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Sample records for positron lifetime measurements

  1. Positron lifetime measurements in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, Devendra S.

    1991-01-01

    Positron lifetimes in the isotropic phases of chiral nematic liquid crystal formulations and their mixtures up to the racemic level were measured. The lifetime spectra for all liquid crystal systems were analyzed into three components. Although the individual spectra in the left- and right-handed components are identical, their racemic mixtures exhibit much larger orthopositronium lifetimes; these larger lifetimes indicate the presence of larger microvoids. This result is consistent with the reportedly higher thermodynamic stability and color play range in the racemic mixtures of chiral nematic liquid crystals.

  2. Study of PRIMAVERA steel samples by positron annihilation spectroscopy technique II - Lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsjak, V.; Grafutin, V.; Ilyukhina, O.; Burcl, R.; Ballesteros, A.; Hähner, P.

    2012-02-01

    In the present article, a positron annihilation lifetime technique was used for the study of VVER-440/230 weld materials, manufactured in the frame of the international PRIMAVERA project on microstructural investigation of the irradiated WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steel. The present results complement our previous report of positron angular correlation experiments and provide in-depth characterization of vacancy type defects behavior under irradiation and thermal treatment. The results give new insight into the previously published atom probe tomography and angular correlation of annihilation radiation studies. The measurements do not show any association of phosphorus or its segregation to the open volume defects investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The embrittlement effects related to the phosphorus seem to be effectively annealed-out during 475 °C thermal treatment and the post annealing microstructure and mechanical properties of the material are consequently affected mostly by agglomerations of vacancy clusters coarsened during thermal treatment.

  3. Evaluation of a microchannel-plate PMT as a potential timing detector suitable for positron lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosev, K.; Butterling, M.; Anwand, W.; Cowan, T.; Hartmann, A.; Heidel, K.; Jungmann, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2010-12-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of a microchannel-plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) as a candidate detector, suitable for positron lifetime studies. Several properties of MCP-PMTs, such as their fast time response, compact size, low susceptibility to magnetic fields, relatively high gain and the low power consumption make them attractive for positron lifetime spectroscopy. The preliminary tests were performed with a 85001-501 Burle Planacon TM photomultiplier tube assembly. Initial measurements were conducted with a pulsed Picosecond Injection Laser (PiLas) system. The engineering sample of the 85001 exhibits a transit-time-spread (TTS) of 110 ps (FWHM). Further timing experiments showing the suitability of the device as Cherenkov detector are presented. For the first time, a conventional positron lifetime spectrum of a Cz-Si probe measured with a spectrometer, where an MCP-PMT detector is included, has been demonstrated.

  4. Vacancy profile in reverse osmosis membranes studied by positron annihilation lifetime measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, A.; Goto, H.; Shintani, T.; Hirose, M.; Suzuki, R.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The positron annihilation technique using a slow positron beam can be used for the study of the vacancy profiles in typical reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this study, the vacancy profile in the polyamide membrane that exhibits a high permselectivity between ions and water was studied using the positron annihilation technique and molecular dynamics simulations. Ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetimes in the surface region of the membranes were evaluated by using a slow positron beam. The diffusion behavior of Na+ and water in the polyamides was simulated by molecular dynamics (MD) methods using the TSUBAME2 supercomputer at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and discussed with the vacancy profile probed by the o-Ps. The results suggested that the large hydration size of Na+ compared to the vacancy size in the polyamides contributes to the increased diffusivity selectivity of water/Na+ that is related to the NaCl desalination performance of the membrane. Both the hydration size of the ions and the vacancy size appeared to be significant parameters to discuss the diffusivity selectivity of water/ions in typical polyamide membranes.

  5. Application possibilities of Acqiris digital card DP240 for positron lifetime measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petriska, M.; Slugeň, V.; Kršjak, V.; Zeman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Based on existing knowledge, a software for the digital positron lifetime (LT) spectrometer has been designed at the Slovak University of Technology. As a digitizer, Acqiris DP240 card was used. Start and stop timing signals have been digitised separately with sampling rate 1GS/s in 8 bit resolution. This sampling rate was not sufficient; therefore a joined delayed channel mode with 2GS/s sampling rate was used. Next applications for the study of advanced materials for nuclear industry are foreseen.

  6. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  7. Positron annihilation lifetime measurement and X-ray analysis on 120 MeV Au+7 irradiated polycrystalline tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Charu Lata; Kulriya, Pawan Kumar; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Pujari, Pradeep K.; Patil, Yashashri; Mehta, Mayur; Patel, Priyanka; Khirwadkar, Samir S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to simulate radiation damages in tungsten, potential plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors, surrogate approach of heavy ion irradiation on polycrystalline tungsten is employed. Tungsten specimen is irradiated with gold heavy ions of energy 120 MeV at different fluences. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements are carried out on pristine and ion beam irradiated tungsten specimens. The variation in positron annihilation lifetime in ion irradiated specimens confirms evolution of vacancy clusters under heavy ion irradiation. The pristine and irradiated tungsten specimens have also been characterized for their microstructural, structural, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. X-ray diffractograms of irradiated tungsten specimens show structural integrity of polycrystalline tungsten even after irradiation. Nevertheless, the increase in microstrain, electrical resistivity and microhardness on irradiation indicates creation of lattice damages inside polycrystalline tungsten specimen. On the other hand, the thermal diffusivity has not change much on heavy ion irradiation. The induction of damages in metallic tungsten is mainly attributed to high electronic energy loss, which is 40 keV/nm in present case as obtained from SRIM program. Although, concomitant effect of nuclear losses on damage creation cannot be ignored. It is believed that the energy received by the electronic system is being transferred to the atomic system by electron-phonon coupling. Eventually, elastic nuclear collisions and the transfer of energy from electronic to atomic system via inelastic collision is leading to significant defect generation in tungsten lattice.

  8. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  9. Positron annihilation lifetime measurement of Fe, Fe-10% Cr and Mo irradiated by fission and fusion neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, E.; Kikuchi, N.; Takenaka, M.

    1988-07-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed at room temperature in the isochronal annealing experiments for high-purity Fe, Fe-10% Cr and Mo specimens irradiated by fission (KUR) and fusion (RTNS-II) neutrons. The difference between fission and fusion neutron irradiated high-purity Fe was observed in the recovery behaviour of the second component I 2 (interstitial clusters), namely I 2 in the latter (fusion) is more resistant to recovery at high temperatures. The same behaviour was observed in the case of the Mo specimen. These are explained by the high thermal stability of microvoids (the third component I 3) at high temperatures in the fusion case due to the absorption of gas atoms (He and H) produced by nuclear transmutation. In the case of the Fe-10% Cr alloy specimen this tendency was not clearly observed.

  10. The free volume in dried and H2O-loaded biopolymers studied by positron lifetime measurements.

    PubMed

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Ceeh, Hubert

    2014-08-01

    We present experiments on glucose-gelatin compounds using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) in order to study the behavior of the free volume dependent on H2O loading, drying, and uniaxial pressure. A semiempirical quantum mechanical model was applied in order to correlate the lifetime of orthopositronium in nanoscaled voids to the void size. This allowed us to determine the absolute value of the mean void radius in the biopolymer samples. In addition, the variation of the total free volume of the differently treated samples is quantified and illustrated by a log-normal distribution function. Most interesting results have been obtained after saturation loading with H2O that leads to the formation of voids with a mean size of 84.3(1.9) Å(3) and to an increase of the total free volume by a factor of 2.5. This observation in the swelled sample is explained by the entropy elastic regime well above the glass transition temperature that greatly facilitates the formation of free volume. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were performed in order to determine the glass transition temperature and to support the interpretation of the results obtained by PALS. PMID:25046083

  11. Moisture dependence of positron lifetime in Kevlar-49

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Holt, William H.; Mock, Willis, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Because of filamentary character of Kevlar-49 aramid fibers, there is some concern about the moisture uptake and its effect on plastic composites reinforced with Kevlar-49 fibers. As part of continuing studies of positron lifetime in polymers, we have measured positron lifetime spectra in Kevlar-49 fibers as a function of their moisture content. The long lifetime component intensities are rather low, being only of the order of 2-3 percent. The measured values of long component lifetimes at various moisture levels in the specimens are as follows: 2072 +/- 173 ps (dry); 2013 +/- 193 ps (20.7 percent saturation); 1665 +/- 85 ps (25.7 percent saturation); 1745 +/- 257 ps (32.1 percent saturation); and 1772 +/- 217 ps (100 percent saturation). It is apparent that the long component lifetime at first decreases and then increases as the specimen moisture content increases. These results have been compared with those inferred from Epon-815 and Epon-815/K-49 composite data.

  12. Novel System for Potential Nondestructive Material Inspection Using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Masato; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Hattori, Kanehisa; Watanabe, Yoshihiro

    2011-08-01

    A new positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer consisting of a start γ-ray detector, a stop γ-ray detector, a digital oscilloscope, and a positron detector, which is a plastic scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, is described. A 22Na source is placed between the positron detector and a sample to be studied. γ-ray signals related to positrons annihilating in the positron detector are rejected by anti-coincidence processing. Comparison of the positron lifetime spectrum of a steel strip collected with the new system with that collected with a conventional system using two specimens sandwiching the 22Na source shows that accurate positron lifetime measurements are possible with the new system. The new system does not require cutting of the samples and is potentially applicable to truly nondestructive onsite inspection of various materials such as those used in nuclear power plants, aircraft and cars, etc., by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS).

  13. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using an S-band compact electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Kuroda, R.; Tanaka, M.; Kumaki, M.; Oshima, N.; O'Rourke, B. E.; Suzuki, R.; Toyokawa, H.

    2014-02-01

    A new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed using an S-band compact electron linac at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). The high energy (<42MeV), intense (105 photons pulse-1), and ultra-short pulse (3 ps pulse width) photon beam creates positrons throughout an entire sample via pair production. A positron lifetime spectrum can be obtained by measuring the time difference between the accelerator's RF frequency and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. The positron lifetimes for lead and yttria-stabilized zirconia samples have been successfully measured.

  14. Moisture determination in composite materials using positron lifetime techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. R.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A technique was developed which has the potential of providing information on the moisture content as well as its depth in the specimen. This technique was based on the dependence of positron lifetime on the moisture content of the composite specimen. The positron lifetime technique of moisture determination and the results of the initial studies are described.

  15. Positron lifetime calculation for possible defects in nanocrystalline copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kai; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Zhu

    2015-10-01

    Structural models for dislocation, vacancy clusters, twin boundary, stacking fault and nanocrystalline sample are constructed using copper as a model material. Positron lifetimes and momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs are calculated for these structural models. The calculated results indicate that the dislocation, twin boundary and stacking fault are shallow traps to positrons. The dislocation associated with monovacancies gives rise to a positron lifetime similar to that of monovacancies. The calculated positron lifetimes of the nanocrystalline copper show no dependence on the mean grain size. The as-constructed nanocrystalline samples contain vacancy clusters in grain boundaries, and positrons are localized by the vacancy clusters. However after relaxation the samples show only other two kinds of free volumes: one is the interatomic space in grain boundaries which is a shallow trap to positrons; the other is similar to a monovacancy. The latter contributes a positron lifetime of about 163 ps. This kind of free volume is not only observed in grain boundaries but also in the regions near grain boundaries. Positron lifetime calculation combined with the momentum distribution calculation is useful to identify the defect in the nanocrystalline Cu.

  16. Single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy with LYSO scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Deller, A.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-08-01

    We have evaluated the application of a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) based detector to single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. We compare this detector directly with a similarly configured PbWO4 scintillator, which is the usual choice for such measurements. We find that the signal to noise ratio obtained using LYSO is around three times higher than that obtained using PbWO4 for measurements of Ps excited to longer-lived (Rydberg) levels, or when they are ionized soon after production. This is due to the much higher light output for LYSO (75% and 1% of NaI for LYSO and PbWO4 respectively). We conclude that LYSO is an ideal scintillator for single-shot measurements of positronium production and excitation performed using a low-intensity pulsed positron beam.

  17. Positron lifetime calculation for the elements of the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Campillo Robles, J M; Ogando, E; Plazaola, F

    2007-04-30

    Theoretical positron lifetime values have been calculated systematically for most of the elements of the periodic table. Self-consistent and non-self-consistent schemes have been used for the calculation of the electronic structure in the solid, as well as different parametrizations for the positron enhancement factor and correlation energy. The results obtained have been studied and compared with experimental data, confirming the theoretical trends. As is known, positron lifetimes in bulk show a periodic behaviour with atomic number. These calculations also confirm that monovacancy lifetimes follow the same behaviour. The effects of enhancement factors used in calculations have been commented upon. Finally, we have analysed the effects that f and d electrons have on positron lifetimes.

  18. Digitized detection of gamma-ray signals concentrated in narrow time windows for transient positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinomura, A. Suzuki, R.; Oshima, N.; O’Rourke, B. E.; Nishijima, T.; Ogawa, H.

    2014-12-15

    A pulsed slow-positron beam generated by an electron linear accelerator was directly used for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy without any positron storage devices. A waveform digitizer was introduced to simultaneously capture multiple gamma-ray signals originating from positron annihilation events during a single accelerator pulse. The positron pulse was chopped and bunched with the chopper signals also sent to the waveform digitizer. Time differences between the annihilation gamma-ray and chopper peaks were calculated and accumulated as lifetime spectra in a computer. The developed technique indicated that positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be performed in a 20 μs time window at a pulse repetition rate synchronous with the linear accelerator. Lifetime spectra of a Kapton sheet and a thermally grown SiO{sub 2} layer on Si were successfully measured. Synchronization of positron lifetime measurements with pulsed ion irradiation was demonstrated by this technique.

  19. Measurements of defect structures by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of the tellurite glass TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 doped with ions of rare earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golis, E.; Yousef, El. S.; Reben, M.; Kotynia, K.; Filipecki, J.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was the structural analysis of the TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 tellurite glasses doped with ions of the rare-earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+ based on the PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy) method of measuring positron lifetimes. Values of positron lifetimes and the corresponding intensities may be connected with the sizes and number of structural defects, such as vacancies, mono-vacancies, dislocations or pores, the sizes of which range from a few angstroms to a few dozen nanometres. Experimental positron lifetime spectrum revealed existence of two positron lifetime components τ1 and τ2. Their interpretation was based on two-state positron trapping model where the physical parameters are the annihilation velocity and positron trapping rate.

  20. Positron annihilation lifetime study of polyvinylpyrrolidone for nanoparticle-stabilizing pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Shpotyuk, O; Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Ingram, A; Shpotyuk, Y

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied to characterize free-volume structure of polyvinylpyrrolidone used as nonionic stabilizer in the production of many nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. The polymer samples with an average molecular weight of 40,000 g mol(-1) were pelletized in a single-punch tableting machine under an applied pressure of 0.7 GPa. Strong mixing in channels of positron and positronium trapping were revealed in the polyvinylpyrrolidone pellets. The positron lifetime spectra accumulated under normal measuring statistics were analysed in terms of unconstrained three- and four-term decomposition, the latter being also realized under fixed 0.125 ns lifetime proper to para-positronium self-annihilation in a vacuum. It was shown that average positron lifetime extracted from each decomposition was primary defined by long-lived ortho-positronium component. The positron lifetime spectra treated within unconstrained three-term fitting were in obvious preference, giving third positron lifetime dominated by ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation in a polymer matrix. This fitting procedure was most meaningful, when analysing expected positron trapping sites in polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. PMID:26444751

  1. Positron annihilation lifetime study of polyvinylpyrrolidone for nanoparticle-stabilizing pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Shpotyuk, O; Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Ingram, A; Shpotyuk, Y

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied to characterize free-volume structure of polyvinylpyrrolidone used as nonionic stabilizer in the production of many nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. The polymer samples with an average molecular weight of 40,000 g mol(-1) were pelletized in a single-punch tableting machine under an applied pressure of 0.7 GPa. Strong mixing in channels of positron and positronium trapping were revealed in the polyvinylpyrrolidone pellets. The positron lifetime spectra accumulated under normal measuring statistics were analysed in terms of unconstrained three- and four-term decomposition, the latter being also realized under fixed 0.125 ns lifetime proper to para-positronium self-annihilation in a vacuum. It was shown that average positron lifetime extracted from each decomposition was primary defined by long-lived ortho-positronium component. The positron lifetime spectra treated within unconstrained three-term fitting were in obvious preference, giving third positron lifetime dominated by ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation in a polymer matrix. This fitting procedure was most meaningful, when analysing expected positron trapping sites in polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized nanocomposite pharmaceuticals.

  2. Study of defects in electron irradiated CuInSe{sub 2} by positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Polity, A.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Staab, T.E.; Puska, M.J.; Klais, J.; Moeller, H.J.; Meyer, B.K.

    1998-01-01

    CuInSe{sub 2} was studied in the as-grown state and after low-temperature (4 K) 2 MeV electron irradiation. The positron bulk lifetime of 235 ps was measured for the unirradiated sample. The positron bulk lifetime was theoretically calculated and is in good agreement with the experimental value. In addition, the defect-related lifetimes for mono-, di-, and trivacancies are theoretically determined. An increased average positron lifetime indicated after electron irradiation the appearance of open-volume defects, most probably of divacancy type. The disappearance of this defect was observed during annealing below 250 K. Other defects were formed leading to a divacancy signal at least stable up to 600 K in the temperature range above 450 K. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Investigation of SPPO Membranes by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Htwe Htwe, Yin; Yin, Zejie; Tang, Shibiao; Huang, Huan

    2006-09-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is a powerful technique to study the free volume in polymers. The lifetime of ortho-positronium (o-Ps), a bound state of an electron and a positron, can be used to assess the pore size while the intensity can be used to characterize the number of pores. On the basis of the values of the long-lived o-Ps components in the lifetime spectra, the radii and fractional free volumes in the sulfonated poly (2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenyleneoxide) (SPPO) membranes with different amounts of LiCl were calculated. It was found that, with the increasing amount of LiCl, the free volume radius and the fractional free volume firstly increased and then decreased. After immersing the membranes in distilled water, the free volume radius and the fractional free volume changed with different water concentrations in the membrane.

  4. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening techniques applied to irradiation-damaged silver

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.

    1981-07-27

    Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements have been used to study defect production resulting from room temperature irradiation of pure silver by D-T fusion neutrons or energetic protons. Use of the positron annihilation analysis has established that the surviving defects from both irradiations have the same dose dependence and that defect concentration can be quantitatively measured and compared to damage models. The relative merit of the lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements in arriving at these conclusions is discussed in this report along with some practical aspects of the measurements. In the proton damaged samples the trapping rate approaches saturation, a circumstance which could be misinterpreted if a less extensive data set containing only Doppler broadening data were available. Some remarks about the analysis of positron data and general conclusions about the defect structure are given. 3 figures.

  5. Study of Chemical Carcinogens by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.; Karasev, A. O.

    2013-11-01

    We have used positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to study the carcinogens C21H20BrN3, C4H7Cl2O4P, CCl4, CHCl3, AlF3, C8H12N4O, C6H4Cl2 and the non-carcinogens H2O, AlCl3, CH2Cl2, C2H6OS. We have established a correlation between the annihilation characteristics of the studied compounds and their degree of carcinogenicity.

  6. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. Analysis of positron annihilation lifetime data by numerical laplace inversion with the program CONTIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Roger B.; Zhu, Yongkang

    1990-05-01

    The performance of the program CONTIN [Stephen W. Provencher, Comput. Phys. Commun. 27 (1982) 229], modified to solve Fredholm integral equations with convoluted kernels of the type that occur in the deconvolution and analysis of positron annihilation lifetime data, is investigated with computer-simulated test data. The method avoids direct determination of the instrument resolution function by employing the decay curve of a reference material with a well-known single lifetime. CONTIN employs a constrained, regularized least-squares analysis to calculate a continuous annihilation-rate probability density function (pdf) which is the most parsimonious solution that is consistent with the experimental data and prior knowledge. The performance of the algorithm for extracting positron annihilation lifetime information was evaluated by using several measures of the information content of the data described by Schrader and Usmar [in: Positron Annihilation Studies of Fluids, ed. S. Sharma (World Scientific, Singapore, 1988) p. 215]. The quality of the CONTIN reconstruction of the annihilation-rate pdf is strongly dependent on the information content of the data and is greatly improved as the total number of counts in the data set is increased. Nevertheless, the method provides excellent estimates of the intensities and mean lifetimes of peaks in the annihilation-rate pdf, even when the total counts in the data set are relatively low (10 5-10 6). The sensitivity of the algorithm to systematic errors in the data, including errors in the instrument resolution function, shifts in the positron of the zero-time channel of the sample and reference data and contamination of the reference decay by additional lifetime components was also evaluated. Errors in the FWHM of the instrument resolution function and shifts in the zero time channel as small as {1}/{10}to{1}/{5} of the channel width of the instrument generate additional spurious peaks in the annihilation-rate pdf and

  9. Positron lifetime studies of decomposition in 2024 (Al-Cu-Mg) and 7010 (Al-Zn-Cu-Mg) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dlubek, G. |; Lademann, P.; Krause, H.; Krause, S.; Unger, R.

    1998-09-04

    In the current paper, the decomposition behavior of the engineering alloys 2024 (Al-Cu-Mg) and 7010 (Al-Zn-Cu-Mg) is studied using positron lifetime measurements. Positrons probe open volume defects such as vacancies and dislocations. However, they may also be used to investigate coherent zones and incoherent precipitates. In order to understand the rather complicated precipitation sequences and the response of positrons to different type of precipitates occurring in 2024 and 7010 alloys, binary and ternary laboratory alloys were also investigated under the same experimental conditions as the engineering alloys. The interpretations of the results are based on experiences of the group from extensive positron studies of laboratory alloys such as Al-Zn, Al-Zn-Mg, Al-Cu, and further Al alloys (see also the review (4)). Their collected results are shown as lifetimes and curve-shape parameters S of the electron-positron momentum distribution curves characteristic for different precipitates in Al alloys.

  10. Measurement of the Ds lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermilab E791 Collaboration; Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report the results of a precise measurement of the Ds meson lifetime based on 1662+/-56 fully reconstructed Ds-->φπ decays, from the charm hadroproduction experiment E791 at Fermilab. Using an unbinned maximum likelihood fit, we measure the Ds lifetime to be 0.518+/-0.014+/-0.007 ps. The ratio of the measured Ds lifetime to the world average D0 lifetime [1] is 1.25+/-0.04. This result differs from unity by six standard deviations, indicating significantly different lifetimes for the Ds and the D0.

  11. Charm lifetime measurements from TASSO

    SciTech Connect

    Forden, G.E.

    1987-10-09

    Recent measurements by TASSO of the lifetimes of charmed mesons is reviewed. The lifetime reported for the D/sub s/ meson utilizes the entire data sample collected. The lifetime of the neutral charmed meson, D/sup o/, is from a subsample of the total data set. Special emphases is given to the experimental procedures used.

  12. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Gaugliardo, P.; Farnan, I.; Zhang, M.; Vance, E. R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R. B.; Mudie, S.; Buckman, S. J.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼1019 α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter.

  13. Voids in mixed-cation silicate glasses: Studies by positron annihilation lifetime and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Reben, M; Golis, E; Filipecki, J; Sitarz, M; Kotynia, K; Jeleń, P; Grelowska, I

    2014-08-14

    PALS in comparison with FTIR studies have been applied to investigate the structure of different oxide glasses. Three components of the positron lifetime τ (τ1 para- and τ3 ortho-positronium and τ2 intermediate lifetime component) and their intensities were obtained. The results of the calculation of mean values of positron lifetimes for the investigated glasses showed the existence of a long-living component on the positron annihilation lifetime spectra. From the Tao-Eldrup formula we can estimate the size of free volume. On the basis of the measurements we can conclude that the size and fraction of free volume reaches the biggest value for the fused silica glass. The degree of network polymerisation increases void size.

  14. Applicability of the MCPNX particle transport code for determination of the source correction effect in positron lifetime measurements on thin polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Urban-Klaehn

    2007-09-01

    The method presented herein uses the MCNPX Monte Carlo particle transport code to track individual positrons and other particles through geometry that accounts for the detectors, backing foils, samples and sources with their actual sizes, positions and material characteristics. Polymer material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with different thickness of films served as samples. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and the MCNPX simulation of source correction effects for varied positron sources and different film thicknesses validates the applicability of the MCNPX code.

  15. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  16. Microstructural Characterization of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Pater, Ruth H.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1996-01-01

    Thermoset and thermoplastic polyimides have complementary physical and mechanical properties. Whereas thermoset polyimides are brittle and generally easier to process, thermoplastic polyimides are tough but harder to process. A combination of these two types of polyimides may help produce polymers more suitable for aerospace applications. Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (S-IPN) of thermoset LaRC(TM)-RP46 and thermoplastic LaRC(TM)-IA polyimides were prepared in weight percent ratios ranging from 100:0 to 0:100. Positron lifetime measurements were made in these samples to correlate their free volume features with physical and mechanical properties. As expected, positronium atoms are not formed in these samples. The second lifetime component has been used to infer the positron trap dimensions. The 'free volume' goes through a minimum at a ratio of about 50:50, and this suggests that S-IPN samples are not merely solid solutions of the two polymers. These data and related structural properties of the S-IPN samples are discussed.

  17. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  18. Lifetime measurements in 180Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. M.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Li, C. B.; Gao, Z. C.; Li, G. S.; Chen, F. Q.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, S. P.; Zhong, J.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, H. W.; Luo, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Lifetimes of the yrast states in 180Pt have been measured from 4+ to 8+ using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. These states were populated by the reaction 156Gd(28Si,4 n )180Pt at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The differential decay curve method was applied to determine the lifetimes from experimental coincidence data. The B (E 2 ) values extracted from lifetimes increase with increasing spin, implying rotor behavior, but do not show the typical shape coexistence where the B (E 2 ) values present a rapid increase at very low spins. Calculations based on the triaxial projected shell model were performed for the yrast states in 180Pt and the results of both energies and E 2 transition probabilities reproduce the experimental data very well. The result also shows that a better description of the yrast band in 180Pt requires consideration of the γ degree of freedom.

  19. [Positron annihilation lifetime spectrometry (PALS) and its pharmaceutical applications].

    PubMed

    Sebe, István; Szabó, Barnabás; Zelkó, Romána

    2012-01-01

    PALS is one of the most widely used "nuclear probe" techniques for the tracking of the structural characteristics of materials. The method is based on the matter-energy equivalence principle recognized by Einstein: the electrons and positrons as particle-antiparticle pairs disappear in mutual destruction of particles, they annihilate with high-energy gamma-radiation, thus "particle-energy transition" occurs. The properties of the resulting radiation exactly correspond to the relevant properties of the electron and positron preceding the annihilation. Since electrons occur in all types of materials, the phenomenon of positron annihilation can play in any environment; consequently the method can be used for the analysis of each type of materials (crystalline and amorphous, organic and inorganic, biotic and abiotic). The present paper provides an overview of the theoretical physical background, the practical realization and evaluation of methods, their limitations, and summarizes the pharmaceutical applications published in recent years. PMID:22570984

  20. [Positron annihilation lifetime spectrometry (PALS) and its pharmaceutical applications].

    PubMed

    Sebe, István; Szabó, Barnabás; Zelkó, Romána

    2012-01-01

    PALS is one of the most widely used "nuclear probe" techniques for the tracking of the structural characteristics of materials. The method is based on the matter-energy equivalence principle recognized by Einstein: the electrons and positrons as particle-antiparticle pairs disappear in mutual destruction of particles, they annihilate with high-energy gamma-radiation, thus "particle-energy transition" occurs. The properties of the resulting radiation exactly correspond to the relevant properties of the electron and positron preceding the annihilation. Since electrons occur in all types of materials, the phenomenon of positron annihilation can play in any environment; consequently the method can be used for the analysis of each type of materials (crystalline and amorphous, organic and inorganic, biotic and abiotic). The present paper provides an overview of the theoretical physical background, the practical realization and evaluation of methods, their limitations, and summarizes the pharmaceutical applications published in recent years.

  1. Investigation of free volume in polymer blend systems by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dielectric relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, G.P.; Zipper, M.D.; Hill, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    Polymer blends form an important area of current technological and academic interest. Due to macromolecular size, entropy of mixing is low and thus full polymer miscibility (mixing on a molecular scale) is rare and many blends are often immiscible. The presence of specific interactions between polymers can, however, lead to partial or full miscibility. Generally, techniques such as microscopy, light scattering and glass transition measurement are used to assess the degree of miscibility. This work presents the results obtained from two characterisation techniques, Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS). PALS is a matter/anti-matter technique in which positrons are emitted from a radioactive source and by monitoring the decay process of orthoPositronium (oPs), free volume cavities of radius 0.2 to 0.6 nm can be investigated. Two parameters, {tau}{sub 3} and I{sub 3} are generally determined and related to the mean radius and relative concentration of free volume sites in the polymer. Dielectric spectroscopy is able to determine mobility and the range of concentration fluctuations and molecular environments in a nominally miscible system. A range of systems have been investigated including a partially miscible system, a number of fully miscible polyester/polycarbonate systems and a range of PC/PMMA materials where the PMMA tacticity is varied. In some of these systems, the results will be correlated with physical, chemical and thermal properties (density, DSC and dynamic mechanical measurements) as well as mechanical properties (impact strength).

  2. Study of bicontinuous phase in (TTAB+pentanol)/water/n-octane reverse micellar system using positron lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramani Singh, K.; Yadav, R.; Khani, P. H.

