaggerated eosonophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) release stimulated by 10(-8) M Substance-P (SP). This novel priming was blocked by; 7B11 and Herbimycin A (HA), the CCR3 antagonist and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, respectively. SDS-Page studies showed significant tyrosine phosphorylation of several protein residues induced by 10(-8) M SP only after priming with 10 ng/ml eotaxin. These results demonstrate a novel co-operation between eotaxin and SP in inducing eosinophil cytotoxicity, which at least in part involves tyrosine kinases pathway(s). PMID:10704057

  20. Arylesterase Phenotype-Specific Positive Association Between Arylesterase Activity and Cholinesterase Specific Activity in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yutaka; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Strickland, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cholinesterase (ChE) specific activity is the ratio of ChE activity to ChE mass and, as a biomarker of exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors, has a potential advantage over simple ChE activity. Objective: To examine the association of several potential correlates (serum arylesterase/paraoxonase activity, serum albumin, sex, age, month of blood collection, and smoking) with plasma ChE specific activity. Methods: We analyzed data from 195 cancer-free controls from a nested case-control study, accounting for potential confounding. Results: Arylesterase activity had an independent, statistically significant positive association with ChE specific activity, and its magnitude was the greatest for the arylesterase phenotype corresponding to the QQ PON1192 genotype followed by phenotypes corresponding to QR and RR genotypes. Serum albumin was positively associated with ChE specific activity. Conclusions: Plasma arylesterase activity was positively associated with plasma ChE specific activity. This observation is consistent with protection conferred by a metabolic phenotype resulting in reduced internal dose. PMID:24473115

  1. Novel JAZ co-operativity and unexpected JA dynamics underpin Arabidopsis defence responses to Pseudomonas syringae infection.

    PubMed

    de Torres Zabala, Marta; Zhai, Bing; Jayaraman, Siddharth; Eleftheriadou, Garoufalia; Winsbury, Rebecca; Yang, Ron; Truman, William; Tang, Saijung; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Grant, Murray

    2016-02-01

    Pathogens target phytohormone signalling pathways to promote disease. Plants deploy salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defences against biotrophs. Pathogens antagonize SA immunity by activating jasmonate signalling, for example Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 produces coronatine (COR), a jasmonic acid (JA) mimic. This study found unexpected dynamics between SA, JA and COR and co-operation between JAZ jasmonate repressor proteins during DC3000 infection. We used a systems-based approach involving targeted hormone profiling, high-temporal-resolution micro-array analysis, reverse genetics and mRNA-seq. Unexpectedly, foliar JA did not accumulate until late in the infection process and was higher in leaves challenged with COR-deficient P. syringae or in the more resistant JA receptor mutant coi1. JAZ regulation was complex and COR alone was insufficient to sustainably induce JAZs. JAZs contribute to early basal and subsequent secondary plant defence responses. We showed that JAZ5 and JAZ10 specifically co-operate to restrict COR cytotoxicity and pathogen growth through a complex transcriptional reprogramming that does not involve the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors MYC2 and related MYC3 and MYC4 previously shown to restrict pathogen growth. mRNA-seq predicts compromised SA signalling in a jaz5/10 mutant and rapid suppression of JA-related components on bacterial infection. PMID:26428397

  2. Using Peer Teaching to Support Co-Operative Learning in Undergraduate Pharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depaz, Iris; Moni, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    We report findings from the second phase of a study of co-operative, group-based assessment in Pharmacology for second-year undergraduates at The University of Queensland, Australia. Students (n = 285) enrolled in the 2006 Bachelor of Science degree program completed a group-based assessment task (weighted 10% of their course). Blended teaching…

  3. The Economic and Social Impact of the Arctic Co-operative Movement on the Canadian Eskimo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Kenneth D.

    Canada's Arctic co-operatives are designed to provide a means of encouraging Eskimos to participate directly in the economic development of the Arctic through the promotion of cooperative ownership and enterprise. They also seek to provide a method of maximizing economic returns in Arctic communities from local businesses and enterprise. Backed by…

  4. Missing--The People's Voice: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable development in education for future economic growth has always been a global focal point for non-governmental agencies across the world. This article highlights the extensive work the Organisation for Economic Co-operation Development (OECD) has achieved over time, constructing contemporary society as we know it today, continually…

  5. Co-Operative Education: Challenges of Qualitative Research on Learning in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Peter; Munby, Hugh; Hutchinson, Nancy L.

    This paper is concerned with the challenges of qualitative research on workplace learning that occurs within co-operative (co-op) education. Co-op education is extensive in Canada, with an estimated 10% of the student population enrolled in co-op secondary education each year. The context for this study was a veterinary clinic in which four co-op…

  6. The Case of the Missing Organizations: Co-operatives and the Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Roderick

    2000-01-01

    States that co-operative (co-op) economics organizations are ignored in economic introductory textbooks in North America and provides evidence for this assertion. Addresses how to deal with this form of economic organization. Argues that asking who makes the decisions in firms and why, using co-ops as an example, raises important questions. (CMK)

  7. International Co-Operation in Control Engineering Education Using Online Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Jim; Schaedel, Herbert M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the international co-operation experience in teaching control engineering with laboratories being conducted remotely by students via the Internet. This paper describes how the students ran the experiments and their personal experiences with the laboratory. A tool for process identification and controller tuning based on…

  8. Environmental Engineering Education (E3) in the Gulf Co-Operation Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jassim, Majeed; Coskuner, Gulnur

    2007-01-01

    The six members of the Gulf Co-operation Countries (GCC)--Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates--are facing enormous environmental challenges associated with rapid urbanisation and industrialisation, especially in the last three decades, due to its role as a global hydrocarbon energy centre. None of these…

  9. From competition to co-operation: new economic relationships in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Goddard, M; Mannion, R

    1998-03-01

    The Labour government has outlined its plans to 'replace' the competitive internal market with a more collaborative system based on partnership. Agreement amongst purchasers and providers is to be based on co-operation rather than competition. Longer term agreements covering periods of 3-5 years are to replace annual contracts within this new environment. The aim of this paper is to explore the potential economic implications of these policy changes by drawing on the economics of co-operation and the transaction costs approach to longer term contracting. Issues surrounding the role of trust in contractual relationships are explored and the relevance of experience and evidence from non-health care sectors is considered in the context of the NHS. It is concluded that both theory and empirical evidence suggest that co-operation and trust can play a central role in the efficient organisation of contractual arrangements in circumstances similar to those under which the NHS operates. However, we warn against the expectation that the policy changes will produce automatically the scale of benefits predicted by the Labour government, especially as they will have to find a way of extracting reasonable performance from providers under a system of collaboration and long term agreements. They may find they need to tread a fine line between competition and co-operation in order to reap the benefits of both. PMID:9565167

  10. Effects of a Co-operative Learning Strategy on Ninth-Graders' Understanding of Human Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soyibo, Kola; Evans, Hermel G.

    2002-01-01

    Looks at the effect of teaching strategies on a group's attitude toward biology and understanding human nutrition. Used an experimental group that participated in co-operative learning and a control group taught using the lecture method. Involves ninth graders (n=156) from two high schools in Jamaica. (Author/YDS)

  11. Gestalt Revisited: Spin-Offs and Assessment in International University Co-Operation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denman, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    International university co-operation is in a constant state of metamorphosis. Its future rests upon extraneous forces such as globalization and internationalization and also upon those who make policy decisions. Many international university organizations are auditing their programs and initiatives to such a degree that the cost effectiveness of…

  12. Some "Get It" More than Others: Cultivating a Co-Operative Ethos in Uncertain Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidge, Gail

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to explore the dilemmas that schools and their members encounter whilst striving to establish a co-operative culture within an educational landscape contoured by decades of neo-liberal policy "reform". In order to (re)consider the construction of democratic subjectivity within contemporary educational discourse, the…

  13. Research on Sino-Australia Co-operative Program Teaching Management Pattern and Implementation Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Dong

    2008-01-01

    With the rapid development of Chinese economy and education, deepening reform and open-up policy, more and more co-operative education programs are established in China. Among them, some programs are just copies of Western style or pattern, which has no Chinese characteristics. This article elaborates on the Sino-Australia program offered at…

  14. Organized network for supporting the amateur-scientist co-operation in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, V.; Haukka, H.; Oksanen, A.; Hentunen, V.-P.

    2014-04-01

    PROAM network is a working group of Ursa Astronomical Association [1] for supporting Finnish amateur astronomers participating to co-operation projects between professional and amateur astronomers. The network relays the information on projects, maintains professional contacts and arranges training on technical skills for research work.

  15. Accelerometer's position independent physical activity recognition system for long-term activity monitoring in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Khan, Adil Mehmood; Lee, Young-Koo; Lee, Sungyoung; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2010-12-01

    Mobility is a good indicator of health status and thus objective mobility data could be used to assess the health status of elderly patients. Accelerometry has emerged as an effective means for long-term physical activity monitoring in the elderly. However, the output of an accelerometer varies at different positions on a subject's body, even for the same activity, resulting in high within-class variance. Existing accelerometer-based activity recognition systems thus require firm attachment of the sensor to a subject's body. This requirement makes them impractical for long-term activity monitoring during unsupervised free-living as it forces subjects into a fixed life pattern and impede their daily activities. Therefore, we introduce a novel single-triaxial-accelerometer-based activity recognition system that reduces the high within-class variance significantly and allows subjects to carry the sensor freely in any pocket without its firm attachment. We validated our system using seven activities: resting (lying/sitting/standing), walking, walking-upstairs, walking-downstairs, running, cycling, and vacuuming, recorded from five positions: chest pocket, front left trousers pocket, front right trousers pocket, rear trousers pocket, and inner jacket pocket. Its simplicity, ability to perform activities unimpeded, and an average recognition accuracy of 94% make our system a practical solution for continuous long-term activity monitoring in the elderly.

  16. Position paper - peer review and design verification of selected activities

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, M.D.

    1994-09-01

    Position Paper to develop and document a position on the performance of independent peer reviews on selected design and analysis components of the Title I (preliminary) and Title II (detailed) design phases of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility project.

  17. Active Healthy Kids Canada's Position on Active Video Games for Children and Youth.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Leblanc, Allana G; McFarlane, Allison; Colley, Rachel C; Thivel, David; Biddle, Stuart Jh; Maddison, Ralph; Leatherdale, Scott T; Tremblay, Mark S

    2013-12-01

    The effect of active video games (AVGs) on acute energy expenditure has previously been reported; however, the influence of AVGs on other health-related lifestyle indicators remains unclear. To address this knowledge gap, Active Healthy Kids Canada (AHKC) convened an international group of researchers to conduct a systematic review to understand whether AVGs should be promoted to increase physical activity and improve health indicators in children and youth (zero to 17 years of age). The present article outlines the process and outcomes of the development of the AHKC's position on active video games for children and youth. In light of the available evidence, AHKC does not recommend AVGs as a strategy to help children be more physically active. However, AVGs may exchange some sedentary time for light- to moderate-intensity physical activity, and there may be specific situations in which AVGs provide benefit (eg, motor skill development in special populations and rehabilitation).

  18. Microprocessor, Setx, Xrn2, and Rrp6 co-operate to induce premature termination of transcription by RNAPII.

    PubMed

    Wagschal, Alexandre; Rousset, Emilie; Basavarajaiah, Poornima; Contreras, Xavier; Harwig, Alex; Laurent-Chabalier, Sabine; Nakamura, Mirai; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Ke; Meziane, Oussama; Boyer, Frédéric; Parrinello, Hugues; Berkhout, Ben; Terzian, Christophe; Benkirane, Monsef; Kiernan, Rosemary

    2012-09-14

    Transcription elongation is increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of gene regulation. Here, we show that microprocessor controls gene expression in an RNAi-independent manner. Microprocessor orchestrates the recruitment of termination factors Setx and Xrn2, and the 3'-5' exoribonuclease, Rrp6, to initiate RNAPII pausing and premature termination at the HIV-1 promoter through cleavage of the stem-loop RNA, TAR. Rrp6 further processes the cleavage product, which generates a small RNA that is required to mediate potent transcriptional repression and chromatin remodeling at the HIV-1 promoter. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq), we identified cellular gene targets whose transcription is modulated by microprocessor. Our study reveals RNAPII pausing and premature termination mediated by the co-operative activity of ribonucleases, Drosha/Dgcr8, Xrn2, and Rrp6, as a regulatory mechanism of RNAPII-dependent transcription elongation.

  19. Power corrupts co-operation: cognitive and motivational effects in a double EEG paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kanso, Riam; Hewstone, Miles; Hawkins, Erin; Waszczuk, Monika; Nobre, Anna Christina

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of interpersonal power on co-operative performance. We used a paired electro-encephalogram paradigm: pairs of participants performed an attention task, followed by feedback indicating monetary loss or gain on every trial. Participants were randomly allocated to the power-holder, subordinate or neutral group by creating different levels of control over how a joint monetary reward would be allocated. We found that power was associated with reduced behavioural accuracy. Event-related potential analysis showed that power-holders devoted less motivational resources to their targets than did subordinates or neutrals, but did not differ at the level of early conflict detection. Their feedback potential results showed a greater expectation of rewards but reduced subjective magnitude attributed to losses. Subordinates, on the other hand, were asymmetrically sensitive to power-holders' targets. They expected fewer rewards, but attributed greater significance to losses. Our study shows that power corrupts balanced co-operation with subordinates.

  20. Positive Youth Development through Physical Activity: Opportunities for Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As physical educators continue to advocate for school-based PE, they should also consider ways to extend their work into community settings in an effort to ensure that all kids have an opportunity to develop physical literacy. This article describes how positive youth development programs can provide an opportunity for physical educators to engage…

  1. Collecting "Total" Vocational Education and Training Activity. Position Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In this position paper, NCVER's Managing Director, Dr Tom Karmel, argues that the submission of vocational education and training student data should be mandated as a condition of registration for all registered training organisations, including private providers. This will ensure a comprehensive data collection that gives a realistic view of…

  2. dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins and regulates expression at divergently paired genes

    PubMed Central

    Korenjak, Michael; Kwon, Eunjeong; Morris, Robert T.; Anderssen, Endre; Amzallag, Arnaud; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    dREAM complexes represent the predominant form of E2F/RBF repressor complexes in Drosophila. dREAM associates with thousands of sites in the fly genome but its mechanism of action is unknown. To understand the genomic context in which dREAM acts we examined the distribution and localization of Drosophila E2F and dREAM proteins. Here we report a striking and unexpected overlap between dE2F2/dREAM sites and binding sites for the insulator-binding proteins CP190 and Beaf-32. Genetic assays show that these components functionally co-operate and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on mutant animals demonstrate that dE2F2 is important for association of CP190 with chromatin. dE2F2/dREAM binding sites are enriched at divergently transcribed genes, and the majority of genes upregulated by dE2F2 depletion represent the repressed half of a differentially expressed, divergently transcribed pair of genes. Analysis of mutant animals confirms that dREAM and CP190 are similarly required for transcriptional integrity at these gene pairs and suggest that dREAM functions in concert with CP190 to establish boundaries between repressed/activated genes. Consistent with the idea that dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins, genomic regions bound by dREAM possess enhancer-blocking activity that depends on multiple dREAM components. These findings suggest that dREAM functions in the organization of transcriptional domains. PMID:25053843

  3. Positive feedback of protein kinase C proteolytic activation during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Leverrier, Sabrina; Vallentin, Alice; Joubert, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and PKCepsilon, which are better known for promoting cell survival, PKCdelta is known for its pro-apoptotic function, which is exerted mainly through a caspase-3-dependent proteolytic activation pathway. In the present study, we used the rat GH3B6 pituitary adenoma cell line to show that PKCalpha and PKCepsilon are activated and relocalized together with PKCdelta when apoptosis is induced by a genotoxic stress. Proteolytic activation is a crucial step used by the three isoforms since: (1) the catalytic domains of the PKCalpha, PKCepsilon or PKCdelta isoforms (CDalpha, CDepsilon and CDdelta respectively) accumulated, and this accumulation was dependent on the activity of both calpain and caspase; and (2) transient expression of CDalpha, CDepsilon or CDdelta sufficed to induce apoptosis. However, following this initial step of proteolytic activation, the pathways diverge; cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation are induced by CDepsilon and CDdelta, but not by CDalpha. Another interesting finding of the present study is the proteolysis of PKCdelta induced by CDepsilon expression that revealed the existence of a cross-talk between PKC isoforms during apoptosis. Hence the PKC family may participate in the apoptotic process of pituitary adenoma cells at two levels: downstream of caspase and calpain, and via retro-activation of caspase-3, resulting in the amplification of its own proteolytic activation. PMID:12238950

  4. Co-operative versus independent transport of different cargoes by Kinesin-1.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Jennetta W; Griffin, Kelly; Jih, Gloria T; Stuckey, Jeanne; Verhey, Kristen J

    2008-05-01

    Kinesin motors drive the intracellular transport of multiple cargoes along microtubule tracks; yet, how kinesins discriminate among their many potential cargoes is unknown. We tested whether Kinesin-1 cargoes compete, co-operate or are transported independently of each other. We focused on Kinesin-1 cargoes that bind directly to the kinesin light chain (KLC) subunit, namely the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase-interacting proteins (JIPs) 1 and 3, Kidins220/ARMS and PAT1. Overexpression of individual cargo proteins in differentiated CAD cells resulted in mislocalization of the endogenous protein but had no effect on localization of other cargo proteins to neurite tips. Thus, while transport of distinct cargoes is saturable, they do not compete with each other. Interestingly, we found that low expression of JIP1 or JIP3 enhanced the transport of the other JIP to neurite tips. Moreover, JIP1 and JIP3 require each other for transport. Co-operative transport is due to an interaction between JIP1 and JIP3 as well as distinct binding sites on the KLC tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) bundle: the TPR groove binds to C-terminal residues of JIP1, whereas the TPR surface binds to internal residues in JIP3. Formation of a JIP1/JIP3/KLC complex is necessary for efficient JIP1 or JIP3 transport in neuronal cells. Thus, JIP scaffolding proteins are transported in a co-operative manner, despite the independent transport of other Kinesin-1 cargoes.

  5. Position paper on active countermeasures for computer networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Randwyk, Jamie A.

    2003-07-01

    Computer security professionals have used passive network countermeasures for several years in order to secure computer networks. Passive countermeasures such as firewalls and intrusion detection systems are effective but their use alone is not enough to protect a network. Active countermeasures offer new ways of protecting a computer network. Corporations and government entities should adopt active network countermeasures as a means of protecting their computer networks.

  6. Positive and negative reinforcement activate human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Weis, Tina; Puschmann, Sebastian; Brechmann, André; Thiel, Christiane M

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies suggest that reward modulates neural activity in sensory cortices, but less is known about punishment. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and an auditory discrimination task, where participants had to judge the duration of frequency modulated tones. In one session correct performance resulted in financial gains at the end of the trial, in a second session incorrect performance resulted in financial loss. Incorrect performance in the rewarded as well as correct performance in the punishment condition resulted in a neutral outcome. The size of gains and losses was either low or high (10 or 50 Euro cent) depending on the direction of frequency modulation. We analyzed neural activity at the end of the trial, during reinforcement, and found increased neural activity in auditory cortex when gaining a financial reward as compared to gaining no reward and when avoiding financial loss as compared to receiving a financial loss. This was independent on the size of gains and losses. A similar pattern of neural activity for both gaining a reward and avoiding a loss was also seen in right middle temporal gyrus, bilateral insula and pre-supplemental motor area, here however neural activity was lower after correct responses compared to incorrect responses. To summarize, this study shows that the activation of sensory cortices, as previously shown for gaining a reward is also seen during avoiding a loss.

  7. Detection system ensures positive alarm activation in digital message loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokros, P.; Burstein, A.; Hewitt, E. D.

    1966-01-01

    Lost Word Detection System /LOWDS/ provides special identification for each error detection message transmitted from receiver to transmitter. The message is identified as an original message or an n-times retransmitted message so the receiver can detect where a retransmission request was not fulfilled and activate an alarm.

  8. Electromyographic Study of Neck Muscle Activity According to Head Position in Rugby Tackles

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Koji; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Fukuhara, Takashi; Kato, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined differences in neck muscle activity in two different head positions during tackles with the aim of contributing to the prevention of sports injuries. [Subjects] The subjects were 28 male high-school rugby players. [Methods] Two tackle positions were considered: a head-up position and a head-down position. Muscle activities of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and the upper, middle, and lower parts of the trapezius muscles were measured. [Results] Muscle activities of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and the right upper trapezius muscle were significantly increased in the head-up position, and the activity of the lower trapezius was significantly increased in the head-down position. [Conclusion] Tackling with the head-up position increases neck muscle activity and stability of the head and the neck. PMID:24259802

  9. GITR Activation Positively Regulates Immune Responses against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Frederico R. C.; Mota, Caroline M.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Silva, Murilo V.; Ferreira, Marcela D.; Fonseca, Denise M.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite responsible for causing clinical diseases especially in pregnant and immunosuppressed individuals. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor (GITR), which is also known as TNFRS18 and belongs to the TNF receptor superfamily, is found to be expressed in various cell types of the immune system and provides an important costimulatory signal for T cells and myeloid cells. However, the precise role of this receptor in the context of T. gondii infection remains elusive. Therefore, the current study investigated the role of GITR activation in the immunoregulation mechanisms induced during the experimental infection of mice with T. gondii. Our data show that T. gondii infection slightly upregulates GITR expression in Treg cells and B cells, but the most robust increment in expression was observed in macrophages and dendritic cells. Interestingly, mice infected and treated with an agonistic antibody anti-GITR (DTA-1) presented a robust increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production at preferential sites of parasite replication, which was associated with the decrease in latent brain parasitism of mice under treatment with DTA-1. Several in vivo and in vitro analysis were performed to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in GITR activation upon infection, however no clear alterations were detected in the phenotype/function of macrophages, Tregs and B cells under treatment with DTA-1. Therefore, GITR appears as a potential target for intervention during infection by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, even though further studies are still necessary to better characterize the immune response triggered by GITR activation during T. gondii infection. PMID:27027302

  10. Real-Time GNSS Positioning Along Canada's Active Coastal Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henton, J. A.; Dragert, H.; Lu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    High-rate, low-latency Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data are being refined for real-time applications to monitor and report motions related to large earthquakes in coastal British Columbia. Given the tectonic setting of Canada's west coast, specific goals for real-time regional geodetic monitoring are: (1) the collection of GNSS data with adequate station density to identify the deformation field for regional earthquakes with M>7.3; (2) the robust, continuous real-time analyses of GNSS data with a precision of 1-2 cm and a latency of less than 10s; and (3) the display of results with attending automated alarms and estimations of earthquake parameters. Megathrust earthquakes (M>8) are the primary targets for immediate identification, since the tsunamis they generate will strike the coast within 15 to 20 min. However, large (6.0positioning streams for regional sites received from the Canadian Geodetic Survey (CGS), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The comparison of these various real-time solutions allows a realistic evaluation of day-to-day software performance especially when faced with adverse conditions such as data gaps or poor satellite geometry. Forward models for scenario earthquakes in this region are used to "fingerprint" the coseismic displacements expected from various offshore events which allows an evaluation of the effectiveness of the current regional coverage. The present distribution and density of real-time sites is largely sufficient for aiding the timely estimation of size, location

  11. Novel positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors with anesthetic activity

    PubMed Central

    Maldifassi, Maria C.; Baur, Roland; Pierce, David; Nourmahnad, Anahita; Forman, Stuart A.; Sigel, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    GABAA receptors are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are targets for numerous clinically important drugs such as benzodiazepines, anxiolytics and anesthetics. We previously identified novel ligands of the classical benzodiazepine binding pocket in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors using an experiment-guided virtual screening (EGVS) method. This screen also identified novel ligands for intramembrane low affinity diazepam site(s). In the current study we have further characterized compounds 31 and 132 identified with EGVS as well as 4-O-methylhonokiol. We investigated the site of action of these compounds in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using voltage-clamp electrophysiology combined with a benzodiazepine site antagonist and transmembrane domain mutations. All three compounds act mainly through the two β+/α− subunit transmembrane interfaces of the GABAA receptors. We then used concatenated receptors to dissect the involvement of individual β+/α− interfaces. We further demonstrated that these compounds have anesthetic activity in a small aquatic animal model, Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The newly identified compounds may serve as scaffolds for the development of novel anesthetics. PMID:27198062

  12. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were made with the hip joint in each of 3 positions: (1) a neutral hip joint position, (2) an abduction hip joint position, and (3) an abduction with external rotation hip joint position. [Results] Gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. Gluteus maximus activity was also significantly higher in the abduction hip joint position than in the neutral hip joint position. Hamstring activity was significantly lower when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise selectively activates the gluteus maximus. PMID:25540492

  13. Co-operative and Hierarchical Binding of c-FLIP and Caspase-8: A Unified Model Defines How c-FLIP Isoforms Differentially Control Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michelle A; Powley, Ian R; Jukes-Jones, Rebekah; Horn, Sebastian; Feoktistova, Maria; Fairall, Louise; Schwabe, John W R; Leverkus, Martin; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion

    2016-03-17

    The death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) initiates death receptor-induced apoptosis. DISC assembly and activation are controlled by c-FLIP isoforms, which function as pro-apoptotic (c-FLIPL only) or anti-apoptotic (c-FLIPL/c-FLIPS) regulators of procaspase-8 activation. Current models assume that c-FLIP directly competes with procaspase-8 for recruitment to FADD. Using a functional reconstituted DISC, structure-guided mutagenesis, and quantitative LC-MS/MS, we show that c-FLIPL/S binding to the DISC is instead a co-operative procaspase-8-dependent process. FADD initially recruits procaspase-8, which in turn recruits and heterodimerizes with c-FLIPL/S via a hierarchical binding mechanism. Procaspase-8 activation is regulated by the ratio of unbound c-FLIPL/S to procaspase-8, which determines composition of the procaspase-8:c-FLIPL/S heterodimer. Thus, procaspase-8:c-FLIPL exhibits localized enzymatic activity and is preferentially an activator, promoting DED-mediated procaspase-8 oligomer assembly, whereas procaspase-8:c-FLIPS lacks activity and potently blocks procaspase-8 activation. This co-operative hierarchical binding model explains the dual role of c-FLIPL and crucially defines how c-FLIP isoforms differentially control cell fate.

  14. Co-operation and conflict in a hospital: interprofessional differences in perception and management of conflicts.

    PubMed

    Skjørshammer, M

    2001-02-01

    This article presents a case study of a Norwegian hospital, analysing how health professionals manage conflicts related to work co-operation. Altogether, 29 health professionals working in the hospital were interviewed, and data was analysed according to a grounded theory approach. When in conflict, health professionals seem to use three major approaches to handling the situation: avoidance, forcing and negotiation, and usually in that order. Avoidance behaviour or suppression is the most common reaction to an emerging conflict. If the use of power does not re-establish a balance between the participants, one negotiates. These conflict styles seem to be determined by two major factors: the perceived interdependence between parties and the perceived urgency of doing something about the situation. Nurses and physicians in particular seem to differ considerably in their perception of what is a conflict and when to do something about it. Such differences in perceptions and the extensive use of avoidance represent important challenges to managers and clinical leaders when it comes to advancing interprofessional co-operation.

  15. Power corrupts co-operation: cognitive and motivational effects in a double EEG paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kanso, Riam; Hewstone, Miles; Hawkins, Erin; Waszczuk, Monika; Nobre, Anna Christina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of interpersonal power on co-operative performance. We used a paired electro-encephalogram paradigm: pairs of participants performed an attention task, followed by feedback indicating monetary loss or gain on every trial. Participants were randomly allocated to the power-holder, subordinate or neutral group by creating different levels of control over how a joint monetary reward would be allocated. We found that power was associated with reduced behavioural accuracy. Event-related potential analysis showed that power-holders devoted less motivational resources to their targets than did subordinates or neutrals, but did not differ at the level of early conflict detection. Their feedback potential results showed a greater expectation of rewards but reduced subjective magnitude attributed to losses. Subordinates, on the other hand, were asymmetrically sensitive to power-holders’ targets. They expected fewer rewards, but attributed greater significance to losses. Our study shows that power corrupts balanced co-operation with subordinates. PMID:23160813

  16. Educational Co-operation in Asia and the Pacific: 30 Years of NIER's Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Ryo, Ed.; Numano, Taro, Ed.; Nagata, Yoshiyuki, Ed.

    The history of the regional cooperation program of the National Institute for Educational Research (NIER) is recorded in this document. Specifically, the report outlines the past 30 years of the program in Asia and the Pacific. Throughout those years, 93 seminars, workshops, and symposia have been organized. In addition, information about the…

  17. Australian Adolescents' Extracurricular Activity Participation and Positive Development: Is the Relationship Mediated by Peer Attributes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomfield, Corey; Barber, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent participation in extracurricular activities is associated with numerous positive outcomes, yet the mechanisms underlying this relationship are largely unknown. This study had two goals: to investigate the association between participation in extracurricular activities and indicators of positive and negative development for Australian…

  18. Interactions between sleeping position and feeding on cardiorespiratory activity in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Fifer, William P; Myers, Michael M; Sahni, Rakesh; Ohira-Kist, Kiyoko; Kashyap, Sudha; Stark, Raymond I; Schulze, Karl F

    2005-11-01

    Infants sleeping in the prone position are at greater risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Sleep position-dependent changes in cardiorespiratory activity may contribute to this increased risk. Cardiorespiratory activity is also affected by feeding. Twenty prematurely-born infants were studied at 31-36 weeks postconceptional age while sleeping in the prone and supine positions. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and patterns of variability were recorded during interfeed intervals, and effects of position and time after feeding were analyzed by repeated measures analyses of variance. There were significant effects of both sleeping position and time after feeding. Heart rate is higher and heart period variability is lower in the prone position, and the effects of sleeping position on cardiac functioning are more pronounced during the middle of the intrafeed interval. In preterm infants, autonomic responses to nutrient processing modulate the cardiorespiratory effects of sleeping position. Prone sleeping risk may vary with time after feeding. PMID:16252285

  19. Effect of seat positions on discomfort, muscle activation, pressure distribution and pedal force during cycling.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rachita; Hansen, Ernst A; de Zee, Mark; Madeleine, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and analyse discomfort and biomechanics of cycling, i.e., muscle activation, centre of pressure of seat pressure profiles and pedal forces as a function of seat position. Twenty-one recreationally active individuals cycled for 10min at 100W on an ergometer cycle using five different seat positions. The neutral position was considered as basic seat position and was compared with upward, downward, forward and backward seat positions. The initial bout was repeated at the end of the recording session. Discomfort increased for upward and backward condition compared with neutral (P<0.05). Normalized surface electromyography from gastrocnemius decreased in the downward and forward position but increased in the upward and backward position. The minimum force became less negative for forward position compared with neutral seat position (P<0.05). The degree of variability of centre of pressure increased in the upward and backward position and the entropy of the centre of pressure of sitting posture for backward position decreased compared with neutral seat position (P<0.05). The present study revealed that consecutive changes of seat position over time lead to increase in discomfort as well as alterations of the biomechanics of cycling. PMID:26938676

  20. International co-operation through the Interpol system to counter illicit drug trafficking.

    PubMed

    Leamy, W J

    1983-01-01

    The International Criminal Police Organization (ICPO/Interpol), whose main aim is the prevention and suppression of ordinary crime, has 135 member countries. The Government of each of these countries has designated an Interpol National Central Bureau to co-operate and liaise within the framework of Interpol. The Drugs Sub-Division of Interpol's General Secretariat monitors and responds to incoming communications on drug enforcement matters, conducts intelligence analysis of information and produces tactical and strategic intelligence reports as well as statistical and other specialized reports. It received 33,181 and dispatched 6,741 drug-enforcement-related communications in 1982, which was over 60 per cent of the entire communications of the General Secretariat. The Drugs Sub-Division participates in drug training and drug strategy seminars world-wide. Interpol also carries out drug liaison officer programmes in five regions of the world.

  1. Co-operation with eastern European countries taking ENAC as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.

    1994-12-31

    In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, the European Community launched an ambitious programme of nuclear safety assistance. The purpose of this programme is to improve the safety of the Nuclear Power stations in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union plants. It was felt in the Western European nuclear industry that the emphasis should be on finding practical solutions to improve the most urgent problems. To achieve this objective, the nuclear industry in Western Europe founded a consortium called ENAC (European Nuclear Assistance Consortium) comprising companies form seven European countries (Great Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Belgium, Italy, Netherlands). The co-operation between these companies and the Russian designers would ensure that the solutions developed meet the approval of all interested parties.

  2. WHO Co-operative studies on a simple culture technique for the isolation of mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Šula, Ladislav

    1963-01-01

    Tuberculosis surveys are in progress in many countries that do not have adequate laboratory facilities for carrying out complicated bacteriological procedures. As part of a WHO co-operative research programme, studies have been undertaken with a view to developing a simple culture technique for the isolation of mycobacteria that does not require elaborate equipment. This paper is the first report on these co-operative studies. Storage and transport are known to affect adversely the viability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pathological specimens, thus giving rise to poor culture results and indicating the advisability of culturing such specimens on the spot. The preparation of the efficient and widely used Löwenstein-Jensen (L-J) culture medium, however, requires materials and facilities that are not easy available in developing countries. In an attempt to overcome this difficulty, the Tuberculosis Research Institute in Prague has developed a semi-synthetic liquid medium that can be prepared in bulk, concentrated and lyophilized, and sent even to distant laboratories. The present paper describes in detail the preparation of this lyophilized medium, which can be stored at room temperature for at least 6-12 months and is easy to reconstitute, and discusses the growth characteristics of mycobacteria multiplied in it. Experience in Czechoslovakia, where between 1953 and 1962 nearly 21 million cultures have been made with the medium, has shown that it is quite satisfactory and even slightly superior to L-J medium in certain respects. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 & 4FIG. 9FIG. 10FIG. 11FIG. 12FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 13FIG. 14FIG. 15FIG. 16 PMID:14102036

  3. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc- Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Trista L; He, Yan; Jackman, Nicole A; Lobner, Doug; Hewett, James A; Hewett, Sandra J

    2015-01-01

    The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc(-)) contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc(-) expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes--either cultured alone or with neurons--to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc(-) mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death.

  4. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc− Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Trista L.; He, Yan; Jackman, Nicole A.; Lobner, Doug; Hewett, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc−) contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc− expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes—either cultured alone or with neurons—to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc− mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death. PMID:26553727

  5. Site selection and characterization for historic low-level radioactive wastes in Ontario, Co-operative Siting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Paktunc, A.D.

    1993-12-31

    The Co-operative Siting Process is a non-confrontational way to site a low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) management facility in Ontario. The facility will be designed to accommodate approximately 880,000 m{sup 3} of LLRW. Four sets of general facility concepts, appropriate for the physical and chemical characteristics of the wastes and the general site conditions, are being considered. These include engineered mounds, shallow burial in trenches, burial in open pit with previous surround, and intermediate depth rock disposal concepts. The communities interested in offering a site are located in the Canadian Shield where the topography is dominated by rolling hills with reliefs of up to 50 meters and hydrogeological conditions are primarily controlled by fractures in the rock and by the types and distribution of glacial sediments. Climatic conditions can be classified as humid-continental. The objective of site characterization activity is to assess the suitability of potential sites for long-term containment of LLRW in the geosphere and their safe isolation from the biosphere. An initial phase involves exploratory studies designed to reduce larger areas to smaller areas and eventually to candidate sites. The second phase involves site-specific studies designed to maximize the changes of identifying more than one site for different facility requirements and complying with the regulatory requirements and performance expectations.

  6. Directed evolution of Tau class glutathione transferases reveals a site that regulates catalytic efficiency and masks co-operativity.

    PubMed

    Axarli, Irine; Muleta, Abdi W; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia; Kotzia, Georgia; Maltezos, Anastasios; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2016-03-01

    A library of Tau class GSTs (glutathione transferases) was constructed by DNA shuffling using the DNA encoding the Glycine max GSTs GmGSTU2-2, GmGSTU4-4 and GmGSTU10-10. The parental GSTs are >88% identical at the sequence level; however, their specificity varies towards different substrates. The DNA library contained chimaeric structures of alternated segments of the parental sequences and point mutations. Chimaeric GST sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli and their enzymatic activities towards CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and the herbicide fluorodifen (4-nitrophenyl α,α,α-trifluoro-2-nitro-p-tolyl ether) were determined. A chimaeric clone (Sh14) with enhanced CDNB- and fluorodifen-detoxifying activities, and unusual co-operative kinetics towards CDNB and fluorodifen, but not towards GSH, was identified. The structure of Sh14 was determined at 1.75 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution in complex with S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione. Analysis of the Sh14 structure showed that a W114C point mutation is responsible for the altered kinetic properties. This was confirmed by the kinetic properties of the Sh14 C114W mutant. It is suggested that the replacement of the bulky tryptophan residue by a smaller amino acid (cysteine) results in conformational changes of the active-site cavity, leading to enhanced catalytic activity of Sh14. Moreover, the structural changes allow the strengthening of the two salt bridges between Glu(66) and Lys(104) at the dimer interface that triggers an allosteric effect and the communication between the hydrophobic sites.

  7. [Immunosuppressive therapy in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic active hepatitis B?].

    PubMed

    Maier, K P; Lepiorz, H; Berthold, H; Gerok, W

    1982-08-01

    The course of HBsAg-positive chronic active hepatitis was followed in 36 patients who were treated by immunosuppression and in 45 controls by means of serial determinations of HBeAg titers and by repeated biopsies of the liver. In the treated group remission occurred in 52% (HBeAg negative) resp. 48% (HBeAg positive); in the control group these percentages were almost identical, that is to say 61% resp. 41%. During therapy 5 out of 9 HBeAg positive patients and 7 out of 12 HBeAg negative patients developed cirrhosis of the liver as compared to 5 resp. 10, and 2 resp. 12 patients in the control group. Judging from these results it seems unlikely, that the course of HBsAg positive, chronic-active hepatitis in patients, whose serum shows a positive HBeAg titer by immunodiffusion, might be influenced in a positive way by immunosuppressive therapy.

  8. Positive affect modulates activity in the visual cortex to images of high calorie foods.

    PubMed

    Killgore, William D S; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2007-05-01

    Activity within the visual cortex can be influenced by the emotional salience of a stimulus, but it is not clear whether such cortical activity is modulated by the affective status of the individual. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the relationship between affect ratings on the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and activity within the occipital cortex of 13 normal-weight women while viewing images of high calorie and low calorie foods. Regression analyses revealed that when participants viewed high calorie foods, Positive Affect correlated significantly with activity within the lingual gyrus and calcarine cortex, whereas Negative Affect was unrelated to visual cortex activity. In contrast, during presentations of low calorie foods, affect ratings, regardless of valence, were unrelated to occipital cortex activity. These findings suggest a mechanism whereby positive affective state may affect the early stages of sensory processing, possibly influencing subsequent perceptual experience of a stimulus. PMID:17464782

  9. Positivity effect in healthy aging in observational but not active feedback-learning.

    PubMed

    Bellebaum, Christian; Rustemeier, Martina; Daum, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of healthy aging on the bias to learn from positive or negative performance feedback in observational and active feedback learning. In active learning, a previous study had already shown a negative learning bias in healthy seniors older than 75 years, while no bias was found for younger seniors. However, healthy aging is accompanied by a 'positivity effect', a tendency to primarily attend to stimuli with positive valence. Based on recent findings of dissociable neural mechanisms in active and observational feedback learning, the positivity effect was hypothesized to influence older participants' observational feedback learning in particular. In two separate experiments, groups of young (mean age 27) and older participants (mean age 60 years) completed an observational or active learning task designed to differentially assess positive and negative learning. Older but not younger observational learners showed a significant bias to learn better from positive than negative feedback. In accordance with previous findings, no bias was found for active learning. This pattern of results is discussed in terms of differences in the neural underpinnings of active and observational learning from performance feedback.

  10. Extended amygdala and emotional salience: a PET activation study of positive and negative affect.

    PubMed

    Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan; Decker, Laura R; Taylor, Stephan F

    2003-04-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have implicated amygdaloid and basal forebrain regions, including sublenticular extended amygdala (SLEA), in the mediation of aversive emotional responses. However, it is not clear whether SLEA responds to 'aversiveness' or to general stimulus salience. We predicted that both pleasant and aversive stimuli would activate this region. Using [(15)O] water PET, we studied 10 healthy subjects while viewing pleasant, aversive, neutral, and blank images. Each subject underwent eight scans, which were processed and averaged with standard statistical methods. Both positive and negative stimuli activated regions in SLEA. Both positive and negative content activated the visual cortex, relative to neutral content. Aversive stimuli deactivated the left frontal pole, relative to positive and neutral stimuli. These findings demonstrate that both positive and negative emotional content evokes processing in the sublenticular/extended amygdala region, suggesting that this region is involved in general emotional processing, such as detection or attribution of salience.

  11. Situational motivation and perceived intensity: their interaction in predicting changes in positive affect from physical activity.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Eva; Fortier, Michelle S

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that affective experiences surrounding physical activity can contribute to the proper self-regulation of an active lifestyle. Motivation toward physical activity, as portrayed by self-determination theory, has been linked to positive affect, as has the intensity of physical activity, especially of a preferred nature. The purpose of this experimental study was to examine the interaction between situational motivation and intensity [i.e., ratings of perceived exertion (RPE)] in predicting changes in positive affect following an acute bout of preferred physical activity, namely, running. Fourty-one female runners engaged in a 30-minute self-paced treadmill run in a laboratory context. Situational motivation for running, pre- and post-running positive affect, and RPE were assessed via validated self-report questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect between RPE and introjection (P < .05) but not between RPE and identified regulation or intrinsic motivation. At low levels of introjection, the influence of RPE on the change in positive affect was considerable, with higher RPE ratings being associated with greater increases in positive affect. The implications of the findings in light of SDT principles as well as the potential contingencies between the regulations and RPE in predicting positive affect among women are discussed.

  12. Situational Motivation and Perceived Intensity: Their Interaction in Predicting Changes in Positive Affect from Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Eva; Fortier, Michelle S.

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that affective experiences surrounding physical activity can contribute to the proper self-regulation of an active lifestyle. Motivation toward physical activity, as portrayed by self-determination theory, has been linked to positive affect, as has the intensity of physical activity, especially of a preferred nature. The purpose of this experimental study was to examine the interaction between situational motivation and intensity [i.e., ratings of perceived exertion (RPE)] in predicting changes in positive affect following an acute bout of preferred physical activity, namely, running. Fourty-one female runners engaged in a 30-minute self-paced treadmill run in a laboratory context. Situational motivation for running, pre- and post-running positive affect, and RPE were assessed via validated self-report questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect between RPE and introjection (P < .05) but not between RPE and identified regulation or intrinsic motivation. At low levels of introjection, the influence of RPE on the change in positive affect was considerable, with higher RPE ratings being associated with greater increases in positive affect. The implications of the findings in light of SDT principles as well as the potential contingencies between the regulations and RPE in predicting positive affect among women are discussed. PMID:22778914

  13. Age independent and position-dependent alterations in motor unit activity of the biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Harwood, B; Edwards, D L; Jakobi, J M

    2010-09-01

    In the biceps brachii, age-related differences in synaptic excitability and muscle architecture may affect motor unit (MU) activity differently depending on the position of the forearm. It was hypothesised that as a result of these age-related differences, greater changes in MU activity would accompany a change in forearm position in old when compared with young men. Six young (22 +/- 3 years) and six old (84 +/- 3 years) men maintained isometric elbow flexion at 10% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) during changes in forearm position. Forty-nine MUs in the short (SBB) and long (LBB) heads of the biceps brachii were followed. Motor unit recruitment and de-recruitment thresholds, motor unit discharge rates (MUDRs), and MU discharge variability were measured. Although an age-related decrease in MU recruitment thresholds, and increase in MU discharge variability was evident, changes in forearm position influenced MUDRs similarly in young and old men (P = 0.27). Motor unit recruitment thresholds of the SBB were highest in the pronated position (8.2 +/- 2.9 %MVC), whereas in the LBB they were highest in the supinated position (8.6 +/- 2.0 %MVC). Motor unit discharge rates of the LBB did not change with forearm position. In the SBB, MUDRs were highest when the forearm was supinated, and also greater when compared with the LBB in this position. No position-dependent changes were observed for MU discharge variability in the LBB, but the SBB exhibited greatest MU discharge variability in the pronated position. The results suggest that MU activity is modulated following a change in forearm position, but the response is similar in young and old adults.

  14. Excerpts from "Position Statement on Physical Fitness and Activity in the Context of Leisure Education."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruskin, Hilleil

    2002-01-01

    Presents a position statement designed to inform governments, non-governmental organizations, and education institutions about the significance and benefits of physical activity for all and establish a clear relationship between physical activity and leisure education. The statement includes specific recommendations for leisure education and…

  15. Physical Activity and Psychological Benefits. International Society of Sport Psychology Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1992

    1992-01-01

    International Society of Sport Psychology clarifies the psychological benefits of physical activity, noting the positive relationship between physical activity level and mental health. Exercise can reduce anxiety, decrease depression levels, reduce neuroticism and anxiety, reduce stress, and have beneficial emotional effects for both sexes across…

  16. Positive Behavior Interventions and Support in a Physical Activity Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Vanessa; Buchanan, Alice M.

    2015-01-01

    This purpose of this study was to investigate the implementation of positive behavior interventions and support (PBIS) in a summer camp. The camp provided physical activity opportunities to underserved children attending a summer program at a local, rural public school. Certified physical education teachers led activity stations. Participants in…

  17. Alignment of Hands-On STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in…

  18. Concentrating on Solar Power in a Trans-Mediterranean Renewable Energy Co-Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieb, F.; Kronshage, S.; Knies, G.

    2004-12-01

    Combining the large demand of clean electricity in Europe (EU) with the large potential of solar electricity generation from concentrating solar power stations (CSP) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) can provide both climate protection and development for both regions and lead to environmental, economical and social sustainability. The presentation will address the concept of solar cogeneration of electricity and desalted water and the scope of generating clean power for MENA and Europe while providing large quantities of freshwater for the MENA countries. Costs and benefits of the concept will be quantified, and the first steps to realisation within the Trans-Mediterranean Renewable Energy Co-Operation TREC are presented. After running through the technology learning curve within about 10-15 years, concentrated solar electricity will be generated at a cost of roughly 4 ct/kWh. Importing solar power from North Africa to Europe, will add 1 ct/kWh, thus being competitive with new fuel fired plants. The total initial support of about 1 billion € needed to trigger CSP market introduction and to achieve forever low electricity costs in the EU and MENA, equals 25 % of the German annual coal subsidies, 1 month of EU agronomic-subsidies or 1 day of US military expenses and could be provided in form of public investment, soft loans or feed-in guaranties like the German Renewable Energy Act.

  19. Adaptability and Prediction of Anticipatory Muscular Activity Parameters to Different Movements in the Sitting Position.

    PubMed

    Chikh, Soufien; Watelain, Eric; Faupin, Arnaud; Pinti, Antonio; Jarraya, Mohamed; Garnier, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Voluntary movement often causes postural perturbation that requires an anticipatory postural adjustment to minimize perturbation and increase the efficiency and coordination during execution. This systematic review focuses specifically on the relationship between the parameters of anticipatory muscular activities and movement finality in sitting position among adults, to study the adaptability and predictability of anticipatory muscular activities parameters to different movements and conditions in sitting position in adults. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Springer-Link, Engineering Village, and EbscoHost. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to retain the most rigorous and specific studies, yielding 76 articles, Seventeen articles were excluded at first reading, and after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 23 were retained. In a sitting position, central nervous system activity precedes movement by diverse anticipatory muscular activities and shows the ability to adapt anticipatory muscular activity parameters to the movement direction, postural stability, or charge weight. In addition, these parameters could be adapted to the speed of execution, as found for the standing position. Parameters of anticipatory muscular activities (duration, order, and amplitude of muscle contractions constituting the anticipatory muscular activity) could be used as a predictive indicator of forthcoming movement. In addition, this systematic review may improve methodology in empirical studies and assistive technology for people with disabilities. PMID:27440765

  20. Dissociation between active and observational learning from positive and negative feedback in Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Kobza, Stefan; Ferrea, Stefano; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina; Südmeyer, Martin; Bellebaum, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Feedback to both actively performed and observed behaviour allows adaptation of future actions. Positive feedback leads to increased activity of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, whereas dopamine neuron activity is decreased following negative feedback. Dopamine level reduction in unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients has been shown to lead to a negative learning bias, i.e. enhanced learning from negative feedback. Recent findings suggest that the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from feedback might differ, with the striatum playing a less prominent role in observational learning. Therefore, it was hypothesized that unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients would show a negative learning bias only in active but not in observational learning. In a between-group design, 19 Parkinson's Disease patients and 40 healthy controls engaged in either an active or an observational probabilistic feedback-learning task. For both tasks, transfer phases aimed to assess the bias to learn better from positive or negative feedback. As expected, actively learning patients showed a negative learning bias, whereas controls learned better from positive feedback. In contrast, no difference between patients and controls emerged for observational learning, with both groups showing better learning from positive feedback. These findings add to neural models of reinforcement-learning by suggesting that dopamine-modulated input to the striatum plays a minor role in observational learning from feedback. Future research will have to elucidate the specific neural underpinnings of observational learning.

  1. Adaptability and Prediction of Anticipatory Muscular Activity Parameters to Different Movements in the Sitting Position.

    PubMed

    Chikh, Soufien; Watelain, Eric; Faupin, Arnaud; Pinti, Antonio; Jarraya, Mohamed; Garnier, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Voluntary movement often causes postural perturbation that requires an anticipatory postural adjustment to minimize perturbation and increase the efficiency and coordination during execution. This systematic review focuses specifically on the relationship between the parameters of anticipatory muscular activities and movement finality in sitting position among adults, to study the adaptability and predictability of anticipatory muscular activities parameters to different movements and conditions in sitting position in adults. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Springer-Link, Engineering Village, and EbscoHost. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to retain the most rigorous and specific studies, yielding 76 articles, Seventeen articles were excluded at first reading, and after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 23 were retained. In a sitting position, central nervous system activity precedes movement by diverse anticipatory muscular activities and shows the ability to adapt anticipatory muscular activity parameters to the movement direction, postural stability, or charge weight. In addition, these parameters could be adapted to the speed of execution, as found for the standing position. Parameters of anticipatory muscular activities (duration, order, and amplitude of muscle contractions constituting the anticipatory muscular activity) could be used as a predictive indicator of forthcoming movement. In addition, this systematic review may improve methodology in empirical studies and assistive technology for people with disabilities.

  2. Alignment of Hands-on STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-12-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in activities such as an after-school robotics program. Both groups are compared and contrasted with a third group of high school students admitted at the eleventh grade to an academy of mathematics and science. All students were assessed using the same science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) dispositions instrument. Findings indicate that the after-school group whose participants self-selected STEM engagement activities, and the self-selected academy of mathematics and science group, each had highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to those of STEM professionals, while a subset of the middle school whole-classroom energy monitoring group that reported high interest in STEM as a career, also possessed highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to the STEM Professionals group. The authors conclude that several different kinds of hands-on STEM engagement activities are likely to foster or maintain positive STEM dispositions at the middle school and high school levels, and that these highly positive levels of dispositions can be viewed as a target toward which projects seeking to interest mainstream secondary students in STEM majors in college and STEM careers, can hope to aspire. Gender findings regarding STEM dispositions are also reported for these groups.

  3. Examining the Research Base on University Co-Operative Education in Light of the Neoliberal Challenge to Liberal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milley, Peter; Kovinthan, Thursica

    2014-01-01

    Debates have been taking place in higher education communities in Canada and other Anglo-American contexts between defenders of liberal education and promoters of neoliberalism. One development not addressed is the growth of co-operative education (co-op). The origins of co-op may reside in John Dewey's (1939, 1966) ideas about experience and…

  4. Student Perceptions of Social Learning Space: Designing and Implementing a Co-Operative Assessment Task in Pharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moni, Roger W.; Depaz, Iris; Lluka, Lesley J.

    2008-01-01

    We report findings from a case study of co-operative, group-based assessment in Pharmacology for second-year undergraduates at The University of Queensland, Australia. Students enrolled in the 2005 Bachelor of Science and 2006 Bachelor of Pharmacy degree programs, were early users of the university's new Collaborative Teaching and Learning Centre…

  5. Western Co-operative College (Study of an Agency); Project Study for Education 480, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, H.E.; And Others

    Based on the philosophy of individuals taking responsibility for their own destinies through mutual self help, and drawing heavily from European cooperatives, Western Co-operative College provides training for elected officials and employees of cooperatives such as marketing, consumer, finance, service, and education cooperatives, and government…

  6. Co-operative Learning for Students with Difficulties in Learning: A Description of Models and Guidelines for Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Ellen; Grey, Ian M.; Honan, Rita

    2005-01-01

    As part of a larger study regarding the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream classroom settings, Ellen Murphy, of the D Clin Psych programme at NUI Galway, with Ian Grey and Rita Honan, from Trinity College, Dublin, reviewed existing literature on co-operative learning in the classroom. In this article, they identify four models…

  7. Environmental Co-Operatives as Instruments for Delivering Across-Farm Environmental and Rural Policy Objectives: Lessons for the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, J. R.; Mc Gloin, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses the potential of environmental co-operatives (EC) to deliver environmental benefits and an integrated and strengthened rural economy in the UK. It is based on research into Dutch EC, which have about 10,000 members, of which a quarter are non-farmers. The paper details the benefits EC have delivered to their members, the Dutch…

  8. Adult Education and Grass-Roots Organisations in Latin America: The Contribution of the International Co-operative University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haubert, Maxime

    1986-01-01

    Reports that adult education through participatory action-research has provided the framework for experiments carried out by groups associated with the International Co-operative University. Traces the background of the development of this method in Latin America and its principal characteristics. (CH)

  9. Petroleum geology of the Timor Gap Zone of co-operation (Area A)

    SciTech Connect

    Whittam, D.B. )

    1996-01-01

    The discovery of the Elang/Kakatua oilfield and Undan/Bayu gas-condensate accumulation has demonstrated the presence of a significant new hydrocarbon province in Area A of the Zone of Co-Operation between Australia and Indonesia (ZOCA). The western part of ZOCA is underlain by a north-west trending Triassic to mid-Cretaceous sag basin (the Northern Bonaparte Basin) which is overprinted by a series of east-west faults. The basin is related to Jurassic rifting and continental separation and is overlain by a seaward thickening, passive-margin wedge of Upper Cretaceous marls and Tertiary carbonates. The east-west faults form horst blocks which are the principal structural trapping style. Hydrocarbons have been encountered in fluvial and shallow marine sandstone of mid-Jurassic age (Bathonian to Callovian). These reservoirs are sealed by marine claystones and shales of Oxfordian to Berriasian age which are also potential petroleum source rocks containing a mixture of Type II and III organic matter. The discovered oils are very light (57[degrees] API), mature crudes with low producing gas/oil ratios. The understanding and prediction of the controls on reservoir quality and access to mature source rocks are key factors in the successful exploration of the area. Poor seismic data quality is a major obstacle to the accurate mapping of structure at the level of top reservoir. Several traps are interpreted to have failed due to breaching and remigration of hydrocarbons caused by Miocene/Pliocene faulting related to the collision between the Australasian and Eurasian plates.

