Science.gov

Sample records for positive-energy particle models

  1. Quantum cosmological Friedman models with a Yang-Mills field and positive energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, Claus

    2010-02-01

    We prove the existence of a spectral resolution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation when the matter field is provided by a Yang-Mills field, with or without mass term, if the spatial geometry of the underlying spacetime is homothetic to {\\bb R}^{3} . The energy levels of the resulting quantum model, i.e. the eigenvalues of the corresponding self-adjoint Hamiltonian with a pure point spectrum, are strictly positive. This work has been supported by the DFG.

  2. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  3. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  4. Description of a bovine model for studying digestive and metabolic effects of a positive energy balance not biased by lactation or gravidity.

    PubMed

    Dänicke, Sven; Meyer, Ulrich; Winkler, Janine; Schulz, Kirsten; Ulrich, Sebastian; Frahm, Jana; Kersten, Susanne; Rehage, Jürgen; Breves, Gerhard; Häussler, Susanne; Sauerwein, Helga; Locher, Lena

    2014-12-01

    Physiological consequences of adaptation to and continued feeding of a high-energetic diet were studied in eight non-pregnant, non-lactating dairy Holstein cows over a period of 16 weeks. The first six weeks served as an adaptation period from the low energetic straw-based diet (3.8 MJ NEL/kg DM) to the high-energetic ration (7.5 MJ NEL/kg DM). Intake of dry matter (DM) increased with dietary energy concentration from 9 to 20 kg/d up to week 9 to 12 and decreased thereafter. The initial live weight (LW) of 550 ± 60 kg was increased linearly and corresponded to an average daily LW gain of 2.3 ± 0.3 kg. Energy balance increased approximately nine-fold to a maximum of 114 MJ NEL/d in week 10. Ruminal fermentation pattern was completely changed from an acetate dominating profile to a propionate based one, which was paralleled by a marked increase in the rumen fluid endotoxin concentration. Unlike blood glucose concentration, which increased continuously, that of cholesterol and triglycerides started to increase after an initial stagnation. In conclusion, both ruminal adaptation to a high-energetic diet and the continued feeding of such a diet induced digestive and metabolic adaptations in non-pregnant, non-lactating cows characterised by a progressing positive energy balance.

  5. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  6. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  7. Patchy Particle Model for Vitrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Leibler, Ludwik; Sciortino, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    Vitrimers—a recently invented new class of polymers—consist of covalent networks that can rearrange their topology via a bond shuffling mechanism, preserving the total number of network links. We introduce a patchy particle model whose dynamics directly mimic the bond exchange mechanism and reproduce the observed glass-forming ability. We calculate the free energy of this model in the limit of strong (chemical) bonds between the particles, both via the Wertheim thermodynamic perturbation theory and using computer simulations. The system exhibits an entropy-driven phase separation between a network phase and a dilute cluster gas, bringing new insight into the swelling behavior of vitrimers in solvents.

  8. CFD Modeling of Particle Resuspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degraw, Jason; Cimbala, John; Freihaut, James

    2006-11-01

    The phenomenon of resuspension plays a role in everyday life and is an important factor in indoor air quality. There are several models available for particle detachment, but the mechanisms by which particles are induced to lift off of a surface are not well explained in the literature. The lifting forces on a particle are generally too small to resuspend it, especially in the air flows generated by human activity (e.g., walking). We model the interaction of the aerodynamic disturbances and a thin layer of particles deposited on the surface. A standard CFD solver is used to compute the flow, and the particle transport model is one-way-coupled with the flow solution. Several time-dependent flows are considered, including an idealized footstep. The foot is represented using an immersed boundary technique, and is modeled as a disk that moves up and down with a trajectory patterned after experimental gait data. A jet and a radially moving vortex are generated as the foot approaches the floor. The strength of the jet is determined by the details of the foot movement near the surface. If the foot is slowed as it nears the floor, we find maximum velocities around 3 m/s, while the maximum velocity is more than doubled by a sudden stop. We have also computed a ``vacuum cleaner'' case to model the airflow generated by cleaning activities. In either case, the wall shear along the floor and the near-wall flow structure are used to examine the resuspension of particles.

  9. A Particle-Particle Collision Model for Smoothed Profile Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, Fazlolah; Mousel, John; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2014-11-01

    Smoothed Profile Method (SPM) is a type of continuous forcing approach that adds the particles to the fluid using a forcing. The fluid-structure interaction is through a diffuse interface which avoids sudden transition from solid to fluid. The SPM simulation as a monolithic approach uses an indicator function field in the whole domain based on the distance from each particle's boundary where the possible particle-particle interaction can occur. A soft sphere potential based on the indicator function field has been defined to add an artificial pressure to the flow pressure in the potential overlapping regions. Thus, a repulsion force is obtained to avoid overlapping. Study of two particles which impulsively start moving in an initially uniform flow shows that the particle in the wake of the other one will have less acceleration leading to frequent collisions. Various Reynolds numbers and initial distances have been chosen to test the robustness of the method. Study of Drafting-Kissing Tumbling of two cylindrical particles shows a deviation from the benchmarks due to lack of rotation modeling. The method is shown to be accurate enough for simulating particle-particle collision and can easily be extended for particle-wall modeling and for non-spherical particles.

  10. Gravitational positive energy theorems from information inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Nima; Lin, Jennifer; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we argue that classical asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes that arise as states in consistent ultraviolet completions of Einstein gravity coupled to matter must satisfy an infinite family of positive energy conditions. To each ball-shaped spatial region B of the boundary spacetime we can associate a bulk spatial region Σ between B and the bulk extremal surface \\Btilde with the same boundary as B. We show that there exists a natural notion of a gravitational energy for every such region that is non-negative, and non-increasing as one makes the region smaller. The results follow from identifying this gravitational energy with a quantum relative entropy in the associated dual conformal field theory state. The positivity and monotonicity properties of the gravitational energy are implied by the positivity and monotonicity of relative entropy, which holds universally in all quantum systems.

  11. Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-04

    Coastal Inlets Research Program Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS) The Particle Tracking Model (PTM) is a Lagrangian...resuspension in coastal, estuarine and river environments. Local sediment particle sources include dredging, placement sites, inflows, and vessel...propeller wash. The PTM calculates pathways and fate of neutrally buoyant or sediment particles under wave and hydrodynamic conditions. Calculations

  12. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  13. Discrete Element Modeling of Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Weitzman, Peter S.; Curry, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carry out experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. While simple Coulombic force between two particles is well understood, its operation in an ensemble of particles is more complex. When the tribocharging of particles and surfaces due to frictional contact is also considered, it is necessary to consider longer range of interaction of particles in response to electrostatic charging. The standard DEM algorithm accounts for particle mechanical properties and inertia as a function of particle shape and mass. If fluid drag is neglected, then particle dynamics are governed by contact between particles, between particles and equipment surfaces and gravity forces. Consideration of particle charge and any tribocharging and

  14. Exploring the Standard Model of Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Watkins, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent discovery of a new particle at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the Higgs boson could be about to be discovered. This paper provides a brief summary of the standard model of particle physics and the importance of the Higgs boson and field in that model for non-specialists. The role of Feynman diagrams in making predictions for…

  15. Exploring the Standard Model of Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Watkins, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent discovery of a new particle at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the Higgs boson could be about to be discovered. This paper provides a brief summary of the standard model of particle physics and the importance of the Higgs boson and field in that model for non-specialists. The role of Feynman diagrams in making predictions for…

  16. New model of the higher spin particle

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoruk, S. Ivanov, E.

    2008-05-15

    We elaborate on a new model of the higher spin (HS) particle which makes manifest the classical equivalence of the HS particle of the unfolded formulation and the HS particle model with a bosonic counterpart of supersymmetry. Both these models emerge as two different gauges of the new master system. Physical states of the master model are massless HS multiplets described by complex HS fields which carry an extra U(1) charge q. The latter fully characterizes the given multiplet by fixing the minimal helicity at q/2. We construct the twistorial formulation of the master model and discuss symmetries of the new HS multiplets within its framework.

  17. Observations and Modeling of Geospace Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlin

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive measurements of energetic particles and electric and magnetic fields from state-of-art instruments onboard Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of the energetic particles and the fields in the inner magnetosphere and impose new challenges to any quantitative modeling of the physical processes responsible for these observations. Concurrent measurements of energetic particles by satellites in highly inclined low Earth orbits and plasma and fields by satellites in farther distances in the magnetospheres and in the up stream solar wind are the critically needed information for quantitative modeling and for leading to eventual accurate forecast of the variations of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere. In this presentation, emphasis will be on the most recent advance in our understanding of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere and the missing links for significantly advance in our modeling and forecasting capabilities.

  18. Polarizable water model for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peter, Emanuel

    2015-11-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is an efficient particle-based method for modeling mesoscopic behavior of fluid systems. DPD forces conserve the momentum resulting in a correct description of hydrodynamic interactions. Polarizability has been introduced into some coarse-grained particle-based simulation methods; however it has not been done with DPD before. We developed a new polarizable coarse-grained water model for DPD, which employs long-range electrostatics and Drude oscillators. In this talk, we will present the model and its applications in simulations of membrane systems, where polarization effects play an essential role.

  19. Space Particle Hazard Measurement and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0120 TR-2016-0120 SPACE PARTICLE HAZARD MEASUREMENT AND MODELING Adrian Wheelock 01 September 2016 Final Report...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE AIR FORCE...AND SUBTITLE Space Particle Hazard Measurement and Modeling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F 6. AUTHOR(S

  20. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-07

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  1. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-01

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  2. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  3. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  4. Probabilistic Solar Energetic Particle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Dietrich, William F.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    To plan and design safe and reliable space missions, it is necessary to take into account the effects of the space radiation environment. This is done by setting the goal of achieving safety and reliability with some desired level of confidence. To achieve this goal, a worst-case space radiation environment at the required confidence level must be obtained. Planning and designing then proceeds, taking into account the effects of this worst-case environment. The result will be a mission that is reliable against the effects of the space radiation environment at the desired confidence level. In this paper we will describe progress toward developing a model that provides worst-case space radiation environments at user-specified confidence levels. We will present a model for worst-case event-integrated solar proton environments that provide the worst-case differential proton spectrum. This model is based on data from IMP-8 and GOES spacecraft that provide a data base extending from 1974 to the present. We will discuss extending this work to create worst-case models for peak flux and mission-integrated fluence for protons. We will also describe plans for similar models for helium and heavier ions.

  5. Polarizable protein model for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Emanuel; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we present a novel polarizable protein model for the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation technique, a coarse-grained particle-based method widely used in modeling of fluid systems at the mesoscale. We employ long-range electrostatics and Drude oscillators in combination with a newly developed polarizable water model. The protein in our model is resembled by a polarizable backbone and a simplified representation of the sidechains. We define the model parameters using the experimental structures of 2 proteins: TrpZip2 and TrpCage. We validate the model on folding of five other proteins and demonstrate that it successfully predicts folding of these proteins into their native conformations. As a perspective of this model, we will give a short outlook on simulations of protein aggregation in the bulk and near a model membrane, a relevant process in several Amyloid diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's and Diabetes II.

  6. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  7. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  8. Stochastic model for supersymmetric particle branching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chan, Aik Hui; Oh, Choo Hiap

    2017-01-01

    We develop a stochastic branching model to describe the jet evolution of supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. This model is a modified two-phase branching process, or more precisely, a two-phase simple birth process plus Poisson process. Both pure SUSY partons initiated jets and SUSY plus ordinary partons initiated jets scenarios are considered. The stochastic branching equations are established and the Multiplicity Distributions (MDs) are derived for these two scenarios. We also fit the distribution of the general case (SUSY plus ordinary partons initiated jets) with experimental data. The fitting shows the SUSY particles have not participated in branching at current collision energy yet.

  9. Computer Models Simulate Fine Particle Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through a NASA Seed Fund partnership with DEM Solutions Inc., of Lebanon, New Hampshire, scientists at Kennedy Space Center refined existing software to study the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces. The software, EDEM, allows users to import particles and obtain accurate representations of their shapes for modeling purposes, such as simulating bulk solids behavior, and was enhanced to be able to more accurately model fine, abrasive, cohesive particles. These new EDEM capabilities can be applied in many industries unrelated to space exploration and have been adopted by several prominent U.S. companies, including John Deere, Pfizer, and Procter & Gamble.

  10. Parallelization of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.L.; O`Steen, B.L.

    1997-08-01

    An advanced stochastic Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) is used by the Atmospheric Technologies Group (ATG) to simulate contaminant transport. The model uses time-dependent three-dimensional fields of wind and turbulence to determine the location of individual particles released into the atmosphere. This report describes modifications to LPDM using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) which allows for execution in a parallel configuration on the Cray Supercomputer facility at the SRS. Use of a parallel version allows for many more particles to be released in a given simulation, with little or no increase in computational time. This significantly lowers (greater than an order of magnitude) the minimum resolvable concentration levels without ad hoc averaging schemes and/or without reducing spatial resolution. The general changes made to LPDM are discussed and a series of tests are performed comparing the serial (single processor) and parallel versions of the code.

  11. Bonded-cell model for particle fracture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc-Hanh; Azéma, Emilien; Sornay, Philippe; Radjai, Farhang

    2015-02-01

    Particle degradation and fracture play an important role in natural granular flows and in many applications of granular materials. We analyze the fracture properties of two-dimensional disklike particles modeled as aggregates of rigid cells bonded along their sides by a cohesive Mohr-Coulomb law and simulated by the contact dynamics method. We show that the compressive strength scales with tensile strength between cells but depends also on the friction coefficient and a parameter describing cell shape distribution. The statistical scatter of compressive strength is well described by the Weibull distribution function with a shape parameter varying from 6 to 10 depending on cell shape distribution. We show that this distribution may be understood in terms of percolating critical intercellular contacts. We propose a random-walk model of critical contacts that leads to particle size dependence of the compressive strength in good agreement with our simulation data.

  12. Model of particle growth in silane discharges

    PubMed

    Gallagher

    2000-08-01

    The growth of silicon particles in the neutral plasma region of pure silane, rf capacitively coupled, steady-state discharges is calculated with a homogeneous, plasma-chemistry model. Plasma conditions are typical of those used in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) device production. SiH3 and SiH-3 grow into particles by the step-by-step addition of silicon atoms, primarily due to reactions with SiH3. Attrition of growing Si(x)H(z)(m) radicals and ions with z charges, which are "particles" for large x, occurs by diffusion of neutral and positively charged radicals to the electrodes. Rate coefficients for electron, ion, radical, and silane collisions with the Si(x)H(z)(m) for x=1-10(5) are estimated from detailed considerations of the literature and relevant physics. Self-consistent anion, cation (n(+)), and electron (n(e)) densities and charge fluxes are used, and charge neutrality is maintained. Typically n(+)/n(e) congruent with100, which causes a large fraction of neutral particles and thereby a major particle flux into the growing a-Si:H film. The density of visible particles (x>10(4)) varies many orders of magnitude with relatively minor changes in discharge power, pressure, and electrode gap. This parameter dependence agrees with experiment, and by adjusting collision parameters within a reasonable range the calculated particle densities can be brought into exact agreement with experiment. An additional result of the model, which has not yet been detected, is that Si(x)H(m) clusters with 3

  13. Bilocal model for the relativistic spinning particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Trevor; Freidel, Laurent

    2017-05-01

    In this work we show that a relativistic spinning particle can be described at the classical and the quantum level as being composed of two physical constituents which are entangled and separated by a fixed distance. This bilocal model for spinning particles allows for a natural description of particle interactions as a local interaction at each of the constituents. This form of the interaction vertex provides a resolution to a long standing issue on the nature of relativistic interactions for spinning objects in the context of the worldline formalism. It also potentially brings a dynamical explanation for why massive fundamental objects are naturally of lowest spin. We analyze first a nonrelativistic system where spin is modeled as an entangled state of two particles with the entanglement encoded into a set of constraints. It is shown that these constraints can be made relativistic and that the resulting description is isomorphic to the usual description of the phase space of massive relativistic particles with the restriction that the quantum spin has to be an integer.

  14. Strong gravitation and models of particles

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, V.F.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of determining the most realistic model of particles in strong gravitation is considered. The relation between the hypothesis of strong gravitation and the structure of the proton is analyzed. The thermodynamics of a hadron as a black hole in strong gravitation is studied.

  15. A Classical WR Model with Particle Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazel, A.; Suhov, Y.; Stuhl, I.

    2015-06-01

    A version of the Widom-Rowlinson model is considered, where particles of types coexist, subject to pairwise hard-core exclusions. For , in the case of large equal fugacities, we give a complete description of the pure phase picture based on the theory of dominant ground states.

  16. Identical particle model on biophoton emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. C.; Liu, Songhao; Popp, Fritz A.; Tang, Ao-Qing

    1996-09-01

    Biophoton emission (PE) method is a non-invasive way revealing biophysical interactions in living tissues. Since its mechanism is not very clear, its acceptance is limited. Gu has presented the quantum theory on biophoton emission according to the Dicke model. However, the Dicke model does not apply to biological system. In this paper, we studied PE by using the identical particle model, the interaction of identical particles by quantum chemistry, as well as the transition of the system interacting with radiation by the time quantum theory on radiation-matter interaction put forward by the first author and his cooperators. It was shown that the identical particles form coherent states, the photon emission probability of the superradiant state is a liner function of N and N2, and the one of the subradiant state is zero. In other words, the photon emission intensity represents the coherent states of the identical particle system. The linear relationship of N and N2 agrees with the PE experiment results on early drosophila embryos. The research on the cell division cycle showed that the superradiant states correspond to the late S phase. This is why PE can be used to differentiate human tumor tissues from normal ones. We also studied induced PE.

  17. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  18. A 1-D model of sinking particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokulsdottir, T.; Archer, D.

    2006-12-01

    Acidification of the surface ocean due to increased atmospheric CO2 levels is altering its saturation state with respect to calcium carbonate (Orr et al., 2005) and the ability of calcifying phytoplankton to calcify (Riebesell et al., 2000). Sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide into the deep ocean is affected by this, because calcite is the key component in ballasting sinking particles (Klaas and Archer, 2001). The settling velocity of particles is not explicitly modeled but often represented as a constant in climate models. That is clearly inaccurate as the composition of particles changes with depth as bacteria and dissolution processes act on its different components, changing their ratio with depth. An idealized, mechanistic model of particles has been developed where settling velocity is calculated from first principles. The model is forced 100m below the surface with export ratios (organic carbon/calcium carbonate) corresponding to different CO2 levels according to Riebesell et al. The resulting flux is compared to the flux generated by the same model where the settling velocity is held constant. The model produces a relatively constant rain ratio regardless of the amount of calcite available to ballast the particle, which is what data suggests (Conte et al., 2001), whereas a constant velocity model does not. Comparing the flux of particulate organic carbon to the seafloor with increasing CO2 levels, the outcome of the constant velocity model is an increase whereas when the velocity is calculated a decrease results. If so, the change in export ratio with an increase in CO2 concentrations acts as a positive feedback: as increased atmospheric CO2 levels lead to the ocean pH being lowered, reduced calcification of marine organisms results and a decrease in particulate organic carbon flux to the deep ocean, which again raises CO2 concentrations. Conte, M.,, N. Ralph, E. Ross, Seasonal and interannual variability in deep ocean particle fluxes at the Oceanic

  19. Beyond the standard model of particle physics.

    PubMed

    Virdee, T S

    2016-08-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its experiments were conceived to tackle open questions in particle physics. The mechanism of the generation of mass of fundamental particles has been elucidated with the discovery of the Higgs boson. It is clear that the standard model is not the final theory. The open questions still awaiting clues or answers, from the LHC and other experiments, include: What is the composition of dark matter and of dark energy? Why is there more matter than anti-matter? Are there more space dimensions than the familiar three? What is the path to the unification of all the fundamental forces? This talk will discuss the status of, and prospects for, the search for new particles, symmetries and forces in order to address the open questions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'.

  20. CFD modeling of particle dispersion and deposition coupled with particle dynamical models in a ventilated room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangping; Wang, Jiasong

    2017-10-01

    Two dynamical models, the traditional method of moments coupled model (MCM) and Taylor-series expansion method of moments coupled model (TECM) for particle dispersion distribution and gravitation deposition are developed in three-dimensional ventilated environments. The turbulent airflow field is modeled with the renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence model. The particle number concentration distribution in a ventilated room is obtained by solving the population balance equation coupled with the airflow field. The coupled dynamical models are validated using experimental data. A good agreement between the numerical and experimental results can be achieved. Both models have a similar characteristic for the spatial distribution of particle concentration. Relative to the MCM model, the TECM model presents a more close result to the experimental data. The vortex structure existed in the air flow makes a relative large concentration difference at the center region and results in a spatial non-uniformity of concentration field. With larger inlet velocity, the mixing level of particles in the room is more uniform. In general, the new dynamical models coupled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the current study provide a reasonable and accurate method for the temporal and spatial evolution of particles effected by the deposition and dispersion behaviors. In addition, two ventilation modes with different inlet velocities are proceeded to study the effect on the particle evolution. The results show that with the ceiling ventilation mode (CVM), the particles can be better mixed and the concentration level is also higher. On the contrast, with the side ceiling ventilation mode (SVM), the particle concentration has an obvious stratified distribution with a relative lower level and it makes a much better environment condition to the human exposure.

  1. A unified kinetic model for particle aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, K.H.; Theis, T.L.

    1996-06-01

    Aggregation of submicrometer particles is a process with significant implications for the fate and transport of contaminants and major nutrients in many coastal, estuarine, and freshwater bodies as well as groundwater systems. A unified model has been developed that describes the kinetics of particle aggregation. The model is unique in the incorporation of surface chemical phenomena along with solution chemistry in the determination of the stability of a colloidal dispersion. The aggregation process is treated in a truly kinetic fashion, the main output from the model being the evolution of complete particle size distributions over time. The model was developed to interpret laboratory data and, as such, has the capacity to estimate a (variable) set of system parameters by fitting the size distribution over time data to that measured. It was found that the attachment distance, a parameter frequently approximated in practice, has a profound influence on the predicted aggregation kinetics as does the choice of a solid/solution interfacial model. Furthermore, simulation of relatively long-term aggregation, which was the principal focus of this work, indicates that values of the collision efficiency factor should be much smaller than those reported elsewhere in the literature.

  2. Particle dynamics modeling methods for colloid suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Grest, Gary S.; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Pierce, Flint; Plimpton, Steven J.; Schunk, P. Randall

    2014-09-01

    We present a review and critique of several methods for the simulation of the dynamics of colloidal suspensions at the mesoscale. We focus particularly on simulation techniques for hydrodynamic interactions, including implicit solvents (Fast Lubrication Dynamics, an approximation to Stokesian Dynamics) and explicit/particle-based solvents (Multi-Particle Collision Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics). Several variants of each method are compared quantitatively for the canonical system of monodisperse hard spheres, with a particular focus on diffusion characteristics, as well as shear rheology and microstructure. In all cases, we attempt to match the relevant properties of a well-characterized solvent, which turns out to be challenging for the explicit solvent models. Reasonable quantitative agreement is observed among all methods, but overall the Fast Lubrication Dynamics technique shows the best accuracy and performance. We also devote significant discussion to the extension of these methods to more complex situations of interest in industrial applications, including models for non-Newtonian solvent rheology, non-spherical particles, drying and curing of solvent and flows in complex geometries. This work identifies research challenges and motivates future efforts to develop techniques for quantitative, predictive simulations of industrially relevant colloidal suspension processes.

  3. Modelling thrombosis using dissipative particle dynamics method

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, N; Kojic, M; Tsuda, A

    2008-01-01

    Aim. Arterial occlusion is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. The main mechanism causing vessel occlusion is thrombus formation, which may be initiated by the activation of platelets. The focus of this study is on the mechanical aspects of platelet-mediated thrombosis which includes the motion, collision, adhesion and aggregation of activated platelets in the blood. A review of the existing continuum-based models is given. A mechanical model of platelet accumulation onto the vessel wall is developed using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method in which the blood (i.e. colloidal-composed medium) is treated as a group of mesoscale particles interacting through conservative, dissipative, attractive and random forces. Methods. Colloidal fluid components (plasma and platelets) are discretized by mesoscopic (micrometre-size) particles that move according to Newton's law. The size of each mesoscopic particle is small enough to allow tracking of each constituent of the colloidal fluid, but significantly larger than the size of atoms such that, in contrast to the molecular dynamics approach, detailed atomic level analysis is not required. Results. To test this model, we simulated the deposition of platelets onto the wall of an expanded tube and compared our computed results with the experimental data of Karino et al. (Miscrovasc. Res. 17, 238–269, 1977). By matching our simulations to the experimental results, the platelet aggregation/adhesion binding force (characterized by an effective spring constant) was determined and found to be within a physiologically reasonable range. Conclusion. Our results suggest that the DPD method offers a promising new approach to the modelling of platelet-mediated thrombosis. The DPD model includes interaction forces between platelets both when they are in the resting state (non-activated) and when they are activated, and therefore it can be extended to the analysis of kinetics of binding and other phenomena relevant to

  4. Modeling Deep Burn TRISO particle nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besmann, T. M.; Stoller, R. E.; Samolyuk, G.; Schuck, P. C.; Golubov, S. I.; Rudin, S. P.; Wills, J. M.; Coe, J. D.; Wirth, B. D.; Kim, S.; Morgan, D. D.; Szlufarska, I.

    2012-11-01

    Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel, the fission product's attack on the SiC coating layer, as well as fission product diffusion through an alternative coating layer, ZrC. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

  5. Particle physics and cosmology in supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, David Edgar

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics provides an excellent description of the elementary particle interactions observed in particle collider experiments, but the model does less well when it is applied to cosmology. Recent measurements of the Universe over very large distances indicate the existence of non-luminous dark matter and an excess of baryons over anti-baryons. The SM is unable to account for either of these results, implying that an extension of the SM description is needed. One such extension is supersymmetry. Within the minimal supersymmetric version of the SM, the MSSM, the lightest superpartner particle can make up the dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry can be generated by the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis (EWBG). In this work, we examine these issues together in order to find out whether the MSSM can account for both of them simultaneously. We find that the MSSM can explain both the baryon asymmetry and the dark matter, but only over a very constrained region of the model parameter space. The strongest constraints on this scenario come from the lower bound on the Higgs boson mass, and the upper bound on the electric dipole moment of the electron. Moreover, upcoming experiments will probe the remaining allowed parameter space in the near future. Some of these constraints may be relaxed by going beyond the MSSM. With this in mind, we also investigate the nMSSM, a minimal singlet extension of the MSSM. We find that this model can also explain both the dark matter and the baryon asymmetry.

  6. Particle-Surface Interaction Model and Method of Determining Particle-Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method and model of predicting particle-surface interactions with a surface, such as the surface of a spacecraft. The method includes the steps of: determining a trajectory path of a plurality of moving particles; predicting whether any of the moving particles will intersect a surface; predicting whether any of the particles will be captured by the surface and/or; predicting a reflected trajectory and velocity of particles reflected from the surface.

  7. Langangian Particle Model of Friction Stir Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2006-12-13

    Since its invention fifteen years ago, Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has found commercial application in the marine, aerospace, rail, and now automotive industries. Development of the FSW process for each new application, however, has remained largely empirical. Few detailed numerical modeling techniques have been developed that can explain and predict important features of the process physics. This is particularly true in the areas of material flow, mixing mechanisms, and void prediction. In this paper we present a novel modeling approach to simulate FSW processes that may have significant advantages over current traditional finite element or finite difference based methods. The proposed model is based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. Unlike traditional grid-based methods, Lagrangian particle methods such as SPH can simulate the dynamics of interfaces, large material deformations, void formations and the material's strain and temperature history without employing complex tracking schemes. Two- and three-dimensional FSW simulations for different tool designs are presented. Preliminary numerical results are in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Detailed comparisons between experimental measurements and larger scale FSW simulations are required to further validate and calibrate the SPH based FSW model.

  8. Particle-based model for skiing traffic.

    PubMed

    Holleczek, Thomas; Tröster, Gerhard

    2012-05-01

    We develop and investigate a particle-based model for ski slope traffic. Skiers are modeled as particles with a mass that are exposed to social and physical forces, which define the riding behavior of skiers during their descents on ski slopes. We also report position and speed data of 21 skiers recorded with GPS-equipped cell phones on two ski slopes. A comparison of these data with the trajectories resulting from computer simulations of our model shows a good correspondence. A study of the relationship among the density, speed, and flow of skiers reveals that congestion does not occur even with arrival rates of skiers exceeding the maximum ski lift capacity. In a sensitivity analysis, we identify the kinetic friction coefficient of skis on snow, the skier mass, the range of repelling social forces, and the arrival rate of skiers as the crucial parameters influencing the simulation results. Our model allows for the prediction of speed zones and skier densities on ski slopes, which is important in the prevention of skiing accidents.

  9. Discrete particle modelling of granular roll waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Jonathan; Dalziel, Stuart; Vriend, Nathalie

    2016-11-01

    A granular current flowing down an inclined chute or plane can undergo an instability that leads to the formation of surface waves, known as roll waves. Examples of roll waves are found in avalanches and debris flows in landslides, and in many industrial processes. Although related to the Kapitza instability of viscous fluid films, granular roll waves are not yet as well understood. Laboratory experiments typically measure the surface height and velocity of a current as functions of position and time, but they do not give insight into the processes below the surface: in particular, the possible formation of a boundary layer at the free surface as well as the base. To overcome this, we are running discrete particle model (DPM) simulations. Simulations are validated against our laboratory experiments, but they also allow us to examine a much larger range of parameters, such as material properties, chute geometry and particle size dispersity, than that which is possible in the lab. We shall present results from simulations in which we vary particle size and dispersity, and examine the implications on roll wave formation and propagation. Future work will include simulations in which the shape of the chute is varied, both cross-sectionally and in the downstream direction. EPSRC studentship (Tsang) and Royal Society Research Fellowship (Vriend).

  10. Microscale simulations of shock interaction with large assembly of particles for developing point-particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Siddharth; Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Sridharan, Prasanth; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Micrsoscale simulations are being conducted for developing point-particle and other related models that are needed for the mesoscale and macroscale simulations of explosive dispersal of particles. These particle models are required to compute (a) instantaneous aerodynamic force on the particle and (b) instantaneous net heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding. A strategy for a sequence of microscale simulations has been devised that allows systematic development of the hybrid surrogate models that are applicable at conditions representative of the explosive dispersal application. The ongoing microscale simulations seek to examine particle force dependence on: (a) Mach number, (b) Reynolds number, and (c) volume fraction (different particle arrangements such as cubic, face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC) and random). Future plans include investigation of sequences of fully-resolved microscale simulations consisting of an array of particles subjected to more realistic time-dependent flows that progressively better approximate the actual problem of explosive dispersal. Additionally, effects of particle shape, size, and number in simulation as well as the transient particle deformation dependence on various parameters including: (a) particle material, (b) medium material, (c) multiple particles, (d) incoming shock pressure and speed, (e) medium to particle impedance ratio, (f) particle shape and orientation to shock, etc. are being investigated.

  11. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  12. Toward a descriptive model of solar particles in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Chenette, D.; Feynman, Joan; Hamilton, Douglas C.; Heckman, G. R.; Konradi, A.; Lee, Martin A.; Nachtwey, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    During a workshop on the interplanetary charged particle environment held in 1987, a descriptive model of solar particles in the heliosphere was assembled. This model includes the fluence, composition, energy spectra, and spatial and temporal variations of solar particles both within and beyong 1 AU. The ability to predict solar particle fluences was also discussed. Suggestions for specific studies designed to improve the basic model were also made.

  13. SEM++: A particle model of cellular growth, signaling and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milde, Florian; Tauriello, Gerardo; Haberkern, Hannah; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-06-01

    We present a discrete particle method to model biological processes from the sub-cellular to the inter-cellular level. Particles interact through a parametrized force field to model cell mechanical properties, cytoskeleton remodeling, growth and proliferation as well as signaling between cells. We discuss the guiding design principles for the selection of the force field and the validation of the particle model using experimental data. The proposed method is integrated into a multiscale particle framework for the simulation of biological systems.

  14. Shock Particle Interaction - Fully Resolved Simulations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Yash; Neal, Chris; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of fully resolved data for shock interacting with multiple particles. In this talk we will fill this gap by presenting results of shock interaction with 1-D array and 3-D structured arrays of particles. Objectives of performing fully resolved simulations of shock propagation through packs of multiple particles are twofold, 1) To understand the complicated physical phenomena occurring during shock particle interaction, and 2) To translate the knowledge from microscale simulations in building next generation point-particle models for macroscale simulations that can better predict the motion (forces) and heat transfer for particles. We compare results from multiple particle simulations against the single particle simulations and make relevant observations. The drag history and flow field for multiple particle simulations are markedly different from those of single particle simluations, highlighting the effect of neighboring particles. We propose new models which capture this effect of neighboring particles. These models are called Pair-wise Interaction Extended Point Particle models (PIEP). Effect of multiple neighboring particles is broken down into pair-wise interactions, and these pair-wise interactions are superimposed to get the final model U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  15. Evaluation of Drying Rates of Lignite Particles in Superheated Steam Using Single-Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyama, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Hideaki; Hashimoto, Akira; Kaneko, Shozo; Maeda, Masafumi

    2016-12-01

    Drying rates of lignite particle groups in superheated steam are evaluated using a single-particle model developed for Australian lignite. Size distributions of the particles are assumed to obey the Rosin-Rammler equation with the maximum particle diameters defined as 100, 50, and 6 mm. The results show the drying rate of a lignite group depends strongly on the maximum particle size, and removal of large particles prior to drying is shown to be effective to reduce the drying time. The calculation model is available for simulations of drying behaviors of lignite in various dryers when an appropriate heat transfer coefficient is given. This study simulates the drying of particles smaller than 6 mm using a heat transfer coefficient in a fluidized bed dryer reported elsewhere. The required drying time estimated from the calculation is comparable to the processing time reported in an actual fluidized bed dryer, supporting the validity of the calculation model.

  16. Modeling of dielectrophoretic particle motion: Point particle versus finite-sized particle.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Barbaros; Öner, S Doğan; Baranoğlu, Besim

    2017-06-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a very popular technique for microfluidic bio-particle manipulation. For the design of a DEP-based microfluidic device, simulation of the particle trajectory within the microchannel network is crucial. There are basically two approaches: (i) point-particle approach and (ii) finite-sized particle approach. In this study, many aspects of both approaches are discussed for the simulation of direct current DEP, alternating current DEP, and traveling-wave DEP applications. Point-particle approach is implemented using Lagrangian tracking method, and finite-sized particle is implemented using boundary element method. The comparison of the point-particle approach and finite-sized particle approach is presented for different DEP applications. Moreover, the effect of particle-particle interaction is explored by simulating the motion of closely packed multiple particles for the same applications, and anomalous-DEP, which is a result of particle-wall interaction at the close vicinity of electrode surface, is illustrated. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore » uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  18. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  19. 3D Lagrangian Model of Particle Saltation in an Open Channel Flow with Emphasis on Particle-Particle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, P. A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2012-12-01

    Particles laying motionless at the bed of rivers, lakes and estuaries can be put into motion when the shear stress exerted by the flow on the particles exceeds the critical shear stress. When these particles start their motion they can either remain suspended by long periods of time (suspended load) or move close to the bed (bed load). Particles are transported as bed load in three different modes: Sliding, rolling and saltation. Saltation is usually described as the bouncing motion of sediment particles in a layer a few particle diameters thick. The amount of particles and the bed-load mode in which they move depend on the particle size and density, and the flow intensity, usually quantified by the shear velocity. The bottom shear stress in natural streams will most likely be large enough to set saltation as the most important bed-load transport mechanism among all three modes. Thus, studying the saltation process is crucial for the overall understanding of bed-load transport. Particularly, numerical simulations of this process have been providing important insight regarding the relative importance of the physical mechanisms involved in it. Several processes occur when particles are saltating near the bed: i) Particles collide with the bed, ii) they "fly" between collisions with the bed, as a result of their interaction with the fluid flow, iii) and they collide among themselves. These processes can be simulated using a three-dimensional Eulerian-Lagrangian model. In order to mimic these processes we have experimented with an averaged turbulent flow field represented by the logarithmic law of the wall, and with a more involved approach in which a computed turbulent velocity field for a flat plate was used as a surrogate of the three-dimensional turbulent conditions present close to stream beds. Since flat-plate and open-channel boundary layers are essentially different, a dynamic similarity analysis was performed showing that the highly-resolved three

  20. A phase-field point-particle model for particle-laden interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chuan; Botto, Lorenzo

    2014-11-01

    The irreversible attachment of solid particles to fluid interfaces is exploited in a variety of applications, such as froth flotation and Pickering emulsions. Critical in these applications is to predict particle transport in and near the interface, and the two-way coupling between the particles and the interface. While it is now possible to carry out particle-resolved simulations of these systems, simulating relatively large systems with many particles remains challenging. We present validation studies and preliminary results for a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation method, in which the dynamics of the interface is fully-resolved by a phase-field approach, while the particles are treated in the ``point-particle'' approximation. With this method, which represents a compromise between the competing needs of resolving particle and interface scale phenomena, we are able to simulate the adsorption of a large number of particles in the interface of drops, and particle-interface interactions during the spinodal coarsening of a multiphase system. While this method models the adsorption phenomenon efficiently and with reasonable accuracy, it still requires understanding subtle issues related to the modelling of hydrodynamic and capillary forces for particles in contact with interface.

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Metallic Materials Containing Embedded Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Iesulauro, Erin; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2004-01-01

    Multiscale modeling at small length scales (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -3) m) is discussed for aluminum matrices with embedded particles. A configuration containing one particle surrounded by about 50 grains and subjected to uniform tension and lateral constraint is considered. The analyses are performed to better understand the effects of material configuration on the initiation and progression of debonding of the particles from the surrounding aluminum matrix. Configurational parameters considered include particle aspect ratio and orientation within the surrounding matrix. Both configurational parameters are shown to have a significant effect on the behavior of the materials as a whole. For elliptical particles with the major axis perpendicular to the direction of loading, a particle with a 1:1 aspect ratio completely debonds from the surrounding matrix at higher loads than particles with higher aspect ratios. As the particle major axis is aligned with the direction of the applied load, increasing amounts of load are required to completely debond the particles.

  2. Modeling Particle Exposure in US Trucking Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Davis, ME; Smith, TJ; Laden, F; Hart, JE; Ryan, LM; Garshick, E

    2007-01-01

    Multi-tiered sampling approaches are common in environmental and occupational exposure assessment, where exposures for a given individual are often modeled based on simultaneous measurements taken at multiple indoor and outdoor sites. The monitoring data from such studies is hierarchical by design, imposing a complex covariance structure that must be accounted for in order to obtain unbiased estimates of exposure. Statistical methods such as structural equation modeling (SEM) represent a useful alternative to simple linear regression in these cases, providing simultaneous and unbiased predictions of each level of exposure based on a set of covariates specific to the exposure setting. We test the SEM approach using data from a large exposure assessment of diesel and combustion particles in the US trucking industry. The exposure assessment includes data from 36 different trucking terminals across the United States sampled between 2001 and 2005, measuring PM2.5 and its elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) components, by personal monitoring, and sampling at two indoor work locations and an outdoor “background” location. Using the SEM method, we predict: 1) personal exposures as a function of work related exposure and smoking status; 2) work related exposure as a function of terminal characteristics, indoor ventilation, job location, and background exposure conditions; and 3) background exposure conditions as a function of weather, nearby source pollution, and other regional differences across terminal sites. The primary advantage of SEMs in this setting is the ability to simultaneously predict exposures at each of the sampling locations, while accounting for the complex covariance structure among the measurements and descriptive variables. The statistically significant results and high R2 values observed from the trucking industry application supports the broader use of this approach in exposure assessment modeling. PMID:16856739

  3. Cluster kinetics model of particle separation in vibrated granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Benjamin J.; Madras, Giridhar

    2006-01-01

    We model the Brazil-nut effect (BNE) by hypothesizing that granules form clusters that fragment and aggregate. This provides a heterogeneous medium in which the immersed intruder particle rises (BNE) or sinks (reverse BNE) according to relative convection currents and buoyant and drag forces. A simple relationship proposed for viscous drag in terms of the vibrational intensity and the particle to grain density ratio allows simulation of published experimental data for rise and sink times as functions of particle radius, initial depth of the particle, and particle-grain density ratio. The proposed model correctly describes the experimentally observed maximum in risetime.

  4. A study on the validity of the point-particle model for particle-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhen; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2002-11-01

    The point-particle model, widely used in simulations of particle-turbulence interaction, is justified when the particle size is smaller than or comparable to the Kolmogorov scale. The precise limits of validity of the approximation and the manner in which errors accrue when the particle size increases are not well known. In the present work, direct simulations are conducted for a single finite-size particle suspended in a decaying homogeneous turbulent flow generated with a spectral code as an intial condition. The simulations are conducted by means of the PHYSALIS method. The trajectories of finite-size and point particles are compared as the particle radius is increased above the Kolmogorov scale for different Stokes numbers.

  5. Modeling the effects of particle deformation in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaochun; Zhao, Yongwu; Wang, Yongguang

    2012-09-01

    In a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, an active abrasive particle participating in the wear process will contact the pad and the wafer at the same time. The applied polishing load causes the deformation of the pad in the contact interface of the particle and the pad, and the deformation of the wafer in the contact interface of the particle and the wafer. Besides, this force causes the deformation of the abrasive particle. Based on the elastic-plastic micro-contact mechanics and abrasive wear theory, a novel model for material removal rate (MRR) with consideration of the abrasive particle deformation is presented in this paper. The deformation of the abrasive particle, affecting the indentation depth of the particle into the wafer, is quantitatively incorporated into the model. The results and analyses show that the present model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Modeling shear-induced particle ordering and deformation in a dense soft particle suspension.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chih-Tang; Wu, Yi-Fan; Chien, Wei; Huang, Jung-Ren; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2017-08-08

    We apply the lattice Boltzmann method and the bead-spring network model of deformable particles (DPs) to study shear-induced particle ordering and deformation and the corresponding rheological behavior for dense DP suspensions confined in a narrow gap under steady external shear. The particle configuration is characterized with small-angle scattering intensity, the real-space 2D local order parameter, and the particle shape factors including deformation, stretching and tilt angles. We investigate how particle ordering and deformation vary with the particle volume fraction  (=0.45-0.65) and the external shear rate characterized with the capillary number Ca (=0.003-0.191). The degree of particle deformation increases mildly with  but significantly with Ca. Under moderate shear rate (Ca=0.105), the inter-particle structure evolves from string-like ordering to layered hexagonal close packing (HCP) as  increases. A long wavelength particle slithering motion emerges for sufficiently large ϕ. For  =0.61, the structure maintains layered HCP for Ca=0.031-0.143 but gradually becomes disordered for larger and smaller Ca. The correlation in particle zigzag movements depends sensitively on  and particle ordering. Layer-by-layer analysis reveals how the non-slippery hard walls affect particle ordering and deformation. The shear-induced reconfiguration of DPs observed in the simulation agrees qualitatively with experimental results of sheared uniform emulsions. The apparent suspension viscosity increases with  but exhibits much weaker dependence compared to hard-sphere suspensions, indicating that particle deformation and unjamming under shear can significantly reduce the viscous stress. Furthermore, the suspension shear-thins, corresponding to increased inter-DP ordering and particle deformation with Ca. This work provides useful insights into the microstructure-rheology relationship of concentrated deformable particle suspensions. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. A model of particle nucleation in premixed ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    D'Anna, Andrea; Sirignano, Mariano; Kent, John

    2010-11-15

    A detailed model of particle inception is proposed to delve into the physical structure and chemistry of combustion-formed particles. A sectional method is used, from a previously developed kinetic mechanism of particle formation with a double discretization of the particle phase in terms of C and H atom number. The present model also distinguishes between different particle structures based on their state of aggregation; single high molecular mass molecules, cluster of molecules and aggregates of clusters. The model predicts the mass of particles, hydrogen content and internal structure. It represents a first approach in following the chemical evolution and internal structure of the particles formed in flames, coupled with the main pyrolysis and oxidation of the fuel. The model is tested in atmospheric premixed flat flames of ethylene and the effect of fuel equivalence ratio on particle morphology is analyzed. Molecular weight growth of aromatic compounds and the inception of particles are predicted. The morphology of the particles and the number of molecules in the clusters at particle inception are also indicated. (author)

  8. Numerical investigation of compaction of deformable particles with bonded-particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosta, Maksym; Costa, Clara; Al-Qureshi, Hazim

    2017-06-01

    In this contribution, a novel approach developed for the microscale modelling of particles which undergo large deformations is presented. The proposed method is based on the bonded-particle model (BPM) and multi-stage strategy to adjust material and model parameters. By the BPM, modelled objects are represented as agglomerates which consist of smaller ideally spherical particles and are connected with cylindrical solid bonds. Each bond is considered as a separate object and in each time step the forces and moments acting in them are calculated. The developed approach has been applied to simulate the compaction of elastomeric rubber particles as single particles or in a random packing. To describe the complex mechanical behaviour of the particles, the solid bonds were modelled as ideally elastic beams. The functional parameters of solid bonds as well as material parameters of bonds and primary particles were estimated based on the experimental data for rubber spheres. Obtained results for acting force and for particle deformations during uniaxial compression are in good agreement with experimental data at higher strains.

  9. Modeling of particle interactions in magnetorheological elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Biller, A. M. Stolbov, O. V. Raikher, Yu. L.

    2014-09-21

    The interaction between two particles made of an isotropic linearly polarizable magnetic material and embedded in an elastomer matrix is studied. In this case, when an external field is imposed, the magnetic attraction of the particles, contrary to point dipoles, is almost wraparound. The exact solution of the magnetic problem in the linear polarization case, although existing, is not practical; to circumvent its use, an interpolation formula is proposed. One more interpolation expression is developed for the resistance of the elastic matrix to the field-induced particle displacements. Minimization of the total energy of the pair reveals its configurational bistability in a certain field range. One of the possible equilibrium states corresponds to the particles dwelling at a distance, the other—to their collapse in a tight dimer. This mesoscopic bistability causes magnetomechanical hysteresis which has important implications for the macroscopic behavior of magnetorheological elastomers.

  10. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  11. Modeling inertial particle acceleration statistics in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyalasomayajula, S.; Warhaft, Z.; Collins, L. R.

    2008-09-01

    Our objective is to explain recent Lagrangian acceleration measurements of inertial particles in decaying, nearly isotropic turbulence [Ayyalasomayajula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 144507 (2006)]. These experiments showed that as particle inertial effects increased, the variance in the particle acceleration fluctuations was reduced, and the tails of the normalized particle acceleration probability density function (PDF) became systematically attenuated. We model this phenomenon using a base flow that consists of a two-dimensional array of evenly spaced vortices with signs and intensities that vary randomly in time. We simulate a large sample of inertial particles moving through the fluid without disturbing the flow (one-way coupling). Consistent with Bec et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 550, 349 (2006)], we find that our model exhibits preferential concentration or clustering of particles in regions located away from the vortex centers. That is, inertial particles selectively sample the flow field, oversampling regions with high strains and undersampling regions with high vorticities. At low Stokes numbers, this biased "sampling" of the flow is responsible for the reduction in the acceleration variance and partially explains the attenuation of the tails of the acceleration PDF. However, contrary to previous findings, we show that the tails of the PDF are also diminished by "filtering" induced by the attenuated response of the inertial particles to temporal variations in the fluid acceleration: Inertial particles do not respond to fluctuations with frequencies much higher than the inverse of the particle stopping time. We show that larger fluid acceleration events have higher frequencies and hence experience greater filtering by particle inertia. We contrast the vortex model with previous Lagrangian acceleration models by Sawford [Phys. Fluids A 3, 1577 (1991)] and Reynolds [Phys. Fluids 15, L1 (2003)] and show that although these models capture some aspects of the inertial

  12. An incompressible two-dimensional multiphase particle-in-cell model for dense particle flows

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, D.M.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Andrews, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    A two-dimensional, incompressible, multiphase particle-in-cell (MP-PIC) method is presented for dense particle flows. The numerical technique solves the governing equations of the fluid phase using a continuum model and those of the particle phase using a Lagrangian model. Difficulties associated with calculating interparticle interactions for dense particle flows with volume fractions above 5% have been eliminated by mapping particle properties to a Eulerian grid and then mapping back computed stress tensors to particle positions. This approach utilizes the best of Eulerian/Eulerian continuum models and Eulerian/Lagrangian discrete models. The solution scheme allows for distributions of types, sizes, and density of particles, with no numerical diffusion from the Lagrangian particle calculations. The computational method is implicit with respect to pressure, velocity, and volume fraction in the continuum solution thus avoiding courant limits on computational time advancement. MP-PIC simulations are compared with one-dimensional problems that have analytical solutions and with two-dimensional problems for which there are experimental data.

  13. Investigation of particles size effects in Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) modelling of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai-Duy, N.; Phan-Thien, N.; Khoo, B. C.

    2015-04-01

    In the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation of suspension, the fluid (solvent) and colloidal particles are replaced by a set of DPD particles and therefore their relative sizes (as measured by their exclusion zones) can affect the maximal packing fraction of the colloidal particles. In this study, we investigate roles of the conservative, dissipative and random forces in this relative size ratio (colloidal/solvent). We propose a mechanism of adjusting the DPD parameters to properly model the solvent phase (the solvent here is supposed to have the same isothermal compressibility to that of water).

  14. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C

    2014-10-07

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  15. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-10-01

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  16. Experimental validation of different modeling approaches for solid particle receivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib S.; Amsbeck, Lars , Spain and Stuttgart, Germany); Roger, Marc , Spain and Stuttgart, Germany); Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Buck, Reiner , Spain and Stuttgart, Germany); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2009-07-01

    Solid particle receivers have the potential to provide high-temperature heat for advanced power cycles, thermochemical processes, and thermal storage via direct particle absorption of concentrated solar energy. This paper presents two different models to evaluate the performance of these systems. One model is a detailed computational fluid dynamics model using FLUENT that includes irradiation from the concentrated solar flux, two-band re-radiation and emission within the cavity, discrete-phase particle transport and heat transfer, gas-phase convection, wall conduction, and radiative and convective heat losses. The second model is an easy-to-use and fast simulation code using Matlab that includes solar and thermal radiation exchange between the particle curtain, cavity walls, and aperture, but neglects convection. Both models were compared to unheated particle flow tests and to on-sun heating tests. Comparisons between measured and simulated particle velocities, opacity, particle volume fractions, particle temperatures, and thermal efficiencies were found to be in good agreement. Sensitivity studies were also performed with the models to identify parameters and modifications to improve the performance of the solid particle receiver.

  17. Computer modeling of test particle acceleration at oblique shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of the basic techniques and illustrative results of charged particle-modeling numerical codes suitable for particle acceleration at oblique, fast-mode collisionless shocks emphasizes the treatment of ions as test particles, calculating particle dynamics through numerical integration along exact phase-space orbits. Attention is given to the acceleration of particles at planar, infinitessimally thin shocks, as well as to plasma simulations in which low-energy ions are injected and accelerated at quasi-perpendicular shocks with internal structure.

  18. TSI Model 3936 Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Model 3936 Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) measures the size distribution of aerosols ranging from 10 nm up to 1000 nm. The SMPS uses a bipolar aerosol charger to keep particles within a known charge distribution. Charged particles are classified according to their electrical mobility, using a long-column differential mobility analyzer (DMA). Particle concentration is measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC). The SMPS is well-suited for applications including: nanoparticle research, atmospheric aerosol studies, pollution studies, smog chamber evaluations, engine exhaust and combustion studies, materials synthesis, filter efficiency testing, nucleation/condensation studies, and rapidly changing aerosol systems.