    2013-06-01

    A phase diagram of (TTAB+pentanol)/water/n-octane has been mapped by using optical method. It exhibits a reverse micellar (L2) phase extending over a wide range of concentrations of the constituents. To investigate the fine structure of the L2 phase, a series of (TTAB+pentanol)/n-octane ternary mixtures having initial concentrations of (TTAB+pentanol) (1:1) in n-octane as 35%, 50% and 65% by weight were prepared. In each of these mixtures, positron lifetime measurements were performed as a function of the concentration of water, using a standard lifetime spectrometer. At water concentrations of 11.8%, 8.5% and 8.4% by weight respectively for the above systems, the o-Ps pick-off lifetime τ3 shows an oscillatory behaviour while I3 representing the Ps formation exhibits an abrupt change. These changes in the positron annihilation parameters have been explained on the basis of onset of bicontinuity in the microemulsion phase. The positron annihilation technique thus suggests the existence of droplet-like and bicontinuous structures in the L2 phase which is otherwise considered optically to be a single phase as the system remains clear and isotropic throughout this phase. Supporting evidence has been provided by the electrical conductivity measurements performed in these systems. These results are presented in this paper.

  3. The study of synthetic food dyes by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    By method of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), substances are food dyes were studied: E-102 (Tartrazine), E-124 (Ponso 4R), E 132 (Indigo carmine), E-133 (Brilliant Blue), E-151 (Black Shiny). They are examined for the presence of carcinogenic properties. The difference between dyes having explicit carcinogenic properties and mutagenic properties (non-explicit carcinogens) is established.

  4. Electric-field distribution in Au-semi-insulating GaAs contact investigated by positron-lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, C. C.; Shek, Y. F.; Huang, A. P.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.

    1999-02-01

    Positron-lifetime spectroscopy has been used to investigate the electric-field distribution occurring at the Au-semi-insulating GaAs interface. Positrons implanted from a 22Na source and drifted back to the interface are detected through their characteristic lifetime at interface traps. The relative intensity of this fraction of interface-trapped positrons reveals that the field strength in the depletion region saturates at applied biases above 50 V, an observation that cannot be reconciled with a simple depletion approximation model. The data, are, however, shown to be fully consistent with recent direct electric-field measurements and the theoretical model proposed by McGregor et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 75, 7910 (1994)] of an enhanced EL2+ electron-capture cross section above a critical electric field that causes a dramatic reduction of the depletion region's net charge density. Two theoretically derived electric field profiles, together with an experimentally based profile, are used to estimate a positron mobility of ~95+/-35 cm2 V-1 s-1 under the saturation field. This value is higher than previous experiments would suggest, and reasons for this effect are discussed.

  5. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    PubMed Central

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  6. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  7. Diffusion of permanent liquid dye molecules in human hair investigated by positron lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekara, M N; Ranganathaiah, C

    2009-02-15

    The diffusion behavior of a commercial permanent liquid hair dye in human hair has been investigated using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and gravimetric sorption method. The positron technique makes it possible to non-invasively characterize the angstrom sized free volume holes in hair, which are supposed to be express pathways for diffusion of small molecules. The o-Ps lifetime parameters tau3 and I3 decrease rapidly during the first 60 min of sorption time. The overall decrease in o-Ps lifetime (tau3) was well over 200 ps and o-Ps intensity (I3) drops by 3.5%. These positron results are explained in terms of dye molecules filling the free volume holes and hair morphology. The dye penetrates the cuticle rapidly, but slowly in cortex. The first hour of dyeing appears to be the most effective period of deposition of dye molecules within hair. These results are well corroborated by the sorption results which suggest that the dye diffusion is essentially a diffusion controlled (i.e. Fickian) process, with no observable relaxation effects. In the latter part of the sorption, where positron parameters remain almost constant, mass increase might be due to surface adhesion. These two stages of sorption are well separated by the positron technique. The sorption curve also yielded an average value of apparent diffusivity of the dye in hair. From this study, we conclude that the free volume theory and positron technique, widely used in polymer research, may expediently be used to understand hair properties, more importantly diffusion of dye molecules.

  8. Resolving Nuclear Reactor Lifetime Extension Questions: A Combined Multiscale Modeling and Positron Characterization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B; Asoka-Kumar, P; Denison, A; Glade, S; Howell, R; Marian, J; Odette, G; Sterne, P

    2004-04-06

    The objective of this work is to determine the chemical composition of nanometer precipitates responsible for irradiation hardening and embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels, which threaten to limit the operating lifetime of nuclear power plants worldwide. The scientific approach incorporates computational multiscale modeling of radiation damage and microstructural evolution in Fe-Cu-Ni-Mn alloys, and experimental characterization by positron annihilation spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering. The modeling and experimental results are

  9. Positron annihilation and conductivity measurements on poly(pyrrole tosylate) and poly(pyrrole fluoride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Naidu, S. V.; Eom, C. I.; Krichene, S.; Reynolds, J. R.

    1990-03-01

    Positron lifetimes, Doppler broadening of the annihilation γ energy, and electrical conductivities have been measured for two conducting polymers, poly(pyrrole tosylate) and poly(pyrrole fluoride), as functions of temperature in the range 10-295 K. The positron-lifetime spectra have been resolved into two exponentials. Positrons are localized in shallow traps, and the lifetime data suggest thermally induced detrapping of positrons at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of the conductivity has been analyzed following the variable-range-hopping model which provides results for the density of states at the Fermi energy [N(EF)] and bipolaron localization length α-1. Whereas the temperature dependence of the conductivity qualitatively follows this model, it provides incorrect results for N(EF) and α-1. .AE

  10. Measurement of the meson lifetime using decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-05-01

    The lifetime of the meson is measured using semileptonic decays having a meson and a muon in the final state. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of , are collected by the LHCb detector in collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The measured lifetime is where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  11. Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

  12. Early stages of superplasticity and positron lifetime spectroscopy in an Al-Mg-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ayciriex, M.D.; Romero, R.; Somoza, A.

    1996-07-01

    In the present paper, by using positron lifetime technique, a careful study is carried out to analyze the microstructural changes induced on samples of an Al-based commercial alloy (Al-Mg-Cu-Mn-Cr) by superplastic deformation in the early stages of superplastic behavior of the alloy (strain range from 0.2% to 100%). These results are compared with those obtained on specimens only heat treated at the same temperature and for a time equivalent to the elapsed time during each tensile test, in order to evaluate the thermal contribution to the microstructural changes induced during the superplastic deformation process. Moreover, the positron results were linked with the microstructural evolution of the samples followed by means of optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness technique.

  13. Proposed parameter-free model for interpreting the measured positron annihilation spectra of materials using a generalized gradient approximation.

    PubMed

    Barbiellini, Bernardo; Kuriplach, Jan

    2015-04-10

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy is often used to analyze the local electronic structure of materials of technological interest. Reliable theoretical tools are crucial to interpret the measured spectra. Here, we propose a parameter-free gradient correction scheme for a local-density approximation obtained from high-quality quantum Monte Carlo data. The results of our calculations compare favorably with positron affinity and lifetime measurements, opening new avenues for highly precise and advanced positron characterization of materials.

  14. Photo-degradation of Lexan polycarbonate studied using positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hareesh, K.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Pandey, A. K.; Meghala, D.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2013-02-05

    The free volume properties of pristine and UV irradiated Lexan polycarbonate have been investigated using Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS). The decrease in o-Ps life time and free volume size of irradiated sample is attributed to free volume modification and formation of more stable free radicals. These free radicals are formed due to the breakage of C-O bonds in Lexan polycarbonate after irradiation. This is also supported by the decrease in the intensity of C-O bond after exposure to UV-radiation as studied from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and it also shows that benzene ring does not undergo any changes after irradiation.

  15. A positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopic study of the corrosion protective properties of epoxy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to measure the free volume cavity sizes and free volume fractions of crosslinked epoxy coatings on steel before and after saturation with liquid water at 23[degrees]C. A direct linear relationship between the equilibrium volume fraction of water absorbed and the dry relative free volume fraction of bisphenol A epoxy coatings was found. The free volume cavity sizes and the number of free volume cavities per unit volume of these epoxies were found to decrease after water saturation. These decreases are ascribed to the occupation of 13-17% of the free volume cavities by 2-4 water molecules per cavity. The free volume cavity size of polyglycol diepoxides was found to increase after water saturation. This increase is ascribed to the expansion of the free volume cavities by water, which is substantiated by the macroscopic swelling observed in these coatings. An inverse, linear relationship between the equilibrium water uptake and the relative free volume fraction of these coatings were observed. This result coupled with the fact that less than one molecule of nitrobenzene was determined to fit into an epoxy free volume cavity, and that nitrobenzene is quite soluble in most of the epoxides, indicates that other factors besides the magnitude of the free volume fraction affect the amount of solvent absorbed by epoxy coatings. The small percentage of free volume occupied by water and the small number of water molecules capable of filling each void of the bisphenol A epoxies after water saturation correlate to the high impedance values and the good corrosion protection of these coatings, suggesting that water passes through these coatings by slow diffusion through the connected free volume cavities in the coating. Increases in the free volume cavity sizes of the polyglycol diepoxides after water saturation correlate to the low impedance and the poor corrosion protection of these coatings.

  16. Measurement of Rydberg positronium fluorescence lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the fluorescence lifetimes of positronium (Ps) atoms with principal quantum numbers n =10 -19 . Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states were produced via a two-color two-step 1 3S→2 3P→n 3S/n measured time-of-flight distributions were used to determine the mean lifetimes of the Rydberg levels, yielding values ranging from 3 μ s to 26 μ s . Our data are in accord with the expected radiative lifetimes of Rydberg-Stark states of Ps.

  17. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  18. Do positrons measure atomic and molecular diameters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Jan; Fedus, Kamil; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.

    2016-07-01

    We report on density functional calculations (DFT) of elastic integral scattering cross-sections for positron collisions with argon, krypton, nitrogen and methane. The long-range asymptotic polarization potential is described using higher-order terms going much beyond an induced dipole potential (- α / r 4) while the short-range interaction is modeled by two different forms of electron - positron correlation potential (Boroński-Nieminen and Quantum Monte Carlo potentials). The results of both approaches agree quite well with the recent theoretical and measured values. Based on the present and previous theoretical and experimental data we discuss some systematics observed in integral scattering cross-sections below the positronium formation threshold. In particular we point out on the correlation between the values of scattering cross-sections and atomic dimensions.

  19. Glucose and water diffusion kinetics study in a fluorosilicone acrylate contact lens material by positron lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deepa Urs, M V; Ranganathaiah, C

    2007-01-01

    A comparative study of water and glucose sorption in a rigid gas-permeable contact lens polymer, Fluoroperm 92, has been carried out using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, gravimetric analysis and refractive index measurements. The water sorption in FP92 is non-Fickian, whereas for glucose sorption it changes to Fickian. Glucose molecules reduce the interaction of water molecules with the polymer, resulting in more free water than bound water. It is observed that lenses which contain more bulk-water are prone to lens dehydration and corneal desiccation. The present results indicate that, in case of diabetics, as the glucose level increases in the aqueous humor, there would be more free water than bound water, which increases the propensity for corneal desiccation. The change in refractive index with increase in glucose content indicates decrease in optical transparency of the material.

  20. Confined water in controlled pore glass CPG-10-120 studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šauša, O.; Mat'ko, I.; Illeková, E.; Macová, E.; Berek, D.

    2015-06-01

    The solidification and melting of water confined in the controlled pore glass (CPG) with average pore size 12.6 nm has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The fully-filled sample of CPG by water as well as the samples of CPG with different content of water were used. The measurements show the presence of amorphous and crystalline phases of water in this type and size of pores, freezing point depression of a confined liquid and presence of certain transitions at lower temperatures, which could be detected only for cooling regime. The localization of confined water in the partially filled pores of CPG at room temperature was studied.

  1. Porous glasses as a matrix for incorporation of photonic materials. Pore determination by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisfeld, Pore determination by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy R.; Saraidarov, T.; Jasinska, B.

    2004-07-01

    Porous glasses prepared by the sol-gel technique have a variety of applications when incorporated by photonic materials: tunable lasers, sensors, luminescence solar concentrators, semiconductor quantum dots, biological markers. The known methods of pore size determinations, the nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry allow to determine the sizes of open pores. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) allows to determine pore sizes also of closed pores. As an example we have performed measurements of non-doped zirconia-silica-polyurethane (ZSUR) ormocer glasses and the same glasses doped with lead sulfide quantum dots. The pore radii range between 0.25-0.38 nm, total surface area 15.5-23.8 m 2/g.

  2. Per-fluorinated sulfonic acid/PTFE copolymer studied by positron annihilation lifetime and gas permeation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Hamdy F. M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.; Ohira, A.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of gas permeation in per-fluorinated sulfonic acid/PTFE copolymer Fumapem® membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells has been investigated from the viewpoint of free volume. Three different samples, Fumapem® F-950, F-1050 and F-14100 membranes with ion exchange capacity (IEC) = 1.05, 0.95 and 0.71 meq/g, respectively were used after drying. Free volume was quantified using the positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) technique and gas permeabilities were measured for O2 and H2 as function of temperature. Good linear correlation between the logarithm of the permeabilities at different temperatures and reciprocal free volume indicate that gas permeation in dry Fumapem® is governed by the free volume. Nevertheless permeabilities are much smaller than the corresponding flexible chain polymer with a similar free volume size due to stiff chains of the perfluoroethylene backbone.

  3. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Iori, M.; Ayan, A.S.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, L.J.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 {+-} 19 reconstructed {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in the {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} decay modes. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is measured to be 65 {+-} 13(stat) {+-} 9(sys) fs.

  4. Measurement of the D(s)+ lifetime.

    PubMed

    Link, J M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Castromonte, C; Machado, A A; Magnin, J; Massafferi, A; de Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Stenson, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F L; Pacetti, S; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; DiCorato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Göbel, C; Hernandez, H; Lopez, A M; Mendez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramirez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Luiggi, E; Moore, J E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2005-07-29

    A high statistics measurement of the D(s)+ lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. We describe the analysis of the two decay modes, D(s)+ --> phi(1020)pi+ and D(s)+ -->K*(892)0K+, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 +/- 5.5(stat) +/- 5.1(syst) fs using 8961 +/- 105 D(s)+ --> phi(1020)pi+ and 4680 +/- 90 D(s)+ --> K*(892)0K+ decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average. PMID:16090867

  5. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  6. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of mechanically milled protein fibre powders and their free volume aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, K.; Sellaiyan, S.; Rajkhowa, R.; Tsuzuki, T.; Lin, T.; Smith, S. V.; Wang, X.; Uedono, A.

    2013-06-01

    The present study reports the fabrication of ultra-fine powders from animal protein fibres such as cashmere guard hair, merino wool and eri silk along with their free volume aspects. The respectively mechanically cleaned, scoured and degummed cashmere guard hair, wool and silk fibres were converted into dry powders by a process sequence: Chopping, Attritor Milling, and Spray Drying. The fabricated protein fibre powders were characterised by scanning electron microscope, particle size distribution and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The PALS results indicated that the average free volume size in protein fibres increased on their wet mechanical milling with a decrease in the corresponding intensities leading to a resultant decrease in their fractional free volumes.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang; Klocke, Axel

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide insights int eh dynamic and structural properties of dyes and their micro- environment. The implementation of fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometric systems allows to monitor large cell and particle populations with high statistical significance. In our system, a modulated laser beam is used for excitation and the phase shift of the fluorescence signal recorded with a fast computer controlled digital oscilloscope is processed digitally to determine the phase shift with respect to a reference beam by fast fourier transform. Total fluorescence intensity as well as other parameters can be determined simultaneously from the same fluorescence signal. We use the epi-illumination design to allow the use of high numerical apertures to collect as much light as possible to ensure detection of even weak fluorescence. Data storage and processing is done comparable to slit-scan flow cytometric data using data analysis system. The results are stored, displayed, combined with other parameters and analyzed as normal listmode data. In our report we discuss carefully the signal to noise ratio for analog and digital processed lifetime signals to evaluate the theoretical minimum fluorescence intensity for lifetime measurements. Applications to be presented include DNA staining, parameters of cell functions as well as different applications in non-mammalian cells such as algae.

  8. On estimating mean lifetimes by a weighted sum of lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosper, Harrison Bertrand

    1987-10-01

    Given N lifetime measurements an estimate of the mean lifetime can be obtained from a weighted sum of these measurements. We derive exact expressions for the probability density function, the moment-generating function, and the cumulative distribution function for the weighted sum. We indicate how these results might be used in the estimation of particle lifetimes. The probability distribution function of Yost for the distribution of lifetime measurements with finite measurement error is our starting point.

  9. Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2007-05-22

    Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in heterogeneous scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Goro; Awasthi, Kamlesh; Furukawa, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence lifetime in heterogeneous multiple light scattering systems is analyzed by an algorithm without solving the diffusion or radiative transfer equations. The algorithm assumes that the optical properties of medium are constant in the excitation and emission wavelength regions. If the assumption is correct and the fluorophore is a single species, the fluorescence lifetime can be determined by a set of measurements of temporal point-spread function of the excitation light and fluorescence at two different concentrations of the fluorophore. This method is not dependent on the heterogeneity of the optical properties of the medium as well as the geometry of the excitation-detection on an arbitrary shape of the sample. The algorithm was validated by an indocyanine green fluorescence in phantom measurements and demonstrated by an in vivo measurement.

  11. RDM lifetime measurements in 107Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Andgren, K.; Ashley, S.F.; Regan, P.H.; McCutchan, E.A.; Zamfir,N.V.; Amon, L.; Cakirli, R.B.; Casten, R.F.; Clark, R.M.; Gurdal, G.; Keyes, K.L.; Meyer, D.A.; Erduran, M.N.; Papenberg, A.; Pietralla, N.; Plettner, C.; Rainovski, G.; Ribas, R.V.; Thomas, N.J.; Vinson, J.; Warner, D.D.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.

    2005-03-18

    Lifetimes for decays linking near-yrast states in {sup 107}Cd have been measured using the recoil distance method (RDM). The nucleus of interest was populated via the {sup 98}Mo({sup 12}C,3n){sup 107}Cd fusion-evaporation reaction at an incident beam energy of 60 MeV. From the measured lifetimes, transition probabilities have been deduced and compared with the theoretical B(E2) values for limiting cases of harmonic vibrational and axially deformed rotational systems. Our initial results suggest a rotor-like behavior for the structure based on the unnatural-parity, h{sub 11/2} orbital in {sup 107}Cd, providing further evidence for the role of this 'shape-polarizing' orbital in stabilizing the nuclear deformation in the A {approx} 100 transitional region.

  12. Physical Selectivity of Molecularly Imprinted polymers evaluated through free volume size distributions derived from Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasang, T.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    The technique of imprinting molecules of various sizes in a stable structure of polymer matrix has derived multitudes of applications. Once the template molecule is extracted from the polymer matrix, it leaves behind a cavity which is physically (size and shape) and chemically (functional binding site) compatible to the particular template molecule. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) is a well known technique to measure cavity sizes precisely in the nanoscale and is not being used in the field of MIPs effectively. This method is capable of measuring nanopores and hence suitable to understand the physical selectivity of the MIPs better. With this idea in mind, we have prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with methacrylicacid (MAA) as monomer and EGDMA as cross linker in different molar ratio for three different size template molecules, viz. 4-Chlorophenol (4CP)(2.29 Å), 2-Nephthol (2NP) (3.36 Å) and Phenolphthalein (PP) (4.47Å). FTIR and the dye chemical reactions are used to confirm the complete extraction of the template molecules from the polymer matrix. The free volume size and its distribution have been derived from the measured o-Ps lifetime spectra. Based on the free volume distribution analysis, the percentage of functional cavities for the three template molecules are determined. Percentage of functional binding cavities for 4-CP molecules has been found out to be 70.2% and the rest are native cavities. Similarly for 2NP it is 81.5% and nearly 100% for PP. Therefore, PALS method proves to be very precise and accurate for determining the physical selectivity of MIPs.

  13. Degradation of encapsulants for photovoltaic modules made of ethylene vinyl acetate studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagihara, Hideaki; Kunioka, Masao; Suda, Hiroyuki; Hara, Yukiko; Masuda, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    The structure of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants of crystalline-Si photovoltaic modules after the damp heat (DH) test was evaluated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). A reduction in free-volume hole size, which indicates the progress of deacetylation, was observed after the DH test. The difference in lifetime (Δτ) between the initial and DH-tested samples clearly increased after the DH test for 3000 h. The increase in Δτ was correlated with the acetic acid concentration in the EVA estimated by ion chromatography. The depth profile analysis by slow positron beam PALS revealed that Δτ in the near-surface region of the Si-cell side was significantly larger than that of the cover-glass side. This result indicates that deacetylation near the Si cell/EVA interface is accelerated.

  14. Measurement of the {tau} lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; (The SLD Collabor...

    1995-11-01

    A measurement of the lifetime of the {tau} lepton has been made using a sample of 1671 {ital Z}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} decays collected by the SLD detector at the SLC. The measurement benefits from the small and stable collision region at the SLC and the precision pixel vertex detector of the SLD. Three analysis techniques have been used: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The combined result is {tau}{sub {tau}}=297{plus_minus}9 (stat){plus_minus}5(syst) fs.

  15. Characteristics of vinyl-ester and carbon fiber composite dry and wet probe by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Mahmoud; Granata, Richard D.

    2015-03-01

    Carbon fiber composites of vinylester resins, Derakane 8084 and 510A, were studied dry and after water exposure. In this study, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to investigate the free volume fraction and the size of the free volume voids within the polymer matrix. The relative free volume (fractions replae by of positron lifetime intensities) in VE8084 polymer and in VE510A (Space) polymer were 35.2% and 13.8%, respectively. The free volume lifetime and intensities were determined as a function of the polymer thickness and significant differences were observed in both polymers with versus without post-curing. The effects of water uptake in these materials were also determined by PALS. Water uptake showed a 2% change in intensity of the longer lifetime (1.85 ns) in VE8084 polymer and in VE510A about 1.8%. The longer lifetime intensities in the wet composites were 17.1% in the 8084 polymer and its carbon fiber composite and 7.1% in the 510A polymer and its carbon fiber composite. For composite with 8084 polymer saturated (0.33% water gain) with seawater at 40 or 60 °C, no change in the longer lifetime intensity was observed which indicates no water entered the free volume voids (indicates replace by and) some differences between composite and neat polymer. For 510A resin the third lifetime intensity dropped from 7.1% to 3.9% indicating 48% of the free volume filled with water in the composite only after saturation with seawater with respect to dry one.

  16. Ionization levels of As vacancies in as-grown GaAs studied by positron-lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saarinen, K.; Hautojaervi, P.; Lanki, P. ); Corbel, C. )

    1991-11-15

    The properties of the native monovacancy defects are systematically investigated by positron-lifetime measurements in {ital n}-type GaAs with carrier concentrations of {ital n}=10{sup 15--}10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. The native defects present two ionization levels at {ital E}{sub {ital C}}{minus}30 meV and {ital E}{sub {ital C}}{minus}140 meV. The first corresponds to a charge transition 1{minus}{r arrow}0 and the second to 0{r arrow}1+. The transitions are attributed to ionizations of As vacancy, which may be isolated or part of a complex. In a simple identification of the defect with {ital V}{sub As}, the ionization level at {ital E}{sub {ital C}}{minus}30 meV is attributed to the transition {ital V}{sub As}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital V}{sub As}{sup 0} and the ionization level at {ital E}{sub {ital C}}{minus}140 meV to the transition {ital V}{sub As}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital V}{sub As}{sup +}. The results show further that the configuration of {ital V}{sub As}{sup {minus}} is strongly relaxed inwards compared to the structure of {ital V}{sub As}{sup 0}.

  17. Plunger Lifetime Measurements in 102Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyva, G.; Spyrou, A.; Axiotis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Saha, B.; Liennemann, A.; Vlastou, R.; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; Rusu, C.; De Angelis, G.; Ur, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Balabanski, D. L.; Julin, R.

    2006-04-26

    Recently, an intense experimental effort has been devoted to the search of empirical proofs of critical-point symmetries in nuclear structure. These symmetries describe shape-phase transitions and provide parameter-free predictions (up to over-all scale factors) for excitation spectra and B(E2) values. This contribution reports on recent plunger-lifetime measurements ON 102Pd carried out at LNL, Legnaro, with the Cologne plunger apparatus coupled to the GASP spectrometer and using the 92Zr(13C,3n)102Pd reaction at 48 MeV. According to the results of our measurements, 102Pd is so far the best known paradigm of the E(5) critical-point symmetry.

  18. Positron scattering measurements for application to medical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James

    2015-09-01

    While the use of positrons in medical imaging is now well established, there is still much to learn regarding the transport of positrons through the body, and the subsequent damage induced. Current models of dosimetry use only a crude approximation of the collision physics involved, and at low energies misrepresent the thermalisation process to a considerable degree. Recently, collaborative work has commenced to attempt to refine these models, incorporating a better representation of the underlying physics and trying to gain a better understanding of the damage done after the emission of a positron from a medical radioisotope. This problem is being attacked from several different angles, with new models being developed based upon established techniques in plasma and swarm physics. For all these models, a realistic representation of the collision processes of positrons with relevant molecular species is required. At the Australian National University, we have undertaken a program of measurements of positron scattering from a range of molecules that are important in biological systems, with a focus on analogs to DNA. This talk will present measurements of positron scattering from a range of these molecules, as well as describing the experimental techniques employed to make such measurements. Targets have been measured that are both liquid and solid at room temperature, and new approaches have been developed to get absolute cross section data. The application of the data to various models of positron thermalisation will also be described.

  19. Photoluminescence lifetime measurements in InP wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    A simple apparatus to measure the minority carrier lifetime in InP has been developed. The technique stimulates the sample with a short pulse of light from a diode laser and measures the photoluminescence decay to extract the minority carrier lifetime. The photoluminescence lifetime in InP as a function of doping on both n- and p-type material is examined. The results also show a marked difference in the lifetime of n-type InP and p-type InP of similar doping levels. N-type InP shows a lifetime considerably longer than the expected radiative limited lifetime.

  20. Cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum measured by PAMELA.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Bianco, A; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S A; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S J; Stockton, J C; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2013-08-23

    Precision measurements of the positron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the propagation of cosmic rays and the nature of particle sources in our Galaxy. The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray positron flux and fraction that extends previously published measurements up to 300 GeV in kinetic energy. The combined measurements of the cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum and fraction provide a unique tool to constrain interpretation models. During the recent solar minimum activity period from July 2006 to December 2009, approximately 24,500 positrons were observed. The results cannot be easily reconciled with purely secondary production, and additional sources of either astrophysical or exotic origin may be required.

  1. Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

  2. Positron annihilation lifetime studies of changes in free volume on some biorelevant nitrogen heterocyclic compounds and their S-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, K R; Khodair, A I; Shaban, S Y

    2015-11-01

    A series of N-heterocyclic compounds was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy as well as Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) at room temperature. The results showed that the formation probability and life time of ortho-positronium in this series are structure and electron-donation character dependent, and can give more information about the structure. The DBAR provides direct information about the change of core and valance electrons as well as the number of defect types present in these compounds. PMID:26272166

  3. Emittance and lifetime measurement with damping wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. M.; Shaftan, T.; Cheng, W. X.; Guo, W.; Ilinsky, P.; Li, Y.; Podobedov, B.; Willeke, F.

    2016-03-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a new third-generation storage ring light source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The storage ring design calls for small horizontal emittance (<1 nm-rad) and diffraction-limited vertical emittance at 12 keV (8 pm-rad). Achieving low value of the beam size will enable novel user experiments with nm-range spatial and meV-energy resolution. The high-brightness NSLS-II lattice has been realized by implementing 30-cell double bend achromatic cells producing the horizontal emittance of 2 nm rad and then halving it further by using several Damping Wigglers (DWs). This paper is focused on characterization of the DW effects in the storage ring performance, namely, on reduction of the beam emittance, and corresponding changes in the energy spread and beam lifetime. The relevant beam parameters have been measured by the X-ray pinhole camera, beam position monitors, beam filling pattern monitor, and current transformers. In this paper, we compare the measured results of the beam performance with analytic estimates for the complement of the 3 DWs installed at the NSLS-II.

  4. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  5. Positron annihilation lifetime characterization of oxygen ion irradiated rutile TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitel, Homnath; Sarkar, A.; Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Chattopadhyay, S.; Asokan, K.; Sanyal, D.

    2016-07-01

    Ferromagnetic ordering at room temperature has been induced in rutile phase of TiO2 polycrystalline sample by O ion irradiation. 96 MeV O ion induced defects in rutile TiO2 sample has been characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopic techniques. Positron annihilation results indicate the formation of cation vacancy (VTi, Ti vacancy) in these irradiated TiO2 samples. Ab initio density functional theoretical calculations indicate that in TiO2 magnetic moment can be induced either by creating Ti or O vacancies.