  10. Petroleum geology of the Timor Gap Zone of co-operation (Area A)

    SciTech Connect

    Whittam, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    The discovery of the Elang/Kakatua oilfield and Undan/Bayu gas-condensate accumulation has demonstrated the presence of a significant new hydrocarbon province in Area A of the Zone of Co-Operation between Australia and Indonesia (ZOCA). The western part of ZOCA is underlain by a north-west trending Triassic to mid-Cretaceous sag basin (the Northern Bonaparte Basin) which is overprinted by a series of east-west faults. The basin is related to Jurassic rifting and continental separation and is overlain by a seaward thickening, passive-margin wedge of Upper Cretaceous marls and Tertiary carbonates. The east-west faults form horst blocks which are the principal structural trapping style. Hydrocarbons have been encountered in fluvial and shallow marine sandstone of mid-Jurassic age (Bathonian to Callovian). These reservoirs are sealed by marine claystones and shales of Oxfordian to Berriasian age which are also potential petroleum source rocks containing a mixture of Type II and III organic matter. The discovered oils are very light (57{degrees} API), mature crudes with low producing gas/oil ratios. The understanding and prediction of the controls on reservoir quality and access to mature source rocks are key factors in the successful exploration of the area. Poor seismic data quality is a major obstacle to the accurate mapping of structure at the level of top reservoir. Several traps are interpreted to have failed due to breaching and remigration of hydrocarbons caused by Miocene/Pliocene faulting related to the collision between the Australasian and Eurasian plates.

  11. Role of Positional Hydrophobicity in the Leishmanicidal Activity of Magainin 2

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Esther; Saugar, José María; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Rivas, Luis

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of membrane-active antimicrobial peptides as new alternatives against pathogens with multiantibiotic resistance requires the design of better analogues. Among the different physicochemical parameters involved in the optimization of linear antimicrobial peptides, positional hydrophobicity has recently been incorporated. This takes into consideration the concept of the topological distribution of hydrophobic residues throughout the sequence rather than the classical concept of hydrophobicity as a global parameter of the peptide, calculated as the summation of the individual hydrophobicities of the residues. In order to assess the contribution of this parameter to the leishmanicidal mechanisms of magainin 2 analogues, the activities of two of these analogues, MG-H1 (GIKKFLHIIWKFIKAFVGEIMNS) and MG-H2 (IIKKFLHSIWKFGKAFVGEIMNI), which have similar charges, amino acid compositions, and hydrophobicities but different positional hydrophobicities, against Leishmania donovani promastigotes were assayed (T. Tachi, R. F. Epand, R. M. Epand, and K. Matsuzaki, Biochemistry 41:10723-10731, 2002). The activities were compared with that of the parental peptide, F5W-magainin 2 (GIGKWLHSAKKFGKAFVGEIMNS). The three peptides were active at micromolar concentrations, in the order MG-H2 > MG-H1 > F5W-magainin 2. These activities differ from their hemolytic and bactericidal activities. The results demonstrate that positional hydrophobicity, which reflects the presence of short stretches of sequences rich in hydrophobic amino acids, plays an important role in the activities of leishmanicidal peptides. PMID:15273109

  12. Greater positive schizotypy relates to reduced N100 activity during rejection scenes.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Preethi; Onwumere, Juliana; Wilson, Daniel; Sumich, Alexander; Castro, Antonio; Kumari, Veena; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Social anxiety due to rejection sensitivity (RS) exacerbates psychosis-like experiences in the general population. While reduced dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity during social rejection in high schizotypy has suggested self-distancing from rejection, earlier stages of mental processing such as feature encoding could also contribute to psychosis-like experiences. This study aimed to determine the stage of mental processing of social rejection that relates to positive schizotypy. Forty-one healthy participants were assessed for schizotypy and RS. Event-related potential amplitudes (ERPs) were measured at frontal, temporal and parieto-occipital sites and their cortical sources (dACC, temporal pole and lingual gyrus) at early (N100) and late (P300 and late slow wave, LSW) timeframes during rejection, acceptance and neutral scenes. ERPs were compared between social interaction types. Correlations were performed between positive schizotypy (defined as the presence of perceptual aberrations, hallucinatory experiences and magical thinking), RS and ERPs during rejection. Amplitude was greater during rejection than acceptance or neutral conditions at the dACC-P300, parieto-occipital-P300, dACC-LSW and frontal-LSW. RS correlated positively with positive schizotypy. Reduced dACC N100 activity during rejection correlated with greater positive schizotypy and RS. Reduced dACC N100 activity and greater RS independently predicted positive schizotypy. An N100 deficit that indicates reduced feature encoding of rejection scenes increases with greater positive schizotypy and RS. Higher RS shows that a greater tendency to misattribute ambiguous social situations as rejecting also increases with positive schizotypy. These two processes, namely primary bottom-up sensory processing and secondary misattribution of rejection, combine to increase psychosis-like experiences. PMID:25010933

  13. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation. PMID:22960742

  14. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation.

  15. HIV Serosorting, Status Disclosure, and Strategic Positioning Among Highly Sexually Active Gay and Bisexual Men.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H Jonathon; Moody, Raymond L; Ventuneac, Ana; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2015-10-01

    Researchers have identified harm reduction strategies that gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) use to reduce HIV transmission--including serosorting, status disclosure, and strategic positioning. We report on patterns of these behaviors among 376 highly sexually active (i.e., 9+partners, <90 days) GBMSM: mean age of 37, 49.5% men of color, 87.8% gay identified, 57.5% college educated. We found evidence that many men engaged in serosorting, status disclosure, and strategic positioning; however, rates varied based on the participant's HIV status. HIV-positive and HIV-negative men both engaged in sex with men of similar status more often than they engaged in sex with men known to be a different HIV status (i.e., serosorting). However, HIV-negative men disclosed their HIV-status with about half of their partners, whereas HIV-positive participants disclosed with only about one-third. With regard to strategic positioning, HIV-positive participants were the receptive partner about half the time with their HIV-negative partners and with their HIV-positive partners. In contrast, strategic positioning was very common among HIV-negative participants-they rarely bottomed with HIV-positive partners, bottomed about one-third of the time with status-unknown partners, and 42% of the time (on average) with HIV-negative partners. Highly sexually active GBMSM are a critical population in which to both investigate HIV prevention strategies as well as develop effective intervention programs. Providers and clinicians might be well served to include a wide range of behavioral harm reduction strategies in addition to condom use and biomedical approaches to reduce onward HIV transmission.

  16. Targeted Deficiency of the Transcriptional Activator Hnf1α Alters Subnuclear Positioning of Its Genomic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sadoni, Nicolas; Zink, Daniele; Ferrer, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    DNA binding transcriptional activators play a central role in gene-selective regulation. In part, this is mediated by targeting local covalent modifications of histone tails. Transcriptional regulation has also been associated with the positioning of genes within the nucleus. We have now examined the role of a transcriptional activator in regulating the positioning of target genes. This was carried out with primary β-cells and hepatocytes freshly isolated from mice lacking Hnf1α, an activator encoded by the most frequently mutated gene in human monogenic diabetes (MODY3). We show that in Hnf1a−/− cells inactive endogenous Hnf1α-target genes exhibit increased trimethylated histone H3-Lys27 and reduced methylated H3-Lys4. Inactive Hnf1α-targets in Hnf1a−/− cells are also preferentially located in peripheral subnuclear domains enriched in trimethylated H3-Lys27, whereas active targets in wild-type cells are positioned in more central domains enriched in methylated H3-Lys4 and RNA polymerase II. We demonstrate that this differential positioning involves the decondensation of target chromatin, and show that it is spatially restricted rather than a reflection of non-specific changes in the nuclear organization of Hnf1a-deficient cells. This study, therefore, provides genetic evidence that a single transcriptional activator can influence the subnuclear location of its endogenous genomic targets in primary cells, and links activator-dependent changes in local chromatin structure to the spatial organization of the genome. We have also revealed a defect in subnuclear gene positioning in a model of a human transcription factor disease. PMID:18497863

  17. Tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients: cellular response and immune activation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Law, K F; Jagirdar, J; Weiden, M D; Bodkin, M; Rom, W N

    1996-04-01

    The host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is dependent on the accumulation and activation of cytotoxic and memory CD4+ T cells, resulting in granuloma formation and delayed type hypersensitivity. We characterized the cellular response of radiographically involved lung segments from 17 HIV-positive and 11 HIV-negative patients with acute tuberculosis (TB) using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and compared the response to uninvolved segments, normal control subjects and peripheral blood. In both HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients, radiographically involved segments had significantly increased numbers of total cells per milliliter, percent of neutrophils recovered, and percent of lymphocytes recovered compared with uninvolved segments or normal control subjects, but HIV-positive patients had a lower proportion of lymphocytes in the involved segments than HIV-negative patients with tuberculosis (19 +/- 5% versus 33 +/- 5%; p < 0.05). Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated that HIV-positive patients had markedly reduced percentages of CD4+ lymphocytes (CD4+ lymphocytes in HIV-positive TB involved site 25 +/- 6%; HIV-negative TB involved site 73 +/- 2%; p < 0.01) and an increase in the percentage of CD8+ lymphocytes (HIV positive involved site 61 +/- 6% versus HIV negative involved site 19 +/- 3%; p < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry of lung biopsy tissue in five HIV-negative patients showed similar lymphocyte subset profiles as BAL, indicating that BAL reflects cell populations in tissue granulomas. BAL lymphocytes from four HIV-positive and four HIV-negative tuberculosis patients demonstrated immune activation by staining with a murine antibody to TIA-1, a cytoplasmic protein associated with cytotoxicity and apoptosis (HIV positive 48 +/- 6%, HIV negative 31 +/- 7%, normals 11 +/- 5%). Steady state mRNA for gamma-interferon was decreased in four HIV-positive patients when compared with four HIV-negative patients. IL-8 production was comparable in HIV-negative and

  18. Evaluation development for a physical activity positive youth development program for girls.

    PubMed

    Ullrich-French, Sarah; Cole, Amy N; Montgomery, Anna K

    2016-04-01

    Girls on the Run (GOTR) is an after school program for girls in third through fifth grade which utilizes a physical activity based positive youth development curriculum that culminates with completing a 5K run. Unfortunately, there is little empirical data documenting GOTR participant changes that align with the curriculum and describe the evaluation process. Therefore, this study presents an evaluation of GOTR consisting of three main processes: curriculum content analysis and stakeholder focus groups (N=11) to identify key outcomes of the program; community-based participatory research to collaborate with program personnel to further identify important outcomes; and the design and pilot testing of an instrument (N=104) for assessing changes in the theoretically grounded outcomes over time. Findings demonstrated a positive collaborative process that led to important information to be used for an impact evaluation of Girls on the Run and for future evaluation development efforts for physical activity based positive youth development.

  19. Enhanced right amygdala activity in adolescents during encoding of positively valenced pictures.

    PubMed

    Vasa, Roma A; Pine, Daniel S; Thorn, Julia M; Nelson, Tess E; Spinelli, Simona; Nelson, Eric; Maheu, Francoise S; Ernst, Monique; Bruck, Maggie; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2011-01-01

    While studies among adults implicate the amygdala and interconnecting brain regions in encoding emotional stimuli, few studies have examined whether developmental changes occur within this emotional-memory network during adolescence. The present study examined whether adolescents and adults differentially engaged the amygdala and hippocampus during successful encoding of emotional pictures, with either positive or negative valence. Eighteen adults and twelve adolescents underwent event-related fMRI while encoding emotional pictures. Approximately 30 min later, outside the scanner, subjects were asked to recall the pictures seen during the scan. Age group differences in brain activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during encoding of the pictures that were later successfully and unsuccessfully recalled were separately compared for the positive and negative pictures. Adolescents, relative to adults, demonstrated enhanced activity in the right amygdala during encoding of positive pictures that were later recalled compared to not recalled. There were no age group differences in amygdala or hippocampal activity during successful encoding of negative pictures. The findings of preferential activity within the adolescent right amygdala during successful encoding of positive pictures may have implications for the increased reward and novelty seeking behavior, as well as elevated rates of psychopathology, observed during this distinct developmental period.

  20. Research on acupuncture points and cortical functional activation position in cats by infrared imaging detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuwang; Sha, Zhanyou; Wang, Shuhai; Wen, Huanming

    2007-12-01

    The research of the brain cognition is mainly to find out the activation position in brain according to the stimulation at present in the world. The research regards the animals as the experimental objects and explores the stimulation response on the cerebral cortex of acupuncture. It provides a new method, which can detect the activation position on the creatural cerebral cortex directly by middle-far infrared imaging. According to the theory of local temperature situation, the difference of cortical temperature maybe associate with the excitement of cortical nerve cells, the metabolism of local tissue and the local hemal circulation. Direct naked detection of temperature variety on cerebral cortex is applied by middle and far infrared imaging technology. So the activation position is ascertained. The effect of stimulation response is superior to other indirect methods. After removing the skulls on the head, full of cerebral cortex of a cat are exposed. By observing the infrared images and measuring the temperatures of the visual cerebral cortex during the process of acupuncturing, the points are used to judge the activation position. The variety in the cortical functional sections is corresponding to the result of the acupuncture points in terms of infrared images and temperatures. According to experimental results, we know that the variety of a cortical functional section is corresponding to a special acupuncture point exactly.

  1. Positive Youth Development through an Outdoor Physical Activity Programme: Evidence from a Four-Year Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Kathleen; Sandford, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Sandford, Armour and Warmington undertook a comprehensive review of the literature on the role of physical activity/sport and physical education in promoting positive development for disaffected youth. This paper revisits the findings of the literature review in light of data from a four-year evaluation of one corporate-sponsored physical…

  2. Assessing the Positive Influence of Music Activities in Community Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Steve

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a framework for assessing the positive influence of music activities in community development programs. It examines hybrid music, health and rich media approaches to creative case study with the purpose of developing more compelling evidence based advocacy that examines the claims of a causal link. This preliminary study…

  3. A Systematic Review of the Relationship between Socio-Economic Position and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidlow, Christopher; Johnston, Lynne Halley; Crone, Diane; Ellis, Naomi; James, David

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present review was to examine epidemiological evidence to determine if there is strong evidence of a positive gradient of increasing physical activity across the socio-economic strata, and how relationships are affected by socio-economic measurement. Design: Systematic review. Method: A search of major databases was…

  4. Physical Activity and Positive Youth Development: Impact of a School-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Kristine A.; Hicks, Katherine; Thompson, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    Background: Protective factors associated with positive youth development predict health and education outcomes. This study explored trends in these protective factors and in physical activity among low-income students, and determined the impact of a school-based youth development program on these trends. Methods: This study used a…

  5. Towards an Understanding of Flow and Other Positive Experience Phenomena within Outdoor and Adventurous Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boniface, Margaret R.

    2000-01-01

    People involved in adventurous activities frequently experience positive phenomena termed peak experience, peak performance, and "flow." Characteristics of these phenomena are compared, along with factors influencing the ability to experience such peak moments. Csikszentmihalyi's flow models are examined with regard to perceived levels of…

  6. Students' Use of Extra-Curricular Activities for Positional Advantage in Competitive Job Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bangerter, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    With the rise of mass higher education, competition between graduates in the labour market is increasing. Students are aware that their degree will not guarantee them a job and realise they should add value and distinction to their credentials to achieve a positional advantage. Participation in extra-curricular activities (ECAs) is one such…

  7. Positive Activities: Qualitative Research with Parents. Solutions Research. Research Report. DCSF-RR142

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Children, Schools and Families, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This research was commissioned by COI and DCSF to understand in depth, the barriers, motivators and messages for parents to encourage participation in positive activities for young people. Within this the research was designed to understand the level of influence of parents in whether a young person participates/what a young person might…

  8. Do increases in physical activity encourage positive beliefs about further change in the ProActive cohort?

    PubMed

    Hardeman, Wendy; Michie, Susan; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Sutton, Stephen

    2011-07-01

    Effects of behaviour change on cognitions are rarely examined within the Theory of Planned Behaviour. We tested whether increases in physical activity resulted in more positive beliefs about further change among a cohort of sedentary adults participating in a behavioural intervention trial (ProActive). At baseline, 6 and 12 months, 365 adults completed questionnaires assessing physical activity and cognitions about becoming more active over the coming year. Objective activity was assessed at baseline and 12 months. Participants reporting larger increases in activity were no more positive about making further increases than those reporting less behaviour change (p-values>0.05). Participants with larger increases in objective activity reported weaker perceived control (β=-0.342; p=0.001) and more negative instrumental attitudes (β=-0.230; p=0.017) at 12 months. Participants may have felt that they had changed enough or measures of perceived success may be more sensitive to behaviour change. Alternatively, long measurement intervals may have missed immediate cognitive and affective consequences of behaviour change, or such effects may require participants to consistently self-monitor or receive feedback on performance. Future studies could test the effect of such techniques on physical activity and a wider range of cognitive, affective and physiological consequences, using more frequent measurement intervals. PMID:21500102

  9. TALE activators regulate gene expression in a position- and strand-dependent manner in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Uhde-Stone, Claudia; Cheung, Edna; Lu, Biao

    2014-01-24

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of transcription factors that are readily programmable to regulate gene expression. Despite their growing popularity, little is known about binding site parameters that influence TALE-mediated gene activation in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that TALE activators modulate gene expression in mammalian cells in a position- and strand-dependent manner. To study the effects of binding site location, we engineered TALEs customized to recognize specific DNA sequences located in either the promoter or the transcribed region of reporter genes. We found that TALE activators robustly activated reporter genes when their binding sites were located within the promoter region. In contrast, TALE activators inhibited the expression of reporter genes when their binding sites were located on the sense strand of the transcribed region. Notably, this repression was independent of the effector domain utilized, suggesting a simple blockage mechanism. We conclude that TALE activators in mammalian cells regulate genes in a position- and strand-dependent manner that is substantially different from gene activation by native TALEs in plants. These findings have implications for optimizing the design of custom TALEs for genetic manipulation in mammalian cells.

  10. Influence of proline position upon the ion channel activity of alamethicin.

    PubMed Central

    Kaduk, C; Duclohier, H; Dathe, M; Wenschuh, H; Beyermann, M; Molle, G; Bienert, M

    1997-01-01

    Alamethicin, a 20-residue peptaibol, induces voltage-dependent ion channels in lipid bilayers according to the barrel-stave model. To study relationships between the proline-14-induced kink region and the channel-forming behavior of the peptide, a set of alamethicin analogs with proline incorporated at positions 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, respectively, as well as an analog with alanine instead of proline at position 14 were synthesized. Macroscopic conductance experiments show that the voltage dependence of the peptides is conserved although slightly influenced, but the apparent mean number of monomers forming the channels is significantly reduced when proline is not located at position 14. This is confirmed in single-channel experiments. The analogs with proline next to position 14 (i.e., 13, 15, 16) show stable conductance levels, but of reduced number, which follows the order Alam-P14 > Alam-P15 > Alam-P16 > Alam-P13. This reduction in the number of levels is connected with changes in the lifetime of the channels. Analogs with proline at position 11, 12, or 17 produce erratic, extremely short-lived current events that could not be resolved. The changes in functional properties are related to structural properties as probed by circular dichroism. The results indicate that proline at position 14 results in optimal channel activity, whereas channels formed by the analogs bearing proline at different positions are considerably less stable. PMID:9129817

  11. Experimental study on active vibration control using genetic algorithm-based system identification and optimized positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszulik, Ryan R.; Shan, Jinjun

    2012-12-01

    A genetic algorithm is implemented to identify the transfer function of an experimental system consisting of a flexible manipulator with a collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair. A multi-mode positive position feedback controller is then designed based upon the identified transfer function. To this end, the same iteratively implemented genetic algorithm is used to optimize all controller parameters by minimization of the closed loop H∞-norm. The designed controller is then applied for vibration suppression on the experimental system.

  12. Arm position influences the activation patterns of trunk muscles during trunk range-of-motion movements.

    PubMed

    Siu, Aaron; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Drake, Janessa Dm

    2016-10-01

    To understand the activation patterns of the trunk musculature, it is also important to consider the implications of adjacent structures such as the upper limbs, and the muscles that act to move the arms. This study investigated the effects of arm positions on the activation patterns and co-activation of the trunk musculature and muscles that move the arm during trunk range-of-motion movements (maximum trunk axial twist, flexion, and lateral bend). Fifteen males and fifteen females, asymptomatic for low back pain, performed maximum trunk range-of-motion movements, with three arm positions for axial twist (loose, crossed, abducted) and two positions for flexion and lateral bend (loose, crossed). Electromyographical data were collected for eight muscles bilaterally, and activation signals were cross-correlated between trunk muscles and the muscles that move the arms (upper trapezius, latissimus dorsi). Results revealed consistently greater muscle co-activation (higher cross-correlation coefficients) between the trunk muscles and upper trapezius for the abducted arm position during maximum trunk axial twist, while results for the latissimus dorsi-trunk pairings were more dependent on the specific trunk muscles (either abdominal or back) and latissimus dorsi muscle (either right or left side), as well as the range-of-motion movement. The findings of this study contribute to the understanding of interactions between the upper limbs and trunk, and highlight the influence of arm positions on the trunk musculature. In addition, the comparison of the present results to those of individuals with back or shoulder conditions may ultimately aid in elucidating underlying mechanisms or contributing factors to those conditions.

  13. Positive And Negative Feedback Loops Coupled By Common Transcription Activator And Repressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical systems consisting of two interlocked loops with negative and positive feedback have been studied using the linear analysis of stability and numerical solutions. Conditions for saddle-node bifurcation were formulated in a general form. Conditions for Hopf bifurcations were found in a few symmetrical cases. Auto-oscillations, when they exist, are generated by the negative feedback repressive loop. This loop determines the frequency and amplitude of oscillations. The positive feedback loop of activation slightly modifies the oscillations. Oscillations are possible when the difference between Hilll's coefficients of the repression and activation is sufficiently high. The highly cooperative activation loop with a fast turnover slows down or even makes the oscillations impossible. The system under consideration can constitute a component of epigenetic or enzymatic regulation network.

  14. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  15. Cumulative activation during positive and negative events and state anxiety predicts subsequent inertia of amygdala reactivity.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Swann; Miendlarzewska, Ewa A; Eryilmaz, Hamdi; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    Inertia, together with intensity and valence, is an important component of emotion. We tested whether positive and negative events generate lingering changes in subsequent brain responses to unrelated threat stimuli and investigated the impact of individual anxiety. We acquired fMRI data while participants watched positive or negative movie-clips and subsequently performed an unrelated task with fearful and neutral faces. We quantified changes in amygdala reactivity to fearful faces as a function of the valence of preceding movies and cumulative neural activity evoked during them. We demonstrate that amygdala responses to emotional movies spill over to subsequent processing of threat information in a valence-specific manner: negative movies enhance later amygdala activation whereas positive movies attenuate it. Critically, the magnitude of such changes is predicted by a measure of cumulative amygdala responses to the preceding positive or negative movies. These effects appear independent of overt attention, are regionally limited to amygdala, with no changes in functional connectivity. Finally, individuals with higher state anxiety displayed stronger modulation of amygdala reactivity by positive movies. These results suggest that intensity and valence of emotional events as well as anxiety levels promote local changes in amygdala sensitivity to threat, highlighting the importance of past experience in shaping future affective reactivity.

  16. Prognostic value of cytosolic tyrosine kinase activity in 249 node-positive breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Romain, S.; Chinot, O.; Klijn, J. G.; van Putten, W. L.; Guirou, O.; Look, M.; Martin, P. M.; Foekens, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Tyrosine-specific protein kinase (TPK) has been associated with the cytoplasmic domain of growth factor receptors as well as oncoproteins. Enzymatic activation appears to be a major initial event in these signal transduction pathways. In this study, TPK was determined in the cytosols of 249 node-positive primary breast tumours. Enzyme activity was measured using [32P]ATP and poly(glutamic acid-tyrosine) (4:1) as an artificial substrate. Levels of TPK varied from 0 to 35.9 pmol ATP min-1 mg-1 protein (median 11.4). No correlation was found with tumour size or number of positive lymph nodes. In contrast, levels of TPK were negatively associated with age (P = 0.01) and menopausal status (P < 0.05) of the patients. Higher concentrations of TPK were in addition found in tumours negative for oestradiol (P < 0.01) and progesterone (P < 0.05) receptors. Finally, a positive correlation was found between TPK and urokinase plasminogen activator (UPA) (P < 0.05). Patients whose tumours contained high levels of TPK had reduced disease-free (P = 0.01) and overall survival (P < 0.05). In Cox multivariate analysis, including patient's age, menopausal status, tumour size, number of positive lymph nodes, steroid receptors and UPA, TPK retained its independent prognostic importance. PMID:8054279

  17. The divide within: Older active ICT users position themselves against different 'Others'.

    PubMed

    Kania-Lundholm, Magdalena; Torres, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Although research into older people's internet usage patterns is rapidly growing, their understandings of digital technologies, particularly in relation to how these are informed by their understandings of aging and old age, remain unexplored. This is the case because research on older active ICT users tends to regard old age as an empirically interesting part of the life-course as opposed to a theoretically profuse source of information about why and how older people engage with digital technologies. This article explores - through focus group interviews with 30 older adults (aged 66-89) - the ways in which the social position of old age is used by older active ICT users in order to make sense of how and why they engage with these technologies. In this article, positioning theory is used to shed light on how the older people interviewed positioned themselves as 'active older users' in the interviews. The analysis brings to the fore the divide that older people themselves create as they discursively position themselves against different types of ICT users and non-users (young and old) when describing how and why they engage with digital technologies. PMID:26568212

  18. Bioengineered Nisin A Derivatives with Enhanced Activity against Both Gram Positive and Gram Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Field, Des; Begley, Maire; O’Connor, Paula M.; Daly, Karen M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Nisin is a bacteriocin widely utilized in more than 50 countries as a safe and natural antibacterial food preservative. It is the most extensively studied bacteriocin, having undergone decades of bioengineering with a view to improving function and physicochemical properties. The discovery of novel nisin variants with enhanced activity against clinical and foodborne pathogens has recently been described. We screened a randomized bank of nisin A producers and identified a variant with a serine to glycine change at position 29 (S29G), with enhanced efficacy against S. aureus SA113. Using a site-saturation mutagenesis approach we generated three more derivatives (S29A, S29D and S29E) with enhanced activity against a range of Gram positive drug resistant clinical, veterinary and food pathogens. In addition, a number of the nisin S29 derivatives displayed superior antimicrobial activity to nisin A when assessed against a range of Gram negative food-associated pathogens, including E. coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Cronobacter sakazakii. This is the first report of derivatives of nisin, or indeed any lantibiotic, with enhanced antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. PMID:23056510

  19. Visualization of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) activation in living cells.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Koh; Luo, Zeping; Schaufele, Fred; Peterlin, B Matija

    2015-01-16

    Regulation of transcription elongation by positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) plays a central role in determining the state of cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. In cells, P-TEFb exists in active and inactive forms. Its release from the inactive 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex is a critical step for P-TEFb to activate transcription elongation. However, no good method exists to analyze this P-TEFb equilibrium in living cells. Only inaccurate and labor-intensive cell-free biochemical assays are currently available. In this study, we present the first experimental system to monitor P-TEFb activation in living cells. We created a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to detect interactions between P-TEFb and its substrate, the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. When cells were treated with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, which releases P-TEFb from the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, they turned green. Other known P-TEFb-releasing agents, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, bromodomain and extraterminal bromodomain inhibitors, and protein kinase C agonists, also scored positive in this assay. Finally, we identified 5'-azacytidine as a new P-TEFb-releasing agent. This release of P-TEFb correlated directly with activation of human HIV and HEXIM1 transcription. Thus, our visualization of P-TEFb activation by fluorescent complementation assay could be used to find new P-TEFb-releasing agents, compare different classes of agents, and assess their efficacy singly and/or in combination.

  20. A portable inhalational induction device provides co-operative induction of anaesthesia in preanaesthetic area for children

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Mi-Ja; Na, Hyo-Seok; Shin, Young Duck; Han, Jun-Sung; Hwang, Jung-Won; Kim, Chong Soo

    2010-01-01

    Background We introduce a new, simple portable inhalational induction device (PD) that provides co-operative inhalational induction of anaesthesia using N2O and subsequent sevoflurane in the preanaesthetic induction area in children. Methods Forty-five children (30 to 94 months old age, <35 kg) who were scheduled to undergo simple operations were assigned randomly to one of three regimens. Patients were encouraged by their parents to inhale N2O followed by sevoflurane (PD N2O-sevo group) or sevoflurane (PD sevo group) using a portable inhalational induction device in the preanaesthetic induction area until they were unable to respond to their names. They were then transferred to the operating room while maintaining inhalation of sevoflurane via the device. The control group underwent conventional inhalational induction in the operating room with the parents in attendance. Results Patients in the PD N2O-sevo group had a higher co-operative inhalation frequency than the patients in the PD sevo or the control group. Anaesthesia induction in the PD N2O-sevo and the PD sevo groups were faster than in the control group. Parent satisfaction score (0-100) was higher for the PD N2O-sevo group than for the control group. Conclusions A new portable inhalational induction device allows faster induction in co-operation with parents present in the preanaesthetic induction area compared to conventional inhalational induction in the unfamiliar operating room with the parents in attendance. PMID:20589175

  1. Gendered experiences of conflict and co-operation in heterosexual relations of Somalis in exile in Gothenburg, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Aden, A S; Dahlgren, L; Tarsitani, G

    2004-01-01

    Political upheaval and poverty at home has been forcing many Somalis to immigrate. These immigrants do not only leave their physical house, families, relatives, loved ones, friends, but also familiarities, culture, customs, and often they do end up in no man's land being between their own and new home culture. Available reports suggest that there are about 15,000 Somalis in Sweden and their majority came here from late 1989 to 1996. About one third these immigrants live in and around the city of Gothenburg. This paper explores and describes gendered experiences of conflict and co-operation in heterosexual relations of Somalis in exile in Gothenburg, Sweden. A qualitative sociological in-depth interviews with 6 women and 7 men was performed during May 1999 to January 2000. A follow up focus group interviews with 10 people (2 women and 8 men) was also carried on. The results show that both the Somali culture and Muslim religion do not support the children being taught sex education in schools or the names of the sex organs being pronounced other than to be used as metaphors. The girls, unlike their age group males, experience a very painful and terrifying process during childhood in which their self-esteem is downgraded by means of serious degrading traditional active violence such as female genital mutilation and visible virginity control. The narratives tell stories in which Somali women are degraded and expected to obey in situations characterised by their man's arbitrariness. They are subject to a very extensive form of social control, which is especially pronounced on issues regarding sexuality. Their integrity as women is, consequently set aside. When Somali refugees came to Sweden some of them came to adopt much of the modern lifestyle and cultural norm systems, preferable young people and some of the females. Relating to a new culture with its new expectations on the norm obedience also created changes in self-esteem. Exile situation tends to generate

  2. Co-operative agreements and the EU Water Framework Directive in conjunction with the Common Agricultural Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, I.

    2007-06-01

    This paper discusses the significance of voluntary arrangements for the water and agricultural policies in the European Union. The current implementation of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) and the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) require new approaches in water management. As many case studies have shown, co-operative agreements (CAs) between water companies, farmers and authorities can help to reduce environmental pressures on water bodies. The main reasons for that are: i) water companies are ready to advise and financially support farmers in changing production methods; ii) changes of farming practices are tailored to the site-specific requirements; iii) farmers and water companies are interested in minimising the costs and environmental pressures as they benefit, for example, from modernization of farming methods, and reductions in cost of water treatment, and iv) voluntarily agreed commitments to change farming practices are often stricter than statutory rules. Moreover, precautionary rather than remedial measures are preferred. Tackling diffuse pollution is one of the main concerns of the WFD. CAs can enhance the cost-effectiveness of actions within the programmes of measures so that good water status is achieved by 2015. In CAs all relevant stakeholders, located in catchment areas of agricultural usage, can be involved. Thus, they can help to foster integrated water resources management. In particular, disproportionate costs of changing farming practices can be identified. With regard to the recent CAP reform, financial support for farmers will be linked to compliance with environmental standards and further commitments. This concerns both direct payments and agri-environmental programmes. The experience gained in CAs can provide information on best agricultural practices. Informed farmers are more ready to meet environmental requirements. Because CAs implement the most cost-effective changes in farming practice, it can be assumed

  3. Co-operative agreements and the EU Water Framework Directive in conjunction with the Common Agricultural Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, I.

    2008-05-01

    This paper discusses the significance of voluntary arrangements for the water and agricultural policies in the European Union. The current implementation of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) and the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) require new approaches in water management. As many case studies have shown, co-operative agreements (CAs) between water companies, farmers and authorities can help to reduce environmental pressures on water bodies. The main reasons for that are: i) water companies are ready to advise and financially support farmers in changing production methods; ii) changes of farming practices are tailored to the site-specific requirements; iii) farmers and water companies are interested in minimising the costs and environmental pressures as they benefit, for example, from modernization of farming methods, and reductions in cost of water treatment, and iv) voluntarily agreed commitments to change farming practices are often stricter than statutory rules. Moreover, precautionary rather than remedial measures are preferred. Tackling diffuse pollution is one of the main concerns of the WFD. CAs can enhance the cost-effectiveness of actions within the programmes of measures so that good water status is achieved by 2015. In CAs all relevant stakeholders, located in catchment areas of agricultural usage, can be involved. Thus, they can help to foster integrated water resources management. In particular, disproportionate costs of changing farming practices can be identified. With regard to the recent CAP reform, financial support for farmers will be linked to compliance with environmental standards and further commitments. This concerns both direct payments and agri-environmental programmes. The experience gained in CAs can provide information on best agricultural practices. Informed farmers are more ready to meet environmental requirements. Because CAs implement the most cost-effective changes in farming practice, it can be assumed

  4. Bactericidal Activity and Mechanism of Photoirradiated Polyphenols against Gram-Positive and -Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ishiyama, Kirika; Sheng, Hong; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2015-09-01

    The bactericidal effect of various types of photoirradiated polyphenols against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria was evaluated in relation to the mode of action. Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus mutans) and Gram-negative bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) suspended in a 1 mg/mL polyphenol aqueous solution (caffeic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, and proanthocyanidin) were exposed to LED light (wavelength, 400 nm; irradiance, 260 mW/cm(2)) for 5 or 10 min. Caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid exerted the highest bactericidal activity followed by gallic acid and proanthocyanidin against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. It was also demonstrated that the disinfection treatment induced oxidative damage of bacterial DNA, which suggests that polyphenols are incorporated into bacterial cells. The present study suggests that blue light irradiation of polyphenols could be a novel disinfection treatment.

  5. Positively valenced stimuli facilitate creative novel metaphoric processes by enhancing medial prefrontal cortical activation.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Beeman, Mark; Faust, Miriam; Mashal, Nira

    2013-01-01

    A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a subject is symbolic of another unrelated object. In the present study, we examined neural patterns associated with both novel unfamiliar and conventional familiar metaphoric processing, and how these patterns are modulated by affective valence. Prior to fMRI scanning, participants received a list of word pairs (novel unfamiliar metaphors as well as conventional familiar metaphors) and were asked to denote the valence (positive, negative, or neutral) of each word pair. During scanning, participants had to decide whether the word pairs formed meaningful or meaningless expressions. Results indicate that participants were faster and more accurate at deciding that positively valenced metaphors were meaningful compared to neutral metaphors. These behavioral findings were accompanied by increased activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and the right inferior parietal lobe (RIPL). Specifically, positively valenced novel unfamiliar metaphors elicited activation in these brain regions in addition to the left superior temporal gyrus when compared to neutral novel metaphors. We also found that the mPFC and PCC mediated the processing of positively valenced metaphors when compared to negatively valenced metaphors. Positively valenced conventional metaphors, however, elicited different neural signatures when contrasted with either neutral or negatively valenced conventional metaphors. Together, our results indicate that positively valenced stimuli facilitate creative metaphoric processes (specifically novel metaphoric processes) by mediating attention and cognitive control processes required for the access, integration, and selection of semantic associations via modulation of the mPFC. The present study is important for the development of neural accounts of emotion-cognition interactions required for creativity, language, and successful social functioning in general.

  6. Relationship between gluteal muscle activation and upper extremity kinematics and kinetics in softball position players.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D

    2014-03-01

    As the biomechanical literature concerning softball pitching is evolving, there are no data to support the mechanics of softball position players. Pitching literature supports the whole kinetic chain approach including the lower extremity in proper throwing mechanics. The purpose of this project was to examine the gluteal muscle group activation patterns and their relationship with shoulder and elbow kinematics and kinetics during the overhead throwing motion of softball position players. Eighteen Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association softball players (19.2 ± 1.0 years; 68.9 ± 8.7 kg; 168.6 ± 6.6 cm) who were listed on the active playing roster volunteered. Electromyographic, kinematic, and kinetic data were collected while players caught a simulated hit or pitched ball and perform their position throw. Pearson correlation revealed a significant negative correlation between non-throwing gluteus maximus during the phase of maximum external rotation to maximum internal rotation (MIR) and elbow moments at ball release (r = -0.52). While at ball release, trunk flexion and rotation both had a positive relationship with shoulder moments at MIR (r = 0.69, r = 0.82, respectively) suggesting that the kinematic actions of the pelvis and trunk are strongly related to the actions of the shoulder during throwing.

  7. Design, synthesis, and antibacterial activities of neomycin-lipid conjugates: polycationic lipids with potent gram-positive activity.

    PubMed

    Bera, Smritilekha; Zhanel, George G; Schweizer, Frank

    2008-10-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics and cationic detergents constitute two classes of clinically important drugs and antiseptics. Their bacteriological and clinical efficacy, however, has decreased recently due to antibiotic resistance. We have synthesized aminoglycoside-lipid conjugates in which the aminoglycoside neomycin forms the cationic headgroup of a polycationic detergent. Our results show that neomycin-C16 and neomycin-C20 conjugates exhibit strong Gram-positive activity but reduced Gram-negative activity. The MIC of neomycin-C16 (C20) conjugates against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is comparable to clinically used antiseptics.

  8. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis.

  9. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis. PMID:27457620

  10. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis. PMID:27457620

  11. Dynamic detection of window starting positions and its implementation within an activity recognition framework.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qin; Patterson, Timothy; Cleland, Ian; Nugent, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Activity recognition is an intrinsic component of many pervasive computing and ambient intelligent solutions. This has been facilitated by an explosion of technological developments in the area of wireless sensor network, wearable and mobile computing. Yet, delivering robust activity recognition, which could be deployed at scale in a real world environment, still remains an active research challenge. Much of the existing literature to date has focused on applying machine learning techniques to pre-segmented data collected in controlled laboratory environments. Whilst this approach can provide valuable ground truth information from which to build recognition models, these techniques often do not function well when implemented in near real time applications. This paper presents the application of a multivariate online change detection algorithm to dynamically detect the starting position of windows for the purposes of activity recognition. PMID:27392647

  12. Graduated exposure and positive reinforcement to overcome setting and activity avoidance in an adolescent with autism.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jonathan D; Luiselli, James K; Rue, Hanna; Whalley, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Some students who have developmental disabilities avoid settings and activities that can improve their learning and quality of life. This two-phase study concerned an adolescent boy with autism who avoided the gross-motor exercise room, gymnasium, and music room at his school; he demonstrated distress, agitation, and problem behaviors when prompted to enter these areas. Using graduated exposure combined with positive reinforcement, he learned to enter these settings without resisting and eventually to participate in activities within the settings. This article discusses this intervention approach for reducing and eliminating avoidant behavior.

  13. Modifications in activation of lower limb muscles as a function of initial foot position in cycling.

    PubMed

    Padulo, Johnny; Powell, Douglas W; Ardigò, Luca P; Viggiano, Davide

    2015-08-01

    Cyclic movements, such as walking/cycling, require the activity of spinal-circuits, the central-pattern-generators (CPG). To our knowledge little work has been done to investigate the activation of these circuits, e.g., the muscular and kinematic activity during cycling initiation. This study aims to detail the muscle output properties as a function of the initial lower limb-position using a simple cycling paradigm. Therefore, subjects were required to pedal on a cycle-ergometer in seated position starting at different-crank-angles (0-150°). Surface-electromyography was recorded from the gluteus major (GL), vastus lateralis (VL), and gastrocnemius medialis (GM), while crank position was recorded using a linear-encoder. Gluteus major peak-activity (PA) occurred at 65.0±12.4° when starting with 0° initial crank position (ICP), while occurred maximally at 110.5±2.9 when starting with 70° ICP. Vastus lateralis PA occurred at 40.7±8.8° with 0° ICP, whereas with 70° ICP PA occurred at 103.4±4.0°. Similarly, GM PA occurred at 112.0±10.7° with 0° ICP, whereas with 70° ICP PA occurred at 142.5±4.2° PA. Gluteus major and gastrocnemius medialis showed similar PA phase shifts, which may suggest they are controlled by same local circuitry, in agreement with their common spinal origin, i.e., motoneurons pool in S1-S2.

  14. Gram-positive antimicrobial activity of amino acid-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Irwansyah, I; Li, Yong-Qiang; Shi, Wenxiong; Qi, Dianpeng; Leow, Wan Ru; Tang, Mark B Y; Li, Shuzhou; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-01-27

    Antimicrobial hydrogels are prepared based on the co-assembly of commercial Fmoc-phenylalanine and Fmoc-leucine, which act as the hydrogelator and antimicrobial building block, respectively. This co-assembled antimicrobial hydrogel is demonstrated to exhibit selective bactericidal activity for gram-positive bacteria while being biocompatible with normal mammalian cells, showing great potential as an antimicrobial coating for clinical anti-infective applications.

  15. Identification of novel aminopiperidine derivatives for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Yeol; An, Kyung-Mi; Jung, Juyoung; Koo, Je-Min; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Yoon, Jong-Min; Lee, Myong-Jae; Jang, HyeonSoo; Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Soobong; Kang, Jae-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported amidopiperidine derivatives as a novel peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitor and evaluated its antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, but poor pharmacokinetic profiles have resulted in low efficacy in in vivo mouse models. In order to overcome these weaknesses, we newly synthesized aminopiperidine derivatives with remarkable antimicrobial properties and oral bioavailability, and also identified their in vivo efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP). PMID:27173797

  16. An Action Research Report on Applying Co-Operative Learning Techniques in an Intensive English Reading Class in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    This study is to examine whether the implementation of CL in an intensive reading class has a positive effect on improving the passive situation of students, whether it helps activate their enthusiasm for and ease their anxiety of participation in language class activities, and whether it is helpful to their improvement of English proficiency. The…

  17. TNF activation of NF-κB is essential for development of single-positive thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Webb, Louise V; Ley, Steven C; Seddon, Benedict

    2016-07-25

    NF-κB activation has been implicated at multiple stages of thymic development of T cells, during which it is thought to mediate developmental signals originating from the T cell receptor (TCR). However, the Card11-Bcl10-Malt1 (CBM) complex that is essential for TCR activation of NF-κB in peripheral T cells is not required for thymocyte development. It has remained unclear whether the TCR activates NF-κB independent of the CBM complex in thymocyte development or whether another NF-κB activating receptor is involved. In the present study, we generated mice in which T cells lacked expression of both catalytic subunits of the inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) complex, IKK1 and IKK2, to investigate this question. Although early stages of T cell development were unperturbed, maturation of CD4 and CD8 single-positive (SP) thymocytes was blocked in mice lacking IKK1/2 in the T cell lineage. We found that IKK1/2-deficient thymocytes were specifically sensitized to TNF-induced cell death in vitro. Furthermore, the block in thymocyte development in IKK1/2-deficient mice could be rescued by blocking TNF with anti-TNF mAb or by ablation of TNFRI expression. These experiments reveal an essential role for TNF activation of NF-κB to promote the survival and development of single positive T cells in the thymus. PMID:27432943

  18. Activity of cells in the lateral vestibular nucleus as a function of head position

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Y.; Rosenberg, Jay; Segundo, J. P.

    1968-01-01

    1. The spike activity of cells in the lateral vestibular nucleus was recorded in cats anaesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Natural labyrinthine stimulation was applied by fixing the animal at different positions reached through roations about a longitudinal or transverse axis. 2. The majority of cells responded to rotations only about the longitudinal axis. Two types of response were found. The first was characterized by a transient change in activity which occurred only during the movement. The second type had an initial transient component and a subsequent steady component that persisted as long as the head remained fixed. 3. The interspike interval means, standard deviations, histograms and autocorrelograms of the steady response components of cells sensitive to lateral tilt were calculated. In every cell the relation between the head position with respect to gravity and the mean interspike interval of the steady discharge showed two main features. (a) `Directional sensitivity': the mean interval increased following rotation in one sense, and decreased following rotation in the other. In twenty-two out of thirty-three cells, the mean increased when the recording side was raised. The remaining cells showed the opposite relation. (b) `Multivaluedness': each particular position is associated with several different values of mean interval and these values had a relatively wide scatter. The curve that resulted from joining points in the order in which they occurred during the experiment was either closed, open, or combined closed and open portions. 4. The standard deviations, histograms and autocorrelograms also showed directional sensitivity and multivaluedness with respect to position. Several types of interspike interval histograms and autocorrelograms characterized lateral vestibular activity. The forms of the histogram and the autocorrelogram of the discharge from each cell usually remained unchanged during stimulation. 5. The extensive spread of the

  19. Fluorometric cell-based assay for β-galactosidase activity in probiotic gram-positive bacterial cells - Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda L; Chiu, Norman H L

    2016-09-01

    Although methods for measuring β-galactosidase activity in intact gram-negative bacterial cells have been reported, the methods may not be applicable to measuring β-galactosidase activity in gram-positive bacterial cells. This report focuses on the development of a fluorometric cell-based assay for measuring β-galactosidase activity in gram-positive cells.

  20. Design and synthesis of new dihydrotestosterone derivative with positive inotropic activity.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Betty, Sarabia Alcocer

    2015-03-01

    There are several reports which indicate that some steroid derivatives have inotropic activity; nevertheless, the cellular site and mechanism of action of steroid derivatives at cardiovascular level is very confusing. In order, to clarify these phenomena in this study, two dihydrotestosterone derivatives (compounds 5 and 10) were synthesized with the objective of to evaluate its biological activity on left ventricular pressure and characterize their molecular mechanism. In the first stage, the Langendorff technique was used to measure changes on perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in an isolated rat heart model in absence or presence of the steroid derivatives. Additionally, to characterize the molecular mechanism involved in the inotropic activity induced by the compound 5 was evaluated by measuring left ventricular pressure in absence or presence of following compounds; nifedipine, flutamide, indomethacin, prazosin, isoproterenol, propranolol and metoprolol. The results showed that the compound 5 significantly increased the perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in comparison with dihydrotestosterone, compound 10 and the control conditions. Other data indicate that 5 increase left ventricular pressure in a dose-dependent manner (0.001-100 nM); nevertheless, this phenomenon was significantly inhibited only by propranolol or metoprolol at a dose of 1 nM. These data suggest that positive inotropic activity induced by the compound 5 is through β1-adrenergic receptor however, this effect was independent of cAMP levels. This phenomenon is a particularly interesting because the positive inotropic activity induced by this steroid derivative involves a molecular mechanism different in comparison with other positive inotropic drugs.

  1. Antioxidant activity via DPPH, gram-positive and gram-negative antimicrobial potential in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Mahmood, Fazal; Khalil, Shahid Akbar; Zamir, Roshan; Fazal, Hina; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2014-10-01

    Edible mushrooms (EMs) are nutritionally rich source of proteins and essential amino acids. In the present study, the antioxidant activity via 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and antimicrobial potential in EMs (Pleurotus ostreatus, Morchella esculenta, P. ostreatus (Black), P. ostreatus (Yellow) and Pleurotus sajor-caju) were investigated. The DPPH radical scavenging activity revealed that the significantly higher activity (66.47%) was observed in Morchella esculenta at a maximum concentration. Similarly, the dose-dependent concentrations (200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 µg) were also used for other four EMs. Pleurotus ostreatus exhibited 36.13% activity, P. ostreatus (Black (B)) exhibited 30.64%, P. ostreatus (Yellow (Y)) exhibited 40.75% and Pleurotus sajor-caju exhibited 47.39% activity at higher concentrations. Furthermore, the antimicrobial potential were investigated for its toxicity against gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumonia, Erwinia carotovora and Agrobacterium tumifaciens), gram-positive bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus and Staphylococcus aureus) and a fungal strain (Candida albicans) in comparison with standard antibiotics. Antimicrobial screening revealed that the ethanol extract of P. ostreatus was active against all microorganism tested except E. coli. Maximum zone of inhibition (13 mm) was observed against fungus and A. tumifaciens. P. sajor-caju showed best activities (12.5 mm) against B. subtilis, B. atrophaeus and K. pneumonia. P. ostreatus (Y) showed best activities against P. aeroginosa (21.83 mm), B. atrophaeus (20 mm) and C. albicans (21 mm). P. ostreatus (B) exhibited best activities against C. albicans (16 mm) and slightly lower activities against all other microbes except S. typhi. M. esculenta possess maximum activities in terms of inhibition zone against all microorganisms tested except S. typhi.

  2. RNA helicase: a novel activity associated with a protein encoded by a positive strand RNA virus.

    PubMed Central

    Laín, S; Riechmann, J L; García, J A

    1990-01-01

    Most positive strand RNA viruses infecting plants and animals encode proteins containing the so-called nucleotide binding motif (NTBM) (1) in their amino acid sequences (2). As suggested from the high level of sequence similarity of these viral proteins with the recently described superfamilies of helicase-like proteins (3-5), the NTBM-containing cylindrical inclusion (CI) protein from plum pox virus (PPV), which belongs to the potyvirus group of positive strand RNA viruses, is shown to be able to unwind RNA duplexes. This activity was found to be dependent on the hydrolysis of NTP to NDP and Pi, and thus it can be considered as an RNA helicase activity. In the in vitro assay used, the PPV CI protein was only able to unwind double strand RNA substrates with 3' single strand overhangs. This result indicates that the helicase activity of the PPV CI protein functions in the 3' to 5' direction (6). To our knowledge, this is the first report on a helicase activity associated with a protein encoded by an RNA virus. Images PMID:2263459

  3. Laser-Machined Shape Memory Alloy Sensors for Position Feedback in Active Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Alexander T.; Park, Byong-Ho; Liang, David H.; Niemeyer, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-based interventions are a form of minimally invasive surgery that can decrease hospitalization time and greatly lower patient morbidity compared to traditional methods. However, percutaneous catheter procedures are hindered by a lack of precise tip manipulation when actuation forces are transmitted over the length of the catheter. Active catheters with local shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuation can potentially provide the desired manipulation of a catheter tip, but hysteresis makes it difficult to control the actuators. A method to integrate small-volume, compliant sensors on an active catheter to provide position feedback for control would greatly improve the viability of SMA-based active catheters. In this work, we describe the design, fabrication, and performance of resistance-based position sensors that are laser-machined from superelastic SMA tubing. Combining simple material models and rapid prototyping, we can develop sensors of appropriate stiffness and sensitivity with simple modifications in sensor geometry. The sensors exhibit excellent linearity over the operating range and are designed to be easily integrated onto an active catheter substrate. PMID:19759806

  4. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  5. Litter effects on seedling establishment interact with seed position and earthworm activity.

    PubMed

    Donath, T W; Eckstein, R L

    2012-01-01

    Seedling establishment is influenced by litter cover and by seed predators, but little is known about interactions between these two factors. We tested their effects on emergence of five typical grassland species in a microcosm experiment. We manipulated the amounts of grass litter, seed sowing position and earthworm activity to determine whether: (i) the protective effect of litter against seed predation depends on cover amount and seed sowing position, i.e., on top or beneath litter; (ii) seed transport by earthworms changes the effect of seed sowing position on seedling emergence; and (iii) seeds transported into deeper soil layers by earthworms are still germinable. Litter cover and presence of earthworms lowered seedling emergence. The impact of seed position increased with seed size. Emergence of large-seeded species was reduced when sown on the surface. Additionally, we found an important seed position × earthworm interaction related to seed size. Emergence of large-seeded species sown on top of the litter was up to three times higher when earthworms were present than without earthworms. Earthworms also significantly altered the depth distribution of seeds in the soil and across treatments: on average 6% of seeds germinated after burial. In contrast to the seed position effect, we found no size effect on mobility and germinability of seeds after burial in the soil. Nevertheless, the fate of different-sized seeds may differ. While burial will remove large seeds from the regeneration pool, it may enhance seed bank build up in small-seeded species. Consequently, changes in the amount of litter cover and the invertebrate community play a significant role in plant community composition. PMID:21972886

  6. Physical Activity in the Prevention of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Probable Association

    PubMed Central

    Bazoni, Jéssica Aparecida; Mendes, William Siqueira; Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz; Melo, Juliana Jandre; Costa, Viviane de Souza Pinho; Teixeira, Denilson de Castro; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Physical inactivity is an important risk factor for many age-related diseases and symptoms such as dizziness and vertigo. Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the possible association between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and regular physical activity in elderly subjects. Methods This cross-sectional study included 491 elderly individuals who lived independently. Physical exercise was assessed through a questionnaire and BPPV by history and the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Results The present study indicates no significant association between BPPV with lack of physical activity in men and in the total population. We have confirmed associations between BPPV with lack of physical activity in women (p = 0.01). Women with a sedentary lifestyle who do not practice physical activity are 2.62 more likely to have BPPV than those with regular physical activity. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for BPPV that can be modified through specific interventions. Regular physical activity is a lifestyle with potential to decrease the risk of vertigo in women. PMID:25992128

  7. Localization of Physical Activity in Primary School Children Using Accelerometry and Global Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Bürgi, Rahel; Tomatis, Laura; Murer, Kurt; de Bruin, Eling D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ecological approaches have highlighted the importance of the built environment as a factor affecting physical activity. However, knowledge on children’s activity patterns is still incomplete. Particularly, data on the spatial context of physical activity is limited, which limits the potential to design location-based interventions effectively. Using global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometry, this study aimed to identify locations where children engage in moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Methods Participants included 119 children (11–14 years, 57% girls) from public schools in Winterthur, Switzerland. During a regular school week between February and April 2013, children wore an accelerometer and GPS sensor for seven consecutive days. Time-matched accelerometer and GPS data was mapped with a geographic information system and each data point was assigned to one of seven defined activity settings. Both the absolute amount of MVPA and proportion of time in MVPA were calculated for every setting. Multilevel analyses accounting for the hierarchical structure of the data were conducted to investigate any gender differences. Results Children achieved most MVPA on streets (34.5%) and on school grounds (33.4%). The proportion children spent in MVPA was highest in recreational facilities (19.4%), at other schools (19.2%) and on streets (18.6%). Boys accumulated significantly more MVPA overall and on other school grounds (p < 0.05) and showed a significantly higher proportion of time in MVPA at own school and outside of Winterthur (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results indicate the importance of streets and school grounds as activity-promoting environments. The high use of streets may be an indicator for active transportation, which appears to contribute to an active lifestyle in both genders. In contrast, the school setting is more likely to encourage physical activity in boys. Recreational facilities seem to be conducive for MVPA among both

  8. Force-Based Puncture Detection and Active Position Holding for Assisted Retinal Vein Cannulation*

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Berk; Tran, Nhat; Riviere, Cameron N.; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vein cannulation is a demanding procedure proposed to treat retinal vein occlusion by direct therapeutic agent delivery methods. Challenges in identifying the moment of venous puncture, achieving cannulation and maintaining cannulation during drug delivery currently limit the feasibility of the procedure. In this study, we respond to these problems with an assistive system combining a handheld micromanipulator, Micron, with a force-sensing microneedle. The integrated system senses the instant of vein puncture based on measured forces and the position of the needle tip. The system actively holds the cannulation device securely in the vein following cannulation and during drug delivery. Preliminary testing of the system in a dry phantom, stretched vinyl membranes, demonstrates a significant improvement in the total time the needle could be maintained stably inside of the vein. This was especially evident in smaller veins and is attributed to decreased movement of the positioned cannula following venous cannulation. PMID:27127804

  9. HIV-Positive Men Sexually Active with Women: Sexual Behaviors and Sexual Risks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gunjeong; Howard, Joyce Moon; Caban, Maria; Abramson, David; Messeri, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study examines patterns of sexual behavior, sexual relating, and sexual risk among HIV-positive men sexually active with women. A total of 278 HIV-positive men were interviewed every 6–12 months between 1994 and 2002 and reported considerable variability in sexual behaviors over time. Many were not sexually active at all for months at a time; many continued to have multiple female and at times male partners. Over one-third of the cohort had one or more periods when they had engaged in unprotected sex with a female partner who was HIV-negative or status unknown (unsafe sex). Periods of unsafe sex alternated with periods of safer sex. Contextual factors such as partner relations, housing status, active drug use, and recently exchanging sex showed the strongest association with increased odds of unsafe sex. A number of predictors of unsafe sex among African American men were not significant among the Latino sub-population, suggesting race/ethnic differences in factors contributing to heterosexual transmission. Implications for prevention interventions are discussed. PMID:16770702

  10. Effect of different aerodynamic time trial cycling positions on muscle activation and crank torque.

    PubMed

    Fintelman, D M; Sterling, M; Hemida, H; Li, F-X

    2016-05-01

    To reduce air resistance, time trial cyclists and triathletes lower their torso angle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lowering time trial torso angle positions on muscle activation patterns and crank torque coordination. It was hypothesized that small torso angles yield a forward shift of the muscle activation timing and crank torque. Twenty-one trained cyclists performed three exercise bouts at 70% maximal aerobic power in a time trial position at three different torso angles (0°, 8°, and 16°) at a fixed cadence of 85 rpm. Measurements included surface electromyography, crank torques and gas exchange. A significant increase in crank torque range and forward shift in peak torque timing was found at smaller torso angles. This relates closely with the later onset and duration of the muscle activation found in the gluteus maximus muscle. Torso angle effects were only observed in proximal monoarticular muscles. Moreover, all measured physiological variables (oxygen consumption, breathing frequency, minute ventilation) were significantly increased with lowering torso angle and hence decreased the gross efficiency. The findings provide support for the notion that at a cycling intensity of 70% maximal aerobic power, the aerodynamic gains outweigh the physiological/biomechanical disadvantages in trained cyclists.