  19. White dwarfs constraints on dark sector models with light particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ubaldi, Lorenzo

    2014-06-24

    The white dwarf luminosity function is well understood in terms of standard model physics and leaves little room for exotic cooling mechanisms related to the possible existence of new weakly interacting light particles. This puts significant constraints on the parameter space of models that contain a massive dark photon and light dark sector particles.

  20. Modelling complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of particle-size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, Sam; Weltje, Gert Jan

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of particle-size made by operators in the field and laboratory represent a vast and relatively untapped data archive. The wide spatial distribution of particle-size estimates makes them ideal for constructing geological models and soil maps. This study uses a large data set from the Netherlands (n = 4837) containing both operator estimates of particle size and complete particle-size distributions measured by laser granulometry. This study introduces a logit-based constrained-cubic-spline (CCS) algorithm to interpolate complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates. The CCS model is compared to four other models: (i) a linear interpolation; (ii) a log-hyperbolic interpolation; (iii) an empirical logistic function; and (iv) an empirical arctan function. Operator estimates were found to be both inaccurate and imprecise; only 14% of samples were successfully classified using the Dutch classification scheme for fine sediment. Operator estimates of sediment particle-size encompass the same range of values as particle-size distributions measured by laser analysis. However, the distributions measured by laser analysis show that most of the sand percentage values lie between zero and one, so the majority of the variability in the data is lost because operator estimates are made to the nearest 1% at best, and more frequently to the nearest 5%. A method for constructing complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of sediment texture using a logit constrained cubit spline (CCS) interpolation algorithm is presented. This model and four other previously published methods are compared to establish the best approach to modelling particle-size distributions. The logit-CCS model is the most accurate method, although both logit-linear and log-linear interpolation models provide reasonable alternatives. Models based on empirical distribution functions are less accurate than interpolation algorithms for modelling particle-size distributions in

  1. Merging for Particle-Mesh Complex Particle Kinetic Modeling of the Multiple Plasma Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a merging procedure for the Particle-Mesh Complex Particle Kinetic (PMCPK) method in case of inter-penetrating flow (multiple plasma beams). We examine the standard particle-in-cell (PIC) and the PMCPK methods in the case of particle acceleration by shock surfing for a wide range of the control numerical parameters. The plasma dynamics is described by a hybrid (particle-ion-fluid-electron) model. Note that one may need a mesh if modeling with the computation of an electromagnetic field. Our calculations use specified, time-independent electromagnetic fields for the shock, rather than self-consistently generated fields. While a particle-mesh method is a well-verified approach, the CPK method seems to be a good approach for multiscale modeling that includes multiple regions with various particle/fluid plasma behavior. However, the CPK method is still in need of a verification for studying the basic plasma phenomena: particle heating and acceleration by collisionless shocks, magnetic field reconnection, beam dynamics, etc.

  2. Merging for Particle-Mesh Complex Particle Kinetic Modeling of the Multiple Plasma Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a merging procedure for the Particle-Mesh Complex Particle Kinetic (PMCPK) method in case of inter-penetrating flow (multiple plasma beams). We examine the standard particle-in-cell (PIC) and the PMCPK methods in the case of particle acceleration by shock surfing for a wide range of the control numerical parameters. The plasma dynamics is described by a hybrid (particle-ion-fluid-electron) model. Note that one may need a mesh if modeling with the computation of an electromagnetic field. Our calculations use specified, time-independent electromagnetic fields for the shock, rather than self-consistently generated fields. While a particle-mesh method is a well-verified approach, the CPK method seems to be a good approach for multiscale modeling that includes multiple regions with various particle/fluid plasma behavior. However, the CPK method is still in need of a verification for studying the basic plasma phenomena: particle heating and acceleration by collisionless shocks, magnetic field reconnection, beam dynamics, etc.

  3. Predictive modeling of particle-laden turbulent flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Bolio, E.J.; Hrenya, C.M.

    1993-12-31

    Earlier work of Sinclair and Jackson which treats the laminar flow of gas-solid suspensions is extended to model dilute turbulent flow. The random particle motion, often exceeding the turbulent fluctuations in the gas, is obtained using a model based on kinetic theory of granular materials. A two-equation low Reynolds number turbulence model is, modified to account for the presence of the dilute particle phase. Comparisons of the model predictions with available experimental data for the mean and fluctuating velocity profiles for both phases indicate that the resulting theory captures many of the flow features observed in the pneumatic transport of large particles. The model predictions did not manifest an extreme sensitivity to the degree of inelasticity in the particle-particle collisions for the range of solid loading ratios investigated.

  4. Particle Physics Primer: Explaining the Standard Model of Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vondracek, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Standard Model, a basic model of the universe that describes electromagnetic force, weak nuclear force radioactivity, and the strong nuclear force responsible for holding particles within the nucleus together. (YDS)

  5. Particle Physics Primer: Explaining the Standard Model of Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vondracek, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Standard Model, a basic model of the universe that describes electromagnetic force, weak nuclear force radioactivity, and the strong nuclear force responsible for holding particles within the nucleus together. (YDS)

  6. Evaluation of stochastic particle dispersion modeling in turbulent round jets

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Guangyuan; Hewson, John C.; Lignell, David O.

    2016-11-02

    ODT (one-dimensional turbulence) simulations of particle-carrier gas interactions are performed in the jet flow configuration. Particles with different diameters are injected onto the centerline of a turbulent air jet. The particles are passive and do not impact the fluid phase. Their radial dispersion and axial velocities are obtained as functions of axial position. The time and length scales of the jet are varied through control of the jet exit velocity and nozzle diameter. Dispersion data at long times of flight for the nozzle diameter (7 mm), particle diameters (60 and 90 µm), and Reynolds numbers (10, 000–30, 000) are analyzedmore » to obtain the Lagrangian particle dispersivity. Flow statistics of the ODT particle model are compared to experimental measurements. It is shown that the particle tracking method is capable of yielding Lagrangian prediction of the dispersive transport of particles in a round jet. In this study, three particle-eddy interaction models (Type-I, -C, and -IC) are presented to examine the details of particle dispersion and particle-eddy interaction in jet flow.« less

  7. Evaluation of stochastic particle dispersion modeling in turbulent round jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan; Hewson, John C.; Lignell, David O.

    2016-11-02

    ODT (one-dimensional turbulence) simulations of particle-carrier gas interactions are performed in the jet flow configuration. Particles with different diameters are injected onto the centerline of a turbulent air jet. The particles are passive and do not impact the fluid phase. Their radial dispersion and axial velocities are obtained as functions of axial position. The time and length scales of the jet are varied through control of the jet exit velocity and nozzle diameter. Dispersion data at long times of flight for the nozzle diameter (7 mm), particle diameters (60 and 90 µm), and Reynolds numbers (10, 000–30, 000) are analyzed to obtain the Lagrangian particle dispersivity. Flow statistics of the ODT particle model are compared to experimental measurements. It is shown that the particle tracking method is capable of yielding Lagrangian prediction of the dispersive transport of particles in a round jet. In this study, three particle-eddy interaction models (Type-I, -C, and -IC) are presented to examine the details of particle dispersion and particle-eddy interaction in jet flow.

  8. Applying Particle Tracking Model In The Coastal Modeling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-78 January 2011 2 Figure 1. CMS domain, grid, and bathymetry . CMS-Flow is driven by...through the simulation. At the end of the simulation, about 65 percent of the released clay particles are considered “ dead ,” ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-78 January...2011 11 which means that they are either permanently buried at the sea bed or have moved out of the model domain. Figure 11. Specifications of

  9. Application of The Stochastic Particle Tracking Model To Evaluate Particle Movement Uncertainty in Extreme Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Lin, E.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, modeling of suspended sediment particle movement in extreme flows is proposed by stochastic particle tracking modeling approaches. The proposed stochastic model is governed by a stochastic differential equation (SDE) composed of two random processes (a Wiener process and a Poisson process), and a random variable (i.e., flow magnitude) simulated by the extreme value Type I distribution. An extreme flow is defined as a hydrologic flow event (such as a flash flood) or a large flow perturbation with a low probability of occurrence and a high impact on its ambient flow environment. In the proposed particle tracking model, a random term mainly caused by fluid eddy motions is modeled as a Wiener process, while the random occurrences of a sequence of extreme flows can be modeled as a Poisson process. Following previous work by Oh and Tsai (2010)[1] and Tsai et al. (2014)[2], this study is intended to modify the jump term, which models the abrupt changes of particle position in the extreme flow environments. It is proposed that the probabilistic magnitude of extreme events can be simulated by the extreme value type I (EV I) distribution. The ensemble mean and variance of particle trajectory can be obtained from the proposed stochastic models via simulations. Our findings suggest that the ability to consider the probabilistic magnitude of extreme events can provide a more comprehensive and realistic estimate of the uncertainty of particle movement when extreme flow events occur. It is also found that the variance of particle position may be attributed to both the random magnitudes and occurrences of particle jumps in the presence of extreme flow events. It is demonstrated from this study that the proposed model can more explicitly quantify the uncertainty of particle movement by taking into considerations both the random arrival process of extreme flows and the variability of the extreme flow magnitude. [1] Oh, J. S., and Tsai, C.W.(2010). "A stochastic jump

  10. Dynamic single-domain particle model for magnetite particles with combined crystalline and shape anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeser, M.; Bente, K.; Buzug, T. M.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamical behaviour of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) is not yet fully understood. In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) SPIONs are used to determine quantitative real-time medical images of a tracer material distribution. For reaching spatial resolution in the sub-millimetre range, MPI requires a well engineered instrumentation providing a magnetic field gradient exceeding 2 T m{}-{1} . However, as the particle performance strongly affects the sensitivity of the imaging process, optimization of the particle parameters is a crucial factor, which is not easy to address. Today most simulations of MPI use the Langevin model to describe the particle behaviour. In equilibrium, the model matches the measured data. If alternating fields in the mid kHz frequency range are applied, the dynamic behaviour of the particles differs from the Langevin theory due to anisotropy effects, particle-particle-interactions and/or exchange interaction in case of multi-core particles. In this paper a model based on previous work is introduced, which was adopted to include crystal and shape anisotropy of immobilised mono-domain single-core particles. The model is applied to typical MPI frequencies and field strengths with different possible superposition of the anisotropy effects, leading to differences in the particle response. It is shown that, despite comparatively high anisotropy constants, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy does not quench the signal response for MPI. The constructive superposition of shape and crystal anisotropy leads to the best performance in terms of sensitivity and resolution of the associated imaging modality and slightly reduces the energy barriers compared to a sole-shape anisotropy.

  11. Hydrodynamic model for particle size segregation in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Leonardo; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2003-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theoretical model for “Brazil nut” size segregation in granular materials. We give analytical solutions for the rise velocity of a large intruder particle immersed in a medium of monodisperse fluidized small particles. We propose a new mechanism for this particle size-segregation due to buoyant forces caused by density variations which come from differences in the local “granular temperature”. The mobility of the particles is modified by the energy dissipation due to inelastic collisions and this leads to a different behavior from what one would expect for an elastic system. Using our model we can explain the size ratio dependence of the upward velocity.

  12. Modeling of the signals of an optical particle counter for real nonspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Heintzenberg, Jost; Okada, Kikuo; Trautmann, Thomas; Hoffmann, Peter

    2004-11-01

    An optical particle counter (OPC) was exposed to atmospheric particles of diameters of 200, 300, and 400 nm. The OPC data were combined with the results of single-particle analysis with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) on samples taken in parallel with the OPC measurements. With a T-matrix-based optical model the measured OPC spectra of scattered light pulses could be approximated with good precision. With an algorithm that simulated the response of the OPC to a given population of model particles derived from the TEM results, average absorption properties of different particle types were retrieved. For mobility sizes of 400 nm, higher light absorption was retrieved with the optical model for soot aggregates than for the rest of the morphological particle types. At smaller mobility sizes no compositional information could be derived from the model particles derived from the TEM data. Despite the limited success of the new methodology applied to the present experiment the results encourage the use of OPCs in combination with electrical mobility analyzers to derive more than aerosol-size distributions. With state-of-the-art pulse-height analysis the light-scattering pulses could be resolved with much finer resolution than in the instrument used.

  13. Modeling of the Signals of an Optical Particle Counter for Real Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintzenberg, Jost; Okada, Kikuo; Trautmann, Thomas; Hoffmann, Peter

    2004-11-01

    An optical particle counter (OPC) was exposed to atmospheric particles of diameters of 200, 300, and 400 nm. The OPC data were combined with the results of single-particle analysis with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) on samples taken in parallel with the OPC measurements. With a T-matrix-based optical model the measured OPC spectra of scattered light pulses could be approximated with good precision. With an algorithm that simulated the response of the OPC to a given population of model particles derived from the TEM results, average absorption properties of different particle types were retrieved. For mobility sizes of 400 nm, higher light absorption was retrieved with the optical model for soot aggregates than for the rest of the morphological particle types. At smaller mobility sizes no compositional information could be derived from the model particles derived from the TEM data. Despite the limited success of the new methodology applied to the present experiment the results encourage the use of OPCs in combination with electrical mobility analyzers to derive more than aerosol-size distributions. With state-of-the-art pulse-height analysis the light-scattering pulses could be resolved with much finer resolution than in the instrument used.

  14. Confidence in climate models including those with suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reck, Ruth A.

    1982-05-01

    Confidence in the predictions of atmospheric models is limited, (1) by the uncertainty in our knowledge of the existing atmospheric system as it is defined by input data, and (2) by the ability of the model to describe all pertinent atmospheric processes. This paper describes a thermal sensitivity study of the global parameters in one version of the Manabe-Wetherald radiative-convective model which inclkudes Mie scattering particles. The relative importance of the usual global model parameters is identified in addition to other atmospheric constituents not commonly included in climate models. In particular this work emphasizes the role of Mie scattering suspended aerosol particles, a component which is seldom included in climate models. Here we discuss the major sources of particles, how the optical properties of individual particles determine the radiative effects of a particle layer, and also illustrate the separate role of absorption and backscatter in determining the sign of the surface temperature change. In addition, the coupling of the particle effects to surface albedo is indicated. Finally, the sign of the surface temperature change from anthropogenic particles is estimated using (1) global maps of particle abundance developed by Kellogg, (2) previous calculations for the Northern Hemisphere published by the author and (3) the surface albedo maps of Hummel and Reck.

  15. Modeling particle transport in downward and upward flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basha, H. A.; Culligan, P. J.

    2010-07-01

    Experimental data obtained for particle transport in downward and upward flows in smooth and rough porous media are analyzed at various flow rates. The data analysis and interpretation are aided through an analytical model with linear kinetics that assumes two sites for particle deposition within a medium, namely, reversible and irreversible, together with a dual mode of irreversible deposition. The bimodal particle transport model is obtained using the Green's function method and is capable of fitting, with reasonable accuracy, the observed transport and deposition behavior of particles. Approximations for advection-dominated flows are also obtained that could represent a simplified modeling tool. Expressions of the temporal moments are developed and algebraic equations are derived that express the model parameters in terms of the moments of the measured particle concentration distributions. The transport models helped define the relationship of the modeled parameters to flow velocity and media roughness. The fitting results show that the parameters for rough and smooth media vary in a systematic way with the pore fluid velocity. The results also reveal that flow direction has a significant influence on the mode and magnitude of irreversible particle deposition for the conditions investigated. For the same seepage velocity, the rate of particle deposition is greater for upward flows than for downward flows. Moreover, roughness effects increase the irreversible particle deposition in downward flows but have little effect in upward flows.

  16. Nucleation of Mesospheric Cloud Particles: Model and Laboratory Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, H.; Kirsch, A.; Rapp, M.; Duft, D.; Nachbar, M.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    Nucleation of mesospheric ice is assumed to occur on meteor smoke particles (MSP). Classical nucleation theory however includes several insufficiently known parameters when applied to the conditions at the mesopause for heterogeneous nucleation on MSP. This leads to a great uncertainty in the nucleation rate for mesospheric ice particles. By determining the parameters with the largest impact and comparing different theories we identified a possible range of nucleation rates. These nucleation rates were implemented in the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). To study the principal effects, CARMA was run in a one-dimensional setup with static background fields and also with dynamically driven fields from the Kühlungsborn Mechanistic Circulation Model (KMCM) for 69°N. The ice particle properties from both runs are compared with observational data from ALOMAR (69°N). We find that while the static background conditions lead to ice particles comparable to those measured by lidar above ALOMAR, the ice particles in the dynamically driven fields do not evolve to detectable populations. To account for the horizontal transport of ice particles, we extended the model to three dimensions and added a tracer algorithm, which enables us to follow the ice particles from their genesis to final evaporation and to analyse the whole life cycle of the ice particles.The modelling studies are completed by a comparison to initial laboratory results for ice nucleation rates on nanometer sized particles under realistic mesopause conditions.

  17. Discrete Modelling of Compaction of Non-spherical Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Evans, Tim J.; Yu, Aibing; Yang, Runyu

    2017-06-01

    Compaction behaviour and mechanical response of a compact show strong dependence on particle shape. In this study, a numerical model based on the discrete element method (DEM) was developed to study the compaction behaviour of spheroidal particles. In the model, particle shape was approximated by gluing multiple spheres together. A bonded particle model was adopted to describe interparticle bonding force. The DEM model was first validated by comparing the properties of packing of spheroids (packing density, coordination number) with literature data and then applied to both die compaction and unconfined compression. In die compaction, the effect of aspect ratio on the densification was mainly due to the difference in the initial packing. In unconfined compression, the increase in compressive strength with increasing aspect ratio was attributed to the increase in the number of interparticle bonding. The findings facilitate a better understanding of the relation of particle shape to the compaction behaviour and compact strength.

  18. Particle tracking modeling of sediment-laden jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S. N.; Lee, J. H. W.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a general model to predict the particulate transport and deposition from a sediment-laden horizontal momentum jet. A three-dimensional (3-D) stochastic particle tracking model is developed based on the governing equation of particle motion. The turbulent velocity fluctuations are modelled by a Lagrangian velocity autocorrelation function that captures the trapping of sediment particles in turbulent eddies, which result in the reduction of settling velocity. Using classical solutions of mean jet velocity, and turbulent fluctuation and dissipation rate profiles derived from computational fluid dynamics calculations of a pure jet, the equation of motion is solved numerically to track the particle movement in the jet flow field. The 3-D particle tracking model predictions of sediment deposition and concentration profiles are in excellent agreement with measured data. The computationally demanding Basset history force is shown to be negligible in the prediction of bottom deposition profiles.

  19. A Particle-based model for water simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N., LLNL

    1998-01-01

    The Smooth-Particle Applied Mechanics (SPAM) model is a relatively recent physical modeling technique It can model both fluids and solids using free-moving particles An implemented SPAM model is described that solved the compressible Navier-Stokes equations to produce animations of splashing and pooling water Because the particle positions are known explicitly each timestep, the SPAM technique produces data amenable to visualization A ray-tracing renderer is also described It samples the underwater light-field distribution and stores tbe information into a Light Accumulation Lattice which is used for scattered light calculations and caustics.

  20. Application of a Semiclassical Model for Particle Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffin, Eugene

    2005-11-01

    We apply a tunneling model of particle decay via the intermediate vector boson. Past workers have applied the tunneling model to pair production [Schwinger, 1951; Brezin and Itzykson, 1970; Casher, Neuberger, and Nussinov, 1979]. In our model we apply a potential barrier of 80 GeV, the mass-energy of the W particle, to inhibit beta-decay. A factor similar to the Bethe preformation factor is then evaluated for various weak interaction particle decays to examine whether we get quantitative agreement with experiment. The model is successful in explaining why certain decays proceed by the strong interaction, and seems to simulate certain weak-decay ratios.

  1. The charged particle accelerators subsystems modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Presented web-based resource for information support the engineering, science and education in Electrophysics, containing web-based tools for simulation subsystems charged particle accelerators. Formulated the development motivation of Web-Environment for Virtual Electrophysical Laboratories. Analyzes the trends of designs the dynamic web-environments for supporting of scientific research and E-learning, within the framework of Open Education concept.

  2. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-09-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  3. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  4. Modelling Liquid Particle Composition In Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, D.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) are thought to be composed of solid ni- tric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles, water ice particles, or supercooled liquid HNO3/H2SO4/H2O particles under different conditions and depending on the ther- mal history of the air mass. The solid particles are believed to form by the freezing of the liquid particles, the rate of which depends on the composition and size of the liquid particles. Lagrangian-in-radius-space numerical schemes have been used be- fore to study particle composition across the PSC size spectrum, in simple box model runs and in domain-filling Lagrangian studies. However these models were not de- signed to be compatible with global chemistry and transport models (CTMs), which currently model PSCs by assuming equilibrium with the atmosphere.We report here on an adaptation of a continuous (Eulerian-in-radius) distribution scheme, modelling the evolution of liquid PSC particles in non-equilibrium conditions. It uses an effi- cient numerical scheme, designed to be compatible with CTMs. Results from the new scheme have been validated against analytical solutions, and corroborate the compo- sition gradients across the size distribution under rapid cooling conditions that were reported in earlier studies.

  5. Modelling aggregate formation and sedimentation of organic and mineral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkmann, Wolfgang; Schäfer-Neth, Christian; Balzer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    A one-dimensional model "ADAM" is presented that allows the prognostic computation of the interactions between mineral particles (dust) and biologically formed aggregates. The model couples a 7-compartment biogeochemical component (NO 3, NH 4, phytoplankton aggregates, zooplankton, detritus, carbon, and chlorophyll) and a 4-compartment component for the tracing of mineral particles: single free particles in the water, particles aggregated with phytoplankton, incorporated in zooplankton, and attached to detritus. It resolves both annual and daily cycles of plankton and the fate of dust from eolian import into the ocean via biological activity, aggregation and disaggregation to sedimentation at the sea floor. The model results suggest that particle scavenging is essentially occurring in the mixed layer, where biological activity and shear aggregation regulate the formation of the aggregates. The aggregates interact intensively with the suspended pool of dust particles, and sink through the upper main thermocline with increasing speed. Particle break up and organic matter degradation are important mechanisms for particle cycling in the intermediate and deeper layers. The model predicts an 80% decrease of the annual carbon flux between 100 m and 3000 m depth. The vertical profile of Al-contents in suspended particulates and the annual average vertical flux of particulate organic matter are fairly well reproduced by the model, as well as the seasonal cycles of carbon and dust fluxes in the ocean interior.

  6. An aggregation model for ash particles in volcanic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A.; Folch, A.; Macedonio, G.; Durant, A.

    2009-12-01

    A large fraction of fine ash particles injected into the atmosphere during explosive eruptions aggregate through complex interactions of surface liquid layers, electrostatic forces, and differences in particle settling velocities. The aggregates formed have a different size and density compared to primary particles formed during eruption which dramatically changes the dynamics of sedimentation from the volcanic cloud. Consequently, the lifetime of ash particles in the atmosphere is reduced and a distal mass deposition maximum is often generated in resulting tephra deposits. A complete and rigorous description of volcanic ash fallout requires the full coupling of models of volcanic cloud dynamics and dispersion, and ash particle transport, aggregation and sedimentation. Furthermore, volcanic ash transport models should include an aggregation model that accounts for the interaction of all particle size classes. The problem with this approach is that simulations would require excessively long computational times thereby prohibiting its application in an operational setting during an explosive volcanic eruption. Here we present a simplified model for ash particle transport and aggregation that includes the effects of water in the volcanic cloud and surrounding atmosphere. The aggregation model assumes a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in aggregates, average sticking efficiency factors, and collision frequency functions that account for Brownian motion, laminar and turbulent fluid shear, and differential settling velocity. A parametric study on the key parameters of the model was performed. We implemented the aggregation model in the WRF+FALL3D coupled modelling system and applied it to different eruptions where aggregation has been recognized to play an important role, including the August and September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions and the 1980 Mt St Helens eruption. In these cases, mass deposited as a function of deposit area and the particle

  7. Particle Models with Self Sustained Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, M.; De Masi, A.; Presutti, E.

    2017-06-01

    We present some computer simulations run on a stochastic cellular automaton (CA). The CA simulates a gas of particles which are in a channel,the interval [1, L] in Z, but also in "reservoirs" R_1 and R_2. The evolution in the channel simulates a lattice gas with Kawasaki dynamics with attractive Kac interactions; the temperature is chosen smaller than the mean field critical one. There are also exchanges of particles between the channel and the reservoirs and among reservoirs. When the rate of exchanges among reservoirs is in a suitable interval the CA reaches an apparently stationary state with a non zero current; for different choices of the initial condition the current changes sign. We have a quite satisfactory theory of the phenomenon but we miss a full mathematical proof.

  8. An extended dissipative particle dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, C. J.; Reich, S.

    2003-12-01

    The method of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) was introduced by Hoogerbrugge and Koelman (Europhys. Lett., 19 (1992) 155) to study meso-scale material processes. The theoretical investigation of the DPD method was initiated by Espanol (Phys. Rev. E, 52 (1995) 1734) who used a Fokker-Planck formulation of the DPD method and applied the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator calculus to obtain the equations of hydrodynamics for DPD. A current limitation of DPD is that it requires a clear separation of scales between the resolved and unresolved processes. In this letter, we suggest a simple extension of DPD that allows for inclusion of unresolved stochastic processes with exponentially decaying variance for any value of the decay rate, and give an application of this algorithm to the simulation of the shallow-water equations using the Hamiltonian particle-mesh method. The proposed extension is as easy to implement as the standard DPD methods.

  9. Modeling Water Waves with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Robert A. Dalrymple Dept of Civil Engineering The Johns Hopkins University 3400 North Charles Street Baltimore, MD 21218 hone: (410) 516...TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) The Johns Hopkins University,Dept of Civil Engineering,3400 North...Computational Physics, 229, 3652-3663. Monaghan , J.J. and Kajtar, J.B., 2009, SPH Particle Boundary Forces for Arbitrary Boundaries, Computer Physics

  10. Particle Methods for Atmosphere and Ocean Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-26

    due to distortion in the particle distribution. The results were disseminated through published articles and presentations at conferences and...errors commonly seen with mesh-based schemes and this is demonstrated in the articles cited below. We apphed LPM to solve the barotropic vorticity...other methods in terms of tracer error and preservation of nonlinear tracer correlations [4]. A longer article on this topic is in preparation in which

  11. Models of motor-assisted transport of intracellular particles.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A; Simmons, R M

    2001-01-01

    One-dimensional models are presented for the macroscopic intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles by molecular motors on a network of aligned intracellular filaments. A motor-coated vesicle or organelle is described as a diffusing particle binding intermittently to filaments, when it is transported at the motor velocity. Two models are treated in detail: 1) a unidirectional model, where only one kind of motor is operative and all filaments have the same polarity; and 2) a bidirectional model, in which filaments of both polarities exist (for example, a randomly polarized actin network for myosin motors) and/or particles have plus-end and minus-end motors operating on unipolar filaments (kinesin and dynein on microtubules). The unidirectional model provides net particle transport in the absence of a concentration gradient. A symmetric bidirectional model, with equal mixtures of filament polarities or plus-end and minus-end motors of the same characteristics, provides rapid transport down a concentration gradient and enhanced dispersion of particles from a point source by motor-assisted diffusion. Both models are studied in detail as a function of the diffusion constant and motor velocity of bound particles, and their rates of binding to and detachment from filaments. These models can form the basis of more realistic models for particle transport in axons, melanophores, and the dendritic arms of melanocytes, in which networks of actin filaments and microtubules coexist and motors for both types of filament are implicated. PMID:11159382

  12. Particle-scale modelling of financial price dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, David

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a particle-based computational framework for modeling of financial price dynamics, which is an extension of the recent empirical work of Financial Brownian Particle (FBP), and discretizes and solves the Langevin equation that is the continuum representation of a financial market. The framework enables us to simulate the limit order book of the USD/JPY exchange rates. The research yields results that are in good agreement with the published empirical results. Our framework of modelling financial prices is of multidisciplinary nature, and can bridge the fields of empirical studies of financial order books, particle dynamics simulation, and modelling of financial market.

  13. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  14. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  15. Multiscale modeling of particle in suspension with smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin; Litvinov, Sergey; Qian, Rui; Ellero, Marco; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2012-01-01

    We apply smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [Español and Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] to model solid particles in suspension. SDPD is a thermodynamically consistent version of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and can be interpreted as a multiscale particle framework linking the macroscopic SPH to the mesoscopic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. Rigid structures of arbitrary shape embedded in the fluid are modeled by frozen particles on which artificial velocities are assigned in order to satisfy exactly the no-slip boundary condition on the solid-liquid interface. The dynamics of the rigid structures is decoupled from the solvent by solving extra equations for the rigid body translational/angular velocities derived from the total drag/torque exerted by the surrounding liquid. The correct scaling of the SDPD thermal fluctuations with the fluid-particle size allows us to describe the behavior of the particle suspension on spatial scales ranging continuously from the diffusion-dominated regime typical of sub-micron-sized objects towards the non-Brownian regime characterizing macro-continuum flow conditions. Extensive tests of the method are performed for the case of two/three dimensional bulk particle-system both in Brownian/ non-Brownian environment showing numerical convergence and excellent agreement with analytical theories. Finally, to illustrate the ability of the model to couple with external boundary geometries, the effect of confinement on the diffusional properties of a single sphere within a micro-channel is considered, and the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the wall-separation distance is evaluated and compared with available analytical results.

  16. Calibration of TSI model 3025 ultrafine condensation particle counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kesten, J.; Reineking, A.; Porstendoerfer, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The registration efficiency of the TSI model 3025 ultrafine condensation particle counter for Ag and NaCl particles of between 2 and 20 nm in diameter was determined. Taking into account the different shapes of the input aerosol size distributions entering the differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and the transfer function of the DMA, the counting efficiencies of condensation nucleus counters (CNC) for monodisperse Ag and NaCl particles were estimated. In addition, the dependence of the CNC registration efficiency on the particle concentration was investigated.

  17. The effects of particle loading on turbulence structure and modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Kyle D.; Eaton, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the present research was to extend the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach to particle-laden turbulent flows using a simple model of particle/flow interaction. The program addressed the simplest type of flow, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence, and examined interactions between the particles and gas phase turbulence. The specific range of problems examined include those in which the particle is much smaller than the smallest length scales of the turbulence yet heavy enough to slip relative to the flow. The particle mass loading is large enough to have a significant impact on the turbulence, while the volume loading was small enough such that particle-particle interactions could be neglected. Therefore, these simulations are relevant to practical problems involving small, dense particles conveyed by turbulent gas flows at moderate loadings. A sample of the results illustrating modifications of the particle concentration field caused by the turbulence structure is presented and attenuation of turbulence by the particle cloud is also illustrated.

  18. Optical modeling of volcanic ash particles using ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikallio, Sini; Muñoz, Olga; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Virtanen, Timo H.; Horttanainen, Matti; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Nousiainen, Timo

    2015-05-01

    The single-scattering properties of volcanic ash particles are modeled here by using ellipsoidal shapes. Ellipsoids are expected to improve the accuracy of the retrieval of aerosol properties using remote sensing techniques, which are currently often based on oversimplified assumptions of spherical ash particles. Measurements of the single-scattering optical properties of ash particles from several volcanoes across the globe, including previously unpublished measurements from the Eyjafjallajökull and Puyehue volcanoes, are used to assess the performance of the ellipsoidal particle models. These comparisons between the measurements and the ellipsoidal particle model include consideration of the whole scattering matrix, as well as sensitivity studies on the point of view of the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) instrument. AATSR, which flew on the ENVISAT satellite, offers two viewing directions but no information on polarization, so usually only the phase function is relevant for interpreting its measurements. As expected, ensembles of ellipsoids are able to reproduce the observed scattering matrix more faithfully than spheres. Performance of ellipsoid ensembles depends on the distribution of particle shapes, which we tried to optimize. No single specific shape distribution could be found that would perform superiorly in all situations, but all of the best-fit ellipsoidal distributions, as well as the additionally tested equiprobable distribution, improved greatly over the performance of spheres. We conclude that an equiprobable shape distribution of ellipsoidal model particles is a relatively good, yet enticingly simple, approach for modeling volcanic ash single-scattering optical properties.

  19. Modeling rainfall-runoff processes using smoothed particle hydrodynamics with mass-varied particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsang-Jung; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Kao-Hua

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a novel treatment of adopting mass-varied particles in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is proposed to solve the shallow water equations (SWEs) and model the rainfall-runoff process. Since SWEs have depth-averaged or cross-section-averaged features, there is no sufficient dimension to add rainfall particles. Thus, SPH-SWE methods have focused on modeling discharge flows in open channels or floodplains without rainfall. With the proposed treatment, the application of SPH-SWEs can be extended to rainfall-runoff processes in watersheds. First, the numerical procedures associated with using mass-varied particles in SPH-SWEs are introduced and derived. Then, numerical validations are conducted for three benchmark problems, including uniform rainfall over a 1D flat sloping channel, nonuniform rain falling over a 1D three-slope channel with different rainfall durations, and uniform rainfall over a 2D plot with complex topography. The simulated results indicate that the proposed treatment can avoid the necessity of a source term function of mass variation, and no additional particles are needed for the increase of mass. Rainfall-runoff processes can be well captured in the presence of hydraulic jumps, dry/wet bed flows, and supercritical/subcritical/transcritical flows. The proposed treatment using mass-varied particles was proven robust and reliable for modeling rainfall-runoff processes. It can provide a new alternative for investigating practical hydrological problems.

  20. A hybrid mathematical model for controlling particle size, particle size distribution, and color properties of toner particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataeefard, Maryam; Shadman, Alireza; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadi, Yousef

    2016-08-01

    A mathematical modeling approach was proposed combining the capabilities of response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF) and implemented successfully in production of printing toner particles. Toner powders were systematically synthesized through suspension copolymerization process. Applying RSM, a series of experiments were designed and toner particles were prepared and the effects of monomer ratio, colorant and surfactant content on the particle size (PS), particle size distribution (PSD), thermal and colorimetric properties (∆ E) of the resulting toner were monitored and discussed. The second-order models corresponding to each target characteristic, i.e., PS, PSD, and ∆ E of different types of toner powders, were obtained by individual optimization to express variation of each property in terms of polymerization parameters. Applying statistical calculations, the best reduced models were identified to be fed in the second step of optimization. Since toners with appropriate PS, PSD, and CP were needed, we applied multi-objective optimization based on DF approach. The results show that exact tuning of toner properties is closely possible with the aid of hybrid mathematical model developed in this work. Noticeably, desirabilities are very close to 100 %.

  1. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic model for viscoelastic fluids with thermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Ellero, Marco; Español, Pep

    2009-05-01

    We present a fluid-particle model for a polymer solution in nonisothermal situations. The state of the fluid particles is characterized by the thermodynamic variables and a configuration tensor that describes the underlying molecular orientation of the polymer molecules. The specification of very simple physical mechanisms inspired by the dynamics of single polymer molecules allows one, with the help of the general equation for nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) formalism, to derive the equations of motion for a set of fluid particles carrying polymer molecules in suspension. In the simplest case of Hookean dumbbells we recover a fluid-particle version of the Oldroyd-B model in which thermal fluctuations are included consistently. Generalization to more complex viscoelastic models, such as finitely extensible nonlinear elastic Peterlin (FENE-P) model, with the proper introduction of thermal fluctuations is straightforward.

  2. Particle model with generalized Poincaré symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A.

    2017-08-01

    Using the techniques of nonlinear coset realization with a generalized Poincaré group, we construct a relativistic particle model, invariant under the generalized symmetries, providing a dynamical realization of the B5 algebra.

  3. Model independence of constraints on particle dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.; Sadoulet, B.

    1989-03-01

    The connection between the annihilation, elastic, and production cross sections is reviewed, showing how a general lower limit on the interaction rate in a detector is obtained from the requirement that a particle be the dark matter. High energy production experiments further constrain models, making very light dark matter particles unlikely. Special attention is paid to the uncertainties, loopholes and model dependencies that go into the arguments and several examples are given. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Elementary particles, dark matter candidate and new extended standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jaekwang

    2017-01-01

    Elementary particle decays and reactions are discussed in terms of the three-dimensional quantized space model beyond the standard model. Three generations of the leptons and quarks correspond to the lepton charges. Three heavy leptons and three heavy quarks are introduced. And the bastons (new particles) are proposed as the possible candidate of the dark matters. Dark matter force, weak force and strong force are explained consistently. Possible rest masses of the new particles are, tentatively, proposed for the experimental searches. For more details, see the conference paper at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/308723916.

  5. A model for sound absorption by spheroidal particles.

    PubMed

    Hipp, Alexander K

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model for the scattering of acoustic waves in dispersions of prolate or oblate non-spherical particles. Based on fundamental equations of change for mass, momentum, and energy, wave equations are derived and solved in spheroidal coordinates. The examination of the boundary-value problem of an aligned spheroidal particle in a continuous medium, excited by a plane wave, leads to a description of the viscoinertial, thermal, and diffractive phenomena. The model is analogous to the Epstein-Carhart-Allegra-Hawley theory for spherical particles, and suggests itself for studying non-sphericity in the acoustic analysis of industrial dispersions.

  6. Solar energetic particle events: Statistical modelling and prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, S. B.; Feynman, J.; Spitale, G.

    1996-01-01

    Solar energetic particle events (SEPEs) can have a significant effect on the design and operation of earth orbiting and interplanetary spacecraft. In relation to this, the calculation of proton fluences and fluxes are considered, describing the current state of the art in statistical modeling. A statistical model that can be used for the estimation of integrated proton fluences for different mission durations of greater than one year is reviewed. The gaps in the modeling capabilities of the SEPE environment, such as a proton flux model, alpha particle and heavy ion models and solar cycle variations are described together with the prospects for the prediction of events using neural networks.

  7. Emergent Dynamics of a Thermodynamically Consistent Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Yeal; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2017-03-01

    We present a thermodynamically consistent particle (TCP) model motivated by the theory of multi-temperature mixture of fluids in the case of spatially homogeneous processes. The proposed model incorporates the Cucker-Smale (C-S) type flocking model as its isothermal approximation. However, it is more complex than the C-S model, because the mutual interactions are not only " mechanical" but are also affected by the "temperature effect" as individual particles may exhibit distinct internal energies. We develop a framework for asymptotic weak and strong flocking in the context of the proposed model.

  8. DSD - A Particle Simulation Code for Modeling Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Glenn; Lampe, Martin; Ganguli, Gurudas

    1999-11-01

    The NRL Dynamically Shielded Dust code (DSD) is a particle simulation code developed to study the behavior of strongly coupled, dusty plasmas. The model includes the electrostatic wake effects of plasma ions flowing through plasma electrons, collisions of dust and plasma particles with each other and with neutrals. The simulation model contains the short-range strong forces of a shielded Coulomb system, and the long-range forces that are caused by the wake. It also includes other effects of a flowing plasma such as drag forces. In order to model strongly coupled dust in plasmas, we make use of the techniques of molecular dynamics simulation, PIC simulation, and the "particle-particle/particle-mesh" (P3M) technique of Hockney and Eastwood. We also make use of the dressed test particle representation of Rostoker and Rosenbluth. Many of the techniques we use in the model are common to all PIC plasma simulation codes. The unique properties of the code follow from the accurate representation of both the short-range aspects of the interaction between dust grains, and long-range forces mediated by the complete plasma dielectric response. If the streaming velocity is zero, the potential used in the model reduces to the Debye-Huckel potential, and the simulation is identical to molecular dynamics models of the Yukawa potential. The plasma appears only implicitly through the plasma dispersion function, so it is not necessary in the code to resolve the fast plasma time scales.

  9. Mathematical modeling of HIV-like particle assembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuewu; Zou, Xiufen

    2017-02-22

    In vitro, the recombinant HIV-1 Gag protein can generate spherical particles with a diameter of 25-30 nm in a fully defined system. It has approximately 80 building blocks, and its intermediates for assembly are abundant in geometry. Accordingly, there are a large number of nonlinear equations in the classical model. Therefore, it is difficult to compute values of geometry parameters for intermediates and make the mathematical analysis using the model. In this work, we develop a new model of HIV-like particle assembly in vitro by using six-fold symmetry of HIV-like particle assembly to decrease the number of geometry parameters. This method will greatly reduce computational costs and facilitate the application of the model. Then, we prove the existence and uniqueness of the positive equilibrium solution for this model with 79 nonlinear equations. Based on this model, we derive the interesting result that concentrations of all intermediates at equilibrium are independent of three important parameters, including two microscopic on-rate constants and the size of nucleating structure. Before equilibrium, these three parameters influence the concentration variation rates of all intermediates. We also analyze the relationship between the initial concentration of building blocks and concentrations of all intermediates. Furthermore, the bounds of concentrations of free building blocks and HIV-like particles are estimated. These results will be helpful to guide HIV-like particle assembly experiments and improve our understanding of the assembly dynamics of HIV-like particles in vitro.

  10. Microscopic positive-energy potential based on the Gogny interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M.; Arellano, H. F.; Vinh Mau, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a nucleon elastic scattering calculation based on Green's function formalism in the random-phase approximation. For the first time, the finite-range Gogny effective interaction is used consistently throughout the whole calculation to account for the complex, nonlocal, and energy-dependent optical potential. Effects of intermediate single-particle resonances are included and found to play a crucial role in the account for measured reaction cross sections. Double counting of the particle-hole second-order contribution is carefully addressed. The resulting integro-differential Schrödinger equation for the scattering process is solved without localization procedures. The method is applied to neutron and proton elastic scattering from 40Ca. A successful account for differential and integral cross sections, including analyzing powers, is obtained for incident energies up to 30 MeV. Discrepancies at higher energies are related to a much-too-high volume integral of the real potential for large partial waves. This work opens the way to simultaneously assess effective interactions suitable for both nuclear structure and reactions.

  11. A particle-grid air quality modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chock, D.P.; Winkler, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    A particle-grid air quality modeling approach that can incorporate chemistry is proposed as an alternative to the conventional PDF-grid air quality modeling. The particle trajectory model can accurately describe advection of air pollutants without introducing artificial diffusion, generating negative concentrations or distorting the concentration distributions. It also accurately describes the dispersion of emissions from point sources and is capable of retaining subgrid-scale information. Inhomogeneous turbulence necessitates use of a small timestep, say, 10 s to describe vertical dispersion of particles in convective conditions. A timestep as large as 200 s can be used to simulate horizontal dispersion. A time-splitting scheme can be used to couple the horizontal and vertical dispersion in a 3D simulation, and about 2000-3000 particles per cell of size 5 km x 5 km X 50 m is sufficient to yield a highly accurate simulation of 3D dispersion. Use of an hourly-averaged concentration further reduces the demand of particle per cell to 500. The particle-grid method is applied to a system of ten reacting chemical species in a two-dimensional rotating flow field with and without diffusion. A chemistry grid within which reactions are assumed to take place can be decoupled from the grid describing the flow field. Two types of chemistry grids are used to describe the chemical reactions: a fixed coarse grid and a moving (the advection case) or stationary (the advection plus diffusion case) fine grid. Two particle-number densities are also used: 256 and 576 particles per fixed coarse grid cell. The species mass redistributed back to the particle after each reaction step is assumed to be proportional to the species mass in the particle before the reaction. The simulation results are very accurate, especially in the advection-chemistry case. Accuracy improves with the use of a fine grid.

  12. Electromagnetic sunscreen model: design of experiments on particle specifications.

    PubMed

    Lécureux, Marie; Deumié, Carole; Enoch, Stefan; Sergent, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    We report a numerical study on sunscreen design and optimization. Thanks to the combined use of electromagnetic modeling and design of experiments, we are able to screen the most relevant parameters of mineral filters and to optimize sunscreens. Several electromagnetic modeling methods are used depending on the type of particles, density of particles, etc. Both the sun protection factor (SPF) and the UVB/UVA ratio are considered. We show that the design of experiments' model should include interactions between materials and other parameters. We conclude that the material of the particles is a key parameter for the SPF and the UVB/UVA ratio. Among the materials considered, none is optimal for both. The SPF is also highly dependent on the size of the particles.

  13. Observational constraints on particle acidity using measurements and modelling of particles and gases.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J G; Gregoire, P K; Tevlin, A G; Wentworth, G R; Ellis, R A; Markovic, M Z; VandenBoer, T C

    2017-08-24

    In many parts of the world, the implementation of air quality regulations has led to significant decreases in SO2 emissions with minimal impact on NH3 emissions. In Canada and the United States, the molar ratio of NH3 : SO2 emissions has increased dramatically between 1990 and 2014. In many regions of North America, this will lead the molar ratio of NHx : SO4, where NHx is the sum of particle phase NH4(+) and gas phase NH3, and SO4 is the sum of particle phase HSO4(-) and SO4(2-), to exceed 2. A thermodynamic model (E-AIM model II) is used to investigate the sensitivity of particle pH, and the gas-particle partitioning of NHx and inorganic nitrate, to the atmospheric NHx : SO4 ratio. Steep increases in pH and the gas fraction of NHx are found as NHx : SO4 varies from below 1 to above 2. The sensitivity of the gas fraction of nitrate also depends strongly on temperature. The results show that if NHx : SO4 exceeds 2, and the gas and particle phase NHx are in equilibrium, the particle pH will be above 2. Observations of the composition of particulate matter and gas phase NH3 from two field campaigns in southern Canada in 2007 and 2012 have median NHx : SO4 ratios of 3.8 and 25, respectively. These campaigns exhibited similar amounts of NH3, but very different particle phase loadings. Under these conditions, the pH values calculated using the observations as input to the E-AIM model were in the range of 1-4. The pH values were typically higher at night because the higher relative humidity increased the particle water content, diluting the acidity. The assumption of equilibration between the gas and particle phase NHx was evaluated by comparing the observed and modelled gas fraction of NHx. In general, E-AIM was able to reproduce the partitioning well, suggesting that the dominant constituents contributing to particle acidity were measured, and that the estimated pH values were realistic. These results suggest that regions of the world where the

  14. Relativistic models in nuclear and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative overview is presented of different approaches to the construction of phenomenological dynamical models that respect basic principles of quantum theory and relativity. Wave functions defined as matrix elements of products of field operators on one hand and wave functions that are defined as representatives of state vectors in model Hilbert spaces are related differently to observables and dynamical models for these wave functions have each distinct advantages and disadvantages 34 refs.

  15. Retention modeling of diesel exhaust particles in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Yu, C P; Yoon, K J

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study was to predict the lung burden in rats and humans of diesel exhaust particles from automobile emissions by means of a mathematical model. We previously developed a model to predict the deposition of diesel exhaust particles in the lungs of these species. In this study, the clearance and retention of diesel exhaust particles deposited in the lung are examined. A diesel particle is composed of a carbonaceous core (soot) and adsorbed organics. These materials can be removed from the lung after deposition by two mechanisms: (1) mechanical clearance, provided by mucociliary transport in the ciliated airways as well as macrophage phagocytosis and migration in the nonciliated airways, and (2) clearance by dissolution. To study the clearance of diesel exhaust particles from the lung, we used a compartmental model consisting of four anatomical compartments: nasopharyngeal, tracheobronchial, alveolar, and the lung-associated lymph node compartments. We also assumed a particle model made up of material components according to the characteristics of clearance: (1) a carbonaceous core of about 80 percent of particle mass, (2) slowly cleared organics of about 10 percent of particle mass, and (3) fast-cleared organics accounting for the remaining 10 percent of particle mass. The kinetic equations of the retention model were first developed for Fischer-344 rats. The transport rates of each material component of diesel exhaust particles (soot, slowly cleared organics, and fast-cleared organics) were derived using available experimental data and several mathematical approximations. The lung burden results calculated from the model showed that although the organics were cleared at nearly constant rates, the alveolar clearance rate of diesel soot decreased with increasing lung burden. This is consistent with existing experimental observations. At low lung burdens, the alveolar clearance rate of diesel soot was a constant, equal to the normal clearance rate

  16. Modeling fibrin aggregation in blood flow with discrete-particles.

    PubMed

    Boryczko, Krzysztof; Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A

    2004-09-01

    Excessive clotting can cause bleeding over a vast capillary area. We study the mesoscopic dynamics of clotting by using the fluid particle model. We assume that the plasma consists of fluid particles containing fibrin monomers, while the red blood cells and capillary walls are modeled with elastic mesh of "solid" particles. The fluid particles interact with each other with a short-ranged, repulsive dissipative force. The particles containing fibrin monomers have a dual character. The polymerization of fibrin monomers into hydrated fibrins is modeled by the change of the interactions between fluid particles from repulsive to attractive forces. This process occurs with a probability being an increasing function of the local density. We study the blood flow in microscopic capillary vessels about 100 microm long and with diameters in order of 10 microm. We show that the model of polymerization reflects clearly the role played by fibrins in clotting. Due to the density fluctuations caused the by the high acceleration, the fibrin chains are produced within a very short time (0.5 ms). Fibrin aggregation modifies the rheological properties of blood, slows down the incipient flow, and entraps the red blood cells, thus forming dangerous clots.

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Particles Embedded in High Speed Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sean; Sen, Oishik; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    Problems involving propagation of shock waves through a cloud of particles are inherently multiscale. The system scale is governed by macro-scale conservation equations, which average over solid and fluid phases. The averaging process results in source terms that represent the unresolved momentum exchange between the solid phase and the fluid phase. Typically, such source terms are modeled using empirical correlations derived from physical experiments conducted in a limited parameter space. The focus of the current research is to advance the multiscale modeling of shocked particle-laden gas flows; particle- (i.e. meso-)scale computations are performed to resolve the dynamics of ensembles of particles and closure laws are obtained from the meso-scale for use in the macro-scale equations. Closure models are constructed from meso-scale simulations using the Dynamic Kriging method. The presentation will demonstrate the multiscale approach by connecting meso-scale simulations to an Eulerian-Lagrangian macro-scale model of particle laden flows. The technique is applied to study shock interactions with particle curtains in shock tubes and the results are compared with experimental data in such systems. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant Number FA9550-12-1-0115 and the National Science Foundation under grant number DMS-115631.

  18. Utilitarian supersymmetric gauge model of particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest

    2010-05-01

    A remarkabale U(1) gauge extension of the supersymmetric standard model was proposed 8 years ago. It is anomaly free, has no μ term, and conserves baryon and lepton numbers automatically. The phenomenology of a specific version of this model is discussed. In particular, leptoquarks are predicted, with couplings to the heavy singlet neutrinos, the scalar partners of which may be components of dark matter. The Majorana neutrino mass matrix itself may have two zero subdeterminants.

  19. The Modeling of Pickup Ion or Energetic Particle Mediated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Mostafavi, P.; Hunana, P.

    2016-05-01

    Suprathermal energetic particles, such as solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere and pickup ions (PUIs) in the outer heliosphere and the very local interstellar medium, often form a thermodynamically dominant component in their various environments. In the supersonic solar wind beyond > 10 AU, in the inner heliosheath (IHS), and in the very local interstellar medium (VLISM), PUIs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background plasma. Similarly, SEPs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background solar wind in the inner heliosphere. In the absence of equilibration between plasma components, a separate coupled plasma description for the energetic particles is necessary. Using a collisionless Chapman-Enskog expansion, we derive a closed system of multi-component equations for a plasma comprised of thermal protons and electrons, and suprathermal particles (SEPs, PUIs). The energetic particles contribute an isotropic scalar pressure to leading order, a collisionless heat flux at the next order, and a collisionless stress tensor at the second-order. The collisionless heat conduction and viscosity in the multi-fluid description results from a nonisotropic energetic particle distribution. A simpler single-fluid MHD-like system of equations with distinct equations of state for both the background plasma and the suprathermal particles is derived. We note briefly potential pitfalls that can emerge in the numerical modeling of collisionless plasma flows that contain a dynamically important energetic particle component.