  6. Confronting recent AMS-02 positron fraction and Fermi-LAT extragalactic γ-ray background measurements with gravitino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carquín, Edson; Díaz, Marco A.; Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Panes, Boris; Viaux, Nicolás

    2016-03-01

    Recent positron flux fraction measurements in cosmic-rays (CR) made by the AMS-02 detector confirm and extend the evidence on the existence of a new (yet unknown) source of high energy electrons and positrons. We test the gravitino dark matter of bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric models as this electrons/positrons source. Being a long lived weak-interacting and spin 3/2 particle, it offers several particularities which makes it an attractive dark matter candidate. We compute the electron, positron and γ-ray fluxes produced by each gravitino decay channel as it would be detected at the Earth's position. Combining the flux from the different decay modes we are able to reproduce AMS-02 measurements of the positron fraction, as well as the electron and positron fluxes, with a gravitino dark matter mass in the range 1-3 TeV and lifetime of ˜1.0-0.7×1026 s. The high statistics measurement of electron and positron fluxes, and the flattening in the behaviour of the positron fraction recently found by AMS-02 allow us to determine that the preferred gravitino decaying mode by the fit is W±τ∓, unlike previous analyses. Then we study the viability of these scenarios through their implication in γ-ray observations. For this we use the Extragalactic γ-ray Background recently reported by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration and a state-of-the-art model of its known contributors. Based on the γ-ray analysis we exclude the gravitino parameter space which provides an acceptable explanation of the AMS-02 data. Therefore, we conclude that the gravitino of bilinear R-parity violating models is ruled out as the unique primary source of electrons and positrons needed to explain the rise in the positron fraction.

  7. Free volume and phase transitions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids from positron lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Beichel, Witali; Dlubek, Günter; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Paluch, Marian; Pionteck, Jürgen; Pfefferkorn, Dirk; Bulut, Safak; Friedrich, Christian; Pogodina, Natalia; Krossing, Ingo

    2012-05-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to study a series of ionic liquids (ILs) with the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([C4MIM](+)) but different anions [Cl](-), [BF4](-), [PF6](-), [OTf](-), [NTf2](-), and [B(hfip)4](-) with increasing anion volumes. Changes of the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime parameters with temperature were observed for crystalline and amorphous (glass, supercooled, and normal liquid) states. Evidence for distinct phase transitions, e.g. melting, crystallization and solid-solid transitions, was observed in several PALS experiments. The o-Ps mean lifetime τ3 showed smaller values in the crystalline phase due to dense packing of the material compared to the amorphous phase. The o-Ps lifetime intensity I3 in the liquid state is clearly smaller than in the crystallized state. This behaviour can be attributed to a solvation of e(+) by the anions, which reduces the Ps formation probability in the normal and supercooled liquid. These phenomena were observed for the first time when applying the PALS technique to ionic liquids by us in one preliminary and in this work. Four of the ionic liquids investigated in this work ([BF4](-), [NTf2](-), [PF6](-) and [Cl](-) ILs) exhibit supercooled phases. The specific hole densities and occupied volumes of those ILs were obtained by comparing the local free volume with the specific volume from pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) experiments. From the o-Ps lifetime, the mean size vh of free volume holes of the four samples was calculated and compared with that calculated according to Fürth's hole theory. The hole volumes from both methods agree well. From the Cohen-Turnbull fitting of viscosity and conductivity against PALS/PVT results, the influence of the free volume on molecular transport properties was investigated.

  8. Measurement of lifetimes in 23Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsebom, O. S.; Bender, P.; Cheeseman, A.; Christian, G.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D. S.; Davids, B.; Evitts, L. J.; Fallis, J.; Galinski, N.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Lighthall, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Machule, P.; Miller, D.; Nielsen, S. T.; Nobs, C. R.; Pearson, C. J.; Rajabali, M. M.; Radich, A. J.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Sanetullaev, A.; Unsworth, C. D.; Wrede, C.

    2016-02-01

    Several lifetimes in 23Mg have been determined for the first time using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. A Monte Carlo simulation code has been written to model the γ -ray line shape. An upper limit of τ <12 fs at the 95% C.L. has been obtained for the astrophysically important 7787 keV state.

  9. Application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) to study the nanostructure in amphiphile self-assembly materials: phytantriol cubosomes and hexosomes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aurelia W; Fong, Celesta; Waddington, Lynne J; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-01-21

    Self-assembled amphiphile nanostructures of colloidal dimensions such as cubosomes and hexosomes are of interest as delivery vectors in pharmaceutical and nanomedicine applications. Translation would be assisted through a better of understanding of the effects of drug loading on the internal nanostructure, and the relationship between this nanostructure and drug release profile. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is sensitive to local microviscosity and is used as an in situ molecular probe to examine the Q2 (cubosome) → H2 (hexosome) → L2 phase transitions of the pharmaceutically relevant phytantriol-water system in the presence of a model hydrophobic drug, vitamin E acetate (VitEA). It is shown that the ortho-positronium lifetime (τ) is sensitive to molecular packing and mobility and this has been correlated with the rheological properties of individual lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases. Characteristic PALS lifetimes for L2 (τ4∼ 4 ns) ∼ H2 (τ4∼ 4 ns) > Q(2 Pn3m) (τ4∼ 2.2 ns) are observed for the phytantriol-water system, with the addition of VitEA yielding a gradual increase in τ from τ∼ 2.2 ns for cubosomes to τ∼ 3.5 ns for hexosomes. The dynamic chain packing at higher temperatures and in the L2 and H2 phases is qualitatively less "viscous", consistent with rheological measurements. This information offers increased understanding of the relationship between internal nanostructure and species permeability.

  10. Measurement of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, W.W.; Band, H.R.; Bloom, E.D.; Bosman, M.; Camporesi, T.; Chadwick, G.B.; Delfino, M.C.; De Sangro, R.; Ford, W.T.; Gettner, M.W.

    1986-09-01

    Data from e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions collected by the MAC detector at the SLAC storage ring PEP with a new vertex chamber having position resolution of 50 ..mu..m have been analyzed with a new method to make a determination of the lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks. In addition, data collected with MAC before the vertex chamber was installed have been re-analyzed using the new method. The combined result for the B lifetime is tau/sub b/ = (1.16 +- 0.16(stat.) +- 0.07(syst.)ps) x (1 +- 0.15), where the last factor is the scale. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  11. 17 C Lifetime Measurements with the TRIPLEX Plunger and GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Duane; Iwasaki, H.; Whitmore, K.; Morse, C.; Loelius, C.; Gade, A.; Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Langer, C.; Recchia, F.; Berryman, J.; Bader, V.; Stroberg, S. R.; Campbell, C.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A.; Wimmer, K.; Lemasson, A.; Parker, J.

    2013-10-01

    As nuclei approach the drip-line exotic features such as deformation and collectivity begin to manifest. Experimental observation of these features provide valuable inputs to test the validity of current theoretical models. Excited state lifetime measurements can be linked directly to the reduced transition probability allowing the inference of structure information. Recent lifetime measurements of the neutron rich 17C have been performed using the gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA and the newly designed TRIPLEX plunger at the NSCL. The TRIPLEX plunger allows multiple lifetimes, ranging from 1ps to 1ns, to be measured with a single setting. This provides a robust model independent methodology for determining excited state lifetimes through in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy. Initial results of the lifetime measurements and the data analysis will be presented.

  12. A study of inter-crystallite spaces in some polycrystalline inorganic systems using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantarovich, V. P.; Suzuki, T.; Ito, Y.; Kondo, K.; Gustov, V. W.; Melikhov, I. V.; Berdonosov, S. S.; Ivanov, L. N.; Yu, R. S.

    2007-02-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used for calculation of number density and effective sizes of free volume holes (inter-crystallite spaces) in polycrystal CaSO 4, CaCO 3 (vaterit) and Ca 10(PO 4) 6(OH) 2 (apatite). The effect of substitution of two-valence Ca(II) for three-valence Eu(III) on annihilation characteristics of apatite, studied together with the data on thermo-stimulated luminescence (TSL) and low-temperature sorption of gas (N 2), helped to elucidate mechanism of positronium atom (Ps) localization in the free volume holes and perform corresponding calculations. It came out that PALS is more sensitive to inter-crystallite sites (10 16 cm -3) in polycrystallites than to the free volume holes in polymer glasses (10 19 cm -3). This is due to higher mobility of the precursor of localized Ps in crystallites.

  13. An outline of positron measurements of superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Fluss, M.J.

    1991-03-01

    Positron measurements on superconducting oxides have gone through an evolution from divergent results of low statistical precision on samples of suspect quality to convergent results of higher statistical precision on high quality samples. We outline the elements affecting the progress of these experiments and questions that can be addressed at our present state of the art. 11 refs.

  14. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section B; Microstructural Characterization of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Pater, Ruth H.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1998-01-01

    Thermoset and thermoplastic polyimides have complementary physical/mechanical properties. Whereas thermoset polyimides are brittle and generally easier to process, thermoplastic polyimides are tough but harder to process. It is expected that a combination of these two types of polyimides may help produce polymers more suitable for aerospace applications. Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (S-IPNs) of thermoset LaRC(Trademark)-RP46 and thermoplastic LARC(Trademark)-IA polyimides were prepared in weight percent ratios ranging from 100:0 to 0: 100. Positron lifetime measurements were made in these samples to correlate their free volume features with physical/mechanical properties. As expected, positronium atoms are not formed in these samples. The second life time component has been used to infer the positron trap dimensions. The "free volume" goes through a minimum at about 50:50 ratio, suggesting that S-IPN samples are not merely solid solutions of the two polymers. These data and related structural properties of the S-IPN samples have been discussed in this paper.

  15. Measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-12-15

    We report a measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel Bs(0) --> Ds- mu+ nuX (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. Using 5176 reconstructed Ds- mu+ signal events, we have measured the Bs(0) lifetime to be tau(Bs(0))=1.398+/-0.044(stat)(-0.025)(+0.028)(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime to date. PMID:17280267

  16. Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime by Counting Trapped Protons

    PubMed Central

    Wietfeldt, F. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fei, X.; Snow, W. M.; Greene, G. L.; Pauwels, J.; Eykens, R.; Lamberty, A.; Van Gestel, J.

    2005-01-01

    We measured the neutron decay lifetime by counting in-beam neutron decay recoil protons trapped in a quasi-Penning trap. The absolute neutron beam fluence was measured by capture in a thin 6LiF foil detector with known efficiency. The combination of these measurements gives the neutron lifetime: τn = (886.8 ± 1.2 ± 3.2) s, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic) in nature. This is the most precise neutron lifetime determination to date using an in-beam method. PMID:27308145

  17. Quantitative carrier lifetime images optically measured on rough silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Martin C.; Pingel, Sebastian; The, Manuel; Warta, Wilhelm

    2007-06-01

    Results of optical carrier lifetime measurements like carrier density imaging significantly depend on surface conditions of the sample under test. Rough or textured surfaces have a severe impact on the measurement quality since they cause blurring and overestimation of the lifetime measurement. We propose a correction method for both, the adjustment of the absolute value and the restoration of the spatial distribution of the recombination lifetime. The absolute value is corrected by taking the emissivity of the sample into account. The unblurred signal distribution is obtained by mathematical deconvolution via Wiener filtering. For this purpose an appropriate point spread function is experimentally determined.

  18. Relative Defect Density Measurements of Laser Shock Peened 316L Stainless Steel Using Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus A. Gagliardi; Bulent H. Sencer; A. W. Hunt; Stuart A. Maloy; George T. Gray III

    2011-12-01

    The surface of an annealed 316L stainless steel coupon was laser shock peened and Vickers hardness measurements were subsequently taken of its surface. This Vickers hardness data was compared with measurements taken using the technique of positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy. When compared, a correlation was found between the Vickers hardness data measurements and those made using Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Although materials with a high defect density can cause the S-parameter measurements to saturate, variations in the Sparameter measurements suggest that through further research the Doppler broadening technique could be used as a viable alternative to measuring a material's hardness. In turn, this technique, could be useful in industrial settings where surface hardness and surface defects are used to predict lifetime of components.

  19. Lifetime measurement of the 9s level of atomic francium.

    PubMed

    Aubin, S; Gomez, E; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D

    2003-11-01

    We use two-photon resonant excitation and time-correlated single-photon counting techniques on a sample of 210Fr atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optical trap to measure the lifetime of the 9s excited level. Direct measurement of the decay through the 7P(3/2) level at 851 nm yields a lifetime of 107.53 +/- 0.80 ns. PMID:14587813

  20. High energy beam lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Hartley, J.; Cowan, T.E.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a positron lifetime defect analysis capability based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational with a 60 mCi {sup 22}Na source providing a current of 7 10{sup 5} positrons per second. Lifetime data are derived from a thin plastic transmission detector providing an implantation time and a BaF{sub 2} detector to determine the annihilation time. Positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick sample specimens at counting rates in excess of 2000 per second. The instrument is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for in situ measurements.

  1. A preliminary, precise measurement of the average B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    SLD Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    The average B hadron lifetime was measured using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLC in 1993. From a sample of {approximately}50,000 Z{sup 0} events, a sample enriched in Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} was selected by applying an impact parameter tag. The lifetime was extracted from the decay length distribution of inclusive vertices reconstructed in three dimensions. A binned maximum likelihood method yielded an average B hadron lifetime of {tau}{sub B} = 1.577 {plus_minus} 0.032(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.046(syst.) ps.

  2. A preliminary measurement of the average B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Manly, S.L.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    The average B hadron lifetime was measured using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLC in 1993. From a sample of {approximately}50,000 Z{sup 0} events, a sample enriched in Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} was selected by applying an impact parameter tag. The lifetime was extracted from the decay length distribution of inclusive vertices reconstructed in three dimensions. A binned maximum likelihood method yielded an average B hadron lifetime of {tau}{sub B} = 1.577{plus_minus}0.032(stat.){plus_minus}0.046(syst.) ps.

  3. Measurement of the τ-lepton lifetime at Belle.

    PubMed

    Belous, K; Shapkin, M; Sokolov, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bhuyan, B; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Doležal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W-S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwashita, T; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kato, E; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Lee, S-H; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mori, T; Mussa, R; Nagasaka, Y; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nayak, M; Nedelkovska, E; Ng, C; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, H K; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ritter, M; Röhrken, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santel, D; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y-S; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, P; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zupanc, A

    2014-01-24

    The lifetime of the τ lepton is measured using the process e+ e- → τ+ τ- , where both τ leptons decay to 3πν(τ). The result for the mean lifetime, based on 711  fb(-1) of data collected with the Belle detector at the ϒ(4S) resonance and 60  MeV below, is τ=(290.17±0.53(stat)±0.33(syst))×10(-15)  s. The first measurement of the lifetime difference between τ+ and τ- is performed. The upper limit on the relative lifetime difference between positive and negative τ leptons is |Δτ|/τ<7.0×10(-3) at 90% C.L. PMID:24484129

  4. Nuclear lifetime measurements from data with independently varying observation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, T. J.; Reed, M. W.; Lane, G. J.; Akber, A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Walker, P. M.

    2016-09-01

    A method is presented for obtaining ground-state and isomeric lifetimes from storage-ring data. The method published by Schmidt et al. is extended to the problems and solutions associated with applying their method to storage-ring data. These developed procedures are applied to real experimental data for 193Re, and a mean-lifetime value of 37-7+9 s is obtained. This is consistent with a previous measurement.

  5. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  6. Reinforcement Mechanism Of Polyurethane-Urea/Clay Nanocomposites Probed By Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy And Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, S. K.; Patri, M.; Sudarshan, K.; Pujari, P. K.; Khakhar, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    A basis for quantitative analysis of the reinforcement mechanism of polyurethane-urea/clay nanocomposites using two characterization methods, positron annihilation life time spectroscopy (PALS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) is provided. DMA was used to measure the constrained volume fraction of amorphous soft segments induced by nanoclay and the storage modulus of the nanocomposites. The interfacial interactions in the nanocomposites were investigated by PALS. The modulus enhancement of the organoclay nanocomposites was found to have a good correlation with the volume fraction of the constrained region and the interfacial interactions.

  7. New Millisecond Isomer Lifetime Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, M. Nelson, R.O.; Fotiades, N.; O'Donnell, J.M.

    2014-06-15

    New half-life measurements have been made of the millisecond isomers {sup 71m}Ge, {sup 114m2}I, {sup 208m}Bi, {sup 88m1}Y, {sup 88m2}Y, and {sup 75m}As populated in neutron-induced reactions. These measurements were made using the unique time structure of the LANSCE/WNR neutron source, by observing the γ-ray decays of the isomers during the time between the LANSCE proton macropulses. Two different LANSCE proton beam time structures were used. The GEANIE array of HPGe detectors was used to detect the γ-ray decays.

  8. Precision lifetime measurements by single-proton counting

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Hill, W.T. III; Leone, S.R.

    1995-08-01

    There is renewed interest in the accurate measurement of lifetimes of excited states in alkalis in order to test ab initio theories which are needed for the interpretation of atomic parity nonconservation measurements. While it is often assumed that the fast-beam laser method yields the most accurate lifetimes, we demonstrated that an alternative technique, time-correlated single-photon counting, is capable of achieving comparable accuracy. Using this method at JILA, we measured the lifetimes of the 6p {sup 2}p{sub 1/2} and 6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels in atomic Cs with accuracies {approx}0.2-0.3%. A high-repetition rate, femtosecond, self-modelocked Ti:sapphire laser is used to excite Cs produced in a well-collimated atomic beam. The time interval between the excitation pulse and the arrival of a fluorescence photon is measured repetitively until the desired statistics are obtained. The lifetime results are 34.75(7) ns and 30.41(10) ns for the 6p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels, respectively. These lifetimes are in agreement with those extracted from ab initio many-ody perturbation theory calculations at the sub 1% level. The measurement errors are dominated by systematic effects, and methods to alleviate these and approach an accuracy of 0.1% were determined.

  9. Measurement of Metastable Lifetimes of Highly-Charged Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is part of a series of measurements of metastable lifetimes of highly-charged ions (HCIs) which contribute to optical absorption, emission and energy balance in the Interstellar Medium (ISM), stellar atmospheres, etc. Measurements were carried out using the 14-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at the JPL HCI facility. The ECR provides useful currents of charge states such as C(sup(1-6)+), Mg(sup(1-6)+) and Fe(sup(1-17)+). In this work the HCI beam is focused into a Kingdon electrostatic ion trap for measuring lifetimes via optical decays.

  10. Microwave irradiation induced modifications on the interfaces in SAN/EVA/PVC and PVAc/BPA/PVP ternary polymer blends: Positron lifetime study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinesh, Meghala; Chikkakuntappa, Ranganathaiah

    2013-09-01

    Ternary polymer blends of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate)/poly(vinyl chloride) (SAN/EVA/PVC) and poly(vinyl acetate)/bisphenol A/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVAc/BPA/PVP) with different compositions have been prepared by solvent casting method and characterized by positron lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry DSC. Phase modifications have been induced by irradiating the blends with microwave radiation. These changes have been monitored by measuring the free-volume content in the blends. The results clearly show improved interactions between the constituent polymers of the blends upon microwave irradiation. However, the free-volume data and DSC measurements are found to be inadequate to reveal the changes at the interfaces and the interfaces determine the final properties of the blend. For this we have used hydrodynamic interaction (αij) approach developed by us to measure strength of hydrodynamic interaction at the interfaces. These results show that microwave irradiation stabilizes the interfaces if the blend contains strong polar groups. SAN/EVA/PVC blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from -3.18 to -4.85 at composition 50/35/15 upon microwave irradiation and PVAc/BPA/PVP blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from -3.81 to -7.57 at composition 20/50/30 after irradiation.

  11. Measurements of the B +, B 0, meson and baryon lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dorosz, P.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sánchez, A. Martín; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Alvarez, A. Pazos; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Trigo, E. Perez; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Sabatino, G.; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-04-01

    Measurements of b-hadron lifetimes are reported using pp collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1, collected by the LHCb detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Using the exclusive decays B + → J/ψ K +, B 0 → J/ψ K ∗(892)0, , and the average decay times in these modes are measured to be where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These represent the most precise lifetime measurements in these decay modes. In addition, ratios of these lifetimes, and the ratio of the decay-width difference, ΔΓ d , to the average width, Γ d , in the B 0 system, ΔΓ d /Γ d = -0 .044 ± 0 .025 ± 0 .011, are reported. All quantities are found to be consistent with Standard Model expectations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Measuring Carrier Lifetime in GaAs by Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1986-01-01

    Luminescence proposed as nondestructive technique for measuring Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination lifetime GaAs. Sample irradiated, and luminescence escapes through surface. Measurement requires no mechanical or electrical contact with sample. No ohmic contacts or p/n junctions needed. Sample not scrapped after tested.

  13. Lifetime measurement of the 8s level in francium

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Galvan, A. Perez

    2005-06-15

    We measure the lifetime of the 8s level of {sup 210}Fr atoms on a magneto-optically trapped sample with time-correlated single-photon counting. The 7P{sub 1/2} state serves as the resonant intermediate level for two-step excitation of the 8s level completed with a 1.3-{mu}m laser. Analysis of the fluorescence decay through the 7P{sub 3/2} level gives 53.30{+-}0.44 ns for the 8s level lifetime.

  14. A measurement of the tau lepton lifetime at ARGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saull, Patrick Richard Behrendt

    Data taken with the ARGUS detector at DESY, Hamburg, specifically toverlinetoverline pairs produced from e+e - collisions in the energy range (10.4-10.6)GeV, are used to make a precision measurement of the tau lifetime. A new method is introduced which is independent of the beam position and envelope, and applicable to tau events having one-three topology. Applied to ARGUS data the method yields a value for the tau lifetime of tt=287+/-11(st atistical)+/-8(systemat ic)fs.

  15. Measuring Luminescence Lifetime With Help of a DSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, J. D. S.

    2009-01-01

    An instrument for measuring the lifetime of luminescence (fluorescence or phosphorescence) includes a digital signal processor (DSP) as the primary means of control, generation of excitation signals, and analysis of response signals. The DSP hardware in the present instrument makes it possible to switch among a variety of operating modes by making changes in software only.

  16. Lifetime measurement of excited states in /sup 105/Ag

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, V.K.; Govil, I.M.

    1986-11-01

    The levels up to about 2.1 MeV in /sup 105/Ag were excited via /sup 105/Pd(p,n..gamma..) reaction. For the first time, lifetimes of energy levels at 1023, 1042, 1097, 1166, 1243, 1295, 1328, 1386, 1442, 1543, 1558, 1587, 1719, 1923, and 2081 keV have been measured using the Doppler shift attenuation technique.

  17. Structure of water + acetonitrile solutions from acoustic and positron annihilation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerie, Kazimierz; Baranowski, Andrzej; Koziol, Stan; Gliński, Jacek; Burakowski, Andrzej

    2005-03-01

    We report the results of acoustic and positron annihilation measurements in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (CH 3CN). Hydrophobicity of the solute is discussed, as well as the possibility of describing the title system in terms of hydrophobic solvation. A new method of calculating the "ideal" positronium lifetimes is proposed, based on the mean volume of cavities (holes) in liquid structure available for positronium pseudoatom. The results are almost identical with those obtained from molar volumes using the concept of Levay et al. On the other hand, the same calculations performed using the "bubble" model of annihilation yield very different results. It seems that either acetonitrile forms with water clathrate-like hydrates of untypical architecture, or it is too weak hydrophobic agent to form clathrate-like hydrates at all. The former interpretation seems to be more probable.

  18. Structure of Aqueous Solutions of Acetonitrile Investigated by Acoustic and Positron Annihilation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerie, K.; Baranowski, A.; Koziol, S.; Burakowski, A.

    2005-05-01

    We report the results of acoustic and positron annihilation measurements in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (CH3CN). Hydrophobicity of the solute is discussed, as well as the possibility of describing the title system in terms of hydrophobic solvation. The concept of Levay et al. of calculating the "ideal positronium lifetimes is applied, basing on the mean volume of cavities (holes) in liquid structure available for positronium pseudoatom. The same calculations performed using the Tao model of annihilation yield very different results. It can be concluded that either acetonitrile forms with water clathrate-like hydrates of untypical architecture, or it is too weak hydrophobic agent to form clathrate-like hydrates at all. The former interpretation seems to be more probable.

  19. Inhomogeneous dephasing masks coherence lifetimes in ensemble measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Griffin, Graham B.; Engel, Gregory S.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2012-04-28

    An open question at the forefront of modern physical sciences is what role, if any, quantum effects may play in biological sensing and energy transport mechanisms. One area of such research concerns the possibility of coherent energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Spectroscopic evidence of long-lived quantum coherence in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment protein complexes (PPCs), along with theoretical modeling of PPCs, has indicated that coherent energy transport might boost efficiency of energy transport in photosynthesis. Accurate assessment of coherence lifetimes is crucial for modeling the extent to which quantum effects participate in this energy transfer, because such quantum effects can only contribute to mechanisms proceeding on timescales over which the coherences persist. While spectroscopy is a useful way to measure coherence lifetimes, inhomogeneity in the transition energies across the measured ensemble may lead to underestimation of coherence lifetimes from spectroscopic experiments. Theoretical models of antenna complexes generally model a single system, and direct comparison of single system models to ensemble averaged experimental data may lead to systematic underestimation of coherence lifetimes, distorting much of the current discussion. In this study, we use simulations of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to model single complexes as well as averaged ensembles to demonstrate and roughly quantify the effect of averaging over an inhomogeneous ensemble on measured coherence lifetimes. We choose to model the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex because that system has been a focus for much of the recent discussion of quantum effects in biology, and use an early version of the well known environment-assisted quantum transport model to facilitate straightforward comparison between the current model and past work. Although ensemble inhomogeneity is known to lead to shorter lifetimes of observed oscillations (simply inhomogeneous spectral

  20. A high statistics measurement of the Lambda(+)(c) lifetime.

    PubMed

    Link, J M; Reyes, M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; Massafferi, A; de Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vazquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Ramirez, J E; Segoni, I; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F L; Zallo, A; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Boschini, M; D'Angelo, P; DiCorato, M; Dini, P; Giammarchi, M; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernandez, H; Lopez, A M; Luiggi, E; Mendez, H; Mendez, L; Mirles, A; Montiel, E; Olaya, D; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Rivera, C; Xiong, W; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Cho, K; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2002-04-22

    A high statistics measurement of the Lambda(+)(c) lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. We describe the analysis technique with particular attention to the determination of the systematic uncertainty. The measured value of 204.6 +/- 3.4 (stat) +/- 2.5 (syst) fs from 8034 +/- 122 Lambda(+)(c)-->pK(-)pi(+) decays represents a significant improvement over the present world average. PMID:11955226

  1. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-01

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. PMID:25166658

  2. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-01

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  3. A Measurement of the Bs Lifetime at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, Sinead

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the proper lifetime of the B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF experiment at Fermilab. The B$0\\atop{s}$ meson lifetime is measured in its semileptonic decay mode, B$0\\atop{s}$ → ℓ+vD$-\\atop{s}$. The D$-\\atop{s}$ meson candidates are reconstructed in the decay mode D$-\\atop{s}$ → Φπ, with Φ → K+K-, in a trigger sample which requires a muon or an electron and another track which has a large impact parameters. The large impact parameter track is required by the silicon vertex trigger which is an innovative triggering device which has not previously been used in lifetime measurements. A total of 905 ± B$0\\atop{s}$ candidates are reconstructed in a sample which has an integrated luminosity of 140 pb-1 using data gathered between February 2002 and August 2003. The pseudo-proper lifetime distribution of these candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit. This fit takes into account the missing momentum carried by the neutrino and the bias caused by requiring a track with large impact parameter by modeling these effects in simulations. The fit yields the result for the B$0\\atop{s}$ proper lifetime: cτ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 419 ± 28$+16\\atop{-13}$ μm and τ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 1.397 ± 0.093$+0.053\\atop{-0.043}$ ps where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  4. Free volume in imidazolium triflimide ([C{sub 3}MIM][NTf{sub 2}]) ionic liquid from positron lifetime: Amorphous, crystalline, and liquid states

    SciTech Connect

    Dlubek, G.; Beichel, W.; Bulut, S.; Pogodina, N.; Krossing, I.; Friedrich, Ch.

    2010-09-28

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is used to study the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C{sub 3}MIM][NTf{sub 2}] in the temperature range between 150 and 320 K. The positron decay spectra are analyzed using the routine LifeTime-9.0 and the size distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer-size holes) is calculated. This distribution is in good agreement with Fuerth's classical hole theory of liquids when taking into account Fuerth's hole coalescence hypothesis. During cooling, the liquid sample remains in a supercooled, amorphous state and shows the glass transition in the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime at 187 K. The mean hole volume varies between 70 A{sup 3} at 150 K and 250 A{sup 3} at 265-300 K. From a comparison with the macroscopic volume, the hole density is estimated to be constant at 0.20x10{sup 21} g{sup -1} corresponding to 0.30 nm{sup -3} at 265 K. The hole free volume fraction varies from 0.023 at 185 K to 0.073 at T{sub m}+12 K=265 K and can be estimated to be 0.17 at 430 K. It is shown that the viscosity follows perfectly the Cohen-Turnbull free volume theory when using the free volume determined here. The heating run clearly shows crystallization at 200 K by an abrupt decrease in the mean <{tau}{sub 3}> and standard deviation {sigma}{sub 3} of the o-Ps lifetime distribution and an increase in the o-Ps intensity I{sub 3}. The parameters of the second lifetime component <{tau}{sub 2}> and {sigma}{sub 2} behave parallel to the o-Ps parameters, which also shows the positron's (e{sup +}) response to structural changes. During melting at 253 K, all lifetime parameters recover to the initial values of the liquid. An abrupt decrease in I{sub 3} is attributed to the solvation of e{sup -} and e{sup +} particles. Different possible interpretations of the o-Ps lifetime in the crystalline state are briefly discussed.