  11. New positive Ca2+-activated K+ channel gating modulators with selectivity for KCa3.1.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Nichole; Brown, Brandon M; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Singh, Vikrant; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Valero, Marta Sofia; Köhler, Ralf; Wulff, Heike

    2014-09-01

    Small-conductance (KCa2) and intermediate-conductance (KCa3.1) calcium-activated K(+) channels are voltage-independent and share a common calcium/calmodulin-mediated gating mechanism. Existing positive gating modulators like EBIO, NS309, or SKA-31 activate both KCa2 and KCa3.1 channels with similar potency or, as in the case of CyPPA and NS13001, selectively activate KCa2.2 and KCa2.3 channels. We performed a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study with the aim of optimizing the benzothiazole pharmacophore of SKA-31 toward KCa3.1 selectivity. We identified SKA-111 (5-methylnaphtho[1,2-d]thiazol-2-amine), which displays 123-fold selectivity for KCa3.1 (EC50 111 ± 27 nM) over KCa2.3 (EC50 13.7 ± 6.9 μM), and SKA-121 (5-methylnaphtho[2,1-d]oxazol-2-amine), which displays 41-fold selectivity for KCa3.1 (EC50 109 nM ± 14 nM) over KCa2.3 (EC50 4.4 ± 1.6 μM). Both compounds are 200- to 400-fold selective over representative KV (KV1.3, KV2.1, KV3.1, and KV11.1), NaV (NaV1.2, NaV1.4, NaV1.5, and NaV1.7), as well as CaV1.2 channels. SKA-121 is a typical positive-gating modulator and shifts the calcium-concentration response curve of KCa3.1 to the left. In blood pressure telemetry experiments, SKA-121 (100 mg/kg i.p.) significantly lowered mean arterial blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive wild-type but not in KCa3.1(-/-) mice. SKA-111, which was found in pharmacokinetic experiments to have a much longer half-life and to be much more brain penetrant than SKA-121, not only lowered blood pressure but also drastically reduced heart rate, presumably through cardiac and neuronal KCa2 activation when dosed at 100 mg/kg. In conclusion, with SKA-121, we generated a KCa3.1-specific positive gating modulator suitable for further exploring the therapeutical potential of KCa3.1 activation.

  12. New Positive Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel Gating Modulators with Selectivity for KCa3.1

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Nichole; Brown, Brandon M.; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Singh, Vikrant; Olmstead, Marilyn M.; Valero, Marta Sofia; Köhler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Small-conductance (KCa2) and intermediate-conductance (KCa3.1) calcium-activated K+ channels are voltage-independent and share a common calcium/calmodulin-mediated gating mechanism. Existing positive gating modulators like EBIO, NS309, or SKA-31 activate both KCa2 and KCa3.1 channels with similar potency or, as in the case of CyPPA and NS13001, selectively activate KCa2.2 and KCa2.3 channels. We performed a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study with the aim of optimizing the benzothiazole pharmacophore of SKA-31 toward KCa3.1 selectivity. We identified SKA-111 (5-methylnaphtho[1,2-d]thiazol-2-amine), which displays 123-fold selectivity for KCa3.1 (EC50 111 ± 27 nM) over KCa2.3 (EC50 13.7 ± 6.9 μM), and SKA-121 (5-methylnaphtho[2,1-d]oxazol-2-amine), which displays 41-fold selectivity for KCa3.1 (EC50 109 nM ± 14 nM) over KCa2.3 (EC50 4.4 ± 1.6 μM). Both compounds are 200- to 400-fold selective over representative KV (KV1.3, KV2.1, KV3.1, and KV11.1), NaV (NaV1.2, NaV1.4, NaV1.5, and NaV1.7), as well as CaV1.2 channels. SKA-121 is a typical positive-gating modulator and shifts the calcium-concentration response curve of KCa3.1 to the left. In blood pressure telemetry experiments, SKA-121 (100 mg/kg i.p.) significantly lowered mean arterial blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive wild-type but not in KCa3.1−/− mice. SKA-111, which was found in pharmacokinetic experiments to have a much longer half-life and to be much more brain penetrant than SKA-121, not only lowered blood pressure but also drastically reduced heart rate, presumably through cardiac and neuronal KCa2 activation when dosed at 100 mg/kg. In conclusion, with SKA-121, we generated a KCa3.1-specific positive gating modulator suitable for further exploring the therapeutical potential of KCa3.1 activation. PMID:24958817

  13. The ePHD protein SPBP interacts with TopBP1 and together they co-operate to stimulate Ets1-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sjøttem, Eva; Rekdal, Cecilie; Svineng, Gunbjørg; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Klenow, Helle; Uglehus, Rebecca Dale; Johansen, Terje

    2007-01-01

    SPBP (Stromelysin-1 PDGF responsive element binding protein) is a ubiquitously expressed 220 kDa nuclear protein shown to enhance or repress the transcriptional activity of various transcription factors. A yeast two-hybrid screen, with the extended plant homeodomain (ePHD) of SPBP as bait, identified TopBP1 (topoisomerase II β-binding protein 1) as a candidate interaction partner of SPBP. TopBP1 has eight BRCA1 carboxy-terminal (BRCT) domains and is involved in DNA replication, DNA damage responses and in the regulation of gene expression. The interaction between SPBP and TopBP1 was confirmed in vitro and in vivo, and was found to be mediated by the ePHD domain of SPBP and the BRCT6 domain of TopBP1. Both SPBP and TopBP1 enhanced the transcriptional activity of Ets1 on the c-myc P1P2- and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) promoters. Together they displayed a more than additive effect. Both proteins were associated with these promoters. The involvement of TopBP1 was dependent on the serine 1159 phosphorylation site, known to be important for transcriptional activation. Depletion of endogenous SPBP by siRNA treatment reduced MMP3 secretion by 50% in phorbol ester-stimulated human fibroblasts. Taken together, our results show that TopBP1 and SPBP interact physically and functionally to co-operate as co-activators of Ets1. PMID:17913746

  14. The ePHD protein SPBP interacts with TopBP1 and together they co-operate to stimulate Ets1-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sjøttem, Eva; Rekdal, Cecilie; Svineng, Gunbjørg; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Klenow, Helle; Uglehus, Rebecca Dale; Johansen, Terje

    2007-01-01

    SPBP (Stromelysin-1 PDGF responsive element binding protein) is a ubiquitously expressed 220 kDa nuclear protein shown to enhance or repress the transcriptional activity of various transcription factors. A yeast two-hybrid screen, with the extended plant homeodomain (ePHD) of SPBP as bait, identified TopBP1 (topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1) as a candidate interaction partner of SPBP. TopBP1 has eight BRCA1 carboxy-terminal (BRCT) domains and is involved in DNA replication, DNA damage responses and in the regulation of gene expression. The interaction between SPBP and TopBP1 was confirmed in vitro and in vivo, and was found to be mediated by the ePHD domain of SPBP and the BRCT6 domain of TopBP1. Both SPBP and TopBP1 enhanced the transcriptional activity of Ets1 on the c-myc P1P2- and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) promoters. Together they displayed a more than additive effect. Both proteins were associated with these promoters. The involvement of TopBP1 was dependent on the serine 1159 phosphorylation site, known to be important for transcriptional activation. Depletion of endogenous SPBP by siRNA treatment reduced MMP3 secretion by 50% in phorbol ester-stimulated human fibroblasts. Taken together, our results show that TopBP1 and SPBP interact physically and functionally to co-operate as co-activators of Ets1. PMID:17913746

  15. Analysis on the Load Carrying Mechanism Integrated as Heterogeneous Co-operative Manipulator in a Walking Wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajay Vedaraj, I. S.; Jain, Ritika; Rao, B. V. A.

    2014-07-01

    After industrial robots came into existence during 1960, the technology of robotics with the design and analysis of robots in various forms in industries as well as in domestic applications were developed. Nowadays, along with the automotive sector the robots are producing a great impact in the form of quality and production rate to register their existence reliable in various other sectors also. Robotic technology has undergone various phase translations from being tortured as humanoids to the present day manipulators. Depending upon the various forms of its existence, robot manipulators are designed as serial manipulators and parallel manipulators. Individually both types can be proved effective though both have various drawbacks in design and the kinematic analysis. The versatility of robots can be increased by making them work in an environment where the same work volume is shared by more than one manipulator. This work volume can be identified as co-operative work volume of those manipulators. Here the interference of manipulators in the work volume of other manipulators is possible and is made obstacle free. The main advantage of co-operative manipulators is that when a number of independent manipulators are put together in a cooperative work envelope the efficiency and ability to perform tasks is greatly enhanced. The main disadvantage of the co-operative manipulators lies in the complication of its design even for a simple application, in almost all fields. In this paper, a cooperative design of robot manipulators to work in co-operative work environment is done and analysed for its efficacy. In the industrial applications when robotic manipulators are put together in more numbers, the trajectory planning becomes the tough task in the work cell. Proper design can remove the design defects of the cooperative manipulators and can be utilized in a more efficient way. In the proposed research paper an analysis is made on such a type of cooperative manipulator

  16. Classical-quantum arbitrarily varying wiretap channel: Ahlswede dichotomy, positivity, resources, super-activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boche, Holger; Cai, Minglai; Deppe, Christian; Nötzel, Janis

    2016-08-01

    We establish the Ahlswede dichotomy for arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels, i.e., either the deterministic secrecy capacity of the channel is zero, or it equals its randomness-assisted secrecy capacity. We analyze the secrecy capacity of these channels when the sender and the receiver use various resources. It turns out that randomness, common randomness, and correlation as resources are very helpful for achieving a positive secrecy capacity. We prove the phenomenon "super-activation" for arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels, i.e., two channels, both with zero deterministic secrecy capacity, if used together allow perfect secure transmission.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of propolis extract against Staphylococcus coagulase positive and Malassezia pachydermatis of canine otitis.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Rosemari Laura; Maboni, Franciele; Machado, Gustavo; Alves, Sydney Hartz; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna

    2010-05-19

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of propolis extract by determining the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) for coagulase-positive Staphylococcus isolates (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus intermedius) and the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) for Malassezia pachydermatis isolates. The microorganisms were assayed using broth microdilution techniques. The MBC(90) was 21 mg mL(-1), and the MFC(90) was 5.3 mg mL(-1). The propolis extract was found to exhibit antimicrobial activity against both pathogens.

  18. S-Nitrosylation Positively Regulates Ascorbate Peroxidase Activity during Plant Stress Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanjie; Mu, Jinye; Chen, Lichao; Feng, Jian; Hu, Jiliang; Li, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Min; Zuo, Jianru

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are two classes of key signaling molecules involved in various developmental processes and stress responses in plants. The burst of NO and ROS triggered by various stimuli activates downstream signaling pathways to cope with abiotic and biotic stresses. Emerging evidence suggests that the interplay of NO and ROS plays a critical role in regulating stress responses. However, the underpinning molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that NO positively regulates the activity of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase1 (APX1). We found that S-nitrosylation of APX1 at cysteine (Cys)-32 enhances its enzymatic activity of scavenging hydrogen peroxide, leading to the increased resistance to oxidative stress, whereas a substitution mutation at Cys-32 causes the reduction of ascorbate peroxidase activity and abolishes its responsiveness to the NO-enhanced enzymatic activity. Moreover, S-nitrosylation of APX1 at Cys-32 also plays an important role in regulating immune responses. These findings illustrate a unique mechanism by which NO regulates hydrogen peroxide homeostasis in plants, thereby establishing a molecular link between NO and ROS signaling pathways. PMID:25667317

  19. Gramicidin A Mutants with Antibiotic Activity against Both Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Joo, Yechaan; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-03-17

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have shown potential as alternatives to traditional antibiotics for fighting infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One promising example of this is gramicidin A (gA). In its wild-type sequence, gA is active by permeating the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. However, gA is toxic to human red blood cells at similar concentrations to those required for it to exert its antimicrobial effects. Installing cationic side chains into gA has been shown to lower its hemolytic activity while maintaining the antimicrobial potency. In this study, we present the synthesis and the antibiotic activity of a new series of gA mutants that display cationic side chains. Specifically, by synthesizing alkylated lysine derivatives through reductive amination, we were able to create a broad selection of structures with varied activities towards Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Importantly, some of the new mutants were observed to have an unprecedented activity towards important Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Psuedomonas aeruginosa. PMID:26918268

  20. Positive inotropic activity induced by a dehydroisoandrosterone derivative in isolated rat heart model.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Valverde, L; Díaz-Cedillo, F; García-Cervera, E; Pool Gómez, E; López-Ramos, M; Rosas-Nexticapa, M; Martinez-Camacho, R

    2013-10-01

    Experimental studies indicate that some steroid derivatives have inotropic activity; nevertheless, there is scarce information about the effects of the dehydroisoandrosterone and its derivatives at cardiovascular level. In addition, to date the cellular site and mechanism of action of dehydroisoandrosterone at cardiovascular level is very confusing. In order, to clarify those phenomena in this study, a dehydroisoandrosterone derivative was synthesized with the objective of to evaluate its activity on perfusion pressure and coronary resistance and compare this phenomenon with the effect exerted by dehydroisoandrosterone. The Langendorff technique was used to measure changes on perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in an isolated rat heart model in absence or presence of dehydroisoandrosterone and its derivative. Additionally, to characterize the molecular mechanism involved in the inotropic activity induced by dehydroisoandrosterone derivative was evaluated by measuring left ventricular pressure in absence or presence of following compounds; flutamide, prazosin, metoprolol and nifedipine. The results showed that dehydroisoandrosterone derivative significantly increased the perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in comparison with the control conditions and dehydroisoandrosterone. Additionally, other data indicate that dehydroisoandrosterone derivative increase left ventricular pressure in a dose-dependent manner [1 × 10(-9)-1 × 10(-4) mmol]; nevertheless, this phenomenon was significantly inhibited by nifedipine at a dose of 1 × 10(-6) mmol. In conclusion, these data suggest that dehydroisoandrosterone derivative induces positive inotropic activity through of activation the L-type calcium channel.

  1. Gramicidin A Mutants with Antibiotic Activity against Both Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Joo, Yechaan; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-03-17

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have shown potential as alternatives to traditional antibiotics for fighting infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One promising example of this is gramicidin A (gA). In its wild-type sequence, gA is active by permeating the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. However, gA is toxic to human red blood cells at similar concentrations to those required for it to exert its antimicrobial effects. Installing cationic side chains into gA has been shown to lower its hemolytic activity while maintaining the antimicrobial potency. In this study, we present the synthesis and the antibiotic activity of a new series of gA mutants that display cationic side chains. Specifically, by synthesizing alkylated lysine derivatives through reductive amination, we were able to create a broad selection of structures with varied activities towards Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Importantly, some of the new mutants were observed to have an unprecedented activity towards important Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Psuedomonas aeruginosa.

  2. From docking false-positive to active anti-HIV agent.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Gabriela; Kim, Joseph T; Guimarães, Cristiano R W; Bailey, Christopher M; Domaoal, Robert A; Wang, Ligong; Anderson, Karen S; Jorgensen, William L

    2007-11-01

    Virtual screening of the Maybridge library of ca. 70 000 compounds was performed using a similarity filter, docking, and molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area postprocessing to seek potential non-nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs). Although known NNRTIs were retrieved well, purchase and assaying of representative, top-scoring compounds from the library failed to yield any active anti-HIV agents. However, the highest-ranked library compound, oxadiazole 1, was pursued as a potential "near-miss" with the BOMB program to seek constructive modifications. Subsequent synthesis and assaying of several polychloro-analogs did yield anti-HIV agents with EC50 values as low as 310 nM. The study demonstrates that it is possible to learn from a formally unsuccessful virtual-screening exercise and, with the aid of computational analyses, to efficiently evolve a false positive into a true active. PMID:17918923

  3. Effects of Cycling Conditions of Active Material From Discharged Ni Positive Plates Studied by Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, Juergen; Varma, Ravi; Diebolt, Lisa; Reid, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: identify atomic-level signatures of electrochemical activity of the active material on the Ni positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries, relate finding to cycling conditions and histories, and develop INS spectroscopy as a non-destructive testing technique for the evaluation of Ni-positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries.

  4. Exogenous Magnesium Chloride Reduces the Activated Partial Thromboplastin Times of Lupus Anticoagulant-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tokutake, Takayoshi; Baba, Hisami; Shimada, Yuji; Takeda, Wataru; Sato, Keijiro; Hiroshima, Yuki; Kirihara, Takehiko; Shimizu, Ikuo; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay is a basic hemostatic assay based on the time it takes for clots to form in plasma samples after the addition of calcium chloride. It is used to screen for various coagulation disorders. Several previous reports have suggested that magnesium (Mg) might contribute to coagulation reactions by binding to specific coagulation proteins. We investigated the effects of Mg on the APTT. In healthy controls, the APTT was significantly prolonged in proportion to the increase in the concentration of magnesium chloride in the range from 2.1 to 16.7 mmol/L. Among eight samples from patients with various disorders that exhibited prolonged APTT, two samples demonstrated shorter APTT when Mg was added, both of which were from patients that were positive for lupus anticoagulant. When we examined 206 clinical APTT samples, we found that Mg shortened the APTT of two samples. These two samples were also from lupus anticoagulant-positive patients (p-value: <0.003). Our findings regarding the unique effects of exogenous Mg on the APTT of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients might shed light on the role of Mg in APTT assays and lead to the development of a novel screening method for lupus anticoagulant. PMID:27355205

  5. Exogenous Magnesium Chloride Reduces the Activated Partial Thromboplastin Times of Lupus Anticoagulant-Positive Patients.

    PubMed

    Tokutake, Takayoshi; Baba, Hisami; Shimada, Yuji; Takeda, Wataru; Sato, Keijiro; Hiroshima, Yuki; Kirihara, Takehiko; Shimizu, Ikuo; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay is a basic hemostatic assay based on the time it takes for clots to form in plasma samples after the addition of calcium chloride. It is used to screen for various coagulation disorders. Several previous reports have suggested that magnesium (Mg) might contribute to coagulation reactions by binding to specific coagulation proteins. We investigated the effects of Mg on the APTT. In healthy controls, the APTT was significantly prolonged in proportion to the increase in the concentration of magnesium chloride in the range from 2.1 to 16.7 mmol/L. Among eight samples from patients with various disorders that exhibited prolonged APTT, two samples demonstrated shorter APTT when Mg was added, both of which were from patients that were positive for lupus anticoagulant. When we examined 206 clinical APTT samples, we found that Mg shortened the APTT of two samples. These two samples were also from lupus anticoagulant-positive patients (p-value: <0.003). Our findings regarding the unique effects of exogenous Mg on the APTT of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients might shed light on the role of Mg in APTT assays and lead to the development of a novel screening method for lupus anticoagulant.

  6. Reproducibility of liver position using active breathing coordinator for liver cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K.; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Hawkins, Maria; Dawson, Laura A. . E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To measure the intrabreath-hold liver motion and the intrafraction and interfraction reproducibility of liver position relative to vertebral bodies using an active breathing coordinator (ABC) in patients with unresectable liver cancer treated with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Tolerability of ABC and organ motion during ABC was assessed using kV fluoroscopy in 34 patients. For patients treated with ABC, repeat breath-hold CT scans in the ABC breath-hold position were acquired at simulation to estimate the volumetric intrafraction reproducibility of the liver relative to the vertebral bodies. In addition, preceding each radiation therapy fraction, with the liver immobilized using ABC, repeat anteroposterior (AP) megavoltage verification images were obtained. Off-line alignments were completed to determine intrafraction reproducibility (from repeat images obtained before one treatment) and interfraction reproducibility (from comparisons of the final image for each fraction with the AP) of diaphragm position relative to vertebral bodies. For each image set, the vertebral bodies were aligned, and the resultant craniocaudal (CC) offset in diaphragm position was measured. Liver position during ABC was also evaluated from kV fluoroscopy acquired at the time of simulation, kV fluoroscopy at the time of treatment, and from MV beam's-eye view movie loops acquired during treatment. Results: Twenty-one of 34 patients were screened to be suitable for ABC. The average free breathing range of these patients was 13 mm (range, 5-1 mm). Fluoroscopy revealed that the average maximal diaphragm motion during ABC breath-hold was 1.4 mm (range, 0-3.4 mm). The MV treatment movie loops confirmed diaphragm stability during treatment. For a measure of intrafraction reproducibility, an analysis of 36 repeat ABC computed tomography (CT) scans in 14 patients was conducted. The average mean difference in the liver surface position was -0.9 mm, -0

  7. Activated WNT signaling in postnatal SOX2-positive dental stem cells can drive odontoma formation

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Guilherme M.; Patist, Amanda L.; Healy, Chris; Pagrut, Ankita; Carreno, Gabriela; Sharpe, Paul T.; Pedro Martinez-Barbera, Juan; Thavaraj, Selvam; Cobourne, Martyn T.; Andoniadou, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    In common with most mammals, humans form only two dentitions during their lifetime. Occasionally, supernumerary teeth develop in addition to the normal complement. Odontoma represent a small group of malformations containing calcified dental tissues of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin, with varying levels of organization, including tooth-like structures. The specific cell type responsible for the induction of odontoma, which retains the capacity to re-initiate de novo tooth development in postnatal tissues, is not known. Here we demonstrate that aberrant activation of WNT signaling by expression of a non-degradable form of β-catenin specifically in SOX2-positive postnatal dental epithelial stem cells is sufficient to generate odontoma containing multiple tooth-like structures complete with all dental tissue layers. Genetic lineage-tracing confirms that odontoma form in a similar manner to normal teeth, derived from both the mutation-sustaining epithelial stem cells and adjacent mesenchymal tissues. Activation of the WNT pathway in embryonic SOX2-positive progenitors results in ectopic expression of secreted signals that promote odontogenesis throughout the oral cavity. Significantly, the inductive potential of epithelial dental stem cells is retained in postnatal tissues, and up-regulation of WNT signaling specifically in these cells is sufficient to promote generation and growth of ectopic malformations faithfully resembling human odontoma. PMID:26411543

  8. Activated WNT signaling in postnatal SOX2-positive dental stem cells can drive odontoma formation.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Guilherme M; Patist, Amanda L; Healy, Chris; Pagrut, Ankita; Carreno, Gabriela; Sharpe, Paul T; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Thavaraj, Selvam; Cobourne, Martyn T; Andoniadou, Cynthia L

    2015-09-28

    In common with most mammals, humans form only two dentitions during their lifetime. Occasionally, supernumerary teeth develop in addition to the normal complement. Odontoma represent a small group of malformations containing calcified dental tissues of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin, with varying levels of organization, including tooth-like structures. The specific cell type responsible for the induction of odontoma, which retains the capacity to re-initiate de novo tooth development in postnatal tissues, is not known. Here we demonstrate that aberrant activation of WNT signaling by expression of a non-degradable form of β-catenin specifically in SOX2-positive postnatal dental epithelial stem cells is sufficient to generate odontoma containing multiple tooth-like structures complete with all dental tissue layers. Genetic lineage-tracing confirms that odontoma form in a similar manner to normal teeth, derived from both the mutation-sustaining epithelial stem cells and adjacent mesenchymal tissues. Activation of the WNT pathway in embryonic SOX2-positive progenitors results in ectopic expression of secreted signals that promote odontogenesis throughout the oral cavity. Significantly, the inductive potential of epithelial dental stem cells is retained in postnatal tissues, and up-regulation of WNT signaling specifically in these cells is sufficient to promote generation and growth of ectopic malformations faithfully resembling human odontoma.

  9. Knowing good from bad: differential activation of human cortical areas by positive and negative outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Slagter, Heleen A; von Geusau, Niels J Alting; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Holroyd, Clay B

    2005-06-01

    Previous research has identified a component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), the feedback-related negativity, that is elicited by feedback stimuli associated with unfavourable outcomes. In the present research we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings to test the common hypothesis that this component is generated in the caudal anterior cingulate cortex. The EEG results indicated that our paradigm, a time estimation task with trial-to-trial performance feedback, elicited a large feedback-related negativity (FRN). Nevertheless, the fMRI results did not reveal any area in the caudal anterior cingulate cortex that was differentially activated by positive and negative performance feedback, casting doubt on the notion that the FRN is generated in this brain region. In contrast, we found a number of brain areas outside the posterior medial frontal cortex that were activated more strongly by positive feedback than by negative feedback. These included areas in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, right superior frontal gyrus, and striatum. An anatomically constrained source model assuming equivalent dipole generators in the rostral anterior cingulate, posterior cingulate, and right superior frontal gyrus produced a simulated scalp distribution that corresponded closely to the observed scalp distribution of the FRN. These results support a new hypothesis regarding the neural generators of the FRN, and have important implications for the use of this component as an electrophysiological index of performance monitoring and reward processing. PMID:15978024

  10. Magnitudes of muscle activation of spine stabilizers, gluteals, and hamstrings during supine bridge to neutral position.

    PubMed

    Youdas, James W; Hartman, James P; Murphy, Brooke A; Rundle, Ashley M; Ugorowski, Jenna M; Hollman, John H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude of selective core muscle activation during supine bridging to neutral exercises (three on a stable and three on an unstable surface). Surface EMG analysis was performed on the lumbar multifidus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, and hamstrings from 13 male and 13 female subjects. Lumbar multifidus recruitment was not influenced by exercise or condition and ranged between 29.2 and 35.9% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Peak gluteus medius activation (42.0% MVIC) occurred in unstable single-leg bridge. Maximum recruitment of gluteus maximus (32.6% MVIC) appeared during stable single-leg bridge. Peak hamstring activation (59.6% MVIC) occurred during stable double-leg hamstring curl. Regardless of condition, hamstrings demonstrated high (51.9-59.6% MVIC) muscle recruitment during double-leg hamstring curls compared with the single-leg bridge or double-leg bridge. Various supine bridging to neutral exercises activated the hamstrings at levels conducive to strengthening, whereas recruitment of lumbar multifidus, gluteus medius, and gluteus maximus promoted endurance training. Clinically, we were unable to conclude the unstable support surface was preferable to the stable surface for boosting muscle recruitment of spine stabilizers, gluteals, and hamstring muscles during supine bridge to neutral position. PMID:25671354

  11. Activity in ventromedial prefrontal cortex during self-related processing: positive subjective value or personal significance?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Marcia K.

    2015-01-01

    Well-being and subjective experience of a coherent world depend on our sense of ‘self’ and relations between the self and the environment (e.g. people, objects and ideas). The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC) is involved in self-related processing, and disrupted vMPFC activity is associated with disruptions of emotional/social functioning (e.g. depression and autism). Clarifying precise function(s) of vMPFC in self-related processing is an area of active investigation. In this study, we sought to more specifically characterize the function of vMPFC in self-related processing, focusing on two alternative accounts: (i) assignment of positive subjective value to self-related information and (ii) assignment of personal significance to self-related information. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants imagined owning objects associated with either their perceived ingroup or outgroup. We found that for ingroup-associated objects, vMPFC showed greater activity for objects with increased than decreased post-ownership preference. In contrast, for outgroup-associated objects, vMPFC showed greater activity for objects with decreased than increased post-ownership preference. Our findings support the idea that the function of vMPFC in self-related processing may not be to represent/evaluate the ‘positivity’ or absolute preference of self-related information but to assign personal significance to it based on its meaning/function for the self. PMID:24837477

  12. Tribolium castaneum defensins are primarily active against Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tonk, Miray; Knorr, Eileen; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J; Kollewe, Christian; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum is a destructive insect pest of stored food and feed products, and a model organism for development, evolutionary biology and immunity. The insect innate immune system includes antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. Defensins are an evolutionarily-conserved class of AMPs and a potential new source of antimicrobial agents. In this context, we report the antimicrobial activity, phylogenetic and structural properties of three T. castaneum defensins (Def1, Def2 and Def3) and their relevance in the immunity of T. castaneum against bacterial pathogens. All three recombinant defensins showed bactericidal activity against Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi, but only Def1 and Def2 showed a bacteriostatic effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis. None of the defensins showed activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas entomophila or against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All three defensins were transcriptionally upregulated following a bacterial challenge, suggesting a key role in the immunity of T. castaneum against bacterial pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that defensins from T. castaneum, mealworms, Udo longhorn beetle and houseflies cluster within a well-defined clade of insect defensins. We conclude that T. castaneum defensins are primarily active against Gram-positive bacteria and that other AMPs may play a more prominent role against Gram-negative species. PMID:26522790

  13. Suppressed catalytic activity of base excision repair enzymes on rotationally positioned uracil in nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Beard, Brian C; Wilson, Samuel H; Smerdon, Michael J

    2003-06-24

    The majority of DNA in eukaryotic cells exists in the highly condensed structural hierarchy of chromatin, which presents a challenge to DNA repair enzymes in that recognition, incision, and restoration of the original sequence at most sites must take place within these structural constraints. To test base excision repair (BER) activities on chromatin substrates, an in vitro system was developed that uses human uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), apyrimidinic/apurinic endonuclease (APE), and DNA polymerase beta (pol beta) on homogeneously damaged, rotationally positioned DNA in nucleosomes. We find that UDG and APE carry out their combined catalytic activities with reduced efficiency on nucleosome substrates ( approximately 10% of that on naked DNA). Furthermore, these enzymes distinguish between two different rotational settings of the lesion on the histone surface, showing a 2- to 3-fold difference in activity between uracil facing "toward" and "away from" the histones. However, UDG and APE will digest such substrates to completion in a concentration-dependent manner. Conversely, the synthesis activity of pol beta is inhibited completely by nucleosome substrates and is independent of enzyme concentration. These results suggest that the first two steps of BER, UDG and APE, may occur "unassisted" in chromatin, whereas downstream factors in this pathway (i.e., pol beta) may require nucleosome remodeling for efficient DNA BER in at least some regions of chromatin in eukaryotic cells.

  14. Immunohistochemical quantitation of oestrogen receptors and proliferative activity in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, V; Ladekarl, M

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To evaluate the effect of the duration of formalin fixation and of tumour heterogeneity on quantitative estimates of oestrogen receptor content (oestrogen receptor index) and proliferative activity (MIB-1 index) in breast cancer. METHODS--Two monoclonal antibodies, MIB-1 and oestrogen receptor, were applied to formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue from 25 prospectively collected oestrogen receptor positive breast carcinomas, using a microwave antigen retrieval method. Tumour tissue was allocated systematically to different periods of fixation to ensure minimal intraspecimen variation. The percentages of MIB-1 positive and oestrogen receptor positive nuclei were estimated in fields of vision sampled systematically from the entire specimen and from the whole tumour area of one "representative" cross-section. RESULTS--No correlation was found between the oestrogen receptor and MIB-1 indices and the duration of formalin fixation. The estimated MIB-1 and oestrogen receptor indices in tissue sampled systematically from the entire tumour were closely correlated with estimates obtained in a "representative" section. The intra- and interobserver correlation of the MIB-1 index was good, although a slight systematical error at the second assessment of the intraobserver study was noted. CONCLUSION--Quantitative estimates of oestrogen receptor content and proliferative activity are not significantly influenced by the period of fixation in formalin, varying from less than four hours to more than 48 hours. The MIB-1 and the oestrogen receptor indices obtained in a "representative" section do not deviate significantly from average indices determined in tissue samples from the entire tumour. Finally, the estimation of MIB-1 index is reproducible, justifying its routine use. PMID:7629289

  15. Effects of Stress Activated Positive-Hole Charge Carriers on Radar Reflectance of Gabbro-Diorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Dahlgren, R.; Cherukupally, A.; Freund, F. T.

    2011-12-01

    When load is applied to igneous or high-grade metamorphic rocks, trapped electron vacancy defects are activated and become mobile positive-hole charge carriers. These mobile charge carriers repel each other through Coulomb interactions and move outward from the stressed region. As large numbers of positive-holes reach the surface of the rock, this surface charge may cause an observable change in radar reflectance. In this experiment, a series of holes is drilled into a large gabbro-diorite boulder from the A.R. Wilson Quarry in Aromas, CA. Bustar, an expansive, non-explosive demolition agent, is poured into the holes while a 1.2 GHz radar system measures the amplitude of radar waves reflected from the rock's surface. Over the course of the experiment, the radar antenna is swept repeatedly across one face of the rock, pausing in one of twelve positions to collect data before moving to the next position. At the end of each sweep, the radar is calibrated against both a corner reflector and a flat-plate reflector. This sampling method is employed to detect and assign a cause to transient effects observed at any one location. An initial analysis of the radar data shows a high level of agreement between readings from the flat-plate and corner reflectors, supporting the use of flat-plate reflectors as a calibration source for this omnidirectional radar system. Fitting a trend to the amplitude of the wave reflected from the rock's surface is complicated by the presence of unexpected outliers and noise artifacts from the radar system itself. It appears that such a trend, if present, would likely indicate a change in amplitude of the reflected signal of less than 5 percent over the course of the experiment.

  16. Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles in afterglow in neon at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pejović, Milić M. Nešić, Nikola T.; Pejović, Momčilo M.

    2014-04-15

    Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles formed during breakdown and successive discharge in neon-filled tube at 6.6 millibars pressure had been analyzed. This analysis was performed on the basis of mean value of electrical breakdown time delay t{sup ¯}{sub d} dependence on afterglow period τ (memory curve). It was shown that positive ions are present in the 1μs < τ < 30 ms interval, which is manifested through t{sup ¯}{sub d} slow increase with the increase of τ. A rapid t{sup ¯}{sub d} increase in the 30 ms < τ < 3 s interval is a consequence of significant decrease of positive ions concentration and dominant role in breakdown initiation have ground state nitrogen atoms, which further release secondary electrons from the cathode by catalytic recombination process. These atoms are formed during discharge by dissociation of ground state nitrogen molecules that are present as impurities in neon. For τ > 3 s, breakdown is initiated by cosmic rays and natural radioactivity. The increase of discharge current leads to decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increase of positive ions concentration in inter electrode gap. The increase of applied voltage also decreases t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms due to the increase of the probability for initial electron to initiate breakdown. The presence of UV radiation leads to the decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increased electron yield caused by photoelectrons. The influence of photoelectrons on breakdown initiation can be noticed for τ > 0.1 ms, while they dominantly determine t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms.

  17. Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles in afterglow in neon at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejović, Milić M.; Nešić, Nikola T.; Pejović, Momčilo M.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles formed during breakdown and successive discharge in neon-filled tube at 6.6 millibars pressure had been analyzed. This analysis was performed on the basis of mean value of electrical breakdown time delay t¯d dependence on afterglow period τ (memory curve). It was shown that positive ions are present in the 1μs < τ < 30 ms interval, which is manifested through t ¯d slow increase with the increase of τ. A rapid t¯d increase in the 30 ms < τ < 3 s interval is a consequence of significant decrease of positive ions concentration and dominant role in breakdown initiation have ground state nitrogen atoms, which further release secondary electrons from the cathode by catalytic recombination process. These atoms are formed during discharge by dissociation of ground state nitrogen molecules that are present as impurities in neon. For τ > 3 s, breakdown is initiated by cosmic rays and natural radioactivity. The increase of discharge current leads to decrease of t¯d due to the increase of positive ions concentration in inter electrode gap. The increase of applied voltage also decreases t¯d for τ > 30 ms due to the increase of the probability for initial electron to initiate breakdown. The presence of UV radiation leads to the decrease of t¯d due to the increased electron yield caused by photoelectrons. The influence of photoelectrons on breakdown initiation can be noticed for τ > 0.1 ms, while they dominantly determine t¯d for τ > 30 ms.

  18. Combining global positioning system and accelerometer data to determine the locations of physical activity in children.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, Nicolas M; Blossom, Jeff; Field, Alison E; Chiang, Sylvia R; Winickoff, Jonathan P; Kleinman, Ronald E

    2012-05-01

    National trends indicate that children and adolescents are not achieving sufficient levels of physical activity. Combining global positioning system (GPS) technology with accelerometers has the potential to provide an objective determination in locations where youth engage in physical activity. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal methods for collecting combined accelerometer and GPS data in youth, to best locate where children spend time and are physically active. A convenience sample of 24 mid-school children in Massachusetts was included. Accelerometers and GPS units were used to quantify and locate childhood physical activity over 5 weekdays and 2 weekend days. Accelerometer and GPS data were joined by time and mapped with a geographical information system (GIS) using ArcGIS software. Data were collected in winter, spring, summer in 2009-2010, collecting a total of 26,406 matched datapoints overall. Matched data yield was low (19.1% total), regardless of season (winter, 12.8%; spring, 30.1%; summer, 14.3%). Teacher-provided, pre-charged equipment yielded the most matched (30.1%; range: 10.1-52.3%) and greatest average days (6.1 days) of data. Across all seasons, children spent most of their time at home. Outdoor use patterns appeared to vary by season, with street use increasing in spring, and park and playground use increasing in summer. Children spent equal amounts of physical activity time at home and walking in the streets. Overall, the various methods for combining GPS and accelerometer data provided similarly low amounts of combined data. No combined GPS and accelerometer data collection method proved superior in every data return category, but use of GIS to map joined accelerometer and GPS data can demarcate childhood physical activity locations.

  19. Reconstructing liver shape and position from MR image slices using an active shape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenchel, Matthias; Thesen, Stefan; Schilling, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    We present an algorithm for fully automatic reconstruction of 3D position, orientation and shape of the human liver from a sparsely covering set of n 2D MR slice images. Reconstructing the shape of an organ from slice images can be used for scan planning, for surgical planning or other purposes where 3D anatomical knowledge has to be inferred from sparse slices. The algorithm is based on adapting an active shape model of the liver surface to a given set of slice images. The active shape model is created from a training set of liver segmentations from a group of volunteers. The training set is set up with semi-manual segmentations of T1-weighted volumetric MR images. Searching for the optimal shape model that best fits to the image data is done by maximizing a similarity measure based on local appearance at the surface. Two different algorithms for the active shape model search are proposed and compared: both algorithms seek to maximize the a-posteriori probability of the grey level appearance around the surface while constraining the surface to the space of valid shapes. The first algorithm works by using grey value profile statistics in normal direction. The second algorithm uses average and variance images to calculate the local surface appearance on the fly. Both algorithms are validated by fitting the active shape model to abdominal 2D slice images and comparing the shapes, which have been reconstructed, to the manual segmentations and to the results of active shape model searches from 3D image data. The results turn out to be promising and competitive to active shape model segmentations from 3D data.

  20. A new co-operative inversion strategy via fuzzy clustering technique applied to seismic and magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong Kieu, Duy; Kepic, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical inversion produces very useful images of earth parameters; however, inversion results usually suffer from inherent non-uniqueness: many subsurface models with different structures and parameters can explain the measurements. To reduce the ambiguity, extra information about the earth's structure and physical properties is needed. This prior information can be extracted from geological principles, prior petrophysical information from well logs, and complementary information from other geophysical methods. Any technique used to constrain inversion should be able to integrate the prior information and to guide updating inversion process in terms of the geological model. In this research, we have adopted fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique for this purpose. FCM is a clustering method that allows us to divide the model of physical parameters into a few clusters of representative values that also may relate to geological units based on the similarity of the geophysical properties. This exploits the fact that in many geological environments the earth is comprised of a few distinctive rock units with different physical properties. Therefore FCM can provide a platform to constrain geophysical inversion, and should tend to produce models that are geologically meaningful. FCM was incorporated in both separate and co-operative inversion processing of seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) data with petrophysical constraints. Using petrophysical information through FCM assists the inversion to build a reliable earth model. In this algorithm, FCM plays a role of guider; it uses the prior information to drive the model update process, and also forming an earth model filled with rocks units rather than smooth transitions when the boundary is in doubt. Where petrophysical information from well logs or core measurement is not locally available the cluster petrophysics may be solved for in inversion as well if some knowledge of how many distinctive geological exist. A

  1. Subtle Changes in Motif Positioning Cause Tissue-Specific Effects on Robustness of an Enhancer's Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Jelena; Saunders, Timothy E.; Girardot, Charles; Devos, Damien P.; Hufnagel, Lars; Furlong, Eileen E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the specific contribution of individual motifs within cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is crucial to understanding how gene expression is regulated and how this process is affected by sequence variation. But despite vast improvements in the ability to identify where transcription factors (TFs) bind throughout the genome, we are limited in our ability to relate information on motif occupancy to function from sequence alone. Here, we engineered 63 synthetic CRMs to systematically assess the relationship between variation in the content and spacing of motifs within CRMs to CRM activity during development using Drosophila transgenic embryos. In over half the cases, very simple elements containing only one or two types of TF binding motifs were capable of driving specific spatio-temporal patterns during development. Different motif organizations provide different degrees of robustness to enhancer activity, ranging from binary on-off responses to more subtle effects including embryo-to-embryo and within-embryo variation. By quantifying the effects of subtle changes in motif organization, we were able to model biophysical rules that explain CRM behavior and may contribute to the spatial positioning of CRM activity in vivo. For the same enhancer, the effects of small differences in motif positions varied in developmentally related tissues, suggesting that gene expression may be more susceptible to sequence variation in one tissue compared to another. This result has important implications for human eQTL studies in which many associated mutations are found in cis-regulatory regions, though the mechanism for how they affect tissue-specific gene expression is often not understood. PMID:24391522

  2. Activity of T-DM1 in Her2-positive breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Rupert; Berghoff, Anna S; Vogl, Ursula; Rudas, Margaretha; Bergen, Elisabeth; Dubsky, Peter; Dieckmann, Karin; Pinker, Katja; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Galid, Arik; Oehler, Leopold; Zielinski, Christoph C; Gnant, Michael; Steger, Guenther G; Preusser, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in metastatic Her2-positive breast cancer. Local treatment remains the standard of care but lapatinib plus capecitabine was recently established as systemic therapy option. Due to a disruption of the blood-brain/tumour-barrier at metastatic sites, even large molecules may penetrate into the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we report on the activity of T-DM1 in Her2-positive breast cancer BM. T-DM1 was administered at a dose of 3.6 mg once every 3 weeks as primary systemic therapy for BM or upon documented CNS progression after initial local treatment. Thus, this study allowed for the appraisal of T-DM1 activity in BM. Restaging was conducted every 12 weeks with MRI or whenever symptoms of disease progression occurred. Ten patients were included; in two asymptomatic subjects, T-DM1 was administered as primary therapy, while eight had progressive BM. All patients had received prior treatment with trastuzumab, six had already received lapatinib, and three pertuzumab as well. Three patients had partial remission of BM, and two patient had stable disease lasting for ≥6 months; two further patients had stable disease for <6 months while three progressed despite treatment. At 8.5 months median follow-up, intracranial PFS was 5 months, and median OS from initiation of T-DM1 was not reached. Local treatment of BM remains the standard of care; lapatinib plus capecitabine is currently the best established systemic therapy option. Still, T-DM1 apparently offers relevant clinical activity in BM and further investigation is warranted.

  3. CCL21/IL21-armed oncolytic adenovirus enhances antitumor activity against TERT-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Yi-Fei; Si, Chong-Zhan; Zhu, Yu-Hui; Jin, Yan; Zhu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Guang-Yao

    2016-07-15

    Multigene-armed oncolytic adenoviruses are capable of efficiently generating a productive antitumor immune response. The chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21) binds to CCR7 on naïve T cells and dendritic cells (DCs) to promote their chemoattraction to the tumor and resultant antitumor activity. Interleukin 21 (IL21) promotes survival of naïve T cells while maintaining their CCR7 surface expression, which increases their capacity to transmigrate in response to CCL21 chemoattraction. IL21 is also involved in NK cell differentiation and B cell activation and proliferation. The generation of effective antitumor immune responses is a complex process dependent upon coordinated interactions of various subsets of effector cells. Using the AdEasy system, we aimed to construct an oncolytic adenovirus co-expressing CCL21 and IL21 that could selectively replicate in TERTp-positive tumor cells (Ad-CCL21-IL21 virus). The E1A promoter of these oncolytic adenoviruses was replaced by telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter (TERTp). Ad-CCL21-IL21 was constructed from three plasmids, pGTE-IL21, pShuttle-CMV-CCL21 and AdEasy-1 and was homologously recombined and propagated in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183 and the packaging cell line HEK-293, respectively. Our results showed that our targeted and armed oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-CCL21-IL21 can induce apoptosis in TERTp-positive tumor cells to give rise to viral propagation, in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, we confirm that these modified oncolytic adenoviruses do not replicate efficiently in normal cells even under high viral loads. Additionally, we investigate the role of Ad-CCL21-IL21 in inducing antitumor activity and tumor specific cytotoxicity of CTLs in vitro. This study suggests that Ad-CCL21-IL21 is a promising targeted tumor-specific oncolytic adenovirus. PMID:27157859

  4. Evaluation of the Unesco Associated Schools Project in Education for International Co-operation and Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Stacy; Omari, Issa

    In accordance with a mandate from Unesco's 1978 General Conference, an evaluation methodology and instruments were devised to assess the Unesco Associated School's success in encouraging international peace and human rights. The background of this assessment project and a report of evaluation activities are presented in this document. The…

  5. Regional Co-operation for Literacy in Asia and the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaoka, Taichi

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the Asian Cultural Centre for UNESCO's copublication program producing follow-up reading materials for expanding literacy. Includes lists of materials produces, information of the development of materials, and personnel training. Describes how the regional literacy programs workshops, and activities ar managed. Suggests that regional…

  6. Clusterless Decoding of Position From Multiunit Activity Using A Marked Point Process Filter

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xinyi; Liu, Daniel F.; Kay, Kenneth; Frank, Loren M.; Eden, Uri T.

    2016-01-01

    Point process filters have been applied successfully to decode neural signals and track neural dynamics. Traditionally, these methods assume that multiunit spiking activity has already been correctly spike-sorted. As a result, these methods are not appropriate for situations where sorting cannot be performed with high precision such as real-time decoding for brain-computer interfaces. As the unsupervised spike-sorting problem remains unsolved, we took an alternative approach that takes advantage of recent insights about clusterless decoding. Here we present a new point process decoding algorithm that does not require multiunit signals to be sorted into individual units. We use the theory of marked point processes to construct a function that characterizes the relationship between a covariate of interest (in this case, the location of a rat on a track) and features of the spike waveforms. In our example, we use tetrode recordings, and the marks represent a four-dimensional vector of the maximum amplitudes of the spike waveform on each of the four electrodes. In general, the marks may represent any features of the spike waveform. We then use Bayes’ rule to estimate spatial location from hippocampal neural activity. We validate our approach with a simulation study and with experimental data recorded in the hippocampus of a rat moving through a linear environment. Our decoding algorithm accurately reconstructs the rat’s position from unsorted multiunit spiking activity. We then compare the quality of our decoding algorithm to that of a traditional spike-sorting and decoding algorithm. Our analyses show that the proposed decoding algorithm performs equivalently or better than algorithms based on sorted single-unit activity. These results provide a path toward accurate real-time decoding of spiking patterns that could be used to carry out content-specific manipulations of population activity in hippocampus or elsewhere in the brain. PMID:25973549

  7. Intervention to increase physical activity in irritable bowel syndrome shows long-term positive effects

    PubMed Central

    Johannesson, Elisabet; Ringström, Gisela; Abrahamsson, Hasse; Sadik, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the long-term effects of physical activity on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and on quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. METHODS: Seventy-six patients from a previous randomized controlled interventional study on increased physical activity in IBS were asked to participate in this long-term follow-up study. The included patients attended one visit in which they filled out questionnaires and they underwent a submaximal cycle ergometer test. The primary end point was the change in the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) at baseline, i.e., before the intervention and at follow-up. The secondary endpoints were changes in quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. RESULTS: A total of 39 [32 women, median age 45 (28-61) years] patients were included in this follow-up. Median follow-up time was 5.2 (range: 3.8-6.2) years. The IBS symptoms were improved compared with baseline [IBS-SSS: 276 (169-360) vs 218 (82-328), P = 0.001]. This was also true for the majority of the dimensions of psychological symptoms such as disease specific quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. The reported time of physical activity during the week before the visit had increased from 3.2 (0.0-10.0) h at baseline to 5.2 (0.0-15.0) h at follow-up, P = 0.019. The most common activities reported were walking, aerobics and cycling. There was no significant difference in the oxygen uptake 31.8 (19.7-45.8) mL per min per kg at baseline vs 34.6 (19.0-54.6) mL/min per kg at follow-up. CONCLUSION: An intervention to increase physical activity has positive long-term effects on IBS symptoms and psychological symptoms. PMID:25593485

  8. Positive and negative regulation of T-cell activation through kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Mustelin, Tomas; Taskén, Kjetil

    2003-01-01

    The sequence of events in T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling leading to T-cell activation involves regulation of a number of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and the phosphorylation status of many of their substrates. Proximal signalling pathways involve PTKs of the Src, Syk, Csk and Tec families, adapter proteins and effector enzymes in a highly organized tyrosine-phosphorylation cascade. In intact cells, tyrosine phosphorylation is rapidly reversible and generally of a very low stoichiometry even under induced conditions due to the fact that the enzymes removing phosphate from tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), have a capacity that is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the PTKs. It follows that a relatively minor change in the PTK/PTPase balance can have a major impact on net tyrosine phosphorylation and thereby on activation and proliferation of T-cells. This review focuses on the involvement of PTKs and PTPases in positive and negative regulation of T-cell activation, the emerging theme of reciprocal regulation of each type of enzyme by the other, as well as regulation of phosphotyrosine turnover by Ser/Thr phosphorylation and regulation of localization of signal components. PMID:12485116

  9. Rethinking procrastination: positive effects of "active" procrastination behavior on attitudes and performance.

    PubMed

    Chu, Angela Hsin Chun; Choi, Jin Nam

    2005-06-01

    Researchers and practitioners have long regarded procrastination as a self-handicapping and dysfunctional behavior. In the present study, the authors proposed that not all procrastination behaviors either are harmful or lead to negative consequences. Specifically, the authors differentiated two types of procrastinators: passive procrastinators versus active procrastinators. Passive procrastinators are procrastinators in the traditional sense. They are paralyzed by their indecision to act and fail to complete tasks on time. In contrast, active procrastinators are a "positive" type of procrastinator. They prefer to work under pressure, and they make deliberate decisions to procrastinate. The present results showed that although active procrastinators procrastinate to the same degree as passive procrastinators, they are more similar to nonprocrastinators than to passive procrastinators in terms of purposive use of time, control of time, self-efficacy belief, coping styles, and outcomes including academic performance. The present findings offer a more sophisticated understanding of procrastination behavior and indicate a need to reevaluate its implications for outcomes of individuals.

  10. Idiotypic networks incorporating T-B cell co-operation. The conditions for percolation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, R J; Hogeweg, P

    1989-07-10

    Previous work was concerned with symmetric immune networks of idiotypic interactions amongst B cell clones. The behaviour of these networks was contrary to expectations. This was caused by an extensive percolation of idiotypic signals. Idiotypic activation was thus expected to affect almost all (greater than 10(7] B cell clones. We here analyse whether the incorporation of helper T cells (Th) into these B cell models could cause a reduction in the percolation. Empirical work on idiotypic interactions between Th and B cells however, would suggest that two different idiotypic Th models should be developed: (1) a Th which recognises native B cell idiotypes, i.e. a non-MHC-restricted "ThId" model, and (2) a "classical" MHC-restricted helper T cell model. In the ThId model, the Th-B cell interaction is symmetric. A 2-D model of a Th and a B cell clone that interact idiotypically with each other accounts for various equilibria (i.e. one virgin and two immune states). Introduction of antigen does indeed lead to a state switch from the virgin to the immune state; such a system is thus able to "remember" its exposure to antigen. Idiotypic signals do however, percolate in ThId models via these "B-Th-B-Th" pathways: proliferating Th and B cell clones that interact idiotypically, will always activate each other reciprocally. In the MHC-restricted Th model, Th-B interactions are asymmetric. Because the B cell idiotypes are processed and subsequently presented by MHC molecules, the Th receptor and the native B cell receptor are not expected to be complementary. Thus the Th and the B cells are unable to activate each other reciprocally, and a 2-D Th-B cell model cannot account for idiotypic memory. In contrast to the ThId model, idiotypic activation cannot percolate via "B-Th-B-Th" interactions. Due to the assymmetry idiotypic activation stops at the first Th level. A Th clone cannot activate a subsequent B cell clone: if the B cells recognise the Th cells, they see idiotype but

  11. PICH promotes sister chromatid disjunction and co-operates with topoisomerase II in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian F; Huttner, Diana; Bizard, Anna H; Hirano, Seiki; Li, Tian-Neng; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Liu, Ying; Nigg, Erich A; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-12-08

    PICH is a SNF2 family DNA translocase that binds to ultra-fine DNA bridges (UFBs) in mitosis. Numerous roles for PICH have been proposed from protein depletion experiments, but a consensus has failed to emerge. Here, we report that deletion of PICH in avian cells causes chromosome structural abnormalities, and hypersensitivity to an inhibitor of Topoisomerase II (Topo II), ICRF-193. ICRF-193-treated PICH(-/-) cells undergo sister chromatid non-disjunction in anaphase, and frequently abort cytokinesis. PICH co-localizes with Topo IIα on UFBs and at the ribosomal DNA locus, and the timely resolution of both structures depends on the ATPase activity of PICH. Purified PICH protein strongly stimulates the catalytic activity of Topo II in vitro. Consistent with this, a human PICH(-/-) cell line exhibits chromosome instability and chromosome condensation and decatenation defects similar to those of ICRF-193-treated cells. We propose that PICH and Topo II cooperate to prevent chromosome missegregation events in mitosis.