  20. Numerical modelling of electrochemical polarization around charged metallic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bücker, Matthias; Undorf, Sabine; Flores Orozco, Adrián; Kemna, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We extend an existing analytical model and carry out numerical simulations to study the polarization process around charged metallic particles immersed in an electrolyte solution. Electro-migration and diffusion processes in the electrolyte are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck system of partial differential equations. To model the surface charge density, we consider a time- and frequency-invariant electric potential at the particle surface, which leads to the build-up of a static electrical double layer (EDL). Upon excitation by an external electric field at low frequencies, we observe the superposition of two polarization processes. On the one hand, the induced dipole moment on the metallic particle leads to the accumulation of opposite charges in the electrolyte. This charge polarization corresponds to the long-known response of uncharged metallic particles. On the other hand, the unequal cation and anion concentrations in the EDL give rise to a salinity gradient between the two opposite sides of the metallic particle. The resulting concentration polarization enhances the magnitude of the overall polarization response. Furthermore, we use our numerical model to study the effect of relevant model parameters such as surface charge density and ionic strength of the electrolyte on the resulting spectra of the effective conductivity of the composite model system. Our results do not only give interesting new insight into the time-harmonic variation of electric potential and ion concentrations around charged metallic particle. They are also able to reduce incongruities between earlier model predictions and geophysical field and laboratory measurements. Our model thereby improves the general understanding of IP signatures of metallic particles and represents the next step towards a quantitative interpretation of IP imaging results. Part of this research is funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy under the Raw Materials Initiative.

  1. Two component mie scattering models of sargasso sea particles.

    PubMed

    Brown, O B; Gordon, H R

    1973-10-01

    The volume scattering function is calculated for particle suspensions consisting of two components systematically distributed in a manner consistent with Coulter Counter observations in the Sargasso Sea. The components are assigned refractive indices 1.01-0.01i and 1.15 to represent organic and inorganic particles, respectively. The only models found that reproduce observed scattering functions require a considerable fraction of the suspended particle volume to be organic in nature. This fraction, however, contributes less than 10% to the total scattering function. The model finally chosen indicates that the inorganic particles smaller than 2.5 micro do not occur in large enough concentrations to have a significant effect on the volume scattering function.

  2. Dissipative particle dynamics model for colloid transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present that the transport of colloidal particles in porous media can be effectively modeled with a new formulation of dissipative particle dynamics, which augments standard DPD with non-central dissipative shear forces between particles while preserving angular momentum. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the new formulation is able to capture accurately the drag forces as well as the drag torques on colloidal particles that result from the hydrodynamic retardation effect. In the present work, we use the new formulation to study the contact efficiency in colloid filtration in saturated porous media. Note that the present model include all transport mechanisms simultaneously, including gravitational sedimentation, interception and Brownian diffusion. Our results of contact efficiency show a good agreement with the predictions of the correlation equation proposed by Tufenkji and EliMelech, which also incorporate all transport mechanisms simultaneously without the additivity assumption.

  3. Rotation in turbulence of aquatic organisms modeled as particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, Evan; Byron, Margaret; Bellani, Gabriele

    2012-11-01

    We investigate which length and time scales are relevant for determining the rotation of aquatic organisms and their gametes. We are interested in parameter space beyond the Stokes regime, and also the effect of particle shape on rotation. We report experimental measurements that use custom-manufactured particles to model aquatic organisms, which are designed with the necessary optical properties so that we can measure their rotation, simultaneously with the vorticity statistics of the surrounding fluid. Lagrangian timeseries of particles' angular velocity allows investigation of rotational diffusion.

  4. Magnetic field models from energetic particle data at Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The locations of features in the Voyager 2 energetic particle data from Neptune are combined with uncertainties in the multipole expansion of the planetary magnetic field to derive new magnetic field models that are consistent both with various interpretations of the particle features and with the magnetic field data. While assumptions as to the origin of the features must be made, they do not provide sufficient constraints to obtain significant new information on any of the unknown multipole coefficients. However, the magnetic L shell positions of the particle features, which are interpreted primarily as absorption signatures of Neptune's satellites, can, in general, be brought into agreement with expected values.

  5. Space Charge Models for Particle Tracking on Long Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P; Potts III, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    In order to efficiently track charged particles over long times, most tracking codes use either analytic charge distributions or particle-in-cell (PIC) methods based on fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). While useful for theoretical studies, analytic distribution models do not allow accurate simulation of real machines. PIC calculations can utilize realistic space charge distributions, but these methods suffer from the presence of discretization errors. We examine the situation for particle tracking with space charge over long times, and consider possible ideas to improve the accuracy of such calculations.

  6. Effect of particle shape on mechanical behaviors of rocks: a numerical study using clumped particle model.

    PubMed

    Rong, Guan; Liu, Guang; Hou, Di; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Since rocks are aggregates of mineral particles, the effect of mineral microstructure on macroscopic mechanical behaviors of rocks is inneglectable. Rock samples of four different particle shapes are established in this study based on clumped particle model, and a sphericity index is used to quantify particle shape. Model parameters for simulation in PFC are obtained by triaxial compression test of quartz sandstone, and simulation of triaxial compression test is then conducted on four rock samples with different particle shapes. It is seen from the results that stress thresholds of rock samples such as crack initiation stress, crack damage stress, and peak stress decrease with the increasing of the sphericity index. The increase of sphericity leads to a drop of elastic modulus and a rise in Poisson ratio, while the decreasing sphericity usually results in the increase of cohesion and internal friction angle. Based on volume change of rock samples during simulation of triaxial compression test, variation of dilation angle with plastic strain is also studied.

  7. Effect of Particle Shape on Mechanical Behaviors of Rocks: A Numerical Study Using Clumped Particle Model

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Guan; Liu, Guang; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2013-01-01

    Since rocks are aggregates of mineral particles, the effect of mineral microstructure on macroscopic mechanical behaviors of rocks is inneglectable. Rock samples of four different particle shapes are established in this study based on clumped particle model, and a sphericity index is used to quantify particle shape. Model parameters for simulation in PFC are obtained by triaxial compression test of quartz sandstone, and simulation of triaxial compression test is then conducted on four rock samples with different particle shapes. It is seen from the results that stress thresholds of rock samples such as crack initiation stress, crack damage stress, and peak stress decrease with the increasing of the sphericity index. The increase of sphericity leads to a drop of elastic modulus and a rise in Poisson ratio, while the decreasing sphericity usually results in the increase of cohesion and internal friction angle. Based on volume change of rock samples during simulation of triaxial compression test, variation of dilation angle with plastic strain is also studied. PMID:23997677

  8. Medical Modeling of Particle Size Effects for CB Inhalation Hazards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    can contain no organisms. As the particle size decreases toward that of an organism (~1 micron for F. tularensis bacteria ), some particles may...set of lung morphologies is also available. The model can calculate deposition in three regions, extrathoracic (ET), tracheobroncial (TB) and...the former type (Day and Berendt, 1972) and spores of B. anthracis are of the latter type (Druett et al., 1953). Bacteria are fairly large, on the

  9. Modeling electrokinetic flow by Lagrangian particle-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Parks, Mike

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on mathematical models and numerical schemes based on Lagrangian particle-based method that can effectively capture mesoscale multiphysics (hydrodynamics, electrostatics, and advection-diffusion) associated in applications of micro-/nano-transport and technology. The order of accuracy is significantly improved for particle-based method with the presented implicit consistent numerical scheme. Specifically, we show simulation results on electrokinetic flows and microfluidic mixing processes in micro-/nano-channel and through semi-permeable porous structures.

  10. Particle production within the quark meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.

    2009-07-15

    Quark-meson coupling (QMC) models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter. In the regime of hot hadronic matter very few calculations exist using the QMC model, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. In the present work, we identify the free energy of the bag with the effective mass of the baryons and we calculate the particle production yields on a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with the QMC model and compare them with results obtained previously with other relativistic models. A smaller temperature for the fireball, T=132 MeV, is obtained because of the smaller effective baryon masses predicted by QMC. QMC was also applied to the description of particle yields at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in Pb+Pb collisions.

  11. Modeling of Fine-Particle Formation in Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Venkat; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of nanostructured particles in high-temperature flames is important both for the control of emissions from combustion devices and for the synthesis of high-value chemicals for a variety of applications. The physiochemical processes that lead to the production of fine particles in turbulent flames are highly sensitive to the flow physics and, in particular, the history of thermochemical compositions and turbulent features they encounter. Consequently, it is possible to change the characteristic size, structure, composition, and yield of the fine particles by altering the flow configuration. This review describes the complex multiscale interactions among turbulent fluid flow, gas-phase chemical reactions, and solid-phase particle evolution. The focus is on modeling the generation of soot particles, an unwanted pollutant from automobile and aircraft engines, as well as metal oxides, a class of high-value chemicals sought for specialized applications, including emissions control. Issues arising due to the numerical methods used to approximate the particle number density function, the modeling of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and model validation are also discussed.

  12. Micromechanics of Ultrafine Particle Adhesion—Contact Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Jürgen

    2009-06-01

    Ultrafine, dry, cohesive and compressible powders (particle diameter d<10 μm) show a wide variety of flow problems that cause insufficient apparatus and system reliability of processing plants. Thus, the understanding of the micromechanics of particle adhesion is essential to assess the product quality and to improve the process performance in particle technology. Comprehensive models are shown that describe the elastic-plastic force-displacement and frictional moment-angle behavior of adhesive contacts of isotropic smooth spheres. By the model stiff particles with soft contacts, a sphere-sphere interaction of van der Waals forces without any contact deformation describes the stiff attractive term. But, the soft micro-contact response generates a flattened contact, i.e. plate-plate interaction, and increasing adhesion. These increasing adhesion forces between particles directly depend on this frozen irreversible deformation. Thus, the adhesion force is found to be load dependent. It contributes to the tangential forces in an elastic-plastic frictional contact with partially sticking and micro-slip within the contact plane. The load dependent rolling resistance and torque of mobilized frictional contact rotation (spin around its principal axis) are also shown. This reasonable combination of particle contact micromechanics and powder continuum mechanics is used to model analytically the macroscopic friction limits of incipient powder consolidation, yield and cohesive steady-state shear flow on physical basis.

  13. Finite difference time domain modelling of particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgens, T.G.; Harfoush, F.A.

    1989-03-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) modelling has been successfully applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic scattering and interaction problems for many years. Here the method is extended to incorporate the modelling of wake fields in particle accelerators. Algorithmic comparisons are made to existing wake field codes, such as MAFIA T3. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  14. A battery model that fully couples mechanics and electrochemistry at both particle and electrode levels by incorporation of particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Lu, Wei

    2017-08-01

    This paper develops a multi-scale mechanical-electrochemical model which enables fully coupled mechanics and electrochemistry at both particle and electrode levels. At the particle level, solid diffusion is modeled using a generalized chemical potential to capture the effects of mechanical stress and phase transformation. At the electrode level, the stress arising from particle interaction is incorporated in a continuum model. This particle interaction stress is in addition to the traditional concept of intercalation stress inside isolated particles. The particle and continuum electrode levels are linked by the particle interaction stress as loads on the particle surface, and by consideration of stress on the electrochemical reaction rate on the particle surface. The effect of mechanical stress on electrochemical reaction results in a stress-dependent over-potential between particle and electrolyte. Stress gradient in an electrode leads to inhomogeneous intercalation/deintercalation currents for particles depending on their interaction stress with neighbors, resulting in stress gradient induced inhomogeneous state of charge. Conversely, non-uniform intercalation/deintercalation currents in an electrode lead to stress between particles. With this model we have an important finding: an electrochemically inactive region in an electrode causes stress built-up. This model provides a powerful tool to address various problems such as fracture in-between particles.

  15. Modeling Water Waves with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    criterion (Jeong & Hussain, 1995), which uses the symmetric and antisymmetric components of the velocity gradient tensor to identify regions of low...surf zone or as a first approximation to a tsunami . Wave data was obtain from the laboratory experiments of Ting (2006). In Figure 4, the measured...R., Hérault, A., & Bilotta, G. SPH modeling of mean velocity transmission in a rip current system, International Conference on Coastal Engineering

  16. Modelling new particle formation events in the South African savannah

    SciTech Connect

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Buekes, Johan P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-05-28

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction of these systems with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scales, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study, measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There already are some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first detailed simulation that includes all the main processes relevant to particle formation. The results show that both of the particle formation mechanisms investigated overestimated the dependency of the formation rates on sulphuric acid. From the two particle formation mechanisms tested in this work, the approach that included low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events than the approach that did not. To obtain a reliable estimate of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa. This work is the first step in developing a more comprehensive new particle formation model applicable to the unique environment in southern Africa. Such a model will assist in better understanding and predicting new particle formation – knowledge which could ultimately be used to mitigate impacts of climate change and air quality.

  17. Modeling transport and aggregation of volcanic ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Antonio; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni; Durant, Adam

    2010-05-01

    A complete description of ash aggregation processes in volcanic clouds is an very arduous task and the full coupling of ash transport and ash aggregation models is still computationally prohibitive. A large fraction of fine ash injected in the atmosphere during explosive eruptions aggregate because of complex interactions of surface liquid layers, electrostatic forces, and differences in settling velocities. The formation of aggregates of size and density different from those of the primary particles dramatically changes the sedimentation dynamics and results in lower atmospheric residence times of ash particles and in the formation of secondary maxima of tephra deposit. Volcanic ash transport models should include a full aggregation model accounting for all particle class interaction. However this approach would require prohibitive computational times. Here we present a simplified model for wet aggregation that accounts for both atmospheric and volcanic water transport. The aggregation model assumes a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in aggregates, average efficiencies factors, and collision frequency functions accounting for Brownian motion, laminar and turbulent fluid shear, and differential settling velocity. We implemented the aggregation model in the WRF+FALL3D coupled modelling system and applied it to different eruptions where aggregation has been recognized to play an important role, such as the August and September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions and the 1980 Mt St Helens eruption. Moreover, understanding aggregation processes in volcanic clouds will contribute to mitigate the risks related with volcanic ash transport and sedimentation.

  18. Cache Allocation in CDN: An Evolutionary Game Generalized Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiang; Lau, Francis C. M.; Gao, Daqi

    Content distribution networks (CDNs) increasingly have been used to reduce the response times experienced by Internet users through placing surrogates close to the clients. This paper presents an object replacement approach based on an evolutionary game generalized particle model (G-GPM). We first propose a problem model for CDNs. The CDN model is then fit into a gravitational field. The origin servers and surrogates are regarded as two kinds of particles which are located in two force-fields. The cache allocation problem is thus transformed into the kinematics and dynamics of the particles in the annular and the round force-fields. The G-GPM approach is unique in four aspects: 1) direct viewing of individual and overall optimization; 2) parallel computing (lower time complexity); 3) multi-objective solution; and 4) being able to deal with some social interactions behaviors.

  19. Hybrid Modeling Method for a DEP Based Particle Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Miled, Mohamed Amine; Gagne, Antoine; Sawan, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a new modeling approach for Dielectrophoresis (DEP) based particle manipulation is presented. The proposed method fulfills missing links in finite element modeling between the multiphysic simulation and the biological behavior. This technique is amongst the first steps to develop a more complex platform covering several types of manipulations such as magnetophoresis and optics. The modeling approach is based on a hybrid interface using both ANSYS and MATLAB to link the propagation of the electrical field in the micro-channel to the particle motion. ANSYS is used to simulate the electrical propagation while MATLAB interprets the results to calculate cell displacement and send the new information to ANSYS for another turn. The beta version of the proposed technique takes into account particle shape, weight and its electrical properties. First obtained results are coherent with experimental results. PMID:23364197

  20. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-21

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we develop a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena of associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture of the void probability and solvation free energy of apolar particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for a understanding emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  1. Statistical modeling of preferential concentration of heavy particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartlep, T.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulent flows is a process that causes heavy particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation, aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and the formation of asteroid and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from large numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at scales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at scales within a decade or so of the inertial scale, and have properties that differ from widely used "beta-function" models.

  2. A point particle model of lightly bound skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillard, Mike; Harland, Derek; Kirk, Elliot; Maybee, Ben; Speight, Martin

    2017-04-01

    A simple model of the dynamics of lightly bound skyrmions is developed in which skyrmions are replaced by point particles, each carrying an internal orientation. The model accounts well for the static energy minimizers of baryon number 1 ≤ B ≤ 8 obtained by numerical simulation of the full field theory. For 9 ≤ B ≤ 23, a large number of static solutions of the point particle model are found, all closely resembling size B subsets of a face centred cubic lattice, with the particle orientations dictated by a simple colouring rule. Rigid body quantization of these solutions is performed, and the spin and isospin of the corresponding ground states extracted. As part of the quantization scheme, an algorithm to compute the symmetry group of an oriented point cloud, and to determine its corresponding Finkelstein-Rubinstein constraints, is devised.

  3. IR decoys modeling method based on particle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun-yu; Wu, Kai-feng; Dong, Yan-bing

    2016-10-01

    Due to the complexity in combustion processes of IR decoys, it is difficult to describe its infrared radiation characteristics by deterministic model. In this work, the IR decoys simulation based on particle system was found. The measured date of the IR decoy is used to analyze the typical characteristic of the IR decoy. A semi-empirical model of the IR decoy motion law has been set up based on friction factors and a IR decoys simulation model has been build up based on particle system. The infrared imaging characteristic and time varying characteristic of the IR decoy were simulated by making use of the particle feature such as lifetime, speed and color. The dynamic IR decoys simulation is realized with the VC++6.0 and OpenGL.

  4. Hybrid modeling method for a DEP based particle manipulation.

    PubMed

    Miled, Mohamed Amine; Gagne, Antoine; Sawan, Mohamad

    2013-01-30

    In this paper, a new modeling approach for Dielectrophoresis (DEP) based particle manipulation is presented. The proposed method fulfills missing links in finite element modeling between the multiphysic simulation and the biological behavior. This technique is amongst the first steps to develop a more complex platform covering several types of manipulations such as magnetophoresis and optics. The modeling approach is based on a hybrid interface using both ANSYS and MATLAB to link the propagation of the electrical field in the micro-channel to the particle motion. ANSYS is used to simulate the electrical propagation while MATLAB interprets the results to calculate cell displacement and send the new information to ANSYS for another turn. The beta version of the proposed technique takes into account particle shape, weight and its electrical properties. First obtained results are coherent with experimental results.

  5. Modeling oceanic multiphase flow by using Lagrangian particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    While the density of seawater is basically determined by its temperature, salinity and pressure, the effective density becomes higher when the water mass contains suspended sediment. On the other hands, effective density declines when water mass contains fine scale materials of lower density such as bubbles and ice crystals. Such density anomaly induced by small scale materials suspended in water masses sometimes plays important roles in the sub-mesoscale ocean physics. To simulate these small scale oceanic multiphase flow, a new modeling framework using an online Lagrangian particle tracking method is developed. A Lagrangian particle tracking method has substantial advantages such as an explicit treatment of buoyancy force acting on each individual particle, no numerical diffusion and dissipation, high dynamic range and an ability to track the history and each individual particle. However, its numerical cost causes difficulty when we try to simulate a large number of particles. In the present study we implement a numerically efficient particle tracking scheme using linked-list data structure, which is coupled with a nonhydrostatic dynamical core. This newly developed model successfully reproduces characteristics of some interesting small scale multiphase processes, for example hyperpycnal flow (a sediment-rich river water plume trapped at ocean floor) and grease ice cover (a slurry mixture of frazil ice crystals and seawater).

  6. Explosive particle soil surface dispersion model for detonated military munitions.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, John E; Rishel, Jeremy P; Walsh, Marianne E; Walsh, Michael R; Taylor, Susan

    2015-07-01

    The accumulation of high explosive mass residue from the detonation of military munitions on training ranges is of environmental concern because of its potential to contaminate the soil, surface water, and groundwater. The US Department of Defense wants to quantify, understand, and remediate high explosive mass residue loadings that might be observed on active firing ranges. Previously, efforts using various sampling methods and techniques have resulted in limited success, due in part to the complicated dispersion pattern of the explosive particle residues upon detonation. In our efforts to simulate particle dispersal for high- and low-order explosions on hypothetical firing ranges, we use experimental particle data from detonations of munitions from a 155-mm howitzer, which are common military munitions. The mass loadings resulting from these simulations provide a previously unattained level of detail to quantify the explosive residue source-term for use in soil and water transport models. In addition, the resulting particle placements can be used to test, validate, and optimize particle sampling methods and statistical models as applied to firing ranges. Although the presented results are for a hypothetical 155-mm howitzer firing range, the method can be used for other munition types once the explosive particle characteristics are known.

  7. Modeling reactive transport with particle tracking and kernel estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater reactive transport models are useful to assess and quantify the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface media and are an essential tool for the analysis of coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes in Earth Systems. Particle Tracking Method (PTM) provides a computationally efficient and adaptable approach to solve the solute transport partial differential equation. On a molecular level, chemical reactions are the result of collisions, combinations, and/or decay of different species. For a well-mixed system, the chem- ical reactions are controlled by the classical thermodynamic rate coefficient. Each of these actions occurs with some probability that is a function of solute concentrations. PTM is based on considering that each particle actually represents a group of molecules. To properly simulate this system, an infinite number of particles is required, which is computationally unfeasible. On the other hand, a finite number of particles lead to a poor-mixed system which is limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect to actually model incomplete mix- ing in naturally occurring porous media. In this work, we demonstrate that this effect in most cases should be attributed to a defficient estimation of the concentrations and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing processes in porous media. To illustrate this, we show that a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations can approach the well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. KDEs provide weighting functions of each particle mass that expands its region of influence, hence providing a wider region for chemical reactions with time. Simulation results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve state-of-the-art simulations of chemical reactions and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative conceptual models and not on a limited number of particles.

  8. Lagrangian Particle Method for Local Scale Dispersion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunarko; ZakiSu'ud

    2016-08-01

    A deterministic model is developed for radioactive dispersion analysis based on random-walk Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Method (LPDM). A diagnostic 3dimensional mass-consistent wind-field with a capability to handle complex topography can be used to provide input for particle advection. Turbulent diffusion process of particles is determined based on empirical lateral and linear vertical relationships. Surface-level concentration is calculated for constant unit release from elevated point source. A series of 60-second segmented groups of particles are released in 3600 seconds total duration. Averaged surface-level concentration within a 5 meter surface layer is obtained and compared with available analytical solution. Results from LPDM shows good agreement with the analytical result for vertically constant and varying wind field with the same atmospheric stability.

  9. Model Adaptation for Prognostics in a Particle Filtering Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2011-01-01

    One of the key motivating factors for using particle filters for prognostics is the ability to include model parameters as part of the state vector to be estimated. This performs model adaptation in conjunction with state tracking, and thus, produces a tuned model that can used for long term predictions. This feature of particle filters works in most part due to the fact that they are not subject to the "curse of dimensionality", i.e. the exponential growth of computational complexity with state dimension. However, in practice, this property holds for "well-designed" particle filters only as dimensionality increases. This paper explores the notion of wellness of design in the context of predicting remaining useful life for individual discharge cycles of Li-ion batteries. Prognostic metrics are used to analyze the tradeoff between different model designs and prediction performance. Results demonstrate how sensitivity analysis may be used to arrive at a well-designed prognostic model that can take advantage of the model adaptation properties of a particle filter.

  10. Investigation of self-oscillation using particle balance model

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Inshik; Na, Byungkeun Chang, Hongyoung

    2015-08-15

    Self-oscillation obtained using a DC-only power supply under specific anode voltage conditions is investigated in a cylindrical system with thermal electrons using tungsten filaments. Analysis of the obtained oscillation profiles reveals that the experimental data are consistent with a model derived from the particle balance model. The self-oscillation period characteristics with respect to the pressure and gas species are also analyzed. As the physics and particle motion of self-oscillation near the plasma transition region are analyzed from different perspectives, this paper may advance the study of this phenomenon.

  11. Kinetic model of particle-inhibited grain growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary Scott

    The effects of second phase particles on matrix grain growth kinetics were investigated using Al2O3-SiC as a model system. In particular, the validity of the conclusion drawn from a previous kinetic analysis that the kinetics of particle-inhibited grain growth in Al2 O3-SiC samples with an intermediate volume fraction of second phase could be well quantified by a modified-Zener model was investigated. A critical analysis of assumptions made during the previous kinetic analysis revealed oversimplifications which affect the validity of the conclusion. Specifically, the degree of interaction between particles and grain boundaries was assumed to be independent of the mean second phase particle size and size distribution. In contrast, current measurements indicate that the degree of interaction in Al2O3-SiC is dependent on these parameters. An improved kinetic model for particle-inhibited grain growth in Al 2O3-SiC was developed using a modified-Zener approach. The comparison of model predictions with experimental grain growth data indicated that significant discrepancies (as much as 4--5 orders of magnitude) existed. Based on this, it was concluded that particles had a much more significant effect on grain growth kinetics than that caused by a simple reduction of the boundary driving force due to the removal of boundary area. Consequently, it was also concluded that the conclusion drawn from the earlier kinetic analysis regarding the validity of a modified-Zener model was incorrect. Discrepancies between model and experiment were found to be the result of a significant decrease in experimental growth rate constant not predicted by the model. Possible physical mechanisms for such a decrease were investigated. The investigation of a small amount of SiO2 on grain growth in Al2O3 indicated that the decrease was not the result of a decrease in grain boundary mobility due to impurity contamination by particles. By process of elimination and based on previous observations

  12. Theoretical model of HZE particle fragmentation by hydrogen targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L.W.; Cucinotta, F. A; Bagga, R.; Tripathi, R. K.

    1996-01-01

    The fragmenting of high energy, heavy ions (HZE particles) by hydrogen targets is an important, physical process in several areas of space radiation research. In this work quantum mechanical optical model methods for estimating cross sections for HZE particle fragmentation by hydrogen targets are presented. The cross sections are calculated using a modified abrasion-ablation collision formalism adapted from a nucleus-nucleus collision model. Elemental and isotopic production cross sections are estimated and compared with reported measurements for the breakup of neon, sulphur, and iron, nuclei at incident energies between 400 and 910 Mev/nucleon. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  13. Charged Particle Environment Definition for NGST: Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Evans, Steven W.; Hardage, Donna M.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    NGST will operate in a halo orbit about the L2 point, 1.5 million km from the Earth, where the spacecraft will periodically travel through the magnetotail region. There are a number of tools available to calculate the high energy, ionizing radiation particle environment from galactic cosmic rays and from solar disturbances. However, space environment tools are not generally available to provide assessments of charged particle environment and its variations in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail at L2 distances. An engineering-level phenomenology code (LRAD) was therefore developed to facilitate the definition of charged particle environments in the vicinity of the L2 point in support of the NGST program. LRAD contains models tied to satellite measurement data of the solar wind and magnetotail regions. The model provides particle flux and fluence calculations necessary to predict spacecraft charging conditions and the degradation of materials used in the construction of NGST. This paper describes the LRAD environment models for the deep magnetotail (XGSE < -100 Re) and solar wind, and presents predictions of the charged particle environment for NGST.

  14. Quasilinear Line Broadened Model for Energetic Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    We present a self-consistent quasi-linear model that describes wave-particle interaction in toroidal geometry and computes fast ion transport during TAE mode evolution. The model bridges the gap between single mode resonances, where it predicts the analytically expected saturation levels, and the case of multiple modes overlapping, where particles diffuse across phase space. Results are presented in the large aspect ratio limit where analytic expressions are used for Fourier harmonics of the power exchange between waves and particles, . Implemention of a more realistic mode structure calculated by NOVAK code are also presented. This work is funded by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Modeling Correlation Effects in Nickelates with Slave Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Alexandru Bogdan; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    Nickelate interfaces display interesting electronic properties including orbital ordering similar to that of cuprate superconductors and thickness dependent metal-insulator transitions. One-particle band theory calculations do not include dynamic localized correlation effects on the nickel sites and thus often incorrectly predict metallic systems or incorrect ARPES spectra. Building on two previous successful slave-particle treatments of local correlations, we present a generalized slave-particle method that includes prior models and allows us to produce new intermediate models. The computational efficiency of these slave-boson methods means that one can readily study correlation effects in complex heterostructures. We show some predictions of these methods for the electronic structure of bulk and thin film nickelates. Work supported by NSF Grant MRSEC DMR-1119826.

  16. Generalized slave-particle method for extended Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a set of generalized slave-particle models for extended Hubbard models that treat localized electronic correlations using slave-boson decompositions. Our models automatically include two slave-particle methods of recent interest, the slave-rotor and slave-spin methods, as well as a ladder of new intermediate models where one can choose which of the electronic degrees of freedom (e.g., spin or orbital labels) are treated as correlated degrees of freedom by the slave bosons. In addition, our method removes the aberrant behavior of the slave-rotor model, where it systematically overestimates the importance of electronic correlation effects for weak interaction strength, by removing the contribution of unphysical states from the bosonic Hilbert space. The flexibility of our formalism permits one to separate and isolate the effect of correlations on the key degrees of freedom.

  17. Applying Dispersive Changes to Lagrangian Particles in Groundwater Transport Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative. ?? US Government 2010.

  18. Applying dispersive changes to Lagrangian particles in groundwater transport models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative.

  19. Computational modeling of single particle scattering over large distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Rebecca; Plumley, Rajan; McCracken, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of the propagation of a single particle through a large three-dimensional volume under the influence of individual scattering events. In such systems, short paths can be quickly and accurately simulated using random walks defined by individual scattering parameters, but the simulation time greatly increases as the size of the space grows. We present a method for reducing the overall simulation time by restricting the simulation to a cube of unit length; each `cell' is characterized by a set of parameters which dictate the distributions of allowable step lengths and polar scattering angles. We model propagation over large distances by constructing a lattice of cells with physical parameters that depend on position, such that the full set would represent a space within the entire volume available to the particle. With these, we propose the use of Markov chains to determine a probable path for the particle, thereby removing the need to simulate every step in the particle's path. For a single particle with constant velocity, we can use the step statistics to determine the travel time of the particle. We investigate the effect of scattering parameters such as average step distance and possible scattering angles on the probabilities of a cell.

  20. Advances in Bayesian Model Based Clustering Using Particle Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Merl, D M

    2009-11-19

    Recent work by Carvalho, Johannes, Lopes and Polson and Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy introduced a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) alternative to traditional iterative Monte Carlo strategies (e.g. MCMC and EM) for Bayesian inference for a large class of dynamic models. The basis of SMC techniques involves representing the underlying inference problem as one of state space estimation, thus giving way to inference via particle filtering. The key insight of Carvalho et al was to construct the sequence of filtering distributions so as to make use of the posterior predictive distribution of the observable, a distribution usually only accessible in certain Bayesian settings. Access to this distribution allows a reversal of the usual propagate and resample steps characteristic of many SMC methods, thereby alleviating to a large extent many problems associated with particle degeneration. Furthermore, Carvalho et al point out that for many conjugate models the posterior distribution of the static variables can be parametrized in terms of [recursively defined] sufficient statistics of the previously observed data. For models where such sufficient statistics exist, particle learning as it is being called, is especially well suited for the analysis of streaming data do to the relative invariance of its algorithmic complexity with the number of data observations. Through a particle learning approach, a statistical model can be fit to data as the data is arriving, allowing at any instant during the observation process direct quantification of uncertainty surrounding underlying model parameters. Here we describe the use of a particle learning approach for fitting a standard Bayesian semiparametric mixture model as described in Carvalho, Lopes, Polson and Taddy. In Section 2 we briefly review the previously presented particle learning algorithm for the case of a Dirichlet process mixture of multivariate normals. In Section 3 we describe several novel extensions to the original

  1. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems, as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.

  2. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  3. Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-31

    applications of CMS-PTM include Long Island Sound, Connecticut; Shinnecock Inlet, New York; Ocean City, Maryland; Poplar Island, Maryland; Cape Fear ...load and bed load, and deposition and resuspension in coastal, estuarine and river environments. Local sediment particle sources include dredging

  4. A note on the multispecies model for identical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M. Y.; Luo Huaqiang

    2008-02-15

    It is pointed out that the multispecies model for identical particles is in general not suitable for considering quasistationary nonlinear plasma structures. For phenomena on long time scales, the a priori partitioning of electrons into hot and cold species is often unrealistic unless the latter are actually separated in the phase space by external or self-consistent fields.

  5. MODELING OF PARTICLE FORMATION AND DYNAMICS IN A FLAME INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model has been developed to predict the formation and growth of metallic particles in a flame incinerator system. Flow fields and temperature profiles in a cylindrical laminar jet flame have been used to determine the position and physical conditions of the species along the fl...

  6. MODELING OF PARTICLE FORMATION AND DYNAMICS IN A FLAME INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model has been developed to predict the formation and growth of metallic particles in a flame incinerator system. Flow fields and temperature profiles in a cylindrical laminar jet flame have been used to determine the position and physical conditions of the species along the fl...

  7. A Dissipative Particle Dynamics model for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Anupam

    2005-11-01

    A Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) model for two-phase flows is presented. The new model, unlike existing models [1, 2], uses different cut-off radii for the attractive and repulsive components of the inter-particle interaction potential and allows for larger density ratios between the phases. Surface tension arises due to the attractive component and a forcing term that depends on higher order density gradients. The model is shown to reproduce the Laplace law and analytical results for drop oscillations. A new method that couples a Lennard-Jones type potential with a coarse-grained potential is also presented. References: [1] Pagonabarraga, I. and Frenkel, D. (2001). Journal of Chemical Physics, 115(11): 5015-5026. [2] Warren, P.B. (2003). Physical Review E. 68. 066702: 1-8.

  8. Physical principles and models describing intracellular virus particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lagache, T; Dauty, E; Holcman, D

    2009-08-01

    Modeling in cellular biology benefits greatly from quantitative analysis that arise from the theory of diffusion and chemical reactions. Recent progress in single particle imaging enables the visualization of viral trajectories evolving in the cytoplasm. Biophysical models and mathematical analysis have been developed to unravel the complexity of single viral trajectories. We review here models of active motion of viruses along the cytoskeleton as well as their diffusion. We present resent efforts to estimate global trafficking properties, such as the probability and the mean time for a viral particle to reach a small nuclear pore. However, most signaling pathways involved in controlling viral motion remain undescribed and should be the goal of future modeling efforts.

  9. Modeling of the recycling particle flux and electron particle transport in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.R.; Jackson, G.L.; Maingi, R.; Owen, L.W.; Porter, G.D.

    1996-10-01

    One of the most difficult aspects of performing an equilibrium particle transport analysis in a diverted tokamak is the determination of the particle flux which enters the plasma after recycling from the divertor plasma, the divertor target plates or the vessel wall. An approach which has been utilized in the past is to model the edge, scrape-off layer (SOL), and divertor plasma to match measured plasma parameters and then use a neutral transport code to obtain an edge recycling flux while trying to match the measured divertor D(x emissivity. Previous simulations were constrained by electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) data at the outer midplane, divertor heat flux from infrared television cameras, and n{sub e}, T{sub e} and particle flux at the target from fixed Langmuir probes, along with the divertor D{sub {alpha}} emissivity. In this paper, we present results of core fueling calculations from the 2-D modeling for ELM-free discharges, constrained by data from the new divertor diagnostics. In addition, we present a simple technique for estimating the recycling flux just after the L-H transition and demonstrate how this technique is supported by the detailed modeling. We will show the effect which inaccuracies in the recycling flux have on the calculated particle flux in the plasma core. For some specific density profiles, it is possible to separate the convective flux from the conductive flux. The diffusion coefficients obtained show a sharp decrease near a normalized radius of 0.9 indicating the presence of a transport barrier.

  10. Standard Model of Particle Physics--a health physics perspective.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2010-11-01

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics is reviewed with an emphasis on its relationship to the physics supporting the health physics profession. Concepts important to health physics are emphasized and specific applications are presented. The capability of the Standard Model to provide health physics relevant information is illustrated with application of conservation laws to neutron and muon decay and in the calculation of the neutron mean lifetime.

  11. Fundamentals of chemistry modeling applicable to a vectorized particle simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the fundamentals of extending the vectorized particle simulation method derived by Baganoff and McDonald (1990), McDonald and Baganoff (1988), and McDonald (1989) for modeling chemically reacting flows. Details of reaction mechanics per reaction are presented, with particular attention given to the quantum nature of the vibrational mode. The models of reactive flows developed here were verified through a simulation of a superheated diatomic gas relaxing thermochemically to equilibrium in a reservoir.

  12. Particle model for optical noisy image recovery via stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbin; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing

    2017-10-01

    We propose a particle model for investigating the optical noisy image recovery via stochastic resonance. The light propagating in nonlinear media is regarded as moving particles, which are used for analyzing the nonlinear coupling of signal and noise. Owing to nonlinearity, a signal seeds a potential to reinforce itself at the expense of noise. The applied electric field, noise intensity, and correlation length are important parameters that influence the recovery effects. The noise-hidden image with the signal-to-noise intensity ratio of 1:30 is successfully restored and an optimal cross-correlation gain of 6.1 is theoretically obtained.

  13. Modeling the behavior of confined colloidal particles under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Mackay, F E; Pastor, K; Karttunen, M; Denniston, C

    2014-11-21

    We investigate the behavior of colloidal suspensions with different volume fractions confined between parallel walls under a range of steady shears. We model the particles using molecular dynamics (MD) with full hydrodynamic interactions implemented through the use of a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) fluid. A quasi-2d ordering occurs in systems characterized by a coexistence of coupled layers with different densities, order, and granular temperature. We present a phase diagram in terms of shear and volume fraction for each layer, and demonstrate that particle exchange between layers is required for entering the disordered phase.

  14. An asymptotic model of particle deposition at an airway bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Halpern, David; Filoche, Marcel; Sapoval, Bernard; Grotberg, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Particle transport and deposition associated with flow over a wedge is investigated as a model for particle transport and flow at the carina of an airway bifurcation during inspiration. Using matched asymptotics, a uniformly valid solution is obtained to represent the high Reynolds number flow over a wedge that considers the viscous boundary layer near the wedge and the outer inviscid region and is then used to solve the particle transport equations. Sometimes particle impaction on the wedge is prevented due to the boundary layer. We call this boundary layer shielding (BLS). This effect can be broken down into different types: rejection, trapping and deflection that are described by what happens to the particle’s initial negative velocity normal to the wall either changing sign, reaching zero, or remaining negative in the boundary layer region. The deposition efficiency depends on the critical Stokes number but exhibits a weak dependence on Reynolds number. Deposition efficiency for Sc in the range 0 < Sc < 0.4 yields the following relationship De ≈ (1.867 Sc1.78− 0.016) sin(βπ/2) at large Reynolds numbers, where βπ is the wedge angle. For a specific deposition efficiency, Sc decreases as βπ increases. The distribution of impacted particles was also computed and revealed that particles primarily impact within one airway diameter of the carina, consistent with computational fluid dynamics approaches. This work provides a new insight that the BLS inherent to the wedge component of the structure is the dominant reason for the particle distribution. This finding is important in linking aerosol deposition to the location of airway disease as well as target sites for therapeutic deposition. PMID:22378463

  15. Quantum kinetics and thermalization in a particle bath model.

    PubMed

    Alamoudi, S M; Boyanovsky, D; de Vega, H J

    1999-07-01

    We study the dynamics of relaxation and thermalization in an exactly solvable model of a particle interacting with a harmonic oscillator bath. Our goal is to understand the effects of non-Markovian processes on the relaxational dynamics and to compare the exact evolution of the distribution function with approximate Markovian and non-Markovian quantum kinetics. There are two different cases that are studied in detail: (i) a quasiparticle (resonance) when the renormalized frequency of the particle is above the frequency threshold of the bath and (ii) a stable renormalized "particle" state below this threshold. The time evolution of the occupation number for the particle is evaluated exactly using different approaches that yield to complementary insights. The exact solution allows us to investigate the concept of the formation time of a quasiparticle and to study the difference between the relaxation of the distribution of bare particles and that of quasiparticles. For the case of quasiparticles, the exact occupation number asymptotically tends to a statistical equilibrium distribution that differs from a simple Bose-Einstein form as a result of off-shell processes whereas in the stable particle case, the distribution of particles does not thermalize with the bath. We derive a non-Markovian quantum kinetic equation which resums the perturbative series and includes off-shell effects. A Markovian approximation that includes off-shell contributions and the usual Boltzmann equation (energy conserving) are obtained from the quantum kinetic equation in the limit of wide separation of time scales upon different coarse-graining assumptions. The relaxational dynamics predicted by the non-Markovian, Markovian, and Boltzmann approximations are compared to the exact result. The Boltzmann approach is seen to fail in the case of wide resonances and when threshold and renormalization effects are important.

  16. Particle systems for adaptive, isotropic meshing of CAD models

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Joshua A.; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a particle-based approach for generating adaptive triangular surface and tetrahedral volume meshes from computer-aided design models. Input shapes are treated as a collection of smooth, parametric surface patches that can meet non-smoothly on boundaries. Our approach uses a hierarchical sampling scheme that places particles on features in order of increasing dimensionality. These particles reach a good distribution by minimizing an energy computed in 3D world space, with movements occurring in the parametric space of each surface patch. Rather than using a pre-computed measure of feature size, our system automatically adapts to both curvature as well as a notion of topological separation. It also enforces a measure of smoothness on these constraints to construct a sizing field that acts as a proxy to piecewise-smooth feature size. We evaluate our technique with comparisons against other popular triangular meshing techniques for this domain. PMID:23162181

  17. Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory is participating in an Innovative Partnership Program (IPP) project with an industry partner to modify a commercial off-the-shelf simulation software product to treat the electrodynamics of particulate systems. Discrete element modeling (DEM) is a numerical technique that can track the dynamics of particle systems. This technique, which was introduced in 1979 for analysis of rock mechanics, was recently refined to include the contact force interaction of particles with arbitrary surfaces and moving machinery. In our work, we endeavor to incorporate electrostatic forces into the DEM calculations to enhance the fidelity of the software and its applicability to (1) particle processes, such as electrophotography, that are greatly affected by electrostatic forces, (2) grain and dust transport, and (3) the study of lunar and Martian regoliths.

  18. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  19. Cirrus cloud model parameterizations: Incorporating realistic ice particle generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Dodd, G. C.; Starr, David OC.

    1990-01-01

    Recent cirrus cloud modeling studies have involved the application of a time-dependent, two dimensional Eulerian model, with generalized cloud microphysical parameterizations drawn from experimental findings. For computing the ice versus vapor phase changes, the ice mass content is linked to the maintenance of a relative humidity with respect to ice (RHI) of 105 percent; ice growth occurs both with regard to the introduction of new particles and the growth of existing particles. In a simplified cloud model designed to investigate the basic role of various physical processes in the growth and maintenance of cirrus clouds, these parametric relations are justifiable. In comparison, the one dimensional cloud microphysical model recently applied to evaluating the nucleation and growth of ice crystals in cirrus clouds explicitly treated populations of haze and cloud droplets, and ice crystals. Although these two modeling approaches are clearly incompatible, the goal of the present numerical study is to develop a parametric treatment of new ice particle generation, on the basis of detailed microphysical model findings, for incorporation into improved cirrus growth models. For example, the relation between temperature and the relative humidity required to generate ice crystals from ammonium sulfate haze droplets, whose probability of freezing through the homogeneous nucleation mode are a combined function of time and droplet molality, volume, and temperature. As an example of this approach, the results of cloud microphysical simulations are presented showing the rather narrow domain in the temperature/humidity field where new ice crystals can be generated. The microphysical simulations point out the need for detailed CCN studies at cirrus altitudes and haze droplet measurements within cirrus clouds, but also suggest that a relatively simple treatment of ice particle generation, which includes cloud chemistry, can be incorporated into cirrus cloud growth.

  20. Modelling New Particle Formation Events in the South African Savannah

    SciTech Connect

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, aka aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scale, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There are already some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first time detailed simulations, that include all the main processes relevant to particle formation, were done. The results show that both investigated particle formation mechanisms overestimated the formation rates dependency on sulphuric acid. The approach including low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events. To get reliable estimation of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa.

  1. Theory and modeling of particles with DNA-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years significant attention has been attracted to proposals which utilize DNA for nanotechnological applications. Potential applications of these ideas range from the programmable self-assembly of colloidal crystals, to biosensors and nanoparticle based drug delivery platforms. In Chapter I we introduce the system, which generically consists of colloidal particles functionalized with specially designed DNA markers. The sequence of bases on the DNA markers determines the particle type. Due to the hybridization between complementary single-stranded DNA, specific, type-dependent interactions can be introduced between particles by choosing the appropriate DNA marker sequences. In Chapter II we develop a statistical mechanical description of the aggregation and melting behavior of particles with DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter III a model is proposed to describe the dynamical departure and diffusion of particles which form reversible key-lock connections. In Chapter IV we propose a method to self-assemble nanoparticle clusters using DNA scaffolds. A natural extension is discussed in Chapter V, the programmable self-assembly of nanoparticle clusters where the desired cluster geometry is encoded using DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter VI we consider a nanoparticle based drug delivery platform for targeted, cell specific chemotherapy. In Chapter VII we present prospects for future research: the connection between DNA-mediated colloidal crystallization and jamming, and the inverse problem in self-assembly.

  2. Experiments and modeling of iron-particle-filled magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danas, K.; Kankanala, S. V.; Triantafyllidis, N.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are ferromagnetic particle impregnated rubbers whose mechanical properties are altered by the application of external magnetic fields. Due to their coupled magnetoelastic response, MREs are finding an increasing number of engineering applications. In this work, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the macroscopic response of a particular MRE consisting of a rubber matrix phase with spherical carbonyl iron particles. The MRE specimens used in this work are cured in the presence of strong magnetic fields leading to the formation of particle chain structures and thus to an overall transversely isotropic composite. The MRE samples are tested experimentally under uniaxial stresses as well as under simple shear in the absence or in the presence of magnetic fields and for different initial orientations of their particle chains with respect to the mechanical and magnetic loading direction. Using the theoretical framework for finitely strained MREs introduced by Kankanala and Triantafyllidis (2004), we propose a transversely isotropic energy density function that is able to reproduce the experimentally measured magnetization, magnetostriction and simple shear curves under different prestresses, initial particle chain orientations and magnetic fields. Microscopic mechanisms are also proposed to explain (i) the counterintuitive effect of dilation under zero or compressive applied mechanical loads for the magnetostriction experiments and (ii) the importance of a finite strain constitutive formulation even at small magnetostrictive strains. The model gives an excellent agreement with experiments for relatively moderate magnetic fields but has also been satisfactorily extended to include magnetic fields near saturation.

  3. Internally electrodynamic particle model: Its experimental basis and its predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng-Johansson, J. X.

    2010-03-15

    The internally electrodynamic (IED) particle model was derived based on overall experimental observations, with the IED process itself being built directly on three experimental facts: (a) electric charges present with all material particles, (b) an accelerated charge generates electromagnetic waves according to Maxwell's equations and Planck energy equation, and (c) source motion produces Doppler effect. A set of well-known basic particle equations and properties become predictable based on first principles solutions for the IED process; several key solutions achieved are outlined, including the de Broglie phase wave, de Broglie relations, Schroedinger equation, mass, Einstein mass-energy relation, Newton's law of gravity, single particle self interference, and electromagnetic radiation and absorption; these equations and properties have long been broadly experimentally validated or demonstrated. A conditioned solution also predicts the Doebner-Goldin equation which emerges to represent a form of long-sought quantum wave equation including gravity. A critical review of the key experiments is given which suggests that the IED process underlies the basic particle equations and properties not just sufficiently but also necessarily.

  4. Particle dispersion models and drag coefficients for particles in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, C. T.; Chung, J. N.; Troutt, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the concepts underlying particle dispersion due to turbulence are reviewed. The traditional approaches to particle dispersion in homogeneous, stationary turbulent fields are addressed, and recent work on particle dispersion in large scale turbulent structures is reviewed. The state of knowledge of particle drag coefficients in turbulent gas-particle flows is also reviewed.

  5. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  6. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  7. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    PubMed

    Backer, J A; Lowe, C P; Hoefsloot, H C J; Iedema, P D

    2005-04-15

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to noise ratio than existing methods. It is based on using periodic boundary conditions to simulate counter-flowing Poiseuille flows without the use of explicit boundaries. The viscosity is then related to the mean flow velocity of the two flows. We apply the method to two quite different systems. First, a simple generic fluid model, dissipative particle dynamics, for which accurate values of the viscosity are needed to characterize the model fluid. Second, the more realistic Lennard-Jones fluid. In both cases the values we calculated are consistent with previous work but, for a given simulation time, they are more accurate than those obtained with other methods.

  8. Particle-hole duality, integrability, and Russian doll BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, L. V.; Pogosov, W. V.

    2015-08-01

    We address a generalized Richardson model (Russian doll BCS model), which is characterized by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. This model is known to be exactly solvable and integrable. We point out that the Russian doll BCS model, on the level of Hamiltonian, is also particle-hole symmetric. This implies that the same state can be expressed both in the particle and hole representations with two different sets of Bethe roots. We then derive exact relations between Bethe roots in the two representations, which can hardly be obtained staying on the level of Bethe equations. In a quasi-classical limit, similar identities for usual Richardson model, known from literature, are recovered from our results. We also show that these relations for Richardson roots take a remarkably simple form at half-filling and for a symmetric with respect to the middle of the interaction band distribution of one-body energy levels, since, in this special case, the rapidities in the particle and hole representations up to the translation satisfy the same system of equations.

  9. Thermochemistry Models Applicable to a Vectorized Particle Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Brian Lee

    1991-02-01

    The finite rates of reactions and thermal excitation processes in a gas result in thermochemical non-equilibrium in the hypersonic rarefied flowfield associated with vehicles during atmospheric entry. The low-density nature of this flow is such that the familiar Navier-Stokes equations are not applicable. Alternatively, particle simulation methods circumvent the difficulties of rarefaction by modeling the gas as a collection of moving and colliding particles in accordance with the principles of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird has been applied extensively but is limited by excessive computational expense. An alternative particle simulation, tailored specifically to the vector-processing architecture of modern supercomputers, has been developed by Baganoff and McDonald to optimize computational performance in modeling the three-dimensional non-reactive flow of general gas mixtures including simple models for rotational and vibrational relaxation. The objective of this thesis is to extend the vectorized simulation to treat chemically reactive flows and to enhance the models for vibrational relaxation. A collision selection rule has been developed to yield vibrational relaxation rates which match the experimental fits of Millikan and White. Selection rules for dissociation, atomic exchange, and recombination reactions were developed to yield reaction rates which match those dictated by the Arrhenius experimental fits over the temperature range of interest. The vibrational relaxation mechanics model of McDonald was modified for application to both the simple harmonic and anharmonic oscillator descriptions of the quantized vibrational mode. Reaction mechanics are modeled by proportional addition or removal of reaction energy from each contributing mode in a collision. All of these models retain computational simplicity while satisfying detailed balance and promoting equilibrium. An improved reaction model

  10. Particle-based models for hydrologically triggered deep seated landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Bagnoli, Franco

    2013-04-01

    In this work we explore the integration between existing soil infiltration modeling and particle based methods in order to simulate two and three-dimensional schemes of triggered deep seated landslides. In literature, usually, the infiltration models are based on continuum scheme, i.e., Eulerian approach by means of which it is possible to define the field of the pore pressure within a soil (e.g., Iverson, 2000). Differently the particle based method follow a discrete Lagrangian scheme that allow to identify the trajectory of the particles and its dynamical properties. At present we test some infiltration models based on classical and generalized Richards equations that are adapted to the molecular dynamics approach according to the failure criterion of Mohr-Coulomb to simulate the triggering mechanism. In case of analytical infiltration model solution, the latter is discretized, differently a numerical one is achieved and the increasing pore pressure effect is simulated at soil particle level, i.e., we can simulate the rainfall in terms of water mass and, using the response function, we take into account the absorbed water in time and space at each thickness of our fictitious soil. The inter-particle interactions are through a force that, in the absence of suitable experimental data and due to the arbitrariness of the grain dimension, is modeled by means of a potential similar to the Lennard-Jones one. For the prediction of the particle positions, after and during a rainfall, we use a molecular dynamics approach that results very suitable to simulate this type of systems. The outcome of simulations are quite satisfactory and we can claim that this types of modeling can represent a new method to simulate landslides triggered by rainfall. Particularly, the results are consistent with the behavior of real landslides, e.g., it is possible to apply the method of the inverse surface displacement velocity for predicting the failure time (Fukuzono 1985). An interesting

  11. Bose-Hubbard model with localized particle losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepesidis, Kosmas V.; Hartmann, Michael J.