  5. Measurement of the Lambdab0 lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewin, M; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-11-01

    We report a measurement of the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime using a sample corresponding to 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment in 2002-2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The Lambda(b)(0) baryon is reconstructed via the decay Lambda(b)(0)-->micronuLambda(c)(+)X. Using 4437+/-329 signal candidates, we measure the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime to be tau(Lambda(b)(0))=1.290(-0.110)(+0.119)(stat)(-0.091)(+0.087)(syst) ps, which is among the most precise measurements in semileptonic Lambda(b)(0) decays. This result is in good agreement with the world average value. PMID:17995396

  6. A Measurement of the D+(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferi, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P. /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-04-01

    A high statistics measurement of the D{sub s}{sup +} lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. They describe the analysis of the two decay modes, D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0}K{sup +}, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 {+-} 5.5(stat.) {+-} 5.1(syst.) is using 8961 {+-} 105 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and 4680 {+-} 90 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0} K{sup +} decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average.

  7. Positron interactions with water-total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J R; Anderson, Emma; White, Ron D; Brunger, M J; Buckman, Stephen J; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco; Sullivan, James P

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

  8. Measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D.E.

    1986-06-01

    This thesis reports a measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks. It is based on data taken with the DELCO detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV. The decays of hadrons containing bottom quarks are tagged in hadronic events by the presence of electrons with a large component of momentum transverse to the event axis. Such electrons are identified in the DELCO detector by an atmospheric pressure Cherenkov counter assisted by a lead/scintillator electromagnetic shower counter. The lifetime measured is 1.17 psec, consistent with previous measurements. This measurement, in conjunction with a limit on the non-charm branching ratio in b-decay obtained by other experiments, can be used to constrain the magnitude of the V/sub cb/ element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix to the range 0.042 (+0.005 or -0.004 (stat.), +0.004 or -0.002 (sys.)), where the errors reflect the uncertainty on tau/sub b/ only and not the uncertainties in the calculations which relate the b-lifetime and the element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix.

  9. Free volume from positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments in relation to structural relaxation of van der Waals molecular glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Dlubek, G; Shaikh, M Q; Rätzke, K; Paluch, M; Faupel, F

    2010-06-16

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is employed to characterize the temperature dependence of the free volume in two van der Waals liquids: 1, 1'-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexane (BMPC) and 1, 1'-di(4-methoxy-5-methylphenyl)cyclohexane (BMMPC). From the PALS spectra analysed with the routine LifeTime9.0, the size (volume) distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer size holes), its mean, [v(h)], and mean dispersion, σ(h), were calculated. A comparison with the macroscopic volume from pressure-volume-temperature (PV T) experiments delivered the hole density and the specific hole free volume and a complete characterization of the free volume microstructure in that sense. These data are used in correlation with structural (α) relaxation data from broad-band dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) in terms of the Cohen-Grest and Cohen-Turnbull free volume models. An extension of the latter model allows us to quantify deviations between experiments and theory and an attempt to systematize these in terms of T(g) or of the fragility. The experimental data for several fragile and less fragile glass formers are involved in the final discussion. It was concluded that, for large differences in the fragility of different glass formers, the positron lifetime mirrors clearly the different character of these materials. For small differences in the fragility, additional properties like the character of bonds and chemical structure of the material may affect size, distribution and thermal behaviour of the free volume.

  10. Lifetime Measurements of Tagged Exotic- and Unbound Nuclear States

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.

    2011-11-30

    A new Differential Plunger device for measuring pico-second lifetimes of Unbound Nuclear States (DPUNS) is being built at The University of Manchester. DPUNS has been designed to work with alpha-, beta- and isomer-tagging methods using the existing JUROGAM II--RITU--GREAT infrastructure at the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland. The importance of proton emission from nuclei is that it provides valuable nuclear-structure information as direct input to nuclear models beyond the drip line. New experimental data beyond the drip line can provide new extensions to these models especially with the possible coupling of weakly bound and unbound states to the continuum. The results of the first experiments to measure lifetimes of unbound nuclear states with this method was discussed along with possible future experiments which can be addressed with DPUNS using proton-, isomer- and alpha-tagging.

  11. Fast-timing lifetime measurement of 152Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhold, J.; Kern, R.; Lizarazo, C.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V.; Jolos, R. V.; Bucurescu, D.; Florea, N.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Lica, R.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Mihai, R.; Mitu, I. O.; Negret, A.; Nita, C.; Olacel, A.; Pascu, S.; Stroe, L.; Toma, S.; Turturica, A.

    2016-10-01

    The lifetime τ (02+) of 152Gd has been measured using fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) with an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detectors. 152Gd was produced via an (α ,n ) reaction on a gold backed 149Sm target. The measured lifetime of τ (02+) =96 (6 ) ps corresponds to a reduced transition strength of B (E 2 ;02+→21+) =111 (7 ) W.u. and an E 0 transition strength of ρ2(E 0 ) =39 (3 ) ×10-3 to the ground state. This result provides experimental support for the validity of a correlation that would be a novel indicator for a quantum phase transition (QPT).

  12. Measurement of the lifetime difference between Bs mass eigenstates.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dörr, C; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ehlers, J; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guenther, M; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; NcNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P A Movilla; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-03-18

    We present measurements of the lifetimes and polarization amplitudes for B(0)(s)-->J/psiphi and B(0)(d)-->J/psiK(*0) decays. Lifetimes of the heavy and light mass eigenstates in the B(0)(s) system are separately measured for the first time by determining the relative contributions of amplitudes with definite CP as a function of the decay time. Using 203+/-15 B(0)(s) decays we obtain tau(L) = (1.05(+0.16)(-0.13) +/- 0.02) ps and tau(H) = (2.07(+0.58)(-0.46) +/- 0.03) ps. Expressed in terms of the difference DeltaGamma(s) and average Gamma(s), of the decay rates of the two eigenstates, the results are DeltaGamma(s)/Gamma(s) = (65(+25)(-33) +/- 1)% and DeltaGamma(s) = (0.47(+0.19)(-0.24) +/- 0.01) ps(-1).

  13. Near-infrared spark source excitation for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, D. J. S.; Hungerford, G.; Imhof, R. E.

    1991-10-01

    We have extended the range of excitation wavelengths from spark sources used in single photon timing fluorometry into the near infrared by means of the all-metal coaxial flashlamp filled with an argon-hydrogen gas mixture. At 750 nm this mixture gives ˜15 times the intensity available from pure hydrogen for a comparable pulse duration. Measurements are demonstrated by using the laser dye IR-140 in acetone, for which a fluorescence lifetime of 1.20 ns is recorded.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9-(Methylaminomethyl

  15. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm-1 and 37,518 cm-1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm-1.

  16. A Precise measurement of the B0(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-04-01

    The authors report a measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{nu}X (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. They have reconstructed 5176 D{sub s}{sup -} {mu}{sup +} signal events, where the D{sub s}{sup -} is identified via the decay D{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}, followed by {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. Using these events, they have measured the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to be {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 1.398 {+-} 0.044 (stat){sub -0.025}{sup +0.028}(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to date.

  17. Lifetime Measurements and Coulomb Excitation of Light Hg Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petts, A.; Butler, P. A.; Grahn, T.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Bruyneel, B.; Cederkäll, J.; Clement, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Dewald, A.; Eberth, J.; Fraile, L.; Fransen, C.; Hornillos, M. B. Gómez; Greenlees, P. T.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hadynska, K.; Helariutta, K.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jolie, J.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Knapen, S.; Kröll, T.; Krü; cken, R.; Larsen, A. C.; Leino, M.; Ljungvall, J.; Maierbeck, P.; Marley, P. L.; Melon, B.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Nyman, M.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Pascovici, G.; Patronis, N.; Peura, P. J.; Piselli, E.; Pissulla, Th.; Rahkila, P.; Reiter, P.; Sarén, J.; Scheck, M.; Scholey, C.; Semchenkov, A.; Siem, S.; Stefanescu, I.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Van de Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Voulot, D.; Wadsworth, R.; Warr, N.; Weisshaar, D.; Wenander, F.; Zielinska, M.

    2009-01-01

    Two complementary experimental programs have taken place to investigate the origin and evolution of shape coexistence in the light mercury region. Recoil Distance Doppler-shift measurements were performed at the University of Jyväskylä utilizing the Köln plunger device in conjunction with the JUROGAM+RITU+GREAT setup. In addition, Coulomb excitation measurements of 184,186,188Hg were performed at REX-ISOLDE using the MINIBALL Ge-detector array. The results of the lifetime measurements of the yrast states up to Iπ = 10+ in 182Hg are reported. Preliminary analysis of the Coulomb excitation data is also discussed.

  18. Lifetime Measurements and Coulomb Excitation of Light Hg Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Petts, A.; Butler, P. A.; Grahn, T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Scheck, M.; Blazhev, A.; Bruyneel, B.; Dewald, A.; Eberth, J.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Melon, B.; Pascovici, G.; Pissulla, Th.; Reiter, P.; Warr, N.; Weisshaar, D.; Bree, N.

    2009-01-28

    Two complementary experimental programs have taken place to investigate the origin and evolution of shape coexistence in the light mercury region. Recoil Distance Doppler-shift measurements were performed at the University of Jyvaeskylae utilizing the Koeln plunger device in conjunction with the JUROGAM+RITU+GREAT setup. In addition, Coulomb excitation measurements of {sup 184,186,188}Hg were performed at REX-ISOLDE using the MINIBALL Ge-detector array. The results of the lifetime measurements of the yrast states up to I{sup {pi}} = 10{sup +} in {sup 182}Hg are reported. Preliminary analysis of the Coulomb excitation data is also discussed.

  19. Measurement of the lifetime of individual foam lamellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Matthias J.; Motschmann, Hubert

    2016-09-01

    Foams play a crucial role in a number of practical applications. Their analysis in terms of stability is subject to a large number of parameters. An automated, light reflection based device for the measurement of the lifetime of a single foam lamella of aqueous surfactant solutions in contact with the liquid and gas phases is proposed. The capability of the method is shown for the analysis of the cationic and anionic model surfactants hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with saturated humidity, respectively. A statistical approach for analysis of the individual foam lamella lifetimes is presented and a comparison to the foam stability parameters obtained from a foam column device is presented.

  20. CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Xi(c)+ lifetime measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, Ugur; /Iowa U.

    2003-12-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 {+-} 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} as 427 {+-} 31 {+-} 13 fs.

  1. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  2. Drug release profiles and microstructural characterization of cast and freeze dried vitamin B12 buccal films by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Barnabás; Kállai, Nikolett; Tóth, Gergő; Hetényi, Gergely; Zelkó, Romána

    2014-02-01

    Solvent cast and freeze dried films, containing the water-soluble vitamin B12 as model drug were prepared from two polymers, sodium alginate (SA), and Carbopol 71G (CP). The proportion of the CP was changed in the films. The microstructural characterization of various samples was carried out by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The drug release kinetics of untreated and stored samples was evaluated by the conventionally applied semi-empirical power law. Correlation was found between the changes of the characteristic parameters of the drug release and the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime values of polymer samples. The results indicated that the increase of CP concentration, the freeze-drying process and the storage at 75% R.H. decreased the rate of drug release. The PALS method enabled the distinction between the micro- and macrostructural factors influencing the drug release profile of polymer films.

  3. Precision lifetime measurements using the recoil distance method

    SciTech Connect

    Kruecken, R.

    2000-02-01

    The recoil distance method (RDM) for the measurements of lifetimes of excited nuclear levels in the range from about 1 ps to 1,000 ps is reviewed. The New Yale Plunger Device for RDM experiments is introduced and the Differential Decay Curve Method for their analysis is reviewed. Results from recent RDM experiments on SD bands in the mass-190 region, shears bands in the neutron deficient lead isotopes, and ground state bands in the mass-130 region are presented. Perspectives for the use of RDM measurements in the study of neutron-rich nuclei are discussed.

  4. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  5. Updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-23

    We present an updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD. 4316 {tau}-pair events, selected from a 150k Z{sup 0} data sample, are analyzed using three techniques: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The measurement benefits from the small and stable interaction region at the SLC and the precision CCD pixel vertex detector of the SLD. The combined result is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) fs.

  6. The “accumulation effect” of positrons in the stack of foils, detected by measurements of the positron implantation profile

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-12-14

    The profiles of positrons implanted from the radioactive source {sup 22}Na into a stack of foils and plates are the subject of our experimental and theoretical studies. The measurements were performed using the depth scanning of positron implantation profile method, and the theoretical calculations using the phenomenological multi-scattering model (MSM). Several stacks consisting of silver, gold and aluminum foils, and titanium and germanium plates were investigated. We notice that the MSM describes well the experimental profiles; however when the stack consisting of silver and gold foils, the backscattering and linear absorption coefficients differ significantly from those reported in the literature. We suggest the energy dependency of the backscattering coefficient for silver and gold. In the stacks which comprise titanium and germanium plates, there were observed the features, which indicate the presence of the “accumulation effect” in the experimental implantation profile. This effect was previously detected in implantation profiles in Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 tool kit, and it consists in higher localization of positrons close the interface. We suppose that this effect can be essential for positron annihilation in any heterogeneous materials.

  7. New procedures for analyzing Doppler-shift attenuation lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, P.; Dewald, A.; Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Asova, G.; Dimitrov, B.; Gavrilov, G.; Mineva, M. N.; Yavahchova, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    A generalization of an earlier proposed version of the Differential decay curve method is presented for the analysis of Doppler-shift attenuation lifetime measurements. The lifetime is derived directly from the line shapes of the depopulating and feeding transitions without any assumptions about or fitting of the time dependence of the population of the corresponding levels except for unobserved feeding when relevant. Fitting of the line shapes is also not necessary. The only approximation involved is related to the continuous treatment of the nuclear scattering events in the Monte Carlo simulation needed. Tests with simulated and real data reveal good reliability of this method. We propose also a new precise procedure where the lifetime is derived by fitting the time dependence of the population of the level of interest using the line shape of the depopulating transition and the difference of the spectra of the depopulating and feeding transitions. Practical application to simulated and real data proves the applicability of the new procedure.

  8. Free volume of an epoxy resin and its relation to structural relaxation: Evidence from positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlubek, Günter; Hassan, E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Pionteck, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The microstructure of the free volume and its temperature dependence in the epoxy resin diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) have been examined using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS, 80-350K , 10-5Pa ) and pressure-volume-temperature (PVT, 293-470K , 0.1-200MPa ) experiments. Employing the Simha-Somcynsky lattice-hole theory (S-S eos), the excess (hole) free volume fraction h and the specific free and occupied volumes, Vf=hV and Vocc=(1-h)V , were estimated. From the PALS spectra analyzed with the new routine LT9.0 the hole size distribution, its mean, ⟨vh⟩ , and mean dispersion, σh , were calculated. ⟨vh⟩ varies from 35to130Å3 . From a comparison of ⟨vh⟩ with V and Vf , the specific hole number Nh' was estimated to be independent of the temperature [Nh(300K)=Nh'/V=0.65nm-3] . From comparison with reported dielectric and viscosity measurements, we found that the structural relaxation slows down faster than the shrinkage of the hole free volume Vf would predict on the basis of the free volume theory. Our results indicate that the structural relaxation in DGEBA operates via the free-volume mechanism only when liquidlike clusters of cells of the S-S lattice appear which contain a local free volume of ˜1.5 or more empty S-S cells. The same conclusion follows from the pressure dependency of the structural relaxation and Vf . It is shown that PALS mirrors thermal volume fluctuations on a subnanometer scale via the dispersion in the ortho-positronium lifetimes. Using a fluctuation approach, the temperature dependency of the characteristic length of dynamic heterogeneity, ξ , is estimated to vary from ξ=1.9nm at Tg to 1.0nm at T/Tg>1.2 . A model was proposed which relates the spatial structure of the free volume as concluded from PALS to the known mobility pattern of the dynamic glass transition at low (cooperative α -relaxation) and high ( a -relaxation) temperatures. We discuss possible reasons for the differences between the

  9. Precision lifetime measurements of the 2p levels in lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Kurtz, C.; Tanner, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    These measurements are motivated by the theoretical challenges posed by lithium. The three-electron lithium atom is one of the simplest atomic systems with which to test atomic structure calculations. Recently, there were several ab initio calculations of the lithium 2s-2p oscillator strengths, which agree to 0.15%. However, the theoretical results differ by 5 sigma from the precise fast-beam-laser lifetime measurement of Gaupp and Andra (Berlin). Hence the need for a new independent and precise measurement. Improvements were added to the fast beam laser techniques developed for cesium in order to measure the lithium 2p state lifetime. Although the technique is similar to that of cesium, the lithium atom presents a few new complications. Since the atom is lighter, it travels more quickly through the interaction and detection regions. Therefore, the 670 nm wavelength requires a dye laser to produce sufficient intensity to populate the excited state. Unfortunately, the intensity of the dye laser is inherently less stable than that of a diode laser. Another complication is that the ion-beam intensity is much more sensitive to fluctuations in the accelerating voltage. Two detectors were added: one to monitor the ion-beam intensity, and the other to monitor the laser power. With the information from the additional detectors, a new data analysis scheme was developed. Sufficient data were taken to evaluate the benefits of the new detectors. No additional work is planned at Argonne for this experiment.

  10. Laser spectroscopy and lifetime measurements on trapped francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsarian, John Edward

    This work describes the first experiments on laser cooled and trapped francium, the heavy alkali atom with no stable isotopes. We have created Fr in a nuclear fusion reaction at the Stony Brook LINAC and have confined a few thousand atoms in a volume of approximately 1 mm3. The cold atoms are an excellent source for laser spectroscopy. We have found the 8S1/2 and 9S1/2 energy levels and measured the hyperfine splitting of the 8S 1/2 level using two-step excitation. The 7S1/2 to 8S1/2 transition is promising for a future measurement of atomic parity nonconservation in this atom. We have performed the first Fr radiative lifetime measurements of the D 1 and D2 transitions using time-correlated single-photon counting. The lifetimes of the 7P3/2 and 7P1/2 levels are 21.02(11) ns and 29.45(11) ns respectively. The measurements are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. We have also observed a hyperfine anomaly in the splittings of the 7P1/2 level in a chain of isotopes, 208,209,210,211Fr.

  11. Electron Beam Lifetime in SPEAR3: Measurement and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Huang, X.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; /Pavilon Tech., Austin

    2007-12-19

    In this paper we report on electron beam lifetime measurements as a function of scraper position, RF voltage and bunch fill pattern in SPEAR3. We then outline development of an empirical, macroscopic model using the beam-loss rate equation. By identifying the dependence of loss coefficients on accelerator and beam parameters, a numerically-integrating simulator can be constructed to compute beam decay with time. In a companion paper, the simulator is used to train a parametric, non-linear dynamics model for the system [1].

  12. Lifetime measurements in the transitional nucleus {sup 138}Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Procter, M. G.; Cullen, D. M.; Taylor, M. J.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hauschild, K.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Rinta-Antilla, S.; Sandzelius, M.; Saren, J.

    2011-08-15

    Lifetime measurements have been made in the ground-state band of the transitional nucleus {sup 138}Gd from coincidence recoil-distance Doppler-shift data. {sup 138}Gd nuclei were produced using the {sup 106}Cd ({sup 36}Ar, 2p2n) reaction with a beam energy of 190 MeV. Reduced transition probabilities have been extracted from the lifetime data collected with the Koeln plunger placed at the target position of the JUROGAM-II array. The B(E2) values have been compared with predictions from X(5) critical-point calculations, which describe the phase transition between vibrational and axially symmetric nuclear shapes, as well as with IBM-1 calculations at the critical point. While the excitation energies in {sup 138}Gd are consistent with X(5) predictions, the large uncertainties associated with the measured B(E2) values cannot preclude vibrational and rotational contributions to the low-lying structure of {sup 138}Gd. Although experimental knowledge for the low-lying {gamma} and {beta}-vibrational bands in {sup 138}Gd is limited, potential-energy surface calculations suggest an increase in {gamma} softness in the ground-state band. In order to more fully account for the effects of {gamma} softness, the X(5) and IBM-1 calculations need to be extended to include the {gamma} degree of freedom for {sup 138}Gd.

  13. Photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer for lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Hori, Akio; Kamada, Takeshi

    2001-05-01

    We propose a phase-modulation fluorometer that is applicable to a very weak fluorescence intensity level. In order to counter the single-photon event situation, we have introduced a combination of a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC) and a pulse height analyzer (PHA) to the phase- modulation fluorometer, the combination of which is usually used in the single-photon correlation method to measure fluorescence decay waveforms by pulsed excitation. In the proposed fluorometer, a sinusoidal response waveform that is shifted in phase over the reference one is obtained statistically as a histogram in the PHA memory and then the fluorescence lifetime can be calculated by the same procedure as the conventional analog phase-modulation method. The excitation light source used was a current- modulated ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED), whose center wavelength was 370 nm and its spectral bandwidth was 10 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes of 17.6 ns and 5.7 ns obtained for 10 ppb quinine sulfate in 0.1 N H2SO4 and for 10 ppb rhodamine 6G in ethanol, respectively, agreed well with those reported in the literature.

  14. Lifetime measurements in transitional nuclei by fast electronic scintillation timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, M. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Casten, R. F.; Amro, H.; Barton, C. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Cooper, J. R.; Gürdal, G.; Hecht, A. A.; Hutter, C.; Krücken, R.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Ressler, J. J.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D. S.; Gill, R. L.; Regan, P. H.

    2002-10-01

    A new generation of experiments studying nuclei in spherical-deformed transition regions has been motivated by the introduction of innovative theoretical approaches to the treatment of these nuclei. The important structural signatures in the transition regions, beyond the basic yrast level properties, involve γ-ray transitions between low-spin, non-yrast levels, and so information on γ-ray branching ratios and absolute matrix elements (or level lifetimes) for these transitions is crucial. A fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) system [H. Mach, R. L. Gill, and M. Moszyński, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 280, 49 (1989)], making use of BaF2 and plastic scintillation detectors, has been implemented at the Yale Moving Tape Collector for the measurement of lifetimes of states populated in β^ decay. Experiments in the A100 (Pd, Ru) and A150 (Dy, Yb) regions have been carried out, and a few examples will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under grants and contracts DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-88ER-40417, and DE-AC02-98CH10886 and by the German DFG under grant Pi 393/1.

  15. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample. 17 figs.

  16. Measurement of picosecond lifetimes in neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, S.; Kröll, Th.; Régis, J.-M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Blanc, A.; Bruce, A. M.; Fraile, L. M.; de France, G.; Hartig, A.-L.; Henrich, C.; Ignatov, A.; Jentschel, M.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Köster, U.; Lalkovski, S.; Lozeva, R.; Mach, H.; Mǎrginean, N.; Mutti, P.; Paziy, V.; Regan, P. H.; Simpson, G. S.; Soldner, T.; Thürauf, M.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Warr, N.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Lifetimes of nuclear excited states in fission fragments have been studied in the past following isotope separation, thus giving access mainly to the fragments' daughters and only to long-lived isomeric states in the primary fragments. For the first time now, short-lived excited states in the primary fragments, produced in neutron-induced prompt fission of 235U and 241Pu, were studied within the EXILL&FATIMA campaign at the intense neutron-beam facility of the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. Purpose: We aim to investigate the quadrupole collective properties of neutron-rich even-even 138,140,142Xe isotopes lying between the double shell closure N =82 and Z =50 and a deformed region with octupole collectivity. Method: The γ rays emitted from the excited fragments were detected with a mixed array consisting of 8 HPGe EXOGAM Clover detectors (EXILL) and 16 LaBr3(Ce) fast scintillators (FATIMA). The detector system has the unique ability to select the interesting fragment making use of the high resolution of the HPGe detectors and determine subnanosecond lifetimes using the fast scintillators. For the analysis the generalized centroid difference method was used. Results: We show that quadrupole collectivity increases smoothly with increasing neutron number above the closed N =82 neutron shell. Our measurements are complemented by state-of-the-art theory calculations based on shell-model descriptions. Conclusions: The observed smooth increase in quadrupole collectivity is similar to the evolution seen in the measured masses of the xenon isotopic chain and is well reproduced by theory. This behavior is in contrast to higher Z even-even nuclei where abrupt change in deformation occurs around N =90 .

  17. Dislocation Substructure in the Cold-Rolled Ni-20 Mass Pct Cr Alloy Analyzed by X-ray Diffraction, Positron Annihilation Lifetime, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Mitsuharu; Inoue, Koji

    2016-08-01

    The systematic change in the dislocation density and characteristics that develop under cold rolling as a simulated deformation was studied in order to examine the fundamental behavior of dislocations in terms of the dislocation substructure formation. In particular, the dislocation density was quantified by X-ray line profile analysis (XLPA), which is effective for quantifying the dislocation density and character; positron annihilation lifetime (PAL), which is sensitive to vacancy-type lattice defects; the Bailey-Hirsch equation from the hardness (Hv); and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The strain dependency of the dislocation density analyzed by XLPA, PAL, TEM, and Hv showed a similar tendency with an increase in the dislocation. In particular, the dislocation density by XLPA had good agreement with the results of TEM at low strain levels and with PAL at high strain levels. As a result, a combination of these techniques successfully showed the behavior of the dislocation substructure.

  18. Determination of the activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations in plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy by positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Mohammed; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Badawi, Emad A.; Abdel-Rahman, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations of plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime technique. Plastic deformation using a hydraulic press produces mainly dislocations and may produce point defects. The type of defect was studied by isochronal annealing which determines the temperature range of recovery of each type. Only one type of defect (dislocations) was observed for the investigated sample and was found to be recovered within the range 455-700 K. Isothermal annealing by slow cooling was performed through this range and used in determination of the activation enthalpy of migration of dislocations which was found to be 0.26 ± 0.01 eV.

  19. Positron and positronium annihilation in silica-based thin films studied by a pulsed positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Ito, K.; Shioya, Y.; Ishimaru, T.

    2003-10-01

    Positron and positronium annihilation in silica-based thin films has been investigated by means of measurement techniques with a monoenergetic pulsed positron beam. The age-momentum correlation study revealed that positron annihilation in thermally grown SiO 2 is basically the same as that in bulk amorphous SiO 2 while o-Ps in the PECVD grown SiCOH film predominantly annihilate with electrons of C and H at the microvoid surfaces. We also discuss time-dependent three-gamma annihilation in porous low- k films by two-dimensional positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

  20. Two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave approach: Accurate and self-consistent computations of positron lifetimes and momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, Julia; Jomard, Gérald; Torrent, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Many techniques have been developed in the past in order to compute positron lifetimes in materials from first principles. However, there is still a lack of a fast and accurate self-consistent scheme that could handle accurately the forces acting on the ions induced by the presence of the positron. We will show in this paper that we have reached this goal by developing the two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method in the open-source code abinit. This tool offers the accuracy of the all-electron methods with the computational efficiency of the plane-wave ones. We can thus deal with supercells that contain few hundreds to thousands of atoms to study point defects as well as more extended defects clusters. Moreover, using the PAW basis set allows us to use techniques able to, for instance, treat strongly correlated systems or spin-orbit coupling, which are necessary to study heavy elements, such as the actinides or their compounds.

  1. Lifetime Measurement of Nickel-58 Using RDM with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loelius, Charles

    2014-09-01

    The structure of nuclei near the doubly magic 56Ni has provided a sensitive probe of configuration mixing across the N=Z=28 shell gap. The shell model description of nuclei in this region is well established, with the gxpf1 interaction accurately reproducing the energy levels and transition strengths of Nuclei in the vicinity of 56Ni. However, there remain open questions as to the effects of higher lying orbitals beyond the pf shell. These can be addressed by a study of the B(E2)'s of nuclei in near the shell gap, particularly the B(E2;4+ -->2+) where effects of high l orbitals may be enhanced. 58Ni provides a strong candidate for study, as the only previous B(E2;4+ -->2+) measurement using the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method resulted in a B(E2) three times larger than that predicted by theory. In order to determine the possible effects of higher lying orbitals, a second measurement of the lifetime of 58Ni was undertaken at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the the Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking in Beam Nuclear Array (GRETINA) and the Recoil Distance Method (RDM). Preliminary results of this measurement will be presented.

  2. Precise Measurement of the 21+ Level Lifetime in 12Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; Merchan, E.; Prasher, V. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Weisshaar, D.; Gade, A.; Bader, V. M.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Loelius, C.; Lunderberg, E. M.; Morse, C.; Recchia, F.; Whitmore, K.

    2013-10-01

    For many years, it has been suggested that 12Be exhibits a breakdown of the N = 8 shell gap. This reflects the tension between the propensity for alpha-clustering in beryllium, with 12Be appearing as a 2-alpha dumb bell bound by a cloud of four poorly bound neutrons, and a more conventional Shell Model picture with the N = 8 neutrons filling the p-shell and holding the nucleus to a near spherical shape. To provide a better understanding of the extent of the breakdown of the N = 8 shell gap, the lifetime of the first 2+ state in 12Be was measured using intermediate-energy inelastic scattering of a 12Be beam combined with the Doppler Shift attenuation method. Gamma rays emitted at the target position were measured with GRETINA in coincidence with reaction residues detected in the S800 spectrometer at NSCL. Three different targets were measured, allowing for consistency checks and a better understanding of systematic effects. Preliminary results on the B(E2) transition strength from the first 2+ state will be presented. Work supported by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10946 and Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  3. The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: Bc lifetime measured using the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine

    2008-09-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb-1 of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the Bc± meson is studied in the Bc± → J/Ψμ± + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/Ψ + μ invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 ± 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: τ(Bc±) = 0.448-0.036+0.038(stat) ± 0.032(sys) ps.