  12. Earthquake lights and the stress-activation of positive hole charge carriers in rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    St-Laurent, F.; Derr, J.S.; Freund, F.T.

    2006-01-01

    Earthquake-related luminous phenomena (also known as earthquake lights) may arise from (1) the stress-activation of positive hole (p-hole) charge carriers in igneous rocks and (2) the accumulation of high charge carrier concentrations at asperities in the crust where the stress rates increase very rapidly as an earthquake approaches. It is proposed that, when a critical charge carrier concentration is reached, the p-holes form a degenerated solid state plasma that can break out of the confined rock volume and propagate as a rapidly expanding charge cloud. Upon reaching the surface the charge cloud causes dielectric breakdown at the air-rock interface, i.e. corona discharges, accompanied by the emission of light and high frequency electromagnetic radiation. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  14. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  15. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ~95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes.

  16. Refining Time-Activity Classification of Human Subjects Using the Global Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Maogui; Li, Wei; Li, Lianfa; Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Detailed spatial location information is important in accurately estimating personal exposure to air pollution. Global Position System (GPS) has been widely used in tracking personal paths and activities. Previous researchers have developed time-activity classification models based on GPS data, most of them were developed for specific regions. An adaptive model for time-location classification can be widely applied to air pollution studies that use GPS to track individual level time-activity patterns. Methods Time-activity data were collected for seven days using GPS loggers and accelerometers from thirteen adult participants from Southern California under free living conditions. We developed an automated model based on random forests to classify major time-activity patterns (i.e. indoor, outdoor-static, outdoor-walking, and in-vehicle travel). Sensitivity analysis was conducted to examine the contribution of the accelerometer data and the supplemental spatial data (i.e. roadway and tax parcel data) to the accuracy of time-activity classification. Our model was evaluated using both leave-one-fold-out and leave-one-subject-out methods. Results Maximum speeds in averaging time intervals of 7 and 5 minutes, and distance to primary highways with limited access were found to be the three most important variables in the classification model. Leave-one-fold-out cross-validation showed an overall accuracy of 99.71%. Sensitivities varied from 84.62% (outdoor walking) to 99.90% (indoor). Specificities varied from 96.33% (indoor) to 99.98% (outdoor static). The exclusion of accelerometer and ambient light sensor variables caused a slight loss in sensitivity for outdoor walking, but little loss in overall accuracy. However, leave-one-subject-out cross-validation showed considerable loss in sensitivity for outdoor static and outdoor walking conditions. Conclusions The random forests classification model can achieve high accuracy for the four major time-activity

  17. Dab2IP Regulates Neuronal Positioning, Rap1 Activity and Integrin Signaling in the Developing Cortex.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuhong; Homayouni, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Dab2IP (DOC-2/DAB2 interacting protein) is a GTPase-activating protein which is involved in various aspects of brain development in addition to its roles in tumor formation and apoptosis in other systems. In this study, we carefully examined the expression profile of Dab2IP and investigated its physiological role during brain development using a Dab2IP-knockdown (KD) mouse model created by retroviral insertion of a LacZ-encoding gene-trapping cassette. LacZ staining revealed that Dab2IP is expressed in the ventricular zone as well as the cortical plate and the intermediate zone. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Dab2IP protein is localized in the leading process and proximal cytoplasmic regions of migrating neurons in the intermediate zone. Bromodeoxyuridine birth dating experiments in combination with immunohistochemical analysis using layer-specific markers showed that Dab2IP is important for proper positioning of a subset of layer II-IV neurons in the developing cortex. Notably, neuronal migration was not completely disrupted in the cerebral cortex of Dab2IP-KD mice and disruption of migration was not strictly layer specific. Previously, we found that Dab2IP regulates multipolar transition in cortical neurons. Others have shown that Rap1 regulates the transition from multipolar to bipolar morphology in migrating postmitotic neurons through N-cadherin signaling and somal translocation in the superficial layer of the cortical plate through integrin signaling. Therefore, we examined whether Rap1 and integrin signaling were affected in Dab2IP-KD brains. We found that Dab2IP-KD resulted in higher levels of activated Rap1 and integrin in the developing cortex. Taken together, our results suggest that Dab2IP plays an important role in the migration and positioning of a subpopulation of later-born (layers II-IV) neurons, likely through the regulation of Rap1 and integrin signaling. PMID:25721469

  18. Dab2IP Regulates Neuronal Positioning, Rap1 Activity and Integrin Signaling in the Developing Cortex.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuhong; Homayouni, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Dab2IP (DOC-2/DAB2 interacting protein) is a GTPase-activating protein which is involved in various aspects of brain development in addition to its roles in tumor formation and apoptosis in other systems. In this study, we carefully examined the expression profile of Dab2IP and investigated its physiological role during brain development using a Dab2IP-knockdown (KD) mouse model created by retroviral insertion of a LacZ-encoding gene-trapping cassette. LacZ staining revealed that Dab2IP is expressed in the ventricular zone as well as the cortical plate and the intermediate zone. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Dab2IP protein is localized in the leading process and proximal cytoplasmic regions of migrating neurons in the intermediate zone. Bromodeoxyuridine birth dating experiments in combination with immunohistochemical analysis using layer-specific markers showed that Dab2IP is important for proper positioning of a subset of layer II-IV neurons in the developing cortex. Notably, neuronal migration was not completely disrupted in the cerebral cortex of Dab2IP-KD mice and disruption of migration was not strictly layer specific. Previously, we found that Dab2IP regulates multipolar transition in cortical neurons. Others have shown that Rap1 regulates the transition from multipolar to bipolar morphology in migrating postmitotic neurons through N-cadherin signaling and somal translocation in the superficial layer of the cortical plate through integrin signaling. Therefore, we examined whether Rap1 and integrin signaling were affected in Dab2IP-KD brains. We found that Dab2IP-KD resulted in higher levels of activated Rap1 and integrin in the developing cortex. Taken together, our results suggest that Dab2IP plays an important role in the migration and positioning of a subpopulation of later-born (layers II-IV) neurons, likely through the regulation of Rap1 and integrin signaling.

  19. A novel method for measuring TBAb activity in TSAb- and TBAb-positive serum.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Yukio; Hachiya, Takashi; Arata, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    We reported a conversion assay in which thyroid blocking antibody (TBAb) function as thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb). TBAb-bound porcine thyroid cells (PTC) were made by incubating TBAb(+) serum and PTC for 1 hour. When these TBAb-bound PTC were incubated 4 h with rabbit anti-human (h) IgG antibody (Ab), cAMP production was high, but when incubated with normal rabbit serum (NRS) cAMP production was low. TBAb-Mnoclonal Ab (MoAb) (KI-70) showed similar conversion. However, when TSAb-MoAb(M22) was assayed, anti-hIgG Ab-produced cAMP was lower than NRS-produced cAMP. When a mixture of M22 and KI-70 was assayed, anti-hIgG Ab-produced cAMP was higher than NRS. Thus, it is possible to determine existence of TBAb in TSAb(+)serum when anti-IgG Ab-produced cAMP is higher than NRS-produced cAMP. In this assay TBAb activity in TSAb(+)serum was scored as positive, gray zone and negative when the difference [anti-hIgG Ab-produced cAMP(%)-NRS-produced cAMP(%)] was >100%, 50-100% and <±50%, respectively. In TSAb(+)sera of Graves' patients with no treatment or anti-thyroid therapy, positive TBAb was 9% (3/33 )and 6.9% (5/72), and gray zone was 18 % (6/33) and 25% (18/72), respectively. A low prevelance of TBAb and low TBAb activity (<200% as cAMP) was found in these Graves' patients. A radioisotope treated Graves' patient showed existence of both TSAb and TBAb at 5 months (NRS, 800% cAMP and anti-IgGAb,1,350% cAMP), and highly positive TBAb (NRS, 180% cAMP and anti-hIgG Ab, 3,200% cAMP) at 30 months. This conversion assay is useful principally for TBAb determination but is also useful for TBAb determination in TSAb(+)serum. PMID:26299889

  20. PICH promotes sister chromatid disjunction and co-operates with topoisomerase II in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Christian F.; Huttner, Diana; Bizard, Anna H.; Hirano, Seiki; Li, Tian-Neng; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Bjerregaard, Victoria A.; Liu, Ying; Nigg, Erich A.; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Hickson, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    PICH is a SNF2 family DNA translocase that binds to ultra-fine DNA bridges (UFBs) in mitosis. Numerous roles for PICH have been proposed from protein depletion experiments, but a consensus has failed to emerge. Here, we report that deletion of PICH in avian cells causes chromosome structural abnormalities, and hypersensitivity to an inhibitor of Topoisomerase II (Topo II), ICRF-193. ICRF-193-treated PICH−/− cells undergo sister chromatid non-disjunction in anaphase, and frequently abort cytokinesis. PICH co-localizes with Topo IIα on UFBs and at the ribosomal DNA locus, and the timely resolution of both structures depends on the ATPase activity of PICH. Purified PICH protein strongly stimulates the catalytic activity of Topo II in vitro. Consistent with this, a human PICH−/− cell line exhibits chromosome instability and chromosome condensation and decatenation defects similar to those of ICRF-193-treated cells. We propose that PICH and Topo II cooperate to prevent chromosome missegregation events in mitosis. PMID:26643143

  1. PICH promotes sister chromatid disjunction and co-operates with topoisomerase II in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian F; Huttner, Diana; Bizard, Anna H; Hirano, Seiki; Li, Tian-Neng; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Liu, Ying; Nigg, Erich A; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    PICH is a SNF2 family DNA translocase that binds to ultra-fine DNA bridges (UFBs) in mitosis. Numerous roles for PICH have been proposed from protein depletion experiments, but a consensus has failed to emerge. Here, we report that deletion of PICH in avian cells causes chromosome structural abnormalities, and hypersensitivity to an inhibitor of Topoisomerase II (Topo II), ICRF-193. ICRF-193-treated PICH(-/-) cells undergo sister chromatid non-disjunction in anaphase, and frequently abort cytokinesis. PICH co-localizes with Topo IIα on UFBs and at the ribosomal DNA locus, and the timely resolution of both structures depends on the ATPase activity of PICH. Purified PICH protein strongly stimulates the catalytic activity of Topo II in vitro. Consistent with this, a human PICH(-/-) cell line exhibits chromosome instability and chromosome condensation and decatenation defects similar to those of ICRF-193-treated cells. We propose that PICH and Topo II cooperate to prevent chromosome missegregation events in mitosis. PMID:26643143

  2. Amino acids and autophagy: cross-talk and co-operation to control cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Bernadette; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Sarkar, Sovan

    2015-10-01

    Maintenance of amino acid homeostasis is important for healthy cellular function, metabolism and growth. Intracellular amino acid concentrations are dynamic; the high demand for protein synthesis must be met with constant dietary intake, followed by cellular influx, utilization and recycling of nutrients. Autophagy is a catabolic process via which superfluous or damaged proteins and organelles are delivered to the lysosome and degraded to release free amino acids into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, autophagy is specifically activated in response to amino acid starvation via two key signaling cascades: the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) and the general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) pathways. These pathways are key regulators of the integration between anabolic (amino acid depleting) and catabolic (such as autophagy which is amino acid replenishing) processes to ensure intracellular amino acid homeostasis. Here, we discuss the key roles that amino acids, along with energy (ATP, glucose) and oxygen, are playing in cellular growth and proliferation. We further explore how sophisticated methods are employed by cells to sense intracellular amino acid concentrations, how amino acids can act as a switch to dictate the temporal and spatial activation of anabolic and catabolic processes and how autophagy contributes to the replenishment of free amino acids, all to ensure cell survival. Relevance of these molecular processes to cellular and organismal physiology and pathology is also discussed.

  3. Cleavages and co-operation in the UK alcohol industry: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    sectors, but within them. Cleavages were evident within the producer sector between different product categories and within the retail sector between different types of off-trade retailers. However, trade associations were particularly important in providing a means by which the entire industry, or broad sectors within it, could speak with a single voice, despite the limitations on this. There was also evidence of ad-hoc cooperation on specific issues, which resulted from both formal and informal contacts between industry actors. Conclusions Alcohol industry corporations and trade associations collaborate with one another effectively where there are shared interests, allowing the best placed bodies to lead on a given issue. Thus, whilst industry actors may be deeply divided on certain issues they are able to coordinate their positions on occasions where there are clear advantages in so doing. Health policymakers may benefit from an awareness of the multiplicity of interests within the industry and the ways that these may shape collective lobbying positions. PMID:22734630

  4. The E3 ligase Itch and deubiquitinase Cyld co-operatively regulate Tak1 and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Neesar; Zeng, Minghui; Sinha, Indrajit; Polin, Lisa; Wei, Wei-Zen; Rathinam, Chozhavendan; Flavell, Richard; Massoumi, Ramin; Venuprasad, K

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been strongly associated with tumor progression, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that E3 ligase Itch and deubiquitinase Cyld form a complex via the interaction through ‘WW-PPXY’ motifs. The Itch-Cyld complex sequentially cleaved K63-linked ubiquitin chains and catalyzed K48-linked ubiquitination on the kinase Tak1 to terminate inflammatory tumor necrosis factor signaling. Reconstitution of wild-type Cyld but not mutant Cyld(Y485A), which cannot associate with Itch, blocked the sustained Tak1 activation and proinflammatory cytokine production by Cyld−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages. Itch or Cyld deficiency resulted in chronic production of tumor-promoting cytokines by the tumor-associated macrophages and aggressive growth of lung carcinoma. Thus, we have uncovered an Itch-Cyld mediated regulatory mechanism in innate inflammatory cells. PMID:22057290

  5. Activating β-catenin signaling in CD133-positive dermal papilla cells increases hair inductivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linli; Yang, Kun; Xu, Mingang; Andl, Thomas; Millar, Sarah E; Boyce, Steven; Zhang, Yuhang

    2016-08-01

    Bioengineering hair follicles using cells isolated from human tissue remains a difficult task. Dermal papilla (DP) cells are known to guide the growth and cycling activities of hair follicles by interacting with keratinocytes. However, DP cells quickly lose their inductivity during in vitro passaging. Rodent DP cell cultures need external addition of growth factors, including WNT and BMP molecules, to maintain the hair inductive property. CD133 is expressed by a subpopulation of DP cells that are capable of inducing hair follicle formation in vivo. We report here that expression of a stabilized form of β-catenin promoted clonal growth of CD133-positive (CD133+) DP cells in in vitro three-dimensional hydrogel culture while maintaining expression of DP markers, including alkaline phosphatase (AP), CD133, and integrin α8. After a 2-week in vitro culture, cultured CD133+ DP cells with up-regulated β-catenin activity led to an accelerated in vivo hair growth in reconstituted skin compared to control cells. Further analysis showed that matrix cell proliferation and differentiation were significantly promoted in hair follicles when β-catenin signaling was up-regulated in CD133+ DP cells. Our data highlight an important role for β-catenin signaling in promoting the inductive capability of CD133+ DP cells for in vitro expansion and in vivo hair follicle regeneration, which could potentially be applied to cultured human DP cells.

  6. Phosphorylation acts positively and negatively to regulate MRTF-A subcellular localisation and activity

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotou, Richard; Miralles, Francesc; Pawlowski, Rafal; Diring, Jessica; Flynn, Helen R; Skehel, Mark; Treisman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) regulate cytoskeletal genes through their partner transcription factor SRF. The MRTFs bind G-actin, and signal-regulated changes in cellular G-actin concentration control their nuclear accumulation. The MRTFs also undergo Rho- and ERK-dependent phosphorylation, but the function of MRTF phosphorylation, and the elements and signals involved in MRTF-A nuclear export are largely unexplored. We show that Rho-dependent MRTF-A phosphorylation reflects relief from an inhibitory function of nuclear actin. We map multiple sites of serum-induced phosphorylation, most of which are S/T-P motifs and show that S/T-P phosphorylation is required for transcriptional activation. ERK-mediated S98 phosphorylation inhibits assembly of G-actin complexes on the MRTF-A regulatory RPEL domain, promoting nuclear import. In contrast, S33 phosphorylation potentiates the activity of an autonomous Crm1-dependent N-terminal NES, which cooperates with five other NES elements to exclude MRTF-A from the nucleus. Phosphorylation thus plays positive and negative roles in the regulation of MRTF-A. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15460.001 PMID:27304076

  7. Gram-positive bacterial cell envelopes: The impact on the activity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-05-01

    A number of cationic antimicrobial peptides, effectors of innate immunity, are supposed to act at the cytoplasmic membrane leading to permeabilization and eventually membrane disruption. Thereby, interaction of antimicrobial peptides with anionic membrane phospholipids is considered to be a key factor in killing of bacteria. Recently, evidence was provided that killing takes place only when bacterial cell membranes are completely saturated with peptides. This adds to an ongoing debate, which role cell wall components such as peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid and lipopolysaccharide may play in the killing event, i.e. if they rather entrap or facilitate antimicrobial peptides access to the cytoplasmic membrane. Therefore, in this review we focused on the impact of Gram-positive cell wall components for the mode of action and activity of antimicrobial peptides as well as in innate immunity. This led us to conclude that interaction of antimicrobial peptides with peptidoglycan may not contribute to a reduction of their antimicrobial activity, whereas interaction with anionic lipoteichoic acids may reduce the local concentration of antimicrobial peptides on the cytoplasmic membrane necessary for sufficient destabilization of the membranes and bacterial killing. Further affinity studies of antimicrobial peptides toward the different cell wall as well as membrane components will be needed to address this problem on a quantitative level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert.

  8. Activating β-catenin signaling in CD133-positive dermal papilla cells increases hair inductivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linli; Yang, Kun; Xu, Mingang; Andl, Thomas; Millar, Sarah E; Boyce, Steven; Zhang, Yuhang

    2016-08-01

    Bioengineering hair follicles using cells isolated from human tissue remains a difficult task. Dermal papilla (DP) cells are known to guide the growth and cycling activities of hair follicles by interacting with keratinocytes. However, DP cells quickly lose their inductivity during in vitro passaging. Rodent DP cell cultures need external addition of growth factors, including WNT and BMP molecules, to maintain the hair inductive property. CD133 is expressed by a subpopulation of DP cells that are capable of inducing hair follicle formation in vivo. We report here that expression of a stabilized form of β-catenin promoted clonal growth of CD133-positive (CD133+) DP cells in in vitro three-dimensional hydrogel culture while maintaining expression of DP markers, including alkaline phosphatase (AP), CD133, and integrin α8. After a 2-week in vitro culture, cultured CD133+ DP cells with up-regulated β-catenin activity led to an accelerated in vivo hair growth in reconstituted skin compared to control cells. Further analysis showed that matrix cell proliferation and differentiation were significantly promoted in hair follicles when β-catenin signaling was up-regulated in CD133+ DP cells. Our data highlight an important role for β-catenin signaling in promoting the inductive capability of CD133+ DP cells for in vitro expansion and in vivo hair follicle regeneration, which could potentially be applied to cultured human DP cells. PMID:27312243

  9. The ACCEND program: a combined BS and MS program in environmental engineering that includes co-operative work experience.

    PubMed

    Bishop, P L; Keener, T C; Kukreti, A R; Kowel, S T

    2004-01-01

    Environmental engineering education has rapidly expanded in recent years and new teaching methods are needed. Many professionals and educators believe that a MS degree in environmental engineering should be the minimum in order to practice the profession, along with practical training. This paper describes an innovative program being offered at the University of Cincinnati that combines an integrated BS in civil engineering and an MS in environmental engineering with extensive practical co-operative education (co-op) experience, all within a five-year period. The program includes distance learning opportunities during the co-op periods. The result is a well-trained graduate who will receive higher pay and more challenging career opportunities, and who will have developed professionalism and maturity beyond that from traditional engineering programs.

  10. The ACCEND program: a combined BS and MS program in environmental engineering that includes co-operative work experience.

    PubMed

    Bishop, P L; Keener, T C; Kukreti, A R; Kowel, S T

    2004-01-01

    Environmental engineering education has rapidly expanded in recent years and new teaching methods are needed. Many professionals and educators believe that a MS degree in environmental engineering should be the minimum in order to practice the profession, along with practical training. This paper describes an innovative program being offered at the University of Cincinnati that combines an integrated BS in civil engineering and an MS in environmental engineering with extensive practical co-operative education (co-op) experience, all within a five-year period. The program includes distance learning opportunities during the co-op periods. The result is a well-trained graduate who will receive higher pay and more challenging career opportunities, and who will have developed professionalism and maturity beyond that from traditional engineering programs. PMID:15193097

  11. Does the Dumbbell-Carrying Position Change the Muscle Activity in Split Squats and Walking Lunges?

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Michal; Zaatar, Amr M.Z.; Svoboda, Zdenek; Xaverova, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Stastny, P, Lehnert, M, Zaatar, AMZ, Svoboda, Z, and Xaverova, Z. Does the dumbbell-carrying position change the muscle activity in split squats and walking lunges? J Strength Cond Res 29(11): 3177–3187, 2015—The forward walking lunge (WL) and split squat (SSq) are similar exercises that have differences in the eccentric phase, and both can be performed in the ipsilateral or contralateral carrying conditions. This study aimed to determine the effects of dumbbell-carrying position on the kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) amplitudes of the gluteus medius (Gmed), vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris during WLs and SSqs. The resistance-trained (RT) and the non–resistance-trained (NT) groups (both n = 14) performed ipsilateral WLs, contralateral WLs, ipsilateral SSqs, and contralateral SSqs in a randomized order in a simulated training session. The EMG amplitude, expressed as a percentage of the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC), and the kinematics, expressed as the range of motion (ROM) of the hip and knee, were measured during 5 repetition maximum for both legs. The repeated measure analyses of variance showed significant differences between the RT and NT groups. The NT group showed a smaller knee flexion ROM (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.36) during both types of WLs, whereas the RT group showed a higher eccentric Gmed amplitude (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.46) during all exercises and a higher eccentric VL amplitude (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.63) during contralateral WLs. Further differences were found between contralateral and ipsilateral WLs in both the RT (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.69) and NT groups (p < 0.001, η2 = 0.80), and contralateral WLs resulted in higher eccentric Gmed amplitudes. Contralateral WLs highly activated the Gmed (90% MVIC); therefore, this exercise can increase the Gmed maximal strength. The ipsilateral loading condition did not increase the Gmed or VM activity in the RT or NT group. PMID:25968228

  12. CXCL8/IL-8 and CXCL12/SDF-1α Co-operatively Promote Invasiveness and Angiogenesis in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yoichi; Ochi, Nobuo; Sawai, Hirozumi; Yasuda, Akira; Takahashi, Hiroki; Funahashi, Hitoshi; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Tong, Zhimin; Guha, Sushovan

    2009-01-01

    CXC-chemokines are involved in the chemotaxis of neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes. However, role of these chemokines in tumorigenesis, especially with regard to interaction between tumor and its microenvironment, has not been clearly elucidated. The purpose of this study was to analyze the co-operative role of CXCL8 and CXCL12 in the tumor-stromal interaction in pancreatic cancer (PaCa). Using ELISA and RT-PCR, we initially confirmed the expression of ligands and receptors, respectively, of CXC-chemokines in PaCa and stromal cells. We examined the co-operative role of CXCL8 and CXCL12 in proliferation/invasion of PaCa and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and in HUVEC tube-formations through tumor-stromal interaction by MTS, Matrigel invasion, and angiogenesis assays, respectively. We detected expression of CXCR4, but not CXCR2, in all PaCa cells and fibroblasts. PaCa cells secreted CXCL8, and fibroblast cells secreted CXCL12. CXCL8 production in PaCa was significantly enhanced by CXCL12, and CXCL12 production in fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by co-culturing with PaCa. CXCL8 enhanced proliferation/invasion of HUVECs but did not promote proliferation/invasion of PaCa. Both recombinant and PaCa-derived CXCL8 enhanced tube formation of HUVECs that were co-cultured with fibroblast cells. CXCL12 enhanced the proliferation/invasion of HUVECs and the invasion of PaCa cells but had no effect on tube formation of HUVEC. We showed that PaCa-derived CXCL8 and fibroblast-derived CXCL12 cooperatively induced angiogenesis in vitro by promoting HUVEC proliferation, invasion, and tube formation. Thus, corresponding receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4 are potential antiangiogenic and antimetastatic therapeutic targets in PaCa. PMID:19035451

  13. Systematic genome assessment of B-vitamin biosynthesis suggests co-operation among gut microbes

    PubMed Central

    Magnúsdóttir, Stefanía; Ravcheev, Dmitry; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Thiele, Ines

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiota supplies its host with essential nutrients, including B-vitamins. Using the PubSEED platform, we systematically assessed the genomes of 256 common human gut bacteria for the presence of biosynthesis pathways for eight B-vitamins: biotin, cobalamin, folate, niacin, pantothenate, pyridoxine, riboflavin, and thiamin. On the basis of the presence and absence of genome annotations, we predicted that each of the eight vitamins was produced by 40–65% of the 256 human gut microbes. The distribution of synthesis pathways was diverse; some genomes had all eight biosynthesis pathways, whereas others contained no de novo synthesis pathways. We compared our predictions to experimental data from 16 organisms and found 88% of our predictions to be in agreement with published data. In addition, we identified several pairs of organisms whose vitamin synthesis pathway pattern complemented those of other organisms. This analysis suggests that human gut bacteria actively exchange B-vitamins among each other, thereby enabling the survival of organisms that do not synthesize any of these essential cofactors. This result indicates the co-evolution of the gut microbes in the human gut environment. Our work presents the first comprehensive assessment of the B-vitamin synthesis capabilities of the human gut microbiota. We propose that in addition to diet, the gut microbiota is an important source of B-vitamins, and that changes in the gut microbiota composition can severely affect our dietary B-vitamin requirements. PMID:25941533

  14. Co-operative Cdc42 and Rho signalling mediates ephrinB-triggered endothelial cell retraction.

    PubMed

    Groeger, Gillian; Nobes, Catherine D

    2007-05-15

    Cell repulsion responses to Eph receptor activation are linked to rapid actin cytoskeletal reorganizations, which in turn are partially mediated by Rho-ROCK (Rho kinase) signalling, driving actomyosin contractility. In the present study, we show that Rho alone is not sufficient for this repulsion response. Rather, Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) and its effector MRCK (myotonic dystrophy kinase-related Cdc42-binding kinase) are also critical for ephrinB-induced cell retraction. Stimulation of endothelial cells with ephrinB2 triggers rapid, but transient, cell retraction. We show that, although membrane retraction is fully blocked by blebbistatin (a myosin-II ATPase inhibitor), it is only partially blocked by inhibiting Rho-ROCK signalling, suggesting that there is ROCK-independent signalling to actomyosin contractility downstream of EphBs. We find that a combination of either Cdc42 or MRCK inhibition with ROCK inhibition completely abolishes the repulsion response. Additionally, endocytosis of ephrin-Eph complexes is not required for initial cell retraction, but is essential for subsequent Rac-mediated re-spreading of cells. Our data reveal a complex interplay of Rho, Rac and Cdc42 in the process of EphB-mediated cell retraction-recovery responses.

  15. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. Objectives To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). Search methods We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Selection criteria Eligible study types included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies that determined LF-LAM accuracy for TB against a microbiological reference standard (culture or nucleic acid amplification test from any body site). A higher quality reference standard was one in which two or more specimen types were

  16. Co-Operative Advances in Behavioral Health and Performance Research and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderArk, Stephen T.; Leveton, Lauren B.

    2011-01-01

    In organizations that engage in both operations and applied research, with operational needs guiding research questions and research informing improved operations, the ideal goal is a synergy of ideas and information. In reality, this ideal synergy is often lacking. Real-time operational needs driving day-to-day decisions, lack of communication, lag time in getting research advances plugged into operations can cause both areas to suffer from this gap between operations and research. At Johnson Space Center, the Behavior Health and Performance group (BHP) strives to bridge this gap by following a Human Research Program framework: Expectations of future operational needs identify the knowledge gaps; the gaps in turn guide research leading to a product that is transitioned into operations. Thus, the direction those of us in research take is in direct response to current and future needs of operations. Likewise, those of us in operations actively seek knowledge that is supported by evidence-based research. We make an ongoing effort to communicate across the research and operations gap by working closely with each other and making a conscious effort to keep each other informed. The objective of the proposed panel discussion is to demonstrate through the following presentations the results of a successful collaboration between research and operations and to provide ASMA members with more practical knowledge and strategies for building these bridges to serve our field of practice well. The panel will consist of six presenters from BHP operations, internal BHP research, and external research instigated by BHP who together represent the entire BHP Research Transition to Operations Framework

  17. Detecting grizzly bear use of ungulate carcasses using global positioning system telemetry and activity data.

    PubMed

    Ebinger, Michael R; Haroldson, Mark A; van Manen, Frank T; Costello, Cecily M; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Thompson, Daniel J; Gunther, Kerry A; Fortin, Jennifer K; Teisberg, Justin E; Pils, Shannon R; White, P J; Cain, Steven L; Cross, Paul C

    2016-07-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) wildlife collars have revolutionized wildlife research. Studies of predation by free-ranging carnivores have particularly benefited from the application of location clustering algorithms to determine when and where predation events occur. These studies have changed our understanding of large carnivore behavior, but the gains have concentrated on obligate carnivores. Facultative carnivores, such as grizzly/brown bears (Ursus arctos), exhibit a variety of behaviors that can lead to the formation of GPS clusters. We combined clustering techniques with field site investigations of grizzly bear GPS locations (n = 732 site investigations; 2004-2011) to produce 174 GPS clusters where documented behavior was partitioned into five classes (large-biomass carcass, small-biomass carcass, old carcass, non-carcass activity, and resting). We used multinomial logistic regression to predict the probability of clusters belonging to each class. Two cross-validation methods-leaving out individual clusters, or leaving out individual bears-showed that correct prediction of bear visitation to large-biomass carcasses was 78-88 %, whereas the false-positive rate was 18-24 %. As a case study, we applied our predictive model to a GPS data set of 266 bear-years in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (2002-2011) and examined trends in carcass visitation during fall hyperphagia (September-October). We identified 1997 spatial GPS clusters, of which 347 were predicted to be large-biomass carcasses. We used the clustered data to develop a carcass visitation index, which varied annually, but more than doubled during the study period. Our study demonstrates the effectiveness and utility of identifying GPS clusters associated with carcass visitation by a facultative carnivore. PMID:26971522

  18. Detecting grizzly bear use of ungulate carcasses using global positioning system telemetry and activity data.

    PubMed

    Ebinger, Michael R; Haroldson, Mark A; van Manen, Frank T; Costello, Cecily M; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Thompson, Daniel J; Gunther, Kerry A; Fortin, Jennifer K; Teisberg, Justin E; Pils, Shannon R; White, P J; Cain, Steven L; Cross, Paul C

    2016-07-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) wildlife collars have revolutionized wildlife research. Studies of predation by free-ranging carnivores have particularly benefited from the application of location clustering algorithms to determine when and where predation events occur. These studies have changed our understanding of large carnivore behavior, but the gains have concentrated on obligate carnivores. Facultative carnivores, such as grizzly/brown bears (Ursus arctos), exhibit a variety of behaviors that can lead to the formation of GPS clusters. We combined clustering techniques with field site investigations of grizzly bear GPS locations (n = 732 site investigations; 2004-2011) to produce 174 GPS clusters where documented behavior was partitioned into five classes (large-biomass carcass, small-biomass carcass, old carcass, non-carcass activity, and resting). We used multinomial logistic regression to predict the probability of clusters belonging to each class. Two cross-validation methods-leaving out individual clusters, or leaving out individual bears-showed that correct prediction of bear visitation to large-biomass carcasses was 78-88 %, whereas the false-positive rate was 18-24 %. As a case study, we applied our predictive model to a GPS data set of 266 bear-years in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (2002-2011) and examined trends in carcass visitation during fall hyperphagia (September-October). We identified 1997 spatial GPS clusters, of which 347 were predicted to be large-biomass carcasses. We used the clustered data to develop a carcass visitation index, which varied annually, but more than doubled during the study period. Our study demonstrates the effectiveness and utility of identifying GPS clusters associated with carcass visitation by a facultative carnivore.

  19. Detecting grizzly bear use of ungulate carcasses using global positioning system telemetry and activity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebinger, Michael R.; Haroldson, Mark A.; van Manen, Frank T.; Costello, Cecily M; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Thompson, Daniel J.; Gunther, Kerry A.; Fortin, Jennifer K.; Teisberg, Justin E.; Pils, Shannon R; White, P J; Cain, Steven L; Cross, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) wildlife collars have revolutionized wildlife research. Studies of predation by free-ranging carnivores have particularly benefited from the application of location clustering algorithms to determine when and where predation events occur. These studies have changed our understanding of large carnivore behavior, but the gains have concentrated on obligate carnivores. Facultative carnivores, such as grizzly/brown bears (Ursus arctos), exhibit a variety of behaviors that can lead to the formation of GPS clusters. We combined clustering techniques with field site investigations of grizzly bear GPS locations (n = 732 site investigations; 2004–2011) to produce 174 GPS clusters where documented behavior was partitioned into five classes (large-biomass carcass, small-biomass carcass, old carcass, non-carcass activity, and resting). We used multinomial logistic regression to predict the probability of clusters belonging to each class. Two cross-validation methods—leaving out individual clusters, or leaving out individual bears—showed that correct prediction of bear visitation to large-biomass carcasses was 78–88%, whereas the false-positive rate was 18–24%. As a case study, we applied our predictive model to a GPS data set of 266 bear-years in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (2002–2011) and examined trends in carcass visitation during fall hyperphagia (September–October). We identified 1997 spatial GPS clusters, of which 347 were predicted to be large-biomass carcasses. We used the clustered data to develop a carcass visitation index, which varied annually, but more than doubled during the study period. Our study demonstrates the effectiveness and utility of identifying GPS clusters associated with carcass visitation by a facultative carnivore.

  20. cVEMP morphology changes with recording electrode position, but single motor unit activity remains constant.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Sally M; Colebatch, James G; Borire, Adeniyi; Straumann, Dominik; Weber, Konrad P

    2016-04-15

    Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) recorded over the lower quarter of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle in normal subjects may have opposite polarity to those recorded over the midpoint. It has thus been suggested that vestibular projections to the lower part of SCM might be excitatory rather than inhibitory. We tested the hypothesis that the SCM muscle receives both inhibitory and excitatory vestibular inputs. We recorded cVEMPs in 10 normal subjects with surface electrodes placed at multiple sites along the anterior (sternal) component of the SCM muscle. We compared several reference sites: sternum, ipsilateral and contralateral earlobes, and contralateral wrist. In five subjects, single motor unit responses were recorded at the upper, middle, and lower parts of the SCM muscle using concentric needle electrodes. The surface cVEMP had the typical positive-negative polarity at the midpoint of the SCM muscle. In all subjects, as the recording electrode was moved toward each insertion point, p13 amplitude became smaller and p13 latency increased, then the polarity inverted to a negative-positive waveform (n1-p1). Changing the reference site did not affect reflex polarity. There was a significant short-latency change in activity in 61/63 single motor units, and in each case this was a decrease or gap in firing, indicating an inhibitory reflex. Single motor unit recordings showed that the reflex was inhibitory along the entire SCM muscle. The cVEMP surface waveform inversion near the mastoid and sternal insertion points likely reflects volume conduction of the potential occurring with increasing distance from the motor point. PMID:26796756

  1. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. Objectives To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). Search methods We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Selection criteria Eligible study types included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies that determined LF-LAM accuracy for TB against a microbiological reference standard (culture or nucleic acid amplification test from any body site). A higher quality reference standard was one in which two or more specimen types were

  2. Physical activity intensity can be accurately monitored by smartphone global positioning system 'app'.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brett Ashley; Bruce, Lyndell; Benson, Amanda Clare

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring physical activity is important to better individualise health and fitness benefits. This study assessed the concurrent validity of a smartphone global positioning system (GPS) 'app' and a sport-specific GPS device with a similar sampling rate, to measure physical activity components of speed and distance, compared to a higher sampling sport-specific GPS device. Thirty-eight (21 female, 17 male) participants, mean age of 24.68, s = 6.46 years, completed two 2.400 km trials around an all-weather athletics track wearing GPSports Pro™ (PRO), GPSports WiSpi™ (WISPI) and an iPhone™ with a Motion X GPS™ 'app' (MOTIONX). Statistical agreement, assessed using t-tests and Bland-Altman plots, indicated an (mean; 95% LOA) underestimation of 2% for average speed (0.126 km·h(-1); -0.389 to 0.642; p < .001), 1.7% for maximal speed (0.442 km·h(-1); -2.676 to 3.561; p = .018) and 1.9% for distance (0.045 km; -0.140 to 0.232; p < .001) by MOTIONX compared to that measured by PRO. In contrast, compared to PRO, WISPI overestimated average speed (0.232 km·h(-1); -0.376 to 0.088; p < .001) and distance (0.083 km; -0.129 to -0.038; p < .001) by 3.5% whilst underestimating maximal speed by 2.5% (0.474 km·h(-1); -1.152 to 2.099; p < .001). Despite the statistically significant difference, the MOTIONX measures intensity of physical activity, with a similar error as WISPI, to an acceptable level for population-based monitoring in unimpeded open-air environments. This presents a low-cost, minimal burden opportunity to remotely monitor physical activity participation to improve the prescription of exercise as medicine.

  3. Physical activity intensity can be accurately monitored by smartphone global positioning system 'app'.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brett Ashley; Bruce, Lyndell; Benson, Amanda Clare

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring physical activity is important to better individualise health and fitness benefits. This study assessed the concurrent validity of a smartphone global positioning system (GPS) 'app' and a sport-specific GPS device with a similar sampling rate, to measure physical activity components of speed and distance, compared to a higher sampling sport-specific GPS device. Thirty-eight (21 female, 17 male) participants, mean age of 24.68, s = 6.46 years, completed two 2.400 km trials around an all-weather athletics track wearing GPSports Pro™ (PRO), GPSports WiSpi™ (WISPI) and an iPhone™ with a Motion X GPS™ 'app' (MOTIONX). Statistical agreement, assessed using t-tests and Bland-Altman plots, indicated an (mean; 95% LOA) underestimation of 2% for average speed (0.126 km·h(-1); -0.389 to 0.642; p < .001), 1.7% for maximal speed (0.442 km·h(-1); -2.676 to 3.561; p = .018) and 1.9% for distance (0.045 km; -0.140 to 0.232; p < .001) by MOTIONX compared to that measured by PRO. In contrast, compared to PRO, WISPI overestimated average speed (0.232 km·h(-1); -0.376 to 0.088; p < .001) and distance (0.083 km; -0.129 to -0.038; p < .001) by 3.5% whilst underestimating maximal speed by 2.5% (0.474 km·h(-1); -1.152 to 2.099; p < .001). Despite the statistically significant difference, the MOTIONX measures intensity of physical activity, with a similar error as WISPI, to an acceptable level for population-based monitoring in unimpeded open-air environments. This presents a low-cost, minimal burden opportunity to remotely monitor physical activity participation to improve the prescription of exercise as medicine. PMID:26505223

  4. LYN-activating mutations mediate antiestrogen resistance in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Luis J; Fox, Emily M; Balko, Justin M; Garrett, Joan T; Kuba, María Gabriela; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B; Red-Brewer, Monica; Mayer, Ingrid A; Abramson, Vandana; Rizzo, Monica; Kelley, Mark C; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-12-01

    Estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancers adapt to hormone deprivation and become resistant to antiestrogen therapy. Here, we performed deep sequencing on ER(+) tumors that remained highly proliferative after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and identified a D189Y mutation in the inhibitory SH2 domain of the SRC family kinase (SFK) LYN. Evaluation of 463 breast tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed four LYN mutations, two of which affected the SH2 domain. In addition, LYN was upregulated in multiple ER(+) breast cancer lines resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). An RNAi-based kinome screen revealed that LYN is required for growth of ER(+) LTED breast cancer cells. Kinase assays and immunoblot analyses of SRC substrates in transfected cells indicated that LYN(D189Y) has higher catalytic activity than WT protein. Further, LYN(D189Y) exhibited reduced phosphorylation at the inhibitory Y507 site compared with LYN(WT). Other SH2 domain LYN mutants, E159K and K209N, also exhibited higher catalytic activity and reduced inhibitory site phosphorylation. LYN(D189Y) overexpression abrogated growth inhibition by fulvestrant and/or the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in 3 ER(+) breast cancer cell lines. The SFK inhibitor dasatinib enhanced the antitumor effect of BKM120 and fulvestrant against estrogen-deprived ER(+) xenografts but not LYN(D189Y)-expressing xenografts. These results suggest that LYN mutations mediate escape from antiestrogens in a subset of ER(+) breast cancers.

  5. Childhood socioeconomic position and adult leisure-time physical activity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Elhakeem, Ahmed; Cooper, Rachel; Bann, David; Hardy, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Regular leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) benefits health and is thought to be less prevalent in lower socioeconomic groups. Evidence suggests that childhood socioeconomic circumstances can impact on adult health and behaviour however, it is unclear if this includes an influence on adult LTPA. This review tested the hypothesis that a lower childhood socioeconomic position (SEP) is associated with less frequent LTPA during adulthood. Studies were located through a systematic search of MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus and by searching reference lists. Eligible studies were English-language publications testing the association between any indicator of childhood SEP and an LTPA outcome measured during adulthood. Forty-five papers from 36 studies, most of which were European, were included. In most samples, childhood SEP and LTPA were self-reported in midlife. Twenty-two studies found evidence to support the review's hypothesis and thirteen studies found no association. Accounting for own adult SEP partly attenuated associations. There was more evidence of an association in British compared with Scandinavian cohorts and in women compared with men. Results did not vary by childhood SEP indicator or age at assessment of LTPA. This review found evidence of an association between less advantaged childhood SEP and less frequent LTPA during adulthood. Understanding how associations vary by gender and place could provide insights into underlying pathways.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of lipodystrophy in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Eichler, K; Bickel, T M; Klauke, S; Eisen, J; Vogl, T J; Zangos, S

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated retrospectively an automated method for the separate detection of subcutaneous and visceral fat in the abdominal region by magnetic resonance studies in HIV-positive patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy. The patients were divided into four different groups: lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, mixed and the control group. The use of software for the automated detection of abdominal compartment visceral adipose tissue (VAT), total adipose tissue (TAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) was compared to manual evaluation methods (fuzzy C-mean). The results of ROC analysis showed that the parameters, particularly the VAT, are better than the VAT/TAT and at identifying patients with the symptoms of abdominal fat accumulation. A sensitivity of 80.3% and a specificity of 79.5% resulted from a threshold VAT value of >87 cm(2). Moreover, the manual evaluation method was shown to provide greater values for VAT and the VAT/TAT ratio than those given by the automated method. In the present study, a rapid MRI protocol for the detection and assessment of the course of lipodystrophy was presented and tested on a group of patients with signs of HALS, as well as on an antiretroviral naïve control group.

  7. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The Pierre auger

    2007-12-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) [1]. The correlation has maximum significance for cosmic rays with energy greater than {approx} 6 x 10{sup 19} eV and AGN at a distance less than {approx} 75 Mpc. We have confirmed the anisotropy at a confidence level of more than 99% through a test with parameters specified a priori, using an independent data set. The observed correlation is compatible with the hypothesis that cosmic rays with the highest energies originate from extra-galactic sources close enough so that their flux is not significantly attenuated by interaction with the cosmic background radiation (the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect). The angular scale of the correlation observed is a few degrees, which suggests a predominantly light composition unless the magnetic fields are very weak outside the thin disk of our galaxy. Our present data do not identify AGN as the sources of cosmic rays unambiguously, and other candidate sources which are distributed as nearby AGN are not ruled out. We discuss the prospect of unequivocal identification of individual sources of the highest-energy cosmic rays within a few years of continued operation of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  8. TRAP-positive osteoclast precursors mediate ROS/NO-dependent bactericidal activity via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazuaki; Shindo, Satoru; Movila, Alexandru; Kayal, Rayyan; Abdullah, Albassam; Savitri, Irma Josefina; Ikeda, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Tsuguno; Howait, Mohammed; Al-Dharrab, Ayman; Mira, Abdulghani; Han, Xiaozhe; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2016-08-01

    Osteoclastogenesis was induced by RANKL stimulation in mouse monocytes to examine the possible bactericidal function of osteoclast precursors (OCp) and mature osteoclasts (OCm) relative to their production of NO and ROS. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive OCp, but few or no OCm, phagocytized and killed Escherichia coli in association with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Phagocytosis of E. coli and production of ROS and NO were significantly lower in TRAP+ OCp derived from Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 KO mice than that derived from wild-type (WT) or TLR2-KO mice. Interestingly, after phagocytosis, TRAP+ OCp derived from wild-type and TLR2-KO mice did not differentiate into OCm, even with continuous exposure to RANKL. In contrast, E. coli-phagocytized TRAP+ OCp from TLR4-KO mice could differentiate into OCm. Importantly, neither NO nor ROS produced by TRAP+ OCp appeared to be engaged in phagocytosis-induced suppression of osteoclastogenesis. These results suggested that TLR4 signaling not only induces ROS and NO production to kill phagocytized bacteria, but also interrupts OCm differentiation. Thus, it can be concluded that TRAP+ OCp, but not OCm, can mediate bactericidal activity via phagocytosis accompanied by the production of ROS and NO via TLR4-associated reprograming toward phagocytic cell type. PMID:27343691

  9. Electrical Conductivity of Rocks and Dominant Charge Carriers. Part 1; Thermally Activated Positive Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann T.; Freund, Minoru M.

    2012-01-01

    The prevailing view in the geophysics community is that the electrical conductivity structure of the Earth's continental crust over the 5-35 km depth range can best be understood by assuming the presence of intergranular fluids and/or of intragranular carbon films. Based on single crystal studies of melt-grown MgO, magma-derived sanidine and anorthosite feldspars and upper mantle olivine, we present evidence for the presence of electronic charge carriers, which derive from peroxy defects that are introduced during cooling, under non-equilibrium conditions, through a redox conversion of pairs of solute hydroxyl arising from dissolution of H2O.The peroxy defects become thermally activated in a 2-step process, leading to the release of defect electrons in the oxygen anion sublattice. Known as positive holes and symbolized by h(dot), these electronic charge carriers are highly mobile. Chemically equivalent to O(-) in a matrix of O(2-) they are highly oxidizing. Being metastable they can exist in the matrix of minerals, which crystallized in highly reduced environments. The h(dot) are highly mobile. They appear to control the electrical conductivity of crustal rocks in much of the 5-35 km depth range.

  10. Frequencies of Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Differentially Affect Brain Activity: Positive and Negative Hypersonic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10–13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  11. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC.

  12. Childhood socioeconomic position and adult leisure-time physical activity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Elhakeem, Ahmed; Cooper, Rachel; Bann, David; Hardy, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Regular leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) benefits health and is thought to be less prevalent in lower socioeconomic groups. Evidence suggests that childhood socioeconomic circumstances can impact on adult health and behaviour however, it is unclear if this includes an influence on adult LTPA. This review tested the hypothesis that a lower childhood socioeconomic position (SEP) is associated with less frequent LTPA during adulthood. Studies were located through a systematic search of MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus and by searching reference lists. Eligible studies were English-language publications testing the association between any indicator of childhood SEP and an LTPA outcome measured during adulthood. Forty-five papers from 36 studies, most of which were European, were included. In most samples, childhood SEP and LTPA were self-reported in midlife. Twenty-two studies found evidence to support the review's hypothesis and thirteen studies found no association. Accounting for own adult SEP partly attenuated associations. There was more evidence of an association in British compared with Scandinavian cohorts and in women compared with men. Results did not vary by childhood SEP indicator or age at assessment of LTPA. This review found evidence of an association between less advantaged childhood SEP and less frequent LTPA during adulthood. Understanding how associations vary by gender and place could provide insights into underlying pathways. PMID:26138985

  13. The activity and proliferation of pituitary prolactin-positive cells and pituitary VIP-positive cells are regulated by interleukin 6.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Enrique J; Carretero-Hernández, Marta; García-Barrado, Josefa; Iglesias-Osma, M Carmen; Carretero, Manuel; Herrero, Julio J; Rubio, Manuel; Riesco, José M; Carretero, José

    2013-12-01

    Interleukins are proteins involved in the immune system and have been related to the endocrine regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as well as to the secretion of ACTH, prolactin (PRL), GH and, possibly, LH. Like interleukin-6 (IL-6), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is synthesized in the pituitary gland and stimulates prolactin secretion. The aim of the present study was to address whether Interleukin 6 is involved in the regulation of VIP, as well as other factors involved in the regulation of prolactin such as dopamine, TRH and estradiol. Accordingly, we performed an in vitro study on monolayer cultures of rat pituitary cells, neutralizing the possible paracrine effect of IL-6 by immunosuppressing the protein by treatment with polyclonal antibody against IL-6 over 1, 3, 6 or 24 hours and then determining the degree of proliferation of VIP cells using double immunocytochemical labelling for VIP or PRL and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). As a control, the effects of immunosuppression on the proliferation of PRL-positive cells were analyzed. Immunosuppression of IL-6 induced modifications in the cellular and nuclear size of VIP-positive cells, indicating an inhibitory process. Moreover, immunosuppression induced a significant decrease in the proliferation rate of PRL-positive or VIP-positive cells for all time-points analyzed. Similar effects on the proliferation rate of PRL-positive cells were found. The results of the present study demonstrate that IL-6 is involved in the regulation of the activity and proliferation of pituitary VIP-producing cells and suggest that, without ruling out a direct effect of IL-6 on prolactin cells, IL-6 could regulate prolactin by acting on pituitary VIP.

  14. A Propensity Score Matching Study of Participation in Community Activities: A Path to Positive Outcomes for Youth in New Zealand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Seini; Jose, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Extracurricular activities are important in many young people's lives and have been associated with positive academic, psychological, and social outcomes. However, most previous research has been limited to school-based activities in the North American context. This study expands existing literature by analyzing longitudinal data from more than…

  15. Structure–activity relationship studies of manzamine A: Amidation of positions 6 and 8 of the β-carboline moiety

    PubMed Central

    Wahba, Amir E.; Peng, Jiangnan; Kudrimoti, Sucheta; Tekwani, Babu L.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty manzamine amides were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro antimalarial and antimicrobial activities. The amides of manzamine A (1) showed significantly reduced cytotoxicity against Vero cells, although were less active than 1. The structure–activity analysis showed that linear, short alkyl groups adjacent to the amide carbonyl at position 8 are favored for antimalarial activity, while bulky and cyclic groups at position 6 provided the most active amides. Most of the amides showed potent activity against Mycobacterium intracellulare. The antimicrobial activity profile for position 8 series was similar to that for antimalarial activity profile, in which linear, slightly short alkyl groups adjacent to the amide carbonyl showed improved activity. Two amides 14 and 21, which showed potent antimalarial activity in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum were further evaluated in vivo in Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Oral administration of 14 and 21 at the dose of 30 mg/kg (once daily for three days) caused parasitemia suppression of 24% and 62%, respectively, with no apparent toxicity. PMID:19833520

  16. A propensity score matching study of participation in community activities: a path to positive outcomes for youth in New Zealand?

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Seini; Jose, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    Extracurricular activities are important in many young people's lives and have been associated with positive academic, psychological, and social outcomes. However, most previous research has been limited to school-based activities in the North American context. This study expands existing literature by analyzing longitudinal data from more than 1,300 young Māori and European New Zealanders, using propensity score matching techniques to control for selection effects. Results suggest that youth participating in community-based activities experienced greater social support than nonparticipants. For Māori youth, participating in nonsports activities was associated with later benefits, while for New Zealand European youth, benefits were associated with sports activities. Participants of different ages reported different types of benefits. These findings highlight points of similarity and difference between New Zealand and North American youth and provide a better understanding of the positive impacts of community-based activities for young people.

  17. A propensity score matching study of participation in community activities: a path to positive outcomes for youth in New Zealand?