    2012-06-01

    We consider the Bose-Hubbard model with particle losses at one lattice site. For the noninteracting case, we find that half of the bosons of an initially homogeneous particle distribution are not affected by dissipation that only acts on one lattice site in the center of the lattice. A physical interpretation of this result is that the surviving particles interfere destructively when they tunnel to the location of the dissipative defect and therefore never reach it. Furthermore we find for a one-dimensional model that a fraction of the particles can propagate across the dissipative defect even if the rate of tunneling between adjacent lattice sites is much slower than the loss rate at the defect. We analyze the robustness of our findings with respect to small interactions and small deviations from the symmetric setting. A possible experimental realization of our setup is provided by ultracold bosonic atoms in an optical lattice, where an electron beam on a single lattice site ionizes atoms that are then extracted by an electrostatic field.

  12. Numerical modeling of a slurry droplet containing a spherical particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megaridis, Constantine M.; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-03-01

    A numerical investigation of the fundamental processes governing the momentum, energy, and mass exchanges between the solid, liquid, and gas phases of a vaporizing slurry droplet is presented. The axisymmetric configuration consists of an isolated slurry droplet with a large spherical solid particle in its core that is suddenly injected in a gaseous high-temperature, laminar, convective environmental. The model allows for independent motion of the solid particle along the axis of symmetry of the slurry droplet, and considers variable gas-phase thermophysical properties as well as variable liquid-phase viscosities and latent heat of vaporization. Additional features of the model include internal liquid circulation with transient droplet heating, droplet surface regression due to vaporization, and droplet deceleration with respect to the free flow due to drag. The numerical calculation employs an iterative solution procedure that has been successfully used previously for an isolated all-liquid droplet. We found that the relative motion of the solid particle and the liquid-carrier fluid is very significant during the early stages of the simulation. In that respect, the fluid mechanics dominate the heat and mass transport phenomena involved, thus strongly suggesting a high possibility of secondary atomization as a result of the penetration of the solid particle through the gas/liquid interface.

  13. A theoretical model for the Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, René; Tao, Zhen; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    In a previous paper [X. Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 120, 014903 (2016)], several experimental devices have been presented, which demonstrate the efficiency of electromagnetic techniques for detecting and sizing electrically insulating particles entrained in the flow of a molten metal. In each case, a non-uniform magnetic field is applied across the flow of the electrically conducting liquid, thereby generating a braking Lorentz force on this moving medium and a reaction force on the magnet, which tends to be entrained in the flow direction. The purpose of this letter is to derive scaling laws for this Lorentz force from an elementary theoretical model. For simplicity, as in the experiments, the flowing liquid is modeled as a solid body moving with a uniform velocity U. The eddy currents in the moving domain are derived from the classic induction equation and Ohm's law, and expressions for the Lorentz force density j ×B and for its integral over the entire moving domain follow. The insulating particles that are eventually present and entrained with this body are then treated as small disturbances in a classic perturbation analysis, thereby leading to scaling laws for the pulses they generate in the Lorentz force. The purpose of this letter is both to illustrate the eddy currents without and with insulating particles in the electrically conducting liquid and to derive a key relation between the pulses in the Lorentz force and the main parameters (particle volume and dimensions of the region subjected to the magnetic field).

  14. Particle-based ablation model for faint meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2014-07-01

    Modeling the ablation of meteoroids as they enter the atmosphere is a way of determining their physical structure and elemental composition. This can provide insight into the structure of parent bodies when combined with an orbit computed from observations. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO) is a source of new, high-resolution observations of faint meteors [1]. These faint objects tend to have pre-atmospheric masses around 10^{-5} kg, corresponding to a radius of 1 mm. A wide-field camera with a 28° field of view provides guidance to a high-resolution camera that tracks meteors in flight with 1.5° field of view. Meteors are recorded with a scale of 4 m per pixel at a range of 135 km, at 110 frames per second, allowing us to investigate detailed meteor morphology. This serves as an important new constraint for ablation models, in addition to meteor brightness (lightcurves) and meteoroid deceleration. High-resolution observations of faint meteors have revealed that contemporary ablation models are not able to predict meteor morphology, even while matching the observed lightcurve and meteoroid deceleration [2]. This implies that other physical processes, in addition to fragmentation, must be considered for faint meteor ablation. We present a new, particle-based approach to modeling the ablation of small meteoroids. In this model, we simulate the collisions between atmospheric particles and the meteoroid to determine the rate of evaporation and deceleration. Subsequent collisions simulated between evaporated meteoroid particles and ambient atmospheric particles then produce light that would be observed by high-resolution cameras. Preliminary results show simultaneous agreement with meteor morphology, lightcurves, and decelerations recorded with CAMO. A sample comparison of simulated and observed meteor morphology is given in the attached figure. Several meteoroids are well-represented as solid, stony bodies, but some require modeling as a dustball [3

  15. Model for particle balance in pumped divertors (pre-VORTEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.

    1990-08-01

    An internally consistent model for particle transport in an open divertor geometry has been developed. Embodied in a new code, pre-VORTEX, the model couples the particle balance in the plasma core, the scrape-off layer, the open divertor channels, and the vacuum'' regions. This mutual coupling is particularly important in determining the conditions required for high recycling in the divertor. The plasma core is considered to have a relatively quiescent core region and a less well confined edge-localized mode''(ELM) region. The scrape-off layer is modeled with one-dimensional parallel and perpendicular transport. A two-point divertor channel model is used; it is similar to previous models, but with the addition of new physical processes: hydrogen charge exchange, impurity thermal charge exchange, and flux-limited parallel transport. Wall recycling data are required to describe the differing recycling properties of the wall regions and the divertor plates. Given local plasma diffusivities and wall recycling properties, the model predicts the volume-averaged density and global particle confinement time. The input data are uncertain, and a major use for the model is to permit comparison with data. The final model, VORTEX, is intended for application to the analysis of divertor confinement experiments; it is coupled to a one-and-one-half--dimensional transport code and uses detailed geometric input from equilibrium fitting codes, experimentally measured core profiles, and such parameters as can be measured in the scrape-off layer. The pre-VORTEX model is compared as a stand-alone code with typical data from the DIII-D experiment and applied to the proposed DIII-D Advanced Divertor Project.

  16. Particle transport model sensitivity on wave-induced processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staneva, Joanna; Ricker, Marcel; Krüger, Oliver; Breivik, Oyvind; Stanev, Emil; Schrum, Corinna

    2017-04-01

    Different effects of wind waves on the hydrodynamics in the North Sea are investigated using a coupled wave (WAM) and circulation (NEMO) model system. The terms accounting for the wave-current interaction are: the Stokes-Coriolis force, the sea-state dependent momentum and energy flux. The role of the different Stokes drift parameterizations is investigated using a particle-drift model. Those particles can be considered as simple representations of either oil fractions, or fish larvae. In the ocean circulation models the momentum flux from the atmosphere, which is related to the wind speed, is passed directly to the ocean and this is controlled by the drag coefficient. However, in the real ocean, the waves play also the role of a reservoir for momentum and energy because different amounts of the momentum flux from the atmosphere is taken up by the waves. In the coupled model system the momentum transferred into the ocean model is estimated as the fraction of the total flux that goes directly to the currents plus the momentum lost from wave dissipation. Additionally, we demonstrate that the wave-induced Stokes-Coriolis force leads to a deflection of the current. During the extreme events the Stokes velocity is comparable in magnitude to the current velocity. The resulting wave-induced drift is crucial for the transport of particles in the upper ocean. The performed sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the model skill depends on the chosen processes. The results are validated using surface drifters, ADCP, HF radar data and other in-situ measurements in different regions of the North Sea with a focus on the coastal areas. The using of a coupled model system reveals that the newly introduced wave effects are important for the drift-model performance, especially during extremes. Those effects cannot be neglected by search and rescue, oil-spill, transport of biological material, or larva drift modelling.

  17. Modelling of particle distribution in the melting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wolf, D. A.; Russchenberg, H. W. J.; Ligthart, L. P.

    1990-12-01

    The analysis of radiowave propagation through, and radar scattering from, the melting layer requires a model of the melting ice particles with appropriate statistics of shape, size, and orientation distributions. Previous studies have indicated that the melting layer can be modeled by a collection of wet snow spheroids in air, of which the effective permittivity and the volume fraction are the most important parameters. It is proposed that the distribution of spheroid shapes can be modeled by a flat probability density of depolarization parameter lambda (3) between a minimum and a maximum value. The location of the average lambda (3) is crucial; the width is less important.

  18. Dissipative-particle-dynamics model of biofilm growth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Scheibe, Timothy D

    2011-06-01

    A dissipative-particle-dynamics model for the quantitative simulation of biofilm growth controlled by substrate (nutrient) consumption, advective and diffusive substrate transport, and hydrodynamic interactions with fluid flow (including fragmentation and reattachment) is described. The model was used to simulate biomass growth, decay, and spreading. It predicts how the biofilm morphology depends on flow conditions, biofilm growth kinetics, the rheomechanical properties of the biofilm, and adhesion to solid surfaces. The morphology of the model biofilm depends strongly on its rigidity and the magnitude of the body force that drives the fluid over the biofilm.

  19. Dissipative-particle-dynamics model of biofilm growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-06-01

    A dissipative-particle-dynamics model for the quantitative simulation of biofilm growth controlled by substrate (nutrient) consumption, advective and diffusive substrate transport, and hydrodynamic interactions with fluid flow (including fragmentation and reattachment) is described. The model was used to simulate biomass growth, decay, and spreading. It predicts how the biofilm morphology depends on flow conditions, biofilm growth kinetics, the rheomechanical properties of the biofilm, and adhesion to solid surfaces. The morphology of the model biofilm depends strongly on its rigidity and the magnitude of the body force that drives the fluid over the biofilm.

  20. Dissipative-particle-dynamics model of biofilm growth

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-06-13

    A dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for the quantitative simulation of biofilm growth controlled by substrate (nutrient) consumption, advective and diffusive substrate transport, and hydrodynamic interactions with fluid flow (including fragmentation and reattachment) is described. The model was used to simulate biomass growth, decay, and spreading. It predicts how the biofilm morphology depends on flow conditions, biofilm growth kinetics, the rheomechanical properties of the biofilm and adhesion to solid surfaces. The morphology of the model biofilm depends strongly on its rigidity and the magnitude of the body force that drives the fluid over the biofilm.

  1. Modeling Particle Rolling Behavior by the Modified Eccentric Circle Model of DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi-Long; Chen, Tsung-Hsien; Weng, Meng-Chia

    2012-09-01

    This study proposes a modified eccentric circle model to simulate the rolling resistance of circle particles through the distinct element method (DEM) simulation. The proposed model contains two major concepts: eccentric circle and local rotational damping. The mass center of a circular particle is first adjusted slightly for eccentricity to provide rotational stiffness. Local rotational damping is adopted to dissipate energy in the rotational direction. These associated material parameters can be obtained easily from the rolling behavior of one rod. This study verifies the proposed model with the repose angle tests of chalk rod assemblies, and the simulated results were satisfactory. Simulations using other existing models were also conducted for comparison, showing that the proposed model achieved better results. A landslide model test was further simulated, and this simulation agreed with both the failure pattern and the sliding process. In conclusion, particle rolling simulation using the proposed model appears to approach the actual particle trajectory, making it useful for various applications.

  2. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: implications for ash dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Scarlato, P.; Andronico, D.; Scollo, S.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first report of experimental measurements of the enhanced settling velocity of volcanic particles as function of particle volume fraction. In order to investigate the differences in the aerodynamic behavior of ash particles when settling individually or in mass, we performed systematic large-scale ash settling experiments using natural basaltic and phonolitic ash. By releasing ash particles at different, controlled volumetric flow rates, in an unconstrained open space and at minimal air movement, we measured their terminal velocity, size, and particle volume fraction with a high-speed camera at 2000 fps. Enhanced settling velocities of individual particles increase with increasing particle volume fraction. This suggests that particle clustering during fallout may be one reason explaining larger than theoretical depletion rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. We provide a quantitative empirical model that allows to calculate, from a given particle size and density, the enhanced velocity resulting from a given particle volume fraction. The proposed model has the potential to serve as a simple tool for the prediction of the terminal velocity of ash of an hypothetical distribution of ash of known particle size and volume fraction. This is of particular importance for advection-diffusion transport model of ash where generally a one-way coupling is adopted, considering only the flow effects on particles. To better quantify the importance of the enhanced settling velocity in ash dispersal, we finally introduced the new formulation in a Lagrangian model calculating for realistic eruptive conditions the resulting ash concentration in the atmosphere and on the ground.

  3. Modelling of microorganisms capture on magnetic carrier particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotariu, O.; Strachan, N. J. C.; Bădescu, V.

    2002-11-01

    Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) is a technique used in the detection of pathogenic microorganisms from food and environmental samples. Current IMS methods are insensitive due to the small sample sizes analysed. A stochastic model is described which estimates the time of collision between a small number of pathogenic microorganisms and superparamagnetic carrier microparticles within an aqueous suspension. The IMS system parameters which are varied in the model include: the diameter of the carrier particles, their volume concentration in suspension, the fraction of magnetic phase within the composite material of the particles and the magnetic field intensity and gradient. The data obtained will be used to help design magnetic separation systems to capture pathogenic microorganisms from large volume samples (approx. 250 ml).

  4. Modeling of Waves with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalrymple, R. A.; Herault, A.

    2008-12-01

    Providing an accurate representation of breaking waves is extremely difficult due to the complexity of the free surface, splash-up, and the induced vortical flows in the water. Monaghan (1994) and Dalrymple and Rogers (2004) are examples of using the numerical method Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics to model these breaking waves. Both of these studies accurately show the plunging jet and the splash-up of breaking plungers. However, full details of the flow requires highly resolved 3-D calculations. SPH is computational intensive, involving large numbers of computational particles and very small time steps. Recently Herault (2008) has shown that very high resolution and significant speed-ups in model calculation occurs by computing on the graphics card (GPU), rather than the CPU of computers. This use of the GPU is an on-going paradigm shift, which will be shown. Examples of breaking waves, along with a number of example free surface flows, will be shown.

  5. Speech enhancement based on nonlinear models using particle filters.

    PubMed

    Mustière, Frédéric; Bolić, Miodrag; Bouchard, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by the reportedly strong performance of particle filters (PFs) for noise reduction on essentially linear speech production models, and the mounting evidence that the introduction of nonlinearities can lead to a refined speech model, this paper presents a study of PF solutions to the problem of speech enhancement in the context of nonlinear, neural-type speech models. Several variations of a global model are presented (single/multiple neurons; bias/no bias), and corresponding PF solutions are derived. Different importance functions are given when beneficial, Rao-Blackwellization is proposed when possible, and dual/nondual versions of each algorithms are presented. The method shown can handle both white and colored noise. Using a variety of speech and noise signals and different objective quality measures, the performance of these algorithms are evaluated against other PF solutions running on linear models, as well as some traditional enhancement algorithms. A certain hierarchy in performance is established between each algorithm in the paper. Depending on the experimental conditions, the best-performing algorithms are a classical Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF) running on a linear model, and a proposed PF employing a nondual, nonlinear model with multiple neurons and no biases. With consistence, the neural-network-based PF outperforms RBPF at low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  6. 3D flare particle model for ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.

    2016-05-01

    A key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare /chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes a new 3D flare particle model in the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR), which provides independent control over the size and radial distribution of its signature. The 3D particles of each flare sub-munition are modelled stochastically and rendered using OpenGL z-buffering, 2D projection, and alpha-blending to produce a unique and time varying signature. A sensitivity analysis on each input parameter provides the data and methods needed to synthesize a model from an IR measurement of a decoy. The new model also eliminated artifacts and deficiencies in our previous model which prevented reliable tracks from the adaptive track gate algorithm already presented by Ramaswamy and Vaitekunas (2015). A sequence of scenarios are used to test and demonstrate the new flare model during a missile engagement.

  7. Multistrange particle production and the statistical hadronization model

    SciTech Connect

    Petran, Michal; Rafelski, Johann

    2010-07-15

    We consider the chemical freeze-out of XI, XI, and phi multistrange hadrons within a statistical hadronization model inspired approach. We study particle yields across a wide range of reaction energy and centrality from NA49 at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiments. We constrain the physical conditions present in the fireball source of strange hadrons and anticipate results expected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  8. Generation of Random Particle Packings for Discrete Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Weatherley, D.; Ayton, T.

    2012-04-01

    An important step in the setup process of Discrete Element Model (DEM) simulations is the generation of a suitable particle packing. There are quite a number of properties such a granular material specimen should ideally have, such as high coordination number, isotropy, the ability to fill arbitrary bounding volumes and the absence of locked-in stresses. An algorithm which is able to produce specimens fulfilling these requirements is the insertion based sphere packing algorithm originally proposed by Place and Mora, 2001 [2] and extended in this work. The algorithm works in two stages. First a number of "seed" spheres are inserted into the bounding volume. In the second stage the gaps between the "seed" spheres are filled by inserting new spheres in a way so they have D+1 (i.e. 3 in 2D, 4 in 3D) touching contacts with either other spheres or the boundaries of the enclosing volume. Here we present an implementation of the algorithm and a systematic statistical analysis of the generated sphere packings. The analysis of the particle radius distribution shows that they follow a power-law with an exponent ≈ D (i.e. ≈3 for a 3D packing and ≈2 for 2D). Although the algorithm intrinsically guarantees coordination numbers of at least 4 in 3D and 3 in 2D, the coordination numbers realized in the generated packings can be significantly higher, reaching beyond 50 if the range of particle radii is sufficiently large. Even for relatively small ranges of particle sizes (e.g. Rmin = 0.5Rmax) the maximum coordination number may exceed 10. The degree of isotropy of the generated sphere packing is also analysed in both 2D and 3D, by measuring the distribution of orientations of vectors joining the centres of adjacent particles. If the range of particle sizes is small, the packing algorithm yields moderate anisotropy approaching that expected for a face-centred cubic packing of equal-sized particles. However, once Rmin < 0.3Rmax a very high degree of isotropy is demonstrated in

  9. Modelling the dispersion of particle numbers in five European cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkonen, J.; Karl, M.; Keuken, M. P.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Denby, B. R.; Singh, V.; Douros, J.; Manders, A.; Samaras, Z.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Jonkers, S.; Aarnio, M.; Karppinen, A.; Kangas, L.; Lützenkirchen, S.; Petäjä, T.; Vouitsis, I.; Sokhi, R. S.

    2016-02-01

    We present an overview of the modelling of particle number concentrations (PNCs) in five major European cities, namely Helsinki, Oslo, London, Rotterdam, and Athens, in 2008. Novel emission inventories of particle numbers have been compiled both on urban and European scales. We used atmospheric dispersion modelling for PNCs in the five target cities and on a European scale, and evaluated the predicted results against available measured concentrations. In all the target cities, the concentrations of particle numbers (PNs) were mostly influenced by the emissions originating from local vehicular traffic. The influence of shipping and harbours was also significant for Helsinki, Oslo, Rotterdam, and Athens, but not for London. The influence of the aviation emissions in Athens was also notable. The regional background concentrations were clearly lower than the contributions originating from urban sources in Helsinki, Oslo, and Athens. The regional background was also lower than urban contributions in traffic environments in London, but higher or approximately equal to urban contributions in Rotterdam. It was numerically evaluated that the influence of coagulation and dry deposition on the predicted PNCs was substantial for the urban background in Oslo. The predicted and measured annual average PNCs in four cities agreed within approximately ≤ 26 % (measured as fractional biases), except for one traffic station in London. This study indicates that it is feasible to model PNCs in major cities within a reasonable accuracy, although major challenges remain in the evaluation of both the emissions and atmospheric transformation of PNCs.

  10. Object Oriented Design and the Standard Model of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovaca, Samir

    2007-04-01

    Inspired by the computer as both tool and metaphor, a new path emerges toward understanding life, physics, and existence. The path leads throughout all of nature, from the interior of cells to inside black holes. This view of science is based on the idea that information is the ultimate ``substance'' from which all things are made. Exploring this view, we will focus on Object - Oriented (OO) design as one of the most important designs in software development. The OO design views the world as composed of objects with well defined properties. The dynamics is pictured as interactions among objects. Interactions are mediated by messages that objects exchange with each other. This description closely resembles the view of the elementary particles world created by the Standard Model of particle physics. The object model (OM) provides a theoretical foundation upon which the OO design is built. The OM is based on the principles of abstraction, encapsulation, modularity and hierarchy. We will show that the Standard Model of particle physics follows the OM principles.

  11. Modelling of strongly coupled particle growth and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruy, F.; Touboul, E.

    2013-02-01

    The mathematical modelling of the dynamics of particle suspension is based on the population balance equation (PBE). PBE is an integro-differential equation for the population density that is a function of time t, space coordinates and internal parameters. Usually, the particle is characterized by a unique parameter, e.g. the matter volume v. PBE consists of several terms: for instance, the growth rate and the aggregation rate. So, the growth rate is a function of v and t. In classical modelling, the growth and the aggregation are independently considered, i.e. they are not coupled. However, current applications occur where the growth and the aggregation are coupled, i.e. the change of the particle volume with time is depending on its initial value v0, that in turn is related to an aggregation event. As a consequence, the dynamics of the suspension does not obey the classical Von Smoluchowski equation. This paper revisits this problem by proposing a new modelling by using a bivariate PBE (with two internal variables: v and v0) and by solving the PBE by means of a numerical method and Monte Carlo simulations. This is applied to a physicochemical system with a simple growth law and a constant aggregation kernel.

  12. Modeling RF Emissions from Particle Showers in Dense Mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyneman, Rachel; Belov, Konstantin; Wissel, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment has recorded multiple Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events via radio-frequency emissions from secondary particle showers in the Earth's atmosphere. The energy of these UHECR particles is reconstructed using Monte Carlo simulations based on first principles. The goal of the SLAC T-510 experiment is to validate these simulations and to provide an energy calibration for ANITA data analysis. We incorporated an RF emission simulation based on ZHS code into the GEANT4 toolkit, used for modeling the passage of particles in accelerator experiments. We predict strong radio emissions at the Cherenkov angle from a cascade of secondary particles in a polyethylene target in moderate magnetic fields. We see a strong dependence of the horizontally polarized component of the electric field on top of the Cherenkov cone on the magnetic field strength. We also observe a skewing of the Cherenkov cone as the magnetic field increases, which we believe to be an indication of the Askaryan effect. Special thanks to the National Science Foundation and the Research Experience for Undergraduates program.

  13. Alpha particle radioimmunotherapy: Animal models and clinical prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, R.M.; Kaplan, W.D.; Ferrara, J.L.; Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.; Burakoff, S.J.; Coleman, C.N. )

    1989-06-01

    Short-lived isotopes that emit alpha particles have a number of physical characteristics which make them attractive candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Among these characteristics are high linear energy transfer and correspondingly high cytotoxicity; particle range limited to several cell diameters from the parent atom; low potential for repair of alpha-induced DNA damage; and low dependence on dose rate and oxygen enhancement effects. This report reviews the synthesis, testing and use in animal models of an alpha particle emitting radioimmunoconjugate constructed via the noncovalent chelation of Bismuth-212 to a monoclonal IgM antibody specific for the murine T cells/neuroectodermal surface antigen, Thy 1.2. These {sup 212}Bi-anti-Thy 1.2 immunoconjugates are capable of extraordinary cytotoxicity in vitro, requiring approximately three {sup 212}Bi-labeled conjugates per target cell to suppress {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation to background levels. The antigen specificity afforded by the monoclonal antibody contributes a factor of approximately 40 to the radiotoxicity of the immunoconjugate. Animals inoculated with a Thy 1.2+ malignant ascites were cured of their tumor in an antigen-specific fashion by intraperitoneal doses of approximately 200 microCi per mouse. Alpha particle emitting radioimmunoconjugates show great potential for regional and intracavitary molecular radiotherapy.

  14. Phase transitions and relaxation dynamics of Ising models exchanging particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Segun; Fortin, Jean-Yves; Choi, M. Y.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of systems in nature and in society are open and subject to exchanging their constituents with other systems (e.g., environments). For instance, in biological systems, cells collect necessary energy and material by exchange of molecules or ions. Similarly, countries, cities or research institutes evolve as their constituents move in or out. To probe the corresponding particle exchange dynamics in such systems, we consider two Ising models exchanging particles and establish a master equation describing the equilibrium phases as well as the non-equilibrium dynamics of the system. It is found that an additional stable phase emerges as a consequence of the particle exchange process. Furthermore, we formulate the Ginzburg-Landau theory which allows to probe correlation effects. Accordingly, critical slowing down is manifested and the associated dynamic exponent is computed in the linear relaxation regime. In particular, this approach is relevant for investigating the grand canonical description of the system plus environment, with particle exchange and state transitions taken into account explicitly.

  15. Comparison of Particle Flow Code and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modelling of Landslide Run outs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preh, A.; Poisel, R.; Hungr, O.

    2009-04-01

    In most continuum mechanics methods modelling the run out of landslides the moving mass is divided into a number of elements, the velocities of which can be established by numerical integration of Newtońs second law (Lagrangian solution). The methods are based on fluid mechanics modelling the movements of an equivalent fluid. In 2004, McDougall and Hungr presented a three-dimensional numerical model for rapid landslides, e.g. debris flows and rock avalanches, called DAN3D.The method is based on the previous work of Hungr (1995) and is using an integrated two-dimensional Lagrangian solution and meshless Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) principle to maintain continuity. DAN3D has an open rheological kernel, allowing the use of frictional (with constant porepressure ratio) and Voellmy rheologies and gives the possibility to change material rheology along the path. Discontinuum (granular) mechanics methods model the run out mass as an assembly of particles moving down a surface. Each particle is followed exactly as it moves and interacts with the surface and with its neighbours. Every particle is checked on contacts with every other particle in every time step using a special cell-logic for contact detection in order to reduce the computational effort. The Discrete Element code PFC3D was adapted in order to make possible discontinuum mechanics models of run outs. Punta Thurwieser Rock Avalanche and Frank Slide were modelled by DAN as well as by PFC3D. The simulations showed correspondingly that the parameters necessary to get results coinciding with observations in nature are completely different. The maximum velocity distributions due to DAN3D reveal that areas of different maximum flow velocity are next to each other in Punta Thurwieser run out whereas the distribution of maximum flow velocity shows almost constant maximum flow velocity over the width of the run out regarding Frank Slide. Some 30 percent of total kinetic energy is rotational kinetic energy in

  16. Current models of the intensely ionizing particle environment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics (CREME) model that is currently in use to estimate single event effect rates in spacecraft is described. The CREME model provides a description of the radiation environment in interplanetary space near the orbit of the earth that contains no major deficiencies. The accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray model is limited by the uncertainties in solar modulation. The model for solar energetic particles could be improved by making use of all the data that has been collected on solar energetic particle events. There remain major uncertainties about the environment within the earth's magnetosphere, because of the uncertainties over the charge states of the heavy ions in the anomalous component and solar flares, and because of trapped heavy ions. The present CREME model is valid only at 1 AU, but it could be extended to other parts of the heliosphere. There is considerable data on the radiation environment from 0.2 to 35 AU in the ecliptic plane. This data could be used to extend the CREME model.

  17. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    B. Robinson

    2000-04-07

    The purpose of the transport methodology and component analysis is to provide the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport and model setup for transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale model. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated into the FEHM computer code and the resulting changes in the FEHM code are to be submitted to the software configuration management system. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining colloid-facilitated transport parameters are outlined for use in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses. Concurrently, process-level flow model calculations are being carrier out in a PMR for the unsaturated zone. The computer code TOUGH2 is being used to generate three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields, that are supplied to the Performance Assessment group for subsequent transport simulations. These flow fields are converted to input files compatible with the FEHM code, which for this application simulates radionuclide transport using the particle-tracking algorithm outlined in this AMR. Therefore, this AMR establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model, but the specific breakthrough curves presented do not necessarily represent the behavior of the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone.

  18. Two-phase flow modeling with discrete particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A.; Trapp, J.A. |

    1992-03-23

    The design of efficient heat exchangers in which the working fluid changes phase requires accurate modeling of two-phase fluid flow. The local Navier-Stokes equations form the basic continuum equations for this flow situation. However, the local instantaneous model using these equations is intractable for afl but the simplest problems. AH the practical models for two-phase flow analysis are based on equations that have been averaged over control volumes. These models average out the detailed description within the control volumes and rely on flow regime maps to determine the distribution of the two phases within a control volume. Flow regime maps depend on steady state models and probably are not correct for dynamic models. Numerical simulations of the averaged two-phase flow models are usually performed using a two-fluid Eulerian description for the two phases. Eulerian descriptions have the advantage of having simple boundary conditions, but the disadvantage of introducing numerical diffusion, i.e., sharp interfaces are not maintained as the flow develops, but are diffused. Lagrangian descriptions have the advantage of being able to track sharp interfaces without diffusion, but they have the disadvantage of requiring more complicated boundary conditions. This paper describes a numerical scheme and attendant computer program, DISCON2, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between the intractable local instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. This new model uses a combination of an Eulerian and a Lagrangian representation of the two phases. The dispersed particles (bubbles or drops) are modeled individually using a large representative number of particles, each with their own Lagrangian description. The continuous phases (liquid or gas) use an Eulerian description.

  19. Modelling the internal structure of nascent soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Totton, Tim S.; Sander, Markus; Kraft, Markus; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Wales, David J.; Misquitta, Alston J.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper we present studies of clusters assembled from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules similar in size to small soot particles. The clusters studied were comprised of coronene (C{sub 24}H{sub 12}) or pyrene (C{sub 16}H{sub 10}) molecules and represent the types of soot precursor molecule typically found in flame environments. A stochastic 'basin-hopping' global optimisation scheme was used to locate low-lying local minima on the potential energy surface of the molecular clusters. TEM-style projections of the resulting geometries show similarities with those observed experimentally in TEM images of soot particles. The mass densities of these clusters have also been calculated and are lower than bulk values of the pure crystalline PAH structures. They are also significantly lower than the standard value of 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} used in our soot models. Consequently we have varied the mass density between 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} to examine the effects of varying soot density on our soot model and observed how the shape of the particle size distribution changes. Based on similarities between nascent soot particles and PAH clusters a more accurate soot density is likely to be significantly lower than 1.8 g/cm{sup 3}. As such, for modelling purposes, we recommend that the density of nascent soot should be taken to be the value obtained for our coronene cluster of 1.12 g/cm{sup 3}. (author)

  20. Modeling electrokinetic flows by consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Parks, Michael L.

    2017-04-01

    We present a consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (I2SPH) discretization of Navier-Stokes, Poisson-Boltzmann, and advection-diffusion equations subject to Dirichlet or Robin boundary conditions. It is applied to model various two and three dimensional electrokinetic flows in simple or complex geometries. The accuracy and convergence of the consistent I2SPH are examined via comparison with analytical solutions, grid-based numerical solutions, or empirical models. The new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in microfluidics and complex fluids with charged objects, such as colloids and biomolecules, in arbitrary complex geometries.

  1. Modeling electrokinetic flows by consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wenxiao; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; ...

    2017-01-03

    In this paper, we present a consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (I2SPH) discretization of Navier–Stokes, Poisson–Boltzmann, and advection–diffusion equations subject to Dirichlet or Robin boundary conditions. It is applied to model various two and three dimensional electrokinetic flows in simple or complex geometries. The accuracy and convergence of the consistent I2SPH are examined via comparison with analytical solutions, grid-based numerical solutions, or empirical models. Lastly, the new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in microfluidics and complex fluids with charged objects, such as colloids and biomolecules, in arbitrary complex geometries.

  2. Particles with variable spin and a composite hadron model

    SciTech Connect

    Pletyukov, V.A.; Strazhev, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of relativistic wave equations (RWE) is examined as a possibility for construction of a gauge model without use of external coordinates, based on localization of nongeometric symmetry. The described approach ascribes to the quark a wave function the component of which obey RWE. It considers the quark as a particle with a variable spin of 1/2, 3/2. Without introducing the concept of color it is possible to solve the problem of the relationship between spin and statistics in the composite hadron model.

  3. Force models for particle-dynamics simulations of granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.

    1994-12-01

    Engineering-mechanics contact models are utilized to describe the inelastic, frictional interparticle forces acting in dry granular systems. Simple analyses based on one-dimensional chains are utilized to illustrate wave propagation phenomena in dense and dilute discrete particulates. The variation of restitution coefficient with impact velocity is illustrated for a variety of viscous and hysteretic normal force models. The effects of interparticle friction on material strength in discrete-particle simulations are much closer to measured values than are theories that do not allow article rotations.

  4. Interactive data exploration and particle tracking for general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, R. I.; Peskin, R. L.; Walther, S. S.; Zinn, H. P.

    1995-01-01

    The SCENE environment for interactive visualization of complex data sets is discussed. This environment is used to create tools for graphical exploration of atmospheric flow models. These tools may be extended by the user in a seamless manner, so that no programming is required. A module for accurately tracing field lines and particle trajectories in SCENE is presented. This is used to examine the flowfield qualitatively with streamlines and pathlines and to identify critical points in the velocity field. The paper also describes a visualization tool for general circulation models on which the primary features of the environment are demonstrated.

  5. Restricting Positive Energy Representations of Diff+( S 1) to the Stabilizer of n Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Mihály

    2008-01-01

    Let G n ⊂ Diff+( S 1) be the stabilizer of n given points of S 1. How much information do we lose if we restrict a positive energy representation U^c_h associated to an admissible pair ( c, h) of the central charge and lowest energy, to the subgroup G n ? The question, and a part of the answer originate in chiral conformal QFT. The value of c can be easily “recovered” from such a restriction; the hard question concerns the value of h. If c ≤ 1, then there is no loss of information, and accordingly, all of these restrictions are irreducible. In this work it is shown that U^ch|_{G_n} is always irreducible for n = 1 and, if h = 0, it is irreducible at least up to n ≤ 3. Moreover, an example is given for c > 2 and certain values of h neq tilde{h} such that U^ch|_{G_1}˜eq U^c_{tilde{h}}|_{G_1} . It is also concluded that for these values U^ch|_{G_n} cannot be irreducible for n ≥ 2. For further values of c, h and n, the question is left open. Nevertheless, the example already shows that, on the circle, there are conformal QFT models in which local and global intertwiners are not equivalent.

  6. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure during solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Anid, Hani Khaled

    show a very different response during anisotropic events, leading to variations in aircrew radiation doses that may be significant for dose assessment. To estimate the additional exposure due to solar flares, a model was developed using a Monte-Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX. The model transports an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere using the MCNPX analysis. This code produces the estimated flux at a specific altitude where radiation dose conversion coefficients are applied to convert the particle flux into effective and ambient dose-equivalent rates. A cut-off rigidity model accounts for the shielding effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during Ground Level Enhancements 60 and 65. An anisotropy analysis that uses neutron monitor responses and the pitch angle distribution of energetic solar particles was used to identify particle anisotropy for a solar event in December 2006. In anticipation of future commercial use, a computer code has been developed to implement the radiation dose assessment model for routine analysis. Keywords: Radiation Dosimetry, Radiation Protection, Space Physics.

  7. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for polymer molecules in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinov, Sergey; Ellero, Marco; Hu, Xiangyu; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2008-06-01

    We present a model for a polymer molecule in solution based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [Español and Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)]. This method is a thermodynamically consistent version of smoothed particle hydrodynamics able to discretize the Navier-Stokes equations and, at the same time, to incorporate thermal fluctuations according to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Within the framework of the method developed for mesoscopic multiphase flows by Hu and Adams [J. Comput. Phys. 213, 844 (2006)], we introduce additional finitely extendable nonlinear elastic interactions between particles that represent the beads of a polymer chain. In order to assess the accuracy of the technique, we analyze the static and dynamic conformational properties of the modeled polymer molecule in solution. Extensive tests of the method for the two-dimensional (2D) case are performed, showing good agreement with the analytical theory. Finally, the effect of confinement on the conformational properties of the polymer molecule is investigated by considering a 2D microchannel with gap H varying between 1 and 10μm , of the same order as the polymer gyration radius. Several SDPD simulations are performed for different chain lengths corresponding to N=20-100 beads, giving a universal behavior of the gyration radius RG and polymer stretch X as functions of the channel gap when normalized properly.

  8. Entrainment of coarse grains using a discrete particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Arnold, Roger B. Jr.

    2014-10-06

    Conventional bedload transport models and incipient motion theories relying on a time-averaged boundary shear stress are incapable of accounting for the effects of fluctuating near-bed velocity in turbulent flow and are therefore prone to significant errors. Impulse, the product of an instantaneous force magnitude and its duration, has been recently proposed as an appropriate criterion for quantifying the effects of flow turbulence in removing coarse grains from the bed surface. Here, a discrete particle model (DPM) is used to examine the effects of impulse, representing a single idealized turbulent event, on particle entrainment. The results are classified according to the degree of grain movement into the following categories: motion prior to entrainment, initial dislodgement, and energetic displacement. The results indicate that in all three cases the degree of particle motion depends on both the force magnitude and the duration of its application and suggest that the effects of turbulence must be adequately accounted for in order to develop a more accurate method of determining incipient motion. DPM is capable of simulating the dynamics of grain entrainment and is an appropriate tool for further study of the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport.

  9. Discussion of Stokes' hypothesis through the smoothed particle hydrodynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Durante, Danilo; Bonet Avalos, Josep; Souto-Iglesias, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Stokes' hypothesis, the zeroing of the bulk viscosity in a Newtonian fluid, is discussed in this paper. To this aim, a continuum macroscopic fluid domain is initially modeled as a Hamiltonian system of discrete particles, for which the interparticle dissipative forces are required to be radial in order to conserve the angular momentum. The resulting system of particles is then reconverted to the continuum domain via the framework of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model. Since an SPH-consistent approximation of the Newtonian viscous term in the momentum equation incorporates interparticle radial as well as nonradial terms, it is postulated that the latter must be null. In the present work it is shown that this constraint implies that first and second viscosities are equal, resulting in a positive value for the bulk viscosity, in contradiction to the cited Stokes' hypothesis. Moreover, it is found that this postulate leads to bulk viscosity coefficients close to values found in the experimental literature for monoatomic gases and common liquids such as water.

  10. Models of filter-based particle light absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasha, Khadeejeh M.

    Light absorption by aerosol is very important in the visible, near UN, and near I.R region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have a great influence on the flux of solar energy, and also impact health in a negative sense when they are breathed into lungs. Aerosol absorption measurements are usually performed by filter-based methods that are derived from the change in light transmission through a filter where particles have been deposited. These methods suffer from interference between light-absorbing and light-scattering aerosol components. The Aethalometer is the most commonly used filter-based instrument for aerosol light absorption measurement. This dissertation describes new understanding of aerosol light absorption obtained by the filter method. The theory uses a multiple scattering model for the combination of filter and particle optics. The theory is evaluated using Aethalometer data from laboratory and ambient measurements in comparison with photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption. Two models were developed to calculate aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data, and were compared to the in-situ aerosol light absorption coefficients. The first is an approximate model and the second is a "full" model. In the approximate model two extreme cases of aerosol optics were used to develop a model-based calibration scheme for the 7-wavelength Aethalometer. These cases include those of very strong scattering aerosols (Ammonium sulfate sample) and very absorbing aerosols (kerosene soot sample). The exponential behavior of light absorption in the strong multiple scattering limit is shown to be the square root of the total absorption optical depth rather than linear with optical depth as is commonly assumed with Beer's law. 2-stream radiative transfer theory was used to develop the full model to calculate the aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data. This comprehensive model

  11. Three-particle correlations in a multiphase transport model

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Yifeng; Ko, Che Ming

    2017-03-31

    Here, we study three-particle mixed harmonic correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions by considering the observable Cm,n,m+n= cos(mφ1+nφ2-(m +n)φ3), where φ1,2,3 are azimuthal angles of all particle triplets, using a multiphase transport model. We find that except for C123, these results on the centrality dependence of C112, C224 and C235 as well as the relative pseudorapidity dependence of C123 and C224 in Au+Au collisions at √s=200 GeV agree reasonable well with the experimental data from the STAR Collaboration. We also discuss the implications of our results.

  12. A Refined Model for Solid Particle Rock Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momber, A. W.

    2016-02-01

    A procedure for the estimation of distribution parameters of a Weibull distribution model K 1 = f( K Ic 12/4 / σ C 23/4 ) for solid particle erosion, as recently suggested in Rock Mech Rock Eng, doi: 10.1007/s00603-014-0658-x, 2014, is derived. The procedure is based on examinations of elastic-plastically responding rocks (rhyolite, granite) and plastically responding rocks (limestone, schist). The types of response are quantified through SEM inspections of eroded surfaces. Quantitative numbers for the distribution parameter K 1 are calculated for 30 rock materials, which cover a wide range of mechanical properties. The ranking according to the parameter K 1 is related to qualitative rock classification schemes. A modified proposal for the erosion of schist due to solid particle impingement at normal incidence is introduced.

  13. From flow and particle transport modeling to vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Joseph Fabian

    2001-08-01

    This thesis is composed of two parts. Part I is devoted to the analysis of particle transport and deposition. In this part, flow and particle transport and deposition in a furnace and under microgravity conditions are analyzed. In the first study of Part I, fluid flow, combustion, heat and mass transfer involved in a methane/air furnace were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in the flow field and thermal conditions in the furnace and to develop methods for improving its efficiency. The analysis of the combustor model was performed using an unstructured grid model developed with the Gambit grid generator of FLUENT version 5. In the second study of Part I, particle dispersion in a liquid filled box under orbital g-jitter excitation is analyzed. The study investigated particle motion experiments that were performed aboard the orbiting shuttle. The experiments have provided confusing data as to the nature of particle dispersion in the orbital environment. To obtain a better understanding of the dynamics involved, a series of numerical simulations are performed to study the dispersion of suspended particles subject to g-jitter excitations. Part II of the thesis is devoted to the analysis of vibration and vibration isolation problems. Following along the lines of vibration effecting system performance, a study of vibration isolation used to protect avionics equipment from adverse aircraft vibration environments was conducted. Passive isolation is the simplest means to achieve this goal. The system used here consisted of a circular steel ring with a lump mass on top and exposed to base excitation. Sinusoidal and filtered zero-mean Gaussian white noise were used to excite the structure and the acceleration response spectra at the top of the ring were computed. An experiment was performed to identify the natural frequencies and modal damping of the circular ring. The polished homogeneity measurement of large optics mounted in a vertical ring

  14. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams’ deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young’s moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams’ survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  15. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles.

    PubMed

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams' deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young's moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams' survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications.

  16. Comprehensive computer model for magnetron sputtering. II. Charged particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Francisco J. Dew, Steven K.; Field, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Discharges for magnetron sputter thin film deposition systems involve complex plasmas that are sensitively dependent on magnetic field configuration and strength, working gas species and pressure, chamber geometry, and discharge power. The authors present a numerical formulation for the general solution of these plasmas as a component of a comprehensive simulation capability for planar magnetron sputtering. This is an extensible, fully three-dimensional model supporting realistic magnetic fields and is self-consistently solvable on a desktop computer. The plasma model features a hybrid approach involving a Monte Carlo treatment of energetic electrons and ions, along with a coupled fluid model for thermalized particles. Validation against a well-known one-dimensional system is presented. Various strategies for improving numerical stability are investigated as is the sensitivity of the solution to various model and process parameters. In particular, the effect of magnetic field, argon gas pressure, and discharge power are studied.

  17. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Watanabe, Takehito; Chadwick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Reduced Quasilinear Models for Energetic Particles Interaction with Alfvenic Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghantous, Katy

    2013-11-01

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) and the 1.5D reduced models are able to predict the effect of Alfvenic eigenmodes' interaction with energetic particles in burning plasmas. This interaction can result in energetic-particle losses that can damage the first wall, deteriorate the plasma performance, and even prevent ignition. The 1.5D model assumes a broad spectrum of overlapping modes and, based on analytic expressions for the growth and damping rates, calculates the pressure profiles that the energetic particles relax to upon interacting with the modes. 1.5D is validated with DIII-D experiments and predicted neutron losses consistent with observation. The model is employed to predict alpha-particle fusion-product losses in a large-scale operational parameter-space for burning plasmas. \\par The LBQ model captures the interaction both in the regime of isolated modes as well as in the conventional regime of overlapping modes. Rules were established that allow quasilinear equations to replicate the expected steady-state saturation levels of isolated modes. The fitting formula is improved and the model is benchmarked with a Vlasov code, BOT. The saturation levels are accurately predicted and the mode evolution is well-replicated in the case of steady-state evolution where the collisions are high enough that coherent structures do not form. When the collisionality is low, oscillatory behavior can occur. LBQ can also exhibit non-steady behavior, but the onset of oscillations occurs for much higher collisional rates in BOT than in LBQ. For certain parameters of low collisionality, hole-clump creation and frequency chirping can occur which are not captured by the LBQ model. Also, there are cases of non-steady evolution without chirping which is possible for LBQ to study. However the results are inconclusive since the periods and amplitudes of the oscillations in the mode evolution are not well-replicated. If multiple modes exist, they can grow to the point of overlap

  19. Reduced quasilinear models for energetic particles interaction with Alfvenic eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) and the 1.5D reduced models are able to predict the effect of Alfvenic eigenmodes' interaction with energetic particles in burning plasmas. This interaction can result in energetic-particle losses that can damage the first wall, deteriorate the plasma performance, and even prevent ignition. The 1.5D model assumes a broad spectrum of overlapping modes and, based on analytic expressions for the growth and damping rates, calculates the pressure profiles that the energetic particles relax to upon interacting with the modes. 1.5D is validated with DIII-D experiments and predicted neutron losses consistent with observation. The model is employed to predict alpha-particle fusion-product losses in a large-scale operational parameter-space for burning plasmas. The LBQ model captures the interaction both in the regime of isolated modes as well as in the conventional regime of overlapping modes. Rules were established that allow quasilinear equations to replicate the expected steady-state saturation levels of isolated modes. The fitting formula is improved and the model is benchmarked with a Vlasov code, BOT. The saturation levels are accurately predicted and the mode evolution is well-replicated in the case of steady-state evolution where the collisions are high enough that coherent structures do not form. When the collisionality is low, oscillatory behavior can occur. LBQ can also exhibit non-steady behavior, but the onset of oscillations occurs for much higher collisional rates in BOT than in LBQ. For certain parameters of low collisionality, hole-clump creation and frequency chirping can occur which are not captured by the LBQ model. Also, there are cases of non-steady evolution without chirping which is possible for LBQ to study. However the results are inconclusive since the periods and amplitudes of the oscillations in the mode evolution are not well-replicated. If multiple modes exist, they can grow to the point of overlap which

  20. A particle based simulation model for glacier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Riikilä, T. I.; Tallinen, T.; Zwinger, T.; Benn, D.; Moore, J. C.; Timonen, J.

    2013-10-01

    A particle-based computer simulation model was developed for investigating the dynamics of glaciers. In the model, large ice bodies are made of discrete elastic particles which are bound together by massless elastic beams. These beams can break, which induces brittle behaviour. At loads below fracture, beams may also break and reform with small probabilities to incorporate slowly deforming viscous behaviour in the model. This model has the advantage that it can simulate important physical processes such as ice calving and fracturing in a more realistic way than traditional continuum models. For benchmarking purposes the deformation of an ice block on a slip-free surface was compared to that of a similar block simulated with a Finite Element full-Stokes continuum model. Two simulations were performed: (1) calving of an ice block partially supported in water, similar to a grounded marine glacier terminus, and (2) fracturing of an ice block on an inclined plane of varying basal friction, which could represent transition to fast flow or surging. Despite several approximations, including restriction to two-dimensions and simplified water-ice interaction, the model was able to reproduce the size distributions of the debris observed in calving, which may be approximated by universal scaling laws. On a moderate slope, a large ice block was stable and quiescent as long as there was enough of friction against the substrate. For a critical length of frictional contact, global sliding began, and the model block disintegrated in a manner suggestive of a surging glacier. In this case the fragment size distribution produced was typical of a grinding process.

  1. A particle based simulation model for glacier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Riikilä, T. I.; Tallinen, T.; Zwinger, T.; Benn, D.; Moore, J. C.; Timonen, J.

    2013-03-01

    A particle-based computer simulation model was developed for investigating the dynamics of glaciers. In the current model, large ice bodies are made of discrete elastic particles which are bound together by massless and elastic beams. The beams can break which induces brittle behaviour. At loads below fracture, beams may also break and reform with small probabilities in order to incorporate slowly deforming viscous behaviour in the model. This model has the advantage that it can simulate important physical processes such as ice calving and fracturing in a more realistic way than traditional continuum models. Two simulations were performed: (1) calving of an ice block partially supported in water, which could represent a grounded marine glacier terminus, and (2) fracturing of an ice block on an inclined plane of varying basal friction, which could represent transition to fast flow or surging. For benchmarking purposes the deformation of an ice block on a slip-free surface was compared to that of a similar block simulated with a Finite Element full-Stokes continuum model. In spite of several simplifications, which include restriction to two-dimenions and simplified rheology for water, the model introduced was able to reproduce the size distributions of the icebergs and the debris observed in calving. The size distributions we produce may be approximated by universal scaling laws. On a moderate slope, a large ice block was stable as long as there was enough of friction against the substrate. This was a quiescent state. For a critical length of frictional contact global sliding began, and the model block disintegrated in a manner suggestive of a surging glacier. In this case the fragment size distribution produced was typical of a grinding process.

  2. Modeling the Controlled Recrystallization of Particle-Containing Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Khaled; Root, Jameson M.; Long, Zhengdong; Field, David P.

    2016-12-01

    The recrystallized fraction for AA7050 during the solution heat treatment is highly dependent upon the history of deformation during thermomechanical processing. In this work, a state variable model was developed to predict the recrystallization volume fraction as a function of processing parameters. Particle stimulated nucleation (PSN) was observed as a dominant mechanism of recrystallization in AA7050. The mesoscale Monte Carlo Potts model was used to simulate the evolved microstructure during static recrystallization with the given recrystallization fraction determined already by the state variable model for AA7050 alloy. The spatial inhomogeneity of nucleation is obtained from the measurement of the actual second-phase particle distribution in the matrix identified using backscattered electron (BSE) imaging. The state variable model showed good fit with the experimental results, and the simulated microstructures were quantitatively comparable to the experimental results for the PSN recrystallized microstructure of 7050 aluminum alloy. It was also found that the volume fraction of recrystallization did not proceed as dictated by the Avrami equation in this alloy because of the presence of the growth inhibitors.

  3. Modeling solar energetic particle events using ENLIL heliosphere simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Mays, M. L.; Odstrcil, D.; Li, Yan; Bain, H.; Lee, C. O.; Galvin, A. B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Larson, D.; Futaana, Y.

    2017-07-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) event modeling has gained renewed attention in part because of the availability of a decade of multipoint measurements from STEREO and L1 spacecraft at 1 AU. These observations are coupled with improving simulations of the geometry and strength of heliospheric shocks obtained by using coronagraph images to send erupted material into realistic solar wind backgrounds. The STEREO and ACE measurements in particular have highlighted the sometimes surprisingly widespread nature of SEP events. It is thus an opportune time for testing SEP models, which typically focus on protons 1-100 MeV, toward both physical insight to these observations and potentially useful space radiation environment forecasting tools. Some approaches emphasize the concept of particle acceleration and propagation from close to the Sun, while others emphasize the local field line connection to a traveling, evolving shock source. Among the latter is the previously introduced SEPMOD treatment, based on the widely accessible and well-exercised WSA-ENLIL-cone model. SEPMOD produces SEP proton time profiles at any location within the ENLIL domain. Here we demonstrate a SEPMOD version that accommodates multiple, concurrent shock sources occurring over periods of several weeks. The results illustrate the importance of considering longer-duration time periods and multiple CME contributions in analyzing, modeling, and forecasting SEP events.