  4. c, b, and tau lifetime measurements in e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments at e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage rings have successfully measured the tau and D/sup 0/ lifetimes and set interesting limits on the B lifetime. So far, the conventional wisdom has prevailed. The tau lifetime is consistent with prediction; there is no sign (but little sensitivity) of a violation of universality. The charmed particle lifetimes are roughly as expected, but richer in their phenomenology than anticipated. The B lifetime is still unknown. The experimental art is developing rapidly. Several experiments have by now installed vertex detectors. Measurements of charmed particle lifetimes from e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments will complement the work that has been done at fixed target machines. Measurements of tau and B lifetimes may be the exclusive province of e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments for the next few years. (WHK)

  5. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  6. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  7. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A D; Karnewar, A K; Holikatti, A C; Yadav, S; Puntambekar, T A; Singh, G; Singh, P

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  8. Measurements of Lifetimes and a Limit on the Lifetime Difference in the Neutral D-Meson System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1999-07-01

    Using the large hadroproduced charm sample collected in experiment E791 at Fermilab, we report the first directly measured constraint on the decay-width difference Δγ for the mass eigenstates of the D0- D¯0 system. We obtain our result from lifetime measurements of the decays D0-->K-π+ and D0-->K-K+, under the assumption of CP invariance, which implies that the CP eigenstates and the mass eigenstates are the same. The lifetime of D0-->K-K+ (the CP-even final state) is τKK = 0.410+/-0.011+/-0.006 ps, and the lifetime of D0-->K-π+ (an equal mixture of CP-odd and CP-even final states) is τKπ = 0.413+/-0.003+/-0.004 ps. The decay-width difference is Δγ = 2\\(γKK-γKπ\\) = 0.04+/-0.14+/-0.05 ps-1. We relate these measurements to measurements of mixing in the neutral D-meson system.

  9. Systematics associated with positronium fractions as measured with variable-energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Jorch, H.H.

    1984-11-01

    Positronium fraction measurements using positron beams have been utilized to extract information about the diffusion properties of positrons as well as defect concentrations in the near surface region of materials under a variety of experimental conditions. Owing to this recent interest we have undertaken to study some of the systematics and uncertainties associated with measurements of the positronium fraction, f. We restrict our discussion to determinations of f based on the peak:total ratio of counting rates for a single detector, only briefly considering alternate ways of obtaining f. We conclude with several recommendations that should be of particular interest to practitioners in the field.

  10. Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othmer, S.; Chen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plate arrays. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results are compared with those obtained using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

  11. Microstructure variation in fused silica irradiated by different fluence of UV laser pulses with positron annihilation lifetime and Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zhu, Qihua; Chen, Jun; Wang, B. Y.; Ju, Xin

    2016-10-01

    We present an original study on the non-destructive evaluation of the microstructure evolution of fused silica induced by pulsed UV laser irradiation at low fluence (less than 50% Fth). Positron annihilation spectroscopy discloses that the spatial size of the vacancy cluster is increased exponentially with the linearly elevated laser fluence. Particularly, the vacancy cluster size in bulk silica is significantly increased by 14.5% after irradiated by pulsed 355 nm laser at F = 14 J/cm2 (50% Fth), while the void size varies only ∼2%. UV laser-excited Raman results suggest that the bond length and average bond angle of Sisbnd Osbnd Si bridging bond are both slightly reduced. Results reveals that the rearrangement process of (Sisbnd O)n fold rings and breakage of the Sisbnd O bridging bond in bulk silica occurred during pulsed UV laser irradiation. The micro-structural changes were taken together to clarify the effect of sub-threshold laser fluence on material stability of silica glass. The obtained data provide important information for studying material stability and controlling the lifetime of fused silica optics for high power laser system.

  12. Characterization of free volume during vulcanization of styrene butadiene rubber by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical test.

    PubMed

    Marzocca, A J; Cerveny, S; Salgueiro, W; Somoza, A; Gonzalez, L

    2002-02-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect on the free volume of the advance of the cross-linking reaction in a copolymer of styrene butadiene rubber by sulfur vulcanization. The dynamic modulus and loss tangent were evaluated over samples cured for different times at 433 K by dynamic mechanical tests over a range of frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz at temperatures between 200 and 300 K. Using the William-Landel-Ferry relationship, master curves were obtained at a reference temperature of 298 K and the coefficients c(0)(1) and c(0)(2) were evaluated. From these parameters the dependence of the free volume on the cure time is obtained. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was also used to estimate the size and number density of free volume sites in the material. The spectra were analyzed in terms of continuous distributions of free volume size. The results suggest an increase of the lower free volume size when cross linking takes place. Both techniques give similar results for the dependence of free volume on the time of cure of the polymer.

  13. Characterization of free volume during vulcanization of styrene butadiene rubber by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical test.

    PubMed

    Marzocca, A J; Cerveny, S; Salgueiro, W; Somoza, A; Gonzalez, L

    2002-02-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect on the free volume of the advance of the cross-linking reaction in a copolymer of styrene butadiene rubber by sulfur vulcanization. The dynamic modulus and loss tangent were evaluated over samples cured for different times at 433 K by dynamic mechanical tests over a range of frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz at temperatures between 200 and 300 K. Using the William-Landel-Ferry relationship, master curves were obtained at a reference temperature of 298 K and the coefficients c(0)(1) and c(0)(2) were evaluated. From these parameters the dependence of the free volume on the cure time is obtained. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was also used to estimate the size and number density of free volume sites in the material. The spectra were analyzed in terms of continuous distributions of free volume size. The results suggest an increase of the lower free volume size when cross linking takes place. Both techniques give similar results for the dependence of free volume on the time of cure of the polymer. PMID:11863549

  14. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy Study of Neutron Irradiated High Temperature Superconductors YBa2Cu3O7-δ for Application in Fusion Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veterníková, J.; Chudý, M.; Slugeň, V.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Sojak, S.; Petriska, M.; Hinca, R.; Degmová, J.; Sabelová, V.

    2012-02-01

    This study focuses on the crystallographic defects introduced by neutron irradiation and the resulting changes of the superconducting properties in the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ. This material is considered to be most promising for magnet systems in future fusion reactors. Two different bulk samples, pure non-doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and multi-seed YBa2Cu3O7-δ doped by platinum (MS2F) were studied prior to and after irradiation in the TRIGA MARK II reactor in Vienna. Neutron irradiation is responsible for a significant enhancement of the critical current densities as well as for a reduction in critical temperature. The accumulation of small open volume defects (<0.5 nm) partially causes those changes. These defects were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at room temperature. A high concentration of Cu-O di-vacancies was found in both samples, which increased with neutron fluence. The defect concentration was significantly reduced after a heat treatment.

  15. Contactless Spectral-dependent Charge Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Silicon Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, John; Hamadani, Behrang; Dagenais, Mario

    Charge carrier lifetime measurements in bulk or unfinished photovoltaic (PV) materials allow for a more accurate estimate of power conversion efficiency in completed solar cells. In this work, carrier lifetimes in PV-grade silicon wafers are obtained by way of quasi-steady state photoconductance measurements. These measurements use a contactless RF system coupled with varying narrow spectrum input LEDs, ranging in wavelength from 460 nm to 1030 nm. Spectral dependent lifetime measurements allow for determination of bulk and surface properties of the material, including the intrinsic bulk lifetime and the surface recombination velocity. The effective lifetimes are fit to an analytical physics-based model to determine the desired parameters. Passivated and non-passivated samples are both studied and are shown to have good agreement with the theoretical model.

  16. Measurement of the positron diffusion constants in polycrystalline molybdenum by the observation of positronium negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takuji; Iida, Simpei; Yamashita, Takashi; Nagashima, Yasuyuki

    2015-06-01

    We have measured the positron diffusion constants in polycrystalline molybdenum by the observation of positronium negative ions (Ps-). The Ps- ions emitted from the sample surface coated with Na were accelerated. The γ-rays from the accelerated Ps- ions were Doppler- shifted and thus the signals of self-annihilation of the Ps- ions were isolated from those of self-annihilation of para-positronium (p-Ps) or pair-annihilation of positrons in the bulk. Clear and reliable values of the diffusion constants have been obtained.

  17. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Ackemann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting Earth's shadow, which, is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 and 200 Ge V. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 Ge V range. The three new spectral points between 100 and 200 GeV are consistent with a fraction that is continuing to rise with energy.

  18. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Brogland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV, We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV,

  19. Measurement of separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the fermi large area telescope.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Llena Garde, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sbarra, C; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2012-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 and 200 GeV. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 GeV range. The three new spectral points between 100 and 200 GeV are consistent with a fraction that is continuing to rise with energy.

  20. A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers is described. This method consists of a wet chemical treatment (surface cleaning, oxidation in solution, and measurement in HF solution) to passivate the silicon surfaces, a laser diode array for carrier excitation, and a microwave bridge measuring system which is more sensitive than the microwave systems used previously for lifetime measurement. Representative experimental data are presented to demonstrate this technique. The result reveals that this method is useful for the determination of bulk lifetime of commercial silicon wafers.

  1. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity.

    PubMed

    Levitt, James A; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ϵ , is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ϵ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  2. Using Minority Carrier Lifetime Measurement to Determine Saw Damage Characteristics on Si Wafer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Devayajanam, Srinivas; Basnyat, Prakash

    2015-06-14

    The damage on the Si wafer surfaces, caused by ingot cutting, is determined from measurement of minority carrier lifetime (..tau..eff). Samples are sequentially etched to remove thin layers from each surface and lifetime is measured after each etch step. The thickness-removed at which the lifetime reaches a peak value corresponds to the damage depth. This technique also allows the depth distribution of the damage to be quantified in terms of surface recombination velocity (SRV). An accurate measurement of ..tau..eff requires corrections to optical reflection, and transmission to account for changes in the surface morphology and in the wafer thickness.

  3. BEAM LIFETIME AND EMITTANCE GROWTH MEASUREMENTS OF GOLD BEAMS IN RHIC AT STORAGE.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; DREES,A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; CONNOLLY,R.; FLILLER,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    During stores of gold beams, longitudinal and transverse beam sizes were recorded. Longitudinal profiles were obtained with a wall current monitor. Transverse profiles were reconstructed from gold-gold collision rates at various relative transverse beam positions. The total beam lifetime was measured with a beam current transformer, the bunched beam lifetime with the wall current monitor. Diffusion rates in the beam halo were determined from the change in the loss rate when a scraper is retracted. The measurements are used to determine the lifetime limiting effects. Beam growth measurements are compared with computations of beam-growth times from intra-beam scattering.

  4. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  5. A lifetime in photochemistry; some ultrafast measurements on singlet states

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, David

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the development of time-correlated single-photon counting techniques from the early use of spark discharge lamps as light sources through to the use of femtosecond mode-locked lasers through the personal work of the author. We used laser-excited fluorescence in studies on energy migration and rotational relaxation in synthetic polymer solutions, in biological probe molecules and in supersonic jet expansions. Time-correlated single-photon counting was the first method used in early fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and we outline the development of this powerful technique, with a comparison of techniques including wide-field microscopy. We employed these modern forms of FLIM to study single biological cells, and applied FLIM also to gain an understanding the distribution in tissue, and fates of photosensitizer molecules used in photodynamic therapy. We also describe the uses and instrumental design of laser systems for the study of ultrafast time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:27436979

  6. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  7. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-12-08

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo.

  8. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  9. Measuring and Sorting Cell Populations Expressing Isospectral Fluorescent Proteins with Different Fluorescence Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Naivar, Mark; Houston, Jessica P.; Brent, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs) fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP) and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼1.5 ns vs ∼3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a “pseudophasor” that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation. PMID:25302964

  10. Measurement of the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the semileptonic decay channel.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-03-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, we measure the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the Bc-/+-->J/psimicro+/-+X final state. A simultaneous unbinned likelihood fit to the J/psi+micro invariant mass and lifetime distributions yields a signal of 881+/-80(stat) candidates and a lifetime measurement of tau(Bc+/-)=0.448(-0.036)(+0.038)(stat)+/-0.032(syst) ps. PMID:19392512

  11. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in 69As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczyński, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczén, J.; Ziebliński, M.; de Angelis, G.; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A.; Brambilla, S.; Leoni, S.; Montanari, D.; Jaworski, G.; Palacz, M.; Wadsworth, R.

    2012-10-01

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in 69As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  12. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in {sup 69}As

    SciTech Connect

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczynski, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Angelis, G. de; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 69}As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  13. Positron annihilation studies of organic superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, H.L.; Lou, Y.; Ali, E.H.

    1994-09-01

    The positron lifetimes of two organic superconductors, {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br, are measured as a function of temperature across {Tc}. A drop of positron lifetime below {Tc} is observed. Positron-electron momentum densities are measured by using 2D-ACAR to search for the Fermi surface in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. Positron density distributions and positron-electron overlaps are calculated by using the orthogonalized linear combination atomic orbital (OLCAO) method to interprete the temperature dependence due to the local charge transfer which is inferred to relate to the superconducting transition. 2D-ACAR results in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br are compared with theoretical band calculations based on a first-principles local density approximation. Importance of performing accurate band calculations for the interpretation of positron annihilation data is emphasized.

  14. Lifetime measurements in an electrostatic ion beam trap using image charge monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rahinov, Igor; Toker, Yoni; Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk

    2012-03-15

    A technique for mass-selective lifetime measurements of keV ions in a linear electrostatic ion beam trap is presented. The technique is based on bunching the ions using a weak RF potential and non-destructive ion detection by a pick-up electrode. This method has no mass-limitation, possesses the advantage of inherent mass-selectivity, and offers a possibility of measuring simultaneously the lifetimes of different ion species with no need for prior mass-selection.

  15. Measurement of the Lambda b lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panikashvili, N; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-01

    We have measured the Lambda b lifetime using the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda, based on 1.2 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed Lambda b decays, where the J/psi and Lambda are identified via the decays J/psi --> mu+ mu- and Lambda --> ppi, we measured the Lambda b lifetime to be tau(Lambda b)=1.218 (+0.130)/(-0.115) (stat) +/- 0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B0 lifetime in the decay B0 --> J/psi(mu+ mu-)K(0)/(S)(pi+ pi-) to be tau(B0)=1.501 (+0.078)/(-0.074) (stat) +/- 0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of tau(Lambda b)/tau(B0)=0.811 (+0.096)/(-0.087) (stat) +/- 0.034(syst). PMID:17930660

  16. Standard reference for instrument response function in fluorescence lifetime measurements in visible and near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chib, Rahul; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Fudala, Rafal; Borejdo, Julian; Zelent, Bogumil; Corradini, Maria G.; Ludescher, Richard D.; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Allura red (AR) fluorophore, a common dye in the food industry, displays a broad emission spectrum in water (visible-to-near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum) and has a remarkably short fluorescence lifetime of about 10 ps. This short lifetime does not depend on the emission (observation) wavelength. We examined time responses of AR fluorescence across emission wavelengths from 550 nm to 750 nm and found that it is an ideal candidate for impulse response functions in fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  17. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  18. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongtao; Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J.; Salthouse, Christopher D.

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 μM. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  19. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D.; Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J.

    2014-05-15

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 μM. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  20. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T J; Salthouse, Christopher D

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 μM. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  1. Microstructural characterization of thin polymer films using Langley low energy positron flux generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag. J.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a highly efficient scheme for generating high fluxes of slow positrons. These positrons have been successfully used to measure lifetimes in thin test films. The lifetime data have been used to develop two structure-property models for the test films. The first model relates the free volume cell size to the molecular weight of the polymer repeat unit. The second model relates the free volume fraction to the dielectric constant of the polymer film.

  2. New lifetime measurements in 109Pd and the onset of deformation at N =60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; Simpson, G. S.; Rissanen, J.; GhiÅ£ǎ, D. G.; Olaizola, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; ńystö, J.; Bentley, I.; Eronen, T.; Fraile, L. M.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Reponen, M.; Ruchowska, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Smith, M. K.; Weber, C.

    2015-12-01

    Several new subnanosecond lifetimes were measured in 109Pd using the fast-timing β γ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A =109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. Lifetimes were obtained for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7 /2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements. The available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N =60 which is related to the strong p -n interaction between π g9 /2 and ν g7 /2 valence nucleons expected in this region.

  3. Lifetime of Ionic Vacancy Created in Redox Electrode Reaction Measured by Cyclotron MHD Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Osaka, Tetsuya; Mogi, Iwao; Asanuma, Miki; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Aogaki, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    The lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in ferricyanide-ferrocyanide redox reaction have been first measured by means of cyclotron magnetohydrodynamic electrode, which is composed of coaxial cylinders partly exposed as electrodes and placed vertically in an electrolytic solution under a vertical magnetic field, so that induced Lorentz force makes ionic vacancies circulate together with the solution along the circumferences. At low magnetic fields, due to low velocities, ionic vacancies once created become extinct on the way of returning, whereas at high magnetic fields, in enhanced velocities, they can come back to their initial birthplaces. Detecting the difference between these two states, we can measure the lifetime of ionic vacancy. As a result, the lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in the oxidation and reduction are the same, and the intrinsic lifetime is 1.25 s, and the formation time of nanobubble from the collision of ionic vacancies is 6.5 ms. PMID:26791269

  4. Laser measurements of the radiative lifetime of the B state of CN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A turnable dye laser was used to measure the radiative lifetime of the individual rotational levels of the B2 Sigma (+) state of CN. The radiative lifetime of the unperturbed rotational levels is 65.6 plus or minus 1.0 nsec. A longer radiative lifetime of 72 plus or minus 1 nsec is observed for the Kaon prime = 4 level of the B state. The measured values of the perturbed and unperturbed levels support the longer lifetimes for the A2 meson pion state of CN. The quenching cross section of the B2 Sigma state of CN is 41 plus or minus 20 Angstroms squared and is independent of the rotational energy of the B state.

  5. Brain dopamine metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease measured with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, K L; Palmer, A J; Quinn, N; Clark, J C; Firnau, G; Garnett, E S; Nahmias, C; Jones, T; Marsden, C D

    1986-01-01

    L-[18F] fluorodopa was administered in trace amounts intravenously to healthy control subjects and to patients with Parkinson's disease. Striatal uptake of radioactivity was measured using positron emission tomography. The capacity of the striatum to retain tracer was severely impaired in patients compared to controls. This may reflect a reduction of striatal dopamine storage in Parkinson's disease. Patients showing the "on/off" phenomenon had an even greater decrease of striatal storage capacity. Images PMID:3091770

  6. Noninvasive measurement of regional myocardial glucose metabolism by positron emission computed tomography. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1980-06-01

    While the results of regional myocardial glucose metabolism measurements using positron emission computed tomography (/sup 13/N-ammonia) are promising, their utility and value remains to be determined in man. If this technique can be applied to patients with acute myocardial ischemia or infarction it may permit delineation of regional myocardial segments with altered, yet still active metabolism. Further, it may become possible to evaluate the effects of interventions designed to salvage reversibly injured myocardium by this technique.

  7. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  8. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. PMID:25279617

  9. Simultaneous one-dimensional fluorescence lifetime measurements of OH and CO in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Malin; Ehn, Andreas; Christensen, Moah; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-04-01

    A method for simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of two species along a line is described. The experimental setup is based on picosecond laser pulses from two tunable optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier systems together with a streak camera. With an appropriate optical time delay between the two laser pulses, whose wavelengths are tuned to excite two different species, laser-induced fluorescence can be both detected temporally and spatially resolved by the streak camera. Hence, our method enables one-dimensional imaging of fluorescence lifetimes of two species in the same streak camera recording. The concept is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime measurements of CO and OH in a laminar methane/air flame on a Bunsen-type burner. Measurements were taken in flames with four different equivalence ratios, namely ϕ = 0.9, 1.0, 1.15, and 1.25. The measured one-dimensional lifetime profiles generally agree well with lifetimes calculated from quenching cross sections found in the literature and quencher concentrations predicted by the GRI 3.0 mechanism. For OH, there is a systematic deviation of approximately 30 % between calculated and measured lifetimes. It is found that this is mainly due to the adiabatic assumption regarding the flame and uncertainty in H2O quenching cross section. This emphasizes the strength of measuring the quenching rates rather than relying on models. The measurement concept might be useful for single-shot measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of several species pairs of vital importance in combustion processes, hence allowing fluorescence signals to be corrected for quenching and ultimately yield quantitative concentration profiles.

  10. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, Jonathan; Fomin, Nadia; BL3 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. A precise value for the neutron lifetime is required for consistency tests of the Standard Model and is needed to predict the primordial 4He abundance from the theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. An effort has begun for an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with an projected <=0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed.

  11. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia; Mulholland, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. A precise value for the neutron lifetime is required for consistency tests of the Standard Model and is needed to predict the primordial 4 He abundance from the theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. An effort has begun for an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with an projected <=0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE office of Science, NIST and NSF.

  12. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Boreham, Alexander; Pikkemaat, Jens; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Kuehne, Christian; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Dernedde, Jens; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-12-24

    Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS) were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine). The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin) and a human complement protein (C1q) to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM). Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue.

  13. Charm and beauty lifetime measurements with the MARK II vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1983-10-01

    We have measured the lifetime of the D/sup 0/ meson and the average lifetime of b-flavored hadrons with the MARK II vertex detector at PEP. We find tau/sub D/sup 0// = (4.0 +- 1.4/1.1 +- 1.0) x 10/sup -13/ sec and tau/sub b/ = (12.0 +- 4.5/3.6 +- 3.0 x 10/sup -13/ sec. 11 references.

  14. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  15. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Lifetime Measurement of Cold Atoms in an Integrating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Zhuo; Wang, Xu-Cheng; Cheng, Hua-Dong; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Liang; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2009-08-01

    We present an experimental measurement of the lifetime of the cold 87Rb atoms in an integrating sphere. The atoms are cooled by the diffuse light which is generated by the diffuse reflection of laser beams in the integrating sphere. Our result shows that the lifetime is primarily determined by the free fall of the cold 87Rb atoms, and its half-life can reach 40 ms, which is suitable for many experiments, especially for a cold atom clock.

  16. Measuring and modeling the lifetime of nitrous oxide including its variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Michael J.; Hsu, Juno; DeLuca, Nicole M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Oman, Luke D.; Douglass, Anne R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Strahan, Susan E.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Søvde, O. Amund; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Funke, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    The lifetime of nitrous oxide, the third-most-important human-emitted greenhouse gas, is based to date primarily on model studies or scaling to other gases. This work calculates a semiempirical lifetime based on Microwave Limb Sounder satellite measurements of stratospheric profiles of nitrous oxide, ozone, and temperature; laboratory cross-section data for ozone and molecular oxygen plus kinetics for O(1D); the observed solar spectrum; and a simple radiative transfer model. The result is 116 ± 9 years. The observed monthly-to-biennial variations in lifetime and tropical abundance are well matched by four independent chemistry-transport models driven by reanalysis meteorological fields for the period of observation (2005-2010), but all these models overestimate the lifetime due to lower abundances in the critical loss region near 32 km in the tropics. These models plus a chemistry-climate model agree on the nitrous oxide feedback factor on its own lifetime of 0.94 ± 0.01, giving N2O perturbations an effective residence time of 109 years. Combining this new empirical lifetime with model estimates of residence time and preindustrial lifetime (123 years) adjusts our best estimates of the human-natural balance of emissions today and improves the accuracy of projected nitrous oxide increases over this century.

  17. First working group meeting on the minority carrier diffusion length/lifetime measurement: Results of the round robin lifetime/diffusion length tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cudzinovic, M; Sopori, B

    1995-11-01

    As was noted in the cover letter that accompanied the samples, the eleven bare silicon samples were from various manufacturers. Table I lists the codes for the samples and the manufacturer of each sample. It also notes if the sample was single or poly-crystalline. The samples had been polished on one side before being sent out for measurements, but no further processing was done. The participants of the study were asked to measure either the lifetime or diffusion length of each of the samples using their standard procedure. Table II shows the experimental conditions used by the groups who measured diffusion length. All the diffusion length measurements were performed using the Surface Photovoltage method (SPV). Table M shows the experimental conditions for the lifetime measurements. All the lifetime measurements were made using the Photoconductance Decay method (PCD) under low level injection. These tables show the diameter of the spot size used during the measurement (the effective sampling area), the locations where measurements were taken, and the number of measurements taken at each location. Table N shows the results of the measurements. The table is divided into diffusion length and lifetime measurements for each sample. The values listed are the average values reported by each group. One of the immediate artifacts seen in the data is the large variation in the lifetime measurements. The values from MIT and Mobil are generally close. However, the measurements from NCSU are typically an order of magnitude lower.

  18. Quantum well intersubband lifetimes measured by mid-IR pump-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, G.L.; Sung, B.; Proctor, M.

    1995-12-31

    Semiconductor quantum wells exhibit quantum-confined electronic energy levels, or subbands, that are similar to one-dimensional {open_quotes}particle in a box{close_quotes} wavefunctions. The light effective mass of electrons allows large spatial extents of the wavefunctions and concomitantly large dipole overlaps between states. These large dipoles have been exploited in a variety of experiments including nonlinear frequency conversion, infrared photodetection, and lasing. A key parameter for many devices is the upper state lifetime. The decay of carriers in the upper state is believed to be dominated by optical phonon scattering and lifetimes on-the order of 1ps are expected. While Raman and saturation measurements have shown good agreement with theory, direct pump-probe measurements have reported longer lifetimes, partially due to carrier heating. In this paper, we discuss our mid-IR (5{mu}m) pump-probe measurements of intersubband lifetimes, performed at the Stanford Picosecond Free Electron Laser Center. At low excitation densities we observe lifetimes of about 1.5 ps, in good agreement with phonon theory. At high excitation densities the lifetime increases to 3.5 ps, demonstrating the transition from the low- to high-excitation agree.

  19. An Improved Atmospheric Lifetime of Nitrous Oxide Based on Measurement and Constrained Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, N. M.; Prather, M. J.; Hsu, J. C.; Sovde, O. A.; Isaksen, I.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.; Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Steenrod, S. D.; Froidevaux, L.; Funke, B.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important part of our atmosphere's chemistry when considering both ozone depletion and the global climate. Long-lived atmospheric gasses like N2O have residence times of over a century, making anthropogenic perturbations in the present a lasting consequence. The study aims to calculate a best present-day atmospheric lifetime of N2O with uncertainty based on satellite observation and global chemistry transport models (CTMs). This revised lifetime needs to be considered in climate change assessments as it affects GWP values and projected N2O abundances. An observationally founded lifetime is first calculated using measurements from the NASA Aura satellite's Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument combined with two independent photochemical models including solar cycle effects. Four free-running CTMs are used to calculate both stratospheric N2O distributions and lifetimes. The MLS observations are compared to CTM tropical N2O distributions to identify model biases. Seasonal and interannual variations in N2O and NOy profiles that affect the N2O lifetime are assessed. The MLS data for N2O and O3 and the MIPAS satellite data for NOy are used as constraints to identify CTM biases that could influence their calculated lifetimes. This study finds that N2O lifetime fluctuates over a quasi-biennial cycle, and free-running CTMs can match this variability very well. The CTMs used here produce a wide range in lifetime, from 100 to more than 150 years, but the lifetime derived from the MLS data lies at the lower end, about 110 years.

  20. Brain energy metabolism and dopaminergic function in Huntington's disease measured in vivo using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Leenders, K.L.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Quinn, N.; Marsden, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with typical Huntington's disease was investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography. Regional cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction, oxygen and glucose utilization, L-Dopa uptake, and dopamine (D2) receptor binding were measured using several positron-labelled tracers. CT showed slight atrophy of the head of caudate but no cortical atrophy, although distinct frontal lobe dysfunction was present on psychometric testing. Oxygen and glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow were decreased in the striata and to a lesser extent in frontal cortex. Cerebral blood flow was in the low normal range throughout the remainder of the brain. A normal metabolic ratio was found in all regions, since the changes in glucose utilization paralleled those in oxygen consumption. The capacity of the striatum to store dopamine as assessed by L-( YF)-fluorodopa uptake was normal, but dopamine (D2) receptor binding was decreased when compared to normal subjects.

  1. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  2. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Iqbal, M; Liu, R; Chi, Y

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  3. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  4. Measurement of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime in Ds⁺π⁻ decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-24

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to Ds⁺π⁻, to that of the B¯⁰ meson. The pp collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1  fb(-1), collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010±0.010±0.008 for this ratio with the known B¯⁰ lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific B¯s⁰ lifetime to be τ(B¯s⁰ )=1.535±0.015±0.014  ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. PMID:25379914

  5. Measurement of the B¯s 0 Meson Lifetime in Ds+π- Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the B¯s 0 meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to Ds+π-, to that of the B¯ 0 meson. The p p collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1 , collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010 ±0.010 ±0.008 for this ratio with the known B¯ 0 lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific B¯s 0 lifetime to be τ (B¯s 0)=1.535 ±0.015 ±0.014 ps , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  6. Measurement of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime in Ds⁺π⁻ decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-24

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to Ds⁺π⁻, to that of the B¯⁰ meson. The pp collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1  fb(-1), collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010±0.010±0.008 for this ratio with the known B¯⁰ lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific B¯s⁰ lifetime to be τ(B¯s⁰ )=1.535±0.015±0.014  ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  7. Plunger lifetime measurements after Coulomb excitation at intermediate beam energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, A.; Hackstein, M.; Rother, W.; Jolie, J.; Melon, B.; Pissulla, T.; Shimbara, Y.; Starosta, K.; Adrich, P.; Amthor, A. M.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Bowen, M.; Chester, A.; Dunomes, A.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Glasmacher, T.; Ginter, T.; Hausmann, M.