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Seini; Jose, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    Extracurricular activities are important in many young people's lives and have been associated with positive academic, psychological, and social outcomes. However, most previous research has been limited to school-based activities in the North American context. This study expands existing literature by analyzing longitudinal data from more than 1,300 young Māori and European New Zealanders, using propensity score matching techniques to control for selection effects. Results suggest that youth participating in community-based activities experienced greater social support than nonparticipants. For Māori youth, participating in nonsports activities was associated with later benefits, while for New Zealand European youth, benefits were associated with sports activities. Participants of different ages reported different types of benefits. These findings highlight points of similarity and difference between New Zealand and North American youth and provide a better understanding of the positive impacts of community-based activities for young people. PMID:22390671

  18. Co-operation and conflict under hard and soft contracting regimes: case studies from England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper examines NHS secondary care contracting in England and Wales in a period which saw increasing policy divergence between the two systems. At face value, England was making greater use of market levers and utilising harder-edged service contracts incorporating financial penalties and incentives, while Wales was retreating from the 1990s internal market and emphasising cooperation and flexibility in the contracting process. But there were also cross-border spill-overs involving common contracting technologies and management cultures that meant that differences in on-the-ground contracting practices might be smaller than headline policy differences suggested. Methods The nature of real-world contracting behaviour was investigated by undertaking two qualitative case studies in England and two in Wales, each based on a local purchaser/provider network. The case studies involved ethnographic observations and interviews with staff in primary care trusts (PCTs) or local health boards (LHBs), NHS or Foundation trusts, and the overseeing Strategic Health Authority or NHS Wales regional office, as well as scrutiny of relevant documents. Results Wider policy differences between the two NHS systems were reflected in differing contracting frameworks, involving regional commissioning in Wales and commissioning by either a PCT, or co-operating pair of PCTs in our English case studies, and also in different oversight arrangements by higher tiers of the service. However, long-term relationships and trust between purchasers and providers had an important role in both systems when the financial viability of organisations was at risk. In England, the study found examples where both PCTs and trusts relaxed contractual requirements to assist partners faced with deficits. In Wales, news of plans to end the purchaser/provider split meant a return to less precisely-specified block contracts and a renewed concern to build cooperation between LHB and trust staff

  19. Breast Milk of HIV-Positive Mothers Has Potent and Species-Specific In Vivo HIV-Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Stamper, Lisa W.; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Permar, Sallie R.; Hinde, Katie; Kuhn, Louise; Bode, Lars; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the nutritional and health benefits of breast milk, breast milk can serve as a vector for mother-to-child HIV transmission. Most HIV-infected infants acquire HIV through breastfeeding. Paradoxically, most infants breastfed by HIV-positive women do not become infected. This is potentially attributed to anti-HIV factors in breast milk. Breast milk of HIV-negative women can inhibit HIV infection. However, the HIV-inhibitory activity of breast milk from HIV-positive mothers has not been evaluated. In addition, while significant differences in breast milk composition between transmitting and nontransmitting HIV-positive mothers have been correlated with transmission risk, the HIV-inhibitory activity of their breast milk has not been compared. This knowledge may significantly impact the design of prevention approaches in resource-limited settings that do not deny infants of HIV-positive women the health benefits of breast milk. Here, we utilized bone marrow/liver/thymus humanized mice to evaluate the in vivo HIV-inhibitory activity of breast milk obtained from HIV-positive transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. We also assessed the species specificity and biochemical characteristics of milk's in vivo HIV-inhibitory activity and its ability to inhibit other modes of HIV infection. Our results demonstrate that breast milk of HIV-positive mothers has potent HIV-inhibitory activity and indicate that breast milk can prevent multiple routes of infection. Most importantly, this activity is unique to human milk. Our results also suggest multiple factors in breast milk may contribute to its HIV-inhibitory activity. Collectively, our results support current recommendations that HIV-positive mothers in resource-limited settings exclusively breastfeed in combination with antiretroviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Approximately 240,000 children become infected with HIV annually, the majority via breastfeeding. Despite daily exposure to virus in breast milk, most infants

  20. The effect of co-stabilizer muscle activation on knee joint position sense: a single group pre-post test

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Yeongyo; Lee, Ho Jun; Choi, Myongryol; Chung, Sangmi; Park, Junhyung; Yu, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of co-stabilizer muscle activation on knee joint position sense. [Subjects and Methods] This study was a pre-post, single-blinded randomly controlled trial (angle sequence randomly selected) design. Seven healthy adults with no orthopaedic or neurological problems participated in this study. Knee joint position sense was measured by a target matching test at target angles of 30°, 45° and 80° of knee flexion a using digital inclinometer under two conditions: erect sitting, which is known to highly activate co-stabilizer muscle and slump sitting, which is known to little activate the co-stabilizer muscle. [Results] A significant difference in joint position matching error at the knee flexion angle of 45° was founded between two conditions erect sitting: (3.83 ± 1.47) and slump sitting: (1.00 ± 0.63). There were no significant differences in joint position matching error at the other target angles. [Conclusion] Knee joint position sense at 45° is likely to be affected by activation of co-stabilizer muscle, and this value is suitable for facilitation of joint position sense with skilled movement. PMID:27512279

  1. In Vitro Activity of Ozenoxacin against Quinolone-Susceptible and Quinolone-Resistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    López, Y.; Tato, M.; Espinal, P.; Garcia-Alonso, F.; Gargallo-Viola, D.; Cantón, R.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro activity of ozenoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated topical (L. D. Saravolatz and J. Leggett, Clin. Infect. Dis. 37:1210–1215, 2003) quinolone, was compared with the activities of other quinolones against well-characterized quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Ozenoxacin was 3-fold to 321-fold more active than other quinolones. Ozenoxacin could represent a first-in-class nonfluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of a broad range of dermatological infections. PMID:24080666

  2. Pharmacological Modulation of NMDA Receptor Activity and the Advent of Negative and Positive Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Daniel T.; Irvine, Mark W.; Costa, Blaise Mathias; Fang, Guangyu; Jane, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) family of L-glutamate receptors are well known to have diverse roles in CNS function as well as in various neuropathological and psychiatric conditions. Until recently, the types of agents available to pharmacologically regulate NMDAR function have been quite limited in terms of mechanism of action and subtype selectivity. This has changed significantly in the past two years. The purpose of this review is to summarize the many drug classes now available for modulating NMDAR activity. Previously, this included competitive antagonists at the L-glutamate and glycine binding sites, high and low affinity channel blockers, and GluN2B-selective N-terminal domain binding site antagonists. More recently, we and others have identifed new classes of NMDAR agents that are either positive or negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively). These compounds include the pan potentiator UBP646, the GluN2A-selective potentiator/GluN2C & GluN2D inhibitor UBP512, the GluN2D-selective potentiator UBP551, the GluN2C/GluN2D-selective potentiator CIQ as well as the new NMDAR-NAMs such as the pan-inhibitor UBP618, the GluN2C/GluN2D-selective inhibitor QZN46 and the GluN2A inhibitors UBP608 and TCN201. These new agents do not bind within the L-glutamate or glycine binding sites, the ion channel pore or the N-terminal regulatory domain. Collectively, these new allosteric modulators appear to be acting at multiple novel sites on the NMDAR complex. Importantly, these agents display improved subtype-selectivity and as NMDAR PAMs and NAMs, they represent a new generation of potential NMDAR therapeutics. PMID:22269804

  3. Activation and repression functions of an SR splicing regulator depend on exonic versus intronic-binding position.

    PubMed

    Shen, Manli; Mattox, William

    2012-01-01

    SR proteins and related factors play widespread roles in alternative pre-mRNA splicing and are known to promote splice site recognition through their Arg-Ser-rich effector domains. However, binding of SR regulators to some targets results in repression of splice sites through a distinct mechanism. Here, we investigate how activated and repressed targets of the Drosophila SR regulator Transformer2 elicit its differing effects on splicing. We find that, like activation, repression affects early steps in the recognition of splice sites and spliceosome assembly. Repositioning of regulatory elements reveals that Tra2 complexes that normally repress splicing from intronic positions activate splicing when located in an exon. Protein tethering experiments demonstrate that this position dependence is an intrinsic property of Tra2 and further show that repression and activation are mediated by separate effector domains of this protein. When other Drosophila SR factors (SF2 and Rbp1) that activate splicing from exonic positions were tethered intronically they failed to either activate or repress splicing. Interestingly, both activities of Tra2 favor the exonic identity of the RNA sequences that encompass its binding sites. This suggests a model in which these two opposite functions act in concert to define both the position and extent of alternatively spliced exons.

  4. [Improving team-oriented co-operation between physicians and nursing staff--opening new opportunities with process orientation and extended nursing roles].

    PubMed

    Dahlgaard, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Co-ordination in terms of synergetic co-operation of the two professional groups is highly demanding and requires creative measures. Co-operation between doctors and nurses can be improved by an integrative organisational concept agreed-upon by the parties involved. The core elements of this KoPM model include jointly practised patient orientation, a process organisation approach to health care provision, successful communication as well as a process support framework. Another task that needs to be performed will be to refine this approach by improving communication efficiency, by employing qualification processes and by evaluating cooperation projects.

  5. Effects of Positive and Negative Mood Induction on the Prefrontal Cortex Activity Measured by Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Compare, A; Brugnera, Agostino; Adorni, R; Sakatani, K

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiological mechanism of positive versus negative emotions is insufficiently understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of event recall tasks on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Nine healthy adults were instructed to recall episodes of their life associated with positive (happiness) and negative (anger) emotion, both silently and verbally. Heart rate (HR) changes were simultaneously measured. NIRS showed an increased oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in the bilateral PFC during silent and verbal recall of both positive and negative episodes. The changes of oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC during silent recall of negative episodes were significantly larger than those during silent recall of positive episodes (p < 0.01). There was no difference in average changes of oxy-Hb between silent and verbal recall of negative episodes (p > 0.95), while changes of oxy-Hb during verbal recall of positive episodes were larger than those during silent recall of positive episodes (p < 0.05). Both verbal and silent recall of positive and negative episodes increased HR; however, verbal recall caused larger increases of HR than silent recall (p < 0.01). The present results suggest that recall of negative episodes affect the PFC activity, which plays a key role in cognitive control of emotions, more than positive episodes. PMID:27526137

  6. Mast cells positive to tryptase, endothelial cells positive to protease-activated receptor-2, and microvascular density correlate among themselves in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who have undergone surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Piardi, Tullio; Zuccalà, Valeria; Patruno, Rosa; Zullo, Alessandra; Zizzo, Nicola; Nardo, Bruno; Marech, Ilaria; Crovace, Alberto; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Pessaux, Patrick; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    Background Mast cells (MCs) can stimulate angiogenesis, releasing several proangiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. In particular MCs can release tryptase, a potent in vivo and in vitro proangiogenic factor via proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Nevertheless, no data are available concerning the relationship between MC density positive to tryptase (MCDPT), endothelial cells positive to PAR-2 forming microvascular density (PAR-2-MVD), and classical MVD (C-MVD) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) angiogenesis. This study analyzed the correlation between MCDPT, PAR-2-MVD, and C-MVD, each correlated to the others and to the main clinicopathological features, in early HCC patients who underwent surgery. Methods A series of 53 HCC patients with early stage (stage 0 according to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Staging Classification) were selected and then underwent surgery. Tumor tissue samples were evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis methods in terms of number of MCDPT, PAR-2-MVD, and C-MVD. Results A significant correlation between MCDPT, PAR-2-MVD, and C-MVD groups, each correlated to the others, was found by Pearson t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.67 to 0.81; P-value ranged from 0.01 to 0.03). No other significant correlation was found. Conclusion Our in vivo pilot data suggest that MCDPT and PAR-2-MVD may play a role in HCC angiogenesis and could be further evaluated as a target of antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:27499640

  7. Photogrammetric and Global Positioning System Measurements of Active Pahoehoe Lava Lobe Emplacement on Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Glaze, Lori S.; James, Mike R.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    Basalt is the most common rock type on the surface of terrestrial bodies throughout the solar system and -- by total volume and areal coverage -- pahoehoe flows are the most abundant form of basaltic lava in subaerial and submarine environments on Earth. A detailed understanding of pahoehoe emplacement processes is necessary for developing accurate models of flow field development, assessing hazards associated with active lava flows, and interpreting the significance of lava flow morphology on Earth and other planetary bodies. Here, we examine the active emplacement of pahoehoe lobes along the margins of the Hook Flow from Pu'u 'O'o on Kilauea, Hawaii. Topographic data were acquired between 21 and 23 February 2006 using stereo-imaging and differential global positing system (DGPS) measurements. During this time, the average discharge rate for the Hook Flow was 0.01-0.05 cubic m/s. Using stereogrammetric point clouds and interpolated digital terrain models (DTMs), active flow fronts were digitized at 1 minute intervals. These areal spreading maps show that the lava lobe grew by a series of breakouts tha t broadly fit into two categories: narrow (0.2-0.6 m-wide) toes that grew preferentially down-slope, and broad (1.4-3.5 m-wide) breakouts that formed along the sides of the lobe, nearly perpendicular to the down-flow axis. These lobes inflated to half of their final thickness within approx 5 minutes, with a rate of inflation that generally deceased with time. Through a combination of down-slope and cross-slope breakouts, lobes developed a parabolic cross-sectional shape within tens of minutes. We also observed that while the average local discharge rate for the lobe was generally constant at 0.0064 +/- 0.0019 cubic m/s, there was a 2 to 6 fold increase in the areal coverage rate every 4.1 +/- 0.6 minutes. We attribute this periodicity to the time required for the dynamic pressurization of the liquid core of the lava lobe to exceed the cooling-induced strength of the

  8. Co-operative Bmp- and Fgf-signaling inputs convert skin wound healing to limb formation in urodele amphibians.

    PubMed

    Makanae, Aki; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Satoh, Akira

    2014-12-01

    Urodele amphibians have remarkable organ regeneration capability, and their limb regeneration capability has been investigated as a representative phenomenon. In the early 19th century, nerves were reported to be an essential tissue for the successful induction of limb regeneration. Nerve substances that function in the induction of limb regeneration responses have long been sought. A new experimental system called the accessory limb model (ALM) has been established to identify the nerve factors. Skin wounding in urodele amphibians results in skin wound healing but never in limb induction. However, nerve deviation to the wounded skin induces limb formation in ALM. Thus, nerves can be considered to have the ability to transform skin wound healing to limb formation. In the present study, co-operative Bmp and Fgf application, instead of nerve deviation, to wounded skin transformed skin wound healing to limb formation in two urodele amphibians, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) and newt (Pleurodeles waltl). Our findings demonstrate that defined factors can induce homeotic transformation in postembryonic bodies of urodele amphibians. The combination of Bmp and Fgf(s) may contribute to the development of novel treatments for organ regeneration.

  9. A co-operative interaction between Neisseria gonorrhoeae and complement receptor 3 mediates infection of primary cervical epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jennifer L; Brown, Eric J; Uk-Nham, Sang; Cannon, Janne G; Blake, Milan S; Apicella, Michael A

    2002-09-01

    Little is known about the pathogenesis of gonococcal infection within the lower female genital tract. We recently described the distribution of complement receptor 3 (CR3) on epithelia of the female genital tract. Our studies further indicate that CR3-mediated endocytosis serves as a primary mechanism by which N. gonorrhoeae elicits membrane ruffling and cellular invasion of primary, human, cervical epithelial cells. We have extended these studies to describe the nature of the gonococcus-CR3 interaction. Western Blot analysis demonstrated production of alternative pathway complement components by ecto- and endocervical cells which allows C3b deposition on gonococci and its rapid conversion to iC3b. Anti-iC3b and -factor I antibodies significantly inhibited adherence and invasion of primary cervical cells, suggesting that iC3b covalently bound to the gonococcus serves as a primary ligand for CR3 adherence. However, gonococcal porin and pili also bound to the I-domain of CR3 in a non-opsonic manner. Binding of porin and pili to CR3 were required for adherence to and invasion of cervical epithelia. Collectively, these data suggest that gonococcal adherence to CR3 occurs in a co-operative manner, which requires gonococcal iC3b-opsonization, porin and pilus. In conjunction, these molecules facilitate targeting to and successful infection of the cervical epithelium. PMID:12390350

  10. Co-operative Bmp- and Fgf-signaling inputs convert skin wound healing to limb formation in urodele amphibians.

    PubMed

    Makanae, Aki; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Satoh, Akira

    2014-12-01

    Urodele amphibians have remarkable organ regeneration capability, and their limb regeneration capability has been investigated as a representative phenomenon. In the early 19th century, nerves were reported to be an essential tissue for the successful induction of limb regeneration. Nerve substances that function in the induction of limb regeneration responses have long been sought. A new experimental system called the accessory limb model (ALM) has been established to identify the nerve factors. Skin wounding in urodele amphibians results in skin wound healing but never in limb induction. However, nerve deviation to the wounded skin induces limb formation in ALM. Thus, nerves can be considered to have the ability to transform skin wound healing to limb formation. In the present study, co-operative Bmp and Fgf application, instead of nerve deviation, to wounded skin transformed skin wound healing to limb formation in two urodele amphibians, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) and newt (Pleurodeles waltl). Our findings demonstrate that defined factors can induce homeotic transformation in postembryonic bodies of urodele amphibians. The combination of Bmp and Fgf(s) may contribute to the development of novel treatments for organ regeneration. PMID:25286122

  11. Paying for outpatient care in rural China: cost escalation under China's New Co-operative Medical Scheme.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Wu, Xun

    2015-03-01

    China's New Co-operative Medical Scheme (NCMS), a government-subsidized health insurance programme, was launched in 2003 in response to deterioration in access to health services in rural areas. Initially designed to cover inpatient care, it has begun to expand its benefit package to cover outpatient care since 2007. The impacts of this initiative on outpatient care costs have raised growing concern, in particular regarding whether it has in fact reduced out-of-pocket (OOP) payments for services among rural participants. This study investigates the impacts on outpatient costs by analysing data from an individual-level longitudinal survey, the China Health and Nutrition Survey, for 2004 and 2009, years shortly before and after NCMS began coverage of outpatient services in 2007. Various health econometrics strategies were employed in the analysis of these data, including the Two-Part Model, the Heckman Selection Model and Propensity Score Matching with the Differences-in-Differences model, to estimate the effects of the 2007 NCMS initiative on per episode outpatient costs. We find that NCMS outpatient coverage starting in 2007 had little impact on reducing its participants' OOP payments for outpatient services. The new coverage may also have contributed to an observed increase in total per episode outpatient costs billed to the insured patients. This increase was more pronounced among village clinics and township health centres-the backbone of the health system for rural residents-than at county and municipal hospitals.

  12. Co-operative DNA binding by GAGA transcription factor requires the conserved BTB/POZ domain and reorganizes promoter topology.

    PubMed Central

    Katsani, K R; Hajibagheri, M A; Verrijzer, C P

    1999-01-01

    The POZ domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif present in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodelling and human cancers. Here, we study the role of the POZ domain of the GAGA transcription factor in promoter recognition. Natural target promoters for GAGA typically contain multiple GAGA-binding elements. Our results show that the POZ domain mediates strong co-operative binding to multiple sites but inhibits binding to single sites. Protein cross-linking and gel filtration chromatography experiments established that the POZ domain is required for GAGA oligomerization into higher order complexes. Thus, GAGA oligomerization increases binding specificity by selecting only promoters with multiple sites. Electron microscopy revealed that GAGA binds to multiple sites as a large oligomer and induces bending of the promoter DNA. Our results indicate a novel mode of DNA binding by GAGA, in which a large GAGA complex binds multiple GAGA elements that are spread out over a region of a few hundred base pairs. We suggest a model in which the promoter DNA is wrapped around a GAGA multimer in a conformation that may exclude normal nucleosome formation. PMID:9927429

  13. [Development of tolerance to the activating action of morphine, fenamin, and alcohol on the positive reinforcement system of rats].

    PubMed

    Burov, Iu V; Borisenko, S A

    1980-06-01

    The development of cross tolerance to morphine, amphetamine and alcohol according to their activating effect on the system of positive reinforcement of the brain was shown on the basis of experimental self-stimulation reaction. It is assumed that the common neurophysiological and neurochemical mechanisms, particularly the adrenergic mechanisms of the system of positive reinforcement, lie at the basis of the development of tolerance to the drugs with euphoric type of action.

  14. Antitumor activity of phenethyl isothiocyanate in HER2-positive breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HER2 is an oncogene, expression of which leads to poor prognosis in 30% of breast cancer patients. Although trastuzumab is apparently an effective therapy against HER2-positive tumors, its systemic toxicity and resistance in the majority of patients restricts its applicability. In this study we evaluated the effects of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) in HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Methods MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells stably transfected with HER2 (high HER2 (HH)) were used in this study. The effect of PEITC was evaluated using cytotoxicity and apoptosis assay in these syngeneic cells. Western blotting was used to delineate HER2 signaling. SCID/NOD mice were implanted with MDA-MB-231 (HH) xenografts. Results Our results show that treatment of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells with varying concentrations of PEITC for 24 h extensively reduced the survival of the cells with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 μM in MDA-MB-231 and 14 μM in MCF-7 cells. PEITC treatment substantially decreased the expression of HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) at Tyr-705. The expression of BCL-2-associated × (BAX) and BIM proteins were increased, whereas the levels of B cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) were significantly decreased in both the cell lines in response to PEITC treatment. Substantial cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) were associated with PEITC-mediated apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. Notably, transient silencing of HER2 decreased and overexpressing HER2 increased the effects of PEITC. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis by PEITC treatment were much higher in breast cancer cells expressing higher levels of HER2 (HH) as compared to parent cell lines. The IC50 of PEITC following 24 h of treatment was

  15. False-positive scalp activity in 131I imaging associated with hair coloring.

    PubMed

    Yan, Di; Doss, Mohan; Mehra, Ranee; Parsons, Rosaleen B; Milestone, Barton N; Yu, Jian Q

    2013-03-01

    A patient with metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma (after surgical resection of tumor and positive lymph nodes) undergoing thyroid ablation therapy with (131)I is described. Whole-body scintigraphy was performed 1 wk after ablation therapy to evaluate the presence of residual disease. The whole-body images demonstrated an artifact caused by tracer accumulation in the patient's scalp related to recent hair coloring. Common etiologies of false-positive (131)I scintigraphic findings are briefly reviewed. The importance of taking preventative measures to decrease the number of false-positive findings and recognizing these findings when they occur is discussed.

  16. False positive control of activated voxels in single fMRI analysis using bootstrap resampling in comparison to spatial smoothing.

    PubMed

    Darki, Fahimeh; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali

    2013-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an effective tool for the measurement of brain neuronal activities. To date, several statistical methods have been proposed for analyzing fMRI datasets to select true active voxels among all the voxels appear to be positively activated. Finding a reliable and valid activation map is very important and becomes more crucial in clinical and neurosurgical investigations of single fMRI data, especially when pre-surgical planning requires accurate lateralization index as well as a precise localization of activation map. Defining a proper threshold to determine true activated regions, using common statistical processes, is a challenging task. This is due to a number of variation sources such as noise, artifacts, and physiological fluctuations in time series of fMRI data which affect spatial distribution of noise in an expected uniform activated region. Spatial smoothing methods are frequently used as a preprocessing step to reduce the effect of noise and artifacts. The smoothing may lead to a shift and enlargement of activation regions, and in some extend, unification of distinct regions. In this article, we propose a bootstrap resampling technique for analyzing single fMRI dataset with the aim of finding more accurate and reliable activated regions. This method can remove false positive voxels and present high localization accuracy in activation map without any spatial smoothing and statistical threshold setting.

  17. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F; Sheehan, David F; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I Lorena; Kittler, Josef T

    2015-12-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca(2+). Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca(2+)-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca(2+) in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca(2+) wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. PMID:26631479

  18. Going Boldly Into the Future: A Series of Case Studies of Co-Operative Research Centres and Their Relationships with the VET Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrier, Fran; Trood, Clifford; Whittingham, Karen

    This document presents case studies of 10 cooperative research centers (CRCs) across Australia and their relationships with the vocational education and training (VET) sector. The CRCs profiled in the case studies are as follows: Co-operative Research Centre for Sustainable Rice Production; Cast Alloy and Solidification Technology Co-operative…

  19. Example of International Co-Operation in the Frame of the Project Phare (TEMPUS) in Innovations in Teaching of Environmental Hydrogeology in Engineering Education in the Czech Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grmela, Arnost; Rapantova, Nadia

    The international TEMPUS (Trans-European Co-operating and Mobility Scheme for Higher Education between Central/Eastern Europe and European Union) project lasted from 1995-1997. In the framework of TEMPUS, a material and knowledge background was developed in order to ensure the education of the branch Geological Engineering with specialization in…

  20. Positive affect and pain: mediators of the within-day relation linking sleep quality to activity interference in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Dhwani J; Davis, Mary C; Yeung, Ellen W; Tennen, Howard A

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain condition often resulting in functional impairments. Nonrestorative sleep is a prominent symptom of FM that is related to disability, but the day-to-day mechanisms relating the prior night's sleep quality to next-day reports of disability have not been examined. This study examined the within-day relations among early-morning reports of sleep quality last night, late-morning reports of pain and positive and negative affect, and end-of-day reports of activity interference. Specifically, we tested whether pain, positive affect, and negative affect mediated the association between sleep quality and subsequent activity interference. Data were drawn from electronic diary reports collected from 220 patients with FM for 21 consecutive days. The direct and mediated effects at the within-person level were estimated with multilevel structural equation modeling. Results showed that pain and positive affect mediated the relation between sleep quality and activity interference. Early-morning reports of poor sleep quality last night predicted elevated levels of pain and lower levels of positive affect at late-morning, which, in turn, predicted elevated end-of-day activity interference. Of note, positive affect was a stronger mediator than pain and negative affect was not a significant mediator. In summary, the findings identify 2 parallel mechanisms, pain and positive affect, through which the prior night's sleep quality predicts disability the next day in patients with FM. Furthermore, results highlight the potential utility of boosting positive affect after a poor night's sleep as one means of preserving daily function in FM. PMID:25679472

  1. Position-dependent splicing activation and repression by SR and hnRNP proteins rely on common mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Erkelenz, Steffen; Mueller, William F.; Evans, Melanie S.; Busch, Anke; Schöneweis, Katrin; Hertel, Klemens J.; Schaal, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by splicing factors that modulate splice site selection. In some cases, however, splicing factors show antagonistic activities by either activating or repressing splicing. Here, we show that these opposing outcomes are based on their binding location relative to regulated 5′ splice sites. SR proteins enhance splicing only when they are recruited to the exon. However, they interfere with splicing by simply relocating them to the opposite intronic side of the splice site. hnRNP splicing factors display analogous opposing activities, but in a reversed position dependence. Activation by SR or hnRNP proteins increases splice site recognition at the earliest steps of exon definition, whereas splicing repression promotes the assembly of nonproductive complexes that arrest spliceosome assembly prior to splice site pairing. Thus, SR and hnRNP splicing factors exploit similar mechanisms to positively or negatively influence splice site selection. PMID:23175589

  2. Muscle Activation Differs between Three Different Knee Joint-Angle Positions during a Maximal Isometric Back Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jarbas da Silva, Josinaldo; Jon Schoenfeld, Brad; Nardi, Priscyla Silva Monteiro; Pecoraro, Silvio Luis; D'Andréa Greve, Julia Maria; Hartigan, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the lower limb muscles when performing a maximal isometric back squat exercise over three different positions. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men performed an isometric back squat at three knee joint angles (20°, 90°, and 140°) in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), and gluteus maximus (GM). In general, muscle activity was the highest at 90° for the three quadriceps muscles, yet differences in muscle activation between knee angles were muscle specific. Activity of the GM was significantly greater at 20° and 90° compared to 140°. The BF and ST displayed similar activation at all joint angles. In conclusion, knee position alters muscles activation of the quadriceps and gluteus maximus muscles. An isometric back squat at 90° generates the highest overall muscle activation, yet an isometric back squat at 140° generates the lowest overall muscle activation of the VL and GM only. PMID:27504484

  3. Comparative in vitro activities of L-695,256, a novel carbapenem, against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Malanoski, G; Collins, L; Eliopoulos, C T; Moellering, R C; Eliopoulos, G M

    1995-01-01

    The in vitro activity of a prototype 2-aryl carbapenem, L-695,256, against gram-positive bacteria was examined. All streptococci and oxacillin-susceptible and -resistant staphylococci were inhibited at concentrations of < or = 0.125, < or = 0.125, and 4 micrograms/ml, respectively. The activity of L-695,256 was superior to that of imipenem against other organisms intrinsically resistant to beta-lactams. PMID:7786011

  4. In vitro activity of paldimycin (U-70138F) against gram-positive bacteria isolated from patients with cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Rolston, K V; LeBlanc, B; Ho, D H; Bodey, G P

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro activity of paldimycin, a novel antimicrobial agent, was compared with that of vancomycin against 306 gram-positive isolates (representing 12 bacterial species) obtained from patients with cancer. Paldimycin had lower MICs for 90% of isolates than vancomycin did against most isolates tested. Its activity, however, was medium and pH dependent, being greatest in Nutrient broth at a pH of 6.8. PMID:3606069

  5. How to create more supportive supervision for primary healthcare: lessons from Ngamiland district of Botswana: co-operative inquiry group

    PubMed Central

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Wojczewski, Silvia; Kutalek, Ruth; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2016-01-01

    Background Supportive supervision is a way to foster performance, productivity, motivation, and retention of health workforce. Nevertheless there is a dearth of evidence of the impact and acceptability of supportive supervision in low- and middle-income countries. This article describes a participatory process of transforming the supervisory practice of district health managers to create a supportive environment for primary healthcare workers. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how district health managers can change their practice to create a more supportive environment for primary healthcare providers. Design A facilitated co-operative inquiry group (CIG) was formed with Ngamiland health district managers. CIG belongs to the participatory action research paradigm and is characterised by a cyclic process of observation, reflection, planning, and action. The CIG went through three cycles between March 2013 and March 2014. Results Twelve district health managers participated in the inquiry group. The major insights and learning that emerged from the inquiry process included inadequate supervisory practice, perceptions of healthcare workers’ experiences, change in the managers’ supervision paradigm, recognition of the supervisors’ inadequate supervisory skills, and barriers to supportive supervision. Finally, the group developed a 10-point consensus on what they had learnt regarding supportive supervision. Conclusion Ngamiland health district managers have come to appreciate the value of supportive supervision and changed their management style to be more supportive of their subordinates. They also developed a consensus on supportive supervision that could be adapted for use nationally. Supportive supervision should be prioritised at all levels of the health system, and it should be adequately resourced. PMID:27345024

  6. Exploring the active conformation of cyclohexane carboxylate positive allosteric modulators of the type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Xavier; Harrak, Youssef; Trapero, Ana; González-Bulnes, Patricia; Malhaire, Fanny; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Goudet, Cyril; Giraldo, Jesús; Llebaria, Amadeu

    2014-12-01

    The active conformation of a family of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGlu4 ) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) with the cyclohexane 1,2-dicarboxylic scaffold present in cis-2-(3,5-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)cyclohexanecarboxylic acid (VU0155041) was investigated by testing structurally similar six-membered ring compounds that have a locked conformation. The norbornane and cyclohexane molecules designed as mGlu4 conformational probes and the enantiomers of the trans diastereomer were computationally characterized and tested in mGlu4 pharmacological assays. The results support a VU0155041 active conformation, with the chair cyclohexane having the aromatic amide substituent in an axial position and the carboxylate in an equatorial position. Moreover, the receptor displays enantiomeric discrimination of the chiral PAMs. The constructed pharmacophore characterized a highly constrained mGlu4 allosteric binding site, thus providing a step forward in structure-based drug design for mGlu4 PAMs.

  7. Rewards for Kids! Ready-to-Use Charts and Activities for Positive Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiller, Viriginia M.; Schneider, Meg F.

    Finding ways to encourage preschoolers and elementary school children to behave well without resorting to scolding, threats, or bribery is a challenge for parents. This book advocates the positive parenting technique of rewards as the key to good behavior and shows parents how to use a variety of child-friendly sticker charts and other tools to…

  8. CRP-dependent positive autoregulation and proteolytic degradation regulate competence activator Sxy of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jaskólska, Milena; Gerdes, Kenn

    2015-03-01

    Natural competence, the ability of bacteria to take up exogenous DNA and incorporate it into their chromosomes, is in most bacteria a transient phenomenon under complex genetic and environmental control. In the Gram-negative bacteria Haemophilus influenzae and Vibrio cholerae, the master regulator Sxy/TfoX controls competence development. Although not known to be naturally competent, Escherichia coli possesses a Sxy homologue and a competence regulon containing the genes required for DNA uptake. Here, we show that in contrast to other characterised Gamma-proteobacteria, E. coli Sxy is positively autoregulated at the level of transcription by a mechanism that requires cAMP receptor protein (CRP), cyclic AMP (cAMP) and a CRP-S site in the sxy promoter. Similarly, we found no evidence that Sxy expression in E. coli was regulated at the translational level. However, our analysis revealed that Sxy is an unstable protein and that its cellular level is negatively regulated at the post-translational level via degradation by Lon protease. Interestingly, in the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis, the competence master regulator ComK is also positively autoregulated at the level of transcription and negatively regulated by proteolysis. Together, these findings reveal striking similarities between the competence regulons of a Gram-positive and a Gram-negative bacterium.

  9. Empathy Is Associated with Dynamic Change in Prefrontal Brain Electrical Activity during Positive Emotion in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Sharee N.; Coan, James A.; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Frye, Corrina; Goldsmith, H. Hill; Davidson, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Empathy is the combined ability to interpret the emotional states of others and experience resultant, related emotions. The relation between prefrontal electroencephalographic asymmetry and emotion in children is well known. The association between positive emotion (assessed via parent report), empathy (measured via observation), and…

  10. Does head posture have a significant effect on the hyoid bone position and sternocleidomastoid electromyographic activity in young adults?

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Saúl; Miralles, Rodolfo; Ravera, María José; Zúñiga, Claudia; Santander, Hugo; Ferrer, Marcelo; Nakouzi, Jorge

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between head posture (head extension, normal head posture, and head flexion) and anteroposterior head position, hyoid bone position, and the sternocleidomastoid integrated electromyographic (IEMG) activity in a sample of young adults. The study included 50 individuals with natural dentition and bilateral molar support. A lateral craniocervical radiograph was taken for each subject and a cephalometric analysis was performed. Head posture was measured by means of the craniovertebral angle formed by the MacGregor plane and the odontoid plane. According to the value of this angle, the sample was divided into the following three groups: head extension (less than 95 degrees); normal head posture (between 95 degrees and 106 degrees); and head flexion (more than 106 degrees). The following cephalometric measurements were taken to compare the three groups: anteroposterior head position (true vertical plane/pterygoid distance), anteroposterior hyoid bone position (true vertical plane-Ha distance), vertical hyoid bone position (H-H' distance in the hyoid triangle), and CO-C2 distance. In the three groups, IEMG recordings at rest and during swallowing of saliva and maximal voluntary clenching were performed by placing bipolar surface electrodes on the right and left sternocleidomastoid muscles. In addition, the condition with/without craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD) in each group was also assessed. Head posture showed no significant association with anteroposterior head position, anteroposterior hyoid bone position, vertical hyoid bone position, or sternocleidomastoid IEMG activity. There was no association to head posture with/without the condition of CMD. Clinical relevance of the results is discussed.

  11. The Positive Effect on Determinants of Physical Activity of a Tailored, General Practice-Based Physical Activity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Sluijs, E. M. F.; Van Poppel, M. N. M.; Twisk, J. W. R.; Brug, J.; Van Mechelen, W.

    2005-01-01

    PACE (Physician-based Assessment and Counseling for Exercise) is an individualized theory-based minimal intervention strategy aimed at the enhancement of regular physical activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a PACE intervention applied by general practitioners (GPs) on potential determinants of physical activity. A…

  12. Analysing Third Generation Activity Systems: Labour-Power, Subject Position and Personal Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Harry; Warmington, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe how Engestrom's "third generation" activity theory, with its emphasis on developing conceptual tools to understand dialogues, multiple perspectives and networks of interacting activity systems, has informed research into professional learning in multiagency service settings in England.…

  13. Can "CANISO" Activate "CASINO"? Transposed-Letter Similarity Effects with Nonadjacent Letter Positions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perea, Manuel; Lupker, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Nonwords created by transposing two "adjacent" letters (i.e., transposed-letter (TL) nonwords like "jugde") are very effective at activating the lexical representation of their base words. This fact poses problems for most computational models of word recognition (e.g., the interactive-activation model and its extensions), which assume that exact…

  14. Neural activity to positive expressions predicts daily experience of schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms in adults with high social anhedonia.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Christine I; Benson, Taylor L; Gyurak, Anett; Yin, Hong; Tully, Laura M; Lincoln, Sarah Hope

    2014-02-01

    Social anhedonia (SA), the diminished pleasure from social relationships, is a prominent characteristic of the vulnerability and manifestation of schizophrenia disorder. However, SA can develop for multiple reasons and little is known about its neural basis; these 2 issues hinder the utility and sensitivity of SA as a marker of schizophrenia pathology. This study investigated whether lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) deficits in social reward processing are associated with both SA and other schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms. During functional MRI (fMRI), a community sample of healthy adults (N = 30) with high and low SA viewed positive, negative, and neutral facial expressions. Afterward, participants completed an online daily diary in which they rated schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms and occurrence of interpersonal conflict each day for 21 days. Compared with low SA, high SA participants had less ventral (V)LPFC activity to positive versus neutral expressions. In addition, participants with a combination of high SA and low VLPFC activity to positive versus neutral expressions had worse daily diary ratings of schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms, including worse cognition, paranoia, motivation/productivity, and vigor/positive affect (i.e., psychomotor activation). Finally, among high SA participants, VLPFC activity predicted the daily relationship between distress from interpersonal conflict and symptom-severity; specifically, high SA participants with low VLPFC activity had worse paranoia on days of high conflict distress. These findings indicate that VLPFC deficits in positive emotion are associated with both SA and other schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms and that understanding the interaction of SA, VLPFC function, and social stress could facilitate the use of SA in the prevention and treatment of schizophrenia.

  15. Brigatinib, an anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, abrogates activity and growth in ALK-positive neuroblastoma cells, Drosophila and mice

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Rivera, Victor M.; Guan, Jikui; Palmer, Ruth H.; Hallberg, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor which has been implicated in numerous solid and hematologic cancers. ALK mutations are reported in about 5-7% of neuroblastoma cases but the ALK-positive percentage increases significantly in the relapsed patient population. Crizotinib, the first clinically approved ALK inhibitor for the treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer has had less dramatic responses in neuroblastoma. Here we investigate the efficacy of a second-generation ALK inhibitor, brigatinib, in a neuroblastoma setting. Employing neuroblastoma cell lines, mouse xenograft and Drosophila melanogaster model systems expressing different constitutively active ALK variants, we show clear and efficient inhibition of ALK activity by brigatinib. Similar abrogation of ALK activity was observed in vitro employing a set of different constitutively active ALK variants in biochemical assays. These results suggest that brigatinib is an effective inhibitor of ALK kinase activity in ALK addicted neuroblastoma that should be considered as a potential future therapeutic option for ALK-positive neuroblastoma patients alone or in combination with other treatments. PMID:27049722

  16. In vitro activities of a new lipopeptide, HMR 1043, against susceptible and resistant gram-positive isolates.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Bryskier, Andre; Drugeon, Henri

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of HMR 1043 with those of daptomycin and teicoplanin against gram-positive isolates. Susceptibility tests were performed for 52 strains, 26 parental strains, including staphylococcal, streptococcal, enterococcal, and listerial strains, and 26 HMR 1043-resistant mutants obtained from parental strains by using the Szybalski method. Agar dilution and disk diffusion susceptibility tests were performed by the procedures outlined by the NCCLS. HMR 1043 demonstrated good activity against susceptible and resistant gram-positive bacteria. The activity of HMR 1043 in vitro was less influenced by the presence of calcium ions than that of daptomycin. Susceptibility test breakpoints were not defined because of the poor correlation coefficients obtained with the different disks tested.

  17. In Vitro Activities of a New Lipopeptide, HMR 1043, against Susceptible and Resistant Gram-Positive Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Pascale; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Bryskier, Andre; Drugeon, Henri

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of HMR 1043 with those of daptomycin and teicoplanin against gram-positive isolates. Susceptibility tests were performed for 52 strains, 26 parental strains, including staphylococcal, streptococcal, enterococcal, and listerial strains, and 26 HMR 1043-resistant mutants obtained from parental strains by using the Szybalski method. Agar dilution and disk diffusion susceptibility tests were performed by the procedures outlined by the NCCLS. HMR 1043 demonstrated good activity against susceptible and resistant gram-positive bacteria. The activity of HMR 1043 in vitro was less influenced by the presence of calcium ions than that of daptomycin. Susceptibility test breakpoints were not defined because of the poor correlation coefficients obtained with the different disks tested. PMID:12937020

  18. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, H. Rich; DeBord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Methods: Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. Results: There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Conclusion: Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test. PMID:24381375

  19. Positive regulation of p53 stability and activity by the deubiquitinating enzyme Otubain 1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Xin; Challagundla, Kishore B; Dai, Mu-Shui

    2012-02-01

    The ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of p53 protein stability and activity. p53 is ubiquitinated and destabilized by MDM2 and several other Ub E3s, whereas it is deubiquitinated and stabilized by Ub-specific protease (USP)7 and USP10. Here we show that the ovarian tumour domain-containing Ub aldehyde-binding protein 1 (Otub1) is a novel p53 regulator. Otub1 directly suppresses MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination in cells and in vitro. Overexpression of Otub1 drastically stabilizes and activates p53, leading to apoptosis and marked inhibition of cell proliferation in a p53-dependent manner. These effects are independent of its catalytic activity but require residue Asp88. Mutation of Asp88 to Ala (Otub1(D88A)) abolishes activity of Otub1 to suppress p53 ubiquitination. Further, wild-type Otub1 and its catalytic mutant (Otub1(C91S)), but not Otub1(D88A), bind to the MDM2 cognate E2, UbcH5, and suppress its Ub-conjugating activity in vitro. Overexpression of Otub1(D88A) or ablation of endogenous Otub1 by siRNA markedly impaired p53 stabilization and activation in response to DNA damage. Together, these results reveal a novel function for Otub1 in regulating p53 stability and activity.

  20. Soil erosion increases soil microbial activity at the depositional position of eroding slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xu; Cardenas, Laura M.; Donovan, Neil; Zhang, Junling; Murray, Phil; Zhang, Fusuo; Dungait, Jennifer A. J.

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion is the most widespread form of soil degradation. Estimation of the impact of agricultural soil erosion on global carbon cycle is a topic of scientific debate, with opposing yet similar magnitude estimates of erosion as a net source or sink of atmospheric carbon. The transport and deposition of eroded agricultural soils affects not only the carbon cycle but other nutrient cycles as well. It has been estimated that erosion-induced lateral fluxes of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) could be similar in magnitude to those from fertilizer application and crop removal (Quinton et al., 2010). In particular, the dynamics of soil N in eroding slopes need to be considered because the management of soil N has profound influences on the functioning of soil microorganisms, which are generally considered as the main biotic driver of soil C efflux. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions tend to increase in deposition positions of eroded slopes, diminishing the sink potential of eroded soils C (. As the global warming potential of nitrous oxide (N2O) is 310 times relative to that of CO2, the sink potential of agricultural erosion could easily be negated with a small increase in N2O emissions. Therefore, an investigation of the potential emissions of greenhouse gases, and especially N2O from soils affected by agricultural erosion, are required. In the present study, a field experiment was established with contrasting cultivation techniques of a C4 crop (Zea mays; δ13C = -12.2‰) to introduce 13C-enriched SOC to a soil previously cropped with C3 plants (δ13C = -29.3‰). Soils sampled from the top, middle, bottom and foot slope positions along a distinct erosion pathway were analyzed using 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and incubated to investigate the responses of microorganisms and associated potential emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The total C and N contents were greatest in soils at the top slope position, whereas soil mineral N (NO3--N and NH4+-N

  1. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  2. “Stepping Up” Activity Poststroke: Ankle-Positioned Accelerometer Can Accurately Record Steps During Slow Walking

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Tara D.; Simpson, Lisa A.; Lim, Shannon B.; Louie, Dennis R.; Parappilly, Beena; Sakakibara, Brodie M.; Zbogar, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Background As physical activity in people poststroke is low, devices that monitor and provide feedback of walking activity provide motivation to engage in exercise and may assist rehabilitation professionals in auditing walking activity. However, most feedback devices are not accurate at slow walking speeds. Objective This study assessed the accuracy of one accelerometer to measure walking steps of community-dwelling individuals poststroke. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Methods Two accelerometers were positioned on the nonparetic waist and ankle of participants (N=43), and walking steps from these devices were recorded at 7 speeds (0.3–0.9 m/s) and compared with video recordings (gold standard). Results When positioned at the waist, the accelerometer had more than 10% error at all speeds, except 0.8 and 0.9 m/s, and numerous participants recorded zero steps at 0.3 to 0.5 m/s. The device had 10% or less error when positioned at the ankle for all speeds between 0.4 and 0.9 m/s. Limitations Some participants were unable to complete the faster walking speeds due to their walking impairments and inability to maintain the requested walking speed. Conclusions Although not recommended by the manufacturer, positioning the accelerometer at the ankle (compared with the waist) may fill a long-standing need for a readily available device that provides accurate feedback for the altered and slow walking patterns that occur with stroke. PMID:26251478

  3. Enhancement of figural creativity by motor activation: effects of unilateral hand contractions on creativity are moderated by positive schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Rominger, Christian; Papousek, Ilona; Fink, Andreas; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is an important trait necessary to achieve innovations in science, economy, arts and daily life. Therefore, the enhancement of creative performance is a significant field of investigation. A recent experiment showed enhanced verbal creativity after unilateral left-hand contractions, which was attributed to elevated activation of the right hemisphere. The present study aimed to extend these findings to the domain of figural creativity. Furthermore, as creativity and positive schizotypy may share some neurobiological underpinnings associated with the right hemisphere, we studied the potential moderating effect of positive schizotypy on the effects of the experimental modification of relative hemispheric activation on creativity. In a gender-balanced sample (20 men and 20 women), squeezing a hand gripper with the left hand enhanced figural creativity on the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking compared to squeezing the gripper with the right hand. However, this was only true when positive schizotypy was low. The moderating effect of schizotypy may be produced by relatively greater activity of certain parts of the right hemisphere being a shared neuronal correlate of creativity and positive schizotypy.

  4. Synthetically Tuning the 2-Position of Halogenated Quinolines: Optimizing Antibacterial and Biofilm Eradication Activities via Alkylation and Reductive Amination Pathways.

    PubMed

    Basak, Akash; Abouelhassan, Yasmeen; Norwood, Verrill M; Bai, Fang; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Jin, Shouguang; Huigens, Robert W

    2016-06-27

    Agents capable of eradicating bacterial biofilms are of great importance to human health as biofilm-associated infections are tolerant to our current antibiotic therapies. We have recently discovered that halogenated quinoline (HQ) small molecules are: 1) capable of eradicating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) biofilms, and 2) synthetic tuning of the 2-position of the HQ scaffold has a significant impact on antibacterial and antibiofilm activities. Here, we report the chemical synthesis and biological evaluation of 39 HQ analogues that have a high degree of structural diversity at the 2-position. We identified diverse analogues that are alkylated and aminated at the 2-position of the HQ scaffold and demonstrate potent antibacterial (MIC≤0.39 μm) and biofilm eradication (MBEC 1.0-93.8 μm) activities against drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecium strains while demonstrating <5 % haemolysis activity against human red blood cells (RBCs) at 200 μm. In addition, these HQs demonstrated low cytotoxicity against HeLa cells. Halogenated quinolines are a promising class of antibiofilm agents against Gram-positive pathogens that could lead to useful treatments against persistent bacterial infections. PMID:27245927

  5. Calpain-controlled detachment of major glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton regulates adhesive properties of activated phosphatidylserine-positive platelets.

    PubMed

    Artemenko, Elena O; Yakimenko, Alena O; Pichugin, Alexey V; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-02-15

    In resting platelets, adhesive membrane glycoproteins are attached to the cytoskeleton. On strong activation, phosphatidylserine(PS)-positive and -negative platelet subpopulations are formed. Platelet activation is accompanied by cytoskeletal rearrangement, although the glycoprotein attachment status in these two subpopulations is not clear. We developed a new, flow cytometry-based, single-cell approach to investigate attachment of membrane glycoproteins to the cytoskeleton in cell subpopulations. In PS-negative platelets, adhesive glycoproteins integrin αIIbβ3, glycoprotein Ib and, as shown for the first time, P-selectin were associated with the cytoskeleton. In contrast, this attachment was disrupted in PS-positive platelets; it was retained to some extent only in the small convex regions or 'caps'. It correlated with the degradation of talin and filamin observed only in PS-positive platelets. Calpain inhibitors essentially prevented the disruption of membrane glycoprotein attachment in PS-positive platelets, as well as talin and filamin degradation. With the suggestion that detachment of glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton may affect platelet adhesive properties, we investigated the ability of PS-positive platelets to resist shear-induced breakaway from the immobilized fibrinogen. Shear rates of 500/s caused PS-positive platelet breakaway, but their adhesion stability increased more than 10-fold after pretreatment of the platelets with calpain inhibitor. In contrast, the ability of PS-positive platelets to adhere to immobilized von Willebrand's factor at 100/s was low, but this was not affected by the preincubation of platelets with a calpain inhibitor. Our data suggest that calpain-controlled detachment of membrane glycoproteins is a new mechanism that is responsible for the loss of ability of the procoagulant platelets to resist detachment from thrombi by high shear stress.

  6. Persistent activation of STAT3 by PIM2-driven positive feedback loop for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Nizam; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Kim, Young-Heon; Cui, Yan-Hong; Kim, In-Gyu; Suh, Yongjoon; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-06-01

    Metastasis of breast cancer is promoted by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Emerging evidence suggests that STAT3 is a critical signaling node in EMT and is constitutively activated in many carcinomas, including breast cancer. However, its signaling mechanisms underlying persistent activation of STAT3 associated with EMT remain obscure. Here, we report that PIM2 promotes activation of STAT3 through induction of cytokines. Activation of STAT3 caused an increase in PIM2 expression, implicating a positive feedback loop between PIM2 and STAT3. In agreement, targeting of either PIM2, STAT3 or PIM2-dependent cytokines suppressed EMT-associated migratory and invasive properties through inhibition of ZEB1. Taken together, our findings identify the signaling mechanisms underlying the persistent activation of STAT3 and the oncogenic role of PIM2 in EMT in breast cancer.

  7. Persistent activation of STAT3 by PIM2-driven positive feedback loop for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Nizam; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Kim, Young-Heon; Cui, Yan-Hong; Kim, In-Gyu; Suh, Yongjoon; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-06-01

    Metastasis of breast cancer is promoted by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Emerging evidence suggests that STAT3 is a critical signaling node in EMT and is constitutively activated in many carcinomas, including breast cancer. However, its signaling mechanisms underlying persistent activation of STAT3 associated with EMT remain obscure. Here, we report that PIM2 promotes activation of STAT3 through induction of cytokines. Activation of STAT3 caused an increase in PIM2 expression, implicating a positive feedback loop between PIM2 and STAT3. In agreement, targeting of either PIM2, STAT3 or PIM2-dependent cytokines suppressed EMT-associated migratory and invasive properties through inhibition of ZEB1. Taken together, our findings identify the signaling mechanisms underlying the persistent activation of STAT3 and the oncogenic role of PIM2 in EMT in breast cancer. PMID:25854938

  8. p38 MAP kinase and MKK-1 co-operate in the generation of GM-CSF from LPS-stimulated human monocytes by an NF-κB-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Meja, Koremu K; Seldon, Paul M; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Ito, Kazuhiro; Barnes, Peter J; Lindsay, Mark A; Giembycz, Mark A

    2000-01-01

    The extent to which the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and MAP kinase kinase (MKK)-1-signalling pathways regulate the expression of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from LPS-stimulated human monocytes has been investigated and compared to the well studied cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα).Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) evoked a concentration-dependent generation of GM-CSF from human monocytes. Temporally, this effect was preceded by an increase in GM-CSF mRNA transcripts and abolished by actinomycin D and cycloheximide.LPS-induced GM-CSF release and mRNA expression were associated with a rapid and time-dependent activation of p38 MAP kinase, ERK-1 and ERK-2.The respective MKK-1 and p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, PD 098059 and SB 203580, maximally suppressed LPS-induced GM-CSF generation by >90%, indicating that both of these signalling cascades co-operate in the generation of this cytokine.Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that LPS increased nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) : DNA binding. SN50, an inhibitor of NF-κB translocation, abolished LPS-induced NF-κB : DNA binding and the elaboration of TNFα, a cytokine known to be regulated by NF-κB in monocytes. In contrast, SN50 failed to affect the release of GM-CSF from the same monocyte cultures.Collectively, these results suggest that the generation of GM-CSF by LPS-stimulated human monocytes is regulated in a co-operative fashion by p38 MAP kinase- and MKK-1-dependent signalling pathways independently of the activation of NF-κB. PMID:11082122

  9. Mutagenic activity of halogenated propanes and propenes: effect of bromine and chlorine positioning.

    PubMed

    Låg, M; Omichinski, J G; Dybing, E; Nelson, S D; Søderlund, E J

    1994-10-01

    A series of halogenated propanes and propenes were studied for mutagenic effects in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 in the absence or presence of NADPH plus liver microsomes from phenobarbital-induced rats as an exogenous metabolism system. The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of the halogenated propane 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) has previously been studied in our laboratories. These studies showed that metabolic activation of DBCP was required to exert its detrimental effects. All of the trihalogenated propane analogues were mutagenic when the microsomal activation system was included. The highest mutagenic activity was obtained with 1,2,3-tribromopropane, with approximately 50-fold higher activity than the least mutagenic trihalogenated propane, 1,2,3-trichloropropane. The order of mutagenicity was as follows: 1,2,3-tribromopropane > or = 1,2-dibromo- 3-chloropropane > 1,3-dibromo-2-chloropropane > or = 1,3-dichloro-2-bromopropane > 1-bromo-2,3-dichloropropane > 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Compared to DBCP, the dihalogenated propanes were substantially less mutagenic. Only 1,2-dibromopropane was mutagenic and its mutagenic potential was approximately 1/30 of that of DBCP. In contrast to DBCP, 1,2-dibromopropane showed similar mutagenic activity with and without the addition of an activation system. The halogenated propenes 2,3-dibromopropene and 2-bromo-3-chloropropene were mutagenic to the bacteria both in the absence and presence of the activation system, whereas 2,3-dichloropropene did not show any mutagenic effect. The large differences in mutagenic potential between the various halogenated propanes and propenes are proposed to be due to the formation of different possible proximate and ultimate mutagenic metabolites resulting from the microsomal metabolism of the various halogenated propanes and propenes, and to differences in the rate of formation of the metabolites. Pathways are proposed for the formation of genotoxic metabolites of di- and trihalogenated

  10. Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia

    PubMed Central

    Söderhamn, Ulrika; Aasgaard, Live; Landmark, Bjørg

    2014-01-01

    Background In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers. Methods The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. Results Four categories, ie, “appreciated activities”, “praised nurses and volunteers”, “being more active”, and “being included in a fellowship”, as well as the overall theme “participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being” emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants’ health and well-being. Conclusion In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers. PMID:25419121

  11. Structure-activity relationship of mastoparan analogs: Effects of the number and positioning of Lys residues on secondary structure, interaction with membrane-mimetic systems and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Souza, Bibiana Monson de; Cabrera, Marcia Perez Dos Santos; Gomes, Paulo Cesar; Dias, Nathalia Baptista; Stabeli, Rodrigo Guerino; Leite, Natalia Bueno; Neto, João Ruggiero; Palma, Mario Sergio

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a series of mastoparan analogs were engineered based on the strategies of Ala and Lys scanning in relation to the sequences of classical mastoparans. Ten analog mastoparans, presenting from zero to six Lys residues in their sequences were synthesized and assayed for some typical biological activities for this group of peptide: mast cell degranulation, hemolysis, and antibiosis. In relation to mast cell degranulation, the apparent structural requirement to optimize this activity was the existence of one or two Lys residues at positions 8 and/or 9. In relation to hemolysis, one structural feature that strongly correlated with the potency of this activity was the number of amino acid residues from the C-terminus of each peptide continuously embedded into the zwitterionic membrane of erythrocytes-mimicking liposomes, probably due to the contribution of this structural feature to the membrane perturbation. The antibiotic activity of mastoparan analogs was directly dependent on the apparent extension of their hydrophilic surface, i.e., their molecules must have from four to six Lys residues between positions 4 and 11 of the peptide chain to achieve activities comparable to or higher than the reference antibiotic compounds. The optimization of the antibacterial activity of the mastoparans must consider Lys residues at the positions 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, and 11 of the tetradecapeptide chain, with the other positions occupied by hydrophobic residues, and with the C-terminal residue in the amidated form. These requirements resulted in highly active AMPs with greatly reduced (or no) hemolytic and mast cell degranulating activities.

  12. Introduction of Methyl Groups at C2 and C6 Positions Enhances the Antiangiogenesis Activity of Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun-Jung; Shin, Sarah; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Byung-Tae; Choe, Yearn Seong

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has diverse biological activities, but is known to undergo rapid metabolism via reduction of vinylic double bonds and phase II conjugation. To prevent reductive metabolism of curcumin, we introduced a methyl group at both C2 and C6 positions (compound 1) or at the C2 position (compound 2) of curcumin, creating steric hindrance on double bonds against metabolizing enzymes. As predicted, these compounds were resistant to reduction by alcohol dehydrogenase. Compound 1 was further evaluated for its antiangiogenesis activity in vitro and in vivo. It exhibited significantly greater inhibitory activity than curcumin against endothelial cell migration, invasion, and tube formation. Similarly, the in vivo Matrigel plug assay in C57BL/6 mice showed more pronounced reduction of blood vessels in the plugs containing 1 than those containing curcumin. Moreover, 1 suppressed tumor growth more effectively than curcumin in a U87MG mouse xenograft model by inhibiting angiogenesis. In vivo metabolite analysis by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry demonstrated that 1 underwent markedly slower reductive metabolism than curcumin. Taken together, our results indicate that 1 has enhanced antiangiogenesis activity and suppression of tumor growth compared with curcumin, reflecting diminished reductive metabolism owing to the introduction of methyl groups at the C2 and C6 positions of curcumin. PMID:26391485

  13. Positive Reinforcement Mediated by Midbrain Dopamine Neurons Requires D1 and D2 Receptor Activation in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Elizabeth E.; Boivin, Josiah R.; Saunders, Benjamin T.; Witten, Ilana B.; Deisseroth, Karl; Janak, Patricia H.