  4. Modeling the Controlled Recrystallization of Particle-Containing Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Khaled; Root, Jameson M.; Long, Zhengdong; Field, David P.

    2017-01-01

    The recrystallized fraction for AA7050 during the solution heat treatment is highly dependent upon the history of deformation during thermomechanical processing. In this work, a state variable model was developed to predict the recrystallization volume fraction as a function of processing parameters. Particle stimulated nucleation (PSN) was observed as a dominant mechanism of recrystallization in AA7050. The mesoscale Monte Carlo Potts model was used to simulate the evolved microstructure during static recrystallization with the given recrystallization fraction determined already by the state variable model for AA7050 alloy. The spatial inhomogeneity of nucleation is obtained from the measurement of the actual second-phase particle distribution in the matrix identified using backscattered electron (BSE) imaging. The state variable model showed good fit with the experimental results, and the simulated microstructures were quantitatively comparable to the experimental results for the PSN recrystallized microstructure of 7050 aluminum alloy. It was also found that the volume fraction of recrystallization did not proceed as dictated by the Avrami equation in this alloy because of the presence of the growth inhibitors.

  5. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  6. Self-assembly of model amphiphilic Janus particles.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Gerald; Gubbins, Keith E; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2012-05-07

    We apply molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure formation of amphiphilic Janus particles in the bulk phase. The Janus particles are modeled as (soft) spheres composed of a hydrophilic and hydrophobic part. Their orientation is described by a vector representing an internal degree of freedom. Investigating energy fluctuations and cluster size distributions, we determine the aggregation line in a temperature-density-diagram, where the reduced temperature is an inverse measure for the anisotropic coupling. Below this aggregation line clusters of various sizes depending on density and reduced temperature are found. For low densities in the range ρ∗ ≤ 0.3, the cluster size distribution has a broad maximum, indicating simultaneous existence of various cluster sizes between 5 and 10. We find no hint of a condensation transition of these clustered systems. In the case of higher densities (ρ∗ = 0.5 and 0.6), the cluster size distribution shows an extremely narrow peak at clusters of size 13. In these icosahedrons, the particles are arranged in a closed-packed manner, thereby maximizing the number of bonds. Analyzing the translational mean-square displacement we also observe indications of hindered diffusion due to aggregation.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of radiative heat transfer in particle-laden flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farbar, Erin; Boyd, Iain D.; Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations are applied to model radiative heat transfer in a dispersed particle phase exhibiting preferential concentration typical of a turbulent, particle-laden flow environment. The dispersed phase is composed of micron-sized nickel particles, and the carrier phase is non-participating. The simulations are performed for a snapshot of the particle field using the Monte Carlo Ray Tracing method, and the spectral dependence of the optical properties is considered. Interaction between the particles and radiation is modeled by projecting the particle locations onto an Eulerian mesh. Results show that the optically thin approximation results in errors in predicted particle heat transfer of up to 35% at some locations in the particle field. Oxidation is shown to change the absorption efficiency of the particles significantly, while consideration of non-spherical particle shapes results in relatively small changes in the predicted optical properties of the particles.

  8. How to model the interaction of charged Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieronimus, Reint; Raschke, Simon; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the interaction of charged Janus particles including screening effects. The explicit interaction is mapped via a least square method on a variable number n of systematically generated tensors that reflect the angular dependence of the potential. For n = 2 we show that the interaction is equivalent to a model previously described by Erdmann, Kröger, and Hess (EKH). Interestingly, this mapping is for n = 2 not able to capture the subtleties of the interaction for small screening lengths. Rather, a larger number of tensors has to be used. We find that the characteristics of the Janus type interaction plays an important role for the aggregation behavior. We obtained cluster structures up to the size of 13 particles for n = 2 and 36 and screening lengths κ-1 = 0.1 and 1.0 via Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of the screening length is analyzed and the structures are compared to results for an electrostatic-type potential and for the multipole-expanded Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We find that a dipole-like potential (EKH or dipole DLVO approximation) is not able to sufficiently reproduce the anisotropy effects of the potential. Instead, a higher order expansion has to be used to obtain cluster structures that are compatible with experimental observations. The resulting minimum-energy clusters are compared to those of sticky hard sphere systems. Janus particles with a short-range screened interaction resemble sticky hard sphere clusters for all considered particle numbers, whereas for long-range screening even very small clusters are structurally different.

  9. Modeling Particle Shape-Dependent Dynamics in Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Samar; Liu, Yaling; Hu, Walter; Gao, Jinming

    2010-01-01

    One of the major challenges in nanomedicine is to improve nanoparticle cell selectivity and adhesion efficiency through designing functionalized nanoparticles of controlled sizes, shapes, and material compositions. Recent data on cylindrically shaped filomicelles are beginning to show that non-spherical particles remarkably improved the biological properties over spherical counterpart. Despite these exciting advances, non-spherical particles have not been widely used in nanomedicine applications due to the lack of fundamental understanding of shape effect on targeting efficiency. This paper intends to investigate the shape-dependent adhesion kinetics of non-spherical nanoparticles through computational modeling. The ligand-receptor binding kinetics is coupled with Brownian dynamics to study the dynamic delivery process of nanorods under various vascular flow conditions. The influences of nanoparticle shape, ligand density, and shear rate on adhesion probability are studied. Nanorods are observed to contact and adhere to the wall much easier than their spherical counterparts under the same configuration due to their tumbling motion. The binding probability of a nanorod under a shear rate of 8 s−1 is found to be three times higher than that of a nanosphere with the same volume. The particle binding probability decreases with increased flow shear rate and channel height. The Brownian motion is found to largely enhance nanoparticle binding. Results from this study contribute to the fundamental understanding and knowledge on how particle shape affects the transport and targeting efficiency of nanocarriers, which will provide mechanistic insights on the design of shape-specific nanomedicine for targeted drug delivery applications. PMID:21399713

  10. Interactive computational models of particle dynamics using virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, T.; Diachin, D.; Freitag, L.; Heath, D.; Herzog, J.; Michels, W.

    1996-12-31

    An increasing number of industrial applications rely on computational models to reduce costs in product design, development, and testing cycles. Here, the authors discuss an interactive environment for the visualization, analysis, and modification of computational models used in industrial settings. In particular, they focus on interactively placing massless, massed, and evaporating particulate matter in computational fluid dynamics applications.they discuss the numerical model used to compute the particle pathlines in the fluid flow for display and analysis. They briefly describe the toolkits developed for vector and scalar field visualization, interactive particulate source placement, and a three-dimensional GUI interface. This system is currently used in two industrial applications, and they present the tools in the context of these applications. They summarize the current state of the project and offer directions for future research.

  11. Evaluations of Particle Scattering Models for Falling Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, G.; Nesbitt, S. W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Several millimeter wavelength scattering models have been developed over the past decade that could potentially be more accurate than the standard "soft sphere" model, a model with is used in GPM algorithms to retrieve snowfall precipitation rates from dual frequency radar measurements. Results from the GCPEx mission, a GPM Ground Validation experiment that flew HVPS and CIP particle imaging probes through snowstorms within fields of Ku/Ka band reflectivity, provide the data necessary to evaluate simulations of non-Rayleigh reflectivity against measured values. This research uses T-Matrix spheroid, RGA spheroid, and Mie Sphere simulations, as well as variations on axial ratio and diameter-density relationships, to quantify the merits and errors of different forward simulation strategies.

  12. Emergent smectic order in simple active particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Chaté, Hugues; Chen, Leiming; Ngo, Sandrine; Toner, John

    2016-06-01

    Novel ‘smectic-P’ behavior, in which self-propelled particles form rows and move on average along them, occurs generically within the orientationally ordered phase of simple models that we simulate. Both apolar (head-tail symmetric) and polar (head-tail asymmetric) models with aligning and repulsive interactions exhibit slow algebraic decay of smectic order with system size up to some finite length scale, after which faster decay occurs. In the apolar case, this scale is that of an undulation instability of the rows. In the polar case, this instability is absent, but traveling fluctuations disrupt the rows in large systems and motion and smectic order may spontaneously globally rotate. These observations agree with a new hydrodynamic theory which we present here. Variants of our models also exhibit active smectic ‘A’ and ‘C’ order, with motion orthogonal and oblique to the layers respectively.

  13. Modeling of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena using charged dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mingge; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we propose a charged dissipative particle dynamics (cDPD) model for investigation of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena. In particular, this particle-based method was designed to simulate micro- or nano- flows which governing by Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equation coupled with Navier-Stokes (NS) equation. For cDPD simulations of wall-bounded fluid systems, a methodology for imposing correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions for both PNP and NS equations is developed. To validate the present cDPD model and the corresponding boundary method, we perform cDPD simulations of electrostatic double layer (EDL) in the vicinity of a charged wall, and the results show good agreement with the mean-field theoretical solutions. The capacity density of a parallel plate capacitor in salt solution is also investigated with different salt concentration. Moreover, we utilize the proposed methodology to study the electroosmotic and electroosmotic/pressure-driven flow in a micro-channel. In the last, we simulate the dilute polyelectrolyte solution both in bulk and micro-channel, which show the flexibility and capability of this method in studying complex fluids. This work was sponsored by the Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) supported by DOE.

  14. Particle Swarm Optimization with Watts-Strogatz Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhuanghua

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is a popular swarm intelligent methodology by simulating the animal social behaviors. Recent study shows that this type of social behaviors is a complex system, however, for most variants of PSO, all individuals lie in a fixed topology, and conflict this natural phenomenon. Therefore, in this paper, a new variant of PSO combined with Watts-Strogatz small-world topology model, called WSPSO, is proposed. In WSPSO, the topology is changed according to Watts-Strogatz rules within the whole evolutionary process. Simulation results show the proposed algorithm is effective and efficient.

  15. Modeling the dynamics of several particles behind a propagating shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedarev, I. A.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of a shock wave in a gas phase with a system of particles moving in this gas has been numerically simulated. The wave pattern of the nonstationary interaction of the propagating shock wave with these particles is described in detail. The mathematical model and computational technology employed is compared with experimental data on the dynamics of particles behind the shock wave. It is established that the approximate model of separate particles used to calculate relaxation of their velocities unsatisfactorily operates in the presence of a mutual influence of particles, whereby one particle can occur in the aerodynamic shadow of an adjacent particle.

  16. Accelerated simulation of stochastic particle removal processes in particle-resolved aerosol models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, J.H.; Michelotti, M.D.; Riemer, N.; Heath, M.T.; West, M.

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods have proven useful for simulating multi-dimensional systems such as composition-resolved aerosol size distributions. While particle-resolved methods have substantial benefits for highly detailed simulations, these techniques suffer from high computational cost, motivating efforts to improve their algorithmic efficiency. Here we formulate an algorithm for accelerating particle removal processes by aggregating particles of similar size into bins. We present the Binned Algorithm for particle removal processes and analyze its performance with application to the atmospherically relevant process of aerosol dry deposition. We show that the Binned Algorithm can dramatically improve the efficiency of particle removals, particularly for low removal rates, and that computational cost is reduced without introducing additional error. In simulations of aerosol particle removal by dry deposition in atmospherically relevant conditions, we demonstrate about 50-times increase in algorithm efficiency.

  17. Event-based total suspended sediment particle size distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jennifer; Sattar, Ahmed M. A.; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Warner, Richard C.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most challenging modelling tasks in hydrology is prediction of the total suspended sediment particle size distribution (TSS-PSD) in stormwater runoff generated from exposed soil surfaces at active construction sites and surface mining operations. The main objective of this study is to employ gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop a new model with the ability to more accurately predict the TSS-PSD by taking advantage of both event-specific and site-specific factors in the model. To compile the data for this study, laboratory scale experiments using rainfall simulators were conducted on fourteen different soils to obtain TSS-PSD. This data is supplemented with field data from three construction sites in Ontario over a period of two years to capture the effect of transport and deposition within the site. The combined data sets provide a wide range of key overlooked site-specific and storm event-specific factors. Both parent soil and TSS-PSD in runoff are quantified by fitting each to a lognormal distribution. Compared to existing regression models, the developed model more accurately predicted the TSS-PSD using a more comprehensive list of key model input parameters. Employment of the new model will increase the efficiency of deployment of required best management practices, designed based on TSS-PSD, to minimize potential adverse effects of construction site runoff on aquatic life in the receiving watercourses.

  18. Modeling of brittle-viscous flow using discrete particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordén Haug, Øystein; Barabasch, Jessica; Virgo, Simon; Souche, Alban; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen; Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2017-04-01

    Many geological processes involve both viscous flow and brittle fractures, e.g. boudinage, folding and magmatic intrusions. Numerical modeling of such viscous-brittle materials poses challenges: one has to account for the discrete fracturing, the continuous viscous flow, the coupling between them, and potential pressure dependence of the flow. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is a numerical technique, widely used for studying fracture of geomaterials. However, the implementation of viscous fluid flow in discrete element models is not trivial. In this study, we model quasi-viscous fluid flow behavior using Esys-Particle software (Abe et al., 2004). We build on the methodology of Abe and Urai (2012) where a combination of elastic repulsion and dashpot interactions between the discrete particles is implemented. Several benchmarks are presented to illustrate the material properties. Here, we present extensive, systematic material tests to characterize the rheology of quasi-viscous DEM particle packing. We present two tests: a simple shear test and a channel flow test, both in 2D and 3D. In the simple shear tests, simulations were performed in a box, where the upper wall is moved with a constant velocity in the x-direction, causing shear deformation of the particle assemblage. Here, the boundary conditions are periodic on the sides, with constant forces on the upper and lower walls. In the channel flow tests, a piston pushes a sample through a channel by Poisseuille flow. For both setups, we present the resulting stress-strain relationships over a range of material parameters, confining stress and strain rate. Results show power-law dependence between stress and strain rate, with a non-linear dependence on confining force. The material is strain softening under some conditions (which). Additionally, volumetric strain can be dilatant or compactant, depending on porosity, confining pressure and strain rate. Constitutive relations are implemented in a way that limits the

  19. Particle-based simulation of ellipse-shaped particle aggregation as a model for vascular network formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palachanis, Dimitrios; Szabó, András; Merks, Roeland M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Computational modeling is helpful for elucidating the cellular mechanisms driving biological morphogenesis. Previous simulation studies of blood vessel growth based on the cellular Potts model proposed that elongated, adhesive or mutually attractive endothelial cells suffice for the formation of blood vessel sprouts and vascular networks. Because each mathematical representation of a model introduces potential artifacts, it is important that model results are reproduced using alternative modeling paradigms. Here, we present a lattice-free, particle-based simulation of the cell elongation model of vasculogenesis. The new, particle-based simulations confirm the results obtained from the previous cellular Potts simulations. Furthermore, our current findings suggest that the emergence of order is possible with the application of a high enough attractive force or, alternatively, a longer attraction radius. The methodology will be applicable to a range of problems in morphogenesis and noisy particle aggregation in which cell shape is a key determining factor.

  20. A particle dynamic model of red blood cell aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Marianne; Garcia, Damien; Meiselman, Herbert J; Cloutier, Guy

    2009-11-01

    To elucidate the relationship between microscopic red blood cell (RBC) interactions and macroscopic rheological behavior, we propose a two-dimensional particle model capable of mimicking the main characteristics of RBC aggregation kinetics. The mechanical model of RBCs sheared in Couette flow is based on Newton law. We assumed a hydrodynamic force to move particles, a force to describe aggregation and an elasticity force. The role of molecular mass and concentration of neutral polymers on aggregation [Neu, B., and H. J. Meiselman. Biophys. J. 83:2482-2490, 2002] could be mimicked. Specifically, it was shown that for any shear rate (SR), the mean aggregate size (MAS) grew with time until it reached a constant value, which is consistent with in vitro experiments. It was also demonstrated that we could mimic the modal relationship between MAS and SR and the occurrence of maximum aggregation at about 0.1 s(-1). As anticipated, simulations indicated that an increase in aggregation force augmented MAS. Further, augmentation of the depletion layer thickness influenced MAS only for SR close to zero, which is a new finding. To conclude, our contribution reveals that the aggregation force intensity and SR influence the steady state MAS, and that the depletion and layer thickness affect the aggregation speed.

  1. Dissipative particle dynamics modeling of blood flow in arterial bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejin; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-11-01

    The motion of a suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing in bifurcations is investigated using both low-dimensional RBC (LD-RBC) and multiscale RBC (MS-RBC) models based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The blood flow is first simulated in a symmetric geometry between the diverging and converging channels to satisfy the periodic flow assumption along the flow direction. The results show that the flowrate ratio of the daughter channels and the feed hematocrit level has considerable influence on blood-plasma separation. We also propose a new method to model the inflow and outflow boundaries for the blood flow simulations: the inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated by DPD fluid with periodic boundary conditions; the outflow in two adjacent regions near the outlet is controlled by adaptive forces to keep the flowrate and velocity gradient equal, while the particles leaving the microfluidic channel at the outlet at each time step are removed from the system. The simulation results of the developing flow match analytical solutions from continuum theory. Plasma skimming and the all-or-nothing phenomenon of RBCs in bifurcation have been investigated in the simulations. The simulation results are consistent with previous experimental results and theoretical predictions. This work is supported by the NIH Grant R01HL094270.

  2. Stereoscopic system for measuring particle trajectories past an underwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.-T.; Weissman, Michael A.; White, Gary B.; Miner, G. E.; Gustafson, William T.

    1994-04-01

    A stereoscopic system was developed that integrates hardware and software components for image acquisition, digitization, processing, display, and measurements. The model-induced trajectories of nearly neutrally buoyant fluorescent particles, illuminated with a 15-W pulsed copper vapor laser, are tracked in a towing tank by stereoscopic time-lapse photography using two 35-mm cameras positioned at a 90-degree angle from the top and the side. A C program, HI, drives two data I/O boards hosted in a PC to set up the run parameters, control the operations of the laser and camera shutters, and acquire the stereo images. The photographic records are digitized and processed to derive the centroids of reference marks and particle images. The centroids are then fed into a Windows-based program, Track/3D, to perform image correlation, correction for image distortion, stereo conversion, stereoscopic display, and measurements. The display module incorporates a graphics library that drives a stereoscopic display adapter attached to a monitor; the stereogram must be viewed with polarizing glasses. Functions are available for image translation, rotation, zooming, and on- screen measurements. The velocity and acceleration components of the 3-D flow field induced by the model are derived from the trajectories, serving as a basis for whole-field stereoscopic quantitative flow visualization.

  3. Explicit 3D continuum fracture modeling with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.

    1993-01-01

    Impact phenomena shaped our solar system. As usual for most solar system processes, the scales are far different than we can address directly in the laboratory. Impact velocities are often much higher than we can achieve, sizes are often vastly larger, and most impacts take place in an environment where the only gravitational force is the mutual pull of the impactors. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique has been applied in the past to the simulations of giant impacts. In these simulations, the colliding objects were so massive (at least a sizeable fraction of the Earth's mass) that material strength was negligible compared to gravity. This assumption can no longer be made when the bodies are much smaller. To this end, we have developed a 3D SPH code that includes a strength model to which we have added a von Mises yielding relation for stresses beyond the Hugoniot Elastic Limit. At the lower stresses associated with brittle failure, we use a rate-dependent strength based on the nucleation of incipient flaws whose number density is given by a Weibull distribution. Following Grady and Kipp and Melosh et al., we introduce a state variable D ('damage'), 0 less than D less than 1, which expresses the local reduction in strength due to crack growth under tensile loading. Unfortunately for the hydrodynamics, Grady and Kipp's model predicts which fragments are the most probable ones and not the ones that are really formed. This means, for example, that if a given laboratory experiment is modeled, the fragment distribution obtained from the Grady-Kipp theory would be equivalent to a ensemble average over many realizations of the experiment. On the other hand, the hydrodynamics itself is explicit and evolves not an ensemble average but very specific fragments. Hence, there is a clear incompatibility with the deterministic nature of the hydrodynamics equations and the statistical approach of the Grady-Kipp dynamical fracture model. We remedy these shortcomings

  4. Explicit 3D continuum fracture modeling with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.

    1993-01-01

    Impact phenomena shaped our solar system. As usual for most solar system processes, the scales are far different than we can address directly in the laboratory. Impact velocities are often much higher than we can achieve, sizes are often vastly larger, and most impacts take place in an environment where the only gravitational force is the mutual pull of the impactors. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique has been applied in the past to the simulations of giant impacts. In these simulations, the colliding objects were so massive (at least a sizeable fraction of the Earth's mass) that material strength was negligible compared to gravity. This assumption can no longer be made when the bodies are much smaller. To this end, we have developed a 3D SPH code that includes a strength model to which we have added a von Mises yielding relation for stresses beyond the Hugoniot Elastic Limit. At the lower stresses associated with brittle failure, we use a rate-dependent strength based on the nucleation of incipient flaws whose number density is given by a Weibull distribution. Following Grady and Kipp and Melosh et al., we introduce a state variable D ('damage'), 0 less than D less than 1, which expresses the local reduction in strength due to crack growth under tensile loading. Unfortunately for the hydrodynamics, Grady and Kipp's model predicts which fragments are the most probable ones and not the ones that are really formed. This means, for example, that if a given laboratory experiment is modeled, the fragment distribution obtained from the Grady-Kipp theory would be equivalent to a ensemble average over many realizations of the experiment. On the other hand, the hydrodynamics itself is explicit and evolves not an ensemble average but very specific fragments. Hence, there is a clear incompatibility with the deterministic nature of the hydrodynamics equations and the statistical approach of the Grady-Kipp dynamical fracture model. We remedy these shortcomings

  5. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    B. Robinson

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the abstraction model being used in total system performance assessment (TSPA) model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). The UZ transport abstraction model uses the particle-tracking method that is incorporated into the finite element heat and mass model (FEHM) computer code (Zyvoloski et al. 1997 [DIRS 100615]) to simulate radionuclide transport in the UZ. This report outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining and inputting transport parameters are outlined for use in the TSPA for license application (LA) analyses. Process-level transport model calculations are documented in another report for the UZ (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). Three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields generated to characterize UZ flow (documented by BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]; DTN: LB03023DSSCP9I.001 [DIRS 163044]) are converted to make them compatible with the FEHM code for use in this abstraction model. This report establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model that is intended to represent UZ transport in the TSPA-LA. Capability of the UZ barrier for retarding the transport is demonstrated in this report, and by the underlying process model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). The technical scope, content, and management of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Transport Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171282]). Deviations from the technical work plan (TWP) are noted within the text of this report, as appropriate. The latest version of this document is being prepared principally to correct parameter values found to be in error due to transcription errors, changes in source data that were not captured in the report, calculation errors, and errors in interpretation of source data.

  6. Modeling of Particle Acceleration and Transport in Gradual SEP Events Using the PATH Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhoglyadova, O.; Li, G.; Zank, G.; Hu, Q.

    2007-12-01

    We discuss Particle Acceleration and Transport in the Heliosphere (PATH) numerical model developed at University of California at Riverside and present current progress on modeling of energetic particle acceleration at a traveling quasi-parallel CME-driven shock. We initiate the code by modeling a quiet-time solar wind background and then follow the propagation and evolution of an MHD shock from a distance of ~0.1 AU to the Earth's orbit. The model utilizes the solar wind parameters measured in situ by ACE. A semi-analytical approach is applied to simulate particle acceleration at the shock by injecting solar wind suprathermal ions locally. The diffusive shock acceleration mechanism due to the ion scattering by Alfvenic turbulence in the vicinity of the shock is adopted in the code. Monte-Carlo approach is used to follow transport of the energetic particles after they escape from the shock. The output of the PATH model includes time-dependent energetic particle fluxes, spectra and compositional ratios (Fe/O) for proton and heavy ions. We model specific SEP events and compare our modeling results with ACE measurements.

  7. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model.

    PubMed

    Nicolás-Carlock, J R; Carrillo-Estrada, J L; Dossetti, V

    2016-01-19

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters' fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  8. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  9. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension. PMID:26781204

  10. Particle model for nonlocal heat transport in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bufferand, H; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Lepri, S; Livi, R

    2013-02-01

    We present a simple stochastic, one-dimensional model for heat transfer in weakly collisional media as fusion plasmas. Energies of plasma particles are treated as lattice random variables interacting with a rate inversely proportional to their energy schematizing a screened Coulomb interaction. We consider both the equilibrium (microcanonical) and nonequilibrium case in which the system is in contact with heat baths at different temperatures. The model exhibits a characteristic length of thermalization that can be associated with an interaction mean free path and one observes a transition from ballistic to diffusive regime depending on the average energy of the system. A mean-field expression for heat flux is deduced from system heat transport properties. Finally, it is shown that the nonequilibrium steady state is characterized by long-range correlations.

  11. Using dissipative particle dynamics to model micromechanics of responsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The ability of responsive hydrogels to undergo complex and reversible shape transformations in response to external stimuli such as temperature, magnetic/electric fields, pH levels, and light intensity has made them the material of choice for tissue scaffolding, drug delivery, bio-adhesive, bio-sensing, and micro-sorting applications. The complex micromechanics and kinetics of these responsive networks however, currently hinders developments in the aforementioned areas. In order to better understand the mechanical properties of these systems and how they change during the volume transition we have developed a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for responsive polymer networks. We use this model to examine the impact of the Flory-Huggins parameter on the bulk and shear moduli. In this fashion we evaluate how environmental factors can affect the micromechanical properties of these networks. Support from NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Polycrystalline CVD diamond device level modeling for particle detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Kanxheri, K.; Servoli, L.; Lagomarsino, S.; Sciortino, S.

    2016-12-01

    Diamond is a promising material whose excellent physical properties foster its use for radiation detection applications, in particular in those hostile operating environments where the silicon-based detectors behavior is limited due to the high radiation fluence. Within this framework, the application of Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulation tools is highly envisaged for the study, the optimization and the predictive analysis of sensing devices. Since the novelty of using diamond in electronics, this material is not included in the library of commercial, state-of-the-art TCAD software tools. In this work, we propose the development, the application and the validation of numerical models to simulate the electrical behavior of polycrystalline (pc)CVD diamond conceived for diamond sensors for particle detection. The model focuses on the characterization of a physically-based pcCVD diamond bandgap taking into account deep-level defects acting as recombination centers and/or trap states. While a definite picture of the polycrystalline diamond band-gap is still debated, the effect of the main parameters (e.g. trap densities, capture cross-sections, etc.) can be deeply investigated thanks to the simulated approach. The charge collection efficiency due to β -particle irradiation of diamond materials provided by different vendors and with different electrode configurations has been selected as figure of merit for the model validation. The good agreement between measurements and simulation findings, keeping the traps density as the only one fitting parameter, assesses the suitability of the TCAD modeling approach as a predictive tool for the design and the optimization of diamond-based radiation detectors.

  13. Virtual Mie particle model of laser damage to optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Kazuya; Haraguchi, Koshi

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, devices being developed for application systems have used laser beams that have high average power, high peak power, short pulse width, and short wavelength. Therefore, optical elements using such application systems require a high laser damage threshold. The laser damage threshold is provided by International Organization for Standardization 11254 (ISO11254). One of the measurement methods of the laser damage threshold provided by ISO11254 is an online method to measure the intensity of light scattering due to a laser damage trace. In this paper, we propose a measurement method for the laser damage threshold that realizes high sensitivity and high accuracy by using polarized light and lock-in detection. Since the scattering light with laser damage is modeled on the asperity of the optical element-surface as Mie particles (virtual Mie particles), we consider the intensity change of scattering light as a change in the radius of a virtual Mie particle. To evaluate this model, the laser damage trace on the optical element-surface was observed by an atomic force microscopy (AFM). Based on the observed AFM image, we analyzed the frequency domain by the Fourier transform, and estimated the dominant virtual Mie particle radius in the AFM measurement area. In addition, we measured the laser damage threshold. The light source was the fifth generation of a Nd:YAG laser (λ =213nm). The specifications of the laser were: repetition frequency 10Hz, pulse width 4ns, linear type polarization, laser pulse energy 4mJ, and laser transverse mode TEM00. The laser specifications were a repetition frequency, pulse width, pulse energy and beam diameter of 10Hz, 4ns, 4mJ and 13mm, respectively. The laser damage thresholds of an aluminum coated mirror and a dielectric multi-layer mirror designed at a wavelength of 213nm as measured by this method were 0.684 J/cm2 and 0.998J/cm2, respectively. These laser damage thresholds were 1/4 the laser damage thresholds measured based

  14. Measurement and Modeling of Electromagnetic Scattering by Particles and Particle Groups. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Small particles forming clouds of interstellar and circumstellar dust, regolith surfaces of many solar system bodies, and cometary atmospheres have a strong and often controlling effect on many ambient physical and chemical processes. Similarly, aerosol and cloud particles exert a strong influence on the regional and global climates of the Earth, other planets of the solar system, and exoplanets. Therefore, detailed and accurate knowledge of physical and chemical characteristics of such particles has the utmost scientific importance.

  15. Particle physics models of inflation and curvaton scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Rocher, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We review the particle theory origin of inflation and curvaton mechanisms for generating large scale structures and the observed temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Since inflaton or curvaton energy density creates all matter, it is important to understand the process of reheating and preheating into the relevant degrees of freedom required for the success of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We discuss two distinct classes of models, one where inflaton and curvaton belong to the hidden sector, which are coupled to the Standard Model gauge sector very weakly. There is another class of models of inflaton and curvaton, which are embedded within Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) gauge group and beyond, and whose origins lie within gauge invariant combinations of supersymmetric quarks and leptons. Their masses and couplings are all well motivated from low energy physics, therefore such models provide us with a unique opportunity that they can be verified/falsified by the CMB data and also by the future collider and non-collider based experiments. We then briefly discuss the stringy origin of inflation, alternative cosmological scenarios, and bouncing universes.

  16. Pegylated polystyrene particles as a model system for artificial cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fenghua; Engbers, Gerard H M; Gessner, Andrea; Müller, Reiner H; Feijen, Jan

    2004-07-01

    Pegylated polystyrene particles (PS-PEG) were prepared as a model system for artificial cells, by modification of carboxyl polystyrene particles (PS-COOH) with homo- and hetero-bifunctional polyethylene glycols (PEG, MW 1500, 3400, and 5000) containing an amino end group for immobilization and an amino, hydroxyl, or methoxy end group that is exposed at the surface after immobilization. Protein adsorption from human plasma dilutions (85 v %) onto PS-PEG with a PEG surface concentration higher than 40 pmol/cm2 was reduced up to 90-95% compared with protein adsorption onto PS-COOH with a final protein surface concentration of approximately 30 ng/cm2. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analyses showed that 30% of the total amount of adsorbed proteins onto PS-PEG are dysopsonins (i.e., nonadhesive proteins like albumin and apolipoproteins). For PS-COOH, <15% of the amount of adsorbed proteins are dysopsonins. In addition, the generation of terminal complement compound (TCC) by PS-PEG particles with a PEG surface concentration lower than approximately 55 pmol/cm2 is not significant. The low protein adsorption, the relatively high percentage of adsorbed dysopsonins, and the low level of complement activation may prevent the uptake of PS-PEG by the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) in vivo. Moreover, PS-PEG (PEG surface concentration > approximately 35 pmol/cm2) shows minimal interaction with cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), which mimics the endothelial lining of the blood vessel wall. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Seamless particle-based modeling of blood clotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2016-11-01

    We propose a new multiscale framework that seamlessly integrate four key components of blood clotting namely, blood rheology, cell mechanics, coagulation kinetics and transport of species and platelet adhesive dynamics. We use transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) which is an extended form of original DPD as the base solver to model both blood flow and the reactive transport of chemical species in the coagulation cascade. Further, we use a coarse-grained representation of blood cell's membrane that accounts for its mechanics; both red blood cells and platelets are resolved at sub-cellular resolution, and stochastic bond formation/dissociation are included to account for platelet adhesive dynamics at the site of injury. Our results show good qualitative agreement with in vivo experiments. The numerical framework allows us to perform systematic analysis on different mechanisms of blood clotting. In addition, this new multiscale particle-based methodology can open new directions in addressing different biological processes from sub-cellular to macroscopic scales. NIH Grant No. U01HL116323.

  18. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  19. Model for boiling and dryout in particle beds. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R. J.

    1982-06-01

    Over the last ten years experiments and modeling of dryout in particle beds have produced over fifty papers. Considering only volume-heated beds, over 250 dryout measurements have been made, and are listed in this work. In addition, fifteen models to predict dryout have been produced and are discussed. A model is developed in this report for one-dimensional boiling and dryout in a porous medium. It is based on conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy. The initial coupled differential equations are reduced to a single first-order differential equation with an algebraic equation for the upper boundary condition. The model includes the effects of both laminar and turbulent flow, two-phase friction, and capillary force. The boundary condition at the bed bottom includes the possibility of inflowing liquid and either an adiabatic or a bottom-cooled support structure. The top of the bed may be either channeled or subcooled. In the first case the channel length and the saturation at the base of the channels are predicted. In the latter case, a criterion for penetration of the subcooled zone by channels is obtained.

  20. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  1. Modeling the dynamical sinking of biogenic particles in oceanic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroy, Pedro; Hernández-García, Emilio; Rossi, Vincent; López, Cristóbal

    2017-06-01

    We study the problem of sinking particles in a realistic oceanic flow, with major energetic structures in the mesoscale, focussing on the range of particle sizes and densities appropriate for marine biogenic particles. Our aim is to evaluate the relevance of theoretical results of finite size particle dynamics in their applications in the oceanographic context. By using a simplified equation of motion of small particles in a mesoscale simulation of the oceanic velocity field, we estimate the influence of physical processes such as the Coriolis force and the inertia of the particles, and we conclude that they represent negligible corrections to the most important terms, which are passive motion with the velocity of the flow, and a constant added vertical velocity due to gravity. Even if within this approximation three-dimensional clustering of particles can not occur, two-dimensional cuts or projections of the evolving three-dimensional density can display inhomogeneities similar to the ones observed in sinking ocean particles.

  2. Characteristics of light scattering by smoke particles based on spheroid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qiyuan; Zhang, Heping; Wan, Yutian; Zhang, Yongming; Qiao, Lifeng

    2007-09-01

    Light scattering models of smoke particles play an important role on the development of photoelectric smoke detection. Aiming at the influence of morphology of smoke particles, spheroid models are introduced to analyze the Stokes scattering matrix of smoke particles, which are lognormal size distributions. Under the condition of random orientations, the effects of refractive indexes and mean size of smoke particles are considered. The results show that after averaging of the orientation and size, the nonsphericity of smoke particles has a considerable effect on their light scattering. Additionally, the nonsphericity of gray smoke particles generated from smoldering fires is more important than soot from flaming fires for analyzing the light scattering.

  3. Numerical modeling of the particle velocity and thermal relaxation behind passing shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedarev, I. A.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with a system of particles moving in a gas is studied by numerical simulation. The wave pattern of the unsteady interaction of the passing shock wave with these particles is described in detail. The mathematical model and computational procedure are verified against experimental data on the particle dynamics behind the shock wave. It is shown that the approximate single-particle model for calculating the velocity relaxation is unsuitable in the case of mutual influence of particles, where one particle is in the wind shadow of another.

  4. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  5. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions with cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.

  6. Validation of chemistry models employed in a particle simulation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.

    1991-01-01

    The chemistry models employed in a statistical particle simulation method, as implemented in the Intel iPSC/860 multiprocessor computer, are validated and applied. Chemical relaxation of five-species air in these reservoirs involves 34 simultaneous dissociation, recombination, and atomic-exchange reactions. The reaction rates employed in the analytic solutions are obtained from Arrhenius experimental correlations as functions of temperature for adiabatic gas reservoirs in thermal equilibrium. Favorable agreement with the analytic solutions validates the simulation when applied to relaxation of O2 toward equilibrium in reservoirs dominated by dissociation and recombination, respectively, and when applied to relaxation of air in the temperature range 5000 to 30,000 K. A flow of O2 over a circular cylinder at high Mach number is simulated to demonstrate application of the method to multidimensional reactive flows.

  7. Validation of chemistry models employed in a particle simulation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.

    1991-01-01

    The chemistry models employed in a statistical particle simulation method, as implemented in the Intel iPSC/860 multiprocessor computer, are validated and applied. Chemical relaxation of five-species air in these reservoirs involves 34 simultaneous dissociation, recombination, and atomic-exchange reactions. The reaction rates employed in the analytic solutions are obtained from Arrhenius experimental correlations as functions of temperature for adiabatic gas reservoirs in thermal equilibrium. Favorable agreement with the analytic solutions validates the simulation when applied to relaxation of O2 toward equilibrium in reservoirs dominated by dissociation and recombination, respectively, and when applied to relaxation of air in the temperature range 5000 to 30,000 K. A flow of O2 over a circular cylinder at high Mach number is simulated to demonstrate application of the method to multidimensional reactive flows.

  8. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions withmore » cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.« less

  9. Minimal model for acoustic forces on Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Balboa Usabiaga, F; Delgado-Buscalioni, R

    2013-12-01

    We present a generalization of inertial coupling (IC) [Balboa Usabiaga et al., J. Comput. Phys. 235, 701 (2013)], which permits the resolution of radiation forces on small particles with arbitrary acoustic contrast factor. The IC method is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach: particles move in continuum space while the fluid equations are solved in a regular mesh (here we use the finite volume method). Thermal fluctuations in the fluid stress, important below the micron scale, are also taken into account following the Landau-Lifshitz fluid description. Each particle is described by a minimal cost resolution which consists of a single small kernel (bell-shaped function) concomitant to the particle. The main role of the particle kernel is to interpolate fluid properties and spread particle forces. Here, we extend the kernel functionality to allow for an arbitrary particle compressibility. The particle-fluid force is obtained from an imposed "no-slip" constraint which enforces similar particle and kernel fluid velocities. This coupling is instantaneous and permits the capture of the fast, nonlinear effects underlying the radiation forces on particles. Acoustic forces arise because of an excess either in particle compressibility (monopolar term) or in mass (dipolar contribution) over the fluid values. Comparison with theoretical expressions shows that the present generalization of the IC method correctly reproduces both contributions. Due to its low computational cost, the present method allows for simulations with many [O(10(4))] particles using a standard graphical processor unit.

  10. Triviality of a model of particles with point interactions in the thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Thomas; Seiringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    We consider a model of fermions interacting via point interactions, defined via a certain weighted Dirichlet form. While for two particles the interaction corresponds to infinite scattering length, the presence of further particles effectively decreases the interaction strength. We show that the model becomes trivial in the thermodynamic limit, in the sense that the free energy density at any given particle density and temperature agrees with the corresponding expression for non-interacting particles.

  11. A generalized Brownian motion model for turbulent relative particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, B. K.

    2016-08-01

    There is speculation that the difficulty in obtaining an extended range with Richardson-Obukhov scaling in both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations is due to the finiteness of the flow Reynolds number Re in these situations. In this paper, a generalized Brownian motion model has been applied to describe the relative particle dispersion problem in more realistic turbulent flows and to shed some light on this issue. The fluctuating pressure forces acting on a fluid particle are taken to be a colored noise and follow a stationary process and are described by the Uhlenbeck-Ornstein model while it appears plausible to take their correlation time to have a power-law dependence on Re, thus introducing a bridge between the Lagrangian quantities and the Eulerian parameters for this problem. This ansatz is in qualitative agreement with the possibility of a connection speculated earlier by Corrsin [26] between the white-noise representation for the fluctuating pressure forces and the large-Re assumption in the Kolmogorov [4] theory for the 3D fully developed turbulence (FDT) as well as a similar argument of Monin and Yaglom [23] and a similar result of Sawford [13] and Borgas and Sawford [24]. It also provides an insight into the result that the Richardson-Obukhov scaling holds only in the infinite-Re limit and disappears otherwise. This ansatz further provides a determination of the Richardson-Obukhov constant g as a function of Re, with an asymptotic constant value in the infinite-Re limit. It is shown to lead to full agreement, in the small-Re limit as well, with the Batchelor-Townsend [27] scaling for the rate of change of the mean square interparticle separation in 3D FDT, hence validating its soundness further.

  12. Acute leukemia classification by ensemble particle swarm model selection.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Hugo Jair; Montes-y-Gómez, Manuel; González, Jesús A; Gómez-Gil, Pilar; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Reyes, Carlos A; Reta, Carolina; Rosales, Alejandro

    2012-07-01

    Acute leukemia is a malignant disease that affects a large proportion of the world population. Different types and subtypes of acute leukemia require different treatments. In order to assign the correct treatment, a physician must identify the leukemia type or subtype. Advanced and precise methods are available for identifying leukemia types, but they are very expensive and not available in most hospitals in developing countries. Thus, alternative methods have been proposed. An option explored in this paper is based on the morphological properties of bone marrow images, where features are extracted from medical images and standard machine learning techniques are used to build leukemia type classifiers. This paper studies the use of ensemble particle swarm model selection (EPSMS), which is an automated tool for the selection of classification models, in the context of acute leukemia classification. EPSMS is the application of particle swarm optimization to the exploration of the search space of ensembles that can be formed by heterogeneous classification models in a machine learning toolbox. EPSMS does not require prior domain knowledge and it is able to select highly accurate classification models without user intervention. Furthermore, specific models can be used for different classification tasks. We report experimental results for acute leukemia classification with real data and show that EPSMS outperformed the best results obtained using manually designed classifiers with the same data. The highest performance using EPSMS was of 97.68% for two-type classification problems and of 94.21% for more than two types problems. To the best of our knowledge, these are the best results reported for this data set. Compared with previous studies, these improvements were consistent among different type/subtype classification tasks, different features extracted from images, and different feature extraction regions. The performance improvements were statistically significant

  13. A Simple Mathematical Model for Standard Model of Elementary Particles and Extension Thereof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    An algebraically (and geometrically) simple model representing the masses of the elementary particles in terms of the interaction (strong, weak, electromagnetic) constants is developed, including the Higgs bosons. The predicted Higgs boson mass is identical to that discovered by LHC experimental programs; while possibility of additional Higgs bosons (and their masses) is indicated. The model can be analyzed to explain and resolve many puzzles of particle physics and cosmology including the neutrino masses and mixing; origin of the proton mass and the mass-difference between the proton and the neutron; the big bang and cosmological Inflation; the Hubble expansion; etc. A novel interpretation of the model in terms of quaternion and rotation in the six-dimensional space of the elementary particle interaction-space - or, equivalently, in six-dimensional spacetime - is presented. Interrelations among particle masses are derived theoretically. A new approach for defining the interaction parameters leading to an elegant and symmetrical diagram is delineated. Generalization of the model to include supersymmetry is illustrated without recourse to complex mathematical formulation and free from any ambiguity. This Abstract represents some results of the Author's Independent Theoretical Research in Particle Physics, with possible connection to the Superstring Theory. However, only very elementary mathematics and physics is used in my presentation.

  14. Modelling pathogen fate in stormwaters by a particle-pathogen interaction model using population balances.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, L; Vallet, B; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2012-01-01

    Stormwater is polluted by various contaminants affecting the quality of receiving water bodies. Pathogens are one of these contaminants, which have a critical effect on water use in rivers. Increasing the retention time of water in stormwater basins can lead to reduced loads of pathogens released to the rivers. In this paper a model describing the behaviour of pathogens in stormwater basins is presented including different fate processes such as decay, adsorption/desorption, settling and solar disinfection. By considering the settling velocity distribution of particles and a layered approach, this model is able to create a light intensity, and particle and pathogen concentration profile along the water depth in the basin. A strong effect of solar disinfection is discerned. The model has been used to evaluate pathogen removal efficiencies in stormwater basins. It includes a population of particle classes characterized by a distribution of settling velocities in order to be able to reproduce stormwater quality and treatment in a realistic way.

  15. A model for investigating the behaviour of non-spherical particles at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Morris, G; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2011-02-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for modelling non-spherical particles with a fixed contact angle at an interface whilst also providing a method to fix the particles orientation. It is shown how a wide variety of particle shapes (spherical, ellipsoidal, disc) can be created from a simple initial geometry containing only six vertices. The shapes are made from one continuous surface with edges and corners treated as smooth curves not discontinuities. As such, particles approaching cylindrical and orthorhombic shapes can be simulated but the contact angle crossing the edges will be fixed. Non-spherical particles, when attached to an interface can cause large distortions in the surface which affect the forces acting on the particle. The model presented is capable of resolving this distortion of the surface around the particle at the interface as well as allowing for the particle's orientation to be controlled. It is shown that, when considering orthorhombic particles with rounded edges, the flatter the particle the more energetically stable it is to sit flat at the interface. However, as the particle becomes more cube like, the effects of contact angle have a greater effect on the energetically stable orientations. Results for cylindrical particles with rounded edges are also discussed. The model presented allows the user to define the shape, dimensions, contact angle and orientation of the particle at the interface allowing more in-depth investigation of the complex phenomenon of 3D film distortion around an attached particle and the forces that arise due to it.

  16. Impact of particle emissions of new laser printers on modeled office room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, Antti J.; Hussein, Tareq; Niemelä, Raimo; Tuomi, Timo; Hämeri, Kaarle

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we present how an indoor aerosol model can be used to characterize particle emitter and predict influence of the source on indoor air quality. Particle size-resolved emission rates were quantified and the source's influence on indoor air quality was estimated by using office model simulations. We measured particle emissions from three modern laser printers in a flow-through chamber. Measured parameters were used as input parameters for an indoor aerosol model, which we then used to quantify the particle emission rates. The same indoor aerosol model was used to simulate the effect of the particle emission source inside an office model. The office model consists of a mechanically ventilated empty room and the particle source. The aerosol from the ventilation air was a filtered urban background aerosol. The effect of the ventilation rate was studied using three different ventilation ratios 1, 2 and 3 h -1. According to the model, peak emission rates of the printers exceeded 7.0 × 10 8 s -1 (2.5 × 10 12 h -1), and emitted mainly ultrafine particles (diameter less than 100 nm). The office model simulation results indicate that a print job increases ultrafine particle concentration to a maximum of 2.6 × 10 5 cm -3. Printer-emitted particles increased 6-h averaged particle concentration over eleven times compared to the background particle concentration.

  17. Sensitivity of dispersion model forecasts of volcanic ash clouds to the physical characteristics of the particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckett, F. M.; Witham, C. S.; Hort, M. C.; Stevenson, J. A.; Bonadonna, C.; Millington, S. C.

    2015-11-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of atmospheric dispersion model forecasts of volcanic ash clouds to the physical characteristics assigned to the particles. We show that the particle size distribution (PSD) used to initialise a dispersion model has a significant impact on the forecast of the mass loading of the ash particles in the atmosphere. This is because the modeled fall velocity of the particles is sensitive to the particle diameter. Forecasts of the long-range transport of the ash cloud consider particles with diameters between 0.1 μm and 100 μm. The fall velocity of particles with diameter 100 μm is over 5 orders of magnitude greater than a particle with diameter 0.1 μm, and 30 μm particles fall 88% slower and travel up to 5× further than a 100 μm particle. Identifying the PSD of the ash cloud at the source, which is required to initialise a model, is difficult. Further, aggregation processes are currently not explicitly modeled in operational dispersion models due to the high computational costs associated with aggregation schemes. We show that using a modified total grain size distribution (TGSD) that effectively accounts for aggregation processes improves the modeled PSD of the ash cloud and deposits from the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. Knowledge of the TGSD of an eruption is therefore critical for reducing uncertainty in quantitative forecasts of ash cloud dispersion. The density and shape assigned to the model particles have a lesser but still significant impact on the calculated fall velocity. Accounting for the density distribution and sphericity of ash from the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, modeled particles can travel up to 84% further than particles with default particle characteristics that assume the particles are spherical and have a fixed density.

  18. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): A Particle Resistance Model for Flow through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jin-Sui; Yin, Shang-Xian; Zhao, Dong-Yu

    2009-06-01

    A particle model for resistance of flow in isotropic porous media is developed based on the fractal geometry theory and on the drag force flowing around sphere. The proposed model is expressed as a function of porosity, fluid property, particle size, fluid velocity (or Reynolds number) and fractal characters Df of particles in porous media. The model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data. The validity of the proposed model is thus verified.

  19. Gravitational Lens Modeling with Genetic Algorithms and Particle Swarm Optimizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D.

    2011-02-01

    Strong gravitational lensing of an extended object is described by a mapping from source to image coordinates that is nonlinear and cannot generally be inverted analytically. Determining the structure of the source intensity distribution also requires a description of the blurring effect due to a point-spread function. This initial study uses an iterative gravitational lens modeling scheme based on the semilinear method to determine the linear parameters (source intensity profile) of a strongly lensed system. Our "matrix-free" approach avoids construction of the lens and blurring operators while retaining the least-squares formulation of the problem. The parameters of an analytical lens model are found through nonlinear optimization by an advanced genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimizer (PSO). These global optimization routines are designed to explore the parameter space thoroughly, mapping model degeneracies in detail. We develop a novel method that determines the L-curve for each solution automatically, which represents the trade-off between the image χ2 and regularization effects, and allows an estimate of the optimally regularized solution for each lens parameter set. In the final step of the optimization procedure, the lens model with the lowest χ2 is used while the global optimizer solves for the source intensity distribution directly. This allows us to accurately determine the number of degrees of freedom in the problem to facilitate comparison between lens models and enforce positivity on the source profile. In practice, we find that the GA conducts a more thorough search of the parameter space than the PSO.

  20. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART version 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisso, Ignacio; Sollum, Espen; Grythe, Henrik; Kristiansen, Nina; Cassiani, Massimo; Eckhardt, Sabine; Thompson, Rona; Groot Zwaaftnik, Christine; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Hamburger, Thomas; Sodemann, Harald; Haimberger, Leopold; Henne, Stephan; Brunner, Dominik; Burkhart, John; Fouilloux, Anne; Fang, Xuekun; Phillip, Anne; Seibert, Petra; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was in its first original release in 1998 designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. The model has now evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modelling and analysis. Its application fields are extended to a range of atmospheric transport processes for both atmospheric gases and aerosols, e.g. greenhouse gases, short-lived climate forces like black carbon, volcanic ash and gases as well as studies of the water cycle. We present the newest release, FLEXPART version 10. Since the last publication fully describing FLEXPART (version 6.2), the model code has been parallelised in order to allow for the possibility to speed up computation. A new, more detailed gravitational settling parametrisation for aerosols was implemented, and the wet deposition scheme for aerosols has been heavily modified and updated to provide a more accurate representation of this physical process. In addition, an optional new turbulence scheme for the convective boundary layer is available, that considers the skewness in the vertical velocity distribution. Also, temporal variation and temperature dependence of the OH-reaction are included. Finally, user input files are updated to a more convenient and user-friendly namelist format, and the option to produce the output-files in netCDF-format instead of binary format is implemented. We present these new developments and show recent model applications. Moreover, we also introduce some tools for the preparation of the meteorological input data, as well as for the processing of FLEXPART output data.

  1. GRAVITATIONAL LENS MODELING WITH GENETIC ALGORITHMS AND PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZERS

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D.

    2011-02-01

    Strong gravitational lensing of an extended object is described by a mapping from source to image coordinates that is nonlinear and cannot generally be inverted analytically. Determining the structure of the source intensity distribution also requires a description of the blurring effect due to a point-spread function. This initial study uses an iterative gravitational lens modeling scheme based on the semilinear method to determine the linear parameters (source intensity profile) of a strongly lensed system. Our 'matrix-free' approach avoids construction of the lens and blurring operators while retaining the least-squares formulation of the problem. The parameters of an analytical lens model are found through nonlinear optimization by an advanced genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimizer (PSO). These global optimization routines are designed to explore the parameter space thoroughly, mapping model degeneracies in detail. We develop a novel method that determines the L-curve for each solution automatically, which represents the trade-off between the image {chi}{sup 2} and regularization effects, and allows an estimate of the optimally regularized solution for each lens parameter set. In the final step of the optimization procedure, the lens model with the lowest {chi}{sup 2} is used while the global optimizer solves for the source intensity distribution directly. This allows us to accurately determine the number of degrees of freedom in the problem to facilitate comparison between lens models and enforce positivity on the source profile. In practice, we find that the GA conducts a more thorough search of the parameter space than the PSO.