    2009-01-28

    Absolute transition probabilities of the first 2{sup +} state in {sup 110,114}Pd were remeasured using the recoil distance Doppler shift technique following projectile Coulomb excitation at intermediate beam energies for the first time. The {sup 110}Pd experiment served to check the novel technique as well as the method used for the data analysis which is based on the examination of {gamma}-ray lineshapes. Whereas the measured B(E2) value for {sup 110}Pd agrees very well with the literature, the value obtained for {sup 114}Pd differs considerably. The data is also used to test a novel concept, called the valence proton symmetry, which allows one to extrapolate nuclear properties to very neutron rich nuclei.

  8. Precision lifetime measurements of N ii levels with the beam-foil-laser method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudinet-Robinet, Y.; Garnir, H.-P.; Dumont, P.-D.; Résimont, J.

    1990-08-01

    Precision lifetime measurements using laser excitation of a fast ion beam preexcited in a carbon foil are reported for two levels in N ii. The cascade-free decays of the fluorescence intensities give lifetimes of 0.249+/-0.004 and 0.267+/-0.010 ns for the N ii 2p3d 1F° and 2p3s 1P° levels, respectively. The lifetime result for the 2p3d 1F° level-which is weakly repopulated by long-lived cascades-is in good agreement with beam-foil values and with the theoretical lifetime of McEachran and Cohen [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 27, 119 (1982)]. The lifetime result for the 2p3s 1P ° level-which is strongly repopulated by cascades-differs significantly from most of the previous experimental values but is in good agreement with the theoretical lifetimes of Luken and Sinanoglu [J. Chem. Phys. 64, 3141 (1976)], Beck and Nicolaides [Phys. Lett. 56A, 265 (1976)], McEachran and Cohen, and Fawcett [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 37, 411 (1987)]. The f-value trend for the 2p2 1D-2p3s 1P° transition along the C i sequence is discussed.

  9. New levels and a lifetime measurement in {sup 204}Tl

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiades, N.; Nelson, R. O.; Devlin, M.; Becker, J. A.

    2008-02-15

    The {sup 205}Tl(n,2n{gamma}) reaction was used to populate excited states in {sup 204}Tl. The {gamma}-ray detection was accomplished with the GEANIE spectrometer, a Compton suppressed array of 26 Ge detectors. An energetic beam of neutrons was provided by the pulsed neutron source of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's WNR facility. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident neutron energies. {gamma}-ray excitation functions were determined from incident neutron energy of 1 MeV up to E{sub n}=25 MeV. The level scheme of {sup 204}Tl was enriched and the partial level scheme and nuclear structure above the previously known 7{sup +} isomer at 1104-keV excitation energy were established for the first time up to E{sub x}{approx}2.3 MeV. The high-spin part of the level scheme exhibits striking similarities to that of the neighboring {sup 202}Tl isotope, suggesting similarities in the underlying nuclear structure. The half-life of the 7{sup +} isomer was measured with a more precise result (T{sub 1/2}=60.7{+-}1.2 {mu}s), in agreement with literature values. A lower limit for the excitation energy of the {pi}h{sub 11/2}{nu}i{sub 13/2} structure with J{sup {pi}}=12{sup -} is proposed.

  10. A Precision Measurement Of The Neutral Pion Lifetime: The PRIMEX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Miskimen, Rory

    2008-10-13

    The PRIMEX collaboration at Jefferson Lab is completing an experimental analysis to obtain a precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Results from the experiment will be presented and comparisons made with the chiral anomaly prediction and NLO calculations. An extension of the experiment to 12 GeV for measurements of the {eta} and {eta}' radiative widths is discussed.

  11. Measurement of electron-positron spectrum in high-energy cosmic rays in the PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelin, A. V.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S. A.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A. A.; Mayorov, A. G.; Malakhov, V. V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Menn, W.; Merge, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Rossetto, L.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-08-01

    At present the existing data on the cosmic ray electron energy spectra in the high energy range are fragmented, and the situation is exacerbated by their small number. In the satellite PAMELA experiment measurements at high energies are carried out by the calorimeter. The experimental data accumulated for more than 8 years of measurements, with the information of the calorimeter, the neutron detector and the scintillation counters made it possible to obtain the total spectrum of high-energy electrons and positrons in energy range 0.3-3 TeV.

  12. In vivo measurement of regional cerebral haematocrit using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lammertsma, A.A.; Brooks, D.J.; Beaney, R.P.; Turton, D.R.; Kensett, M.J.; Heather, J.D.; Marshall, J.; Jones, T.

    1984-09-01

    A method is described for measuring the regional cerebral-to-large vessel haematocrit ratio using inhalation of carbon-11-labelled carbon monoxide and the intravenous injection of carbon-11-labelled methyl-albumin in combination with positron emission tomography. The mean value in a series of nine subjects was 0.69. This is approximately 20% lower than the value of 0.85 previously reported. It is concluded that previous measurements of regional cerebral blood volume using a haematocrit ratio of 0.85 will have underestimated the value of regional cerebral blood volume by 20%.

  13. On the measurement the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons in a vacuum quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J. D.; Penttila, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime ({approx}882 s) with an accuracy of 10{sup -4}. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of UCNs confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at LANL has developed a prototype ultra-cold neutron UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100 UCN/cm{sup 3}. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10{sup -4} in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic error in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap.

  14. On the Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using Ultracold Neutrons in a Vacuum Quadrupole Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. David; Penttila, S. I.

    2005-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime (~886 s) with an accuracy of 10−4. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a prototype UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100/cm3 [1]. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10−4 in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic uncertainty in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap. PMID:27308151

  15. New lifetime measurements in the stable semimagic Sn isotopes using the Doppler-shift attenuation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, A.; Walker, J.; Leske, J.; Speidel, K.-H.; Stuchbery, A. E.; East, M.; Boutachkov, P.; Cederkäll, J.; Doornenbal, P.; Egido, J. L.; Ekström, A.; Gerl, J.; Gernhäuser, R.; Goel, N.; Górska, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Maier-Komor, P.; Modamio, V.; Naqvi, F.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Schaffner, H.; Schwengner, R.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2011-09-01

    Precise measurements of lifetimes in the picosecond range of excited states in the stable even-A Sn isotopes 112,114,116,122Sn have been performed using the Doppler shift attenuation technique. For the first excited 2+ states in 112Sn, 114Sn and 116Sn the E2 transition strengths deduced from the measured lifetimes are in disagreement with the previously adopted values. They indicate a shallow minimum at N = 66 in contrast to the maximum at mid-shell predicted by modern shell model calculations.

  16. New linear sweep technique to measure generation lifetimes in thin-film SOI MOSFET's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, S.; Pierret, R. F.; Neudeck, G. W.

    1994-04-01

    A new linear sweep technique to measure generation lifetimes (tau(sub g)) in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) material is presented. A detailed analytic formulation is applied to fully-depleted and partially-depleted SOI films and used to simulate the behavior of the SOI devices under linear sweep conditions. A novel algorithm accurately determines the effective generation width in fully depleted SOI films. The measurement technique is experimentally verified by applying the algorithm to fully depleted SIMOX P-channel MOSFET's where observed lifetimes ranged from 0.3 mu s to 2.4 mu s.

  17. Measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime using the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-07-01

    We present a measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime in the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue using the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. From a sample of about of 360 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV, we reconstruct J/Psie+ pairs with invariant mass in the kinematically allowed range 4< M(J/Psie) < 6 GeV/c2. A fit to the decay-length distribution of 238 signal events yields a measured Bc+ meson lifetime of 0.463(-0.065)(+0.073)(stat) +/- 0.036(syst) ps.

  18. A new differential plunger to measure lifetimes of unbound states in tagged exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Smith, A. J.; Twist, V.; Jones, P. M.; Nieminen, P.; Grahn, T.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.

    2011-11-30

    A new differential plunger is being designed and built at the University of Manchester to measure lifetimes of unbound states in exotic nuclei approaching the proton drip-line. The device is designed to work in both vacuum and gas environments and will primarily be used in conjunction with the gas filled separator RITU at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. This will enable the accurate measurement of excited state lifetimes identified via isomer and charged-particle tagging. The plunger will be used to address many key facets of nuclear structure physics with particular emphasis on the effect of deformation on proton emission rates.

  19. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  20. DPUNS--A Differential-Plunger For Lifetime Measurements Of Tagged Exotic/Unbound Nuclear States

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.

    2011-10-28

    This contribution focused on research to measure the lifetimes of unbound nuclear states using a differential-plunger technique combined with recoil-proton decay tagging. The results of the first lifetime measurements of unbound states in the spherical proton emitter, {sup 109}I, were discussed along with the limits to the technique. In order to proceed further, a new differential-plunger device, DPUNS, has been designed and is currently being built at the University of Manchester. DPUNS has been optimised to work with the GREAT/RITU/TDR setup at the University of Jyvaeskylae and the status of the new device is discussed.

  1. Lifetime Measurement of the First Excited 2{sup +} State in {sup 16}C

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedeking, M.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Gibelin, J.; Basunia, M. S.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M.-A.; Gros, S.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I.-Y.; Moretto, L. G.; Pavan, J.; Phair, L.; Rodriguez-Vietiez, E.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Lesher, S. R.

    2008-04-18

    The lifetime of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state in {sup 16}C has been measured with the recoil distance method using the {sup 9}Be({sup 9}Be,2p) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 40 MeV. The mean lifetime was measured to be 11.7(20) ps corresponding to a B(E2; 2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sup +}) value of 4.15(73)e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} [1.73(30) W.u.], consistent with other even-even closed shell nuclei. Our result does not support an interpretation for ''decoupled'' valence neutrons.

  2. Measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime using the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-07-01

    We present a measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime in the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue using the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. From a sample of about of 360 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV, we reconstruct J/Psie+ pairs with invariant mass in the kinematically allowed range 4< M(J/Psie) < 6 GeV/c2. A fit to the decay-length distribution of 238 signal events yields a measured Bc+ meson lifetime of 0.463(-0.065)(+0.073)(stat) +/- 0.036(syst) ps. PMID:16907366

  3. Variations in the electrical short-circuit current decay for recombination lifetime and velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Tae-Won; Lindholm, Fredrik A.; Neugroschel, Arnost

    1987-01-01

    An improved measurement system for electrical short-circuit current decay is presented that extends applicability of the method to silicon solar cells having an effective lifetime as low as 1 microsec. The system uses metal/oxide/semiconductor transistors as voltage-controlled switches. Advances in theory developed here increase precision and sensitivity in the determination of the minority-carrier recombination lifetime and recombination velocity. A variation of the method, which exploits measurements made on related back-surface field and back-ohmic contact devices, further improves precision and sensitivity. The improvements are illustrated by application to 15 different silicon solar cells.

  4. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  5. Lifetime measurement of 2+- state in 74Zn by recoil-distance Doppler-shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikura, M.; Mouginot, B.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Matea, I.; Stefan, I.; Verney, D.; Assie, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Borcea, C.; Burger, A.; Burgunder, G.; Buta, A.; Cáceres, L.; Cléement, E.; Coquard, L.; de Angelis, G.; de France, G.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Dewald, A.; Dijon, A.; Dombradi, Z.; Fiori, E.; Fransen, C.; Friessner, G.; Gaudefroy, L.; Georgiev, G.; Grévy, S.; Hackstein, M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Ibrahim, F.; Kamalou, O.; Kmiecik, M.; Lozeva, R.; Maj, A.; Mihai, C.; Möller, O.; Myalski, S.; Negoita, F.; Pantelica, D.; Perrot, L.; Pissulla, Th.; Rotaru, F.; Rother, W.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Ujic, P.

    2013-09-01

    We have performed the first direct lifetime measurement of the 2+- state in 74Zn. The neutron-rich 74Zn beam was produced by in-flight fragmentation of 76Ge at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds and separated with the LISE spectrometer. The lifetime of the 2+- state was measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method with the Cologne plunger device combined with the EXOGAM detectors. The lifetime of the 2+- state in 74Zn was determined to be 27.0(24) ps, which corresponds to a reduced transition probability B(E2; 2+- -> 0+) = 370(33) e2fm4.

  6. Cerebral blood volume measured with inhaled C/sup 15/O and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.; Powers, W.J.; Raichle, M.E.

    1987-08-01

    Local cerebral blood volume (CBV) has been measured previously with inhaled /sup 11/CO and positron emission tomography (PET). The model used assumes that equilibrium in tracer concentration has occurred between arterial and systemic venous blood before the PET measurement is made. To verify that this model may be used with the much shorter half-lived C/sup 15/O, we have simultaneously measured arterial and venous blood radioactivity following C/sup 15/O inhalation. Equilibrium occurred 95 +/- 39 s after inhalation (n = 7). If the PET measurement is commenced prior to arteriovenous equilibrium, significant errors occur in calculated CBV. These data indicate that C/sup 15/O may be used as a tracer for CBV measurement provided that emission data collection commences at approximately 120 s after inhalation. Strict quality control measures must be maintained to minimize the contamination of administered C/sup 15/O with /sup 15/O-labeled CO/sub 2/.

  7. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  8. Measurement of human cerebral blood flow with (15O)butanol and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Berridge, M.S.; Adler, L.P.; Nelson, A.D.; Cassidy, E.H.; Muzic, R.F.; Bednarczyk, E.M.; Miraldi, F. )

    1991-09-01

    Although H2(15)O is widely used for CBF measurement by positron tomography, it underestimates CBF, especially at elevated flow rates. Several tracers, including butanol, overcome this problem, but the short half-life of 15O provides advantages that cause water to remain the tracer of choice. The authors report the first use and evaluation of 15O-labeled butanol for CBF measurement. Flow measurements made in a similar fashion with water and butanol at 10-min intervals were compared in normal volunteers under resting and hypercapnic conditions. Regional analysis showed good agreement between the tracers at low flows, and significant underestimation of flow by water relative to butanol in regions of elevated flow. The observed relationship between the tracers and the curve-fitted permeability-surface area product for water (133 ml.100 g-1.min-1) follow the known relationship between water and true flow. These observations indicate that (15O)-butanol provided accurate measurements of human regional CBF under conditions of elevated perfusion. They conclude that butanol is a convenient and accurate method for routine CBF determination by positron emission tomography.

  9. EUV Line Identifications and Lifetime Measurements in Highly Charged Iron Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träbert, E.

    2005-01-01

    When beam-foil experiments on ions of the iron group were done at the Bochum Dynamitron tandem accelerator, line identifications of intercombination lines in Mg- and Al-like Fe matched previously unclassified lines that appear in the EUV spectrum of the solar corona. Beam-foil work continued on Si- to Cl-like Fe ions, identifying in particular decays of high-J levels with nanosecond lifetimes. Millisecond lifetimes in the same ions were then measured at a heavy-ion storage ring and at an electron beam ion trap. Remaining problems and prospects for solutions are discussed.

  10. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Buican, T.N.

    1993-05-04

    Apparatus and method is described for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochromes in the sample.

  11. Measurement of the lifetime of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakova, O I; Yakovlev, A V; Chapovskii, P L

    2008-09-30

    The lifetimes of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap are measured at different populations of the 'bright' and 'dark' hyperfine states of captured atoms. It is found that the lifetime of atoms in the trap decreases if they spend more time in the bright state. A simple explanation of this effect is proposed which is based on the increase in the transport cross section for collisions of thermal rubidium atoms surrounding the trap with cold rubidium atoms upon their electronic excitation. (laser cooling)

  12. First measurement of lifetimes in the yrast band of {sup 100}Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Radeck, D.; Blazhev, A.; Albers, M.; Bernards, C.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Heidemann, M.; Jolie, J.; Melon, B.; Muecher, D.; Pissulla, Th.; Rother, W.; Zell, K. O.; Moeller, O.

    2009-10-15

    Lifetimes of the yrast states up to 12{sup +} and of a negative parity 5{sup -} state in {sup 100}Pd were measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler shift technique. The experiment was performed at the Cologne FN Tandem accelerator with the Cologne Plunger using the reaction {sup 92}Mo({sup 11}B,p2n) to populate excited states in {sup 100}Pd. Lifetimes were determined by analyzing the transitions in coincidence mode employing the differential decay curve method. The obtained E2 transition strengths were compared to predictions from collective models and the shell model.

  13. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochomes in the sample.

  14. A method for measuring picosecond phenomena in photolabile species: the emission lifetime of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, M D; Marcus, M A; Lewis, A; Mahr, H; Frigo, N

    1976-01-01

    We have measured the emission lifetime of bacteriorhodopsin at physiological temperatures to be 15 +/- 3 ps using a technique which employs a mode-locked dye laser, a sum frequency light gate, and a continuous flow system. We observe no concentration dependence of the lifetime over the range of 1.1 X 10(-4) M to 1.0 X 10(-5) M. We conclude that the emission which we observe comes from bacteriorhodopsin and not one of its photochemically produced intermediates, and that the emission cannot originate from the state into which light is absorbed. PMID:990393

  15. A High Throughput Approach to Measuring Carrier Mobility and Lifetime of Thin Film Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, S. S.; Ma, Z. X.; Oehlerking, L. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Yu, P. Y.

    2011-12-01

    A new technique has been developed to measure the carrier mobility and lifetime based on current transients produced by a sub-picosecond laser pulse. The theoretical model we proposed agrees well with the experimental data. This technique has been applied to the material libraries fabricated by the combinatorial growth technique.

  16. Measurement of the Ξb- and Ωb- baryon lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-09-01

    Using a data sample of pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, the Ξb- and Ωb- baryons are reconstructed in the Ξb-→J/ψΞ- and Ωb-→J/ψΩ- decay modes and their lifetimes measured to be

  17. An Undergraduate Experiment on Nuclear Lifetime Measurement Using the Doppler Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    While designed for a senior undergraduate laboratory, the experiment illustrates the principles involved in the various Doppler techniques currently used in nuclear lifetime studies and demonstrates the versatility of the Ge(Li) detector in applications other than direct energy or intensity measurement. (Author/TS)

  18. Measurement of the Masses and Lifetimes of B Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-05-01

    The latest results for the B Hadron sector at the Tevatron Collider are summarized. The properties of B hadrons can be precisely measured at the Tevatron. In particularly they will focus on the masses and lifetimes. The new Tevatron results for the CP violation in B Hadrons are also discussed.

  19. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  20. Measuring long-lived 13C2 state lifetimes at natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claytor, Kevin; Theis, Thomas; Feng, Yesu; Warren, Warren

    2014-02-01

    Long-lived disconnected eigenstates (for example, the singlet state in a system with two nearly equivalent carbons, or the singlet-singlet state in a system with two chemically equivalent carbons and two chemically equivalent hydrogens) hold the potential to drastically extend the lifetime of hyperpolarization in molecular tracers for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, a first-principles calculation of the expected lifetime (and thus selection of potential imaging agents) is made very difficult because of the large variety of relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation mechanisms. As a result, all previous measurements relied on costly and time consuming syntheses of 13C labeled compounds. Here we show that it is possible to determine 13C singlet state lifetimes by detecting the naturally abundant doubly-labeled species. This approach allows for rapid and low cost screening of potential molecular biomarkers bearing long-lived states.

  1. Neutron lifetime measurement with the UCN trap-in-trap MAMBO II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichlmaier, A.; Varlamov, V.; Schreckenbach, K.; Geltenbort, P.

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the free neutron lifetime τ by storage of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) in a Fomblin coated UCN trap of in situ variable size. The method was initially developed by W. Mampe et al. (1989) [10] with MAMBO I and improved by the addition of a prestorage volume yielding a well defined UCN spectrum for storage in the main trap. By extrapolation to infinite trap size using the time scaling method we obtain for the free neutron lifetime τ=(880.7±1.3±1.2) s. Data from different UCN spectra, trap temperatures and storage times were used for the evaluation. The present result is compared with other experimental neutron lifetime data.

  2. Carrier Lifetime Measurement for Characterization of Ultraclean Thin p/p+ Silicon Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhami Khorasani, Arash

    Carrier lifetime is one of the few parameters which can give information about the low defect densities in today's semiconductors. In principle there is no lower limit to the defect density determined by lifetime measurements. No other technique can easily detect defect densities as low as 10 -9 - 10-10 cm-3 in a simple, contactless room temperature measurement. However in practice, recombination lifetime τ r measurements such as photoconductance decay (PCD) and surface photovoltage (SPV) that are widely used for characterization of bulk wafers face serious limitations when applied to thin epitaxial layers, where the layer thickness is smaller than the minority carrier diffusion length Ln. Other methods such as microwave photoconductance decay (µ-PCD), photoluminescence (PL), and frequency-dependent SPV, where the generated excess carriers are confined to the epitaxial layer width by using short excitation wavelengths, require complicated configuration and extensive surface passivation processes that make them time-consuming and not suitable for process screening purposes. Generation lifetime τg, typically measured with pulsed MOS capacitors (MOS-C) as test structures, has been shown to be an eminently suitable technique for characterization of thin epitaxial layers. It is for these reasons that the IC community, largely concerned with unipolar MOS devices, uses lifetime measurements as a "process cleanliness monitor." However when dealing with ultraclean epitaxial wafers, the classic MOS-C technique measures an effective generation lifetime τgeff which is dominated by the surface generation and hence cannot be used for screening impurity densities. I have developed a modified pulsed MOS technique for measuring generation lifetime in ultraclean thin p/p+ epitaxial layers which can be used to detect metallic impurities with densities as low as 10-10 cm-3. The widely used classic version has been shown to be unable to effectively detect such low impurity

  3. Application of Positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy to the Measurement of the Uniformity of Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, C. A.; Sheffield, Thomas; Stacy, Scott; Yang, Chun

    2009-03-10

    The uniformity of rubber-carbon black composite materials has been investigated with positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS). The number of grams of carbon black (CB) mixed into one hundred grams of rubber, phr, is used to characterize a sample. A typical concentration for rubber in tires is 50 phr. The S parameter measured by DBS has been found to depend on the phr of the sample as well as the type of rubber and carbon black. The variation in carbon black concentration within a surface area of about 5 mm diameter can be measured by moving a standard Na-22 or Ge-68 positron source over an extended sample. The precision of the concentration measurement depends on the dwell time at a point on the sample. The time required to determine uniformity over an extended sample can be reduced by running with much higher counting rate than is typical in DBS and correcting for the systematic variation of S parameter with counting rate. Variation in CB concentration with mixing time at the level of about 0.5% has been observed.

  4. Positron emission tomography for measurement of copper fluxes in live organisms.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fangyu

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient for the physiology of live organisms, but excessive copper can be harmful. Copper radioisotopes are used for measurement of copper fluxes in live organisms using a radioactivity assay of body fluids or whole-body positron emission tomography (PET). Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a versatile tool for real-time measurement of copper fluxes combining the high sensitivity and quantification capability of PET and the superior spatial resolution of CT for anatomic localization of radioactive tracer activity. Kinetic analysis of copper metabolism in the liver and extrahepatic tissues of Atp7b(-/-) knockout mice, a mouse model of Wilson's disease, demonstrated the feasibility of measuring copper fluxes in live organisms with PET/CT using copper-64 chloride ((64) CuCl2 ) as a radioactive tracer ((64) CuCl2 -PET/CT). (64) CuCl2 -PET/CT holds potential as a useful tool for the diagnosis of inherited and acquired human copper metabolism disorders and for monitoring the effects of copper-modulating therapy.

  5. Precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei based on Doppler-shift techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Hironori

    2013-04-19

    A recent progress in precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University is presented. The Recoil Distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) technique has been applied to nuclear reactions involving intermediate-energy rare isotope (RI) beams, to determine absolute transition strengths between nuclear states model independently from level lifetimes of interest. As such an example, recent lifetime measurements of the first 2{sup +} states in the neutron-rich {sup 62,64,66}Fe isotopes at and around N=40 are introduced. The experiment was performed at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL using a unique combination of several experimental instruments; the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA), the plunger device, and the S800 spectrograph. The reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) are determined directly from the measured lifetimes. The observed trend of B(E2) clearly demonstrates that an enhanced collectivity persists in {sup 66}Fe despite the harmonic-oscillator magic number N=40. The present results are also discussed in comparison with the large-scale shell model calculations, pointing to a possible extension of the deformation region beyond N=40.

  6. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gast, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The results show, for the first time, that neither e+ nor e- can be described by a single power law above 27.2 and 52.3 GeV, respectively. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. The dependence of the electron and positron fluxes on time will also be discussed.

  7. Reliability and validity of an internet-based questionnaire measuring lifetime physical activity.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Mary A; Ratzlaff, Charles; Doerfling, Paul; Kopec, Jacek

    2010-11-15

    Lifetime exposure to physical activity is an important construct for evaluating associations between physical activity and disease outcomes, given the long induction periods in many chronic diseases. The authors' objective in this study was to evaluate the measurement properties of the Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire (L-PAQ), a novel Internet-based, self-administered instrument measuring lifetime physical activity, among Canadian men and women in 2005-2006. Reliability was examined using a test-retest study. Validity was examined in a 2-part study consisting of 1) comparisons with previously validated instruments measuring similar constructs, the Lifetime Total Physical Activity Questionnaire (LT-PAQ) and the Chasan-Taber Physical Activity Questionnaire (CT-PAQ), and 2) a priori hypothesis tests of constructs measured by the L-PAQ. The L-PAQ demonstrated good reliability, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.67 (household activity) to 0.89 (sports/recreation). Comparison between the L-PAQ and the LT-PAQ resulted in Spearman correlation coefficients ranging from 0.41 (total activity) to 0.71 (household activity); comparison between the L-PAQ and the CT-PAQ yielded coefficients of 0.58 (sports/recreation), 0.56 (household activity), and 0.50 (total activity). L-PAQ validity was further supported by observed relations between the L-PAQ and sociodemographic variables, consistent with a priori hypotheses. Overall, the L-PAQ is a useful instrument for assessing multiple domains of lifetime physical activity with acceptable reliability and validity.

  8. Measurement of short lifetimes in highly-charged ions using a two-foil target

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Dunford, R.W.; Gemmell, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    One of the frontiers in the study of the atomic physics of highly-charged ions is the measurement of lifetimes in the 100 fs to 10 ps regime. The standard technique for measuring lifetimes of states in highly-charged ions is the beam-foil time-of-flight method in which the intensity of an emission line is monitored as a function of the separation between the exciting foil and the portion of the beam being viewed by the detector. This method becomes increasingly difficult as the decay lengths of the states of interest become shorter. At a typical beam velocity of 10% of the speed of light, the beam travels 30 microns in a picosecond. The standard beam-foil time-of-flight method necessitates observation of the decay radiation within one or two decay lengths from the foil while preventing the detectors from observing the beam spot at the foil. For short-lived states this requires tight collimation of the detector with a resulting loss in solid angle. We are developing a method for measuring ultrashort atomic lifetimes utilizing a two-foil target. As a specific case to demonstrate the feasibility of our method, we are studying the decay of the 2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} level in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. This level has a calculated lifetime of 9.5 ps which corresponds to a decay length of 380 {mu}m. For krypton, theory predicts that 90% of the 2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} states decay via M2 radiation to the ground state. A measurement of the lifetime of this state would contribute to an important current problem which concerns the understanding of atomic structure when both electron correlations and relativistic effects are simultaneously important.

  9. A magneto-gravitational neutron trap for the measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, Daniel J.

    Neutron decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta-decay. The mean decay lifetime is a key input for predicting the abundance of light elements in the early universe. A precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, when combined with other neutron decay observables, can test for physics beyond the standard model in a way that is complimentary to, and potentially competitive with, results from high energy collider experiments. Many previous measurements of the neutron lifetime used ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in material bottles. In a material bottle experiment, UCN are loaded into the apparatus, stored for varying times, and the surviving UCN are emptied and counted. These measurements are in poor agreement with experiments that use neutron beams, and new experiments are needed to resolve the discrepancy and precisely determine the lifetime. Here we present an experiment that uses a bowl-shaped array of NdFeB magnets to confine neutrons without material wall interactions. The trap shape is designed to rapidly remove higher energy UCN that might slowly leak from the top of the trap, and can facilitate new techniques to count surviving UCN within the trap. We review the scientific motivation for a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, and present the commissioning of the trap. Data are presented using a vanadium activation technique to count UCN within the trap, providing an alternative method to emptying neutrons from the trap and into a counter. Potential systematic effects in the experiment are then discussed and estimated using analytical and numerical techniques. We also investigate solid nitrogen-15 as a source of UCN using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy. We conclude with a discussion of forthcoming research and development for UCN detection and UCN sources.

  10. Lifetime measurements of normally deformed and superdeformed states in {sup 82}Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Baktash, C.; Brinkman, M.J.; Jin, H.; Rudolph, D.; Gross, C.J.; Devlin, M.; LaFosse, D.R.; Lerma, F.; Sarantites, D.G.; Sylvan, G.N.; Tabor, S.L.; Birriel, I.; Saladin, J.X.; Winchell, D.F.; Wood, V.Q.; Clark, R.M.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Wells, J.C. |; Petrovici, A.; Schmid, K.W.; Faessler, A.