    2014-01-01

    The neural basis of positive reinforcement is often studied in the laboratory using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), a simple behavioral model in which subjects perform an action in order to obtain exogenous stimulation of a specific brain area. Recently we showed that activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons supports ICSS behavior, consistent with proposed roles of this neural population in reinforcement learning. However, VTA dopamine neurons make connections with diverse brain regions, and the specific efferent target(s) that mediate the ability of dopamine neuron activation to support ICSS have not been definitively demonstrated. Here, we examine in transgenic rats whether dopamine neuron-specific ICSS relies on the connection between the VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region also implicated in positive reinforcement. We find that optogenetic activation of dopaminergic terminals innervating the NAc is sufficient to drive ICSS, and that ICSS driven by optical activation of dopamine neuron somata in the VTA is significantly attenuated by intra-NAc injections of D1 or D2 receptor antagonists. These data demonstrate that the NAc is a critical efferent target sustaining dopamine neuron-specific ICSS, identify receptor subtypes through which dopamine acts to promote this behavior, and ultimately help to refine our understanding of the neural circuitry mediating positive reinforcement. PMID:24733061

  14. Positive reinforcement mediated by midbrain dopamine neurons requires D1 and D2 receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Elizabeth E; Boivin, Josiah R; Saunders, Benjamin T; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Janak, Patricia H

    2014-01-01

    The neural basis of positive reinforcement is often studied in the laboratory using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), a simple behavioral model in which subjects perform an action in order to obtain exogenous stimulation of a specific brain area. Recently we showed that activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons supports ICSS behavior, consistent with proposed roles of this neural population in reinforcement learning. However, VTA dopamine neurons make connections with diverse brain regions, and the specific efferent target(s) that mediate the ability of dopamine neuron activation to support ICSS have not been definitively demonstrated. Here, we examine in transgenic rats whether dopamine neuron-specific ICSS relies on the connection between the VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region also implicated in positive reinforcement. We find that optogenetic activation of dopaminergic terminals innervating the NAc is sufficient to drive ICSS, and that ICSS driven by optical activation of dopamine neuron somata in the VTA is significantly attenuated by intra-NAc injections of D1 or D2 receptor antagonists. These data demonstrate that the NAc is a critical efferent target sustaining dopamine neuron-specific ICSS, identify receptor subtypes through which dopamine acts to promote this behavior, and ultimately help to refine our understanding of the neural circuitry mediating positive reinforcement.

  15. Joint positioning sense, perceived force level and two-point discrimination tests of young and active elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Priscila G.; Santos, Karini B.; Rodacki, André L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Changes in the proprioceptive system are associated with aging. Proprioception is important to maintaining and/or recovering balance and to reducing the risk of falls. Objective: To compare the performance of young and active elderly adults in three proprioceptive tests. Method: Twenty-one active elderly participants (66.9±5.5 years) and 21 healthy young participants (24.6±3.9 years) were evaluated in the following tests: perception of position of the ankle and hip joints, perceived force level of the ankle joint, and two-point discrimination of the sole of the foot. Results: No differences (p>0.05) were found between groups for the joint position and perceived force level. On the other hand, the elderly participants showed lower sensitivity in the two-point discrimination (higher threshold) when compared to the young participants (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Except for the cutaneous plantar sensitivity, the active elderly participants had maintained proprioception. Their physical activity status may explain similarities between groups for the joint position sense and perceived force level, however it may not be sufficient to prevent sensory degeneration with aging. PMID:26443978

  16. fMRI brain activation during a delay discounting task in HIV-positive adults with and without cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Christina S.; Lowen, Steven B.; MacLean, Robert R.; Key, Mary D.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine use is associated with poorer HIV clinical outcomes and may contribute to neurobiological impairments associated with impulsive decision making. This study examined the effect of cocaine dependence on brain activation during a delay discounting task involving choices between smaller immediate rewards and larger delayed ones. Participants were 39 HIV-positive adults on antiretroviral therapy who had current cocaine dependence (“active,” n=15), past cocaine dependence (“recovered,” n=13), or no lifetime substance dependence (“naïve,” n=11). Based on responses on a traditional delay discounting task, three types of choices were individualized for presentation during fMRI scanning: hard (similarly valued), easy (disparately valued), and no (single option). Active participants had significantly smaller increases in activation than naïve participants during hard versus easy choices bilaterally in the precentral gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex and in the right frontal pole (including dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and orbitofrontal cortex). During hard and easy choices relative to no choices, active participants had smaller increases in activation compared to naïve participants in frontoparietal cortical regions. These deficits in the executive network during delay discounting choices may contribute to impulsive decision making among HIV-positive cocaine users, with implications for risk behaviors associated with disease transmission and progression. PMID:21546221

  17. Functionally Active Gap Junctions between Connexin 43-Positive Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gabashvili, A N; Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Levinskii, A B; Mel'nikov, P A; Cherepanov, S A; Chekhonin, V P

    2015-05-01

    The formation of functional gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and cells of low-grade rat glioma C6 cells was studied in in vitro experiments. Immunocytochemical analysis with antibodies to connexin 43 extracellular loop 2 showed that mesenchymal stem cells as well as C6 glioma cells express the main astroglial gap junction protein connexin 43. Analysis of migration activity showed that mesenchymal stem cells actively migrate towards C6 glioma cells. During co-culturing, mesenchymal stem cells and glioma C6 form functionally active gap junctions mediating the transport of cytoplasmic dye from glioma cells to mesenchymal stem cells in the opposite direction. Fluorometry showed that the intensity of transport of low-molecular substances through heterologous gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and glioma cells is similar to that through homologous gap junctions between glioma cells. This phenomenon can be used for the development of new methods of cell therapy of high-grade gliomas.

  18. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  19. Turning a Negative into a Positive: Ascending GABAergic Control of Cortical Activation and Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; McKenna, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Recent technological advances have illuminated the role of GABAergic neurons in control of cortical arousal and sleep. Sleep-promoting GABAergic neurons in the preoptic hypothalamus are well-known. Less well-appreciated are GABAergic projection neurons in the brainstem, midbrain, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain, which paradoxically promote arousal and fast electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms. Thus, GABA is not purely a sleep-promoting neurotransmitter. GABAergic projection neurons in the brainstem nucleus incertus and ventral tegmental nucleus of Gudden promote theta (4–8 Hz) rhythms. Ventral tegmental area GABAergic neurons, neighboring midbrain dopamine neurons, project to the frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. They discharge faster during cortical arousal and regulate reward. Thalamic reticular nucleus GABAergic neurons initiate sleep spindles in non-REM sleep. In addition, however, during wakefulness, they tonically regulate the activity of thalamocortical neurons. Other GABAergic inputs to the thalamus arising in the globus pallidus pars interna, substantia nigra pars reticulata, zona incerta, and basal forebrain regulate motor activity, arousal, attention, and sensory transmission. Several subpopulations of cortically projecting GABAergic neurons in the basal forebrain project to the thalamus and neocortex and preferentially promote cortical gamma-band (30–80 Hz) activity and wakefulness. Unlike sleep-active GABAergic neurons, these ascending GABAergic neurons are fast-firing neurons which disinhibit and synchronize the activity of their forebrain targets, promoting the fast EEG rhythms typical of conscious states. They are prominent targets of GABAergic hypnotic agents. Understanding the properties of ascending GABAergic neurons may lead to novel treatments for diseases involving disorders of cortical activation and wakefulness. PMID:26124745

  20. An Activity Theory Analysis of Teaching Goals versus Student Epistemological Positions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Barbara; Robinson, Carol; Matthews, Janette; Croft, Tony

    2012-01-01

    A teaching innovation for first year engineering students' was designed to involve inquiry-based questions, an electronic graphical medium, small group activity and modifications to assessment. The use of an inquiry approach was intended to encourage students' deeper engagement with mathematics and more conceptual understanding. Data were…

  1. Development of Positive Racial Attitudes, Knowledges, and Activities in Pre-Service Social Studies Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.; Lamb, Morris L.

    Information on aspects of social studies teachers' racial attitudes, knowledges, and skill in implementing relevant ethnic-racial activities in the classroom are presented. Major research studies that have examined teacher attitudes toward black and other minority group children are discussed along with information on programs that have attempted…

  2. Pavlov's Position on Old Age within the Framework of the Theory of Higher Nervous Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windholz, George

    1995-01-01

    In later life, I. P. Pavlov incorporated his findings on aging into his theory of higher nervous activity. Some of the major findings showed that salivary conditioning and stimulus differentiation were difficult to establish in old dogs, but that conditioned reflexes established earlier in life persisted into old age. Pavlov hypothesized that…

  3. Graduated Exposure and Positive Reinforcement to Overcome Setting and Activity Avoidance in an Adolescent with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Jonathan D.; Luiselli, James K.; Rue, Hanna; Whalley, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Some students who have developmental disabilities avoid settings and activities that can improve their learning and quality of life. This two-phase study concerned an adolescent boy with autism who avoided the gross-motor exercise room, gymnasium, and music room at his school; he demonstrated distress, agitation, and problem behaviors when…

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Enterococcus Faecium Fair-E 198 against gram-positive pathogens

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Maristela da Silva; Moreno, Izildinha; Kuaye, Arnaldo Yoshiteru

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigated the antimicrobial activity of Enterococcus faecium FAIR-E 198 against Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Using the critical-dilution method, the bacteriocin produced by E. faecium FAIR-E 198 inhibited all L. monocytogenes strains evaluated (1,600 to 19,200 AU mL-1). However, none of the B. cereus and S. aureus strains investigated were inhibited. The maximum activity of this bacteriocin (800 AU mL-1) was observed in MRS broth, while the activity in milk was 100 AU mL-1. In the co-cultivation test in milk, B. cereus K1-B041 was reduced to below the detection limit (1.00 log CFU mL-1) after 48 h. E. faecium reduced the initial L. monocytogenes Scott A population by 1 log CFU mL-1 after 3 h at 35°C, However, the pathogen regained growth, reaching 3.68 log CFU mL-1 after 48 h. E. faecium did not influence the growth of S. aureus ATCC 27154 during the 48 h of co-cultivation, Therefore, it can be concluded that the effectiveness of the antimicrobial activity of E. faecium FAIR-E 198 is strictly related to the species and strain of the target microorganism and to the culture medium, PMID:24031466

  5. Pin1 enhances adipocyte differentiation by positively regulating the transcriptional activity of PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Han, Younho; Lee, Sung Ho; Bahn, Minjin; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2016-11-15

    Pin1 is a peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase and it has a unique enzymatic activity of catalyzing isomerization of the peptide bond between phospho-serine/threonine and proline. Through the conformational change of its substrates, Pin1 regulates diverse biological processes including adipogenesis. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, overexpression of Pin1 enhances adipocyte differentiation whereas inhibition of Pin1 activity suppresses it. However, the precise functions of Pin1 during adipogenesis are not clear. In the present study, we investigated the potential targets of Pin1 during adipogenesis. We found that Pin1 interacts directly with and regulates the transcriptional activity of PPARγ, a key regulator of adipogenesis. In addition, ERK activity and Ser273 of PPARγ, a potential ERK phosphorylation target site, are important for the regulation of PPARγ function by Pin1 in 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together our results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism of Pin1 during adipogenesis, in which Pin1 enhances adipocyte differentiation by regulating the function of PPARγ. PMID:27475846

  6. Identification of IDO-positive and IDO-negative human dendritic cells after activation by various proinflammatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Von Bubnoff, Dagmar; Scheler, Marina; Wilms, Helene; Fimmers, Rolf; Bieber, Thomas

    2011-06-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can induce tolerance or immunity. We identified and characterized an IDO-expressing and an IDO-negative human DC population after stimulation by various proinflammatory stimuli. IDO expression was strongly dependent on the maturation status of the cells (CD83-positive cells only). The two DC subpopulations remained IDO positive and IDO negative, respectively, over a time period of at least 48 h. IDO enzyme activity of human DCs was highest during stimulation by strongly maturation-inducing TLR ligands such as highly purified LPS (TLR4 ligand) or polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (TLR3 ligand); factors of the adaptive immune system such as IFN-γ, a mixture of cytokines, and IFN-α had lesser stimulatory capacity for IDO induction and activity. After stimulation with CD40L, IDO-positive DCs expressed significantly increased levels of B7 family molecules such as CD40, CD80, CD86, ICOS ligand, as well as PD-L1 (B7-H1) and PD-L2 (B7-DC) compared with the IDO-negative DC subset. At the same time, the inhibitory receptors Ig-like transcripts 3 and 4 were significantly downregulated on IDO-positive cells. Functionally, IDO-positive DCs produced significantly more IL-1β and IL-15 and less IL-10 and IL-6 than the IDO-negative subset after CD40L stimulation. These results show that IDO expression is associated with a distinctive phenotype and functional capacity in mature DCs. It seems likely that the IDO-positive DC subset possesses a regulatory function and might skew a T cell response toward tolerance.

  7. The Effects of Aesthetic Science Activities on Improving At-Risk Families Children's Anxiety About Learning Science and Positive Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zuway-R.; Lin, Huann-shyang; Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Chia-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of aesthetic science activities on improving elementary school at-risk families' children's positive thinking, attitudes toward science, and decreasing their anxiety about learning science. Thirty-six 4th-grade children from at-risk families volunteered to participate in a 12-week intervention and formed the experimental group; another 97 typical 4th graders were randomly selected to participant in the assessment and were used as the comparison group. The treatment for experimental group children emphasized scaffolding aesthetic science activities and inquiry strategies. The Elementary School Student Questionnaire was administered to assess all children's positive thinking, attitudes toward science, and anxiety about learning science. In addition, nine target children from the experimental group with the lowest scores on either positive thinking, or attitudes toward science, or with the highest scores on anxiety about learning science in the pre-test were recruited to be interviewed at the end of the intervention and observed weekly. Confirmatory factor analyses, analyses of covariance, and content theme analysis assessed the similarities and differences between groups. It was found that the at-risk families' children were motivated by the treatment and made significant progress on positive thinking and attitudes toward science, and also decreased their anxiety about learning science. The findings from interviews and classroom observations also revealed that the intervention made differences in children's affective perceptions of learning science. Implication and research recommendation are discussed.

  8. Functionally active ganglioneuroma with increased plasma and urinary catecholamines and positive iodine 131-meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Clerico, A.; Jenkner, A.; Castello, M.A.; Ciofetta, G.; Lucarelli, C.; Codini, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Ganglioneuromas are usually considered not to be functionally active. Studies of their catecholamine excretory pattern and of their imaging by means of the adrenergic tracing agent 131-I-MIBG have been therefore sparse. We report on a case of secretory ganglioneuroma, as demonstrated by the increased urinary excretion of the catecholamine metabolites HVA and VMA, increased plasma dopamine and epinephrine levels, and positive 131-I-MIBG scintigraphy. We must therefore be aware that a functionally active tumor is not necessarily a neuroblastoma, and that the diagnosis should be biopsy proven.

  9. Performance Analysis of Positive-feedback-based Active Anti-islanding Schemes for Inverter-Based Distributed Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Pengwei; Aponte, Erick E.; Nelson, J. Keith

    2010-06-14

    Recently proposed positive-feedback-based anti-islanding schemes (AI) are highly effective in preventing islanding without causing any degradation in power quality. This paper aims to analyze the performance of these schemes quantitatively in the context of the dynamic models of inverter-based distributed generators (DG). In this study, the characteristics of these active anti-islanding methods are discussed and design guidelines are derived.

  10. 3D monolithically stacked CMOS Active Pixel Sensors for particle position and direction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Passeri, D.; Morozzi, A.; Magalotti, D.; Piperku, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we propose a 3D monolithically stacked, multi-layer detectors based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) layers which allows at the same time accurate estimation of the impact point and of the incidence angle an ionizing particle. The whole system features two fully-functional CMOS APS matrix detectors, including both sensing area and control/signal elaboration circuitry, stacked in a monolithic device by means of Through Silicon Via (TSV) connections thanks to the capabilities of the CMOS vertical scale integration (3D-IC) 130 nm Chartered/Tezzaron technology. In order to evaluate the suitability of the two layer monolithic active pixel sensor system to reconstruct particle tracks, tests with proton beams have been carried out at the INFN LABEC laboratories in Florence (Italy) with 3 MeV proton beam.

  11. The kinases Mst1 and Mst2 positively regulate phagocyte ROS induction and bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jing; Sun, Xiufeng; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Shihao; Wang, Xiaozhen; Wu, Hongtan; Hong, Lixin; Xie, Changchuan; Li, Xun; Zhao, Hao; Liu, Qingxu; Jiang, Mingting; Chen, Qinghua; Zhang, Jinjia; Li, Yang; Song, Siyang; Wang, Hong-Rui; Zhou, Rongbin; Johnson, Randy L.; Chien, Kun-Yi; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Han, Jiahuai; Avruch, Joseph; Chen, Lanfen; Zhou, Dawang

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria need to be juxtaposted to phagosomes to synergistically produce ample reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytes for pathogens killing. However, how phagosomes transmit signal to recruit mitochondria remains unclear. Here, we report that the kinases Mst1 and Mst2 function to control ROS production by regulating mitochondrial trafficking and mitochondrion-phagosome juxtaposition. Mst1 and Mst2 activate Rac GTPase to promote Toll-like receptor (TLR)-triggered assembly of the TRAF6-ECSIT complex that is required for mitochondrial recruitment to phagosomes. Inactive forms of Rac, including the human Rac2D57N mutant, disrupt the TRAF6-ECSIT complex by sequestering TRAF6, and severely dampen ROS production and greatly increase susceptibility to bacterial infection. These findings demonstrate the TLR-Mst1-Mst2-Rac signalling axis to be critical for effective phagosome-mitochondrion function and bactericidal activity. PMID:26414765

  12. Individual Differences in Anticipatory Somatosensory Cortex Activity for Shock is Positively Related with Trait Anxiety and Multisensory Integration

    PubMed Central

    Greening, Steven G.; Lee, Tae-Ho; Mather, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety is associated with an exaggerated expectancy of harm, including overestimation of how likely a conditioned stimulus (CS+) predicts a harmful unconditioned stimulus (US). In the current study we tested whether anxiety-associated expectancy of harm increases primary sensory cortex (S1) activity on non-reinforced (i.e., no shock) CS+ trials. Twenty healthy volunteers completed a differential-tone trace conditioning task while undergoing fMRI, with shock delivered to the left hand. We found a positive correlation between trait anxiety and activity in right, but not left, S1 during CS+ versus CS− conditions. Right S1 activity also correlated with individual differences in both primary auditory cortices (A1) and amygdala activity. Lastly, a seed-based functional connectivity analysis demonstrated that trial-wise S1 activity was positively correlated with regions of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), suggesting that higher-order cognitive processes contribute to the anticipatory sensory reactivity. Our findings indicate that individual differences in trait anxiety relate to anticipatory reactivity for the US during associative learning. This anticipatory reactivity is also integrated along with emotion-related sensory signals into a brain network implicated in fear-conditioned responding. PMID:26751483

  13. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289. PMID:26029848

  14. Positive effect of dietary lutein and cholesterol on the undirected song activity of an opportunistic breeder

    PubMed Central

    Pinxten, Rianne; Zaid, Erika; Eens, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Song is a sexually selected trait that is thought to be an honest signal of the health condition of an individual in many bird species. For species that breed opportunistically, the quantity of food may be a determinant of singing activity. However, it is not yet known whether the quality of food plays an important role in this respect. The aim of the present study was to experimentally investigate the role of two calorie-free nutrients (lutein and cholesterol) in determining the expression of a sexually selected behavior (song rate) and other behaviors (locomotor activity, self-maintenance activity, eating and resting) in male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We predicted that males supplemented with lutein and cholesterol would sing at higher rates than controls because both lutein and cholesterol have important health-related physiological functions in birds and birdsong mirrors individual condition. To control for testosterone secretion that may upregulate birdsong, birds were exposed to a decreasing photoperiod. Our results showed that control males down-regulated testosterone in response to a decreasing photoperiod, while birds treated with lutein or cholesterol maintained a constant singing activity. Both lutein- and cholesterol-supplemented groups sang more than control groups by the end of the experiment, indicating that the quality of food can affect undirected song irrespective of circulating testosterone concentrations. None of the other measured behaviors were affected by the treatment, suggesting that, when individuals have full availability of food, sexually selected song traits are more sensitive to the effect of food quality than other behavioral traits. Overall the results support our prediction that undirected song produced by male zebra finches signals access to high-quality food. PMID:27761321

  15. Fragmentation of positively-charged biological ions activated with a beam of high-energy cations.

    PubMed

    Chingin, Konstantin; Makarov, Alexander; Denisov, Eduard; Rebrov, Oleksii; Zubarev, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    First results are reported on the fragmentation of multiply protonated polypeptide ions produced in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with a beam of high-energy cations as a source of activation. The ion beam is generated with a microwave plasma gun installed on a benchtop Q Exactive mass spectrometer. Precursor polypeptide ions are activated when trapped inside the collision cell of the instrument (HCD cell), and product species are detected in the Orbitrap analyzer. Upon exposure to the beam of air plasma cations (∼100 μA, 5 s), model precursor species such as multiply protonated angiotensin I and ubiquitin dissociated across a variety of pathways. Those pathways include the cleavages of C-CO, C-N as well as N-Cα backbone bonds, accordingly manifested as b/y, a, and c/z fragment ion series in tandem mass spectra. The fragmentation pattern observed includes characteristic fragments of collision-induced dissociation (CID) (b/y/a fragments) as well as electron capture/transfer dissociation (ECD, ETD) (c/z fragments), suggesting substantial contribution of both vibrational and electronic excitation in our experiments. Besides backbone cleavages, notable amounts of nondissociated precursor species were observed with reduced net charge, formed via electron or proton transfer between the colliding partners. Peaks corresponding to increased charge states of the precursor ions were also detected, which is the major distinctive feature of ion beam activation.

  16. Selective activity of deguelin identifies therapeutic targets for androgen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Robles, Andrew J; Cai, Shengxin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Mooberry, Susan L

    2016-06-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are aggressive malignancies with no effective targeted therapies. Recent gene expression profiling of these heterogeneous cancers and the classification of cell line models now allows for the identification of compounds with selective activities against molecular subtypes of TNBC. The natural product deguelin was found to have selective activity against MDA-MB-453 and SUM-185PE cell lines, which both model the luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype of TNBC. Deguelin potently inhibited proliferation of these cells with GI50 values of 30 and 61 nM, in MDA-MB-453 and SUM-185PE cells, respectively. Deguelin had exceptionally high selectivity, 197 to 566-fold, for these cell lines compared to cell lines representing other TNBC subtypes. Deguelin's mechanisms of action were investigated to determine how it produced these potent and selective effects. Our results show that deguelin has dual activities, inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, and decreasing androgen receptor levels and nuclear localization. Based on these data, we hypothesized that the combination of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and the antiandrogen enzalutamide would have efficacy in LAR models. Rapamycin and enzalutamide showed additive effects in MDA-MB-453 cells, and both drugs had potent antitumor efficacy in a LAR xenograft model. These results suggest that the combination of antiandrogens and mTOR inhibitors might be an effective strategy for the treatment of androgen receptor-expressing TNBC. PMID:27255535

  17. P21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) is required for metaphase spindle positioning and anchoring.

    PubMed

    Bompard, G; Rabeharivelo, G; Cau, J; Abrieu, A; Delsert, C; Morin, N

    2013-02-14

    The oncogenic kinase PAK4 was recently found to be involved in the regulation of the G1 phase and the G2/M transition of the cell cycle. We have also identified that PAK4 regulates Ran GTPase activity during mitosis. Here, we show that after entering mitosis, PAK4-depleted cells maintain a prolonged metaphase-like state. In these cells, chromosome congression to the metaphase plate occurs with normal kinetics but is followed by an extended period during which membrane blebbing and spindle rotation are observed. These bipolar PAK4-depleted metaphase-like spindles have a defective astral microtubule (MT) network and are not centered in the cell but are in close contact with the cell cortex. As the metaphase-like state persists, centrosome fragmentation occurs, chromosomes scatter from the metaphase plate and move toward the spindle poles with an active spindle assembly checkpoint, a phenotype that is reminiscent of cohesion fatigue. PAK4 also regulates the acto-myosin cytoskeleton and we report that PAK4 depletion results in the induction of cortical membrane blebbing during prometaphase arrest. However, we show that membrane blebs, which are strongly enriched in phospho-cofilin, are not responsible for the poor anchoring of the spindle. As PAK4 depletion interferes with the localization of components of the dynein/dynactin complexes at the kinetochores and on the astral MTs, we propose that loss of PAK4 could induce a change in the activities of motor proteins. PMID:22450748

  18. Identification of novel cyclic lipopeptides from a positional scanning combinatorial library with enhanced antibacterial and antibiofilm activities.

    PubMed

    Bionda, Nina; Fleeman, Renee M; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Rodriguez, Maria C; Reffuveille, Fany; Shaw, Lindsey N; Pastar, Irena; Davis, Stephen C; Hancock, Robert E W; Cudic, Predrag

    2016-01-27

    Treating bacterial infections can be difficult due to innate or acquired resistance mechanisms, and the formation of biofilms. Cyclic lipopeptides derived from fusaricidin/LI-F natural products represent particularly attractive candidates for the development of new antibacterial and antibiofilm agents, with the potential to meet the challenge of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. A positional-scanning combinatorial approach was used to identify the amino acid residues responsible for driving antibacterial activity, and increase the potency of these cyclic lipopeptides. Screening against the antibiotic resistant ESKAPE pathogens revealed the importance of hydrophobic as well as positively charged amino acid residues for activity of this class of peptides. The improvement in potency was especially evident against bacterial biofilms, since the lead cyclic lipopeptide showed promising in vitro and in vivo anti-biofilm activity at the concentration far below its respective MICs. Importantly, structural changes resulting in a more hydrophobic and positively charged analog did not lead to an increase in toxicity toward human cells.

  19. Identification of novel cyclic lipopeptides from a positional scanning combinatorial library with enhanced antibacterial and antibiofilm activities.

    PubMed

    Bionda, Nina; Fleeman, Renee M; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Rodriguez, Maria C; Reffuveille, Fany; Shaw, Lindsey N; Pastar, Irena; Davis, Stephen C; Hancock, Robert E W; Cudic, Predrag

    2016-01-27

    Treating bacterial infections can be difficult due to innate or acquired resistance mechanisms, and the formation of biofilms. Cyclic lipopeptides derived from fusaricidin/LI-F natural products represent particularly attractive candidates for the development of new antibacterial and antibiofilm agents, with the potential to meet the challenge of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. A positional-scanning combinatorial approach was used to identify the amino acid residues responsible for driving antibacterial activity, and increase the potency of these cyclic lipopeptides. Screening against the antibiotic resistant ESKAPE pathogens revealed the importance of hydrophobic as well as positively charged amino acid residues for activity of this class of peptides. The improvement in potency was especially evident against bacterial biofilms, since the lead cyclic lipopeptide showed promising in vitro and in vivo anti-biofilm activity at the concentration far below its respective MICs. Importantly, structural changes resulting in a more hydrophobic and positively charged analog did not lead to an increase in toxicity toward human cells. PMID:26703794

  20. Positive and negative regulation of Gli activity by Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Ashish Kumar; Ben, Jin; Zhao, Zhonghua; Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Niah, Weixin; Ng, Ashley Shu Mei; Iyu, Audrey; Yu, Weimiao; Elworthy, Stone; van Eeden, Fredericus J M; Ingham, Philip William

    2013-01-01

    Loss of function mutations of Kif7, the vertebrate orthologue of the Drosophila Hh pathway component Costal2, cause defects in the limbs and neural tubes of mice, attributable to ectopic expression of Hh target genes. While this implies a functional conservation of Cos2 and Kif7 between flies and vertebrates, the association of Kif7 with the primary cilium, an organelle absent from most Drosophila cells, suggests their mechanisms of action may have diverged. Here, using mutant alleles induced by Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated targeted mutagenesis, we show that in zebrafish, Kif7 acts principally to suppress the activity of the Gli1 transcription factor. Notably, we find that endogenous Kif7 protein accumulates not only in the primary cilium, as previously observed in mammalian cells, but also in cytoplasmic puncta that disperse in response to Hh pathway activation. Moreover, we show that Drosophila Costal2 can substitute for Kif7, suggesting a conserved mode of action of the two proteins. We show that Kif7 interacts with both Gli1 and Gli2a and suggest that it functions to sequester Gli proteins in the cytoplasm, in a manner analogous to the regulation of Ci by Cos2 in Drosophila. We also show that zebrafish Kif7 potentiates Gli2a activity by promoting its dissociation from the Suppressor of Fused (Sufu) protein and present evidence that it mediates a Smo dependent modification of the full length form of Gli2a. Surprisingly, the function of Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo appears restricted principally to mesodermal derivatives, its inactivation having little effect on neural tube patterning, even when Sufu protein levels are depleted. Remarkably, zebrafish lacking all Kif7 function are viable, in contrast to the peri-natal lethality of mouse kif7 mutants but similar to some Acrocallosal or Joubert syndrome patients who are homozygous for loss of function KIF7 alleles.

  1. Autonomic nervous system reactivity to positive and negative mood induction: The role of acute psychological responses and frontal electrocortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Kop, Willem J.; Synowski, Stephen J.; Newell, Miranda E.; Schmidt, Louis A.; Waldstein, Shari R.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    The differential effects of positive versus negative emotions on autonomic nervous system activity are insufficiently understood. This study examined the role of acute mood responses and central nervous system activity on heart rate variability (HRV) using 5-min event recall tasks (happiness and anger recall) and a 5-min Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT) in 20 healthy individuals (mean age 25±4 years, 55% female). HRV was measured in high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) domains, and frontal brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG) in the alpha frequency band in F3 and F4. Happiness Recall resulted in increased LF-HRV (p=0.005) but not HF-HRV (p=0.71). Anger Recall did not change HRV (p-values>0.10). The SCWT produced decreases in HF-HRV (p=0.001) as well as LF-HRV (p=0.001). The magnitude of feeling “happy” during Happiness Recall was positively correlated with ΔHF-HRV (p=0.050), whereas an incongruent mood state (“frustrated”) was associated with smaller ΔHF-HRV (p=0.070). Associations between frontal EEG activation and HRV responses were mostly non-significant, except for increased right frontal activation during Happiness Recall which was associated with a decrease in LF/HF ratio (p = 0.009), It is concluded that positive and negative mood induction result in differential HRV responses, which is related to both task valence and the intensity of task-induced emotions. PMID:21182891

  2. Importance of the tuning of band position in optimizing the electronic coupling and photocatalytic activity of nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xiaoyan; Mok, Eun Kyung; Baek, Ji-Won; Park, Sang-Hyun; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2015-10-15

    The electronic coupling and photocatalytic activity of Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite can be optimized by the fine-tuning of the band position of titanium oxide with nitrogen doping. The increase of the valence band energy of TiO{sub 2} by N-doping leads not only to the enhanced absorption of visible light but also to the promoted hole transfer from Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to TiO{sub 2}, resulting in the efficient spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. While the undoped Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite shows an inferior photocatalytic activity to the pure Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, the photocatalyst performance of N-doped nanocomposite is better than those of Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and undoped Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite. This observation underscores a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of nanocomposite upon N-doping, a result of enhanced electronic coupling between the hybridized species. The present results clearly demonstrate the importance of the fine-tuning of band position in optimizing the photocatalytic activity of hybrid-type photocatalysts. - Highlights: • The band position of Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} can be effectively tailored by nitrogen doping. • The N-doping leads to the improvement of charge separation. • The N-doped Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} shows high photocatalytic activity.

  3. Comparative Activities of Clinafloxacin against Gram-Positive and -Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ednie, Lois M.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    Activities of clinafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, trovafloxacin, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ceftazidime, and imipenem against 354 ciprofloxacin-susceptible and -intermediate-resistant organisms were tested by agar dilution. Clinafloxacin yielded the lowest quinolone MICs (≤0.5 μg/ml against ciprofloxacin-susceptible organisms and ≤16.0 μg/ml against ciprofloxacin-intermediate-resistant organisms) compared to those of levofloxacin, trovafloxacin, and sparfloxacin. Ceftazidime, piperacillin alone or combined with tazobactam, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and imipenem usually yielded higher MICs against ciprofloxacin-resistant strains. PMID:9593165

  4. A turn-key Concept for active cancellation of Global Positioning System L3 Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigra, Lou; Lewis, B. M.; Edgar, C. E.; Perillat, P.; Quintero, L.; Stanimirovic, S.; Gallagher, J. S., III

    2011-01-01

    We present a concept, developed at the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center (NAIC) at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, for suppression of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals in the 305 m dish radio receiver path prior to backend processing. The subsystem does not require an auxiliary antenna and is intended for easy integration with radio telescope systems with a goal of being a turnkey addition to virtually any facility. We have focused on detection and cancellation of the GPS L3 signal at 1381.05 MHz which, during periodic test modes and particularly during system-wide tests, interfere with observations of objects in a range of redshifts that includes the Coma supercluster, for example. The signal can dynamically change modulation modes and our scheme has demonstrated, through simulations using actual sampled telescope data, the ability to acquire and track these signals as well as detect the mode changes in order to apply cancellation or blanking, as appropriate. The subsystem can also be adapted to GPS L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2C (1227.6 MHz), and others. A follow-up is underway to develop a prototype to deploy and evaluate at NAIC.

  5. Simple method for the rapid simultaneous screening of photocatalytic activity over multiple positions of self-cleaning films.

    PubMed

    Kafizas, Andreas; Adriaens, Davy; Mills, Andrew; Parkin, Ivan P

    2009-10-01

    An intelligent ink, previously shown to be capable of rapidly assessing photocatalytic activity, was simply applied via a felt-pen onto a commercially available piece of Activ self-cleaning glass. The ink, comprising of redox dye resazurin and the sacrificial electron donor glycerol within an aqueous hydroxy ethyl cellulose (HEC) polymer media, was photocatalytically degraded in a two-step process. The key initial stage was the photo-reductive conversion of resazurin to resorufin, whereby a colour change from blue to pink occurred. The latter stage was the subsequent photo-reduction of the resorufin, where a slower change from pink to colourless was seen. Red and green components of red-green-blue colour extracted from flat-bed scanner digital images of resazurin ink coated photocatalytic films at intervals during the photocatalysis reaction were inversely proportional to the changes seen via UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and indicative of reaction kinetics. A 3 x 3 grid of intelligent ink was drawn onto a piece of Activ and a glass blank. The photocatalysis reaction was monitored solely by flat-bed digital scanning. Red-green-blue values of respective positions on the grid were extracted using a custom-built program entitled RGB Extractor. The program was capable of extracting a number of 5 x 5 pixel averages of red-green-blue components simultaneously. Allocation of merely three coordinates allowed for the automatic generation of a grid, with scroll-bars controlling the number of positions to be extracted on the grid formed. No significant change in red and green components for any position on the glass blank was observed; however, the Activ film displayed a homogenous photo-reduction of the dye, reaching maxima in red and minima in green components in 23 +/- 3 and 14 +/- 2 min, respectively. A compositionally graded N-doped titania film synthesised in house via a combinatorial APCVD reaction was also photocatalytically tested by this method where 247

  6. Covalent ISG15 conjugation positively regulates the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of parkin

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eunju; Yoo, Lang; Hyun, Minju; Shin, Woo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in aggregates called Lewy bodies. Several mutated genes have been found in familial PD patients, including SNCA (α-synuclein), PARK2 (parkin), PINK1, PARK7 (DJ-1), LRRK2 and ATP13A2. Many pathogenic mutations of PARK2, which encodes the ubiquitin E3 ligase parkin, result in loss of function, leading to accumulation of parkin substrates and consequently contributing to dopaminergic cell death. ISG15 is a member of the ubiquitin-like modifier family and is induced by stimulation with type I interferons. Similar to ubiquitin and ubiquitination, covalent conjugation of ISG15 to target proteins (ISGylation) regulates their biochemical properties. In this study, we identified parkin as a novel target of ISGylation specifically mediated by the ISG15-E3 ligase HERC5. In addition, we identified two ISGylation sites, Lys-349 and Lys-369, in the in-between-ring domain of parkin. ISGylation of these sites promotes parkin's ubiquitin E3 ligase activity by suppressing the intramolecular interaction that maintains its autoinhibited conformation and increases its cytoprotective effect. In conclusion, covalent ISG15 conjugation is a novel mode of modulating parkin activity, and alteration in this pathway may be associated with PD pathogenesis. PMID:27534820

  7. Tissue Specific Expression of Cre in Rat Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Dopamine Active Transporter-Positive Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brown, Andrew; Fisher, Dan; Wu, Yumei; Warren, Joe; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a preferred model system over the mouse for neurological studies, and cell type-specific Cre expression in the rat enables precise ablation of gene function in neurons of interest, which is especially valuable for neurodegenerative disease modeling and optogenetics. Yet, few such Cre rats are available. Here we report the characterization of two Cre rats, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre and dopamine active transporter (DAT or Slc6a3)-Cre, by using a combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as well as a fluorescent reporter for Cre activity. We detected Cre expression in expected neurons in both Cre lines. Interestingly, we also found that in Th-Cre rats, but not DAT-Cre rats, Cre is expressed in female germ cells, allowing germline excision of the floxed allele and hence the generation of whole-body knockout rats. In summary, our data demonstrate that targeted integration of Cre cassette lead to faithful recapitulation of expression pattern of the endogenous promoter, and mRNA FISH, in addition to IHC, is an effective method for the analysis of the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns in the rat brain, alleviating the dependence on high quality antibodies that are often not available against rat proteins. The Th-Cre and the DAT-Cre rat lines express Cre in selective subsets of dopaminergic neurons and should be particularly useful for researches on Parkinson's disease.

  8. Composition and Activity of the Non-canonical Gram-positive SecY2 Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Bandara, Mikaila; Corey, Robin A.; Martin, Remy; Skehel, J. Mark; Blocker, Ariel J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The accessory Sec system in Streptococcus gordonii DL1 is a specialized export system that transports a large serine-rich repeat protein, Hsa, to the bacterial surface. The system is composed of core proteins SecA2 and SecY2 and accessory Sec proteins Asp1–Asp5. Similar to canonical SecYEG, SecY2 forms a channel for translocation of the Hsa adhesin across the cytoplasmic membrane. Accessory Sec proteins Asp4 and Asp5 have been suggested to work alongside SecY2 to form the translocon, similar to the associated SecY, SecE, and SecG of the canonical system (SecYEG). To test this theory, S. gordonii secY2, asp4, and asp5 were co-expressed in Escherichia coli. The resultant complex was subsequently purified, and its composition was confirmed by mass spectrometry to be SecY2-Asp4-Asp5. Like SecYEG, the non-canonical complex activates the ATPase activity of the SecA motor (SecA2). This study also shows that Asp4 and Asp5 are necessary for optimal adhesion of S. gordonii to glycoproteins gp340 and fibronectin, known Hsa binding partners, as well as for early stage biofilm formation. This work opens new avenues for understanding the structure and function of the accessory Sec system. PMID:27551046

  9. Tissue Specific Expression of Cre in Rat Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Dopamine Active Transporter-Positive Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brown, Andrew; Fisher, Dan; Wu, Yumei; Warren, Joe; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a preferred model system over the mouse for neurological studies, and cell type-specific Cre expression in the rat enables precise ablation of gene function in neurons of interest, which is especially valuable for neurodegenerative disease modeling and optogenetics. Yet, few such Cre rats are available. Here we report the characterization of two Cre rats, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre and dopamine active transporter (DAT or Slc6a3)-Cre, by using a combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as well as a fluorescent reporter for Cre activity. We detected Cre expression in expected neurons in both Cre lines. Interestingly, we also found that in Th-Cre rats, but not DAT-Cre rats, Cre is expressed in female germ cells, allowing germline excision of the floxed allele and hence the generation of whole-body knockout rats. In summary, our data demonstrate that targeted integration of Cre cassette lead to faithful recapitulation of expression pattern of the endogenous promoter, and mRNA FISH, in addition to IHC, is an effective method for the analysis of the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns in the rat brain, alleviating the dependence on high quality antibodies that are often not available against rat proteins. The Th-Cre and the DAT-Cre rat lines express Cre in selective subsets of dopaminergic neurons and should be particularly useful for researches on Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26886559

  10. Constitutively active Notch1 induces growth arrest of HPV-positive cervical cancer cells via separate signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Talora, Claudio; Cialfi, Samantha; Segatto, Oreste; Morrone, Stefania; Kim Choi, John; Frati, Luigi; Paolo Dotto, Gian; Gulino, Alberto; Screpanti, Isabella . E-mail: isabella.screpanti@uniroma1.it

    2005-05-01

    Notch signaling plays a key role in cell-fate determination and differentiation in different organisms and cell types. Several reports suggest that Notch signaling may be involved in neoplastic transformation. However, in primary keratinocytes, Notch1 can function as a tumor suppressor. Similarly, in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, constitutively active Notch1 signaling was found to cause growth suppression. Activated Notch1 in these cells represses viral E6/E7 expression through AP-1 down-modulation, resulting in increased p53 expression and a block of pRb hyperphosphorylation. Here we show that in cervical cancer cell lines in which Notch1 ability to repress AP-1 activity is impaired, Notch1-enforced expression elicits an alternative pathway leading to growth arrest. Indeed, activated Notch1 signaling suppresses activity of the helix-loop-helix transcription factor E47, via ERK1/2 activation, resulting in inhibition of cell cycle progression. Moreover, we found that RBP-J{kappa}-dependent Notch signaling is specifically repressed in cervical cancer cells and this repression could provide one such mechanism that needs to be activated for cervical carcinogenesis. Finally, we show that inhibition of endogenous Notch1 signaling, although results in a proliferative advantage, sensitizes cervical cancer cell lines to drug-induced apoptosis. Together, our results provide novel molecular insights into Notch1-dependent growth inhibitory effects, counteracting the transforming potential of HPV.

  11. The effects of gender on quadriceps muscle activation strategies during a maneuver that mimics a high ACL injury risk position.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Hewett, Timothy E

    2005-04-01

    While the increased incidence of serious knee injuries in female athletes is well established, the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms related to the elevated ACL injury rate has yet to be delineated. Video analysis of ACL injury during competitive sports play indicates a common body position associated with non-contact ACL injury; the tibia is externally rotated, the knee is close to full extension, the foot is planted and as the limb is decelerated it collapses into valgus. The purpose of the current prospective study was to evaluate gender differences in quadriceps muscle activation strategies when performing a physically challenging, but reproducible maneuver that mimics the high ACL injury risk position (in the absence of high velocity and high loads). Twenty physically active college-aged subjects (10 male and 10 female) performed multiple sets of the prescribed exercise. EMG recordings were employed to measure the ratio of activation between the medial and lateral quadriceps during the 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20th sets of exercise. Females demonstrated decreased RMS medial-to-lateral quadriceps ratios compared to males (F(1,18)=5.88, p=0.026). There was no main effect of set number on RMS quadriceps ratio (p>0.05). The results of this study suggest that females utilize neuromuscular activation strategies which may contribute to "dynamic valgus" and ACL rupture when performing high-risk maneuvers.

  12. Exploiting MEK Inhibitor-Mediated Activation of ERα for Therapeutic Intervention in ER-Positive Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hou, June Y.; Rodriguez-Gabin, Alicia; Samaweera, Leleesha; Hazan, Rachel; Goldberg, Gary L.; Horwitz, Susan Band; McDaid, Hayley M.

    2013-01-01

    While the clinical benefit of MEK inhibitor (MEKi)-based therapy is well established in Raf mutant malignancies, its utility as a suppressor of hyperactive MAPK signaling in the absence of mutated Raf or Ras, is an area of ongoing research. MAPK activation is associated with loss of ERα expression and hormonal resistance in numerous malignancies. Herein, we demonstrate that MEKi induces a feedback response that results in ERα overexpression, phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of ER-regulated genes. Mechanistically, MEKi-mediated ERα overexpression is largely independent of erbB2 and AKT feedback activation, but is ERK-dependent. We subsequently exploit this phenomenon therapeutically by combining the ER-antagonist, fulvestrant with MEKi. This results in synergistic suppression of tumor growth, in vitro and potentiation of single agent activity in vivo in nude mice bearing xenografts. Thus, we demonstrate that exploiting adaptive feedback after MEKi can be used to sensitize ERα-positive tumors to hormonal therapy, and propose that this strategy may have broader clinical utility in ERα-positive ovarian carcinoma. PMID:23390495

  13. Ground state destabilization from a positioned general base in the ketosteroid isomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Eliza A; Schwans, Jason P; Sonnett, Matthew; Natarajan, Aditya; Gonzalez, Ana; Tsai, Yingssu; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-02-12

    We compared the binding affinities of ground state analogues for bacterial ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) with a wild-type anionic Asp general base and with uncharged Asn and Ala in the general base position to provide a measure of potential ground state destabilization that could arise from the close juxtaposition of the anionic Asp and hydrophobic steroid in the reaction's Michaelis complex. The analogue binding affinity increased ~1 order of magnitude for the Asp38Asn mutation and ~2 orders of magnitude for the Asp38Ala mutation, relative to the affinity with Asp38, for KSI from two sources. The increased level of binding suggests that the abutment of a charged general base and a hydrophobic steroid is modestly destabilizing, relative to a standard state in water, and that this destabilization is relieved in the transition state and intermediate in which the charge on the general base has been neutralized because of proton abstraction. Stronger binding also arose from mutation of Pro39, the residue adjacent to the Asp general base, consistent with an ability of the Asp general base to now reorient to avoid the destabilizing interaction. Consistent with this model, the Pro mutants reduced or eliminated the increased level of binding upon replacement of Asp38 with Asn or Ala. These results, supported by additional structural observations, suggest that ground state destabilization from the negatively charged Asp38 general base provides a modest contribution to KSI catalysis. They also provide a clear illustration of the well-recognized concept that enzymes evolve for catalytic function and not, in general, to maximize ground state binding. This ground state destabilization mechanism may be common to the many enzymes with anionic side chains that deprotonate carbon acids.

  14. Active Position Control of a Flexible Smart Beam Using Internal Model Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEE, Y.-S.; ELLIOTT, S. J.

    2001-05-01

    The problem of controlling the position at the tip of a flexible cantilever beam to follow a command signal is considered, by using a pair of piezoelectric actuators at the clamped end. The beam is lightly damped and so the natural transient response is rather long, and also since the sensor and actuator are not collocated, the plant response is non-minimum phase. Two control strategies were investigated. The first involved conventional PID control in which the feedback gains were adjusted to give the fastest closed-loop response to a step input. The second control strategy was based on an internal model control (IMC) architecture. The control filter in the IMC controller was a digital FIR device designed to minimize the expectation of the mean square tracking error. In practice, such smart beams could be exposed to temperature fluctuations and changes in geometry. The effect of these variations on the stability was studied and it is shown that the need for robustness to such variations leads to a limitation in the performance of an IMC controller. The improvement in the stability robustness by incorporating control effort weighting into the cost function being minimized was investigated, as was the incorporation of modelling delay in the design of the IMC control filter. The IMC controller designed for the beam was found to have much reduced settling times to a step input compared with those of the PID controller while maintaining good robustness to changes in temperature. However, the extremely low damping of the experimental beam made it difficult to implement an accurate plant model in practice.

  15. Active Learning in a Neuroethics Course Positively Impacts Moral Judgment Development in Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Desiree; Dziobek, Derek; Jimenez, Nathalia Torres; Barbey, Christopher; Dubinsky, Janet M

    2015-01-01

    The growing neuroscientific understanding of the biological basis of behaviors has profound social and ethical implications. To address the need for public awareness of the consequences of these advances, we developed an undergraduate neuroethics course, Neuroscience and Society, at the University of Minnesota. Course evolution, objectives, content, and impact are described here. To engage all students and facilitate undergraduate ethics education, this course employed daily reading, writing, and student discussion, case analysis, and team presentations with goals of fostering development of moral reasoning and judgment and introducing application of bioethical frameworks to topics raised by neuroscience. Pre- and post-course Defining Issues Test (DIT) scores and student end-of-course reflections demonstrated that course objectives for student application of bioethical frameworks to neuroethical issues were met. The active-learning, student-centered pedagogical approaches used to achieve these goals serve as a model for how to effectively teach neuroethics at the undergraduate level. PMID:25838802

  16. Biosynthetic Pathway for Mannopeptimycins, Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotics Active against Drug-Resistant Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Magarvey, Nathan A.; Haltli, Brad; He, Min; Greenstein, Michael; Hucul, John A.

    2006-01-01

    The mannopeptimycins are a novel class of lipoglycopeptide antibiotics active against multidrug-resistant pathogens with potential as clinically useful antibacterials. This report is the first to describe the biosynthesis of this novel class of mannosylated lipoglycopeptides. Included here are the cloning, sequencing, annotation, and manipulation of the mannopeptimycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL 30439. Encoded by genes within the mannopeptimycin biosynthetic gene cluster are enzymes responsible for the generation of the hexapeptide core (nonribosomal peptide synthetases [NRPS]) and tailoring reactions (mannosylation, isovalerylation, hydroxylation, and methylation). The NRPS system is noncanonical in that it has six modules utilizing only five amino acid-specific adenylation domains and it lacks a prototypical NRPS macrocyclizing thioesterase domain. Analysis of the mannopeptimycin gene cluster and its engineering has elucidated the mannopeptimycin biosynthetic pathway and provides the framework to make new and improved mannopeptimycins biosynthetically. PMID:16723579

  17. Probing the Role of Medication, DBS Electrode Position, and Antidromic Activation on Impulsivity Using a Computational Model of Basal Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mandali, Alekhya; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Everyday, we encounter situations where available choices are nearly equally rewarding (high conflict) calling for some tough decision making. Experimental recordings showed that the activity of Sub Thalamic Nucleus (STN) increases during such situations providing the extra time needed to make the right decision, teasing apart the most rewarding choice from the runner up closely trailing behind. This prolonged deliberation necessary for decision making under high conflict was absent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who underwent Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery of STN. In an attempt to understand the underlying cause of such adverse response, we built a 2D spiking network model (50 × 50 lattice) of Basal ganglia incorporating the key nuclei. Using the model we studied the Probabilistic learning task (PLT) in untreated, treated (L-Dopa and Dopamine Agonist) and STN-DBS PD conditions. Based on the experimental observation that dopaminergic activity is analogous to temporal difference (TD) and induces cortico-striatal plasticity, we introduced learning in the cortico-striatal weights. The results show that healthy and untreated conditions of PD model were able to more or less equally select (avoid) the rewarding (punitive) choice, a behavior that was absent in treated PD condition. The time taken to select a choice in high conflict trials was high in normal condition, which is in agreement with experimental results. The treated PD (Dopamine Agonist) patients made impulsive decisions (small reaction time) which in turn led to poor performance. The underlying cause of the observed impulsivity in DBS patients was studied in the model by (1) varying the electrode position within STN, (2) causing antidromic activation of GPe neurons. The effect of electrode position on reaction time was analyzed by studying the activity of STN neurons where, a decrease in STN neural activity was observed for certain electrode positions. We also observed that a higher antidromic

  18. Probing the Role of Medication, DBS Electrode Position, and Antidromic Activation on Impulsivity Using a Computational Model of Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Mandali, Alekhya; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Everyday, we encounter situations where available choices are nearly equally rewarding (high conflict) calling for some tough decision making. Experimental recordings showed that the activity of Sub Thalamic Nucleus (STN) increases during such situations providing the extra time needed to make the right decision, teasing apart the most rewarding choice from the runner up closely trailing behind. This prolonged deliberation necessary for decision making under high conflict was absent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who underwent Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery of STN. In an attempt to understand the underlying cause of such adverse response, we built a 2D spiking network model (50 × 50 lattice) of Basal ganglia incorporating the key nuclei. Using the model we studied the Probabilistic learning task (PLT) in untreated, treated (L-Dopa and Dopamine Agonist) and STN-DBS PD conditions. Based on the experimental observation that dopaminergic activity is analogous to temporal difference (TD) and induces cortico-striatal plasticity, we introduced learning in the cortico-striatal weights. The results show that healthy and untreated conditions of PD model were able to more or less equally select (avoid) the rewarding (punitive) choice, a behavior that was absent in treated PD condition. The time taken to select a choice in high conflict trials was high in normal condition, which is in agreement with experimental results. The treated PD (Dopamine Agonist) patients made impulsive decisions (small reaction time) which in turn led to poor performance. The underlying cause of the observed impulsivity in DBS patients was studied in the model by (1) varying the electrode position within STN, (2) causing antidromic activation of GPe neurons. The effect of electrode position on reaction time was analyzed by studying the activity of STN neurons where, a decrease in STN neural activity was observed for certain electrode positions. We also observed that a higher antidromic

  19. Probing the Role of Medication, DBS Electrode Position, and Antidromic Activation on Impulsivity Using a Computational Model of Basal Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mandali, Alekhya; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Everyday, we encounter situations where available choices are nearly equally rewarding (high conflict) calling for some tough decision making. Experimental recordings showed that the activity of Sub Thalamic Nucleus (STN) increases during such situations providing the extra time needed to make the right decision, teasing apart the most rewarding choice from the runner up closely trailing behind. This prolonged deliberation necessary for decision making under high conflict was absent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who underwent Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery of STN. In an attempt to understand the underlying cause of such adverse response, we built a 2D spiking network model (50 × 50 lattice) of Basal ganglia incorporating the key nuclei. Using the model we studied the Probabilistic learning task (PLT) in untreated, treated (L-Dopa and Dopamine Agonist) and STN-DBS PD conditions. Based on the experimental observation that dopaminergic activity is analogous to temporal difference (TD) and induces cortico-striatal plasticity, we introduced learning in the cortico-striatal weights. The results show that healthy and untreated conditions of PD model were able to more or less equally select (avoid) the rewarding (punitive) choice, a behavior that was absent in treated PD condition. The time taken to select a choice in high conflict trials was high in normal condition, which is in agreement with experimental results. The treated PD (Dopamine Agonist) patients made impulsive decisions (small reaction time) which in turn led to poor performance. The underlying cause of the observed impulsivity in DBS patients was studied in the model by (1) varying the electrode position within STN, (2) causing antidromic activation of GPe neurons. The effect of electrode position on reaction time was analyzed by studying the activity of STN neurons where, a decrease in STN neural activity was observed for certain electrode positions. We also observed that a higher antidromic

  20. Probing the Role of Medication, DBS Electrode Position, and Antidromic Activation on Impulsivity Using a Computational Model of Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Mandali, Alekhya; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Everyday, we encounter situations where available choices are nearly equally rewarding (high conflict) calling for some tough decision making. Experimental recordings showed that the activity of Sub Thalamic Nucleus (STN) increases during such situations providing the extra time needed to make the right decision, teasing apart the most rewarding choice from the runner up closely trailing behind. This prolonged deliberation necessary for decision making under high conflict was absent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who underwent Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery of STN. In an attempt to understand the underlying cause of such adverse response, we built a 2D spiking network model (50 × 50 lattice) of Basal ganglia incorporating the key nuclei. Using the model we studied the Probabilistic learning task (PLT) in untreated, treated (L-Dopa and Dopamine Agonist) and STN-DBS PD conditions. Based on the experimental observation that dopaminergic activity is analogous to temporal difference (TD) and induces cortico-striatal plasticity, we introduced learning in the cortico-striatal weights. The results show that healthy and untreated conditions of PD model were able to more or less equally select (avoid) the rewarding (punitive) choice, a behavior that was absent in treated PD condition. The time taken to select a choice in high conflict trials was high in normal condition, which is in agreement with experimental results. The treated PD (Dopamine Agonist) patients made impulsive decisions (small reaction time) which in turn led to poor performance. The underlying cause of the observed impulsivity in DBS patients was studied in the model by (1) varying the electrode position within STN, (2) causing antidromic activation of GPe neurons. The effect of electrode position on reaction time was analyzed by studying the activity of STN neurons where, a decrease in STN neural activity was observed for certain electrode positions. We also observed that a higher antidromic

  1. Highly active modulators of indole signaling alter pathogenic behaviors in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Minvielle, Marine J; Eguren, Kristen; Melander, Christian

    2013-12-16

    Indole is a universal signal that regulates various bacterial behaviors, such as biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. To generate mechanistic probes of indole signaling and control indole-mediated pathogenic phenotypes in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, we have investigated the use of desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) derivatives to generate highly active indole mimetics. We have developed non-microbicidal dFBr derivatives that are 27-2000 times more active than indole in modulating biofilm formation, motility, acid resistance, and antibiotic resistance. The activity of these analogues parallels indole, because they are dependent on temperature, the enzyme tryptophanase TnaA, and the transcriptional regulator SdiA. This investigation demonstrates that molecules based on the dFBr scaffold can alter pathogenic behaviors by mimicking indole-signaling pathways.