  2. Implicit frictional-contact model for soft particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezamabadi, Saeid; Radjai, Farhang; Averseng, Julien; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a novel numerical approach for the simulation of soft particles interacting via frictional contacts. This approach is based on an implicit formulation of the Material Point Method, allowing for large particle deformations, combined with the Contact Dynamics method for the treatment of unilateral frictional contacts between particles. This approach is both precise due to the treatment of contacts with no regularization and artificial damping parameters, and robust due to implicit time integration of both bulk degrees of freedom and relative contact velocities at the nodes representing the contact points. By construction, our algorithm is capable of handling arbitrary particle shapes and deformations. We illustrate this approach by two simple 2D examples: a Hertz contact and a rolling particle on an inclined plane. We also investigate the compaction of a packing of circular particles up to a solid fraction well above the jamming limit of hard particles. We find that, for the same level of deformation, the solid fraction in a packing of frictional particles is above that of a packing of frictionless particles as a result of larger particle shape change.

  3. A cyclic model for particle motion in the pulmonary acinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, S.; Tsuda, A.

    2006-11-01

    A simplified model for the pulmonary alveolus that imitates the rhythmical expansion of the alveolus and the periodic shear flow in the adjacent airway is explored. The model consists of two eccentric cylinders and incompressible fluid that occupies the gap between them. The two cylinders undergo a simultaneous rhythmical expansion and contraction (mimicking the alveolus expansion) while the inner cylinder performs a periodic rotation about its axis (inducing shear flow mimicking airway ductal flow). An analytical solution is obtained for the creeping flow induced by the simultaneously expanding cylinders. It is shown that above a certain critical value of rotation to expansion velocity ratio, the flow exhibits characteristic features such as a saddle point and closed streamlines about a centre, similar to those existing inside a single alveolus during inhalation and exhalation. Poincaré maps of the trajectories of fluid particles demonstrate that, under various flow conditions, chaotic trajectories may exist, provided that expansion and rotation are slightly out of phase. This is similar to normal breathing conditions where the periodic expansion of the alveolus and the tidal flow (i.e. shear flow above the mouth of the alveolus) may be slightly out of phase. A novel definition of overall convective mixing efficiency is also suggested that inherently discounts reversible processes that do not contribute to mixing. It is demonstrated that two different convective mechanisms, related to the irreversibility of exhalation and inhalation and the onset of chaos, govern mixing efficiency in lung alveoli.

  4. Joint tracking algorithm using particle filter and mean shift with target model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Tian, Weifeng; Jin, Zhihua

    2006-10-01

    Roughly, visual tracking algorithms can be divided into two main classes: deterministic tracking and stochastic tracking. Mean shift and particle filter are their typical representatives, respectively. Recently, a hybrid tracker, seamlessly integrating the respective advantages of mean shift and particle filter (MSPF) has achieved impressive success in robust tracking. The pivot of MSPF is to sample fewer particles using particle filter and then those particles are shifted to their respective local maximum of target searching space by mean shift. MSPF not only can greatly reduce the number of particles that particle filter required, but can remedy the deficiency of mean shift. Unfortunately, due to its inherent principle, MSPF is restricted to those applications with little changes of the target model. To make MSPF more flexible and robust, an adaptive target model is extended to MSPF in this paper. Experimental results show that MSPF with target model updating can robustly track the target through the whole sequences regardless of the change of target model.

  5. Hydrodynamic Model with Binary Particle Diameters to Predict Axial Voidage Profile in a CFB Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. J.; Zhang, H.; Yang, H. R.; Wu, Y. X.; Lu, J. F.; Yue, G. X.

    A hydrodynamic model with binary particle diameters was developed to better predict axial voidage profile in a CFB combustor. In the model, the CFB is regarded as a superposition of two sub-beds, a fast fluidized bed in the upper riser with a characteristic particle diameter of O.2mm and a bubbling fluidized bed or turbulent bed in the bottom riser with a characteristic particle diameter of 2mm. Furthermore, a variable critical particle diameter whose terminal velocity equals to the superficial gas velocity was employed to determine which flow regime the particle belongs to. The results show that binary particle diameter model has the advantages in describing wide particle diameter distribution while reducing the complexity of computation. The model was verified by the field data of voidage profile in a 300MW CFB boiler.

  6. Coupled Particle Transport and Pattern Formation in a Nonlinear Leaky-Box Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; El-Nemr, K. W.; Baird, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of particle-particle coupling on particle characteristics in nonlinear leaky-box type descriptions of the acceleration and transport of energetic particles in space plasmas are examined in the framework of a simple two-particle model based on the Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. In this model, the two particles are assumed coupled via a common nonlinear source term. In analogy with a prototypical mathematical system of diffusion-driven instability, this work demonstrates that steady-state patterns with strong dependence on the magnetic turbulence but a rather weak one on the coupled particles attributes can emerge in solutions of a nonlinearly coupled leaky-box model. The insight gained from this simple model may be of wider use and significance to nonlinearly coupled leaky-box type descriptions in general.

  7. Modeling of hydrogen production methods: Single particle model and kinetics assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J.

    1996-10-01

    The investigation carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is devoted to the modeling of biomass pyrolysis reactors producing an oil vapor (tar) which is a precursor to hydrogen. This is an informal collaboration with NREL whereby JPL uses the experimentally-generated NREL data both as initial and boundary conditions for the calculations, and as a benchmark for model validation. The goal of this investigation is to find drivers of biomass fast-pyrolysis in the low temperature regime. The rationale is that experimental observations produce sparse discrete conditions for model validation, and that numerical simulations produced with a validated model are an economic way to find control parameters and an optimal operation regime, thereby circumventing costly changes in hardware and tests. During this first year of the investigation, a detailed mathematical model has been formulated for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in biomass particles. These are porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas phase flow. The methodology has been applied to the pyrolysis of spherically symmetric biomass particles by considering previously published kinetics schemes for both cellulose and wood. The results show that models which neglect the thermal and species boundary layers exterior to the particle will generally over predict both the pyrolysis rates and experimentally obtainable tar yields. An evaluation of the simulation results through comparisons with experimental data indicates that while the cellulose kinetics is reasonably accurate, the wood pyrolysis kinetics is not accurate; particularly at high reactor temperatures. Current effort in collaboration with NREL is aimed at finding accurate wood kinetics.

  8. Microbial interactions lead to rapid micro-scale successions on model marine particles.

    PubMed

    Datta, Manoshi S; Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Gore, Jeff; Polz, Martin F; Cordero, Otto X

    2016-06-17

    In the ocean, organic particles harbour diverse bacterial communities, which collectively digest and recycle essential nutrients. Traits like motility and exo-enzyme production allow individual taxa to colonize and exploit particle resources, but it remains unclear how community dynamics emerge from these individual traits. Here we track the taxon and trait dynamics of bacteria attached to model marine particles and demonstrate that particle-attached communities undergo rapid, reproducible successions driven by ecological interactions. Motile, particle-degrading taxa are selected for during early successional stages. However, this selective pressure is later relaxed when secondary consumers invade, which are unable to use the particle resource but, instead, rely on carbon from primary degraders. This creates a trophic chain that shifts community metabolism away from the particle substrate. These results suggest that primary successions may shape particle-attached bacterial communities in the ocean and that rapid community-wide metabolic shifts could limit rates of marine particle degradation.

  9. Microbial interactions lead to rapid micro-scale successions on model marine particles

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Manoshi S.; Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Gore, Jeff; Polz, Martin F.; Cordero, Otto X.

    2016-01-01

    In the ocean, organic particles harbour diverse bacterial communities, which collectively digest and recycle essential nutrients. Traits like motility and exo-enzyme production allow individual taxa to colonize and exploit particle resources, but it remains unclear how community dynamics emerge from these individual traits. Here we track the taxon and trait dynamics of bacteria attached to model marine particles and demonstrate that particle-attached communities undergo rapid, reproducible successions driven by ecological interactions. Motile, particle-degrading taxa are selected for during early successional stages. However, this selective pressure is later relaxed when secondary consumers invade, which are unable to use the particle resource but, instead, rely on carbon from primary degraders. This creates a trophic chain that shifts community metabolism away from the particle substrate. These results suggest that primary successions may shape particle-attached bacterial communities in the ocean and that rapid community-wide metabolic shifts could limit rates of marine particle degradation. PMID:27311813

  10. Critical examination of the colloidal particle model of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Prasad S; Hudson, Steven D; Jones, Ronald L; Douglas, Jack F; Pathak, Jai A

    2015-02-03

    Recent studies of globular protein solutions have uniformly adopted a colloidal view of proteins as particles, a perspective that neglects the polymeric primary structure of these biological macromolecules, their intrinsic flexibility, and their ability to sample a large configurational space. While the colloidal perspective often serves as a useful idealization in many cases, the macromolecular identity of proteins must reveal itself under thermodynamic conditions in which the native state is no longer stable, such as denaturing solvents and high protein concentrations where macromolecules tend to have screened excluded volume, charge, and hydrodynamic interactions. Under extreme pH conditions, charge repulsion interactions within the protein chain can overcome the attractive hydrogen-bonding interactions, holding it in its native globular state. Conformational changes can therefore be expected to have great significance on the shear viscosity and other rheological properties of protein solutions. These changes are not envisioned in conventional colloidal protein models and we have initiated an investigation of the scattering and rheological properties of model proteins. We initiate this effort by considering bovine serum albumin because it is a globular protein whose solution properties have also been extensively investigated as a function of pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration. As we anticipated, near-ultraviolet circular dichroism measurements and intrinsic viscosity measurements clearly indicate that the bovine serum albumin tertiary structure changes as protein concentration and pH are varied. Our findings point to limited validity of the colloidal protein model and to the need for further consideration and quantification of the effects of conformational changes on protein solution viscosity, protein association, and the phase behavior. Small-angle Neutron Scattering measurements have allowed us to assess how these conformational changes

  11. Critical Examination of the Colloidal Particle Model of Globular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarangapani, Prasad S.; Hudson, Steven D.; Jones, Ronald L.; Douglas, Jack F.; Pathak, Jai A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of globular protein solutions have uniformly adopted a colloidal view of proteins as particles, a perspective that neglects the polymeric primary structure of these biological macromolecules, their intrinsic flexibility, and their ability to sample a large configurational space. While the colloidal perspective often serves as a useful idealization in many cases, the macromolecular identity of proteins must reveal itself under thermodynamic conditions in which the native state is no longer stable, such as denaturing solvents and high protein concentrations where macromolecules tend to have screened excluded volume, charge, and hydrodynamic interactions. Under extreme pH conditions, charge repulsion interactions within the protein chain can overcome the attractive hydrogen-bonding interactions, holding it in its native globular state. Conformational changes can therefore be expected to have great significance on the shear viscosity and other rheological properties of protein solutions. These changes are not envisioned in conventional colloidal protein models and we have initiated an investigation of the scattering and rheological properties of model proteins. We initiate this effort by considering bovine serum albumin because it is a globular protein whose solution properties have also been extensively investigated as a function of pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration. As we anticipated, near-ultraviolet circular dichroism measurements and intrinsic viscosity measurements clearly indicate that the bovine serum albumin tertiary structure changes as protein concentration and pH are varied. Our findings point to limited validity of the colloidal protein model and to the need for further consideration and quantification of the effects of conformational changes on protein solution viscosity, protein association, and the phase behavior. Small-angle Neutron Scattering measurements have allowed us to assess how these conformational changes

  12. Particle models for discrete element modeling of bulk grain properties of wheat kernels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent research has shown the potential of discrete element method (DEM) in simulating grain flow in bulk handling systems. Research has also revealed that simulation of grain flow with DEM requires establishment of appropriate particle models for each grain type. This research completes the three-p...

  13. BDO-RFQ Program Complex of Modelling and Optimization of Charged Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsyannikov, D. A.; Ovsyannikov, A. D.; Antropov, I. V.; Kozynchenko, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The article is dedicated to BDO Code program complex used for modelling and optimization of charged particle dynamics with consideration of interaction in RFQ accelerating structures. The structure of the program complex and its functionality are described; mathematical models of charged particle dynamics, interaction models and methods of optimization are given.

  14. Modelling the surface deposition of meteoric smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, James S. A.; Feng, Wuhu; Mann, Graham W.; Dhomse, Sandip S.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    The flux of meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) in Greenland and Antarctica has been measured using Ir and Pt observations in ice cores, by Gabrielli et al. [1,2]. They obtained MSP deposition fluxes of 1.5 ± 0.45 × 10-4 g m-2 yr-1 (209 ± 63 t d-1) in Greenland and 3.9 ± 1.4 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 (55 ± 19 t d-1) in Antarctica, where the values in parentheses are total atmospheric inputs, assuming a uniform global deposition rate. These results show reasonable agreement with those of Lanci et al. [3], who used ice core magnetisation measurements, resulting in MSP fluxes of 1.7 ± 0.23 × 10-4 g m-2 yr-1 (236 ± 50 t d-1) (Greenland) and 2.0 ± 0.52 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 (29 ± 5.0 t d-1) (Antarctica). Atmospheric modelling studies have been performed to assess the transport and deposition of MSPs, using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model), and the CARMA (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model) aerosol microphysics package. An MSP input function totalling 44 t d-1 was added between about 80 and 105 km. Several model runs have been performed in which the aerosol scavenging by precipitation was varied. Wet deposition is expected (and calculated here) to be the main deposition process; however, rain and snow aerosol scavenging coefficients have uncertainties spanning up to two and three orders of magnitude, respectively [4]. The model experiments that we have carried out include simple adjustments of the scavenging coefficients, full inclusion of a parametrisation reported by Wang et al. [4], and a scheme based on aerosol removal where relative humidity > 100 %. The MSP fluxes obtained vary between 1.4 × 10-5 and 2.6 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 for Greenland, and 5.1 × 10-6 and 1.7 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 for Antarctica. These values are about an order of magnitude lower than the Greenland observations, but show reasonable agreement for Antarctica. The UM (Unified Model), UKCA (United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols Model), and GLOMAP (GLObal Model of Aerosol Processes) have

  15. Lower Bound on the Mean Square Displacement of Particles in the Hard Disk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richthammer, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The hard disk model is a 2D Gibbsian process of particles interacting via pure hard core repulsion. At high particle density the model is believed to show orientational order, however, it is known not to exhibit positional order. Here we investigate to what extent particle positions may fluctuate. We consider a finite volume version of the model in a box of dimensions 2 n × 2 n with arbitrary boundary configuration, and we show that the mean square displacement of particles near the center of the box is bounded from below by c log n. The result generalizes to a large class of models with fairly arbitrary interaction.

  16. Reinterpretation of Students' Ideas When Reasoning about Particle Model Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langbeheim, Elon

    2015-01-01

    The article, "Using Animations in Identifying General Chemistry Students' Misconceptions and Evaluating Their Knowledge Transfer Relating to Particle Position in Physical Changes" (Smith and Villarreal, 2015), reports that a substantial proportion of undergraduate students expressed misconceived ideas regarding the motion of particles in…

  17. Reinterpretation of Students' Ideas When Reasoning about Particle Model Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langbeheim, Elon

    2015-01-01

    The article, "Using Animations in Identifying General Chemistry Students' Misconceptions and Evaluating Their Knowledge Transfer Relating to Particle Position in Physical Changes" (Smith and Villarreal, 2015), reports that a substantial proportion of undergraduate students expressed misconceived ideas regarding the motion of particles in…

  18. In Vivo Murine Model of Continuous Intramedullary Infusion of Particles – A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ting; Ortiz, Steven G.; Huang, Zhinong; Ren, Peigen; Smith, R. Lane; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2008-01-01

    Continued production of wear debris affects both initial osseointegration and subsequent bone remodeling of total joint replacements (TJRs). However, continuous delivery of clinically relevant particles using a viable, cost effective, quantitative animal model to simulate the scenario in humans has been a challenge for orthopaedic researchers. In this study, we successfully infused blue-dyed polystyrene particles, similar in size to wear debris in humans, to the intramedullary space of the mouse femur for four weeks using an osmotic pump. Approximately 40% of the original particle load (85 ul) was delivered into the intramedullary space, an estimate of 3 × 10 9 particles. The visible blue dye carried by the particles confirmed the delivery. This model demonstrated that continuous infusion of particles to the murine bone-implant interface is possible. In vivo biological processes associated using wear debris particles can be studied using this new animal model. PMID:18777575

  19. Waste Slurry Particle Properties for Use in Slurry Flow Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jewett, J. R.; Conrads, T. J.; Julyk, L. J.; Reynolds, D. A.; Jensen, L.; Kirch, N. W.; Estey, S. D.; Bechtold, D. B.; Callaway III, W. S.; Cooke, G. A.; Herting, D. L.; Person, J. C.; Duncan, J. B.; Onishi, Y.; Tingey, J. M.

    2003-02-26

    Hanford's tank farm piping system must be substantially modified to deliver high-level wastes from the underground storage tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant now under construction. Improved knowledge of the physical properties of the solids was required to support the design of the modified system. To provide this additional knowledge, particle size distributions for composite samples from seven high-level waste feed tanks were measured using two different laser lightscattering particle size analyzers. These measurements were made under a variety of instrumental conditions, including various flow rates through the sample loop, various stirring rates in the sample reservoir, and before and after subjecting the particles to ultrasonic energy. A mean value over all the tanks of 4.2 {micro}m was obtained for the volume-based median particle size. Additional particle size information was obtained from sieving tests, settling tests and microscopic observations.

  20. Missing experimental challenges to the Standard Model of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovic, Slobodan

    The success of particle detection in high energy physics colliders critically depends on the criteria for selecting a small number of interactions from an overwhelming number that occur in the detector. It also depends on the selection of the exact data to be analyzed and the techniques of analysis. The introduction of automation into the detection process has traded the direct involvement of the physicist at each stage of selection and analysis for the efficient handling of vast amounts of data. This tradeoff, in combination with the organizational changes in laboratories of increasing size and complexity, has resulted in automated and semi-automated systems of detection. Various aspects of the semi-automated regime were greatly diminished in more generic automated systems, but turned out to be essential to a number of surprising discoveries of anomalous processes that led to theoretical breakthroughs, notably the establishment of the Standard Model of particle physics. The automated systems are much more efficient in confirming specific hypothesis in narrow energy domains than in performing broad exploratory searches. Thus, in the main, detection processes relying excessively on automation are more likely to miss potential anomalies and impede potential theoretical advances. I suggest that putting substantially more effort into the study of electron-positron colliders and increasing its funding could minimize the likelihood of missing potential anomalies, because detection in such an environment can be handled by the semi-automated regime-unlike detection in hadron colliders. Despite virtually unavoidable excessive reliance on automated detection in hadron colliders, their development has been deemed a priority because they can operate at currently highest energy levels. I suggest, however, that a focus on collisions at the highest achievable energy levels diverts funds from searches for potential anomalies overlooked due to tradeoffs at the previous energy

  1. Tail plasma sheet models derived from Geotail particle data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.; Mukai, T.

    2003-03-01

    Simple analytical models have been derived for the first time, describing the 2-D distribution (along and across the Earth's magnetotail) of the central plasma sheet (CPS) ion temperature, density, and pressure, as functions of the incoming solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) parameters, at distances between 10 and 50 RE. The models are based on a large set of data of the Low-Energy Particle (LEP) and Magnetic Field (MGF) instruments, taken by Geotail spacecraft between 1994 and 1998, comprising 7234 1-min average values of the CPS temperature and density. Concurrent solar wind and IMF data were provided by the Wind and IMP 8 spacecraft. The accuracy of the models was gauged by the correlation coefficient (c.c.) R between the observed and predicted values of a parameter. The CPS ion density N is controlled mostly by the solar wind proton density and by the northward component of the IMF. Being the least stable characteristic of the CPS, it yielded the lowest c.c. RN = 0.57. The CPS temperature T, controlled mainly by the solar wind speed V and the IMF Bz, gave a higher c.c. RT = 0.71. The CPS ion pressure P was best controlled by the solar wind ram pressure Psw and by an IMF-related parameter F = B⟂?, where B⟂ is the perpendicular component of the IMF and θ is its clock angle. In a striking contrast with N and T, the model pressure P revealed a very high c.c. with the data, RP = 0.95, an apparent consequence of the force balance between the CPS and the tail lobe magnetic field. No significant dawn-dusk asymmetry of the CPS was found beyond the distance 10 RE, in line with the observed symmetry of the tail lobe magnetic field. The plasma density N is lowest at midnight and increases toward the tail's flanks. Larger (smaller) solar wind ion densities and northward (southward) IMF Bz result in larger (smaller) N in the CPS. In contrast to the density N, the temperature T peaks at the midnight meridian and falls off toward the dawn/dusk flanks

  2. Modeling Evaporation and Particle Assembly in Colloidal Droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2017-06-13

    Evaporation-induced assembly of nanoparticles in a drying droplet is of great importance in many engineering applications, including printing, coating, and thin film processing. The investigation of particle dynamics in evaporating droplets can provide fundamental hydrodynamic insight for revealing the processing-structure relationship in the particle self-organization induced by solvent evaporation. We develop a free-energy-based multiphase lattice Boltzmann method coupled with Brownian dynamics to simulate evaporating colloidal droplets on solid substrates with specified wetting properties. The influence of interface-bound nanoparticles on the surface tension and evaporation of a flat liquid-vapor interface is first quantified. The results indicate that the particles at the interface reduce surface tension and enhance evaporation flux. For evaporating particle-covered droplets on substrates with different wetting properties, we characterize the increase of evaporate rate via measuring droplet volume. We find that droplet evaporation is determined by the number density and circumferential distribution of interfacial particles. We further correlate particle dynamics and assembly to the evaporation-induced convection in the bulk and on the surface of droplet. Finally, we observe distinct final deposits from evaporating colloidal droplets with bulk-dispersed and interface-bound particles. In addition, the deposit pattern is also influenced by the equilibrium contact angle of droplet.

  3. Hierarchy of second order gyrokinetic Hamiltonian models for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronko, N.; Bottino, A.; Chandre, C.; Sonnendruecker, E.

    2017-06-01

    The reduced particle model is the central element for the systematic derivation of the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations from first principles. Coupled to the fields inside the gyrokinetic field-particle Lagrangian, the reduced particle model defines polarization and magnetization effects appearing in the gyrokinetic Maxwell equations. It is also used for the reconstruction of the gyrokinetic Vlasov equation from the particle characteristics. Various representations of reduced particle models are available according to the choice of the gyrokinetic phase space coordinates. In this paper, the Hamiltonian representation of the reduced particle dynamics at an order suitable for the implementation in particle-in-cell simulations is explicitly derived from the general reduction procedure. The second-order (with respect to the fluctuating electromagnetic fields), full finite Larmor radius (FLR) Hamiltonian gyrokinetic particle model as well as the second-order model suitable specifically for the long-wavelength approximation (i.e., containing up to the second-order FLR corrections), are derived and compared to the model recently implemented in the particle-in-cell code ORB5. We show that the same long-wavelength approximate equations can also be derived by taking the proper limit of the full FLR model.

  4. Visible and Sub-visible Particle Formation for a Model Bioconjugate.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lavinia M; Pizzo, Michelle E; Sinha, Sandipan; Ahmed, Syed S; Joseph, Liji

    2017-04-01

    The time-course and extent of visible particle (VP) and sub-visible particle (SVP) formation was monitored as a function of interfacial area (IA) for a model bioconjugate. To facilitate particle formation, the bioconjugate was agitated in a glass vial and exposed to IAs up to 478 mm(2). Since vials had equal fill and headspace volumes, the area of the air-water interface was varied by placing vials on angled blocks at 0°, 30°, 60°, or 90° from the horizontal. A significant increase in visible and sub-visible particle formation was observed with increasing air-water IA. Exposure to IAs below ∼305 mm(2) resulted in the formation of very few particles, while IAs > ∼305 mm(2) resulted in substantial particle formation. Visible and sub-visible particle morphology varied with interfacial area and time. The sub-visible particles initially increased with time but did not reach steady state; instead the initial increase was followed by complete depletion. These phenomena indicate that visible particle formation likely increased at the expense of the sub-visible particle population and demonstrate a potential link between the two particle populations for this model bioconjugate. Initiation of particle formation did not result in corresponding decreases in protein concentration or increases in soluble aggregates. However, extended agitation time resulted in a significant decrease in protein concentration.

  5. Adaptation of multidimensional group particle tracking and particle wall-boundary condition model to the FDNS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A particulate two-phase flow CFD model was developed based on the FDNS code which is a pressure based predictor plus multi-corrector Navier-Stokes flow solver. Turbulence models with compressibility correction and the wall function models were employed as submodels. A finite-rate chemistry model was used for reacting flow simulation. For particulate two-phase flow simulations, a Eulerian-Lagrangian solution method using an efficient implicit particle trajectory integration scheme was developed in this study. Effects of particle-gas reaction and particle size change to agglomeration or fragmentation were not considered in this investigation. At the onset of the present study, a two-dimensional version of FDNS which had been modified to treat Lagrangian tracking of particles (FDNS-2DEL) had already been written and was operational. The FDNS-2DEL code was too slow for practical use, mainly because it had not been written in a form amenable to vectorization on the Cray, nor was the full three-dimensional form of FDNS utilized. The specific objective of this study was to reorder to calculations into long single arrays for automatic vectorization on the Cray and to implement the full three-dimensional version of FDNS to produce the FDNS-3DEL code. Since the FDNS-2DEL code was slow, a very limited number of test cases had been run with it. This study was also intended to increase the number of cases simulated to verify and improve, as necessary, the particle tracking methodology coded in FDNS.

  6. Particle acceleration model for gas--solid suspensions at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Sudheer; Garg, Rahul; Hrenya, Christine; Fox, Rodney; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2009-11-01

    Particle granular temperature plays an important role in the prediction of core annular structure in riser flows. The covariance of fluctuating particle acceleration and fluctuating particle velocity governs the evolution of the granular temperature in homogeneous suspensions undergoing elastic collisions. Koch and co--workers (Phys. Fluid. 1990, JFM 1999) showed that the granular temperature has a source term due to hydrodynamic interactions in gas--solid suspensions in the Stokes flow regime. We performed direct numerical simulations (DNS) of freely evolving suspensions at moderate Reynolds numbers using the immersed boundary method (IBM). We found that simple extension of a class of mean particle acceleration models to their instantaneous counterparts does not predict the correct fluctuating particle acceleration--fluctuating velocity covariance that is obtained from DNS. The fluctuating particle velocity autocorrelation function decay and the Lagrangian structure function obtained from DNS motivate the use of a Langevin model for the instantaneous particle acceleration.

  7. Solvable model of the collective motion of heterogeneous particles interacting on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takuma

    2014-02-01

    I propose a model of mutually interacting particles on an M-dimensional unit sphere. I derive the dynamics of the particles by extending the dynamics of the Kuramoto-Sakaguchi model. The dynamics include a natural-frequency matrix, which determines the motion of a particle with no external force, and an external force vector. The position (state variable) of a particle at a given time is obtained by the projection transformation of the initial position of the particle. The same projection transformation gives the position of the particles with the same natural-frequency matrix. I show that the motion of the center of mass of an infinite number of heterogeneous particles whose natural-frequency matrices are obtained from a class of multivariate Lorentz distribution is given by an M-dimensional ordinary differential equation in closed form. This result is an extension of the Ott-Antonsen theory.

  8. Model independent constraints on charges of new particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chway, Dongjin; Dermíšek, Radovan; Jung, Tae Hyun; Kim, Hyung Do

    2017-06-01

    Any particle that is charged under S U (3 )C and U (1 )EM can mediate the g g →γ γ process through loops. Near the threshold for the new particle pair production, gauge boson exchanges necessitate the resummation of ladder diagrams. We discuss the leading log order matching of the one-loop result with the nonrelativistic effective theory resummed result. We show how the diphoton invariant mass spectrum varies depending on decay width, color representation, and electric charge of the new particle. The exclusion limits on the product of S U (3 )C and U (1 )EM charges of the new scalar or fermion particle are obtained from current LHC data.

  9. Mesoderm-specific transcript is associated with fat mass expansion in response to a positive energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Nikonova, Larissa; Koza, Robert A.; Mendoza, Tamra; Chao, Pei-Min; Curley, James P.; Kozak, Leslie P.

    2008-01-01

    A 50-fold variation in mRNA and protein levels of the mesoderm-specific transcript gene (Mest) in white fat of C57BL/6J (B6) mice fed an obesogenic diet is positively correlated with expansion of fat mass. MEST protein was detected only in adipocytes, in which its induction occurred with both unsaturated and saturated dietary fat. To test the hypothesis that MEST modulates fat mass expansion, its expression was compared to that of stearoyl CoA desaturase (Scd1) in B6 mice exposed to diets and environmental temperatures that generated conditions separating the effects of food intake and adiposity. Under a range of conditions, Mest expression was always associated with variations in adiposity, whereas Scd1 expression was associated with the amount of saturated fat in the diet. Mest mRNA was expressed at its highest levels during early postnatal growth at the onset of the most rapid phase of fat mass expansion. MEST is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus where its putative enzymatic properties as a lipase or acyltransferase, predicted from sequence homology with members of the α/β fold hydrolase superfamily, can enable it to function in lipid accumulation under conditions of positive energy balance. Variations in adiposity and Mest expression in genetically identical mice also provides a model of epigenetic regulation.—Nikonova, L., Koza, R. A., Mendoza, T., Chao, P.-M., Curley, J. P., Kozak, L. P. Mesoderm-specific transcript is associated with fat mass expansion in response to a positive energy balance. PMID:18644838

  10. Multiscale Particle-Based Modeling of Flowing Platelets in Blood Plasma Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Na; Slepian, Marvin J.; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiscale particle-based model of platelets, to study the transport dynamics of shear stresses between the surrounding fluid and the platelet membrane. This model facilitates a more accurate prediction of the activation potential of platelets by viscous shear stresses - one of the major mechanisms leading to thrombus formation in cardiovascular diseases and in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. The interface of the model couples coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The CGMD handles individual platelets while the DPD models the macroscopic transport of blood plasma in vessels. A hybrid force field is formulated for establishing a functional interface between the platelet membrane and the surrounding fluid, in which the microstructural changes of platelets may respond to the extracellular viscous shear stresses transferred to them. The interaction between the two systems preserves dynamic properties of the flowing platelets, such as the flipping motion. Using this multiscale particle-based approach, we have further studied the effects of the platelet elastic modulus by comparing the action of the flow-induced shear stresses on rigid and deformable platelet models. The results indicate that neglecting the platelet deformability may overestimate the stress on the platelet membrane, which in turn may lead to erroneous predictions of the platelet activation under viscous shear flow conditions. This particle-based fluid-structure interaction multiscale model offers for the first time a computationally feasible approach for simulating deformable platelets interacting with viscous blood flow, aimed at predicting flow induced platelet activation by using a highly resolved mapping of the stress distribution on the platelet membrane under dynamic flow conditions. PMID:25530818

  11. Multiscale Particle-Based Modeling of Flowing Platelets in Blood Plasma Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Na; Slepian, Marvin J; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-12-01

    We developed a multiscale particle-based model of platelets, to study the transport dynamics of shear stresses between the surrounding fluid and the platelet membrane. This model facilitates a more accurate prediction of the activation potential of platelets by viscous shear stresses - one of the major mechanisms leading to thrombus formation in cardiovascular diseases and in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. The interface of the model couples coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The CGMD handles individual platelets while the DPD models the macroscopic transport of blood plasma in vessels. A hybrid force field is formulated for establishing a functional interface between the platelet membrane and the surrounding fluid, in which the microstructural changes of platelets may respond to the extracellular viscous shear stresses transferred to them. The interaction between the two systems preserves dynamic properties of the flowing platelets, such as the flipping motion. Using this multiscale particle-based approach, we have further studied the effects of the platelet elastic modulus by comparing the action of the flow-induced shear stresses on rigid and deformable platelet models. The results indicate that neglecting the platelet deformability may overestimate the stress on the platelet membrane, which in turn may lead to erroneous predictions of the platelet activation under viscous shear flow conditions. This particle-based fluid-structure interaction multiscale model offers for the first time a computationally feasible approach for simulating deformable platelets interacting with viscous blood flow, aimed at predicting flow induced platelet activation by using a highly resolved mapping of the stress distribution on the platelet membrane under dynamic flow conditions.

  12. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C.; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2016-01-01

    Oil–particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual–numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil–particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil–particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil–particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil–particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil–particle aggregation.

  13. Numerical Model for Ultra-fine Particles in the Absence and Presence of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Elliott, James A.

    2009-06-01

    Length scales of particles and their surrounding medium strongly determines the nature of their interactions with one another and their responses to external fields. We are interested in systems of ultra-fine particles (0.1-1.0 micron) such as volcanic ash, soot from forest fires, solid aerosols, or fine powders for pharmaceutical inhalation applications. We have a developed a numerical model which captures the dominant physical interactions which control the behavior of these systems. The adhesive interactions between the particles use the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov (DMT) adhesion theory along with the van der Waals attraction. The elastic restoring forces are modeled by the Hertz's contact model, and require details of material properties such as the Young's modulus and Poisson ratio. Commencing with a three dimensional gas of ultra-fine particles, the absence of gravity does not produce any noticeable clustering. The presence of gravity initially generates a large population of clusters with small number of particles, as the particles settle. The initial population of small clusters or single particles which have settled decrease with time as more particles, or clusters, agglomerate with one another. Our final results show clusters containing 10 to 100 particles, with a larger population of small clusters. We present details of the model, and some preliminary results which demonstrate the influence of the particle surface properties on the clustering dynamics of these systems, in the absence and presence of gravity (M. Dutt, J. A. Elliott, et al. in press).

  14. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith

    2016-05-15

    Oil-particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual-numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil-particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil-particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil-particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil-particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil-particle aggregation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Retrieval of particle size distribution in the dependent model using the moment method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaogang; Tang, Hong; Dai, Jingmin

    2007-09-03

    The problem of determining particle size distribution using the moment method in the spectral extinction technique is studied. The feasibility and reliability of the retrieval of spherical particle size distribution using the moment method are investigated. The single spherical particle extinction efficiency, which is derived theoretically using the Mie's solution to Maxwell's equation, is approximated with a higher order polynomial in order to apply the moment method. Simulation and experimental results indicate that a fairly reasonable representation of the particle size distribution can be obtained using the moment method in the dependent model algorithm. The method has advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and suitability for in-line particle size measurement.

  16. Consistent model reduction of polymer chains in solution in dissipative particle dynamics: Model description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Nicolas; Nunes, Suzana P.; Calo, Victor M.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain models for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, where the properties governing the phase equilibria such as the characteristic size of the chain, compressibility, density, and temperature are preserved. The proposed methodology reduces the number of degrees of freedom required in traditional DPD representations to model equilibrium properties of systems with complex molecules (e.g., linear polymers). Based on geometrical considerations we explicitly account for the correlation between beads in fine-grained DPD models and consistently represent the effect of these correlations in a reduced model, in a practical and simple fashion via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. In order to satisfy the geometrical constraints in the reduced model we introduce bond-angle potentials that account for the changes in the chain free energy after the model reduction. Following this coarse-graining process we represent high molecular weight DPD chains (i.e., ≥ 200 beads per chain) with a significant reduction in the number of particles required (i.e., ≥ 20 times the original system). We show that our methodology has potential applications modeling systems of high molecular weight molecules at large scales, such as diblock copolymer and DNA.

  17. Conceptual Change Texts in Chemistry Teaching: A Study on the Particle Model of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beerenwinkel, Anne; Parchmann, Ilka; Grasel, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effect of a conceptual change text on students' awareness of common misconceptions on the particle model of matter. The conceptual change text was designed based on principles of text comprehensibility, of conceptual change instruction and of instructional approaches how to introduce the particle model. It was evaluated in…

  18. Conceptual Change Texts in Chemistry Teaching: A Study on the Particle Model of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beerenwinkel, Anne; Parchmann, Ilka; Grasel, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effect of a conceptual change text on students' awareness of common misconceptions on the particle model of matter. The conceptual change text was designed based on principles of text comprehensibility, of conceptual change instruction and of instructional approaches how to introduce the particle model. It was evaluated in…

  19. A MODEL FOR FINE PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers (CFBAS) has been developed. It can model the influence of different factors on agglomeration, such as the geometry of CFBAs, superficial gas velocity, initial particle size distribution, and type of ag...

  20. Sand Production Modeling Using Superquadric Discrete Elements and Coupling of Fluid Flow and Particle Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S. Perkins, E.D.

    1999-02-10

    Techniques for modeling oil well sand production have been developed using the formulations for superquadric discrete elements and Darcy fluid flow. Discrete element models are generated using the new technique of particle cloning. Discrete element sources and sinks allow simulation of sand production from the initial state through the transition to an equilibrium state where particles are created and removed at the same rate.

  1. A MODEL FOR FINE PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers (CFBAS) has been developed. It can model the influence of different factors on agglomeration, such as the geometry of CFBAs, superficial gas velocity, initial particle size distribution, and type of ag...

  2. Dispersion modelling of a tall stack plume in the spanish mediterranean coast by a particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, J. F.; Cremades, L.; Baldasano, J. M.

    A Lagrangian particle model has been used to simulate the dispersion of a tall stack plume of a power plant located in a complex coastal site at the Spanish Mediterranean coast, under summer meteorological conditions: land and sea breezes and thermal low effects. These are responsible for a particular behavior of plume (rotations greater than 90°). The model is based on the numerical solution of Langevin's equation (Sawford, 1984; Thomson, 1984, 1987; de Baas et al., 1986) by following the trajectories of many particles. The displacement of these particles is governed by meteorological parameters resulting from Eulerian wind data adjusted by an objective analysis model based on variational calculus. The adjusted values should satisfy continuity as a strong constraint (Sherman, 1978; Mathur and Peters, 1990). The model allows to simulate the atmospheric dispersion both in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous turbulence according to de Baas et al. (1986) and Zannetti (1990) schemes. The numerical results obtained by the dispersion model are compared with experimental data from a measurement campaign developed at the surroundings of Castellon power plant. The model is applied to the problem of predicting the ground level concentration (GLC) (3 m, above ground level) of the SO 2 emitted by the power plant. Model behavior was evaluated through several statistical indices: relative mean bias, normalized mean square error and the cumulative frequency distribution of the point-by-point ratio between observed and predicted concentrations. Both models were developed at the Instituto de Tecnología y Modelización Ambiental (ITEMA) of the Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña (UPC).

  3. Application of stochastic weighted algorithms to a multidimensional silica particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menz, William J.; Patterson, Robert I. A.; Wagner, Wolfgang; Kraft, Markus

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of the numerical behaviour of stochastic weighted algorithms (SWAs) using the transition regime coagulation kernel and a multidimensional silica particle model. The implementation in the SWAs of the transition regime coagulation kernel and associated majorant rates is described. The silica particle model of Shekar et al. [S. Shekar, A.J. Smith, W.J. Menz, M. Sander, M. Kraft, A multidimensional population balance model to describe the aerosol synthesis of silica nanoparticles, Journal of Aerosol Science 44 (2012) 83-98] was used in conjunction with this coagulation kernel to study the convergence properties of SWAs with a multidimensional particle model. High precision solutions were calculated with two SWAs and also with the established direct simulation algorithm. These solutions, which were generated using large number of computational particles, showed close agreement. It was thus demonstrated that SWAs can be successfully used with complex coagulation kernels and high dimensional particle models to simulate real-world systems.

  4. Reduced model for combustion of a small biomass particle at high operating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Haseli, Y; van Oijen, J A; de Goey, L P H

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate a model for a spherical biomass particle combusting at high temperatures with reduced number of variables. The model is based on the observation that combustion of a small particle includes three main phases: heating up, pyrolysis, and char conversion. It is assumed that the pyrolysis begins as soon as the particle surface attains a pyrolysis temperature, yielding a char front, moving towards the center of particle as time passes. The formulation of the heating up and pyrolysis phases is based on an integral method which allows describing the energy conservation with an ordinary differential equation. The char combustion model is according to the shrinking core approximation. Model validation is carried out by comparing the predictions with experiments of sawdust particles taken from the literature, and with computations of partial differential equation-based models. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the predictions and experimental data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A model for electrophoretic transport of charged particles through membrane before steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Tatiana Miranda; Fragoso, Viviane Muniz da Silva; Cruz, Frederico Alan de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we are presenting a model for electrophoretic motion of a charged particle through the membrane before it reaches the steady state, based on concepts of Physics. Some results from analysis of the model are discussed.

  6. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  7. A model for wet aggregation of ash particles in volcanic plumes and clouds: 2. Model application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Durant, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of particle aggregation has a dramatic effect on the transport and sedimentation of volcanic ash. The aggregation process is complex and can occur under different conditions and in multiple regions of the plume and in the ash cloud. In the companion paper, Costa et al. develop an aggregation model based on a fractal relationship to describe the rate particles are incorporated into ash aggregates. The model includes the effects of both magmatic and atmospheric water present in the volcanic cloud and demonstrates that the rate of aggregation depends on the characteristics of the initial particle size distribution. The aggregation model includes two parameters, the fractal exponent Df, which describes the efficiency of the aggregation process, and the aggregate settling velocity correction factor ψe, which influences the distance at which distal mass deposition maxima form. Both parameters are adjusted using features of the observed deposits. Here this aggregation model is implemented in the FALL3D volcanic ash transport model and applied to the 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens and the 17-18 September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions. For both eruptions, the optimized values for Df (2.96-3.00) and ψe (0.27-0.33) indicate that the ash aggregates had a bulk density of 700-800 kg m-3. The model provides a higher degree of agreement than previous fully empirical aggregation models and successfully reproduces the depositional characteristics of the deposits investigated over a large range of scales, including the position and thickness of the secondary maxima.

  8. A New Multiphase Model for Simulating Energetically Driven Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D E; Murphy, M J

    2010-02-02

    The proper representation of particulate phenomena is important for the simulation of many non-ideal particle loaded explosives. These explosives present severe numerical difficulties to simulate because numerical approaches for packed particle beds often behave poorly for the dilute regime and the reverse is often true for methods developed for the dilute regime. This paper presents a multiphase framework for the simulation of these non-ideal explosives that accurately accounts for the particulate behavior in both of these regimes. The capability of this framework is enhanced by the use of prescribed PDF methods for both particle size distributions and the representation of chemical processes. We have validated this framework using several experimental methods that accommodate the separation of momentum flux measurements in two-phase blast flows.

  9. Beyond Standard Model Physics: At the Frontiers of Cosmology and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Suarez, Alejandro O.

    I begin to write this thesis at a time of great excitement in the field of cosmology and particle physics. The aim of this thesis is to study and search for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics in the cosmological and high energy particle fields. There are two main questions, which this thesis aims to address: 1) what can we learn about the inflationary epoch utilizing the pioneer gravitational wave detector Adv. LIGO?, and 2) what are the dark matter particle properties and interactions with the standard model particles?. This thesis will focus on advances in answering both questions.

  10. DEM investigation on characteristics of rolling resistance for modelling particle shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lunlun; Chu, Xihua; Xu, Yuanjie

    2017-06-01

    To examine the capability of rolling resistance to model the effects of particle shape, two sets of samples, composed of binary clumped particles and circular particles with rolling resistance, are tested in DEM simulation. The coefficient of rolling friction is estimated based on the energy dissipation. The effects of rolling resistance and particle shape on the shear strength, deformation behavior and non-coaxiality are compared. The numerical results show that rolling resistance reproduces well the effect of particle shape on the peak strength. However, other macro-properties, such as residual strength, elasticity modulus, poisson's ratio, dilatancy and non-coaxiality, introduced by rolling resistance both exist certain differences compared with the effect of particle shape. The discrepancies is thought to be due to the increasing compressibility of samples as the particle shape becomes more elongated, which cannot be reproduced by increasing rolling friction.

  11. Small-angle Coulomb collision model for particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, Don S. Winske, Dan; Daughton, William; Albright, Brian

    2009-03-20

    We construct and investigate a set of stochastic differential equations that incorporate the physics of velocity-dependent small-angle Coulomb collisions among the plasma particles in a particle-in-cell simulation. Each particle is scattered stochastically from all the other particles in a simulation cell modeled as one or more Maxwellians. Total energy and momentum are conserved by linear transformation of the velocity increments. In two test simulations the proposed 'particle-moment' collision algorithm performs well with time steps as large as 10% of the relaxation time - far larger than a particle-pairing collision algorithm, in which pairs of particles are scattered from one another, requires to achieve the same accuracy.

  12. Modeling and experimental study of a honeycomb beam filled with damping particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nazeer; Ranganath, R.; Ghosal, Ashitava

    2017-03-01

    Honeycomb sandwich laminates which are the basic structural element of spacecraft have inherently low damping. In this paper, we propose to improve the damping characteristics of such structures by adding damping particles in the cells of the honeycomb. This paper presents modeling of a cantilever beam constructed with honeycomb structure with the hexagonal honeycomb cells, filled with particles. The beam is subjected to external dynamic loads and the interactions of damping particles with the walls of the cells and its overall effect on the frequency response function (FRF) and the damping of the beam are obtained. The discrete-element-method (DEM) is used to model the dynamics of the particles in conjunction with the governing equations of motion of the beam and the cell-walls. The particle-particle and particle-wall impact is modeled using Hertz's non-linear dissipative contact model for normal component and Coulomb's laws of friction for tangential component. Contiguous block of cells near the tip of the cantilever beam were filled with the damping particles and the beam was excited with a random signal near the fixed end. The damping and transfer functions obtained experimentally are compared to those obtained from the mathematical model and they are found to match very well. Further the model was used to study the effect of fill fraction, mass ratio, and the level of excitation signal on transfer function. Depending on the mass ratio and fill fraction, significant reductions in vibration levels are observed.

  13. Application of the implicit particle filter to a model of nearshore circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. N.; Ehret, L. L.

    2014-04-01

    The implicit particle filter is applied to a stochastically forced shallow water model of nearshore flow, and found to produce reliable state estimates with tens of particles. The state vector of this model consists of a height anomaly and two horizontal velocity components at each point on a 128 × 98 regular rectangular grid, making for a state dimension O(104). The particle filter was applied to the model with two parameter choices representing two distinct dynamical regimes, and performed well in both. Demands on computing resources were manageable. Simulations with as many as a hundred particles ran overnight on a modestly configured workstation. In this case of observations defined by a linear function of the state vector, taken every time step of the numerical model, the implicit particle filter is equivalent to the optimal importance filter, i.e., at each step any given particle is drawn from the density of the system conditioned jointly upon observations and the state of that particle at the previous time. Even in this ideal case, the sample occasionally collapses to a single particle, and resampling is necessary. In those cases, the sample rapidly reinflates, and the analysis never loses track. In both dynamical regimes, the ensembles of particles deviated significantly from normality.

  14. SPARSE-A subgrid particle averaged Reynolds stress equivalent model: testing with a priori closure.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sean L; Jacobs, Gustaaf B; Sen, Oishik; Udaykumar, H S

    2017-03-01

    A Lagrangian particle cloud model is proposed that accounts for the effects of Reynolds-averaged particle and turbulent stresses and the averaged carrier-phase velocity of the subparticle cloud scale on the averaged motion and velocity of the cloud. The SPARSE (subgrid particle averaged Reynolds stress equivalent) model is based on a combination of a truncated Taylor expansion of a drag correction function and Reynolds averaging. It reduces the required number of computational parcels to trace a cloud of particles in Eulerian-Lagrangian methods for the simulation of particle-laden flow. Closure is performed in an a priori manner using a reference simulation where all particles in the cloud are traced individually with a point-particle model. Comparison of a first-order model and SPARSE with the reference simulation in one dimension shows that both the stress and the averaging of the carrier-phase velocity on the cloud subscale affect the averaged motion of the particle. A three-dimensional isotropic turbulence computation shows that only one computational parcel is sufficient to accurately trace a cloud of tens of thousands of particles.

  15. Rayleigh-Debye-Gans as a model for continuous monitoring of biological particles: Part II, development of a hybrid model.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lopez, Alicia C; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H

    2008-03-31

    Rayleigh-Debye-Gans and Mie theory were previously shown to disagree for spherical particles under ideal conditions4. A Hybrid model for spheres was developed by the authors combining Mie theory and Rayleigh- Debye-Gans. The hybrid model was tested against Mie and Rayleigh- Debye-Gans for different refractive indices and diameter sizes across the UV-Vis spectrum. The results of this study show that the hybrid model represents a considerable improvement over Rayleigh-Debye-Gans for submicron particles and is computationally more effective compared to Mie model. The development of the spherical hybrid model establishes a platform for the analysis of non-spherical particles.

  16. New Bianchi type-I cosmological models for biharmonic particles using string cosmology with exponential law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körpinar, Talat; Ünlütürk, Yasin

    2015-11-01

    Anisotropic Bianchi type-I magnetized string cosmological models are obtained in decaying vacuum energy density proposed by Pradhan (Commun Theor Phys 55:931-941, 2011). In this study, we obtain some physical and geometrical properties of biharmonic particles of a new spacetime using Bianchi type-I (B-I) cosmological model. We use solution of the Einstein's field equations for biharmonic particles. Some important features of the model have been discussed. Established the existence of string cosmological models for biharmonic particles, unlike the earlier authors, in this theory and studied some physical and geometrical properties.

  17. Numerical modelling of particle-laden sonic CO2 jets with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Fairweather, M.; Peakall, J.; Keevil, G.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Woolley, R. M.

    2013-10-01

    The characteristics of the particle distribution, evolution and movement in a sonic jet release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from a high pressure reservoir are investigated. The motivation is to numerically model the sonic jet with particles, using the hitherto unknown initial particle distribution measured herein, and hence understand and numerically reproduce the experimentally observedparticle behaviour downstream of the Mach shock, including turbulence characteristics and level of agglomeration. We employ a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes scheme with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), combined with a Lagrangian particle tracker and particle distribution function. The model is seeded at the nozzle with the experimentally measured particle distribution and exploited to reproduce the observed characteristics of the jet. These releases are designed to be representative of a sonic CO2 release into the atmosphere and so provide data to help interpret how accidental or operational releases from the transport aspect of a carbon capture and storage chain might behave.

  18. A model of coal particle drying in fluidized bed combustion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Komatina, M.; Manovic, V.; Saljnikov, A.

    2007-02-15

    Experimental and theoretical investigation on drying of a single coal particle in fluidized bed combustor is presented. Coal particle drying was considered via the moist shrinking core mechanism. The results of the drying test runs of low-rank Serbian coals were used for experimental verification of the model. The temperature of the coal particle center was measured, assuming that drying was completed when the temperature equalled 100{sup o}C. The influence of different parameters (thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of coal, fluidized bed temperature, moisture content and superheating of steam) on drying time and temperature profile within the coal particle was analyzed by a parametric analysis. The experimentally obtained results confirmed that the moist shrinking core mechanism can be applied for the mathematical description of a coal particle drying, while dependence between drying time and coal particle radius, a square law relationship, implicates heat transfer control of the process and confirms the validity of assumptions used in modeling.

  19. Physical Models for Particle Tracking Simulations in the RF Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    This document describes the algorithms that are used in the PyORBIT code to track the particles accelerated in the Radio-Frequency cavities. It gives the mathematical description of the algorithms and the assumptions made in each case. The derived formulas have been implemented in the PyORBIT code. The necessary data for each algorithm are described in detail.

  20. A review of dispersion modelling and its application to the dispersion of particles: An overview of different dispersion models available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, N. S.; Morawska, L.