    1998-01-01

    Lifetimes of a superdeformed band in {sup 82}Sr were measured with the centroid shift method. The measured average quadrupole moment of this band corresponds to a quadrupole deformation of {beta}{sub 2}{approx}0.49, which is slightly smaller than both the theoretical prediction, and the measured deformation of the SD band in the neighboring isotone {sup 84}Zr. Lifetimes of high spin states of three normally deformed rotational bands in {sup 82}Sr were also measured with the Doppler shift attenuation method technique. The quadrupole moments of these normally deformed bands show a decrease at the highest spins, supporting the predicted band terminations. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  12. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optomechanics in a handheld form factor. We examined the characteristics of the optomechanics with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (from LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  13. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optical mount in a hand-held form factor. We examined the characteristics of the 3D printed optical system with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  14. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optomechanics in a handheld form factor. We examined the characteristics of the optomechanics with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (from LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  15. New lifetime measurements in Pd109 and the onset of deformation at N=60

    DOE PAGES

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; Simpson, G. S.; Rissanen, J.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Olaizola, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; Äystö, J.; Bentley, I.; et al

    2015-12-14

    We measured several new subnanosecond lifetimes in 109Pd using the fast-timing βγ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A = 109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. We obtained lifetimes for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7/2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements.more » Finally, the available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N = 60 which is related to the strong p-n interaction between πg9/2 and νg7/2 valence nucleons expected in this region.« less

  16. Fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify sub-cellular oxygen measurements in live macrophage during bacterial invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragavon, Joe; Amiri, Megdouda; Marteyn, Benoit; Sansonetti, Philipe; Shorte, Spencer

    2011-03-01

    Fluorophore concentration, the surrounding microenvironment, and photobleaching greatly influence the fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore, increasing the difficulty to directly observe micro-environmental factors such as pH and oxygen. However, the fluorescence lifetime of a fluorophore is essentially independent of both the fluorophore concentration and photobleaching, providing a viable alternative to intensity measurements. The development of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) allows for the direct measurement of the microenvironment surrounding a fluorophore. Pt-porphyrin is a fluorophore whose optical properties include a very stable triplet excited state. This energy level overlaps strongly with the ground triplet state of oxygen, making the phosphorescent lifetime directly proportional to the surrounding oxygen concentration. Initial experiments using this fluorophore involved the use of individual microwells coated with the porphyrin. Cells were allowed to enter the micro-wells before being sealed to create a diffusionally isolated volume. The decrease in the extracellular oxygen concentration was observed using FLI. However, this isolation technique provides only the consumption rate but cannot indicate the subcellular oxygen distribution. To improve upon this, live macrophages are loaded with the porphyrin and the fluorescence lifetime determined using a Lambert Instruments Lifa-X FLI system. Initial results indicate that an increase in subcellular oxygen is observed upon initial exposure to invasive bacteria. A substantial decrease in oxygen is observed after about 1 hour of exposure. The cells remain in this deoxygenated state until the bacteria are removed or cell death occurs.

  17. Measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability with positron emission tomography and (68Ga)EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Goble, J.C.; Bird, J.H.; Girton, M.E.; Doppman, J.L.; Rapoport, S.I.; Barranger, J.A.

    1984-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was employed to examine time-dependent changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to (68Ga)ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) in the rhesus monkey, following reversible barrier opening by intracarotid infusion of a hypertonic mannitol solution. The PET technique, when combined with measurements of plasma radioactivity, provided a quantitative measure of the cerebrovascular permeability-area product (PA) at different times following mannitol infusion. Hypertonic mannitol treatment reversibly increased PA to (68Ga)EDTA more than 10-fold; much of the barrier effect was over by 10 min after mannitol treatment. The results show that PET can be used to measure transient changes in BBB integrity in specific brain regions, under in vivo, noninvasive conditions.

  18. Atmospheric lifetime of caesium-137 as an estimate of aerosol lifetime -quantified from global measurements in the months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iren Kristiansen, Nina; Stohl, Andreas; Wotawa, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Radionuclides like caesium-137 (137Cs) can be emitted to the atmosphere in great quantities during nuclear accidents and are of significant health impact. A global set of radionuclide measurements collected over several months after the accidental release from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 has been used to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs. Lifetime is here defined as the e-folding time scale (the time interval in which the exponential decay of the 137Cs quantity has decreased by factor of e). The estimated atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs can also be used as an estimate of the lifetime of aerosols in the atmosphere. This is based on the fact that 137Cs attaches to the ambient accumulation-mode (AM) aerosols and trace their fate in the atmosphere. The 137Cs "tags" the AM aerosols and both the 137Cs and AM aerosols are removed simultaneously from the atmosphere by scavenging within clouds, precipitation and dry deposition. The 137Cs emitted from Fukushima attached mainly to sulphate aerosols in the size range 0.1-2 μm diameter. Measured 137Cs activity concentrations from several stations spread mostly over the Northern Hemisphere were evaluated, and the decrease in activity concentrations over time (after correction for radioactive decay) reflects the removal of aerosols by wet and dry deposition. Corrections for air mass transport were made using measurements of the noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe) which was also released during the accident. This noble gas does not attach to the aerosols and was thus used as a passive tracer of air mass transport. The atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs was estimated to 10.0-13.9 days during April and May 2011. This represents the atmospheric lifetime of a "background" AM aerosol well mixed in the extratropical northern hemisphere troposphere. It is expected that the lifetime of this vertically mixed background aerosol is longer than the lifetime of fresh AM aerosols directly emitted from surface sources

  19. Measurement of the B(s) lifetime using semileptonic decays with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun

    The measurement of the lifetime of the B0s meson has great importance and is of special interest. The first motivation is to check the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE) predictions for the B meson lifetimes. Besides testing HQE, the lifetime of the b quark is directly related to the CKM matrix element Vcb; the B meson lifetime measurement thus gives a good probe of the weak decay mechanics of the heavy hadrons. The B0s meson is of special interest because of the expected B0sB¯0 s mixing with large oscillation frequency, which can be expressed in terms of Deltam, the mass difference of the two mass eigenstates of the B0s meson. The B0s mesons contain short and long lived components, the light (L) and heavy (H) eigenstates, BL and BH . They differ not only in their masses Deltam = mL - mH, but also in their widths DeltaGamma = GammaL - Gamma H, which is expected to be large enough to be measurable. In flavor-specific decays, such as the semileptonic decay in this analysis, the B0s will have equal fractions of BL and BH when generated. A superposition of two exponentials thus results with decay width Gammas +/- DeltaGamma s/2. When fitting to a single exponential we obtain a measure of the flavor-specific lifetime: tB0s fs=1Gs 1+DGs/2G s21- DGs/2Gs 2 Hence by measuring tau( B0s )fs, in combination with other measurements, we can reduce the significant correlations between the average B0s lifetime tau( B0s ) = 1Gs and DeltaGammas/Gamma s, and determine them more precisely. In this dissertation, the lifetime of the B0s meson is measured using partially reconstructed semileptonic decays. The following semileptonic decay processes (and their charge conjugates) are used in this analysis: B0s→l++D- s+X where l denotes either a muon or an electron, and the Ds decays into D-s→f+p -,f→K++K- D-s→K*0 +K-,K*0→K+ +p- D-s→p ++p-+p- The data were collected during the years 2002 to 2005 using 4 GeV lepton plus displaced track triggers (lepton+SVT) by the CDF Collaboration at

  20. Measurements of Lifetimes and f-Values In Highly-Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven; Chutjian, Ara; Hossain, Sabbir

    2006-05-01

    Measurements have been made of lifetimes of metastable levels of highly-charged ions (HCI). These contribute to the optical absorption, emission and energy balance in the ISM, stellar and solar atmospheres, etc. The experimental lifetime measurements are carried out using the 14.0 GHz electron cyclotron ion source at the JPL facility.[l] Ions are injected into a Kingdon ion trap and stored for times longer than the metastable lifetimes. Decay channels include inter-combination, E2, M1 and 2E transitions. The UV photons are filtered by an interference filter and detected by a UV grade photomultiplier tube using a UV grade optical system. The Kingdon trap was constructed in collaboration with Texas A and M University [2]. We previously have reported lifetimes for transitions of C^+ [1]and 0^2+ [4]. Additional metastable lifetimes have been measured for M^6+, Fe^9+, Fe^10+ and Fe^13+ metastable states [5]. New results for Fe^11+ will be presented. Sabbir Hossain acknowledges support through NASA-NRC program. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech and was supported by the NASA [1] Steven J. Smith, A. Chutjian, J.B. Greenwood, Phys. Rev. A 60, 3569 (1999). [2] L.Yang and D.A. Church, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3860 (1993).[3] S.J. Smith, I. Cadez, A. Chutjian, and M. Niimura, Ap. J. 602, 1075 (2004).[5] S.J. Smith , A. Chutjian, J. Lozano, Phys Rev. A 72, 062504 (2005).

  1. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of High Performance Polymer Films under CO2 Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Quarles; John R. Klaehn; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2010-08-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. Different polymers are found to behave differently. Some polymers studied form positronium and some, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those samples that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don’t form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. Some polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO2 pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO2 pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO2 into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm.

  2. Measurement of excited-state lifetime using two-pulse photon echoes in rubidium vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Rotberg, E. A.; Barrett, B.; Beattie, S.; Chudasama, S.; Weel, M.; Chan, I.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2007-03-15

    We report a measurement of the 5P{sub 3/2} excited-state lifetime using two-pulse photon echoes in Rb vapor. The measurement is precise to {approx}1% and agrees with the best measurement of atomic lifetime in Rb. The results suggest that a measurement precise to {approx}0.25% is possible through additional data acquisition and study of systematic effects. The experiment relies on short optical pulses generated from a cw laser using acousto-optic modulators. The excitation pulses are on resonance with the F=3{yields}F{sup '}=4 transition in {sup 85}Rb or the F=2{yields}F{sup '}=3 transition in {sup 87}Rb. The resulting photon echo signal is detected using a heterodyne detection technique. The excited-state lifetime is determined by measuring the exponential decay of the echo intensity as a function of the time between the excitation pulses. We also present a study of the echo intensity as a function of excitation pulse area and compare the results to simulations based on optical Bloch equations. The simulations include the effects of spontaneous emission as well as spatial and temporal variations of the intensities of excitation pulses.

  3. Positron annihilation study of high impact polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Naoki; Takamori, Akimitsu; Baba, Junpei; Matsuda, Junichi; Hyodo, Toshio; Okamoto, Yasushi; Miyagi, Hiroshi

    2000-06-01

    Positron lifetime spectra for general purpose polystyrene (GPPS), polybutadiene rubber (PBR), and their copolymers, styrenebutadiene rubber (SBR) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) have been measured. It has been found that the free volumes in the copolymers are smaller than the average over the individual polymers, due to the interfacial interaction between the styrene and rubber phases. A long-lived component with a mean lifetime of about 123 ns was observed in the spectrum for deformed HIPS, showing the existence of ortho-positronium ( o-Ps) in the deformation induced crazes.

  4. Precision measurement of the ratio of the Λb0 to B lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Caponio, F.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb measurement of the lifetime ratio of the Λb0 baryon to the B meson is updated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 collected using 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The decay modes used are Λb0→J/ψpK- and B→J/ψπ+K-, where the π+K- mass is consistent with that of the K(892) meson. The lifetime ratio is determined with unprecedented precision to be 0.974±0.006±0.004, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with original theoretical predictions based on the heavy quark expansion. Using the current world average of the B lifetime, the Λb0 lifetime is found to be 1.479±0.009±0.010 ps.

  5. Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes reasons that lifetime measurments may be irreproducible using iodine-in-ethanol (I-E) passivation. Possible factors include the strength of the iodine in ethanol solution, wafer cleaning procedures, influence of wafer container during lifetime measurement, and stability of I-E.

  6. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξb⁻ baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-12-12

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)⁻ baryon using about 1800 Ξ(b)⁻ decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb⁻¹ collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the Ξ(b)⁻→Ξ(c)⁰π⁻, Ξ(c)⁰→pK⁻K⁻π⁺ channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the Λ(b)⁰→Λ(c)⁺π⁻ mode as a reference. We measure M(Ξ(b)⁻)-M(Λ(b)⁰)=178.36±0.46±0.16  MeV/c², (τ(Ξ(b)⁻)/τ(Λ(b)⁰)=1.089±0.026±0.011, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the Ξ(b)⁻ mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations. PMID:25541768

  7. Precision Measurement of the Mass and Lifetime of the Ξb- Baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the Ξb- baryon using about 1800 Ξb- decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the Ξb-→Ξc0π-, Ξc0→p K-K-π+ channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the Λb0→Λc+π- mode as a reference. We measure M (Ξb-)-M (Λb0)=178.36 ±0.46 ±0.16 MeV /c2 , (τΞb-/τΛb0)=1.089 ±0.026 ±0.011 , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the Ξb- mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations.

  8. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξb⁻ baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-12-12

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)⁻ baryon using about 1800 Ξ(b)⁻ decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb⁻¹ collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the Ξ(b)⁻→Ξ(c)⁰π⁻, Ξ(c)⁰→pK⁻K⁻π⁺ channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the Λ(b)⁰→Λ(c)⁺π⁻ mode as a reference. We measure M(Ξ(b)⁻)-M(Λ(b)⁰)=178.36±0.46±0.16  MeV/c², (τ(Ξ(b)⁻)/τ(Λ(b)⁰)=1.089±0.026±0.011, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the Ξ(b)⁻ mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations.

  9. A Direct Measurement of Lifetimes and Stellar Luminosities on the AGB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Marigo, Paola; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) represents the phase of stellar evolution where stars become their brightest and reddest. As such, understanding stellar lifetimes and luminosities during this evolutionary phase is crucial to accurately interpret red and infrared light from galaxies using population synthesis models. Recently, there has been much controversy over the inferred ages and masses of infrared galaxies due to our lack of understanding of this phase. In this presentation, I'll present a direct measurement of the stellar core mass growth on the AGB by comparing the initial core masses to the post AGB core masses measured from spectroscopy of white dwarfs. The resulting data allows us to calculate the stellar lifetime and luminosity on the AGB, and to compare to popular models that are used to interpret light from distant galaxies.

  10. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Z. E.; Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of 106Cd to study excited states of 110Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime measurement with confocal endomicroscopy for direct analysis of tissue biochemistry in vivo.

    PubMed

    Won, Youngjae; Park, Byungjun; Kim, Inwook; Lee, Seungrag

    2016-08-01

    Confocal endomicroscopy is a powerful tool for in vivo real-time imaging at cellular resolution inside a living body without tissue resection. Microscopic fluorescence lifetime measurement can provide information about localized biochemical conditions such as pH and the concentrations of oxygen and calcium. We hypothesized that combining these techniques could assist accurate cancer discrimination by providing both biochemical and morphological information. We designed a dual-mode experimental setup for confocal endomicroscopic imaging and fluorescence lifetime measurement and applied it to a mouse xenograft model of activated human pancreatic cancer generated by subcutaneous injection of AsPC-1 tumor cells. Using this method with pH-sensitive sodium fluorescein injection, we demonstrated discrimination between normal and cancerous tissues in a living mouse. With further development, this method may be useful for clinical cancer detection. PMID:27547835

  12. Excited State Lifetime Measurements in Rare Earth Nuclei with Fast Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Bonett-Matiz, M.; Williams, E.; Régis, J.-M.; Rudigier, M.; Ahn, T.; Anagnostatou, V.; Berant, Z.; Bunce, M.; Elvers, M.; Heinz, A.; Ilie, G.; Jolie, J.; Radeck, D.; Savran, D.; Smith, M.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the collectivity of the lowest excited 2+ states of even-even rare earth nuclei. The B(E2) excitation strengths of these nuclei should directly correlate to the size of the valence space, and maximize at mid-shell. The previously identified saturation of B(E2) strength in well-deformed rotors at mid-shell is put to a high precision test in this series of measurements. Lifetimes of the 2+1 states in 168Hf and 174W have been measured using the newly developed LaBr3 scintillation detectors. The excellent energy resolution in conjunction with superb time properties of the new material allows for reliable handling of background, which is a source of systematic error in such experiments. Preliminary lifetime values are obtained and discussed in the context of previous and ongoing work.

  13. Lifetime measurements using the CLARA-PRISMA setup around the {sup 48}Ca doubly-magic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; Fioretto, E.; Grodner, E.; Mason, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Mengoni, D.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Ur, C. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Lunardi, S.; Scarlassara, F.; Dewald, A.

    2008-11-11

    The lifetimes of the first excited states of nuclei around the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been determined using a novel method that combines the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) method with the CLARA-PRISMA spectrometers. This is the first time such a method is applied to measure lifetimes of neutron-rich nuclei populated via a multinucleon transfer reaction. This novel method and some preliminary results on lifetimes are presented.

  14. Study of excitation transfer in laser dye mixtures by direct measurement of fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Dienes, A.

    1973-01-01

    By directly measuring the donor fluorescence lifetime as a function of acceptor concentration in the laser dye mixture Rhodamine 6G-Cresyl violet, we found that the Stern-Volmer relation is obeyed, from which the rate of excitation transfer is determined. The experimental results indicate that the dominant mechanism responsible for the efficient excitation transfer is that of resonance transfer due to long range dipole-dipole interaction.

  15. UCNtau: Study of Lifetime Measurement in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Alexander; Salvat, D.; Adamek, E.; Bowman, D.; Clayton, S.; Cude, C.; Fox, W.; Hogan, G.; Hickerson, K.; Holley, A. T.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M.; Manus, G.; Morris, C.; Penttila, S.; Ramsey, J.; Sawtelle, S.; Solberg, K.; Vanderwerp, J.; VornDick, B.; Walstrom, P.; Wang, Z.; Young, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The UCNtau project is intended to develop a new measurement of the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons (UCNs) stored in a magneto-gravitational trap. In this article, we will describe the development of the experiment so far, including the trap itself, the UCN transport and monitoring system, the neutron detection methods, and the Monte Carlo simulations that have been used to model these elements. Finally, we will describe the first systematic effects that we plan to study using this apparatus.

  16. Measurement of the $B^-$ lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-04-01

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B{sup -} using the mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}. The B{sup -} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup -}} = 1.663 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  17. Monte Carlo modelling of positron transport in real world applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanović, S.; Banković, A.; Šuvakov, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2014-05-01

    Due to the unstable nature of positrons and their short lifetime, it is difficult to obtain high positron particle densities. This is why the Monte Carlo simulation technique, as a swarm method, is very suitable for modelling most of the current positron applications involving gaseous and liquid media. The ongoing work on the measurements of cross-sections for positron interactions with atoms and molecules and swarm calculations for positrons in gasses led to the establishment of good cross-section sets for positron interaction with gasses commonly used in real-world applications. Using the standard Monte Carlo technique and codes that can follow both low- (down to thermal energy) and high- (up to keV) energy particles, we are able to model different systems directly applicable to existing experimental setups and techniques. This paper reviews the results on modelling Surko-type positron buffer gas traps, application of the rotating wall technique and simulation of positron tracks in water vapor as a substitute for human tissue, and pinpoints the challenges in and advantages of applying Monte Carlo simulations to these systems.

  18. Beam-laser lifetime measurements for some selected levels in singly ionized thulium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Georg; McCurdy, Michelle M.; Pinnington, Eric H.

    1999-11-01

    The lifetimes of 16 levels in Tm II have been measured using the fast-beam-laser technique to resolve the disagreement between time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements recently published by Anderson, Den Hartog, and Lawler [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 13, 2382 (1996)] and a new relativistic Hartree-Fock calculation by Quinet, Palmeri, and Biémont [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 62, 625 (1999)]. In all cases except one, our results support the previous measurement, but with a higher precision.

  19. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-10-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.

  20. Calculations and measurements for the SLAC SLC positron return quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Early, R.A.; Cobb, J.K.

    1986-09-01

    The three-dimensional magnetostatic computer program TOSCA, running on the NMFECC CRAY X-MP computer, was used to compute the integral of gradient length for the SLC type QT4 positron return line quadrupole magnet. Since the bore diameter of the magnet is 12.7 centimeters, and the length is only 10.16 centimeters, three dimensional effects are important. POISSON calculations were done on a two-dimensional model to obtain magnetic shimming which assured enough positive twelve pole to offset end effects, while TOSCA was used to estimate the effective length of the quadrupole. No corrections were required on the magnet as built. Measurements showed that the required integrated gradient was achieved for the given current, and that integrated higher harmonics were generally less than 0.1% of the quadrupole component.

  1. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  2. On the uncertainty in single molecule fluorescent lifetime and energy emission measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; Mccollom, Alex D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least square methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67% of those can be noise and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probably density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. the ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background nose and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  3. High-resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear-structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III.

    1981-02-28

    Extensive data analysis and theoretical analysis has been done to complete the extensive decay scheme investigation of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Fr and the level structures of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Rn. A final version of a journal article is presented in preprint form. Extensive Monte Carlo calculations have been made to correct the end point energies of positron spectra taken with intrinsic Ge detectors for annihilation radiation interferences. These calculations were tested using the decay of /sup 82/Sr which has previously measured positron branches. This technique was applied to the positron spectra collected at the on-line UNISOR isotope separator. The reactions used were /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;p2n)/sup 77/Rb and /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;pn)/sup 78/Rb. Values for 5, ..gamma..-..beta../sup +/ coincidence positron end point energies are given for the decay of /sup 77/Rb. The implied Q-value is 5.075 +- 0.010 MeV. A complete paper on the calculated corrections is presented. A flow chart of a more complete program which accounts for positrons scattering out of the detector and for bremsstralung radiation is also presented. End-point energies of four ..beta../sup +/ branches in /sup 77/Rb are given as well as a proposed energy level scheme of /sup 75/Kr based on ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidence data taken at UNISOR.

  4. Turbulent eddy diffusivity and mean eddy lifetimes measured in spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, J. F.; Pelaccio, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative description of the eddy structure that occurs in turbulent combustion processes can be obtained by the use of laser velocimetry, as shown in this work. The mean eddy length scales, eddy lifetimes, and turbulent diffusivity have been determined in a spray combustion flame for the first time. Velocity data was obtained at various locations within the flame, and standard correlation techniques were modified and then applied to reduce the data. In order to assess how the spray burns, the measured eddy lifetimes were compared with the relevant reaction times and drop lifetimes. Conditions that are conducive to group combustion of the droplets, rather than individual droplet combustion, were found to exist in the upstream region of the spray. Local measurements of the hydrocarbon concentration also support the conclusion that the majority of droplets undergo group combustion. However, the data indicate that some of the larger drops can survive the initial burning region and form a dilute spray downstream where conditions favor individual droplet combustion.

  5. Toward a measurement of α -decay lifetime change at high pressure: The case of 241Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissim, Noaz; Belloni, Fabio; Eliezer, Shalom; Delle Side, Domenico; Martinez Val, José Maria

    2016-07-01

    This paper suggests that a change in the lifetime of the α -decay process in 241Am may be detected at high pressures achievable in the laboratory, essentially, due to the extraordinary high compressibility of Am at the megabar range. The Thomas-Fermi model was used to calculate the effect of high pressure on the atomic electron density and the variation of the atomic potential of 241Am . It was found that at pressures of about 0.5 Mbar the relative change in the lifetime of 241Am is about -2 ×10-4 . Detailed experimental procedures to measure this effect by compressing the 241Am metal in a diamond-anvil cell are presented where diagnostics is based on counting of the 60-keV γ rays accompanying the α decay and/or mass spectrometry on the 237Np/241Am isotope ratio.

  6. Direct Measurement of the Radiative Lifetime of Vibrationally Excited OH Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y.T. van de; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard; Loo, Mark P.J. van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2005-07-01

    Neutral molecules, isolated in the gas phase, can be prepared in a long-lived excited state and stored in a trap. The long observation time afforded by the trap can then be exploited to measure the radiative lifetime of this state by monitoring the temporal decay of the population in the trap. This method is demonstrated here and used to benchmark the Einstein A coefficients in the Meinel system of OH. A pulsed beam of vibrationally excited OH radicals is Stark decelerated and loaded into an electrostatic quadrupole trap. The radiative lifetime of the upper {lambda}-doublet component of the X {sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2}, v=1, J=3/2 level is determined as 59.0{+-}2.0 ms, in good agreement with the calculated value of 58.0{+-}1.0 ms.

  7. Apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K.; Johnston, Steven W.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearity for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  8. Interpretation of recent positron-electron measurements between 20 and 800 MeV. [interplanetary cosmic ray solar modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerin, C. J.; Hartman, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Recently measured positron and negatron spectra are discussed with regard to the problem of solar modulation. At energies above 180 MeV, the spherically symmetric Fokker-Planck equation with a diffusion coefficient proportional to particle rigidity provides reasonable fits to both the positron and total electron data. At energies below 180 MeV, the data are consistent with a continuation of the same diffusion coefficient and a local source of negatrons or with a change in the diffusion coefficient to a constant value.

  9. Measurement of the metastable lifetime for the 2s^2 2p^2 ^1So level in O^2+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Cadez, I.; Chutjian, A.; Niimura, M.

    2004-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of the 1S0 level was found to be 540 +/- 27 ms. This is in good agreement with a previous measurement and with a number of theoretical calculations. Metastable lifetimes, when combined with collisional excitation rates, can provide a diagnostic for electron density Ne in a stellar or solar plasma.

  10. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and decay modes of hadrons at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2010-05-01

    The Tevatron provides 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions and allows for collection of rich b-hadron samples to the two experiments CDF and D0. The study of heavy flavor properties represents a fruitful opportunity to investigate the flavor sector of the Standard Model (SM) and to look for hints of New Physics (NP). Here we report the first measurement of polarization amplitudes in B{sub s}{sup 0} charmless decays, world leading results on b-hadron lifetimes, and measurements of several other properties of b-hadrons.

  11. {sup 128}Xe Lifetime Measurement Using the Coulex-Plunger Technique in Inverse Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinopoulos, T.; Lagoyannis, A.; Harissopulos, S.; Dewald, A.; Rother, W.; Ilie, G.; Jones, P.; Rakhila, P.; Greenlees, P.; Grahn, T.; Julin, R.; Balabanski, D. L.

    2008-05-12

    The lifetimes of the lowest collective yrast and non-yrast states in {sup 128}Xe were measured in a Coulomb excitation experiment using the recoil distance method (RDM) in inverse kinematics. Hereby, the Cologne plunger apparatus was employed together with the JUROGAM spectrometer. Excited states in {sup 128}Xe were populated using a {sup 128}Xe beam impinging on a {sup nat}Fe target with E({sup 128}Xe){approx_equal}525 MeV. Recoils were detected by means of an array of solar cells placed at forward angles. Recoil-gated {gamma}-spectra were measured at different plunger distances.

  12. Surface recombination velocity and lifetime in InP measured by transient microwave reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothra, S.; Tyagi, S. D.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are determined in organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)-grown InP by a contactless microwave technique. For lightly doped n-type InP, a surface recombination velocity of 5000 cm/s is measured. However, in solar cells with a heavily doped n-type emitter a surface recombination velocity of 1 x 10 to the 6th cm/s is observed. Possible reasons for this due to surface pinning are discussed. The effects of various chemical treatments and SiO on the surface recombination velocity are measured.

  13. B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing and lifetime difference measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi

    2010-02-10

    We review latest experimental results on the Bs mixing and lifetime difference measurements at CDF. We report on the latest beta{sub s} and DELTAGAMMA{sub s} results from B{sub s}->J/psiphi. We also discuss flavor specific DELTAGAMMA{sub s} measurements, including information from hadronic channels, B{sub s}->D{sub s}D{sub s} and B{sub s}->KK. We describe the new flavor tagging methodology and its calibration using the B{sub s} oscillations.

  14. Measurement of Beauty and Charm Photoproduction at H1 using inclusive lifetime tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, L.

    2005-10-06

    A measurement of the charm and beauty photoproduction cross sections at the ep collider HERA is presented. The lifetime signature of c and b-flavoured hadrons is exploited to determine the fractions of events in the sample containing charm or beauty. Differential cross sections as a function of the jet transverse momentum, the rapidity and x{sub {gamma}}{sup obs} are measured in the photoproduction region Q2 < 1 GeV2, with inelasticity 0.15 < y < 0.8. The results are compared with calculations in next-to-leading order perturbative QCD and Monte Carlo models as implemented in PYTHIA and CASCADE.

  15. Measurement of the lifetimes of the neutral and charged D mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Gladney, L.D.

    1985-03-01

    Results are presented on the use of a high-resolution drift chamber in the Mark II Detector at PEP to measure the lifetimes of D/sup 0/ and D/sup + -/ mesons produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at 29 GeV. Based on a sample of 74 events for the D/sup 0/ mesons and 23 events for the D/sup + -/ mesons, the lifetimes are found to be tau/sub D/sup 0/ = 4.7/sub -0.8//sup +0.9/ +- 0.5 x 10/sup -13/ s; tau/sub D/sup + -// = 8.9/sub -2.7//sup +3.8/ +- 1.3 x 10/sup -13/ s. The ratio of these lifetimes, tau/sub D/sup 0///tau/sub D/sup + -// = 1.9/sub -0.7//sup +0.9/ +- 0.3, indicates that the decays of these mesons cannot be explained by the simple spectator model of charmed particle decay.

  16. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted.

  17. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted. PMID:27245647

  18. Studies on the Use of Liquid Surface Passivation for Lifetime Measurements on Good-Quality Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Devayajanam, S.; Rupnowski, P.; Shet, S.; Sopori, B. L.; Ravindra, N. M.; Caskey, D.; Chang, J.; Covington, J.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated several liquid passivants, viz. solutions of iodine ethanol (IE), quinhydrone methanol (QHM), and potassium cyanide (KCN), for measuring minority-carrier lifetime. Lifetime was measured by the WCT-100 (Sinton Instruments) and WT-2000 (Semilab). Our results show that both IE and QHM passivation are reliable mechanisms. We also find that the KCN solution is moderately passivating on oxidized surfaces, but is only minimally effective on bare Si surfaces. This paper presents details of our studies. In particular, the effect of illumination on IE-passivated surfaces and possible reasons for variations in lifetime measurement are discussed.