  2. Effects of lower body positive pressure on muscle sympathetic nerve activity response [correction of respopnse] to head-up tilt.

    PubMed

    Fu, Q; Iwase, S; Niimi, Y; Kamiya, A; Kawanokuchi, J; Cui, J; Mano, T

    2001-07-01

    The benefits of lower body positive pressure (LBPP) are generally accepted for clinical treatment in medical emergencies caused by massive bleeding to maintain the systemic blood pressure. They are also used by NASA post spaceflight for preventing orthostatic hypotension in the astronauts. However, controversy still exists concerning the mechanisms underlying LBPP benefits. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the baroreflex-mediated enhancement in sympathetic activity would be attenuated by LBPP during an orthostatic challenge in humans. Specifically, we studied 1) the sympathetic activity responses by the microneurographic technique, using direct intraneural measurement of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA); and 2) the contributions of preload and afterload to the chances in MSNA response during orthostasis on application of LBPP. To accomplish these issues, MSNA was recorded microneurographically along with noninvasive measurement of the cardiovascular variables in all the subjects during exposure to a 70 degrees HUT with 30-mm Hg LBPP.

  3. Thusin, a Novel Two-Component Lantibiotic with Potent Antimicrobial Activity against Several Gram-Positive Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bingyue; Zheng, Jinshui; Liu, Hualin; Li, Junhua; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sajid, Muhammad; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Due to the rapidly increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains, the need for new antimicrobial drugs to treat infections has become urgent. Bacteriocins, which are antimicrobial peptides of bacterial origin, are considered potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics and have attracted widespread attention in recent years. Among these bacteriocins, lantibiotics, especially two-component lantibiotics, exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against some clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens and have potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry. In this study, we characterized a novel two-component lantibiotic termed thusin that consists of Thsα, Thsβ, and Thsβ' (mutation of Thsβ, A14G) and that was isolated from a B. thuringiensis strain BGSC 4BT1. Thsα and Thsβ (or Thsβ') exhibit optimal antimicrobial activity at a 1:1 ratio and act sequentially to affect target cells, and they are all highly thermostable (100°C for 30 min) and pH tolerant (pH 2.0 to 9.0). Thusin shows remarkable efficacy against all tested Gram-positive bacteria and greater activities than two known lantibiotics thuricin 4A-4 and ticin A4, and one antibiotic vancomycin against various bacterial pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus sciuri, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Moreover, thusin is also able to inhibit the outgrowth of B. cereus spores. The potent antimicrobial activity of thusin against some Gram-positive pathogens indicates that it has potential for the development of new drugs. PMID:27486447

  4. Thusin, a Novel Two-Component Lantibiotic with Potent Antimicrobial Activity against Several Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Bingyue; Zheng, Jinshui; Liu, Hualin; Li, Junhua; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sajid, Muhammad; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Due to the rapidly increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains, the need for new antimicrobial drugs to treat infections has become urgent. Bacteriocins, which are antimicrobial peptides of bacterial origin, are considered potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics and have attracted widespread attention in recent years. Among these bacteriocins, lantibiotics, especially two-component lantibiotics, exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against some clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens and have potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry. In this study, we characterized a novel two-component lantibiotic termed thusin that consists of Thsα, Thsβ, and Thsβ' (mutation of Thsβ, A14G) and that was isolated from a B. thuringiensis strain BGSC 4BT1. Thsα and Thsβ (or Thsβ') exhibit optimal antimicrobial activity at a 1:1 ratio and act sequentially to affect target cells, and they are all highly thermostable (100°C for 30 min) and pH tolerant (pH 2.0 to 9.0). Thusin shows remarkable efficacy against all tested Gram-positive bacteria and greater activities than two known lantibiotics thuricin 4A-4 and ticin A4, and one antibiotic vancomycin against various bacterial pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus sciuri, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Moreover, thusin is also able to inhibit the outgrowth of B. cereus spores. The potent antimicrobial activity of thusin against some Gram-positive pathogens indicates that it has potential for the development of new drugs. PMID:27486447

  5. Thusin, a Novel Two-Component Lantibiotic with Potent Antimicrobial Activity against Several Gram-Positive Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bingyue; Zheng, Jinshui; Liu, Hualin; Li, Junhua; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sajid, Muhammad; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Due to the rapidly increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains, the need for new antimicrobial drugs to treat infections has become urgent. Bacteriocins, which are antimicrobial peptides of bacterial origin, are considered potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics and have attracted widespread attention in recent years. Among these bacteriocins, lantibiotics, especially two-component lantibiotics, exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against some clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens and have potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry. In this study, we characterized a novel two-component lantibiotic termed thusin that consists of Thsα, Thsβ, and Thsβ' (mutation of Thsβ, A14G) and that was isolated from a B. thuringiensis strain BGSC 4BT1. Thsα and Thsβ (or Thsβ') exhibit optimal antimicrobial activity at a 1:1 ratio and act sequentially to affect target cells, and they are all highly thermostable (100°C for 30 min) and pH tolerant (pH 2.0 to 9.0). Thusin shows remarkable efficacy against all tested Gram-positive bacteria and greater activities than two known lantibiotics thuricin 4A-4 and ticin A4, and one antibiotic vancomycin against various bacterial pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus sciuri, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Moreover, thusin is also able to inhibit the outgrowth of B. cereus spores. The potent antimicrobial activity of thusin against some Gram-positive pathogens indicates that it has potential for the development of new drugs.

  6. Exposure to blue wavelength light modulates anterior cingulate cortex activation in response to 'uncertain' versus 'certain' anticipation of positive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Alkozei, Anna; Smith, Ryan; Killgore, William D S

    2016-03-11

    Blue wavelength light has been used as an effective treatment for some types of mood disorders and circadian rhythm related sleep problems. We hypothesized that acute exposure to blue wavelength light would directly affect the functioning of neurocircuity implicated in emotion regulation (i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, insula, and anterior cingulate cortex [ACC]) during 'certain' and 'uncertain' anticipation of negative and positive stimuli. Thirty-five healthy adults were randomized to receive a thirty-minute exposure to either blue (active) or amber (placebo) light, immediately followed by an emotional anticipation task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In contrast to placebo, participants in the blue light group showed significantly reduced activation within the rostral ACC during 'uncertain' anticipation (i.e., uncertainty regarding whether a positive or negative stimulus would be shown) in comparison to 'certain' anticipation of a positive stimulus. These findings may be explicable in terms of interactions between blue light exposure and the influence of specific neuromodulators on ACC-mediated decision-making mechanisms.

  7. Exposure to blue wavelength light modulates anterior cingulate cortex activation in response to 'uncertain' versus 'certain' anticipation of positive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Alkozei, Anna; Smith, Ryan; Killgore, William D S

    2016-03-11

    Blue wavelength light has been used as an effective treatment for some types of mood disorders and circadian rhythm related sleep problems. We hypothesized that acute exposure to blue wavelength light would directly affect the functioning of neurocircuity implicated in emotion regulation (i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, insula, and anterior cingulate cortex [ACC]) during 'certain' and 'uncertain' anticipation of negative and positive stimuli. Thirty-five healthy adults were randomized to receive a thirty-minute exposure to either blue (active) or amber (placebo) light, immediately followed by an emotional anticipation task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In contrast to placebo, participants in the blue light group showed significantly reduced activation within the rostral ACC during 'uncertain' anticipation (i.e., uncertainty regarding whether a positive or negative stimulus would be shown) in comparison to 'certain' anticipation of a positive stimulus. These findings may be explicable in terms of interactions between blue light exposure and the influence of specific neuromodulators on ACC-mediated decision-making mechanisms. PMID:26806862

  8. Activity Profiles and Physiological Responses of Representative Tag Football Players in Relation to Playing Position and Physical Fitness.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Luke W; Burkett, Brendan J; McKean, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the physical fitness, match-activity profiles and physiological responses of representative tag football players and examined the relationship between physical fitness and the match-activity profile. Microtechnology devices and heart rate (HR) chest straps were used to determine the match-activity profiles of sixteen tag football players for five matches during the 2014 Australian National Championships. The relationships between lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) and the match-activity profile were examined using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Outside players had greater lower body muscular power (ES = 0.98) and straight line running speed (ES = 1.03-1.18) than inside players, and also covered greater very high-speed running (VHSR) distance/min (ES = 0.67) and reached higher peak running speeds (ES = 0.95) during matches. Inside and outside players performed a similar number of repeated high-intensity effort (RHIE) bouts and reported similar mean and maximum efforts per RHIE bout. However, there were differences between playing positions for mean and maximal RHIE effort durations (ES = 0.69-1.15) and mean RHIE bout recovery (ES = 0.56). Inside and outside players also reported small to moderate differences (ES = 0.43-0.80) for times spent in each HR zone. There were a number of moderate to very large correlations between physical fitness measures and match-activity profile variables. This study found lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo IR2 to be related to the match-activities of representative tag football players, although differences between inside and outside players suggest that athlete testing and training practices should be modified for different playing positions.

  9. Activity Profiles and Physiological Responses of Representative Tag Football Players in Relation to Playing Position and Physical Fitness

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the physical fitness, match-activity profiles and physiological responses of representative tag football players and examined the relationship between physical fitness and the match-activity profile. Microtechnology devices and heart rate (HR) chest straps were used to determine the match-activity profiles of sixteen tag football players for five matches during the 2014 Australian National Championships. The relationships between lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) and the match-activity profile were examined using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Outside players had greater lower body muscular power (ES = 0.98) and straight line running speed (ES = 1.03–1.18) than inside players, and also covered greater very high-speed running (VHSR) distance/min (ES = 0.67) and reached higher peak running speeds (ES = 0.95) during matches. Inside and outside players performed a similar number of repeated high-intensity effort (RHIE) bouts and reported similar mean and maximum efforts per RHIE bout. However, there were differences between playing positions for mean and maximal RHIE effort durations (ES = 0.69–1.15) and mean RHIE bout recovery (ES = 0.56). Inside and outside players also reported small to moderate differences (ES = 0.43–0.80) for times spent in each HR zone. There were a number of moderate to very large correlations between physical fitness measures and match-activity profile variables. This study found lower body muscular power, straight line running speed and Yo-Yo IR2 to be related to the match-activities of representative tag football players, although differences between inside and outside players suggest that athlete testing and training practices should be modified for different playing positions. PMID:26642320

  10. Position surveillance using one active ranging satellite and time-of-arrival of a signal from an independent satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Frey, R. L.; Lewis, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Position surveillance using one active ranging/communication satellite and the time-of-arrival of signals from an independent satellite was shown to be feasible and practical. A towboat on the Mississippi River was equipped with a tone-code ranging transponder and a receiver tuned to the timing signals of the GOES satellite. A similar transponder was located at the office of the towing company. Tone-code ranging interrogations were transmitted from the General Electric Earth Station Laboratory through ATS-6 to the towboat and to the ground truth transponder office. Their automatic responses included digital transmissions of time-of-arrival measurements derived from the GOES signals. The Earth Station Laboratory determined ranges from the satellites to the towboat and computed position fixes. The ATS-6 lines-of-position were more precise than 0.1 NMi, 1 sigma, and the GOES lines-of-position were more precise than 1.6 NMi, 1 sigma. High quality voice communications were accomplished with the transponders using a nondirectional antenna on the towboat. The simple and effective surveillance technique merits further evaluation using operational maritime satellites.

  11. Autophagy Activated by Bluetongue Virus Infection Plays a Positive Role in Its Replication.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shuang; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Yang, Tao; Li, Junping; Feng, Yufei; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Zhang, Jikai; Wu, Donglai

    2015-08-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an important pathogen of wild and domestic ruminants. Despite extensive study in recent decades, the interplay between BTV and host cells is not clearly understood. Autophagy as a cellular adaptive response plays a part in many viral infections. In our study, we found that BTV1 infection triggers the complete autophagic process in host cells, as demonstrated by the appearance of obvious double-membrane autophagosome-like vesicles, GFP-LC3 dots accumulation, the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and increased levels of autophagic flux in BSR cells (baby hamster kidney cell clones) and primary lamb lingual epithelial cells upon BTV1 infection. Moreover, the results of a UV-inactivated BTV1 infection assay suggested that the induction of autophagy was dependent on BTV1 replication. Therefore, we investigated the role of autophagy in BTV1 replication. The inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors (3-MA, CQ) and RNA interference (siBeclin1) significantly decreased viral protein synthesis and virus yields. In contrast, treating BSR cells with rapamycin, an inducer of autophagy, promoted viral protein expression and the production of infectious BTV1. These findings lead us to conclude that autophagy is activated by BTV1 and contributes to its replication, and provide novel insights into BTV-host interactions.

  12. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles proceeds through activation of Sox2-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In contrast to mammals, amphibians, such as adult urodeles (for example, newts) and anuran larvae (for example, Xenopus) can regenerate their spinal cord after injury. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. Results Here, we report that tail amputation results in a global increase of Sox2 levels and proliferation of Sox2+ cells. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 diminished proliferation of spinal cord resident cells affecting tail regeneration after amputation, suggesting that spinal cord regeneration is crucial for the whole process. After spinal cord transection, Sox2+ cells are found in the ablation gap forming aggregates. Furthermore, Sox2 levels correlated with regenerative capabilities during metamorphosis, observing a decrease in Sox2 levels at non-regenerative stages. Conclusions Sox2+ cells contribute to the regeneration of spinal cord after tail amputation and transection. Sox2 levels decreases during metamorphosis concomitantly with the lost of regenerative capabilities. Our results lead to a working hypothesis in which spinal cord damage activates proliferation and/or migration of Sox2+ cells, thus allowing regeneration of the spinal cord after tail amputation or reconstitution of the ependymal epithelium after spinal cord transection. PMID:22537391

  13. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Iñigo; Novick, Richard P; Christie, Gail E; Penadés, José R

    2013-08-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria.

  14. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penadés, José R.

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  15. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Iñigo; Novick, Richard P; Christie, Gail E; Penadés, José R

    2013-08-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  16. Positive feedback regulation of maize NADPH oxidase by mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in abscisic acid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fan; Ding, Haidong; Wang, Jinxiang; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Aying; Zhang, Yun; Tan, Mingpu; Dong, Wen; Jiang, Mingyi

    2009-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays), abscisic acid (ABA)-induced H2O2 production activates a 46 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase (p46MAPK), and the activation of p46MAPK also regulates the production of H2O2. However, the mechanism for the regulation of H2O2 production by MAPK in ABA signalling remains to be elucidated. In this study, four reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing NADPH oxidase (rboh) genes (ZmrbohA–D) were isolated and characterized in maize leaves. ABA treatment induced a biphasic response (phase I and phase II) in the expression of ZmrbohA–D and the activity of NADPH oxidase. Phase II induced by ABA was blocked by pretreatments with two MAPK kinase (MPKKK) inhibitors and two H2O2 scavengers, but phase I was not affected by these inhibitors or scavengers. Treatment with H2O2 alone also only induced phase II, and the induction was arrested by the MAPKK inhibitors. Furthermore, the ABA-activated p46MAPK was partially purified. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, the p46MAPK gene was cloned. Analysis of the tryptic peptides and the p46MAPK sequence indicate it is the known ZmMPK5. Treatments with ABA and H2O2 led to a significant increase in the activity of ZmMPK5, although ABA treatment only induced a slight increase in the expression of ZmMPK5. The data indicate that H2O2-activated ZmMPK5 is involved in the activation of phase II in ABA signalling, but not in phase I. The results suggest that there is a positive feedback loop involving NADPH oxidase, H2O2, and ZmMPK5 in ABA signalling. PMID:19592501

  17. Active stable maintenance functions in low copy-number plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria I. Partition systems.

    PubMed

    Dmowski, Michał; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2013-01-01

    Low copy number plasmids cannot rely on the random segregation during bacterial cell division. To be stably maintained in the population they evolved two types of mechanisms (i) partition systems (PAR) that actively separate replicated plasmid molecules to the daughter cells and (ii) toxin-andidote systems (TA) that act after cell division to kill plasmid-less cells. Our knowledge of partition systems has been based mainly on analysis of plasmids from Gram-negative bacteria. Now, numerous partition systems of plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria have also been characterized and make significant contribution to our understanding of these mechanisms.

  18. A positive association between active lifestyle and hemispheric lateralization for motor control and learning in older adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinsung; D'Amato, Arthur; Bambrough, Jennifer; Swartz, Ann M; Miller, Nora E

    2016-11-01

    Physical activity (PA) is well known to have general health benefits for older adults, but it is unclear whether it can also positively affect brain function involved in motor control and learning. We have previously shown that interlimb transfer of visuomotor adaptation occurs asymmetrically in young adults, while that occurs symmetrically in older adults, which suggests that the lateralized function of each hemisphere during motor tasks is diminished with aging. Here, we investigated the association between the level of PA and hemispheric motor lateralization by comparing the pattern of interlimb transfer following visuomotor adaptation between physically active and inactive older adults. Subjects were divided into two groups based on their PA level (active, inactive). They were further divided into two groups, such that a half of the subjects in each group adapted to a 30° rotation during targeted reaching movements with the left arm first, then with the right arm; and the other half with the right arm first, then with the left arm. Results indicated asymmetrical transfer (from left to right only) in the active subjects, whereas symmetrical transfer (from left to right, and vice versa) was observed in the inactive subjects. These findings suggest that older adults who maintain active lifestyle have a central nervous system that is more intact in terms of its lateralized motor function as compared with those who are inactive. PMID:27481694

  19. Visual Feedback of the Non-Moving Limb Improves Active Joint-Position Sense of the Impaired Limb in Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smorenburg, Ana R. P.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the active joint-position sense in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) and the effect of static visual feedback and static mirror visual feedback, of the non-moving limb, on the joint-position sense. Participants were asked to match the position of one upper limb with that of the contralateral limb. The task…

  20. Arginine Patch Predicts the RNA Annealing Activity of Hfq from Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Amy; Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    The Sm-protein Hfq facilitates interactions between small non-coding RNA (sRNA) and target mRNAs. In enteric Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq is required for sRNA regulation, and hfq deletion results in stress intolerance and reduced virulence. By contrast, the role of Hfq in Gram-positive is less established and varies among species. The RNA binding and RNA annealing activity of Hfq from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus were compared using minimal RNAs and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that RNA annealing activity increases with the number of arginines in a semi-conserved patch on the rim of the Hfq hexamer and correlates with the previously reported requirement for Hfq in sRNA regulation. Thus, the amino acid sequence of the arginine patch can predict the chaperone function of Hfq in sRNA regulation in different organisms. PMID:27049793

  1. Effect of the Spacing of Backpack Shoulder Straps on Cervical Muscle Activity, Acromion and Scapular Position, and Upper Trapezius Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-hee; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of the spacing of backpack shoulder straps on cervical muscle activity, acromion and scapular position, and upper trapezius (UT) pain. [Subjects] Fourteen males aged 20–32 years, were recruited. [Methods] We measured the MPS (midcervical paraspinal) activity, acromial angle, scapular distance, and UT pain after gait carrying a backpack with different shoulder strap spacings. [Results] The MPS, scapular inferior distance, and UT pressure pain threshold was significantly decreased and the acromion angle was significantly increased when carrying a backpack with wide shoulder straps compared to narrow shoulder straps. [Conclusion] A backpack with wide shoulder straps may cause scapular depression syndrome and chronic UT pain. PMID:24259829

  2. A Conserved Surface Loop in Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases Positions an Active Site Arginine and Functions in Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Peterson, Scott N.; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-04-18

    Dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the third step in the biosynthetic shikimate pathway. We present three crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica type I DHQD that address the functionality of a surface loop that is observed to close over the active site following substrate binding. Two wild-type structures with differing loop conformations and kinetic and structural studies of a mutant provide evidence of both direct and indirect mechanisms of involvement of the loop in substrate binding. In addition to allowing amino acid side chains to establish a direct interaction with the substrate, closure of the loop necessitates a conformational change of a key active site arginine, which in turn positions the substrate productively. The absence of DHQD in humans and its essentiality in many pathogenic bacteria make the enzyme a target for the development of nontoxic antimicrobials. The structures and ligand binding insights presented here may inform the design of novel type I DHQD inhibiting molecules.

  3. Arginine Patch Predicts the RNA Annealing Activity of Hfq from Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Amy; Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    The Sm-protein Hfq facilitates interactions between small non-coding RNA (sRNA) and target mRNAs. In enteric Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq is required for sRNA regulation, and hfq deletion results in stress intolerance and reduced virulence. By contrast, the role of Hfq in Gram-positive is less established and varies among species. The RNA binding and RNA annealing activity of Hfq from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus were compared using minimal RNAs and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that RNA annealing activity increases with the number of arginines in a semi-conserved patch on the rim of the Hfq hexamer and correlates with the previously reported requirement for Hfq in sRNA regulation. Thus, the amino acid sequence of the arginine patch can predict the chaperone function of Hfq in sRNA regulation in different organisms.

  4. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated upper-extremity muscle activities in natural, ideal, and corrected head positions. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulder were recruited and randomly assigned to the natural head position group (n = 13), ideal head position group (n = 14), or corrected head position group (n = 13). Muscle activities were measured using a four-channel surface electromyography system at the sternocleidomastoideus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles on the right side during an overhead reaching task. [Results] The muscle activities of the upper trapezius and serratus anterior differed significantly among head positions. Post hoc tests revealed significant differences between natural and ideal head positions, and natural and ideal head positions for both the upper trapezius and serratus anterior. [Conclusion] Recovery of normal upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle functions plays an important role in correcting forward head posture and rounded shoulders. PMID:26180310

  5. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated upper-extremity muscle activities in natural, ideal, and corrected head positions. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulder were recruited and randomly assigned to the natural head position group (n = 13), ideal head position group (n = 14), or corrected head position group (n = 13). Muscle activities were measured using a four-channel surface electromyography system at the sternocleidomastoideus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles on the right side during an overhead reaching task. [Results] The muscle activities of the upper trapezius and serratus anterior differed significantly among head positions. Post hoc tests revealed significant differences between natural and ideal head positions, and natural and ideal head positions for both the upper trapezius and serratus anterior. [Conclusion] Recovery of normal upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle functions plays an important role in correcting forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

  6. A Finger-Pressing Position Detector for Assisting People with Developmental Disabilities to Control Their Environmental Stimulation through Fine Motor Activities with a Standard Keyboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    This study used a standard keyboard with a newly developed finger-pressing position detection program (FPPDP), i.e. a new software program, which turns a standard keyboard into a finger-pressing position detector, to evaluate whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform fine motor activities to control their…

  7. Micropruina glycogenica gen. nov., sp. nov., a new Gram-positive glycogen-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Shintani, T; Liu, W T; Hanada, S; Kamagata, Y; Miyaoka, S; Suzuki, T; Nakamura, K

    2000-01-01

    A new Gram-positive non-spore-forming bacterium, strain Lg2T, was isolated from an activated sludge reactor showing enhanced biological phosphorus removal activity. The new isolate was a slowly growing organism and was capable of accumulating large amounts of intracellular glycogen from substrate taken up. Both oxidase and catalase were produced. The new isolate contained meso-diaminopimelic acid (DAP) in the cell wall. Complex fatty acid patterns with iso-C14:0, anteiso-C15:0, C16:0, iso-C16:0 and four other minor saturated or unsaturated straight-chain fatty acids were detected. The isolate contained a high genomic G+C content (70.5 mol%). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed the isolate in the high G+C Gram-positive group with Microlunatus phosphovorus and Friedmanniella antarctica as the closest relatives (sequence similarities are 93 and 92 %, respectively). These three organisms shared common features in morphology, but strain Lg2T could be differentiated from the other species by its peptidoglycan type (meso-DAP), fatty acid composition, carbon source utilization profile and G+C content. On the basis of these findings, it is proposed that a new genus and species, Micropruina glycogenica, should be created for the new isolate; the type strain is strain Lg2T (= JCM 10248T).

  8. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Daniels, Dwayne; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50  μ L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  9. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Daniels, Dwayne; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50  μ L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties.

  10. Pain as a reward: changing the meaning of pain from negative to positive co-activates opioid and cannabinoid systems.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Thoen, Wilma; Blanchard, Catherine; Vighetti, Sergio; Arduino, Claudia

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a negative emotional experience that is modulated by a variety of psychological factors through different inhibitory systems. For example, endogenous opioids and cannabinoids have been found to be involved in stress and placebo analgesia. Here we show that when the meaning of the pain experience is changed from negative to positive through verbal suggestions, the opioid and cannabinoid systems are co-activated and these, in turn, increase pain tolerance. We induced ischemic arm pain in healthy volunteers, who had to tolerate the pain as long as possible. One group was informed about the aversive nature of the task, as done in any pain study. Conversely, a second group was told that the ischemia would be beneficial to the muscles, thus emphasizing the usefulness of the pain endurance task. We found that in the second group pain tolerance was significantly higher compared to the first one, and that this effect was partially blocked by the opioid antagonist naltrexone alone and by the cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant alone. However, the combined administration of naltrexone and rimonabant antagonized the increased tolerance completely. Our results indicate that a positive approach to pain reduces the global pain experience through the co-activation of the opioid and cannabinoid systems. These findings may have a profound impact on clinical practice. For example, postoperative pain, which means healing, can be perceived as less unpleasant than cancer pain, which means death. Therefore, the behavioral and/or pharmacological manipulation of the meaning of pain can represent an effective approach to pain management.

  11. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50 μL leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  12. Postsaccadic activities in the posterior parietal cortex of primates are influenced by both eye movement vectors and eye position.

    PubMed

    Genovesio, Aldo; Brunamonti, Emiliano; Giusti, Maria Assunta; Ferraina, Stefano

    2007-03-21

    Primates explore their visual environment by redirecting the gaze to objects of interest by alternating eye movements and periods of steady fixation. During this task, the fixation point changes frequently in depth. Therefore, the representation of object location based on retinal disparity requires frequent updating. Neural activity was recorded in the lateral intraparietal (LIP) area while monkeys performed saccades between targets in different depths. We report that in the early postsaccadic period, posterior parietal neurons continue to encode the difference in depth between fixation point and targets. About one-third of these neurons are, during the same period, modulated by eye position in depth as well. In the late postsaccadic period, the influence of the previous movement vector dissipates, and parietal neurons are modulated only by the new fixation distance. This result suggests that the postsaccadic activity of area LIP contributes to the dynamic representation of the visual space, and it is compatible with the presence of both a vector subtraction computation and eye-position-dependent gain fields. PMID:17376987

  13. Co-operative leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia reveals C/EBPα as a common target of TRIB1 and PML/RARA

    PubMed Central

    Keeshan, Karen; Vieugué, Pauline; Chaudhury, Shahzya; Rishi, Loveena; Gaillard, Coline; Liang, Lu; Garcia, Elaine; Nakamura, Takuro; Omidvar, Nader; Kogan, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The PML/RARA fusion protein occurs as a result of the t(15;17) translocation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia subtype of human acute myeloid leukemia. Gain of chromosome 8 is the most common chromosomal gain in human acute myeloid leukemia, including acute promyelocytic leukemia. We previously demonstrated that gain of chromosome 8-containing MYC is of central importance in trisomy 8, but the role of the nearby TRIB1 gene has not been experimentally addressed in this context. We have now tested the hypothesis that both MYC and TRIB1 have functional roles underlying leukemogenesis of trisomy 8 by using retroviral vectors to express MYC and TRIB1 in wild-type bone marrow and in marrow that expressed a PML/RARA transgene. Interestingly, although MYC and TRIB1 readily co-operated in leukemogenesis for wild-type bone marrow, TRIB1 provided no selective advantage to cells expressing PML/RARA. We hypothesized that this lack of co-operation between PML/RARA and TRIB1 reflected a common pathway for their effect: both proteins targeting the myeloid transcription factor C/EBPα. In support of this idea, TRIB1 expression abrogated the all-trans retinoic acid response of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Our data delineate the common and redundant inhibitory effects of TRIB1 and PML/RARA on C/EBPα providing a potential explanation for the lack of selection of TRIB1 in human acute promyelocytic leukemia, and highlighting the key role of C/EBPs in acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis and therapeutic response. In addition, the co-operativity we observed between MYC and TRIB1 in the absence of PML/RARA show that, outside of acute promyelocytic leukemia, gain of both genes may drive selection for trisomy 8. PMID:27390356

  14. Antibacterial Activity of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Endolysin P28 against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongling; Zhu, Chaoyang; Chen, Jingyi; Ye, Xing; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Maltocin P28 is a phage-tail like bacteriocin produced by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia P28. The ORF8 of maltocin P28 gene cluster is predicted to encode an endolysin and we name it endolysin P28. Sequence analysis revealed that it contains the lysozyme_like superfamily conserved domain. Endolysin P28 has the four consensus motifs as that of Escherichia coli phage lambda gpR. In this study, endolysin P28 was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The antibacterial activity of endolysin P28 increased as the temperature rose from 25 to 45°C. Thermostability assays showed that endolysin P28 was stable up to 50°C, while its residual activity was reduced by 55% after treatment at 70°C for 30 min. Acidity and high salinity could enhance its antibacterial activity. Endolysin P28 exhibited a broad antibacterial activity against 14 out of 16 tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria besides S. maltophilia. Moreover, it could effectively lyse intact Gram-negative bacteria in the absence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as an outer membrane permeabilizer. Therefore, the characteristics of endolysin P28 make it a potential therapeutic agent against multi-drug-resistant pathogens. PMID:26635765

  15. A novel activator-type ERF of Thinopyrum intermedium, TiERF1, positively regulates defence responses

    PubMed Central

    Liang, HongXia; Lu, Yan; Liu, HongXia; Wang, FengDe; Xin, ZhiYong; Zhang, ZengYan

    2008-01-01

    Thinopyrum intermedium is resistant to many different pathogens. To understand the roles of ethylene response factors (ERFs) in defence responses, the first member of the ERF family in T. intermedium, TiERF1, was characterized and functionally analysed in this study. The TiERF1 gene encodes a putative protein of 292 amino acids, belonging to the B3 subgroup of the ERF transcription factor family. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the TiERF1 protein is capable of binding to the GCC box, a cis-element present in the promoters of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, and possessing transactivation activity, as well as localizing to the nucleus. The transcript of TiERF1 in T. intermedium is rapidly induced by infection with Rhizoctonia cerealis, Fusarium graminearum, or Blumeria graminis, and ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid treatments. More importantly, the ectopic expression of TiERF1 in tobacco activated the transcript of the PR genes of tobacco with a GCC box cis-element, and ACO and ACS genes key to ethylene synthesis, and in turn improved the resistance level to Alternaria alternata and tobacco mosaic virus, as well as causing some phenotypic changes associated with ethylene response in the transgenic tobacco plants. Taken together, TiERF1 protein as an ERF transcription activator positively regulates defence responses via the activation of some defence-related genes. PMID:18611911

  16. Positional specificity of a phospholipase A activity induced by wounding, systemin, and oligosaccharide elicitors in tomato leaves

    PubMed Central

    Narvaez-Vasquez, J; Florin-Christensen, J; Ryan, CA

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipase A (PLA) activity, as measured by the accumulation of (14)C-lysophosphatidylcholine in leaves of tomato plants, increased rapidly and systemically in response to wounding. The increase in PLA activity in the systemic unwounded leaves was biphasic in wild-type tomato plants, peaking at 15 min and again at 60 min, but the second peak of activity was absent in transgenic prosystemin antisense plants. Supplying young excised tomato plants with the polypeptide hormone systemin also caused (14)C-lysophosphatidylcholine to increase to levels similar to those induced by wounding, but the increase in activity persisted for >2 hr. Antagonists of systemin blocked both the release of (14)C-lysophosphatidylcholine and the accumulation of defense proteins in response to systemin. (14)C-lysophosphatidylcholine levels did not increase in response to jasmonic acid. Chemical acylation of the lysophosphatidylcholine produced by wounding, systemin, and oligosaccharide elicitors followed by enzymatic hydrolysis with lipases of known specificities demostrated that the lysophosphatidylcholine is generated by a PLA with specificity for the sn-2 position. PMID:10559447

  17. Calpain-Mediated Positional Information Directs Cell Wall Orientation to Sustain Plant Stem Cell Activity, Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Brown, Roy C; Fletcher, Jennifer C; Opsahl-Sorteberg, Hilde-Gunn

    2015-09-01

    Eukaryotic development and stem cell control depend on the integration of cell positional sensing with cell cycle control and cell wall positioning, yet few factors that directly link these events are known. The DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1) gene encoding the unique plant calpain protein is fundamental for development and growth, being essential to confer and maintain epidermal cell identity that allows development beyond the globular embryo stage. We show that DEK1 expression is highest in the actively dividing cells of seeds, meristems and vasculature. We further show that eliminating Arabidopsis DEK1 function leads to changes in developmental cues from the first zygotic division onward, altered microtubule patterns and misshapen cells, resulting in early embryo abortion. Expression of the embryonic marker genes WOX2, ATML1, PIN4, WUS and STM, related to axis organization, cell identity and meristem functions, is also altered in dek1 embryos. By monitoring cell layer-specific DEK1 down-regulation, we show that L1- and 35S-induced down-regulation mainly affects stem cell functions, causing severe shoot apical meristem phenotypes. These results are consistent with a requirement for DEK1 to direct layer-specific cellular activities and set downstream developmental cues. Our data suggest that DEK1 may anchor cell wall positions and control cell division and differentiation, thereby balancing the plant's requirement to maintain totipotent stem cell reservoirs while simultaneously directing growth and organ formation. A role for DEK1 in regulating microtubule-orchestrated cell wall orientation during cell division can explain its effects on embryonic development, and suggests a more general function for calpains in microtubule organization in eukaryotic cells.

  18. The use of nanometer tetrabasic lead sulfate as positive active material additive for valve regulated lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Dianlong; Hu, Chiyu; Tang, Shenzhi; Zhu, Junsheng; Guo, Chenfeng

    2014-12-01

    Conventional tetrabasic lead sulfate used as positive active material additive shows the results of the low effective lead dioxide conversion rate due to the large grain size and crossed the crystal structure. In this paper, we study on a type of nanometer tetrabasic lead sulfate. Through the XRD and SEM test and Material Studio software calculation, the purity of tetrabasic lead sulfate is very high, the grain size of the nanometer 4BS is almost unanimous, and can be controlled below 200 nm. When charged and discharged in 1.75 V-2.42 V with the current density of 40 mA g-1, 80 mA g-1 and 160 mA g-1, the effective lead dioxide conversion rate of nanometer 4BS after formation can achieve to 83.48%, 71.42%, and 66.96%. Subsequently, the nanometer 4BS as additive is added to positive paste of lead-acid battery. When the batteries are tested galvanostatically between 1.75 V and 2.42 V at 0.25 C charge and 0.5 C discharge rates at room temperature. The ratio of adding nanometer 4BS is 0%, 1% and 4% and the initial discharge specific capacities are 60 mAh g-1, 65 mAh g-1 and 68 mAh g-1. After 80 cycles, the initial discharge capacity of positive active material with 1% nanometer 4BS decreased less than 10%, while adding 4% nanometer 4BS, the initial discharge capacity doesn't decrease obviously.

  19. Trends and Predictors of Mortality Among HIV Positive Patients in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Rubaihayo, John; Tumwesigye, Nazarius M.; Konde-Lule, Joseph; Makumbi, Fredrick; Nakku, Edith J.; Wamani, Henry; Etukoit, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of mortality trends and predictors among HIV-positive patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in resource poor settings is still limited. The aim of this study was to describe trends and predictors of mortality among HIV-positive patients in the era of HAART in Uganda. Data from 2004 to 2013 for adult HIV-positive patients (≥15 years) obtaining care and treatment from the AIDS Support Organization in Uganda were reviewed for mortality. Descriptive statistics were analyzed by frequencies and cross tabulations. Calendar period was used as a proxy measure for HAART exposure and a time plot of the proportion of HIV-positive patients reporting dead per year was used to describe the trends. Logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of mortality at bivariate and multivariate levels, respectively. We included in the analysis 95,857 HIV positive patients; 64% were female with median age of 33 years (interquartile range 27-40). Of these 36,133 (38%) were initiated on ART and a total of 4279 (4.5%) died; 19.5% (835/4279) of those who died had an opportunistic infection. Overall, mortality first increased between 2004 and 2006 and thereafter substantially declined (X2trend=211.9, P<0.001). Mortality was relatively higher in Eastern Uganda compared to other geographical areas. Male gender, older age (>45 years), being from Eastern or Northern Uganda, having none or primary education, being unemployed, advanced immunodeficiency (CD4 count <100 cell/µL or WHO stage III or IV) and underweight (<45 kg weight) at HAART initiation and calendar period 2004-2008 were significant predictors of mortality (P<0.001). Overall, the expanding coverage of HAART is associated with a declining trend in mortality among HIV positive patients in Uganda. However, mortality trends differed significantly by geographical area and men remain potentially at higher risk of death probably because of delayed initiation on ART. There is urgent need for

  20. The physical environment and health-enhancing activity during the school commute: global positioning system, geographical information systems and accelerometry.

    PubMed

    McMinn, David; Oreskovic, Nicolas M; Aitkenhead, Matt J; Johnston, Derek W; Murtagh, Shemane; Rowe, David A

    2014-05-01

    Active school travel is in decline. An understanding of the potential determinants of health-enhancing physical activity during the school commute may help to inform interventions aimed at reversing these trends. The purpose of this study was to identify the physical environmental factors associated with health-enhancing physical activity during the school commute. Data were collected in 2009 on 166 children commuting home from school in Scotland. Data on location and physical activity were measured using global positioning systems (GPS) and accelerometers, and mapped using geographical information systems (GIS). Multi-level logistic regression models accounting for repeated observations within participants were used to test for associations between each land-use category (road/track/path, other man-made, greenspace, other natural) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Thirty-nine children provided 2,782 matched data points. Over one third (37.1%) of children's school commute time was spent in MVPA. Children commuted approximately equal amounts of time via natural and man-made land-uses (50.2% and 49.8% respectively). Commuting via road/track/path was associated with increased likelihood of MVPA (Exp(B)=1.23, P <0.05), but this association was not seen for commuting via other manmade land-uses. No association was noted between greenspace use and MVPA, but travelling via other natural land-uses was associated with lower odds of MVPA (Exp(B)=0.32, P <0.05). Children spend equal amounts of time commuting to school via man-made and natural land-uses, yet man-made transportation route infrastructure appears to provide greater opportunities for achieving health-enhancing physical activity levels.

  1. Activated RhoA is a positive feedback regulator of the Lbc family of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor proteins.

    PubMed

    Medina, Frank; Carter, Angela M; Dada, Olugbenga; Gutowski, Stephen; Hadas, Jana; Chen, Zhe; Sternweis, Paul C

    2013-04-19

    The monomeric Rho GTPases are essential for cellular regulation including cell architecture and movement. A direct mechanism for hormonal regulation of the RhoA-type GTPases is their modulation by the G12 and G13 proteins via RH (RGS homology) containing RhoGEFs. In addition to the interaction of the G protein α subunits with the RH domain, activated RhoA also binds to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of PDZRhoGEF. The latter interaction is now extended to all seven members of the homologous Lbc family of RhoGEFs which includes the RH-RhoGEFs. This is evinced by direct measurements of binding or through effects on selected signaling pathways in cells. Overexpression of these PH domains alone can block RhoA-dependent signaling in cells to various extents. Whereas activated RhoA does not modulate the intrinsic activity of the RhoGEFs, activated RhoA associated with phospholipid vesicles can facilitate increased activity of soluble RhoGEFs on vesicle-delimited substrate (RhoA-GDP). This demonstrates feasibility of the hypothesis that binding of activated RhoA to the PH domains acts as a positive feedback mechanism. This is supported by cellular studies in which mutation of this binding site on PH strongly attenuates the stimulation of RhoA observed by overexpression of five of the RhoGEF DH-PH domains. This mutation is even more dramatic in the context of full-length p115RhoGEF. The utilization of this mechanism by multiple RhoGEFs suggests that this regulatory paradigm may be a common feature in the broader family of RhoGEFs.

  2. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 μg/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 μg/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 μg/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection.

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Sphingoid Bases and Fatty Acids against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L.; Drake, David R.; Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Brogden, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity—the sphingoid bases d-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid—against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. d-Sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 μg/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 μg/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 μg/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection. PMID:22155833

  4. Muscular activity during uphill cycling: effect of slope, posture, hand grip position and constrained bicycle lateral sways.

    PubMed

    Duc, S; Bertucci, W; Pernin, J N; Grappe, F

    2008-02-01

    Despite the wide use of surface electromyography (EMG) to study pedalling movement, there is a paucity of data concerning the muscular activity during uphill cycling, notably in standing posture. The aim of this study was to investigate the muscular activity of eight lower limb muscles and four upper limb muscles across various laboratory pedalling exercises which simulated uphill cycling conditions. Ten trained cyclists rode at 80% of their maximal aerobic power on an inclined motorised treadmill (4%, 7% and 10%) with using two pedalling postures (seated and standing). Two additional rides were made in standing at 4% slope to test the effect of the change of the hand grip position (from brake levers to the drops of the handlebar), and the influence of the lateral sways of the bicycle. For this last goal, the bicycle was fixed on a stationary ergometer to prevent the lean of the bicycle side-to-side. EMG was recorded from M. gluteus maximus (GM), M. vastus medialis (VM), M. rectus femoris (RF), M. biceps femoris (BF), M. semimembranosus (SM), M. gastrocnemius medialis (GAS), M. soleus (SOL), M. tibialis anterior (TA), M. biceps brachii (BB), M. triceps brachii (TB), M. rectus abdominis (RA) and M. erector spinae (ES). Unlike the slope, the change of pedalling posture in uphill cycling had a significant effect on the EMG activity, except for the three muscles crossing the ankle's joint (GAS, SOL and TA). Intensity and duration of GM, VM, RF, BF, BB, TA, RA and ES activity were greater in standing while SM activity showed a slight decrease. In standing, global activity of upper limb was higher when the hand grip position was changed from brake level to the drops, but lower when the lateral sways of the bicycle were constrained. These results seem to be related to (1) the increase of the peak pedal force, (2) the change of the hip and knee joint moments, (3) the need to stabilize pelvic in reference with removing the saddle support, and (4) the shift of the mass

  5. Alectinib's activity against CNS metastases from ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: a single institution case series.

    PubMed

    Metro, Giulio; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Bennati, Chiara; Chiarini, Pietro; Sperduti, Isabella; Ricciuti, Biagio; Marcomigni, Luca; Costa, Cinzia; Crinò, Lucio; Floridi, Piero; Gori, Stefania; Chiari, Rita

    2016-09-01

    In the present study we assessed the activity of the next-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (-TKI) alectinib, in patients with ALK-postive, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and central nervous system (CNS) metastases. NSCLCs with ALK-positive disease, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and CNS metastases were treated with alectinib 600 mg BID. Included patients were followed prospectively in order to evaluate the efficacy of the drug, with particular emphasis on activity in the CNS. Eleven consecutive patients were enrolled. The majority of them were pretreated with crizotinib (n = 10, 90.9 %), and cranial radiotherapy (n = 8, 72.7 %). Six of the seven patients with measurable CNS disease experienced a CNS response, including three patients who were naïve for cranial radiation. Median duration of response was 8 months. For the whole population, median CNS-progression-free survival (-PFS), systemic-PFS, overall-PFS, overall survival, and 1-year survival were 8, 11, 8, 13 months, and 31.1 %, respectively. Two patients experiencing a CNS response were assessed for alectinib's concentrations in serum and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and showed a CSF-to-serum ratio ranging from 0.001 to 0.003 ng/mL. Alectinib is highly active against CNS metastases from ALK-positive NSCLCs, irrespective of prior treatment(s) with ALK-TKI(s) and/or cranial radiotherapy. The low CSF-to-serum ratio of alectinib suggests that measuring the concentrations of the drug in the CSF may not be a reliable surrogate of its distribution into the CNS. PMID:27324494

  6. Metformin increases antitumor activity of MEK inhibitors through GLI1 downregulation in LKB1 positive human NSCLC cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Mauro, Concetta Di; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Papaccio, Federica; Fasano, Morena; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; De Vita, Ferdinando; Orditura, Michele; Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Morgillo, Floriana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Metformin, widely used as antidiabetic drug, showed antitumoral effects expecially in combination with chemotherapy. Our group recently has demonstrated that metformin and gefitinib are synergistic in LKB1-wild-type NSCLC cells. In these models, metformin as single agent induced an activation and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated-protein-kinase (MAPK) through an increased C-RAF/B-RAF heterodimerization. Experimental design Since single agent metformin enhances proliferating signals through the RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway, and several MEK inhibitors (MEK-I) demonstrated clinical efficacy in combination with other agents in NSCLC, we tested the effects of metformin plus MEK-I (selumetinib or pimasertib) on proliferation, invasiveness, migration abilities in vitro and in vivo in LKB1 positive NSCLC models harboring KRAS wild type and mutated gene. Results The combination of metformin with MEK-I showed a strong anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effect in Calu-3, H1299, H358 and H1975 human NSCLC cell lines, independently from the KRAS mutational status. The combination reduced the metastatic behaviour of NSCLC cells, via a downregulation of GLI1 trascritional activity, thus affecting the transition from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype. Metformin and MEK-Is combinations also decreased the production and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by reducing the NF-jB (p65) binding to MMP-2 and MMP-9 promoters. Conclusions Metformin potentiates the antitumor activity of MEK-Is in human LKB1-wild-type NSCLC cell lines, independently from the KRAS mutational status, through GLI1 downregulation and by reducing the NF-jB (p65)-mediated transcription of MMP-2 and MMP-9. PMID:26673006

  7. Positional effects of hydroxy groups on catalytic activity of proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Suna, Yuki; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Wang, Wan-Hui; Kambayashi, Hide; Manaka, Yuichi; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-11-12

    Proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Ir(III) complexes possessing a bipyridine ligand with two hydroxy groups at the 3,3'-, 4,4'-, 5,5'- or 6,6'-positions (3DHBP, 4DHBP, 5DHBP, or 6DHBP) were systematically investigated. UV-vis titration data provided average pK a values of the hydroxy groups on the ligands. Both hydroxy groups were found to deprotonate in the pH 4.6–5.6 range for the 4–6DHBP complexes. One of the hydroxy groups of the 3DHBP complex exhibited the low pKa value of < 0.4 because the deprotonation is facilitated by the strong intramolecular hydrogen bond formed between the generated oxyanion and the remaining hydroxy group, which in turn leads to an elevated pKa value of ~13.6 for the second deprotonation step. The crystal structures of the 4– and 6DHBP complexes obtained from basic aqueous solutions revealed their deprotonated forms. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in the 3DHBP complex was also observed in the crystal structures. The catalytic activities of these complexes in aqueous phase reactions, at appropriate pH, for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (pH 8.5), dehydrogenation of formic acid (pH 1.8), transfer hydrogenation reactions using formic acid/formate as a hydrogen source (pH 7.2 and 2.6) were investigated to compare the positional effects of the hydroxy groups. The 4– and 6DHBP complexes exhibited remarkably enhanced catalytic activities under basic conditions because of the resonance effect of the strong electrondonating oxyanions, whereas the 5DHBP complex exhibited negligible activity despite the presence of electron-donating groups. The 3DHBP complex exhibited relatively high catalytic activity at low pH owing to the one strong electron-donating oxyanion group stabilized by the intramolecular hydrogen bond. DFT calculations were employed to study the mechanism of CO₂ hydrogenation by the 4DHBP and 6DHBP complexes, and comparison of the activation free energies of the H₂ heterolysis and CO

  8. Positional effects of hydroxy groups on catalytic activity of proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Iridium(III) complexes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Suna, Yuki; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Wang, Wan-Hui; Kambayashi, Hide; Manaka, Yuichi; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-11-12

    Proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Ir(III) complexes possessing a bipyridine ligand with two hydroxy groups at the 3,3'-, 4,4'-, 5,5'- or 6,6'-positions (3DHBP, 4DHBP, 5DHBP, or 6DHBP) were systematically investigated. UV-vis titration data provided average pK a values of the hydroxy groups on the ligands. Both hydroxy groups were found to deprotonate in the pH 4.6–5.6 range for the 4–6DHBP complexes. One of the hydroxy groups of the 3DHBP complex exhibited the low pKa value of < 0.4 because the deprotonation is facilitated by the strong intramolecular hydrogen bond formed between the generated oxyanion and the remaining hydroxy group, which in turn leadsmore » to an elevated pKa value of ~13.6 for the second deprotonation step. The crystal structures of the 4– and 6DHBP complexes obtained from basic aqueous solutions revealed their deprotonated forms. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in the 3DHBP complex was also observed in the crystal structures. The catalytic activities of these complexes in aqueous phase reactions, at appropriate pH, for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (pH 8.5), dehydrogenation of formic acid (pH 1.8), transfer hydrogenation reactions using formic acid/formate as a hydrogen source (pH 7.2 and 2.6) were investigated to compare the positional effects of the hydroxy groups. The 4– and 6DHBP complexes exhibited remarkably enhanced catalytic activities under basic conditions because of the resonance effect of the strong electrondonating oxyanions, whereas the 5DHBP complex exhibited negligible activity despite the presence of electron-donating groups. The 3DHBP complex exhibited relatively high catalytic activity at low pH owing to the one strong electron-donating oxyanion group stabilized by the intramolecular hydrogen bond. DFT calculations were employed to study the mechanism of CO₂ hydrogenation by the 4DHBP and 6DHBP complexes, and comparison of the activation free energies of the H₂ heterolysis and CO₂ insertion steps

  9. Estimating the prevalence of active Helicobacter pylori infection in a rural community with global positioning system technology-assisted sampling.

    PubMed

    Melius, E J; Davis, S I; Redd, J T; Lewin, M; Herlihy, R; Henderson, A; Sobel, J; Gold, B; Cheek, J E

    2013-03-01

    We investigated a possible outbreak of H. pylori in a rural Northern Plains community. In a cross-sectional survey, we randomly sampled 244 households from a geocoded emergency medical system database. We used a complex survey design and global positioning system units to locate houses and randomly selected one eligible household member to administer a questionnaire and a 13C-urea breath test for active H. pylori infection (n = 166). In weighted analyses, active H. pylori infection was detected in 55·0% of the sample. Factors associated with infection on multivariate analysis included using a public drinking-water supply [odds ratio (OR) 12·2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·9-50·7] and current cigarette smoking (OR 4·1, 95% CI 1·7-9·6). People who lived in houses with more rooms, a possible indicator of decreased crowding in the home, were less likely to have active H. pylori infections (OR 0·7, 95% CI 0·5-0·9 for each additional room).

  10. The StrongWomen Change Clubs: Engaging Residents to Catalyze Positive Change in Food and Physical Activity Environments

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Rebecca A.; Folta, Sara C.; Nelson, Miriam E.; Heidkamp-Young, Eleanor; Fenton, Mark; Junot, Bridgid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The epidemic of obesity is a multifaceted public health issue. Positive policy and environmental changes are needed to support healthier eating and increased physical activity. Methods. StrongWomen Change Clubs (SWCCs) were developed through an academic-community research partnership between researchers at Cornell University and Tufts University and community partners (cooperative extension educators) in rural towns in seven U.S. states. Extension educators served as the local leader and each recruited 10–15 residents to undertake a project to improve some aspect of the nutrition or physical activity environment. Most residents had limited (or no) experience in civic engagement. At 6 and 12 months after implementation, the research team conducted key informant interviews with SWCC leaders to capture their perceptions of program process, benchmark achievement, and self-efficacy. Results. At 12 months, each SWCC had accomplished one benchmark; the majority had completed three or more benchmarks. They described common processes for achieving benchmarks such as building relationships and leveraging stakeholder partnerships. Barriers to benchmark achievement included busy schedules and resistance to and slow pace of change. Conclusion. Findings suggest that community change initiatives that involve stakeholders, build upon existing activities and organizational resources, and establish feasible timelines and goals can successfully catalyze environmental change. PMID:25525441

  11. Positive effect of acute mild exercise on executive function via arousal-related prefrontal activations: an fNIRS study.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyeongho; Hyodo, Kazuki; Suwabe, Kazuya; Ochi, Genta; Sakairi, Yosuke; Kato, Morimasa; Dan, Ippeita; Soya, Hideaki

    2014-09-01

    Despite the practical implication of mild exercise, little is known about its influence on executive function and its neural substrates. To address these issues, the present study examined the effect of an acute bout of mild exercise on executive function and attempted to identify potential neural substrates using non-invasive functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Twenty-five young individuals performed a color-word matching Stroop task (CWST) and a two-dimensional scale to measure changes of psychological mood states both before and after a 10-minute exercise session on a cycle ergometer at light intensity (30% v(·)o2peak) and, for the control session, without exercise. Cortical hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal area were monitored with fNIRS during the CWST in both sessions. The acute bout of mild exercise led to improved Stroop performance, which was positively correlated with increased arousal levels. It also evoked cortical activations regarding Stroop interference on the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and frontopolar area. These activations significantly corresponded with both improved cognitive performance and increased arousal levels. Concurrently, this study provides empirical evidence that an acute bout of mild exercise improves executive function mediated by the exercise-induced arousal system, which intensifies cortical activation in task-related prefrontal sub-regions. PMID:24799137

  12. Design and Preparation of Supported Au Catalyst with Enhanced Catalytic Activities by Rationally Positioning Au Nanoparticles on Anatase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hong; Rice, Andrew E; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Mingshu; Meng, Xiangju; Lewis, James P; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-06-18

    A synergistic effect between individual components is crucial for increasing the activity of metal/metal oxide catalysts. The greatest challenge is how to control the synergistic effect to obtain enhanced catalytic performance. Through density functional theory calculations of model Au/TiO2 catalysts, it is suggested that there is strong interaction between Au nanoparticles and Ti species at the edge/corner sites of anatase, which is favorable for the formation of stable oxygen vacancies. Motivated by this theoretical analysis, we have rationally prepared Au nanoparticles attached to edge/corner sites of anatase support (Au/TiO2-EC), confirmed by their HR-TEM images. As expected, this strong interaction is well characterized by Raman, UV-visible, and XPS techniques. Very interestingly, compared with conventional Au catalysts, Au/TiO2-EC exhibits superior catalytic activity in the oxidations using O2. Our approach to controlling Au nanoparticle positioning on anatase to obtain enhanced catalytic activity offers an efficient strategy for developing more novel supported metal catalysts.