    This paper provides the first review of the application of atmospheric models for particle dispersion. The different types of dispersion models available, from simple box type models to complex fluid dynamics models are outlined and the suitability of the different approaches to dispersion modelling within different environments, in regards to scale, complexity of the environment and concentration parameters is assessed. Finally, several major commercial and non-commercial particle dispersion packages are reviewed, detailing which processes are included and advantages and limitations of their use to modelling particle dispersion. The models reviewed included: Box models (AURORA, CPB and PBM), Gaussian models (CALINE4, HIWAY2, CAR-FMI, OSPM, CALPUFF, AEROPOL, AERMOD, UK-ADMS and SCREEN3), Lagrangian/Eulerian Models (GRAL, TAPM, ARIA Regional), CFD models (ARIA Local, MISKAM, MICRO-CALGRID) and models which include aerosol dynamics (GATOR, MONO32, UHMA, CIT, AERO, RPM, AEROFOR2, URM-1ATM, MADRID, CALGRID and UNI-AERO).

  1. Modeling of the optical properties of a two-dimensional system of small conductive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondikov, A. A.; Tonkaev, P. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.

    2016-08-01

    Software was developed for quick numerical calculations and graphic display of the absorption, reflection and transmittance spectra of two-dimensional systems of small conductive particles. It allowed us to make instant comparison of calculation results and experimental data. A lattice model was used to simulate nearly distributed particles, and the coherent-potential approximation was applied to obtain a solution to the problem of interacting particles. The Delphi programming environment was used.

  2. Many particle approximation of the Aw-Rascle-Zhang second order model for vehicular traffic.

    PubMed

    Francesco, Marco Di; Fagioli, Simone; Rosini, Massimiliano D

    2017-02-01

    We consider the follow-the-leader approximation of the Aw-Rascle-Zhang (ARZ) model for traffic flow in a multi population formulation. We prove rigorous convergence to weak solutions of the ARZ system in the many particle limit in presence of vacuum. The result is based on uniform BV estimates on the discrete particle velocity. We complement our result with numerical simulations of the particle method compared with some exact solutions to the Riemann problem of the ARZ system.

  3. Evaluation of char combustion models: measurement and analysis of variability in char particle size and density

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, Daniel J; Monazam, Esmail R; Casleton, Kent H; Shaddix, Christopher R

    2008-08-01

    Char samples representing a range of combustion conditions and extents of burnout were obtained from a well-characterized laminar flow combustion experiment. Individual particles from the parent coal and char samples were characterized to determine distributions in particle volume, mass, and density at different extent of burnout. The data were then compared with predictions from a comprehensive char combustion model referred to as the char burnout kinetics model (CBK). The data clearly reflect the particle- to-particle heterogeneity of the parent coal and show a significant broadening in the size and density distributions of the chars resulting from both devolatilization and combustion. Data for chars prepared in a lower oxygen content environment (6% oxygen by vol.) are consistent with zone II type combustion behavior where most of the combustion is occurring near the particle surface. At higher oxygen contents (12% by vol.), the data show indications of more burning occurring in the particle interior. The CBK model does a good job of predicting the general nature of the development of size and density distributions during burning but the input distribution of particle size and density is critical to obtaining good predictions. A significant reduction in particle size was observed to occur as a result of devolatilization. For comprehensive combustion models to provide accurate predictions, this size reduction phenomenon needs to be included in devolatilization models so that representative char distributions are carried through the calculations.

  4. Nonisothermal particle modeling of municipal solid waste combustion with heavy metal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Mazza, G.; Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G.; Soria, J.

    2010-12-15

    A particulate model was developed for municipal solid-waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining solid-waste-particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from the burning particles. Based on a simpler, isothermal version presented previously, this model combines an asymptotic-combustion model for carbonaceous-solid combustion and a shrinking-core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization phenomenon, in which the particle is now considered nonisothermal. A parametric study is presented that shows the influence of temperature on the global metal-vaporization process. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator and to the results of the simpler isothermal model. It is shown that conduction in the particle strongly affects the variation of the vaporization rate with time and that the present version of the model well fits both the shape of the plots and the maximum heavy metal vaporization rates for all bed temperatures. (author)

  5. Predictive models for deposition of inhaled diesel exhaust particles in humans and laboratory species

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.P.; Xu, G.B. )

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical and computer models of the respiratory tracts of human beings and of laboratory animals (rats, hamsters, guinea pigs) were used to estimate the deposition patterns of inhaled diesel exhaust particles from automobile emissions. Our goal was to be able to predict the relation between exposure to diesel exhaust particles and the deposition of these particles in the lungs of humans of various ages. Diesel exhaust particles are aggregates with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of approximately 0.2 micron. Their actual size depends on the conditions under which they are generated. Using an appropriate particle model, we derived mathematical expressions that describe the effects of diffusion, sedimentation, impaction, and interception on the deposition of these particles. Because of their small size, we found that most diesel exhaust particles deposited through diffusion, and that the role of the other mechanisms was minor. Anatomical models of the human lung from birth to adulthood, as well as models of the lungs of laboratory species were formulated mathematically using available morphometric data. We used these lung models, together with the corresponding ventilation conditions of each species, to calculate deposition of diesel exhaust particles in the lungs. Under normal breathing conditions, we calculated that 7 to 13 percent (depending on particle size) of inhaled diesel exhaust particles deposit in the alveolar region of the adult human lung. Although the breathing mode (nose or mouth breathing) did not appear to affect alveolar deposition, increasing the minute ventilation increased alveolar deposition significantly. The calculated deposition patterns for diesel exhaust particles in younger humans (under age 25) were similar.

  6. Emergence of particle clusters in a one-dimensional model: connection to condensation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Matthew; Carpenter, Daniel; Jack, Robert L.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss a simple model of particles hopping in one dimension with attractive interactions. Taking a hydrodynamic limit in which the interaction strength increases with the system size, we observe the formation of multiple clusters of particles, with large gaps between them. These clusters are correlated in space, and the system has a self-similar (fractal) structure. These results are related to condensation phenomena in mass transport models and to a recent mathematical analysis of the hydrodynamic limit in a related model.

  7. Estimation of heat transfer coefficients for biomass particles by direct numerical simulation using microstructured particle models in the Laminar regime

    SciTech Connect

    Pecha, M. Brennan; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Foust, Thomas D.; Ciesielski, Peter N.

    2016-11-08

    Here, direct numerical simulation of convective heat transfer from hot gas to isolated biomass particle models with realistic morphology and explicit microstructure was performed over a range of conditions with laminar flow of hot gas (500 degrees C). Steady-state results demonstrated that convective interfacial heat transfer is dependent on the wood species. The computed heat transfer coefficients were shown to vary between the pine and aspen models by nearly 20%. These differences are attributed to the species-specific variations in the exterior surface morphology of the biomass particles. We also quantify variations in heat transfer experienced by the particle when positioned in different orientations with respect to the direction of fluid flow. These results are compared to previously reported heat transfer coefficient correlations in the range of 0.1 < Pr < 1.5 and 10 < Re < 500. Comparison of these simulation results to correlations commonly used in the literature (Gunn, Ranz-Marshall, and Bird-Stewart-Lightfoot) shows that the Ranz-Marshall (sphere) correlation gave the closest h values to our steady-state simulations for both wood species, though no existing correlation was within 20% of both species at all conditions studied. In general, this work exemplifies the fact that all biomass feedstocks are not created equal, and that their species-specific characteristics must be appreciated in order to facilitate accurate simulations of conversion processes.

  8. Estimation of heat transfer coefficients for biomass particles by direct numerical simulation using microstructured particle models in the Laminar regime

    DOE PAGES

    Pecha, M. Brennan; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Foust, Thomas D.; ...

    2016-11-08

    Here, direct numerical simulation of convective heat transfer from hot gas to isolated biomass particle models with realistic morphology and explicit microstructure was performed over a range of conditions with laminar flow of hot gas (500 degrees C). Steady-state results demonstrated that convective interfacial heat transfer is dependent on the wood species. The computed heat transfer coefficients were shown to vary between the pine and aspen models by nearly 20%. These differences are attributed to the species-specific variations in the exterior surface morphology of the biomass particles. We also quantify variations in heat transfer experienced by the particle when positionedmore » in different orientations with respect to the direction of fluid flow. These results are compared to previously reported heat transfer coefficient correlations in the range of 0.1 < Pr < 1.5 and 10 < Re < 500. Comparison of these simulation results to correlations commonly used in the literature (Gunn, Ranz-Marshall, and Bird-Stewart-Lightfoot) shows that the Ranz-Marshall (sphere) correlation gave the closest h values to our steady-state simulations for both wood species, though no existing correlation was within 20% of both species at all conditions studied. In general, this work exemplifies the fact that all biomass feedstocks are not created equal, and that their species-specific characteristics must be appreciated in order to facilitate accurate simulations of conversion processes.« less

  9. Coupled incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for continuum-based modelling sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahar, Gourabananda; Dhar, Anirban

    2017-04-01

    A coupled solenoidal Incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) model is presented for simulation of sediment displacement in erodible bed. The coupled framework consists of two separate incompressible modules: (a) granular module, (b) fluid module. The granular module considers a friction based rheology model to calculate deviatoric stress components from pressure. The module is validated for Bagnold flow profile and two standardized test cases of sediment avalanching. The fluid module resolves fluid flow inside and outside porous domain. An interaction force pair containing fluid pressure, viscous term and drag force acts as a bridge between two different flow modules. The coupled model is validated against three dambreak flow cases with different initial conditions of movable bed. The simulated results are in good agreement with experimental data. A demonstrative case considering effect of granular column failure under full/partial submergence highlights the capability of the coupled model for application in generalized scenario.

  10. Modeling Particle Concentration In Slurry Flows Using Shear-Induced Migration: Theory vs. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kanhui; Latterman, Paul; Koch, Trystan; Hu, Vincent; Ho, Joyce; Mata, Matthew; Murisic, Nebojsa; Bertozzi, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    Different flow regimes observed in our experimental study of particle-laden thin film flows are characterized by differing particle concentration profiles. We develop a theoretical model for particle concentration in order to capture our experimental observations. Our model is based on equilibrium assumption and it incorporates all relevant physical mechanisms, including shear-induced particle migration and settling due to gravity. It leads to a coupled system of ordinary differential equations for particle volume fraction and shear, which are solved numerically for various parameter sets. We find excellent agreement between our numerical results and experimental data. Our model is not only successful in reproducing the experimentally observed regimes, but also in capturing the connection between these regimes and the experimental parameters.

  11. Comparisons of Kinetic Electron Models in Gyrokinetic Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.; Lin, Z.; Lewandowski, J. L. V.; Lee, W. W.

    2001-10-01

    Comparisons of the hybrid [1] and split-weight [2,3] schemes for the electron dynamics in gyrokinetic particle simulations has been carried out. The emphasis here is to understand the regions of validity for these schemes as well as their numerical properties with regard to noise, time step and accuracy. The numerical issues for the implementation of these schemes in our 3D global gyrokinetic particle code (GTC) in general geometry [4] will also be discussed. Work supported by US DoE. [1] Z. Lin and L. Chen, Phys. Plasmas <8>, 1447 (2001). [2] I. Manuilskiy and W. W. Lee, Phys. Plasmas <7>, 1381 (2000). [3] W. W. Lee, J. L. V. Lewandowski, T. S. Hahm and Z. Lin, Phys. Plasmas (to appear). [4] Z. Lin, T. S. Hahm, W. W. Lee, W. M. Tang and R. White, Science <281>, 1835 (1998).

  12. Modeled deposition of fine particles in human airway in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoying; Yan, Caiqing; Patterson, Regan F.; Zhu, Yujiao; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhu, Yifang; Ma, Shexia; Qiu, Xinghua; Zhu, Tong; Zheng, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to simulate depositions of size-segregated particles in human airway in Beijing, China during seasons when fine particulate matter concentrations are high (December 2011 and April 2012). Particle size distributions (5.6-560 nm, electrical mobility diameter) near a major road in Beijing were measured by the TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). The information of size distributions provided by FMPS was applied in the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry model (MPPD) to quantify number and mass depositions of particles in human airway including extrathoracic (ET), tracheobronchial (TB), and pulmonary (PUL) regions of exposed Chinese in Beijing. Our results show that under ambient conditions, particle number concentration (NC) deposition in PUL is the highest in the three major regions of human airway. The total particle NC deposition in human airway in winter is higher than that in spring, especially for ultrafine particles (1.8 times higher) while particle mass concentration (MC) deposition is higher in spring. Although particle MC in clean days are much lower than that in heavily polluted days, total particle NC deposition in human airway in clean days is comparable to that in heavily polluted days. NC deposition for nucleation mode particles (10-20 nm, aerodynamic diameter) in clean days is higher than that in heavily polluted days. MC deposition for accumulation mode particles (100-641 nm, aerodynamic diameter) in heavily polluted days is much higher than that in clean days, while that of nucleation mode is negligible. The temporal variation shows that the arithmetic mean and the median values of particle NC and MC depositions in the evening are both the highest, followed by morning and noon, and it is most likely due to increased contribution from traffic emissions.

  13. Particle-hole optical model and strength functions for high-energy giant resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Urin, M. H.

    2010-08-15

    A formulation of the particle-hole optical model is proposed for describing the contribution of the fragmentation effect to the formation of strength functions for high-energy giant resonances. The model is based on the Bethe-Goldstone equation for the energy-averaged particle-hole Green's function. In this equation, the particle-hole interaction that is induced by a virtual excitation of multiquasiparticle configurations and in which, upon averaging over energy, an imaginary part is contained is taken into account. An analogy with the single-quasiparticle optical model is discussed.

  14. Particle orbits in two-dimensional equilibrium models for the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Pritchett, P. L.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1990-01-01

    Assuming that there exist an equilibrium state for the magnetotail, particle orbits are investigated in two-dimensional kinetic equilibrium models for the magnetotail. Particle orbits in the equilibrium field are compared with those calculated earlier with one-dimensional models, where the main component of the magnetic field (Bx) was approximated as either a hyperbolic tangent or a linear function of z with the normal field (Bz) assumed to be a constant. It was found that the particle orbits calculated with the two types of models are significantly different, mainly due to the neglect of the variation of Bx with x in the one-dimensional fields.

  15. Mathematical model of reaction rate oscillations on a chain of nm-sized catalyst particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskov, N. V.; Slinko, M. M.; Jaeger, N. I.

    2003-05-01

    The model of reaction rate oscillations over the surface of nanoparticles embedded into zeolite matrix is numerically investigated. The reaction rate oscillations on each particle are described by a lumped model. The reactions on separate particles interact via the gas diffusion through the pores, which is modeled in the frame of the Maxwell-Stefan approach. The reaction reveals a complex dynamical behavior if a nonhomogeneous distribution of reagent concentrations exists along the chain of particles with a sufficiently large gradient near the ends of the chain.

  16. Mathematical modeling of processes occurring during deposition of sprayed particles of polymeric powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyaev, V. L.; Galimov, E. R.; Galimova, N. Ya; Takhaviev, M. S.; Siraev, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of polymeric powder particles on a surface of a treated body and a layer of particles deposited previously is considered using mathematical modeling. Basic provisions of the impact theory are used. The relationships to evaluate the characteristic parameters of the processes under study are given, the results of their analysis and recommendations to improve the deposition efficiency are presented.

  17. The model of the mechanical interaction of particles with the combustion products in a nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterev, A. V.; Mandrik, P. A.; Misuchenko, N. I.; Rudak, L. V.

    2017-07-01

    This article describes the development of model of interaction of condensed particles with the gas flow in the Laval nozzle. Conducted parametric calculations have shown that the interaction of particles with the combustion products, even with a relatively small volume content may lead to a qualitative change in the internal flow in the Laval nozzle, and thereby influence the characteristics of the nozzle.

  18. Let's Have a Coffee with the Standard Model of Particle Physics!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woithe, Julia; Wiener, Gerfried J.; Van der Veken, Frederik F.

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is one of the most successful theories in physics and describes the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. It is encoded in a compact description, the so-called "Lagrangian," which even fits on t-shirts and coffee mugs. This mathematical formulation, however, is complex and only…

  19. Lieb-Thirring inequality for a model of particles with point interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Rupert L.; Seiringer, Robert

    2012-09-15

    We consider a model of quantum-mechanical particles interacting via point interactions of infinite scattering length. In the case of fermions we prove a Lieb-Thirring inequality for the energy, i.e., we show that the energy is bounded from below by a constant times the integral of the particle density to the power (5/3).

  20. Concurrent Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Interaction Forces Improves Particle Deposition Predictions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Ren, Carolyn L; Emelko, Monica B

    2016-04-19

    It is widely believed that media surface roughness enhances particle deposition-numerous, but inconsistent, examples of this effect have been reported. Here, a new mathematical framework describing the effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough spherical collectors in absence of an energy barrier was developed and validated. In addition to quantifying DLVO force, the model includes improved descriptions of flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation functions. This work demonstrates that hydrodynamic effects can significantly alter particle deposition relative to expectations when only the DLVO force is considered. Moreover, the combined effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough, spherical media are not additive, but synergistic. Notably, the developed model's particle deposition predictions are in closer agreement with experimental observations than those from current models, demonstrating the importance of inclusion of roughness impacts in particle deposition description/simulation. Consideration of hydrodynamic contributions to particle deposition may help to explain discrepancies between model-based expectations and experimental outcomes and improve descriptions of particle deposition during physicochemical filtration in systems with nonsmooth collector surfaces.

  1. Comparative numerical modeling of inhaled micron-sized particle deposition in human and rat nasal cavities.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yidan; Dong, Jingliang; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Micron-sized particle deposition in anatomically realistic models of a rat and human nasal cavity was numerically investigated. A steady laminar inhalation flow rate was applied and particles were released from the outside air. Particles showing equivalent total particle deposition fractions were classified into low, medium and high inertial particle. Typical particle sizes are 2.5, 9 and 20 μm for the human model and 1, 2 and 3 μm for the rat model, respectively. Using a surface-mapping technique the 3D nasal cavity surface was "unwrapped" into a 2D domain and the particle deposition locations were plotted for complete visual coverage of the domain surface. The total surface area comparison showed that the surface area of the human nasal model was about ten times the size of the rat model. In contrast, the regional surface area percentage analysis revealed the olfactory region of the rat model was significantly larger than all other regions making up ∼55.6% of the total surface area, while that of the human nasal model only occupying 10.5%. Flow pattern comparisons showed rapid airflow acceleration was found at the nasopharynx region and the nostril region for the human and rat model, respectively. For the human model, the main passage is the major deposition region for micro-particles. While for the rat model, it is the vestibule. Through comparing the regional deposition flux between human and rat models, this study can contribute towards better extrapolation approach of inhalation exposure data between inter-subject species.

  2. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; ...

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introducesmore » a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.« less

  3. CFD modeling of turbulent flow and particle deposition in human lungs.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, H; Kassinos, S

    2009-01-01

    Understanding transport and deposition of inhaled particles in the human airways plays a crucial role in the targeted therapy of pulmonary diseases, and the administration of inhaled medicines. Numerous researchers have studied the inhalation of particles using experiments or computer models. Even though experiments have shown that the airflow in the trachea and the upper branches of the lung is turbulent, the flow is taken to be laminar in most computer models. Only few recently published papers have looked at the turbulent transport of air in the human airways. Even fewer results have been published on the effect of the upper airway structures on the turbulent airflow in the lungs or on the effect of the turbulence on particle deposition. The previously published turbulent models have also mainly used RANS methods to predict the flow. To study the unsteady flow and particle deposition in a human lung, an LES model with a dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid scale model was used. The model equations were solved to study steady inspirational flow at different flow rates for different particle sizes. Results indicate that the upper airway geometry produces turbulence in the flow and the deposition of particles is mainly affected by the particle size and Stokes number.

  4. Applying sequential Monte Carlo methods into a distributed hydrologic model: lagged particle filtering approach with regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, S. J.; Tachikawa, Y.; Shiiba, M.; Kim, S.

    2011-04-01

    Applications of data assimilation techniques have been widely used to improve hydrologic prediction. Among various data assimilation techniques, sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods, known as "particle filters", provide the capability to handle non-linear and non-Gaussian state-space models. In this paper, we propose an improved particle filtering approach to consider different response time of internal state variables in a hydrologic model. The proposed method adopts a lagged filtering approach to aggregate model response until uncertainty of each hydrologic process is propagated. The regularization with an additional move step based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is also implemented to preserve sample diversity under the lagged filtering approach. A distributed hydrologic model, WEP is implemented for the sequential data assimilation through the updating of state variables. Particle filtering is parallelized and implemented in the multi-core computing environment via open message passing interface (MPI). We compare performance results of particle filters in terms of model efficiency, predictive QQ plots and particle diversity. The improvement of model efficiency and the preservation of particle diversity are found in the lagged regularized particle filter.

  5. Two-structured solid particle model for predicting and analyzing supercritical extraction performance.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Sara; Vaziri, Behrooz Mahmoodzadeh

    2017-07-14

    Solid extraction process, using the supercritical fluid, is a modern science and technology, which has come in vogue regarding its considerable advantages. In the present article, a new and comprehensive model is presented for predicting the performance and separation yield of the supercritical extraction process. The base of process modeling is partial differential mass balances. In the proposed model, the solid particles are considered twofold: (a) particles with intact structure, (b) particles with destructed structure. A distinct mass transfer coefficient has been used for extraction of each part of solid particles to express different extraction regimes and to evaluate the process accurately (internal mass transfer coefficient was used for the intact-structure particles and external mass transfer coefficient was employed for the destructed-structure particles). In order to evaluate and validate the proposed model, the obtained results from simulations were compared with two series of available experimental data for extraction of chamomile extract with supercritical carbon dioxide, which had an excellent agreement. This is indicative of high potentiality of the model in predicting the extraction process, precisely. In the following, the effect of major parameters on supercritical extraction process, like pressure, temperature, supercritical fluid flow rate, and the size of solid particles was evaluated. The model can be used as a superb starting point for scientific and experimental applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Coupled Large Eddy Simulation and Discrete Element Model for Particle Saltation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Liu, D.; Fu, X.

    2016-12-01

    Particle saltation is the major mode of motion for sediment transport. The quantification of the characteristics of saltation, either as an individual particle or as a group, is of great importance to our understanding of the transport process. In the past, experiments and numerical models have been performed to study the saltation length, height, and velocity under different turbulent flow and rough bed conditions. Most previous numerical models have very restrictive assumptions. For example, many models assumed Log-law flow velocity profiles to drive the motion of particles. Others assumed some "splash-function" which assigns the reflection angle for the rebounding of the saltating particle after each collision with bed. This research aims to relax these restrictions by a coupled eddy-resolving flow solver and a discrete element model. The model simulates the fully four-way coupling among fluid, particles, and wall. The model is extensively validated on both the turbulent flow field and saltation statistics. The results show that the two controlling factors for particle saltation are turbulent fluctuations and bed collision. Detailed quantification of these two factors will be presented. Through the statistics of incidence reflection angles, a more physical "splash-function" is obtained in which the reflection angle follows an asymmetric bimodal distribution for a given incidence angle. The higher mode is always located on the upstream side of the bed particle, while the lower one is always on the downstream surface.

  7. Numerical modeling of particle generation from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Ozone-terpene reactions are important sources of indoor ultrafine particles (UFPs), a potential health hazard for human beings. Humans themselves act as possible sites for ozone-initiated particle generation through reactions with squalene (a terpene) that is present in their skin, hair, and clothing. This investigation developed a numerical model to probe particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing worn by humans. The model was based on particle generation measured in an environmental chamber as well as physical formulations of particle nucleation, condensational growth, and deposition. In five out of the six test cases, the model was able to predict particle size distributions reasonably well. The failure in the remaining case demonstrated the fundamental limitations of nucleation models. The model that was developed was used to predict particle generation under various building and airliner cabin conditions. These predictions indicate that ozone reactions with human-worn clothing could be an important source of UFPs in densely occupied classrooms and airliner cabins. Those reactions could account for about 40% of the total UFPs measured on a Boeing 737-700 flight. The model predictions at this stage are indicative and should be improved further.

  8. Quench field sensitivity of two-particle correlation in a Hubbard model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X. Z.; Lin, S.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Short-range interaction can give rise to particle pairing with a short-range correlation, which may be destroyed in the presence of an external field. We study the transition between correlated and uncorrelated particle states in the framework of one- dimensional Hubbard model driven by a field. We show that the long time-scale transfer rate from an initial correlated state to final uncorrelated particle states is sensitive to the quench field strength and exhibits a periodic behavior. This process involves an irreversible energy transfer from the field to particles, leading to a quantum electrothermal effect. PMID:27250080

  9. Multi-particle interaction in a model of the hydrophobic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedeaux, D.; Koper, G. J. M.; Ispolatov, S.; Widom, B.

    2001-03-01

    The multi-particle potential of mean force between interstitial solute molecules in Ben-Naim's one-dimensional, many-state lattice model is calculated. The solution is a direct extension of an earlier calculation of the two-particle interaction by Kolomeisky and Widom (Faraday Dis. 112 (1999) 81). It is found that the many-particle interaction potential is a sum of pair potentials between neighboring particles only. An exact equation of state, expressing the activity in the temperature and the pressure, is derived. The resulting solubility of a gaseous hydrophobe, which is defined osmotically, is calculated and found to increase considerably with the gas density.

  10. Particle orbits in model current sheet with a nonzero B(y) component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhongwei; Parks, George

    1993-01-01

    The problem of charged particle motions in magnetotaillike model current sheets is revisited with the inclusion of a nonzero dawn-dusk magnetic field component. Three cases are examined considering both trapped and escaped orbits. The results show that a nonzero B(y) component disturbs the particle orbits by destroying orbit symmetry in the phase space about the z = 0 plane. It also changes the bounce frequency of particle orbits. The presence of B(y) thus modifies the Speiser orbits, particularly near the ejection phase. The process of ejected particle such as ejection direction, ejection velocity, and pitch angles are shown to depend on the sign of the charge.

  11. Component-specific, cigarette particle deposition modeling in the human respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Price, Owen T.; Yurteri, Caner U.; Dickens, Colin; McAughey, John

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of cigarette smoke particles (CSP) leads to adverse health effects in smokers. Determination of the localized dose to the lung of the inhaled smoke aids in determining vulnerable sites, and identifying components of the smoke that may be responsible for the adverse effects; thus providing a roadmap for harm reduction of cigarette smoking. A particle deposition model specific to CSP was developed for the oral cavity and the lung by accounting for cigarette particle size growth by hygroscopicity, phase change and coagulation. In addition, since the cigarette puff enters the respiratory tract as a dense cloud, the cloud effect on particle drag and deposition was accounted for in the deposition model. Models of particle losses in the oral cavities were developed during puff drawing and subsequent mouth-hold. Cigarette particles were found to grow by hygroscopicity and coagulation, but to shrink as a result of nicotine evaporation. The particle size reached a plateau beyond which any disturbances in the environmental conditions caused the various mechanisms to balance each other out and the particle size remain stable. Predicted particle deposition considering the cloud effects was greater than when treated as a collection of non-interacting particles (i.e. no cloud effects). Accounting for cloud movement provided the necessary physical mechanism to explain the greater than expected, experimentally observed and particle deposition. The deposition model for CSP can provide the necessary input to determine the fate of inhaled CSP in the lung. The knowledge of deposition will be helpful for health assessment and identification and reduction of harmful components of CSP. PMID:24354791

  12. Computational Modeling of Nanoscale and Microscale Particle Deposition, Retention and Dosimetry in the Mouse Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Asgharian, B.; Price, O.T.; Oldham, M.; Chen, L.C.; Saunders, E.L.; Gordon, T.; Mikheev, V.B.; Minard, K.R.; Teeguarden, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Comparing effects of inhaled particles across rodent test systems and between rodent test systems and humans is a key obstacle to the interpretation of common toxicological test systems for human risk assessment. These comparisons, correlation with effects and prediction of effects, are best conducted using measures of tissue dose in the respiratory tract. Differences in lung geometry, physiology and the characteristics of ventilation can give rise to differences in the regional deposition of particles in the lung in these species. Differences in regional lung tissue doses cannot currently be measured experimentally. Regional lung tissue dosimetry can however be predicted using models developed for rats, monkeys, and humans. A computational model of particle respiratory tract deposition and clearance was developed for BALB/c and B6C3F1 mice, creating a cross species suite of available models for particle dosimetry in the lung. Airflow and particle transport equations were solved throughout the respiratory tract of these mice strains to obtain temporal and spatial concentration of inhaled particles from which deposition fractions were determined. Particle inhalability (Inhalable fraction, IF) and upper respiratory tract (URT) deposition were directly related to particle diffusive and inertial properties. Measurements of the retained mass at several post-exposure times following exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles, micro and nanoscale C60 fullerene, and nanoscale silver particles were used to calibrate and verify model predictions of total lung dose. Interstrain (mice) and interspecies (mouse, rat, human) differences in particle inhalability, fractional deposition and tissue dosimetry are described for ultrafine, fine and coarse particles. PMID:25373829

  13. Particle-Resolved Modeling of Aerosol Mixing State in an Evolving Ship Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, N. S.; Tian, J.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Schlager, H.; Petzold, A.

    2011-12-01

    The aerosol mixing state is important since it impacts the particles' optical and CCN properties and thereby their climate impact. It evolves continuously during the particles' residence time in the atmosphere as a result of coagulation with other particles and condensation of secondary aerosol species. This evolution is challenging to represent in traditional aerosol models since they require the representation of a multi-dimensional particle distribution. While modal or sectional aerosol representations cannot practically resolve the aerosol mixing state for more than a few species, particle-resolved models store the composition of many individual aerosol particles directly. They thus sample the high-dimensional composition state space very efficiently and so can deal with tens of species, fully resolving the mixing state. Here we use the capabilities of the particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC to simulate the evolution of particulate matter emitted from marine diesel engines and compare the results to aircraft measurements made in the English Channel in 2007 as part of the European campaign QUANTIFY. The model was initialized with values of gas concentrations and particle size distributions and compositions representing fresh ship emissions. These values were obtained from a test rig study in the European project HERCULES in 2006 using a serial four-stroke marine diesel engine operating on high-sulfur heavy fuel oil. The freshly emitted particles consisted of sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon and ash. We then tracked the particle population for several hours as it evolved undergoing coagulation, dilution with the background air, and chemical transformations in the aerosol and gas phase. This simulation was used to compute the evolution of CCN properties and optical properties of the plume on a per-particle basis. We compared our results to size-resolved data of aged ship plumes from the QUANTIFY Study in 2007 and showed that the model was able to reproduce

  14. Inertial particle dynamics in large artery flows - Implications for modeling arterial embolisms.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Shadden, Shawn C

    2017-02-08

    The complexity of inertial particle dynamics through swirling chaotic flow structures characteristic of pulsatile large-artery hemodynamics renders significant challenges in predictive understanding of transport of such particles. This is specifically crucial for arterial embolisms, where knowledge of embolus transport to major vascular beds helps in disease diagnosis and surgical planning. Using a computational framework built upon image-based CFD and discrete particle dynamics modeling, a multi-parameter sampling-based study was conducted on embolic particle dynamics and transport. The results highlighted the strong influence of material properties, embolus size, release instance, and embolus source on embolus distribution to the cerebral, renal and mesenteric, and ilio-femoral vasculature beds. The study also isolated the importance of shear-gradient lift, and elastohydrodynamic contact, in affecting embolic particle transport. Near-wall particle re-suspension due to lift alters aortogenic embolic particle dynamics significantly as compared to cardiogenic. The observations collectively indicated the complex interplay of particle inertia, fluid-particle density ratio, and wall collisions, with chaotic flow structures, which render the overall motion of the particles to be non-trivially dispersive in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Computational model of particle deposition in the nasal cavity under steady and dynamic flow.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Paraskevi; Alexopoulos, Aleck H; Kiparissides, Costas

    2015-01-01

    A computational model for flow and particle deposition in a three-dimensional representation of the human nasal cavity is developed. Simulations of steady state and dynamic airflow during inhalation are performed at flow rates of 9-60 l/min. Depositions for particles of size 0.5-20 μm are determined and compared with experimental and simulation results from the literature in terms of deposition efficiencies. The nasal model is validated by comparison with experimental and simulation results from the literature for particle deposition under steady-state flow. The distribution of deposited particles in the nasal cavity is presented in terms of an axial deposition distribution as well as a bivariate axial deposition and particle size distribution. Simulations of dynamic airflow and particle deposition during an inhalation cycle are performed for different nasal cavity outlet pressure variations and different particle injections. The total particle deposition efficiency under dynamic flow is found to depend strongly on the dynamics of airflow as well as the type of particle injection.

  16. Velocity and displacement statistics in a stochastic model of nonlinear friction showing bounded particle speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of colloidal particles in a complex environment such as polymer networks or biological cells is a topic of high complexity with significant biological and medical relevance. In such situations, the interaction between the surroundings and the particle motion has to be taken into account. We analyze a simplified diffusion model that includes some aspects of a complex environment in the framework of a nonlinear friction process: at low particle speeds, friction grows linearly with the particle velocity as for regular viscous friction; it grows more than linearly at higher particle speeds; finally, at a maximum of the possible particle speed, the friction diverges. In addition to bare diffusion, we study the influence of a constant drift force acting on the diffusing particle. While the corresponding stationary velocity distributions can be derived analytically, the displacement statistics generally must be determined numerically. However, as a benefit of our model, analytical progress can be made in one case of a special maximum particle speed. The effect of a drift force in this case is analytically determined by perturbation theory. It will be interesting in the future to compare our results to real experimental systems. One realization could be magnetic colloidal particles diffusing through a shear-thickening environment such as starch suspensions, possibly exposed to an external magnetic field gradient.

  17. Velocity and displacement statistics in a stochastic model of nonlinear friction showing bounded particle speed.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas M

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of colloidal particles in a complex environment such as polymer networks or biological cells is a topic of high complexity with significant biological and medical relevance. In such situations, the interaction between the surroundings and the particle motion has to be taken into account. We analyze a simplified diffusion model that includes some aspects of a complex environment in the framework of a nonlinear friction process: at low particle speeds, friction grows linearly with the particle velocity as for regular viscous friction; it grows more than linearly at higher particle speeds; finally, at a maximum of the possible particle speed, the friction diverges. In addition to bare diffusion, we study the influence of a constant drift force acting on the diffusing particle. While the corresponding stationary velocity distributions can be derived analytically, the displacement statistics generally must be determined numerically. However, as a benefit of our model, analytical progress can be made in one case of a special maximum particle speed. The effect of a drift force in this case is analytically determined by perturbation theory. It will be interesting in the future to compare our results to real experimental systems. One realization could be magnetic colloidal particles diffusing through a shear-thickening environment such as starch suspensions, possibly exposed to an external magnetic field gradient.

  18. Chaotic delocalization of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model in the regime when one-particle motion is absolutely bounded inside one cell of periodic potential. The interaction between particles breaks integrability of classical motion leading to emergence of Hamiltonian dynamical chaos. At moderate interactions and certain energies above the mobility edge this chaos leads to a chaotic propulsion of two particles with their diffusive spreading over the whole space both in one and two dimensions. At the same time the distance between particles remains bounded by one or two periodic cells demonstrating appearance of new composite quasi-particles called chaons. The effect of chaotic delocalization of chaons is shown to be rather general being present for Coulomb and short range interactions. It is argued that such delocalized chaons can be observed in experiments with cold atoms and ions in optical lattices.

  19. 2D double interaction method for modeling small particles contaminating microstructures located on substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albella, P.; Moreno, F.; Saiz, J. M.; González, F.

    2007-07-01

    An interaction model developed in previous research [de la Peña JL, González F, Saiz JM, Moreno F, Valle PJ. Sizing particles on substrates. A general method for oblique incidence. J Appl Phys 1999; 85:432] is extended to the study of two-scaled systems consisting of particles located on larger structures. Far-field scattering patterns produced by these systems can be obtained by coherent addition of different electromagnetic contributions, each one obtained from an independent isolated particle calculation. Results are performed on a 2D scheme, where they can be easily compared with those given by an exact method. This analysis shows some features of the scattering patterns that can be obtained with high reliability. Research on this kind of systems can be applied to 3D situations like particle substrate contamination and particle particle contamination.

  20. Multiphysics modelling and simulation of dry laser cleaning of micro-slots with particle contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Liyang; Wang, Zengbo; Li, Lin

    2012-04-01

    Light could interact differently with thin-film contaminants and particle contaminates because of their different surface morphologies. In the case of dry laser cleaning of small transparent particles, it is well known that particles could function like mini-lenses, causing a localized near-field hot spot effect on the cleaning process. This paper looks into a special, yet important, phenomenon of dry laser cleaning of particles trapped in micro-sized slots. The effects of slot size, particle size and particle aggregate states in the cleaning process have been theoretically investigated, based on a coupled electromagnetic-thermal-mechanical multiphysics modelling and simulation approach. The study is important for the development and optimization of laser cleaning processes for contamination removal from cracks and slots.

  1. Pairwise Interaction Extended Point Particle (PIEP) Model for a Random Array of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiki, Georges; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan; CenterCompressible Multiphase Turbulence Team

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates a flow past random array of spherical particles. The understanding of the governing forces within these arrays is crucial for obtaining accurate models used in particle-laden simulations. These models have to faithfully reflect the sub-grid interactions between the particles and the continuous phase. The models being used today assumes an average force on all particles within the array based on the mean volume fraction and Reynolds number. Here, we develop a model which can compute the drag and lateral forces on each particle by accounting for the precise location of few surrounding neighbors. A pairwise interaction is assumed where the perturbation flow induced by each neighbor is considered separately, then the effect of all neighbors are linearly superposed to obtain the total perturbation. Faxén correction is used to quantify the force perturbation due to the presence of the neighbors. The single neighbor perturbations are mapped in the vicinity of a reference sphere and stored as libraries. We test the Pairwise Interaction Extended Point-Particle (PIEP) model for random arrays at two different volume fractions of ϕ = 0 . 1 and 0.21 and Reynolds number in the range 16 <= Re <= 170 . The PIEP model predictions are compared against drag and lift forces obtained from fully-resolved DNS performed using immersed boundary method. We observe the PIEP model prediction to correlate much better with the DNS results than the classical mean drag model prediction.

  2. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera, Hector A.; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-12-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 103 particles/cc and 1.3 × 105 particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 104 particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 1014 particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available.

  3. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Olvera, Hector A.; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 103 particles/cc and 1.3 × 105 particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 104 particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 1014 particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available. PMID:25313294

  4. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Hector A; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-12-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 10(3) particles/cc and 1.3 × 10(5) particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 10(4) particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 10(14) particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available.

  5. The effect of model fidelity on prediction of char burnout for single-particle coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Josh; Sutherland, James C.

    2016-07-09

    In this study, practical simulation of industrial-scale coal combustion relies on the ability to accurately capture the dynamics of coal subprocesses while also ensuring the computational cost remains reasonable. The majority of the residence time occurs post-devolatilization, so it is of great importance that a balance between the computational efficiency and accuracy of char combustion models is carefully considered. In this work, we consider the importance of model fidelity during char combustion by comparing combinations of simple and complex gas and particle-phase chemistry models. Detailed kinetics based on the GRI 3.0 mechanism and infinitely-fast chemistry are considered in the gas-phase. The Char Conversion Kinetics model and nth-Order Langmuir–Hinshelwood model are considered for char consumption. For devolatilization, the Chemical Percolation and Devolatilization and Kobayashi-Sarofim models are employed. The relative importance of gasification versus oxidation reactions in air and oxyfuel environments is also examined for various coal types. Results are compared to previously published experimental data collected under laminar, single-particle conditions. Calculated particle temperature histories are strongly dependent on the choice of gas phase and char chemistry models, but only weakly dependent on the chosen devolatilization model. Particle mass calculations were found to be very sensitive to the choice of devolatilization model, but only somewhat sensitive to the choice of gas chemistry and char chemistry models. High-fidelity models for devolatilization generally resulted in particle temperature and mass calculations that were closer to experimentally observed values.

  6. The effect of model fidelity on prediction of char burnout for single-particle coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Josh; Sutherland, James C.

    2016-07-09

    In this study, practical simulation of industrial-scale coal combustion relies on the ability to accurately capture the dynamics of coal subprocesses while also ensuring the computational cost remains reasonable. The majority of the residence time occurs post-devolatilization, so it is of great importance that a balance between the computational efficiency and accuracy of char combustion models is carefully considered. In this work, we consider the importance of model fidelity during char combustion by comparing combinations of simple and complex gas and particle-phase chemistry models. Detailed kinetics based on the GRI 3.0 mechanism and infinitely-fast chemistry are considered in the gas-phase. The Char Conversion Kinetics model and nth-Order Langmuir–Hinshelwood model are considered for char consumption. For devolatilization, the Chemical Percolation and Devolatilization and Kobayashi-Sarofim models are employed. The relative importance of gasification versus oxidation reactions in air and oxyfuel environments is also examined for various coal types. Results are compared to previously published experimental data collected under laminar, single-particle conditions. Calculated particle temperature histories are strongly dependent on the choice of gas phase and char chemistry models, but only weakly dependent on the chosen devolatilization model. Particle mass calculations were found to be very sensitive to the choice of devolatilization model, but only somewhat sensitive to the choice of gas chemistry and char chemistry models. High-fidelity models for devolatilization generally resulted in particle temperature and mass calculations that were closer to experimentally observed values.

  7. Modeling of composite latex particle morphology by off-lattice Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Duda, Yurko; Vázquez, Flavio

    2005-02-01

    Composite latex particles have shown a great range of applications such as paint resins, varnishes, water borne adhesives, impact modifiers, etc. The high-performance properties of this kind of materials may be explained in terms of a synergistical combination of two different polymers (usually a rubber and a thermoplastic). A great variety of composite latex particles with very different morphologies may be obtained by two-step emulsion polymerization processes. The formation of specific particle morphology depends on the chemical and physical nature of the monomers used during the synthesis, the process temperature, the reaction initiator, the surfactants, etc. Only a few models have been proposed to explain the appearance of the composite particle morphologies. These models have been based on the change of the interfacial energies during the synthesis. In this work, we present a new three-component model: Polymer blend (flexible and rigid chain particles) is dispersed in water by forming spherical cavities. Monte Carlo simulations of the model in two dimensions are used to determine the density distribution of chains and water molecules inside the suspended particle. This approach allows us to study the dependence of the morphology of the composite latex particles on the relative hydrophilicity and flexibility of the chain molecules as well as on their density and composition. It has been shown that our simple model is capable of reproducing the main features of the various morphologies observed in synthesis experiments.

  8. A new coincidence model for single particle counters, Part II: Advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Knapp, J Z; Lieberman, A; Abramson, L R

    1994-01-01

    Accuracy, acceptance limits and methods for U.S.P. (788) contaminating particle assays published in the XXII Revision are refined in U.S.P. XXIII. In both Revisions, although different numerical values and methods are employed, particle contamination limits remain constants for all S.V.I. container volumes. The effect of this quality standard is high particle concentration acceptance limits in the smallest S.V.I. container sizes. The effect of these high concentrations is to introduce both undercount errors and false counts into U.S.P. (788) SVI contaminating particle assays. There is general agreement that the count of high concentrations of particles by a single particle light extinction counter result in an increase of the average size of the distribution of particles reported and a decrease in their total number. The error mechanism is termed "signal coincidence." Understanding and control of both these problems is unified with the introduction of the count efficiency parameter. Part I of this paper makes available two core concepts with which evaluation and control of coincidence error in single particle counters can be accurately quantified. These two core concepts are the "Particle Triggered Poisson Model," a new more accurate statistical model of the particle counting process and a concentration measure that includes the effect of particle size on the counting capability of a detector. Use of these concepts make it possible to evaluate particle detector count efficiency capability from experimental data of the coincidence effect. This is an application paper. It combines the theory in the Part I paper with the replicability of particle counters into a simple test protocol. The test results can be used to calculate a contour of particle size and count within which both undercount errors and the introduction of false counts into U.S.P. (788) particle assays are controlled. From the data analyzed it can be seen that any single particle size test cannot

  9. Measurement and modeling the coefficient of restitution of char particles under simulated entrained flow gasifier conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, LaTosha M.

    Inefficiencies in plant operations due to carbon loss in flyash, necessitate control of ash deposition and the handling of the slag disposal. Excessive char/ash deposition in convective coolers causes reduction in the heat transfer, both in the radiative (slagging) section and in the low-temperature convective (fouling) heating section. This can lead to unplanned shutdowns and result in an increased cost of electricity generation. CFD models for entrained flow gasification have used the average bulk coal composition to simulate slagging and ash deposition with a narrow particle size distribution (PSD). However, the variations in mineral (inorganic) and macerals (organic) components in coal have led to particles with a variation in their inorganic and organic composition after grinding as governed by their Particle Size Distribution (PSD) and mineral liberation kinetics. As a result, each particle in a PSD of coal exhibits differences in its conversion, particle trajectory within the gasifier, fragmentation, swelling, and slagging probability depending on the gasifier conditions (such as the temperature, coal to oxygen ratio, and swirling capacity of the coal injector). Given the heterogeneous behavior of char particles within a gasifier, the main objective of this work was to determine boundary conditions of char particle adhering and/or rebounding from the refractory wall or a layer of previously adhered particles. In the past, viscosity models based on the influence of ash composition have been used as the method to characterize sticking. It is well documented that carbon contributes to the non-wettability of particles. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that viscosity models would not be adequate to accurately predict the adhesion behavior of char. Certain particle wall impact models have incorporated surface tension which can account the contributions of the carbon content to the adhesive properties of a char particle. These particle wall impact models also

  10. Source Term Model for Fine Particle Resuspension from Indoor Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    9 2.2.1 Resuspension Factor K and Resuspension Rate Λ 9 2.2.2 Empirical Models 9 2.2.3 Theoretical Models 11 2.3...17 3.3.1 Empirical Correlations 18 3.3.2 Physics-Based Model 27 3.3.3 Comparison...of Dimensionless Variables in Empirical Correlations and Physics- based Model 30 3.4 Testing of Models

  11. A detailed one-dimensional model of combustion of a woody biomass particle.

    PubMed

    Haseli, Y; van Oijen, J A; de Goey, L P H

    2011-10-01

    A detailed one-dimensional model for combustion of a single biomass particle is presented. It accounts for particle heating up, pyrolysis, char gasification and oxidation and gas phase reactions within and in the vicinity of the particle. The biomass pyrolysis is assumed to take place through three competing reactions yielding char, light gas and tar. The model is validated using different sets of experiments reported in the literature. Special emphasis is placed on examination of the effects of pyrolysis kinetic constants and gas phase reactions on the combustion process which have not been thoroughly discussed in previous works. It is shown that depending on the process condition and reactor temperature, correct selection of the pyrolysis kinetic data is a necessary step for simulation of biomass particle conversion. The computer program developed for the purpose of this study enables one to get a deeper insight into the biomass particle combustion process.

  12. A numerical model study of the effect of interface shape on particle pushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaliotis, Eliana M.; Schvezov, Carlos E.; Rosenberger, Mario R.; Ares, Alicia E.

    2012-09-01

    A numerical model using an axisymmetric approximation is developed to study particle pushing during solidification. The model is applied to determine the effect of different parameters on the predicted critical velocity for engulfment of the particle by the solidifying interface. The main parameters considered are particle radius, interface velocity and interface shape as obtained for different thermal conductivities between matrix and particle. The relative thermal conductivity is very important in the pushing/capture process in increasing or decreasing the critical velocity for pushing one order of magnitude, with respect to the critical velocity for a flat interface, depending on whether the interface is concave or convex. Moreover, the predicted critical velocities cover the span of measured values in agreement with the tendency given by the thermal conductivities and particle radius.

  13. Particle-hole symmetry in generalized seniority, microscopic interacting boson (fermion) model, nucleon-pair approximation, and other models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, L. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The particle-hole symmetry (equivalence) of the full shell-model Hilbert space is straightforward and routinely used in practical calculations. In this work I show that this symmetry is preserved in the subspace truncated up to a certain generalized seniority and give the explicit transformation between the states in the two types (particle and hole) of representations. Based on the results, I study particle-hole symmetry in popular theories that could be regarded as further truncations on top of the generalized seniority, including the microscopic interacting boson (fermion) model, the nucleon-pair approximation, and other models.

  14. A core-particle model for periodically focused ion beams withintense space-charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; Bukh, Boris; Chawla, SurgreevR.; Chilton, Sven H.

    2006-08-28

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam that has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section. The model can be applied to both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent flutter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  15. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  16. Application of stochastic weighted algorithms to a multidimensional silica particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Menz, William J.; Patterson, Robert I.A.; Wagner, Wolfgang; Kraft, Markus

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: •Stochastic weighted algorithms (SWAs) are developed for a detailed silica model. •An implementation of SWAs with the transition kernel is presented. •The SWAs’ solutions converge to the direct simulation algorithm’s (DSA) solution. •The efficiency of SWAs is evaluated for this multidimensional particle model. •It is shown that SWAs can be used for coagulation problems in industrial systems. -- Abstract: This paper presents a detailed study of the numerical behaviour of stochastic weighted algorithms (SWAs) using the transition regime coagulation kernel and a multidimensional silica particle model. The implementation in the SWAs of the transition regime coagulation kernel and associated majorant rates is described. The silica particle model of Shekar et al. [S. Shekar, A.J. Smith, W.J. Menz, M. Sander, M. Kraft, A multidimensional population balance model to describe the aerosol synthesis of silica nanoparticles, Journal of Aerosol Science 44 (2012) 83–98] was used in conjunction with this coagulation kernel to study the convergence properties of SWAs with a multidimensional particle model. High precision solutions were calculated with two SWAs and also with the established direct simulation algorithm. These solutions, which were generated using large number of computational particles, showed close agreement. It was thus demonstrated that SWAs can be successfully used with complex coagulation kernels and high dimensional particle models to simulate real-world systems.

  17. A mathematical model of turbulence modulation in particle-laden pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Lightstone, M. F.; Wood, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation is concerned with developing a model of the processes involved in turbulence modulation by relatively large particles in dilute gas solid turbulent flows. The mathematical model, which focuses on two-way coupling, has been developed based on the work of Lightstone and Hodgson (Turbulence modulation in gas particle flows: a comparison of selected models, “Can. J. Chem. Eng.” 82, 2004, 209 219) to account for both enhancements and reductions in turbulent kinetic energy as well as the particle crossing trajectory effect. The underlying formulation scheme employs an Eulerian Lagrangian reference frame, i.e. the carrier phase is considered as a continuum system, while the trajectories of individual particles are calculated using a Lagrangian framework. A random walk model is used to solve the particle motion equation. The proposed model, along with turbulence modulation models from the literature, is used to simulate a particle-laden vertical pipe flow. The simulation results show that the new model provides improved predictions of the experimental data.

  18. Fokker–Planck kinetic modeling of suprathermal α-particles in a fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Peigney, B.E.

    2014-12-01

    We present an ion kinetic model describing the transport of suprathermal α-particles in inertial fusion targets. The analysis of the underlying physical model enables us to develop efficient numerical methods to simulate the creation, transport and collisional relaxation of fusion reaction products (α-particles) at a kinetic level. The model assumes spherical symmetry in configuration space and axial symmetry in velocity space around the mean flow velocity. A two-energy-scale approach leads to a self-consistent modeling of the coupling between suprathermal α-particles and the thermal bulk of the imploding plasma. This method provides an accurate numerical treatment of energy deposition and transport processes involving suprathermal particles. The numerical tools presented here are then validated against known analytical results. This enables us to investigate the potential role of ion kinetic effects on the physics of ignition and thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion schemes.

  19. Webinar Presentation: Particle-Resolved Simulations for Quantifying Black Carbon Climate Impact and Model Uncertainty

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Particle-Resolved Simulations for Quantifying Black Carbon Climate Impact and Model Uncertainty, was given at the STAR Black Carbon 2016 Webinar Series: Changing Chemistry over Time held on Oct. 31, 2016.

  20. CELL TRACKING USING PARTICLE FILTERS WITH IMPLICIT CONVEX SHAPE MODEL IN 4D CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY IMAGES.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Nisha; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2014-10-01

    Bayesian frameworks are commonly used in tracking algorithms. An important example is the particle filter, where a stochastic motion model describes the evolution of the state, and the observation model relates the noisy measurements to the state. Particle filters have been used to track the lineage of cells. Propagating the shape model of the cell through the particle filter is beneficial for tracking. We approximate arbitrary shapes of cells with a novel implicit convex function. The importance sampling step of the particle filter is defined using the cost associated with fitting our implicit convex shape model to the observations. Our technique is capable of tracking the lineage of cells for nonmitotic stages. We validate our algorithm by tracking the lineage of retinal and lens cells in zebrafish embryos.

  1. Detailed modeling of size distribution functions and hydrogen content in combustion-formed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sirignano, Mariano; D'Anna, Andrea; Kent, John

    2010-06-15

    A kinetic modeling approach is proposed to delve into the nature and chemistry of combustion-produced particles. A sectional method is used for the first time on this purpose. It is based on modeling of gas-to-particle transitions by sections containing 125 lumped species with C numbers ranging from 24 to 4 x 10{sup 8} and H/C ratio ranging from 0 to 1. This allows not only the mass evolution of particles, but also their hydrogen content to be followed. The model is tested in an atmospheric pressure premixed flat flame of ethylene/oxygen with C/O = 0.8 and cold gas flow velocity of 4 cm/s. Comparison of modeled results with experimental data is satisfying in terms of species concentrations and H/C ratio of the particles. Analysis of model results in comparison with the experimental data has shown that it is possible to distinguish different precursors of particles moving from the exit of the burner into the post-oxidation region of the flame. At particle inception, i.e. just downstream from the flame front, gas-phase PAHs are responsible for particle nucleation and oligomers of aromatic hydrocarbons and small pericondensed hydrocarbons are predominantly present. Then the dehydrogenation process takes place and soot formation starts; in this zone large pericondensed and stacked structures are produced. Further up soot maturation generally linked with dehydrogenation is present, but still a few particles with higher H/C and with low coagulation efficiency are produced and remain present along the flame. The model, in accordance with experimental structural soot analysis, shows that in soot particles condensed structures typical of clusters of large pericondensed hydrocarbons are present whereas high-molecular mass condensed species mainly comprise oligomers of small aromatic compounds of clusters of small pericondensed hydrocarbons. (author)

  2. Lagrangian filtered density function for LES-based stochastic modelling of turbulent particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Alessio; Marchioli, Cristian; Chibbaro, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach based on Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is one of the most promising and viable numerical tools to study particle-laden turbulent flows, when the computational cost of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) becomes too expensive. The applicability of this approach is however limited if the effects of the Sub-Grid Scales (SGSs) of the flow on particle dynamics are neglected. In this paper, we propose to take these effects into account by means of a Lagrangian stochastic SGS model for the equations of particle motion. The model extends to particle-laden flows the velocity-filtered density function method originally developed for reactive flows. The underlying filtered density function is simulated through a Lagrangian Monte Carlo procedure that solves a set of Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) along individual particle trajectories. The resulting model is tested for the reference case of turbulent channel flow, using a hybrid algorithm in which the fluid velocity field is provided by LES and then used to advance the SDEs in time. The model consistency is assessed in the limit of particles with zero inertia, when "duplicate fields" are available from both the Eulerian LES and the Lagrangian tracking. Tests with inertial particles were performed to examine the capability of the model to capture the particle preferential concentration and near-wall segregation. Upon comparison with DNS-based statistics, our results show improved accuracy and considerably reduced errors with respect to the case in which no SGS model is used in the equations of particle motion.

  3. Flow properties of particles in a model annular shear cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhu, H. P.; Yu, A. B.

    2012-05-01

    In order to quantitatively investigate the mechanical and rheological properties of solid flow in a shear cell under conditions relevant to those in an annular cell, we performed a series of discrete particle simulations of slightly polydispersed spheres from quasi-static to intermediate flow regimes. It is shown that the average values of stress tensor components are uniformly distributed in the cell space away from the stationary walls; however, some degree of inhomogeneity in their spatial distributions does exist. A linear relationship between the (internal/external) shear and normal stresses prevails in the shear cell and the internal and external friction coefficients can compare well with each other. It is confirmed that annular shear cells are reasonably effective as a method of measuring particle flow properties. The so-called I-rheology proposed by Jop et al. [Nature (London) 441, 727 (2006)] is rigorously tested in this cell system. The results unambiguously display that the I-rheology can effectively describe the intermediate flow regime with a high correlation coefficient. However, significant deviations take place when it is applied to the quasi-static regime, which corresponds to very small values of inertial number.

  4. A model for the prediction of droplet size in Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged particles.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Trivikram; Mani, Ethayaraja; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2014-08-12

    Colloidal particles irreversibly adsorb at fluid-fluid interfaces stabilizing what are commonly called "Pickering" emulsions and foams. A simple geometrical model, the limited coalescence model, was earlier proposed to estimate droplet sizes in emulsions. This model assumes that all of the particles are effective in stabilization. The model predicts that the average emulsion drop size scales inversely with the total number of particles, confirmed qualitatively with experimental data on Pickering emulsions. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in synthesizing emulsions with oppositely charged particles (OCPs). In our experimental study, we observed that the drop size varies nonmonotonically with the number ratio of oppositely charged colloids, even when a fixed total number concentration of colloids is used, showing a minimum. We develop a mathematical model to predict this dependence of drop size on number ratio in such a mixed particle system. The proposed model is based on the hypothesis that oppositely charged colloids form stable clusters due to the strong electrostatic attraction between them and that these clusters are the effective stabilizing agents. The proposed model is a two-parameter model, parameters being the ratio of effective charge of OCPs (denoted as k) and the size of the aggregate containing X particles formed due to aggregation of OCPs. Because the size of aggregates formed during emulsification is not directly measurable, we use suitable values of parameters k and X to best match the experimental observations. The model predictions are in qualitative agreement with experimentally observed nonmonotonic variation of droplet sizes. Using experiments and theory, we present a physical insight into the formation of OCP stabilized Pickering emulsions. Our model upgrades the existing Wiley's limited coalescence model as applied to emulsions containing a binary mixture of oppositely charged particles.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Coarse Grained Model of Tetra-PEG Gel with Monomers of 5 and 9 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shizuka; Waide, Sayaka; Takasu, Masako; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Sakai, Takamasa; Chung, Ung-il

    We study the early process of gelation using our model of 5 particles and 9 particles in a monomer. We compare our models and obtain slower reaction for model of 9 particles. We also study the effect of random force and obtain slower reaction with random force but more extended structure.

  6. A SUNTANS-based unstructured grid local exact particle tracking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangliang; Chua, Vivien P.

    2016-07-01

    A parallel particle tracking model, which employs the local exact integration method to achieve high accuracy, has been developed and embedded in an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, Stanford Unstructured Nonhydrostatic Terrain-following Adaptive Navier-Stokes Simulator (SUNTANS). The particle tracking model is verified and compared with traditional numerical integration methods, such as Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods using several test cases. In two-dimensional linear steady rotating flow, the local exact particle tracking model is able to track particles along the circular streamline accurately, while Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods produce trajectories that deviate from the streamlines. In periodically varying double-gyre flow, the trajectories produced by local exact particle tracking model with time step of 1.0 × 10- 2 s are similar to those trajectories obtained from the numerical integration methods with reduced time steps of 1.0 × 10- 4 s. In three-dimensional steady Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) flow, the trajectories integrated with the local exact particle tracking model compares well with the approximated true path. The trajectories spiral upward and their projection on the x- y plane is a periodic ellipse. The trajectories derived with the Runge-Kutta fourth-order method deviate from the approximated true path, and their projections on the x- y plane are unclosed ellipses with growing long and short axes. The spatial temporal resolution needs to be carefully chosen before particle tracking models are applied. Our results show that the developed local exact particle tracking model is accurate and suitable for marine Lagrangian (trajectory-based)-related research.

  7. Simulating the Evolution of Soot Mixing State with a Particle-Resolved Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Nicole; West, Matt; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.

    2009-05-05

    The mixing state of soot particles in the atmosphere is of crucial importance for assessing their climatic impact, since it governs their chemical reactivity, cloud condensation nuclei activity and radiative properties. To improve the mixing state representation in models, we present a new approach, the stochastic particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC, which explicitly resolves the composition of individual particles in a given population of different types of aerosol particles. This approach accurately tracks the evolution of the mixing state of particles due to emission, dilution, condensation and coagulation. To make this direct stochastic particle-based method practical, we implemented a new multiscale stochastic coagulation method. With this method we achieved optimal efficiency for applications when the coagulation kernel is highly non-uniform, as is the case for many realistic applications. PartMC-MOSAIC was applied to an idealized urban plume case representative of a large urban area to simulate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types due to coagulation and condensation. For this urban plume scenario we quantified the individual processes that contribute to the aging of the aerosol distribution, illustrating the capabilities of our modeling approach. The results showed for the first time the multidimensional structure of particle composition, which is usually lost in internally-mixed sectional or modal aerosol models.

  8. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-02-01

    High concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere during exhaust cools and dilutes have hazardous health effects and impair visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulphur content (FSC), under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested; based on the measured gaseous sulphuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrierless heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between GSA and semi-volatile organic vapour (for example adipic acid) combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur by the same organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) ×1012cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had opposite trend on the NUP formation, and maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, NUP formation was ceased if the GSA concentration was less than 1010cm-3 which suggests, based on the measurements, the usage of biofuel to prevent volatile particles in diesel exhaust.

  9. Modeling of magnetic hystereses in soft MREs filled with NdFeB particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalina, K. A.; Brummund, J.; Metsch, P.; Kästner, M.; Borin, D. Yu; Linke, J. M.; Odenbach, S.

    2017-10-01

    Herein, we investigate the structure-property relationships of soft magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) filled with remanently magnetizable particles. The study is motivated from experimental results which indicate a large difference between the magnetization loops of soft MREs filled with NdFeB particles and the loops of such particles embedded in a comparatively stiff matrix, e.g. an epoxy resin. We present a microscale model for MREs based on a general continuum formulation of the magnetomechanical boundary value problem which is valid for finite strains. In particular, we develop an energetically consistent constitutive model for the hysteretic magnetization behavior of the magnetically hard particles. The microstructure is discretized and the problem is solved numerically in terms of a coupled nonlinear finite element approach. Since the local magnetic and mechanical fields are resolved explicitly inside the heterogeneous microstructure of the MRE, our model also accounts for interactions of particles close to each other. In order to connect the microscopic fields to effective macroscopic quantities of the MRE, a suitable computational homogenization scheme is used. Based on this modeling approach, it is demonstrated that the observable macroscopic behavior of the considered MREs results from the rotation of the embedded particles. Furthermore, the performed numerical simulations indicate that the reversion of the sample’s magnetization occurs due to a combination of particle rotations and internal domain conversion processes. All of our simulation results obtained for such materials are in a good qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  10. A convergence: special relativity, zitterbewegung, and new models for the subcomponent structure of quantum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Hestenes has presented an integration of Schrödinger's zitterbewegung with the spin matrices of the Dirac equation, suggesting the electron can be modeled by a rapidly rotating dipole moment and a frequency related to the de Broglie frequency. He presents an elegant spacetime algebra that provides a reformulation of the Dirac equation that incorporates these real spin characteristics. A similar heuristic model for quantum particles has been derived by this author from a different, quasi-classical premise: That the most fundamental subcomponents of quantum particles all travel at a constant speed of light. Time is equated with the spatial displacement of these subcomponents - the speed of light is the speed of time. This approach suggests a means of integrating special relativity and quantum mechanics with the same concept of time. The relativistic transformation of spinning quantum particles create the appearance of additional, compactified spatial dimensions that can be correlated with the complex phase of the spin matrices as in the Dirac formalism. This paper further examines the convergence on such new models for quantum particles built on this rapid motion of particle subcomponents. The modeling leverages a string-like heuristic for particle subcomponents and a revised description for the wave-like properties of particles. This examination provides useful insights to the real spatial geometries and interactions of electrons and photons.

  11. Map model for nonlinear alpha particle interaction with toroidal Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Ye, H.

    1992-09-01

    A map model has been developed for studying the nonlinear interaction of alpha particles with the toroidal Alfven eigenmodes. The map is constructed by assuming a linear interaction during a single poloidal transit, which allows the study of the nonlinear interaction over many transits. By using this map, analytic expressions are obtained for the particle nonlinear bounce frequency, and the wave amplitude threshold for the onset of particle orbit stochasticity. The map model can also facilitate self-consistent simulations which incorporate the time variation of the waves.

  12. Numerical modeling of pollutant transport using a Lagrangian marker particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, M.

    1976-01-01

    A derivation and code were developed for the three-dimensional mass transport equation, using a particle-in-cell solution technique, to solve coastal zone waste discharge problems where particles are a major component of the waste. Improvements in the particle movement techniques are suggested and typical examples illustrated. Preliminary model comparisons with analytic solutions for an instantaneous point release in a uniform flow show good results in resolving the waste motion. The findings to date indicate that this computational model will provide a useful technique to study the motion of sediment, dredged spoils, and other particulate waste commonly deposited in coastal waters.

  13. A numerical model for investigation of emission of particle debris from laser-irradiated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2017-09-01

    A simulation model of the hydrodynamics of emission of particle debris from laser ablation is presented. On the basis of a Lagrangian description of the fluid, numerical methods for the placement of a mesh along the distribution of the material to investigate the dynamics of gas bubbles in liquid as well as liquid particles in gas are developed. As an application of the methods, liquid-to-gas transitions are represented. By dividing cells and rearranging the meshes, an appropriate ratio between the volume of liquid and gas region of the material is reproduced. Using the model, an estimation of a criterion of emission of particle debris from the laser ablation is presented.

  14. Ferrimagnetism and single-particle excitations in a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiro; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Zhang, Qinfang; Li, Tao; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    By using the variationalcluster approximation and cluster perturbation theory, we investigate the magnetism and single-particle excitations of a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice as an effective model for the single-side hydrogenated graphene, namely, graphone. We calculate the magnetic moment as a function of U (Coulomb interaction on impurity sites) with showing that the ground state is ferrimagneticfor any U > 0. We then calculate the single-particle excitations and show that the single-particle excitations are gapless and exhibit quadratic dispersion relation near the Fermi energy.

  15. Particle Swarm Social Adaptive Model for Multi-Agent Based Insurgency Warfare Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E

    2009-12-01

    To better understand insurgent activities and asymmetric warfare, a social adaptive model for modeling multiple insurgent groups attacking multiple military and civilian targets is proposed and investigated. This report presents a pilot study using the particle swarm modeling, a widely used non-linear optimal tool to model the emergence of insurgency campaign. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of insurgent social adaptation for the dynamically changing environment and to provide insight and understanding of insurgency warfare. Our results show that unified leadership, strategic planning, and effective communication between insurgent groups are not the necessary requirements for insurgents to efficiently attain their objective.

  16. The application of single particle hydrodynamics in continuum models of multiphase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Rand

    1988-01-01

    A review of the application of single particle hydrodynamics in models for the exchange of interphase momentum in continuum models of multiphase flow is presented. Considered are the equations of motion for a laminar, mechanical two phase flow. Inherent to this theory is a model for the interphase exchange of momentum due to drag between the dispersed particulate and continuous fluid phases. In addition, applications of two phase flow theory to de-mixing flows require the modeling of interphase momentum exchange due to lift forces. The applications of single particle analysis in deriving models for drag and lift are examined.

  17. Models of thermal relaxation mechanics for particle simulation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.; Dagum, Leonardo

    1993-01-01

    A comparative study is conducted of the simulation of molecular vibrational relaxation in rarefied flows by means of existing models and a novel phenomenological microscopic model. This improved technique iterates between translation-rotation and rotation-vibration exchanges; equilibrium is in this way promoted if the model for the latter process is compatible with quantized oscillators. The iteration-equipartition model retains computational simplicity and promotes thermal equilibrium, even in the case of nondegenerate anharmonic quantized oscillators and multispecies gas mixtures.

  18. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  19. Loss cone evolution and particle escape in collapsing magnetic trap models in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eradat Oskoui, Solmaz; Neukirch, Thomas; Grady, Keith James

    2014-03-01

    Context. Collapsing magnetic traps (CMTs) have been suggested as one possible mechanism responsible for the acceleration of high-energy particles during solar flares. An important question regarding the CMT acceleration mechanism is which particle orbits escape and which are trapped during the time evolution of a CMT. While some models predict the escape of the majority of particle orbits, other more sophisticated CMT models show that, in particular, the highest-energy particles remain trapped at all times. The exact prediction is not straightforward because both the loss cone angle and the particle orbit pitch angle evolve in time in a CMT. Aims: Our aim is to gain a better understanding of the conditions leading to either particle orbit escape or trapping in CMTs. Methods: We present a detailed investigation of the time evolution of particle orbit pitch angles in the CMT model of Giuliani and collaborators and compare this with the time evolution of the loss cone angle. The non-relativistic guiding centre approximation is used to calculate the particle orbits. We also use simplified models to corroborate the findings of the particle orbit calculations. Results: We find that there is a critical initial pitch angle for each field line of a CMT that divides trapped and escaping particle orbits. This critical initial pitch angle is greater than the initial loss cone angle, but smaller than the asymptotic (final) loss cone angle for that field line. As the final loss cone angle in CMTs is larger than the initial loss cone angle, particle orbits with pitch angles that cross into the loss cone during their time evolution will escape whereas all other particle orbits are trapped. We find that in realistic CMT models, Fermi acceleration will only dominate in the initial phase of the CMT evolution and, in this case, can reduce the pitch angle, but that betatron acceleration will dominate for later stages of the CMT evolution leading to a systematic increase of the pitch

  20. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Monache, L D; Stull, R B

    2006-04-19

    An atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. Reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate. Urban air quality, and particularly airborne particles, is a major concern in terms of human health impacts. Sea-spray is known to be a major component of the particle ensemble at coastal sites yet relatively few air quality models include the interaction of gases with sea-spray and the fate of the particles produced. Sea-spray is not an inert addition to the particle ensemble because heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray droplets changes the droplets composition and the particle size distribution, which impacts deposition and the ion balance in different particle size fractions. It is shown that the ISOPART model is capable of simulating gas and particle concentrations in the coastal metropolis of Vancouver and the surrounding valley. It is also demonstrated that to accurately simulate ambient concentrations of particles and reactive/soluble gases in a coastal valley it is absolutely critical to include heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray. Partitioning of total particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} between sea-spray and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is highly sensitive to the amount of sea-spray present, and hence the initial vertical profile, sea-spray source functions [48] and the wind speed. When a fixed wind speed is used to initialize the sea-spray vertical profiles, as expected, the sea-spray concentration decays with distance inland, but the particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration decays more slowly because it is also a function of the uptake rate for HNO{sub 3}. The simulation results imply model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield highly misleading results in terms of emission sensitivities of the PM

  1. Diffusion in pulsar wind nebulae: an investigation using magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.; Vorster, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the transport of high-energy particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and test-particle simulations, as well as a Fokker-Planck particle transport model. The latter includes radiative and adiabatic losses, diffusion, and advection on the background flow of the simulated MHD nebula. By combining the models, the spatial evolution of flux and photon index of the X-ray synchrotron emission is modelled for the three nebulae G21.5-0.9, the inner regions of Vela, and 3C 58, thereby allowing us to derive governing parameters: the magnetic field strength, average flow velocity, and spatial diffusion coefficient. For comparison, the nebulae are also modelled with the semi-analytic Kennel & Coroniti model but the Porth et al. model generally yields better fits to the observational data. We find that high velocity fluctuations in the turbulent nebula (downstream of the termination shock) give rise to efficient diffusive transport of particles, with average Péclet number close to unity, indicating that both advection and diffusion play an important role in particle transport. We find that the diffusive transport coefficient of the order of ˜ 2 × 1027(Ls/0.42 Ly) cm2 s- 1 (Ls is the size of the termination shock) is independent of energy up to extreme particle Lorentz factors of γp ˜ 1010.

  2. Particle dynamics and deposition in true-scale pulmonary acinar models

    PubMed Central

    Fishler, Rami; Hofemeier, Philipp; Etzion, Yael; Dubowski, Yael; Sznitman, Josué

    2015-01-01

    Particle transport phenomena in the deep alveolated airways of the lungs (i.e. pulmonary acinus) govern deposition outcomes following inhalation of hazardous or pharmaceutical aerosols. Yet, there is still a dearth of experimental tools for resolving acinar particle dynamics and validating numerical simulations. Here, we present a true-scale experimental model of acinar structures consisting of bifurcating alveolated ducts that capture breathing-like wall motion and ensuing respiratory acinar flows. We study experimentally captured trajectories of inhaled polydispersed smoke particles (0.2 to 1 μm in diameter), demonstrating how intrinsic particle motion, i.e. gravity and diffusion, is crucial in determining dispersion and deposition of aerosols through a streamline crossing mechanism, a phenomenon paramount during flow reversal and locally within alveolar cavities. A simple conceptual framework is constructed for predicting the fate of inhaled particles near an alveolus by identifying capture and escape zones and considering how streamline crossing may shift particles between them. In addition, we examine the effect of particle size on detailed deposition patterns of monodispersed microspheres between 0.1–2 μm. Our experiments underline local modifications in the deposition patterns due to gravity for particles ≥0.5 μm compared to smaller particles, and show good agreement with corresponding numerical simulations. PMID:26358580

  3. Euler-Lagrange Modeling of Vortex Interaction with a Particle-Laden Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Fernando

    Rotorcraft operation in austere environments can result in difficult operating conditions, particularly in the vicinity of sandy areas. The uplift of sediment by rotorcraft downwash, a phenomenon known as brownout, hinders pilot visual cues and may result in a potentially dangerous situation. Brownout is a complex multiphase flow problem that is not unique and depends on both the characteristics of the rotorcraft and the sediment. The lack of fundamental understanding constrains models and limits development of technologies that could mitigate the adverse effects of brownout. This provides the over-arching motivation of the current work focusing on models of particle-laden sediment beds. The particular focus of the current investigations is numerical modeling of near-surface fluid-particle interactions in turbulent boundary layers with and without coherent vortices superimposed on the background flow, that model rotorcraft downwash. The simulations are performed with two groups of particles having different densities both of which display strong vortex-particle interaction close to the source location. The simulations include cases with inter-particle collisions and gravitational settling. Particle effects on the fluid are ignored. The numerical simulations are performed using an Euler- Lagrange method in which a fractional-step approach is used for the fluid and with the particulate phase advanced using Discrete Particle Simulation. The objectives are to gain insight into the fluid-particle dynamics that influence transport near the bed by analyzing the competing effects of the vortices, inter-particle collisions, and gravity. Following the introduction of coherent vortices into the domain, the structures convect downstream, dissipate, and then recover to an equilibrium state with the boundary layer. The particle phase displays an analogous return to an equilibrium state as the vortices dissipate and the boundary layer recovers, though this recovery is slower than

  4. A biomathematical model of particle clearance and retention in the lungs of coal miners.

    PubMed

    Kuempel, E D; O'Flaherty, E J; Stayner, L T; Smith, R J; Green, F H; Vallyathan, V

    2001-08-01

    To understand better the factors influencing the relationships among airborne particle exposure, lung burden, and fibrotic lung disease, we developed a biologically based kinetic model to predict the long-term retention of particles in the lungs of coal miners. This model includes alveolar, interstitial, and hilar lymph node compartments. The 131 miners in this study had worked in the Beckley, West Virginia, area and died during the 1960s. The data used to develop this model include exposure to respirable coal mine dust by intensity and duration within each job, lung and lymph node dust burdens at autopsy, pathological classification of fibrotic lung disease, and smoking history. Initial parameter estimates for this model were based on both human and animal data of particle deposition and clearance and on the biological and physical factors influencing these processes. Parameter estimation and model fit to the data were determined using least squares. Results show that the end-of-life lung dust burdens in these coal miners were substantially higher than expected from first-order clearance kinetics, yet lower than expected from the overloading of alveolar clearance predicted from rodent studies. The best-fitting and most parsimonious model includes processes for first-order alveolar-macrophage-mediated clearance and transfer of particles to the lung interstitium. These results are consistent with the particle retention patterns observed previously in the lungs of primates. The findings indicate that rodent models extrapolated to humans, without adjustment for the kinetic differences in particle clearance and retention, would be inadequate for predicting lung dust burdens in humans. Also, this human lung kinetic model predicts greater retained lung dust burdens from occupational exposure than predicted from current human models based on lower exposure data. This model is useful for risk assessment of particle-induced lung diseases, by estimating equivalent internal

  5. Modeling accumulations of particles in lung during chronic inhalation exposures that lead to impaired clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, R.K.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.; Cuddihy, R.G.; Snipes, M.B.; Henderson, R.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; McClellan, R.O. )

    1989-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of insoluble particles of low toxicity that produce substantial lung burdens of particles, or inhalation of particles that are highly toxic to the lung, can impair clearance. This report describes model calculations of accumulations in lung of inhaled low-toxicity diesel exhaust soot and high-toxicity Ga2O3 particles. Lung burdens of diesel soot were measured periodically during a 24-mo exposure to inhaled diesel exhaust at soot concentrations of 0, 0.35, 3.5, and 7 mg m-3, 7 h d-1, 5 d wk-1. Lung burdens of Ga2O3 were measured for 1 y after a 4-wk exposure to 23 mg Ga2O3 m-3, 2 h d-1, 5 d wk-1. Lung burdens of Ga2O3 were measured for 1 y both studies using inhaled radiolabeled tracer particles. Simulation models fit the observed lung burdens of diesel soot in rats exposed to the 3.5- and 7-mg m-3 concentrations of soot only if it was assumed that clearance remained normal for several months, then virtually stopped. Impaired clearance from high-toxicity particles occurred early after accumulations of a low burden, but that from low-toxicity particles was evident only after months of exposure, when high burdens had accumulated in lung. The impairment in clearances of Ga2O3 particles and radiolabeled tracers was similar, but the impairment in clearance of diesel soot and radiolabeled tracers differed in magnitude. This might have been related to differences in particle size and composition between the tracers and diesel soot. Particle clearance impairment should be considered both in the design of chronic exposures of laboratory animals to inhaled particles and in extrapolating the results to people.

  6. Biomass particle models with realistic morphology and resolved microstructure for simulations of intraparticle transport phenomena

    DOE PAGES

    Ciesielski, Peter N.; Crowley, Michael F.; Nimlos, Mark R.; ...

    2014-12-09

    Biomass exhibits a complex microstructure of directional pores that impact how heat and mass are transferred within biomass particles during conversion processes. However, models of biomass particles used in simulations of conversion processes typically employ oversimplified geometries such as spheres and cylinders and neglect intraparticle microstructure. In this study, we develop 3D models of biomass particles with size, morphology, and microstructure based on parameters obtained from quantitative image analysis. We obtain measurements of particle size and morphology by analyzing large ensembles of particles that result from typical size reduction methods, and we delineate several representative size classes. Microstructural parameters, includingmore » cell wall thickness and cell lumen dimensions, are measured directly from micrographs of sectioned biomass. A general constructive solid geometry algorithm is presented that produces models of biomass particles based on these measurements. Next, we employ the parameters obtained from image analysis to construct models of three different particle size classes from two different feedstocks representing a hardwood poplar species (Populus tremuloides, quaking aspen) and a softwood pine (Pinus taeda, loblolly pine). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the models and the effects explicit microstructure by performing finite-element simulations of intraparticle heat and mass transfer, and the results are compared to similar simulations using traditional simplified geometries. In conclusion, we show how the behavior of particle models with more realistic morphology and explicit microstructure departs from that of spherical models in simulations of transport phenomena and that species-dependent differences in microstructure impact simulation results in some cases.« less

  7. Biomass particle models with realistic morphology and resolved microstructure for simulations of intraparticle transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesielski, Peter N.; Crowley, Michael F.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Sanders, Aric W.; Wiggins, Gavin M.; Robichaud, David; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Foust, Thomas D.

    2014-12-09

    Biomass exhibits a complex microstructure of directional pores that impact how heat and mass are transferred within biomass particles during conversion processes. However, models of biomass particles used in simulations of conversion processes typically employ oversimplified geometries such as spheres and cylinders and neglect intraparticle microstructure. In this study, we develop 3D models of biomass particles with size, morphology, and microstructure based on parameters obtained from quantitative image analysis. We obtain measurements of particle size and morphology by analyzing large ensembles of particles that result from typical size reduction methods, and we delineate several representative size classes. Microstructural parameters, including cell wall thickness and cell lumen dimensions, are measured directly from micrographs of sectioned biomass. A general constructive solid geometry algorithm is presented that produces models of biomass particles based on these measurements. Next, we employ the parameters obtained from image analysis to construct models of three different particle size classes from two different feedstocks representing a hardwood poplar species (Populus tremuloides, quaking aspen) and a softwood pine (Pinus taeda, loblolly pine). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the models and the effects explicit microstructure by performing finite-element simulations of intraparticle heat and mass transfer, and the results are compared to similar simulations using traditional simplified geometries. In conclusion, we show how the behavior of particle models with more realistic morphology and explicit microstructure departs from that of spherical models in simulations of transport phenomena and that species-dependent differences in microstructure impact simulation results in some cases.

  8. Size resolved ultrafine particles emission model--a continues size distribution approach.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Irina; Janssen, Stijn; Vrancken, Karl; Vos, Peter; Mishra, Vinit; Berghmans, Patrick

    2011-08-15

    A new parameterization for size resolved ultrafine particles (UFP) traffic emissions is proposed based on the results of PARTICULATES project (Samaras et al., 2005). It includes the emission factors from the Emission Inventory Guidebook (2006) (total number of particles, #/km/veh), the shape of the corresponding particle size distribution given in PARTICULATES and data for the traffic activity. The output of the model UFPEM (UltraFine Particle Emission Model) is a sum of continuous distributions of ultrafine particles emissions per vehicle type (passenger cars and heavy duty vehicles), fuel (petrol and diesel) and average speed representative for urban, rural and highway driving. The results from the parameterization are compared with measured total number of ultrafine particles and size distributions in a tunnel in Antwerp (Belgium). The measured UFP concentration over the entire campaign shows a close relation to the traffic activity. The modelled concentration is found to be lower than the measured in the campaign. The average emission factor from the measurement is 4.29E+14 #/km/veh whereas the calculated is around 30% lower. A comparison of emission factors with literature is done as well and in overall a good agreement is found. For the size distributions it is found that the measured distributions consist of three modes--Nucleation, Aitken and accumulation and most of the ultrafine particles belong to the Nucleation and the Aitken modes. The modelled Aitken mode (peak around 0.04-0.05 μm) is found in a good agreement both as amplitude of the peak and the number of particles whereas the modelled Nucleation mode is shifted to smaller diameters and the peak is much lower that the observed. Time scale analysis shows that at 300 m in the tunnel coagulation and deposition are slow and therefore neglected. The UFPEM emission model can be used as a source term in dispersion models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictive models for deposition of inhaled diesel exhaust particles in humans and laboratory species.

    PubMed

    Yu, C P; Xu, G B

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical and computer models of the respiratory tracts of human beings and of laboratory animals (rats, hamsters, guinea pigs) were used to estimate the deposition patterns of inhaled diesel exhaust particles from automobile emissions. The accuracy of these models was tested by comparing the calculated depositions in laboratory animals with actual laboratory data. Our goal was to be able to predict the relation between exposure to diesel exhaust particles and the deposition of these particles in the lungs of humans of various ages. Diesel exhaust particles are aggregates with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of approximately 0.2 micron. Their actual size depends on the conditions under which they are generated. Using an appropriate particle model, we derived mathematical expressions that describe the effects of diffusion, sedimentation, impaction, and interception on the deposition of these particles. Because of their small size, we found that most diesel exhaust particles deposited through diffusion, and that the role of the other mechanisms was minor. Anatomical models of the human lung from birth to adulthood, as well as models of the lungs of laboratory species were formulated mathematically using available morphometric data. We used these lung models, together with the corresponding ventilation conditions of each species, to calculate deposition of diesel exhaust particles in the lungs. Under normal breathing conditions, we calculated that 7 to 13 percent (depending on particle size) of inhaled diesel exhaust particles deposit in the alveolar region of the adult human lung. Although the breathing mode (nose or mouth breathing) did not appear to affect alveolar deposition, increasing the minute ventilation (the number of breaths per minute multiplied by the tidal volume) increased alveolar deposition significantly. The calculated deposition patterns for diesel exhaust particles in younger humans (under age 25) were similar. However, with the exception of

  10. Modeling Single Particle Transport in Stochastic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Ben; Fiksel, Gennady; Prager, Stewart

    2001-10-01

    Single particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field is simulated via code ION and RIO. Developed in collaboration with a group in Novosibirsk, Russia, they simulate both single ion and multiple ion trajectories in a stochastic magnetic field. A sharp decrease in the relative diffusion of ions to magnetic field lines is seen in two gyro-radii regimes. One is explainable from the unbroken flux surfaces near the edge of the plasma. The other is thought to be due to a "gyro-averaging" effect that occurs when the gyro-radius exceeds the radial correlation length of the field lines. The simulations indicate a decrease in expected transport, most strongly as a function of gyro-radius, which will be tested experimentally with the MST neutral beam injector.

  11. A direct comparison of fully resolved and point-particle models in particle-laden turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Jeremy; Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Subramaniam, Shankar; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Point-particle methods have become a popular methodology to simulate viscous fluids laden with dispersed solid elements. Such methods may be contrasted with particle-resolved methods, whereby the boundary conditions between particles and fluid are treated exactly, while point-particle methods do not capture the boundary conditions exactly and couple the continuous and dispersed phase via point-forces. This allows point-particle methods to simulate particle-turbulence interaction at considerably lower resolution and computational cost than particle-resolved methods. However, lack of validation of point-particle methods begs the question of the predictive power of point-particle methods. In other words, can point-particle methods recover particle and fluid statistics compared with particle-resolved simulation of dynamically equivalent non-dimensional problems? We address this question in this work by examining decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence laden with particles. For the same nominal conditions, we compare statistics predicted by a particle resolved method to those predicted by a point-particle method. We also examine the effect of the undisturbed velocity in the point-particle drag law by studying the same problem with a correction scheme. Supported by DOE and NSF.

  12. Investigating motion and stability of particles in flows using numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Nidhi

    The phenomenon of transport of particles in a fluid is ubiquitous in nature and a detailed understanding of its mechanism continues to remain a fundamental question for physicists. In this thesis, we use numerical methods to study the dynamics and stability of particles advected in flows. First, we investigate the dynamics of a single, motile particle advected in a two-dimensional chaotic flow. The particle can be either spherical or ellipsoidal. Particle activity is modeled as a constant intrinsic swimming velocity and stochastic fluctuations in both the translational and rotational motions are also taken into account. Our results indicate that interaction of swimming with flow structures causes a reduction in long-term transport at low speeds. Swimmers can get trapped at the transport barriers of the flow. We show that elongated swimmers respond more strongly to the dynamical structures of the flow field. At low speeds, their macroscopic transport is reduced even further than in the case of spherical swimmers. However, at high speeds these elongated swimmers tend to get attracted to the stable manifolds of hyperbolic fixed points, leading to increased transport. We then investigate the collective dynamics of a system of particles. The particles may interact both with each other and with the background flow. We focus on two different cases. In the fist case, we examine the stability of aggregation models in a turbulent-like flow. We use a simple aggregation model in which a point-like particle moves with a constant intrinsic speed while its velocity vector is reoriented according to the average direction of motion of its neighbors. We generate a strongly fluctuating, spatially correlated background flow using Kinematic Simulation, and show that flocks are highly sensitive to this background flow and break into smaller clusters. Our results indicate that such environmental perturbations must be taken into account for models which aim to capture the collective

  13. Dynamic Modeling of Yield and Particle Size Distribution in Continuous Bayer Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Jerry L.; Kapraun, Chris

    Process engineers at Alcoa's Point Comfort refinery are using a dynamic model of the Bayer precipitation area to evaluate options in operating strategies. The dynamic model, a joint development effort between Point Comfort and the Alcoa Technical Center, predicts process yields, particle size distributions and occluded soda levels for various flowsheet configurations of the precipitation and classification circuit. In addition to rigorous heat, material and particle population balances, the model includes mechanistic kinetic expressions for particle growth and agglomeration and semi-empirical kinetics for nucleation and attrition. The kinetic parameters have been tuned to Point Comfort's operating data, with excellent matches between the model results and plant data. The model is written for the ACSL dynamic simulation program with specifically developed input/output graphical user interfaces to provide a user-friendly tool. Features such as a seed charge controller enhance the model's usefulness for evaluating operating conditions and process control approaches.

  14. A spatiotemporal tree model for turbulence in dispersed phase multiphase flows: Energy dissipation rate behavior in single particle and binary particles arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikiö, Päivi; Tynjälä, Tero; Jalali, Payman

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a spatiotemporal dynamical system model (tree model) is utilized for investigating the features of forced and unforced turbulence in a dispersed phase two-phase system. The tree model includes a variable for spatial dimension in addition to variables of wavenumber and time, which display both spatial and temporal intermittencies. The focus of this paper is to study the turbulence modulation due to the presence of rigid particles. The study considers particles with the sizes of 32, 64, and 128 times the Kolmogorov length scale. Specifically, the study of the energy dissipation rate (EDR) at the particle-fluid interface is considered. Two models, namely, A and B with different types of interaction connections between nearby shells, are used first to compare the results of the particle-laden case with decaying turbulence. The number of tree connections in the model is found to affect the amount of augmentation of EDR near the particle surface. Model B is studied further with different sizes of particles in forced turbulence cases and compared to the unladen case with the same parameters. Also, the model expression is studied in the forced turbulence case of dual particles separated by given distances. The results of spatiotemporal shell models provide new approach of handling high Reynolds turbulence in dispersed phase multiphase systems.

  15. Model solution for volume reflection of relativistic particles in a bent crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenco, M. V.

    2010-10-15

    For volume reflection process in a bent crystal, exact analytic expressions for positively- and negatively-charged particle trajectories are obtained within a model of parabolic continuous potential in each interplanar interval, with the neglect of incoherent multiple scattering. In the limit of the crystal bending radius greatly exceeding the critical value, asymptotic formulas are obtained for the particle mean deflection angle in units of Lindhard's critical angle, and for the final beam profile. Volume reflection of negatively charged particles is shown to contain effects of rainbow scattering and orbiting, whereas with positively charged particles none of these effects arise within the given model. The model predictions are compared with experimental results and numerical simulations. Estimates of the volume reflection mean angle and the final beam profile robustness under multiple scattering are performed.

  16. A distribution model for the aerial application of granular agricultural particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, S. T.; Ormsbee, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    A model is developed to predict the shape of the distribution of granular agricultural particles applied by aircraft. The particle is assumed to have a random size and shape and the model includes the effect of air resistance, distributor geometry and aircraft wake. General requirements for the maintenance of similarity of the distribution for scale model tests are derived and are addressed to the problem of a nongeneral drag law. It is shown that if the mean and variance of the particle diameter and density are scaled according to the scaling laws governing the system, the shape of the distribution will be preserved. Distributions are calculated numerically and show the effect of a random initial lateral position, particle size and drag coefficient. A listing of the computer code is included.

  17. Particle capture by aquatic vegetation modeled in flume experiments: the effects of particle size, stem density, biofilm, and flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerwin, R.; Fauria, K.; Nover, D.; Schladow, G.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetated floodplains and wetlands can trap and remove particles from suspension thereby affecting water quality, land accretion, and wetland functioning. However, the rate of particle removal by vegetation remains poorly characterized, especially for fine particles. In this study, we monitored particle concentration and size distribution (1.25 - 250 µm diameter suspended road dust) in a laboratory flume as flow velocity, plant stem density, initial particle concentration, and the presence of biofilm on vegetation were varied. We characterized change in particle concentration through time by calculating decay constants, termed capture rates. Based on our experiments, we found that suspended particle concentration decayed more rapidly in the presence, rather than in the absence, of vegetation. Additionally, particle capture rates increased with stem density, particle size, and the presence of biofilm, while decreasing with flow velocity. These results demonstrate that low flow velocities and the presence of biofilm optimize particle capture by vegetation. Our results are relevant to floodplain and wetland restoration efforts.

  18. Calcination of kaolinite clay particles for cement production: A modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Teklay, Abraham; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Bøjer, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Kaolinite rich clay particles calcined under certain conditions can attain favorable pozzolanic properties and can be used to substitute part of the CO{sub 2} intensive clinker in cement production. To better guide calcination of a clay material, a transient one-dimensional single particle model is developed, which fully addresses the conversion process of raw kaolinite particles suspended in hot gas. Particles are discretized into a number of spherical cells, on each of which mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations are numerically solved by using the finite volume method. Reactions considered in the model include dehydration, dehydroxylation and various phase transformations. Thermogravimetric analysis is used to determine reaction kinetic data required as inputs in the model and to validate the model. Finally, model-based sensitivity analysis is performed, from which quantitative guidelines for calcination condition optimization are derived. - Highlights: • A general 1D mathematical model for single clay particle calcination is developed. • The model fully addresses momentum, heat and mass transfer and all the reactions. • Experiments are performed to determine kinetic data of the key reactions. • The model is verified by different means, including experimental results. • Sensitivity study is done to address key assumptions and derive useful guidelines.

  19. Modeling partially coupled objects with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    A very simple phenomenological model is presented to model objects that are partially coupled (i.e. welded or bonded) where usually the coupled interface is weaker than the bulk material. The model works by letting objects fully interact in compression and having the objects only partially interact in tension. A disconnect factor is provided to adjust the tensile interaction to simulate coupling strengths. Three cases of an example impact calculation are shown-no coupling, full coupling and partial coupling.

  20. Modelling of Coalescence of PMMA Particles/Farz Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzaneh, S.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2011-05-01

    In this study we are interested by sintering phenomenon during rotational molding of PMMA. It is well known that sintering begins by coalescence of grains and follows by powder densification. First we have followed the coalescence of two grains; then the coalescence of several grains is studied in order to see the effect of other grains on this phenomenon. In the basis of the Bellehumeur's model, a new model has been proposed to consider this effect. This model was validated by the experiments.

  1. Human lung morphology models for particle deposition studies.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Schroeter, J D; Hwang, D; Fleming, J S; Conway, J H

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of human lung morphology is of paramount importance in calculating deposition patterns of inhaled particulate matter (PM) to be used in the definition of ambient air quality standards. Due to the inherently complex nature of the branching structure of the airway network, practical assumptions must be made for modeling purposes. The most commonly used mathematical models reported in the literature that describe PM deposition use Weibel's model A morphology. This assumes the airways of the lung to be a symmetric, dichotomously branching system. However, computer simulations of this model, when compared to scintigraphy images, have shown it to lack physiological realism (Martonen et al., 1994a). Therefore, a more physiologically realistic model of the lung is needed to improve the current PM dosimetry models. Herein, a morphological model is presented that is based on laboratory data from planar gamma camera and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Key elements of this model include: The parenchymal wall of the lung is defined in mathematical terms, the whole lung is divided into distinct left and right components, a set of branching angles is derived from experimental measurements, and the branching network is confined within the discrete left and right components (i.e., there is no overlapping of airways). In future work, this new, more physiologically realistic morphological model can be used to calculate PM deposition patterns for risk assessment protocols.

  2. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box. We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E(sub max)) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  3. Flow field analysis in a compliant acinus replica model using particle image velocimetry (PIV).

    PubMed

    Berg, Emily J; Weisman, Jessica L; Oldham, Michael J; Robinson, Risa J

    2010-04-19

    Inhaled particles reaching the alveolar walls have the potential to cross the blood-gas barrier and enter the blood stream. Experimental evidence of pulmonary dosimetry, however, cannot be explained by current whole lung dosimetry models. Numerical and experimental studies shed some light on the mechanisms of particle transport, but realistic geometries have not been investigated. In this study, a three dimensional expanding model including two generations of respiratory bronchioles and five terminal alveolar sacs was created from a replica human lung cast. Flow visualization techniques were employed to quantify the fluid flow while utilizing streamlines to evaluate recirculation. Pathlines were plotted to track the fluid motion and estimate penetration depth of inhaled air. This study provides evidence that the two generations immediately proximal to the terminal alveolar sacs do not have recirculating eddies, even for intense breathing. Results of Peclet number calculations indicate that substantial convective motion is present in vivo for the case of deep breathing, which significantly increases particle penetration into the alveoli. However, particle diffusion remains the dominant mechanism of particle transport over convection, even for intense breathing because inhaled particles do not reach the alveolar wall in a single breath by convection alone. Examination of the velocity fields revealed significant uneven ventilation of the alveoli during a single breath, likely due to variations in size and location. This flow field data, obtained from replica model geometry with realistic breathing conditions, provides information to better understand fluid and particle behavior in the acinus region of the lung.

  4. Modeling and simulation of soft-particle colloids under dynamic environmental gradients.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Xiong, Shisheng; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Molecke, Ryan A.

    2010-09-01

    Controlled assembly in soft-particle colloidal suspensions is a technology poised to advance manufacturing methods for nano-scale templating, coating, and bio-conjugate devices. Applications for soft-particle colloids include photovoltaics, nanoelectronics, functionalized thin-film coatings, and a wide range of bio-conjugate devices such as sensors, assays, and bio-fuel cells. This presentation covers the topics of modeling and simulation of soft-particle colloidal systems over dewetting, evaporation, and irradiation gradients, including deposition of particles to surfaces. By tuning particle/solvent and environmental parameters, we transition from the regime of self-assembly to that of controlled assembly, and enable finer resolution of features at both the nano-scale and meso-scale. We report models of interparticle potentials and order parametrization techniques including results from simulations of colloids utilizing soft-particle field potentials. Using LAMMPS (Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator), we demonstrate effects of volume fraction, shear and drag profiles, adsorbed and bulk polymer parameters, solvent chi parameter, and deposition profiles. Results are compared to theoretical models and correlation to TEM images from soft-particle irradiation experiments.

  5. Particle release transport in Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean: a modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Kimura, Nobuaki; Hsu, Ming-Hsi

    2010-09-01

    A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was created to study the Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean in Taiwan. The model was verified using measurements of the time-series water surface elevation, tidal current, and salinity from 1999. We conclude that our model is consistent with these observations. Our particle-tracking model was also used to explore the transport of particles released from the Hsin-Hai Bridge, an area that is heavily polluted. The results suggest that it takes a much longer time for the estuary to be flushed out under low freshwater discharge conditions than with high freshwater discharge. We conclude that the northeast and southwest winds minimally impact particle dispersion in the estuary. The particles fail to settle to the bottom in the absence of density-induced circulation. Our model was also used to simulate the ocean outfall at the Bali. Our experimental results suggest that the tidal current dominates the particle trajectories and influences the transport properties in the absence of a wind stress condition. The particles tend to move northeast or southwest along the coast when northeast or southwest winds prevail. Our data suggest that wind-driven currents and tidal currents play important roles in water movement as linked with ocean outfall in the context of the Danshuei River.

  6. Modeling compressible multiphase flows with dispersed particles in both dense and dilute regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, T.; St. Clair, J.; Balachandar, S.

    2017-06-01

    Many important explosives and energetics applications involve multiphase formulations employing dispersed particles. While considerable progress has been made toward developing mathematical models and computational methodologies for these flows, significant challenges remain. In this work, we apply a mathematical model for compressible multiphase flows with dispersed particles to existing shock and explosive dispersal problems from the literature. The model is cast in an Eulerian framework, treats all phases as compressible, is hyperbolic, and satisfies the second law of thermodynamics. It directly applies the continuous-phase pressure gradient as a forcing function for particle acceleration and thereby retains relaxed characteristics for the dispersed particle phase that remove the constituent material sound velocity from the eigenvalues. This is consistent with the expected characteristics of dispersed particle phases and can significantly improve the stable time-step size for explicit methods. The model is applied to test cases involving the shock and explosive dispersal of solid particles and compared to data from the literature. Computed results compare well with experimental measurements, providing confidence in the model and computational methods applied.

  7. Meteoric smoke particles; a model study of microphysical properties and global distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megner, L.; Rapp, M.; Siskind, D.; Gumbel, J.

    2005-12-01

    Meteoric material reaching the Earth ablates in the 80-100 km region and is believed to be the major source of so-called "smoke particles". These are thought to play a major role in a host of atmospheric phenomena such as noctilucent clouds, polar mesosphere summer echoes, metal atom layers, and heterogeneous chemistry controlling key atmospheric species such as water vapour. Despite their obvious scientific importance, only little is known about their actual properties. Motivated by the recent first experimental proof of the existence of these particles in the course of the MAGIC project (MAGIC = Mesospheric Aerosol: Genesis, Interaction and Composition), we here present a systematic model study of the properties of mesospheric smoke particles. We investigate the sensitivity of particle properties and their spatial distribution on parameters such as the magnitude of the meteoric influx, microphysical parameters controlling particle coagulation, and vertical transport. The study is carried out using the 1D CARMA model (CARMA = Community Aerosol and radiation Model for Atmospheres). Current work involves combining the CARMA model with a 2D chemical transport model (CHEM2D) to study transport of smoke particles by the meridional circulation. The global smoke distribution is particulary interesting in the light of recent experimental findings. Preliminary results from this work will also be presented"

  8. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for Magnetotelluric (MT) 1D Inversion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandis, Hendra; Maulana, Yahya

    2017-04-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is one of nature-inspired optimization algorithms that adopts swarm (insects, school of fish, flock of birds etc.) behaviour in search for food or common target in a collaborative manner. The particles (or agents) in the swarm learn from their neighbours as well as themselves regarding the promising area in the search space. The information is then used to update their position in order to reach the target. The search algorithm of a particle is dictated by the best position of that particle during the process (individual learning term) and the best particle in its surroundings (social learning term) at a particular iteration. In terms of optimization, the particles are models defined by their parameters, while the promising area in the model space is characterized by a low misfit associated with optimum models. Being a global search approach, PSO is suitable for nonlinear inverse problem resolution. The algorithm was applied to a simple minimization problem for illustration purpose. The application of PSO in geophysical inverse problem is demonstrated by inversion of synthetic magnetotelluric (MT) data associated with simple 1D models with satisfactory results in terms of model recovery as well as data misfit.

  9. A kinetic model for heterogeneous condensation of vapor on an insoluble spherical particle.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xisheng; Fan, Yu; Qin, Fenghua; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo

    2014-01-14

    A kinetic model is developed to describe the heterogeneous condensation of vapor on an insoluble spherical particle. This new model considers two mechanisms of cluster growth: direct addition of water molecules from the vapor and surface diffusion of adsorbed water molecules on the particle. The effect of line tension is also included in the model. For the first time, the exact expression of evaporation coefficient is derived for heterogeneous condensation of vapor on an insoluble spherical particle by using the detailed balance. The obtained expression of evaporation coefficient is proved to be also correct in the homogeneous condensation and the heterogeneous condensation on a planar solid surface. The contributions of the two mechanisms to heterogeneous condensation including the effect of line tension are evaluated and analysed. It is found that the cluster growth via surface diffusion of adsorbed water molecules on the particle is more important than the direct addition from the vapor. As an example of our model applications, the growth rate of the cap shaped droplet on the insoluble spherical particle is derived. Our evaluation shows that the growth rate of droplet in heterogeneous condensation is larger than that in homogeneous condensation. These results indicate that an explicit kinetic model is benefit to the study of heterogeneous condensation on an insoluble spherical particle.

  10. Microbial and Organic Fine Particle Transport Dynamics in Streams - a Combined Experimental and Stochastic Modeling Approach