  13. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  14. Effects of 12 Months Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Sympathetic Activity Related Brainstem Function and Structure in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Luke A; Fatouleh, Rania H; Lundblad, Linda C; McKenzie, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2016-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during normoxic daytime wakefulness. Increased MSNA is a precursor to hypertension and elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms underlying the high MSNA in OSA are not well understood. In this study we used concurrent microneurography and magnetic resonance imaging to explore MSNA-related brainstem activity changes and anatomical changes in 15 control and 15 OSA subjects before and after 6 and 12 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. We found that following 6 and 12 months of CPAP treatment, resting MSNA levels were significantly reduced in individuals with OSA. Furthermore, this MSNA reduction was associated with restoration of MSNA-related brainstem activity and structural changes in the medullary raphe, rostral ventrolateral medulla, dorsolateral pons, and ventral midbrain. This restoration occurred after 6 months of CPAP treatment and was maintained following 12 months CPAP. These findings show that continual CPAP treatment is an effective long-term treatment for elevated MSNA likely due to its effects on restoring brainstem structure and function. PMID:27013952

  15. Effects of 12 Months Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Sympathetic Activity Related Brainstem Function and Structure in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Luke A.; Fatouleh, Rania H.; Lundblad, Linda C.; McKenzie, David K.; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during normoxic daytime wakefulness. Increased MSNA is a precursor to hypertension and elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms underlying the high MSNA in OSA are not well understood. In this study we used concurrent microneurography and magnetic resonance imaging to explore MSNA-related brainstem activity changes and anatomical changes in 15 control and 15 OSA subjects before and after 6 and 12 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. We found that following 6 and 12 months of CPAP treatment, resting MSNA levels were significantly reduced in individuals with OSA. Furthermore, this MSNA reduction was associated with restoration of MSNA-related brainstem activity and structural changes in the medullary raphe, rostral ventrolateral medulla, dorsolateral pons, and ventral midbrain. This restoration occurred after 6 months of CPAP treatment and was maintained following 12 months CPAP. These findings show that continual CPAP treatment is an effective long-term treatment for elevated MSNA likely due to its effects on restoring brainstem structure and function. PMID:27013952

  16. Positive effect of acute mild exercise on executive function via arousal-related prefrontal activations: an fNIRS study.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyeongho; Hyodo, Kazuki; Suwabe, Kazuya; Ochi, Genta; Sakairi, Yosuke; Kato, Morimasa; Dan, Ippeita; Soya, Hideaki

    2014-09-01

    Despite the practical implication of mild exercise, little is known about its influence on executive function and its neural substrates. To address these issues, the present study examined the effect of an acute bout of mild exercise on executive function and attempted to identify potential neural substrates using non-invasive functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Twenty-five young individuals performed a color-word matching Stroop task (CWST) and a two-dimensional scale to measure changes of psychological mood states both before and after a 10-minute exercise session on a cycle ergometer at light intensity (30% v(·)o2peak) and, for the control session, without exercise. Cortical hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal area were monitored with fNIRS during the CWST in both sessions. The acute bout of mild exercise led to improved Stroop performance, which was positively correlated with increased arousal levels. It also evoked cortical activations regarding Stroop interference on the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and frontopolar area. These activations significantly corresponded with both improved cognitive performance and increased arousal levels. Concurrently, this study provides empirical evidence that an acute bout of mild exercise improves executive function mediated by the exercise-induced arousal system, which intensifies cortical activation in task-related prefrontal sub-regions.

  17. Design and Preparation of Supported Au Catalyst with Enhanced Catalytic Activities by Rationally Positioning Au Nanoparticles on Anatase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hong; Rice, Andrew E; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Mingshu; Meng, Xiangju; Lewis, James P; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-06-18

    A synergistic effect between individual components is crucial for increasing the activity of metal/metal oxide catalysts. The greatest challenge is how to control the synergistic effect to obtain enhanced catalytic performance. Through density functional theory calculations of model Au/TiO2 catalysts, it is suggested that there is strong interaction between Au nanoparticles and Ti species at the edge/corner sites of anatase, which is favorable for the formation of stable oxygen vacancies. Motivated by this theoretical analysis, we have rationally prepared Au nanoparticles attached to edge/corner sites of anatase support (Au/TiO2-EC), confirmed by their HR-TEM images. As expected, this strong interaction is well characterized by Raman, UV-visible, and XPS techniques. Very interestingly, compared with conventional Au catalysts, Au/TiO2-EC exhibits superior catalytic activity in the oxidations using O2. Our approach to controlling Au nanoparticle positioning on anatase to obtain enhanced catalytic activity offers an efficient strategy for developing more novel supported metal catalysts. PMID:26266615

  18. The results of the three-month co-operation between a German and a Greek surgical team in a role II military hospital in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Gourgiotis, Stavros; Triantafyllou, Christos; Karamitros, Athanasios; Thinnes, Katrin; Thüringen, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: There are a lot of unique challenges for the military medical personnel assigned to Afghanistan. We evaluate the results of the co-operation between a German and a Greek surgical team during a 3-month period in a role II hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients who were admitted to the role II German hospital of Kunduz were evaluated. We reviewed the type of diseases, mechanism and location of injuries, management, types of surgical procedures, blood supply, and outcome. Results: The data included 792 ISAF patients, 18 NGOs patients, and 296 local patients. Out of them, 71.6% of the patients were ISAF personnel; 51 patients underwent a surgical operation; 35 of them were operated in an emergency base. Fifty-five surgical procedures were performed. In 22 (43.1%) of these patients, orthopedic procedures were performed, while in the rest 29 (56.9%) patients the operations were of general surgery interest. Gunshot injuries were the main mechanism of injury for locals, whereas ISAF personnel were usually presented with injuries after IEDs and rocket attacks. A total number of 11 patients were transferred to role III military hospitals for further treatment within 24 hours. Conclusions: The co-operation between surgical teams from different countries, when appropriately trained, staffed, and equipped, can be highly effective in a combat environment. PMID:22416153

  19. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting and Gene Expression Profiling of GFP-Positive Cells from Transgenic Zebrafish Lines.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Hideyuki; Seki, Masahide; Itoh, Mari; Deepak, Ailani; Lal, Pradeep; Horiuchi, Terumi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression profiling is a useful approach for deeper understanding of the specificity of cells, tissues, and organs in the transcriptional level. Recent development of high-throughput next-generation sequence (NGS) allows the RNA-seq method for this profiling. This method provides precise information of transcripts about the quantitation and the structure such as the splicing variants. In this chapter, we describe a method for gene expression profiling of GFP-positive cells from transgenic zebrafish by RNA-seq. We labeled specific cells in the brain with GFP by crossing a Gal4 driver line with the UAS:GFP line, isolated those cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and analyzed by RNA-seq. PMID:27464803

  20. Synthesis and antitumor activity evaluation of quinazoline derivatives bearing piperazine-1-carbodithioate moiety at C4-position.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yang, Chao-Rui; Tang, Xue; Cao, Sheng-Li; Ren, Ting-Ting; Gao, Man; Liao, Ji; Xu, Xingzhi

    2016-10-01

    A series of quinazoline derivatives bearing piperazine-1-carbodithioate moiety at the C4-position were synthesized using piperidine and 1-bromo-3-chloropropane as starting materials via eight steps. Final compounds 8a-q and 9a-i were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against human lung cancer A549, breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7, and colorectal cancer HCT-116 cell lines. The results showed that fourteen of twenty-six final compounds inhibited the proliferation of three cancer cell lines with IC50 values less than 10μM. When treated with a representative compound 8n, HCT-116 cells were arrested at G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. This provided a clue to further investigation of the mechanism of action. PMID:27575478

  1. Synthesis and calpain inhibitory activity of peptidomimetic compounds with constrained amino acids at the P2 position

    PubMed Central

    Korukonda, Rajani

    2008-01-01

    The effect of incorporating α,α’-diethylglycine and α-aminocyclopentane carboxylic acid at the P2 position of inhibitors on μ-calpain inhibition was studied. Compound 3 with α,α’-diethylglycine was over 20-fold more potent than 2 with α-aminocyclopentane carboxylic acid. Additionally, 3 was over 35-fold selective for μ-calpain compared to cathepsin B, while 2 was 3-fold selective for cathepsin B compared to μ-calpain. Thus, the conformation induced by the P2 residue influenced the activities of the compounds versus the closely related cysteine proteases and suggests an approach to the discovery of selective μ-calpain inhibitors. PMID:18694642

  2. Comparison of two self-assembled macromolecular prodrug micelles with different conjugate positions of SN38 for enhancing antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Piao, Hongyu; Gao, Ying; Xu, Caihong; Tian, Ye; Wang, Lihong; Liu, Jinwen; Tang, Bo; Zou, Meijuan; Cheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN38), an active metabolite of irinotecan (CPT-11), is a remarkably potent antitumor agent. The clinical application of SN38 has been extremely restricted by its insolubility in water. In this study, we successfully synthesized two macromolecular prodrugs of SN38 with different conjugate positions (chitosan-(C10-OH)SN38 and chitosan-(C20-OH)SN38) to improve the water solubility and antitumor activity of SN38. These prodrugs can self-assemble into micelles in aqueous medium. The particle size, morphology, zeta potential, and in vitro drug release of SN38 and its derivatives, as well as their cytotoxicity, pharmacokinetics, and in vivo antitumor activity in a xenograft BALB/c mouse model were studied. In vitro, chitosan-(C10-OH)SN38 (CS-(10s)SN38) and chitosan-(C20-OH) SN38 (CS-(20s)SN38) were 13.3- and 25.9-fold more potent than CPT-11 in the murine colon adenocarcinoma cell line CT26, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC)0–24 of SN38 after intravenously administering CS-(10s)SN38 and CS-(20s)SN38 to Sprague Dawley rats was greatly improved when compared with CPT-11 (both P<0.01). A larger AUC0–24 of CS-(20s)SN38 was observed when compared to CS-(10s)SN38 (P<0.05). Both of the novel self-assembled chitosan-SN38 prodrugs demonstrated superior anticancer activity to CPT-11 in the CT26 xenograft BALB/c mouse model. We have also investigated the differences between these macromolecular prodrug micelles with regards to enhancing the antitumor activity of SN38. CS-(20s)SN38 exhibited better in vivo antitumor activity than CS-(10s)SN38 at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg (P<0.05). In conclusion, both macromolecular prodrug micelles improved the in vivo conversion rate and antitumor activity of SN38, but the prodrug in which C20-OH was conjugated to macromolecular materials could be a more promising platform for SN38 delivery. PMID:25848251

  3. Activating health goals reduces (increases) hedonic evaluation of food brands for people who harbor highly positive (negative) affect toward them.

    PubMed

    Connell, Paul M; Mayor, Lauren F

    2013-06-01

    Associations of pleasure and fun with junk foods have the potential to create considerable challenges for efforts to improve diets. The aim of this research was to determine whether activating health goals had the potential to exploit mixed motivations (i.e., health and pleasure) that people have related to food, and subsequently strip junk foods of the expected pleasure derived from them. In study 1, 98 participants evaluated a soft drink brand after being primed (not primed) for health. In study 2, 93 participants evaluated a presweetened breakfast cereal brand after being primed (not primed) for health. In both studies, participants who harbored highly positive feelings for the food brands devalued their hedonic judgments of them when they were primed for health. However, in an unexpected result, participants in both studies who harbored highly negative feelings for the food brands revalued their hedonic judgments of them (i.e., increased the favorability) when they were primed for health. Thus, increasing health salience is only effective in decreasing expected pleasure derived from junk foods for people who harbor positive affect toward junk food brands, and is likely counterproductive for people who harbor negative affect toward junk food brands.

  4. Activating health goals reduces (increases) hedonic evaluation of food brands for people who harbor highly positive (negative) affect toward them.

    PubMed

    Connell, Paul M; Mayor, Lauren F

    2013-06-01

    Associations of pleasure and fun with junk foods have the potential to create considerable challenges for efforts to improve diets. The aim of this research was to determine whether activating health goals had the potential to exploit mixed motivations (i.e., health and pleasure) that people have related to food, and subsequently strip junk foods of the expected pleasure derived from them. In study 1, 98 participants evaluated a soft drink brand after being primed (not primed) for health. In study 2, 93 participants evaluated a presweetened breakfast cereal brand after being primed (not primed) for health. In both studies, participants who harbored highly positive feelings for the food brands devalued their hedonic judgments of them when they were primed for health. However, in an unexpected result, participants in both studies who harbored highly negative feelings for the food brands revalued their hedonic judgments of them (i.e., increased the favorability) when they were primed for health. Thus, increasing health salience is only effective in decreasing expected pleasure derived from junk foods for people who harbor positive affect toward junk food brands, and is likely counterproductive for people who harbor negative affect toward junk food brands. PMID:23428938

  5. Positive feedback produces broad distributions in maximum activation attained within a narrow time window in stochastic biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2013-03-01

    Stochastic fluctuations in biochemical reactions can regulate single cell decision processes. Using exact solutions and semi-analytical methods we calculate distributions of the maximum value (N) of species concentrations (Pmax (N)) and the time (t) taken to reach the maximum value (Pmax (t)) in minimal models of stochastic chemical reactions commonly found in cell signaling systems. We find, the presence of positive feedback interactions make Pmax (N) more spread out with a higher ``peakedness'' in Pmax (t) . Thus positive feedback interactions may help single cells to respond sensitively to a stimulus when cell decision processes require upregulation of activated forms of key proteins to a threshold number within a time window. Moreover, unlike other models of strongly correlated random variables such as Brownian walks or fluctuating interfaces, the extreme value distributions for the chemical reactions display multiscaling behavior emphasizing the presence of many time scales in cell signaling kinetics. This work was funded by the Research Institute at the Nationwide Children's Hospital and a grant (1R56AI090115-01A1) from the NIH.

  6. Tryptophan-containing lipopeptide antibiotics derived from polymyxin B with activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Grau-Campistany, Ariadna; Manresa, Ángeles; Pujol, Montserrat; Rabanal, Francesc; Cajal, Yolanda

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to all known antibiotics is a growing concern worldwide, and has renewed the interest in antimicrobial peptides, a structurally diverse class of amphipathic molecules that essentially act on the bacterial membrane. Propelled by the antimicrobial potential of this compound class, we have designed three new lipopeptides derived from polymyxin B, sp-34, sp-96 and sp-100, with potent antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The three peptides bind with high affinity to lipopolysaccharide as demonstrated by monolayer penetration and dansyl-displacement. The interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane has been elucidated by biophysical experiments with model membranes of POPG or POPE/POPG (6:4), mimicking the Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial membrane. Trp-based fluorescence experiments including steady-state, quenching, anisotropy and FRET, reveal selectivity for anionic phospholipids and deep insertion into the membrane. All three lipopeptides induce membrane fusion and leakage from anionic vesicles, a process that is favored by the presence of POPE. The molecules bind to zwitterionic POPC vesicles, a model of the eukaryotic membrane, but in a different way, with lower affinity, less penetration into the bilayer and no fusion or permeabilization of the membrane. Results in model membranes are consistent with flow cytometry experiments in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus using a membrane potential sensitive dye (bis-oxonol) and a nucleic acid dye (propidium iodide), suggesting that the mechanism of action is based on membrane binding and collapse of membrane integrity by depolarization and permeabilization.

  7. Positive alcohol expectancies mediate the influence of the behavioral activation system on alcohol use: a prospective path analysis.

    PubMed

    Wardell, Jeffrey D; Read, Jennifer P; Colder, Craig R; Merrill, Jennifer E

    2012-04-01

    Gray's (1975, 1987) behavioral activation (BAS) and behavioral inhibition systems (BIS) are thought to underlie sensitivity to reinforcement and punishment, respectively. Consistent with Gray's theory and the Acquired Preparedness model, BAS may facilitate the learning of positive alcohol expectancies (PAEs) over time, leading to increases in drinking. Yet, no prospective tests of this pathway have been reported. The present study investigated whether BAS prospectively predicted PAEs and whether PAEs mediated the association between BAS and subsequent alcohol use. We hypothesized that BAS would influence drinking specifically via enhancement-related PAEs. We also explored the role of BIS in PAEs and drinking. College students (N=557) completed online BAS, PAE, and alcohol use measures in September of their first (T1), second (T2), and third (T3) years of college. We conducted autoregressive path analyses with three BAS subscales and BIS (T1) as predictors, four PAE types (T2) as mediators, and quantity and frequency of drinking (T3) as outcomes. The BAS Fun-Seeking scale was prospectively associated with PAEs, and there was a significant indirect path from Fun-Seeking to alcohol use mediated specifically through activity enhancement PAEs. BIS was positively associated with some PAE types, but did not have indirect effects on drinking. Findings are consistent with both the theory of the BAS and the Acquired Preparedness model, as individuals high on BAS Fun-Seeking may find the rewarding properties of alcohol more reinforcing, leading to stronger enhancement PAEs and increased drinking over time. The prospective design helps establish the temporal association between BAS and alcohol-related learning, and points to the need for prevention efforts that target these at-risk students. PMID:22209025

  8. Positive alcohol expectancies mediate the influence of the behavioral activation system on alcohol use: a prospective path analysis.

    PubMed

    Wardell, Jeffrey D; Read, Jennifer P; Colder, Craig R; Merrill, Jennifer E

    2012-04-01

    Gray's (1975, 1987) behavioral activation (BAS) and behavioral inhibition systems (BIS) are thought to underlie sensitivity to reinforcement and punishment, respectively. Consistent with Gray's theory and the Acquired Preparedness model, BAS may facilitate the learning of positive alcohol expectancies (PAEs) over time, leading to increases in drinking. Yet, no prospective tests of this pathway have been reported. The present study investigated whether BAS prospectively predicted PAEs and whether PAEs mediated the association between BAS and subsequent alcohol use. We hypothesized that BAS would influence drinking specifically via enhancement-related PAEs. We also explored the role of BIS in PAEs and drinking. College students (N=557) completed online BAS, PAE, and alcohol use measures in September of their first (T1), second (T2), and third (T3) years of college. We conducted autoregressive path analyses with three BAS subscales and BIS (T1) as predictors, four PAE types (T2) as mediators, and quantity and frequency of drinking (T3) as outcomes. The BAS Fun-Seeking scale was prospectively associated with PAEs, and there was a significant indirect path from Fun-Seeking to alcohol use mediated specifically through activity enhancement PAEs. BIS was positively associated with some PAE types, but did not have indirect effects on drinking. Findings are consistent with both the theory of the BAS and the Acquired Preparedness model, as individuals high on BAS Fun-Seeking may find the rewarding properties of alcohol more reinforcing, leading to stronger enhancement PAEs and increased drinking over time. The prospective design helps establish the temporal association between BAS and alcohol-related learning, and points to the need for prevention efforts that target these at-risk students.

  9. Positive regulation of the enzymatic activity of gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase by sialylation of its β-subunit.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takuto; Watanabe, Midori; Shimizu, Takahiro; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Kushiro, Keiichiro; Takai, Madoka; Sakai, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    The gastric proton pump (H(+),K(+)-ATPase) consists of a catalytic α-subunit (αHK) and a glycosylated β-subunit (βHK). βHK glycosylation is essential for the apical trafficking and stability of αHK in gastric parietal cells. Here, we report the properties of sialic acids at the termini of the oligosaccharide chains of βHK. Sialylation of βHK was found in LLC-PK1 cells stably expressing αHK and βHK by staining of the cells with lectin-tagged fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles. This sialylation was also confirmed by biochemical studies using sialic acid-binding lectin beads and an anti-βHK antibody. The sialic acids of βHK are cleaved enzymatically by neuraminidase (sialidase) and nonenzymatically by an acidic solution (pH5). Interestingly, the enzymatic activity of H(+),K(+)-ATPase was significantly decreased by cleavage of the sialic acids of βHK. In contrast, βHK was not sialylated in the gastric tubulovesicles prepared from the stomach of fed hogs. The H(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in these tubulovesicles was not significantly altered by neuraminidase. Importantly, the sialylation of βHK was observed in the gastric samples prepared from the stomach of famotidine (a histamine H2 receptor antagonist)-treated rats, but not histamine (an acid secretagogue)-treated rats. The enzymatic activity of H(+),K(+)-ATPase in the samples of the famotidine-treated rats was significantly higher than in the histamine-treated rats. The effects of famotidine were weakened by neuraminidase. These results indicate that βHK is sialylated at neutral or weakly acidic pH, but not at acidic pH, suggesting that the sialic acids of βHK positively regulate the enzymatic activity of αHK.

  10. Influence of the Length and Positioning of the Antiestrogenic Side Chain of Endoxifen and 4-Hydroxytamoxifen on Gene Activation and Growth of Estrogen Receptor Positive Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen has biologically active metabolites: 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT) and endoxifen. The E-isomers are not stable in solution as Z-isomerization occurs. We have synthesized fixed ring (FR) analogues of 4OHT and endoxifen as well as FR E and Z isomers with methoxy and ethoxy side chains. Pharmacologic properties were documented in the MCF-7 cell line, and prolactin synthesis was assessed in GH3 rat pituitary tumor cells. The FR Z-isomers of 4OHT and endoxifen were equivalent to 4OHT and endoxifen. Other test compounds used possessed partial estrogenic activity. The E-isomers of FR 4OHT and endoxifen had no estrogenic activity at therapeutic serum concentrations. None of the newly synthesized compounds were able to down-regulate ER levels. Molecular modeling demonstrated that some compounds would each create a best fit with a novel agonist conformation of the ER. The results demonstrate modulation by the ER complex of cell replication or gene transcription in cancer. PMID:24805199

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorβ/δ activation is essential for modulating p-Foxo1/Foxo1 status in functional insulin-positive cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Li, T; Zhang, Y; Pan, Z; Wu, B; Huang, X; Zhang, Y; Mei, Y; Ge, L; Shen, G; Ge, R-s; Zhu, D; Lou, Y

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) participate in energy homeostasis and play essential roles in diabetes therapy through their effects on non-pancreas tissues. Pathological microenvironment may influence the metabolic requirements for the maintenance of stem cell differentiation. Accordingly, understanding the mechanisms of PPARs on pancreatic β-cell differentiation may be helpful to find the underlying targets of disrupted energy homeostasis under the pancreatic disease condition. PPARs are involved in stem cell differentiation via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, but the subtype member activation and the downstream regulation in functional insulin-positive (INS+) cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we show a novel role of PPARβ/δ activation in determining INS+ cell differentiation and functional maturation. We found PPARβ/δ expression selectively upregulated in mouse embryonic pancreases or stem cells-derived INS+ cells at the pancreatic mature stage in vivo and in vitro. Strikingly, given the inefficiency of generating INS+ cells in vitro, PPARβ/δ activation displayed increasing mouse and human ES cell-derived INS+ cell numbers and insulin secretion. This phenomenon was closely associated with the forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo1) nuclear shuttling, which was dependent on PPARβ/δ downstream PI3K/Akt signaling transduction. The present study reveals the essential role of PPARβ/δ activation on p-Foxo1/Foxo1 status, and in turn, determining INS+ cell generation and insulin secretion via affecting pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 expression. The results demonstrate the underlying mechanism by which PPARβ/δ activation promotes functional INS+ cell differentiation. It also provides potential targets for anti-diabetes drug discovery and hopeful clinical applications in human cell therapy. PMID:25855963

  12. Glioma-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) regulates the recruitment of LRP1 positive mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananya; Coum, Antoine; Marinescu, Voichita D; Põlajeva, Jelena; Smits, Anja; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Tchougounova, Elena

    2015-09-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a high-grade glioma with a complex microenvironment, including various inflammatory cells and mast cells (MCs) as one of them. Previously we had identified glioma grade-dependent MC recruitment. In the present study we investigated the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in MC recruitment.PAI-1, a primary regulator in the fibrinolytic cascade is capable of forming a complex with fibrinolytic system proteins together with low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We found that neutralizing PAI-1 attenuated infiltration of MCs. To address the potential implication of LRP1 in this process, we used a LRP1 antagonist, receptor-associated protein (RAP), and demonstrated the attenuation of MC migration. Moreover, a positive correlation between the number of MCs and the level of PAI-1 in a large cohort of human glioma samples was observed. Our study demonstrated the expression of LRP1 in human MC line LAD2 and in MCs in human high-grade glioma. The activation of potential PAI-1/LRP1 axis with purified PAI-1 promoted increased phosphorylation of STAT3 and subsequently exocytosis in MCs.These findings indicate the influence of the PAI-1/LRP1 axis on the recruitment of MCs in glioma. The connection between high-grade glioma and MC infiltration could contribute to patient tailored therapy and improve patient stratification in future therapeutic trials.

  13. Activation of β-Catenin Signaling in CD133-Positive Dermal Papilla Cells Drives Postnatal Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linli; Xu, Mingang; Yang, Yongguang; Yang, Kun; Wickett, Randall R.; Andl, Thomas; Millar, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The hair follicle dermal papilla (DP) contains a unique prominin-1/CD133-positive (CD133+) cell subpopulation, which has been shown to possess hair follicle-inducing capability. By assaying for endogenous CD133 expression and performing lineage tracing using CD133-CreERT2; ZsGreen1 reporter mice, we find that CD133 is expressed in a subpopulation of DP cells during the growth phase of the murine hair cycle (anagen), but is absent at anagen onset. However, how CD133+ DP cells interact with keratinocytes to induce hair regenerative growth remains unclear. Wnt/β-catenin has long been recognized as a major signaling pathway required for hair follicle morphogenesis, development, and regeneration. Nuclear Wnt/β-catenin activity is observed in the DP during the hair growth phase. Here we show that induced expression of a stabilized form of β-catenin in CD133+ DP cells significantly accelerates spontaneous and depilation-induced hair growth. However, hair follicle regression is not affected in these mutants. Further analysis indicates that CD133+ DP-expressed β-catenin increases proliferation and differentiation of epithelial matrix keratinocytes. Upregulated Wnt/β-catenin activity in CD133+ DP cells also increases the number of proliferating DP cells in each anagen follicle. Our data demonstrate that β-catenin signaling potentiates the capability of CD133+ DP cells to promote postnatal hair growth. PMID:27472062

  14. Set7 mediated Gli3 methylation plays a positive role in the activation of Sonic Hedgehog pathway in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lin; Wu, Hailong; Cheng, Steven Y; Gao, Daming; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling plays very important roles in development and cancers. Vertebrates have three transcriptional factors, Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3. Among them, Gli3 is a very special transcriptional factor which closely resembles Cubitus interruptus (Ci, in Drosophila) structurally and functionally as a ‘double agent’ for Shh target gene expression. Here we show that Gli3 full-length, but not the truncated form, can be methylated at K436 and K595. This methylation is specifically catalyzed by Set7, a lysine methyltransferase (KMT). Methylation at K436 and K595 respectively increases the stability and DNA binding ability of Gli3, resulting in an enhancement of Shh signaling activation. Furthermore, functional experiments indicate that the Gli3 methylation contributes to the tumor growth and metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we propose that Set7 mediated methylation is a novel PTM of Gli3, which positively regulates the transactivity of Gli3 and the activation of Shh signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15690.001 PMID:27146893

  15. Activation of β-Catenin Signaling in CD133-Positive Dermal Papilla Cells Drives Postnatal Hair Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linli; Xu, Mingang; Yang, Yongguang; Yang, Kun; Wickett, Randall R; Andl, Thomas; Millar, Sarah E; Zhang, Yuhang

    2016-01-01

    The hair follicle dermal papilla (DP) contains a unique prominin-1/CD133-positive (CD133+) cell subpopulation, which has been shown to possess hair follicle-inducing capability. By assaying for endogenous CD133 expression and performing lineage tracing using CD133-CreERT2; ZsGreen1 reporter mice, we find that CD133 is expressed in a subpopulation of DP cells during the growth phase of the murine hair cycle (anagen), but is absent at anagen onset. However, how CD133+ DP cells interact with keratinocytes to induce hair regenerative growth remains unclear. Wnt/β-catenin has long been recognized as a major signaling pathway required for hair follicle morphogenesis, development, and regeneration. Nuclear Wnt/β-catenin activity is observed in the DP during the hair growth phase. Here we show that induced expression of a stabilized form of β-catenin in CD133+ DP cells significantly accelerates spontaneous and depilation-induced hair growth. However, hair follicle regression is not affected in these mutants. Further analysis indicates that CD133+ DP-expressed β-catenin increases proliferation and differentiation of epithelial matrix keratinocytes. Upregulated Wnt/β-catenin activity in CD133+ DP cells also increases the number of proliferating DP cells in each anagen follicle. Our data demonstrate that β-catenin signaling potentiates the capability of CD133+ DP cells to promote postnatal hair growth. PMID:27472062

  16. A WNT/beta-catenin signaling activator, R-spondin, plays positive regulatory roles during skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang Hua; Jin, Yong-Ri; Seto, Marianne; Yoon, Jeong Kyo

    2011-03-25

    R-spondins (RSPOs) are a recently characterized family of secreted proteins that activate WNT/β-catenin signaling. In this study, we investigated the potential roles of the RSPO proteins during myogenic differentiation. Overexpression of the Rspo1 gene or administration of recombinant RSPO2 protein enhanced mRNA and protein expression of a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class myogenic determination factor, MYF5, in both C2C12 myoblasts and primary satellite cells, whereas MYOD or PAX7 expression was not affected. RSPOs also promoted myogenic differentiation and induced hypertrophic myotube formation in C2C12 cells. In addition, Rspo2 and Rspo3 gene knockdown by RNA interference significantly compromised MYF5 expression, myogenic differentiation, and myotube formation. Furthermore, Myf5 expression was reduced in the developing limbs of mouse embryos lacking the Rspo2 gene. Finally, we demonstrated that blocking of WNT/β-catenin signaling by DKK1 or a dominant-negative form of TCF4 reversed MYF5 expression, myogenic differentiation, and hypertrophic myotube formation induced by RSPO2, indicating that RSPO2 exerts its activity through the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway. Our results provide strong evidence that RSPOs are key positive regulators of skeletal myogenesis acting through the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  17. Positive affect as coercive strategy: conditionality, activation and the role of psychology in UK government workfare programmes.

    PubMed

    Friedli, Lynne; Stearn, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Eligibility for social security benefits in many advanced economies is dependent on unemployed and underemployed people carrying out an expanding range of job search, training and work preparation activities, as well as mandatory unpaid labour (workfare). Increasingly, these activities include interventions intended to modify attitudes, beliefs and personality, notably through the imposition of positive affect. Labour on the self in order to achieve characteristics said to increase employability is now widely promoted. This work and the discourse on it are central to the experience of many claimants and contribute to the view that unemployment is evidence of both personal failure and psychological deficit. The use of psychology in the delivery of workfare functions to erase the experience and effects of social and economic inequalities, to construct a psychological ideal that links unemployment to psychological deficit, and so to authorise the extension of state-and state-contracted-surveillance to psychological characteristics. This paper describes the coercive and punitive nature of many psycho-policy interventions and considers the implications of psycho-policy for the disadvantaged and excluded populations who are its primary targets. We draw on personal testimonies of people experiencing workfare, policy analysis and social media records of campaigns opposed to workfare in order to explore the extent of psycho-compulsion in workfare. This is an area that has received little attention in the academic literature but that raises issues of ethics and professional accountability and challenges the field of medical humanities to reflect more critically on its relationship to psychology.

  18. A noncanonical bromodomain in the AAA ATPase protein Yta7 directs chromosomal positioning and barrier chromatin activity.

    PubMed

    Gradolatto, Angeline; Smart, Sherri K; Byrum, Stephanie; Blair, Lauren P; Rogers, Richard S; Kolar, Elizabeth A; Lavender, Heather; Larson, Signe K; Aitchison, John D; Taverna, Sean D; Tackett, Alan J

    2009-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yta7 is a barrier active protein that modulates transcriptional states at the silent mating locus, HMR. Additionally, Yta7 regulates histone gene transcription and has overlapping functions with known histone chaperones. This study focused on deciphering the functional role of the noncanonical Yta7 bromodomain. By use of genetic and epistasis analyses, the Yta7 bromodomain was shown to be necessary for barrier activity at HMR and to have overlapping functions with histone regulators (Asf1 and Spt16). Canonical bromodomains can bind to acetylated lysines on histones; however, the Yta7 bromodomain showed an association with histones that was independent of posttranslational modification. Further investigation showed that regions of Yta7 other than the bromodomain conferred histone association. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-chip analyses revealed that the Yta7 bromodomain was not solely responsible for histone association but was also necessary for proper chromosomal positioning of Yta7. This work demonstrates that the Yta7 bromodomain engages histones for certain cellular functions like barrier chromatin maintenance and particular Spt16/Asf1 cellular pathways of chromatin regulation.

  19. Production of a bacteriocin by a poultry derived Campylobacter jejuni isolate with antimicrobial activity against Clostridium perfringens and other Gram positive bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have purified a bacteriocin peptide (termed CUV-3), produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni (strain CUV-3) with inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria mon...

  20. Co-operating STAT5 and AKT signaling pathways in chronic myeloid leukemia and mastocytosis: possible new targets of therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Siham; Arslanhan, Melis Dilara; Langenfeld, Florent; Jeanningros, Sylvie; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Tchertanov, Luba; Moriggl, Richard; Valent, Peter; Arock, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis are myeloid neoplasms sharing a number of pathogenetic and clinical features. In both conditions, an aberrantly activated oncoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity, namely BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia, and mutant KIT, mostly KIT D816V, in systemic mastocytosis, is key to disease evolution. The appreciation of the role of such tyrosine kinases in these diseases has led to the development of improved therapies with tyrosine kinase-targeted inhibitors. However, most drugs, including new KIT D816V-blocking agents, have failed to achieve long-lasting remissions in advanced systemic mastocytosis, and there is a similar problem in chronic myeloid leukemia, where imatinib-resistant patients sometimes fail to achieve remission, even with second- or third-line BCR-ABL1 specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. During disease progression, additional signaling pathways become activated in neoplastic cells, but most converge into major downstream networks. Among these, the AKT and STAT5 pathways appear most critical and may result in drug-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis. Inhibition of phosphorylation of these targets has proven their crucial role in disease-evolution in both malignancies. Together, these observations suggest that STAT5 and AKT are key drivers of oncogenesis in drug-resistant forms of the diseases, and that targeting STAT5 and AKT might be an interesting approach in these malignancies. The present article provides an overview of our current knowledge about the critical role of AKT and STAT5 in the pathophysiology of chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis and on their potential value as therapeutic targets in these neoplasms. PMID:24598853

  1. Monomeric C-reactive protein and Notch-3 co-operatively increase angiogenesis through PI3K signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Boras, Emhamed; Slevin, Mark; Alexander, M Yvonne; Aljohi, Ali; Gilmore, William; Ashworth, Jason; Krupinski, Jerzy; Potempa, Lawrence A; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Elobeid, Adila; Matou-Nasri, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the most acute-phase reactant serum protein of inflammation and a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease. Its expression is associated with atherosclerotic plaque instability and the formation of immature micro-vessels. We have previously shown that CRP upregulates endothelial-derived Notch-3, a key receptor involved in vascular development, remodelling and maturation. In this study, we investigated the links between the bioactive monomeric CRP (mCRP) and Notch-3 signalling in angiogenesis. We used in vitro (cell counting, wound-healing and tubulogenesis assays) and in vivo (chorioallantoic membrane) angiogenic assays and Western blotting to study the angiogenic signalling pathways induced by mCRP and Notch-3 activator chimera protein (Notch-3/Fc). Our results showed an additive effect on angiogenesis of mCRP stimulatory effect combined with Notch-3/Fc promoting bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) proliferation, migration, tube formation in Matrigel(TM) with up-regulation of phospho-Akt expression. The pharmacological blockade of PI3K/Akt survival pathway by LY294002 fully inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis induced by mCRP/Notch-3/Fc combination while blocking Notch signalling by gamma-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) partially inhibited mCRP/Notch-3/Fc-induced angiogenesis. Using a BAEC vascular smooth muscle cell co-culture sprouting angiogenesis assay and transmission electron microscopy, we showed that activation of both mCRP and Notch-3 signalling induced the formation of thicker sprouts which were shown later by Western blotting to be associated with an up-regulation of N-cadherin expression and a down-regulation of VE-cadherin expression. Thus, mCRP combined with Notch-3 activator promote angiogenesis through the PI3K/Akt pathway and their therapeutic combination has potential to promote and stabilize vessel formation whilst reducing the risk of haemorrhage from unstable plaques. PMID:24972386

  2. Is the Modified Tardieu Scale in Semi-Standing Position Better Associated with Knee Extension and Hamstring Activity in Terminal Swing than the Supine Tardieu?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Irene R.; Nienhuis, Bart; Rijs, Nique P. A. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Duysens, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) in a semi-standing position, used for the assessment of hamstrings spasticity, was better associated with knee extension and hamstrings activity in terminal swing than the MTS in a supine position in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven children diagnosed with…

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) induces estrogen receptor-positive mammary neoplasia through an inflammatory and metabolic phenotype linked to mTor activation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongyan; Lu, Jin; Xiao, Junfeng; Upadhyay, Geeta; Umans, Rachel; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Yin, Yuhzi; Fant, Michael E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Glazer, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ) regulates a multitude of physiological processes associated with glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammation and proliferation. One or more of these processes are potential risk factors for the ability of PPARδ agonists to promote tumorigenesis in the mammary gland. In the present study, we describe a new transgenic mouse model in which activation of PPARδ in the mammary epithelium by endogenous or synthetic ligands resulted in progressive histopathological changes that culminated in the appearance of estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-positive and ErbB2-negative infiltrating ductal carcinomas. Multiparous mice presented with mammary carcinomas after a latency of 12 months, and administration of the PPARδ ligand GW501516 reduced tumor latency to five months. Histopathological changes occurred concurrently with an increase in an inflammatory, invasive, metabolic and proliferative gene signature, including expression of the trophoblast gene, Plac1, beginning one week after GW501516 treatment, and remained elevated throughout tumorigenesis. The appearance of malignant changes correlated with a pronounced increase in phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid metabolites, which coincided with activation of Akt and mTor signaling that were attenuated by treatment with the mTor inhibitor everolimus. Our findings are the first to demonstrate a direct role of PPARδ in the pathogenesis of mammary tumorigenesis, and suggest a rationale for therapeutic approaches to prevent and treat this disease. PMID:23811944

  4. Emergence of constitutively active estrogen receptor-α mutations in pretreated advanced estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Ferrer-Lozano, Jaime; Perez-Fidalgo, Jose A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Gómez, Henry; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Giltnane, Jennifer; Balko, Justin M.; Cronin, Maureen T; Jarosz, Mirna; Sun, James; Hawryluk, Matthew; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Ross, Jeffrey S; Dvir, Addie; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Wolf, Ido; Rubinek, Tamar; Gilmore, Lauren; Schnitt, Stuart; Come, Steven E.; Pusztai, Lajos; Stephens, Philip; Brown, Myles; Miller, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We undertook this study to determine the prevalence of estrogen receptor (ER) α (ESR1) mutations throughout the natural history of hormone dependent breast cancer and to delineate the functional roles of the most commonly detected alterations. Experimental Design We studied a total of 249 tumor specimens from 208 patients. The specimens include 134 ER positive (ER+/HER2–) and, as controls, 115 ER negative (ER−) tumors. The ER+ samples consist of 58 primary breast cancers and 76 metastatic samples. All tumors were sequenced to high unique coverage using next generation sequencing targeting the coding sequence of the estrogen receptor and an additional 182 cancer-related genes. Results Recurring somatic mutations in codons 537 and 538 within the ligand-binding domain of ER were detected in ER+ metastatic disease. Overall, the frequency of these mutations was 12% (9/76, 95% CI 6%-21%) in metastatic tumors and in a subgroup of patients who received an average of 7 lines of treatment the frequency was 20% (5/25, 95% CI 7%-41%). These mutations were not detected in primary or treatment naïve ER+ cancer or in any stage of ER− disease. Functional studies in cell line models demonstrate that these mutations render estrogen receptor constitutive activity and confer partial resistance to currently available endocrine treatments. Conclusions In this study we show evidence for the temporal selection of functional ESR1 mutations as potential drivers of endocrine resistance during the progression of ER positive breast cancer. PMID:24398047

  5. Antipsychotic profiles of TASP0443294, a novel and orally active positive allosteric modulator of metabotropic glutamate 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hikichi, Hirohiko; Hiyoshi, Tetsuaki; Marumo, Toshiyuki; Tomishima, Yasumitsu; Kaku, Ayaka; Iida, Izumi; Urabe, Hiroki; Tamita, Tomoko; Yasuhara, Akito; Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2015-03-01

    Glutamatergic dysfunction has been implicated in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. The stimulation of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2 receptor has been shown to be effective in a number of animal models of schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated the antipsychotic profiles of (2S)-5-methyl-2-{[4-(1,1,1-trifluoro-2-methylpropan-2-yl)phenoxy]methyl}-2,3-dihydroimidazo[2,1-b][1,3]oxazole-6-carboxamide (TASP0443294), a newly synthesized positive allosteric modulator of the mGlu2 receptor. TASP0443294 potentiated the response of human mGlu2 and rat mGlu2 receptors to glutamate with EC50 values of 277 and 149 nM, respectively, without affecting the glutamate response of human mGlu3 receptor. TASP0443294 was distributed in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid after peroral administration in rats. The peroral administration of TASP0443294 inhibited methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats, which was attenuated by an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, and improved social memory impairment induced by 5R,10S-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801) in rats. Furthermore, TASP0443294 reduced the ketamine-induced basal gamma hyperactivity in the prefrontal cortex and suppressed rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in rats. These findings indicate that TASP0443294 is an mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulator with antipsychotic activity, and that the suppression of aberrant gamma oscillations and REM sleep could be considered as neurophysiological biomarkers for TASP0443294. PMID:25837934

  6. A perfect storm: examining the synergistic effects of negative and positive emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Edward A.; Cornelius, Talea; Fehling, Kara B.; Kranzler, Amy; Panza, Emily A.; Lavender, Jason M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Engel, Scott G.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Grange, Daniel Le

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that both positive and negative emotion potentially influence the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa, through both positive and negative reinforcement of weight loss activities. Such reactive emotional experience may be characterized by frequent and intense fluctuations in emotion, a construct known as “emotional instability.” The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between positive emotional instability and weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa, and to investigate the synergistic effects of positive and negative emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities. Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device. Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity. These findings indicate that when women with anorexia exhibit both high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability they are more prone to a variety of weight loss activities. The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed. PMID:26379588

  7. A perfect storm: examining the synergistic effects of negative and positive emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Selby, Edward A; Cornelius, Talea; Fehling, Kara B; Kranzler, Amy; Panza, Emily A; Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that both positive and negative emotion potentially influence the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa, through both positive and negative reinforcement of weight loss activities. Such reactive emotional experience may be characterized by frequent and intense fluctuations in emotion, a construct known as "emotional instability." The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between positive emotional instability and weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa, and to investigate the synergistic effects of positive and negative emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities. Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device. Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity. These findings indicate that when women with anorexia exhibit both high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability they are more prone to a variety of weight loss activities. The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed. PMID:26379588

  8. Tumor suppressor gene co-operativity in compound Patched1 and Suppressor of fused heterozygous mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Svärd, Jessica; Rozell, Björn; Toftgård, Rune; Teglund, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway is central to the development of certain tumor types, including medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Patched1 (Ptch1) and Suppressor of fused (Sufu) are two essential negative regulators of the pathway with tumor suppressor activity. Ptch1+/− mice are predisposed to developing medulloblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma, while Sufu+/− mice develop a skin phenotype characterized by basaloid epidermal proliferations. Here, we have studied tumor development in Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− mice to determine the effect of compound heterozygosity on the onset, incidence, and spectrum of tumors. We found significantly more (2.3-fold) basaloid proliferations in Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− compared to Sufu+/− female, but not male, mice. For medulloblastoma, the cumulative one-year incidence was 1.5-fold higher in Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− compared to Ptch1+/− female mice but this strong trend was not statistically significant. Together this suggests a weak genetic interaction of the two tumor suppressor genes. We noted a few rhabdomyosarcomas and pancreatic cysts in the Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− mice, but the numbers were not significantly different from the single heterozygous mice. Hydrocephalus developed in ∼20% of the Ptch1+/− and Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− but not in Sufu+/− mice. Interestingly, most of the medulloblastomas from the Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− mice had lost expression of the remaining Ptch1 wild-type allele but not the Sufu wild-type allele. On the contrary, Sufu as well as Gli1 and Gli2 expression was upregulated in the medulloblastomas compared to adult cerebellum in Ptch1+/− and Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− mice. This suggests that Sufu expression may be regulated by Hedgehog pathway activity and could constitute another negative feedback loop in the pathway. PMID:18781608

  9. The co-operative performance of a hydrated salt assisted sponge like P(VDF-HFP) piezoelectric generator: an effective piezoelectric based energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Prakriti; Garain, Samiran; Mandal, Dipankar

    2015-03-21

    We have prepared hydrated salt filler assisted sponge like P(VDF-HFP) micro-porous electroactive films to fabricate a high performance flexible piezoelectric generator (FPG). These FPGs deliver up to 8 V of open circuit voltage under external stress and also generate enough power to turn on at least fifteen commercial blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) instantly. Furthermore, capacitors have been successfully charged by repeated finger touches indicating the potential of the FPGs to be used as self-powered devices where different types of mechanical vibrations can be applied. The high performance of FPGs might be attributed to the co-operative contribution from the porous electret structure and electroactive nature of the P(VDF-HFP) film, as they also enhance the dielectric permittivity. This approach is simple, cost-effective, and well-suited for large-scale fabrication of high-performance FPGs.

  10. The co-operative performance of a hydrated salt assisted sponge like P(VDF-HFP) piezoelectric generator: an effective piezoelectric based energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Prakriti; Garain, Samiran; Mandal, Dipankar

    2015-03-21

    We have prepared hydrated salt filler assisted sponge like P(VDF-HFP) micro-porous electroactive films to fabricate a high performance flexible piezoelectric generator (FPG). These FPGs deliver up to 8 V of open circuit voltage under external stress and also generate enough power to turn on at least fifteen commercial blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) instantly. Furthermore, capacitors have been successfully charged by repeated finger touches indicating the potential of the FPGs to be used as self-powered devices where different types of mechanical vibrations can be applied. The high performance of FPGs might be attributed to the co-operative contribution from the porous electret structure and electroactive nature of the P(VDF-HFP) film, as they also enhance the dielectric permittivity. This approach is simple, cost-effective, and well-suited for large-scale fabrication of high-performance FPGs. PMID:25693657

  11. Motif co-regulation and co-operativity are common mechanisms in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Van Roey, Kim; Davey, Norman E

    2015-01-01

    A substantial portion of the regulatory interactions in the higher eukaryotic cell are mediated by simple sequence motifs in the regulatory segments of genes and (pre-)mRNAs, and in the intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. Although these regulatory modules are physicochemically distinct, they share an evolutionary plasticity that has facilitated a rapid growth of their use and resulted in their ubiquity in complex organisms. The ease of motif acquisition simplifies access to basal housekeeping functions, facilitates the co-regulation of multiple biomolecules allowing them to respond in a coordinated manner to changes in the cell state, and supports the integration of multiple signals for combinatorial decision-making. Consequently, motifs are indispensable for temporal, spatial, conditional and basal regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level. In this review, we highlight that many of the key regulatory pathways of the cell are recruited by motifs and that the ease of motif acquisition has resulted in large networks of co-regulated biomolecules. We discuss how co-operativity allows simple static motifs to perform the conditional regulation that underlies decision-making in higher eukaryotic biological systems. We observe that each gene and its products have a unique set of DNA, RNA or protein motifs that encode a regulatory program to define the logical circuitry that guides the life cycle of these biomolecules, from transcription to degradation. Finally, we contrast the regulatory properties of protein motifs and the regulatory elements of DNA and (pre-)mRNAs, advocating that co-regulation, co-operativity, and motif-driven regulatory programs are common mechanisms that emerge from the use of simple, evolutionarily plastic regulatory modules. PMID:26626130

  12. Positive influence of long-lasting and intensive weight-bearing physical activity on hip structure of young adults.

    PubMed

    Bréban, Sophie; Chappard, Christine; Jaffre, Christelle; Khacef, Farida; Briot, Karine; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the associations between high-intensity and long-lasting weight-bearing sports with hip structure in young adults. One hundred and seventy-two subjects aged 17-28 yr were divided into 4 groups: 40 athlete women (10.2 ± 2.2 h/wk), 30 control women, 67 athlete men (11.4 ± 3.6 h/wk), and 35 control men. The nondominant femur, lumbar spine, and whole body were scanned by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to assess bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD). Hip structure analysis (HSA) software was applied to evaluate cross-sectional area, cross-sectional moment of inertia, and section modulus at the femoral neck, intertrochanter, and femoral shaft regions. All the BMC and BMD values were significantly higher in athletes of both sexes compared with controls (p < 0.05). Most of the hip structural parameters were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in athletes compared with controls. Most of the differences were maintained after adjustments for height, weight, and calcium intake. Positively significant correlations were observed between HSA parameters and physical activity variables in both sexes (r > 0.32; p < 0.05). Partial correlation suggested that the hours of practice appeared to have a greater influence than the years of practice on hip bone geometry. These results suggest that external mechanical loading is a strong determinant of hip bone structure when weight-bearing physical activity is commenced before puberty and maintained during adulthood.

  13. Positive affect as coercive strategy: conditionality, activation and the role of psychology in UK government workfare programmes

    PubMed Central

    Friedli, Lynne; Stearn, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Eligibility for social security benefits in many advanced economies is dependent on unemployed and underemployed people carrying out an expanding range of job search, training and work preparation activities, as well as mandatory unpaid labour (workfare). Increasingly, these activities include interventions intended to modify attitudes, beliefs and personality, notably through the imposition of positive affect. Labour on the self in order to achieve characteristics said to increase employability is now widely promoted. This work and the discourse on it are central to the experience of many claimants and contribute to the view that unemployment is evidence of both personal failure and psychological deficit. The use of psychology in the delivery of workfare functions to erase the experience and effects of social and economic inequalities, to construct a psychological ideal that links unemployment to psychological deficit, and so to authorise the extension of state—and state-contracted—surveillance to psychological characteristics. This paper describes the coercive and punitive nature of many psycho-policy interventions and considers the implications of psycho-policy for the disadvantaged and excluded populations who are its primary targets. We draw on personal testimonies of people experiencing workfare, policy analysis and social media records of campaigns opposed to workfare in order to explore the extent of psycho-compulsion in workfare. This is an area that has received little attention in the academic literature but that raises issues of ethics and professional accountability and challenges the field of medical humanities to reflect more critically on its relationship to psychology. PMID:26052120

  14. The PECACE domain: a new family of enzymes with potential peptidoglycan cleavage activity in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pagliero, Estelle; Dideberg, Otto; Vernet, Thierry; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie

    2005-01-01

    Background The metabolism of bacterial peptidoglycan is a dynamic process, synthases and cleavage enzymes are functionally coordinated. Lytic Transglycosylase enzymes (LT) are part of multienzyme complexes which regulate bacterial division and elongation. LTs are also involved in peptidoglycan turnover and in macromolecular transport systems. Despite their central importance, no LTs have been identified in the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. We report the identification of the first putative LT enzyme in S. pneumoniae and discuss its role in pneumococcal peptidoglycan metabolism. Results Homology searches of the pneumococcal genome allowed the identification of a new domain putatively involved in peptidoglycan cleavage (PECACE, PEptidoglycan CArbohydrate Cleavage Enzyme). This sequence has been found exclusively in Gram-positive bacteria and gene clusters containing pecace are conserved among Streptococcal species. The PECACE domain is, in some instances, found in association with other domains known to catalyze peptidoglycan hydrolysis. Conclusions A new domain, PECACE, putatively involved in peptidoglycan hydrolysis has been identified in S. pneumoniae. The probable enzymatic activity deduced from the detailed analysis of the amino acid sequence suggests that the PECACE domain may proceed through a LT-type or goose lyzosyme-type cleavage mechanism. The PECACE function may differ largely from the other hydrolases already identified in the pneumococcus: LytA, LytB, LytC, CBPD and PcsB. The multimodular architecture of proteins containing the PECACE domain is another example of the many activities harbored by peptidoglycan hydrolases, which is probably required for the regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism. The release of new bacterial genomes sequences will probably add new members to the five groups identified so far in this work, and new groups could also emerge. Conversely, the functional characterization of the unknown domains mentioned in this work

  15. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results

  16. Positive affect as coercive strategy: conditionality, activation and the role of psychology in UK government workfare programmes.

    PubMed

    Friedli, Lynne; Stearn, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Eligibility for social security benefits in many advanced economies is dependent on unemployed and underemployed people carrying out an expanding range of job search, training and work preparation activities, as well as mandatory unpaid labour (workfare). Increasingly, these activities include interventions intended to modify attitudes, beliefs and personality, notably through the imposition of positive affect. Labour on the self in order to achieve characteristics said to increase employability is now widely promoted. This work and the discourse on it are central to the experience of many claimants and contribute to the view that unemployment is evidence of both personal failure and psychological deficit. The use of psychology in the delivery of workfare functions to erase the experience and effects of social and economic inequalities, to construct a psychological ideal that links unemployment to psychological deficit, and so to authorise the extension of state-and state-contracted-surveillance to psychological characteristics. This paper describes the coercive and punitive nature of many psycho-policy interventions and considers the implications of psycho-policy for the disadvantaged and excluded populations who are its primary targets. We draw on personal testimonies of people experiencing workfare, policy analysis and social media records of campaigns opposed to workfare in order to explore the extent of psycho-compulsion in workfare. This is an area that has received little attention in the academic literature but that raises issues of ethics and professional accountability and challenges the field of medical humanities to reflect more critically on its relationship to psychology. PMID:26052120

  17. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results

  18. An Experience Sampling Study of Physical Activity and Positive Affect: Investigating the Role of Situational Motivation and Perceived Intensity Across Time.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Eva; Fortier, Michelle S; Sweet, Shane N

    2013-04-18

    The nature of the association between physical activity and positive affect is complex, prompting experts to recommend continued examination of moderating variables. The main purpose of this 2-week field study was to examine the influence of situational motivational regulations from self-determination theory (SDT) on changes in positive affect from pre- to post- to 3-hours post-physical activity. Another purpose was to clarify the relationship between physical activity intensity [i.e., Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE)] and positive affect at the stated time points. This study employed an experience sampling design using electronic questionnaires. Sixty-six healthy and active, multiple-role women provided recurrent assessments of their physical activity, situational motivation, and positive affect in their everyday lives over a 14-day period. Specifically, measures were obtained at the three time points of interest (i.e., pre-, post-, 3-hours post-physical activity). The data were analyzed using multilevel modeling. Results showed that intrinsic motivation was related to post-physical activity positive affect while the influence of identified regulation appeared 3-hours post-physical activity. In addition, RPE, which was significantly predicted by levels of introjection, was more strongly associated with an increase in p