  19. Effect of positron source irradiation on positronium annihilation in fine powdered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Z. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation were measured as a function of time to study the irradiation effect by 22Na positron source in fine powdered alumina. The γ-Al2O3 samples were put in a vacuum chamber with a pressure of about 10-6 Torr and were cooled down to 10 K by a closed-cycle helium gas refrigerator. The irradiation of γ-Al2O3 samples by positron source was taken for a duration of about two days immediately after the sample was cooled down. After that, the sample was subjected to a warm up process from 10 K to 300 K with a step of 10 K. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectra were measured simultaneously during these processes. Two long lifetime components corresponding to ortho-positronium annihilation were observed. A significant shortening of these long lifetime components and a large increase in S parameter is observed during irradiation. It is supposed that positron source irradiation creates a large number of paramagnetic centers on the surface of the γ-Al2O3 grains, which induce spin conversion quenching of positronium. The irradiation induced paramagnetic centers are unstable above 70 K and are nearly annealed out when the temperature rises to 190 K. After warming up of the sample to room temperature, the positron lifetime spectrum is identical to that before irradiation. It was also found that after irradiation, a medium long lifetime component of about 5 ns appears, of which the intensity increases with increasing irradiation time. This may be originated from the formation of the surface o-Ps state. This surface o-Ps state is also inhibited at elevated temperatures. Our results indicate that positronium is a very sensitive probe for the surface defects in porous materials.

  20. Design and construction of a Vertex Chamber and measurement of the average B-Hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-10-01

    Four parameters describe the mixing of the three quark generations in the Standard Model of the weak charged current interaction. These four parameters are experimental inputs to the model. A measurement of the mean lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks, or B-Hadrons, constrains the magnitudes of two of these parameters. Measurement of the B-Hadron lifetime requires a device that can measure the locations of the stable particles that result from B-Hadron decay. This device must function reliably in an inaccessible location, and survive high radiation levels. We describe the design and construction of such a device, a gaseous drift chamber. Tubes of 6.9 mm diameter, having aluminized mylar walls of 100 ..mu..m thickness are utilized in this Vertex Chamber. It achieves a spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m, and a resolution in extrapolation to the B-Hadron decay location of 87 ..mu..m. Its inner layer is 4.6 cm from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams. The Vertex Chamber is situated within the MAC detector at PEP. We have analyzed botht he 94 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity accumulated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the Vertex Chamber in place as well as the 210 pb/sup -1/ accumulated previously. We require a lepton with large momentum transverse to the event thrust axis to obtain a sample of events enriched in B-Hadron decays. The distribution of signed impact parameters of all tracks in these events is used to measure the B-Hadron flight distance, and hence lifetime. 106 refs., 79 figs., 20 tabs.

  1. Positron-rubidium scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A 5-state close-coupling calculation (5s-5p-4d-6s-6p) was carried out for positron-Rb scattering in the energy range 3.7 to 28.0 eV. In contrast to the results of similar close-coupling calculations for positron-Na and positron-K scattering the (effective) total integrated cross section has an energy dependence which is contrary to recent experimental measurements.

  2. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud density In the Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, Mauro T.F.; Krasnykh, Anatoly K.; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnaad, Kiran G.; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom

    2008-06-18

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electrons clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appears to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regionsif the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  3. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density In The Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Krasnykh, A.K; Byrd, J.; Santis, S.De; Sonnad, K.G.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; /CERN

    2008-07-03

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appear to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regions if the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  4. Lifetime measurement of the 167.1 keV state in {sup 41}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    White, E. R.; Mach, H.; Fraile, L. M.; Koester, U.; Arndt, O.; Blazhev, A.; Braun, N.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Boelaert, N.; Borge, M. J. G.; Boutami, R.; Reillo, E.-M.; Tengblad, O.; Bradley, H.; Dlouhy, Z.; Ugryumov, V.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hinke, Ch.; Kroell, T.

    2007-11-15

    The Advanced-Time-Delayed method was used to measure lifetimes of the states in {sup 41}Ar populated in the {beta} decay of {sup 41}Cl. The nuclei {sup 41}Cl were produced at ISOLDE by 1.4-GeV proton bombardment of a thick UC{sub x} target and mass-separated as molecular ions, XeCl{sup +}. Our measured half-life of the 167.1-keV state, T{sub 1/2}=315(15) ps, is significantly lower than the previously measured value of 410(30) ps. We have also determined T{sub 1/2}=260(80) ps and T{sub 1/2}{<=}46 ps for the 515.9- and 1867.7-keV states, respectively. These are the shortest lifetimes measured so far with the ultrafast timing method using the new LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) crystals for {gamma}-ray detection.

  5. Measurements on cracktips in stainless steel AISI 321 by using a new positron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaks, M.; Bennewitz, K.; Bihr, H.; Männig, U.; Zamponi, C.; Maier, K.

    1999-08-01

    High resolution positron microscopy provides a new method for non-destructive investigations of plastic deformation with spatial resolution in the micron range. As positron annihilation is highly sensitive to lattice defects, low concentrations of dislocations are detectable, so that the plastic zone in front of a cracktip appears larger than in comparable metallographic methods. To demonstrate this, a plastic zone in the common stainless steel AISI 321 is imaged with the Bonn Positron Microprobe (BPM) with a spatial resolution of 20 μm.

  6. Magnetic moment and lifetime measurements of Coulomb-excited states in Cd106

    DOE PAGES

    Benczer-Koller, N.; Kumbartzki, G. J.; Speidel, K. -H.; Torres, D. A.; Robinson, S. J. Q.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Allmond, J. M.; Fallon, P.; Abramovic, I.; Bernstein, L. A.; et al

    2016-09-06

    The Cd isotopes are well studied, but experimental data for the rare isotopes are sparse. At energies above the Coulomb barrier, higher states become accessible. Remeasure and supplement existing lifetimes and magnetic moments of low-lying states in 106Cd. Methods: In an inverse kinematics reaction, a 106Cd beam impinging on a 12C target was used to Coulomb excite the projectiles. The high recoil velocities provide a unique opportunity to measure g factors with the transient-field technique and to determine lifetimes from lineshapes by using the Doppler-shift-attenuation method. Large-scale shell-model calculations were carried out for 106Cd. As a result, the g factorsmore » of the 2+1 and 4+1 states in 106Cd were measured to be g(2+1) = +0.398(22) and g(4+1) = +0.23(5). A lineshape analysis yielded lifetimes in disagreement with published values. The new results are τ(106Cd; 2+1) = 7.0(3) ps and τ(106Cd; 4+1) = 2.5(2) ps. The mean life τ(106Cd; 2+2) = 0.28(2) ps was determined from the fully-Doppler-shifted γ line. Mean lives of τ(106Cd; 4+3) = 1.1(1) ps and τ(106Cd; 3–1) = 0.16(1) ps were determined for the first time. In conclusion, the newly measured g(4+1) of 106Cd is found to be only 59% of the g(2+1). This difference cannot be explained by either shell-model or collective-model calculations.« less

  7. Magnetic moment and lifetime measurements of Coulomb-excited states in 106Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benczer-Koller, N.; Kumbartzki, G. J.; Speidel, K.-H.; Torres, D. A.; Robinson, S. J. Q.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Allmond, J. M.; Fallon, P.; Abramovic, I.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bevins, J. E.; Crawford, H. L.; Guevara, Z. E.; Hurst, A. M.; Kirsch, L.; Laplace, T. A.; Lo, A.; Matthews, E. F.; Mayers, I.; Phair, L. W.; Ramirez, F.; Wiens, A.

    2016-09-01

    Background: The Cd isotopes are well studied, but experimental data for the rare isotopes are sparse. At energies above the Coulomb barrier, higher states become accessible. Purpose: Remeasure and supplement existing lifetimes and magnetic moments of low-lying states in 106Cd. Methods: In an inverse kinematics reaction, a 106Cd beam impinging on a 12C target was used to Coulomb excite the projectiles. The high recoil velocities provide a unique opportunity to measure g factors with the transient-field technique and to determine lifetimes from lineshapes by using the Doppler-shift-attenuation method. Large-scale shell-model calculations were carried out for 106Cd. Results: The g factors of the 21+ and 41+ states in 106Cd were measured to be g (21+)=+0.398 (22 ) and g (41+)=+0.23 (5 ) . A lineshape analysis yielded lifetimes in disagreement with published values. The new results are τ (106Cd;21+)=7.0 (3 )ps and τ (106Cd;41+)=2.5 (2 )ps . The mean life τ (106Cd;22+)=0.28 (2 )ps was determined from the fully-Doppler-shifted γ line. Mean lives of τ (106Cd;43+)=1.1 (1 )ps and τ (106Cd;31-)=0.16 (1 )ps were determined for the first time. Conclusions: The newly measured g (41+) of 106Cd is found to be only 59% of the g (21+) . This difference cannot be explained by either shell-model or collective-model calculations.

  8. Experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility: lifetime products for large sample of pixilated CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadawale, S. V.; Shanmugam, M.; Purohit, Shishir; Acharya, Y. B.; Sudhakar, Manju

    2012-07-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) is thought to be a primary work horse for hard X-ray astronomy in future. Due to the relatively large band-gap, it offers near room temperature operation while maintaining much better energy resolution then scintillator detectors operating in similar energy range. Further, CZT detectors are available in the form of pixilated detectors with area up to few cm2 and hence it is possible to realize very large detector area by having an array of such pixilated CZT detectors. However, it is well known that the energy spectrum of mono-energetic X-ray measured by CZT detectors does not have a Gaussian shape but has significant low-energy tail. This is mainly due to relatively poor mobility and small life time of the charge carriers, particularly of holes, in the CZT crystals. Thus, in order to understand spectral response for a large array of CZT detectors consisting of multiple elements / pixels, it is essential to characterize the mobility-lifetime products of charge carriers for each individual elements / pixels. Here we present experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility-lifetime products for large sample of multi-pixel CZT detectors. The mobility-lifetime products are measured by simultaneously fitting a ‘CZT line’ model to pixel wise spectra of 122 keV X-rays from 57Co at three different bias voltages. These were carried out as a part of selection of CZT detector modules for the “High Energy X-ray spectrometer (HEX)” onboard Indian moon mission - Chandrayaan-1.

  9. Measurement of cosmic ray positron and negatron spectra between 50 and 800 MeV. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of cosmic ray positrons and negatrons at energies between 50 and 800 MeV. Comparisons of the separate positron and negatron spectra observed near the earth with their expected intensities in interstellar space can be used to investigate the complex (and variable) interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the expanding solar wind. The present measurements, which have established finite values or upper limits for the positron and negatron spectral between 50 and 800 MeV, have confirmed earlier evidence for the existence of a dominant component of negatrons from primary sources in the galaxy. The present results are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that the positron component is in fact mainly attributable to collisions between cosmic ray nuclei and the interstellar gas. The estimate of the absolute intensities confirm the indications from neutron monitors that in 1972 the interplanetary cosmic ray intensities were already recovering toward their high levels observed in 1965.

  10. Mechanical durability of polymeric coatings studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy: correlation between cyclic loading and free volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Peng, Q.; Huang, Y. Y.; Zhang, R.; Mallon, P. E.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.; Wu, Y.; Richardson, J. R.; Sandreczki, T. C.; Jean, Y. C.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2002-06-01

    The mechanical durability of seven commercially polymeric coatings is investigated using slow positron beam techniques to monitor changes in sub-nanometer defects during the process of cyclic loading. Doppler broadened energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were performed as a function of the slow positron energy at different periods of cycling loading. The positron annihilation dada show that both S-defect parameter and o-positronium (Ps) lifetime decrease as the loading cycle increases. The results indicate a loss of free volumes due to the loss of mechanical durability by cyclic loading. A direct correlation between the loss of S-defect parameter and the period of loading cycle is observed. This is interpreted as that durability of polymeric coatings is controlled by the atomic level free volumes. It is shown that the slow positron beam is a very successful probe in detecting the very early stages of coating degradation due to mechanical processes.

  11. Measurement requirements and techniques for degradation studies and lifetime prediction testing of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Derringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Tests of weathering and aging behavior are being developed to characterize the degradation and predict the lifetimes of low-cost photovoltaic arrays. Environmental factors which affect array performance include UV radiation, thermal energy, water, oxygen (generally involved in synergistic effects with UV radiation or high temperatures), physical stress, pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and ozone), abrasives and dirt. A survey of photovoltaic array testing has shown the need to establish quantitative correlations between certain measurable properties (carbonyl formation, glass transition temperature, and molecular weight change) and modes of degradation and failure.

  12. Lifetime measurements of the D +, D 0, D {/s +}, and Λ {/c +} charmed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. P.; Barate, R.; Bloch, D.; Bonamy, P.; Borgeaud, P.; Burchell, M.; Burmeister, H.; Brunet, J. M.; Calvino, F.; Cattaneo, M.; Crespo, J. M.; D'Almagne, B.; David, M.; Diciaccio, L.; Dixon, J.; Druet, P.; Duane, A.; Engel, J. P.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Fokitis, E.; Forty, R. W.; Foucault, P.; Gazis, E. N.; Gerber, J. P.; Giomataris, Y.; Hofmokl, T.; Katsoutis, E. C.; Koratzinos, M.; Krafft, C.; Lefievre, B.; Lemoigne, Y.; Lopez, A.; Lui, W. K.; Magneville, C.; Maltezos, A.; McEwen, J. G.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pattison, B.; Poutot, D.; Primout, M.; Rahmani, H.; Roudeau, P.; Seez, C.; Six, J.; Strub, R.; Treille, D.; Triscos, P.; Tristram, G.; Villet, G.; Volte, A.; Wayne, M.; Websdale, D. M.; Wormser, G.; Zolnierowski, Y.

    1990-12-01

    Using a high-statistics sample of more than 1000 reconstructed charmed-particle decays, the lifetimes of the weakly decaying charmed mesons and of the Λ {/c +} baryon have been measured: 10052_2005_Article_BF01552318_TeX2GIFE1.gif begin{gathered} tau _{D^ + } = 1.03 ± 0.08 + 0.06 ps,tau _{D^0 } = 0.417 ± 0.018 ± 0.015 ps \\ tau _{D_s^ + } = 0.33_{ - 0.08}^{ + 0.12} ± 0.03 ps,tau _{Λ _c^ + } = 0.18 ± 0.03 ± 0.03 ps. \\

  13. Lifetime measurements and dipole transition rates for superdeformed states in {sup 190}Hg.

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, H.

    1999-03-24

    The Doppler-shift attenuation method was used to measure life-times of superdeformed (SD) states for both the yrast and the first excited superdeformed band of {sup 190}Hg. Intrinsic quadruple moments Q{sub 0} were extracted. For the first time, the dipole transition rates have been extracted for the inter-band transitions which connect the excited SD band to the yrast states in the second minimum. The results support the interpretation of the excited SD band as a rotational band built on an octupole vibration.

  14. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosives molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailors the stability of the molecular adduct complex. TIMS flexibility to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments / low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with higher confidence levels. PMID:26153567

  15. A measurement of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime at the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, Marcus Philip

    2007-07-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the lifetime of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ baryon, performed using data from proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ-$\\bar{v}$μX was reconstructed in approximately 1.3 fbμ-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector in 2002-2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A signal of 4437 ± 329 Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ- pairs was obtained, and the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime was measured using a binned X2 fit, which gives a value {tau}(Λ$0\\atop{b}$) = 1.290$+0.091\\atop{-1.110}$(stat)$+0.085\\atop{-0.091}$(syst) ps. This result is consistent with the world average and is one of the most precise measurements of this quantity.

  16. A Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Lifetime via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The neutral pion radiative width has been measured to 8.411 eV ± 1.8% + 1.13% - 1.70% (lifetime = 7.826 ± 0.14 + 0.088 - 0.133 x 10-17 s) utilizing the Primakoff effect and roughly 4.9 to 5.5 GeV photons at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. The Hall B Photon Tagger, the Hall B Pair Spectrometer, a state of the art Hybrid Calorimter enabled precision incident photon energy measurement, photon flux measurement, and neutral pion identification, respectively. With these and other hardware and software tools, elastic neutral pion yields were extracted from the data. A well developed and understood simulation calculated geometric and software cut efficiency curves. The simulation also provided photo-pion production response functions to fit the experimental cross sections and extract the Primakoff cross section and thus the neutral pion radiative width and lifetime. Future work includes improving understanding of the nuclear incoherent process and any other background sources of elastic neutral pions in this data.

  17. Measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ωb- baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A proton-proton collision data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by LHCb at √{s }=7 and 8 TeV, is used to reconstruct 63 ±9 Ωb-→Ωc0π-, Ωc0→p K-K-π+ decays. Using the Ξb-→Ξc0π-, Ξc0→p K-K-π+ decay mode for calibration, the lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of the Ωb- baryon are measured to be τΩb-/τΞb-=1.11 ±0.16 ±0.03 , τΩb-=1.78 ±0.26 ±0.05 ±0.06 ps , where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and from the calibration mode (for τΩb- only). A measurement is also made of the mass difference, mΩb--mΞb-, and the corresponding Ωb- mass, which yields mΩb--mΞb-=247.4 ±3.2 ±0.5 MeV /c2 , mΩb-=6045.1 ±3.2 ±0.5 ±0.6 MeV /c2 . These results are consistent with previous measurements.

  18. Measurement of the Bs(0) → Ds-Ds+ and Bs(0) → D-Ds+ effective lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Warrington, N; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-03-21

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the B(s)(0) meson in the decay B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ effective lifetime is 1.379 ± 0.026 ± 0.017 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light B(s)(0) mass eigenstate of ΓL = 0.725 ± 0.014 ± 0.009 ps(-1). The B(s)(0) lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific B(s)(0)→ D-Ds+ decay to be 1.52 ± 0.15 ± 0.01 ps. PMID:24702350

  19. Measurement of the Bs(0) → Ds-Ds+ and Bs(0) → D-Ds+ effective lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Warrington, N; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-03-21

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the B(s)(0) meson in the decay B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ effective lifetime is 1.379 ± 0.026 ± 0.017 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light B(s)(0) mass eigenstate of ΓL = 0.725 ± 0.014 ± 0.009 ps(-1). The B(s)(0) lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific B(s)(0)→ D-Ds+ decay to be 1.52 ± 0.15 ± 0.01 ps.

  20. Measuring excited state lifetime of Rb atoms with pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Boiko, D. L.

    2015-08-31

    A technique for measuring the excited state lifetime τ{sub ex} of optical transitions in alkali atoms is presented. It is a form of pump-probe technique based on time-resolved optical transmission through the atomic vapor cell. This technique can serve as an alternative to the traditionally used time-resolved photofluorescence methods when measuring alkali vapor cells with heavily quenched fluorescence, where the τ{sub ex} is expected to be on the order of a few nanoseconds, and the highly sensitive fluorescence detectors with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution that are required may not be available. We use this technique to measure the τ{sub ex} of Rb atoms in vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures.

  1. Frequency-domain measurement of the spin-imbalance lifetime in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quay, C. H. L.; Dutreix, C.; Chevallier, D.; Bena, C.; Aprili, M.

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the lifetime of spin imbalances in the quasiparticle population of a superconductor (τs) in the frequency domain. A time-dependent spin imbalance is created by injecting spin-polarized electrons at finite excitation frequencies into a thin-film mesoscopic superconductor (Al) in an in-plane magnetic field (in the Pauli limit). The time-averaged value of the spin-imbalance signal as a function of excitation frequency frf shows a cutoff at frf≈1 /(2 π τs) . The spin-imbalance lifetime is relatively constant in the accessible ranges of temperatures, with perhaps a slight increase with increasing magnetic field. Taking into account sample thickness effects, τs is consistent with previous measurements and of the order of the electron-electron scattering time τe e. Our data are qualitatively well described by a theoretical model taking into account all quasiparticle tunneling processes from a normal metal into a superconductor.

  2. Measurement of the B+ and B0 Lifetimes using Topological Vertexing at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.

    2004-01-29

    The lifetimes of B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mesons have been measured using a sample of 200,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC between 1993 and 1996. The analysis is an improvement of the inclusive topological measurement recently reported and includes the 50,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays collected in 1996 with the SLD upgrade vertex detector. A high statistics sample of 12841 (7942) charged (neutral) vertices with good charge purity is obtained. The charge purity is enhanced by using the vertex mass, the SLC electron beam polarization (63% for 1993 and 77% for 1994-6) and an opposite hemisphere jet charge technique. Lifetime fits for the full data sample yield: {tau}{sub B{sup +}} = 1.698 {+-} 0.040(stat) {+-} 0.046(syst) ps, {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.581 {+-} 0.043(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst) ps, {tau}{sub B{sup +}}/{tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.072 {+-} {sub 0.049}{sup 0.052}(stat) {+-} 0.038(syst).

  3. Measurement of the B+- lifetime and top quark identification using secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, Ariel G

    2004-02-01

    This dissertation presents a preliminary measurement of the B{sup {+-}} lifetime through the full reconstruction of its decay chain, and the identification of top quark production in the electron plus jets channel using the displaced vertex b-tagging method. Its main contribution is the development, implementation and optimization of the Kalman filter algorithm for vertex reconstruction, and of the displaced vertex technique for tagging jets arising from b quark fragmentation, both of which have now become part of the standard D0 reconstruction package. These two algorithms fully exploit the new state-of-the-art tracking detectors, recently installed as part of the Run 2 D0 upgrade project. The analysis is based on data collected during Run 2a at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Hadron Collider up to April 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb{sup -1}. The measured B meson lifetime of {tau} = 1.57 {+-} 0.18 ps is in agreement with the current world average, with a competitive level of precision expected when the full data sample becomes available.

  4. Positron annihilation study of microvoids in centrifugally atomized 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. Y.; Byrne, J. G.

    1993-03-01

    Positron trapping in microvoids was studied by positron-lifetime and positron Doppler line-shape measurements of centrifugally atomized 304 stainless-steel powder, which was hot-isostatically-press consolidated. This material contained a concentration of several times 1023/m3 of 1.5-nm-diam microvoids. Positron annihilation was strongly influenced by the microvoids in that a very long lifetime component τ3 of about 600 ps resulted. The intensity of the τ3 component decreased with decreasing number density of 1.5 nm microvoids. The Doppler peak shape was found to be much more strongly influenced by microvoids than by any other defects such as precipitates or grain boundaries. In particular microvoids produced significant narrowing of the Doppler distribution shape.

  5. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy Study of Ni-Mn-Ga Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Apiñaniz, Estibaliz; Plazaola, Fernando; Sanchez-Alarcos, Vicente; Pérez-Landazábal, Jose Ignacio; Recarte, Vicente

    We have studied the role that vacancy type defects play in the martensitic transformation of Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys by means of positron lifetime spectroscopy. The measurements presented in this work have been performed in five ternary alloys. Three of them transform to modulated and two to non-modulated martensitic phases. With these five samples we cover a large range in composition. Positron experiments have been performed at room temperature after subsequent isochronal annealing at different temperatures and up to a maximum temperature of 600°C. Results show a large variation of the average positron lifetime value with the isochronal annealing temperature in non-modulated samples. However, the response in the modulated samples is quite different. The results are discussed in term of different type of positron trapping defects and their evolution with the annealing temperature. The present work shows a correlation between vacancy concentration and martensitic transformation temperature of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

  6. Test-Retest Repeatability of Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements using Rubidium-82 Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efseaff, Matthew

    Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proposed for routine myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification. Few studies have investigated the test-retest repeatability of this method. Same-day repeatability of rest MBF imaging was optimized with a highly automated analysis program using image-derived input functions and a dual spillover correction (SOC). The effects of heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and subject hemodynamics on test-retest repeatability were investigated at rest and during hyperemic stress. Factors affecting rest MBF repeatability included gender, suspected coronary artery disease, and dual SOC (p < 0.001). The best repeatability coefficient for same-day rest MBF was 0.20 mL/min/g using a six-minute scan-time, iterative reconstruction, dual SOC, resting rate-pressure-product (RPP) adjustment, and a left atrium image-derived input function. The serial study repeatabilities of the optimized protocol in subjects with homogeneous RPPs and tracer infusion profiles was 0.19 and 0.53 mL/min/g at rest and stress, and 0.95 for stress / rest myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Subjects with heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and hemodynamic conditions had significantly less repeatable MBF measurements at rest, stress, and stress/rest flow reserve (p < 0.05).

  7. Measurement of the average {ital B} hadron lifetime in {ital Z}{sup 0} decays using reconstructed vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; (SLD Collabora...

    1995-11-13

    We report a measurement of the average {ital B} hadron lifetime using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider in 1993. An inclusive analysis selected three-dimensional vertices with {ital B} hadron lifetime information in a sample of 50{times}10{sup 3} {ital Z}{sup 0} decays. A lifetime of 1.564{plus_minus}0.030(stat){plus_minus}0.036(syst) ps was extracted from the decay length distribution of these vertices using a binned maximum likelihood method. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  8. Technique for measurement of fluorescence lifetime by use of stroboscopic excitation and continuous-wave detection.

    PubMed

    Matthews, D R; Summers, H D; Njoh, K; Errington, R J; Smith, P J; Barber, P; Ameer-Beg, S; Vojnovic, B

    2006-03-20

    A study of the practicality a simple technique for obtaining time-domain information that uses continuous wave detection of fluorescence is presented. We show that this technique has potential for use in assays for which a change in the lifetime of an indicator occurs in reaction to an analyte, in fluorescence resonance energy transfer, for example, and could be particularly important when one is carrying out such measurements in the scaled-down environment of a lab on a chip (biochip). A rate-equation model is presented that allows an objective analysis to be made of the relative importance of the key measurement parameters: optical saturation of the fluorophore and period of the excitation pulse. An experimental demonstration of the technique that uses a cuvette-based analysis of a carbocyanine dye and for which the excitation source is a 650 nm wavelength, self-pulsing AlGaInP laser diode is compared with the model.

  9. RDDS lifetime measurements of low-lying superdeformed states in {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, R.; Dewald, A.; Kruecken, R.

    1996-12-31

    The lifetimes of three low-lying states in the superdeformed (SD) yrast band of {sup 194}Hg were measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. The deduced transition quadrupole moments, Q{sub t}, equal those extracted from a DSAM measurement for the high-lying states of the band corroborate the assumption that the decay out of SD bands does not strongly affect the structure of the corresponding states. By a simple mixing-model the decay can be described assuming a very small admixture of normal-deformed (ND) states to the decaying SD states. The deduced ND mixing amplitudes for the yrast SD bands in {sup 192,194}Hg and {sup 194}Pb are presented along with average transition quadrupole moments for the lower parts of the excited SD bands.

  10. SPS Outstanding Student Award for Undergraduate Research Talk: Lifetime Measurements and Deformation in 79Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Kaye, Robert; Arora, S. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Doring, J.; Sun, Y.; Baldwin, T. D.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Cooper, M. W.; Gerbick, S. M.; Wiedeking, M.; Hoffman, C. R.; Pavan, J.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Riley, L. A.

    2008-04-01

    High-spin states in ^79Sr were produced following the ^54Fe(^28Si, 2pn) fusion-evaporation reaction using a beam kinetic energy of 90 MeV at the Florida State University (FSU) Tandem-Linac particle accelerator facility, and the resulting de-exciting γ rays were detected with the FSU array of 10 Compton-suppressed high-purity Ge detectors comprised of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The synthesized nuclei were stopped completely in the target, resulting in Doppler-shifted γ-ray line shapes that could be analyzed using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The experimental line shapes were acquired at detection angles of 35 and 145 , and the resulting Doppler-shifted peaks were analyzed to extract the lifetime of their parent states. In all, 23 lifetimes were measured in three separate band structures using this method, and then used to infer transition quadrupole moments (Qt) and quadrupole deformations (β2) using the rotational model. The resulting Qt values indicated a high degree of collectivity and deformation in all three observed sequences of excited states (bands) with only a modest decline in collectivity with increasing angular momentum. The results show good qualitative agreement with the predictions of both cranked Woods-Saxon (CWS) and projected shell model (PSM) calculations. In addition, the pattern of excited energy states and their de-exciting gamma-ray transitions (level scheme) was re-examined and compared to the most recent study of ^79Sr using γ-γ coincidence measurements, intensity measurements, and directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) ratios in addition to the lifetime measurements. Overall, the level scheme was verified, with the exception of the re-arrangement of one transition. The band based on the intrinsic d5/2 single-particle orbital from the shell model, was found to have the largest average deformation (β2,ave = 0.41) among the three observed bands, in agreement with the CWS and PSM

  11. Z =50 core stability in 110Sn from magnetic-moment and lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbartzki, G. J.; Benczer-Koller, N.; Speidel, K.-H.; Torres, D. A.; Allmond, J. M.; Fallon, P.; Abramovic, I.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bevins, J. E.; Crawford, H. L.; Guevara, Z. E.; Gürdal, G.; Hurst, A. M.; Kirsch, L.; Laplace, T. A.; Lo, A.; Matthews, E. F.; Mayers, I.; Phair, L. W.; Ramirez, F.; Robinson, S. J. Q.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Wiens, A.

    2016-04-01

    Background: The structure of the semimagic 50Sn isotopes were previously studied via measurements of B (E 2 ;21+→01+ ) and g factors of 21+ states. The values of the B (E 2 ;21+ ) in the isotopes below midshell at N = 66 show an enhancement in collectivity, contrary to predictions from shell-model calculations. Purpose: This work presents the first measurement of the 2 1+ and 4 1+ states' magnetic moments in the unstable neutron-deficient 110Sn. The g factors provide complementary structure information to the interpretation of the observed B (E 2 ) values. Methods: The 110Sn nuclei have been produced in inverse kinematics in an α -particle transfer reaction from 12C to 106Cd projectiles at 390, 400, and 410 MeV. The g factors have been measured with the transient field technique. Lifetimes have been determined from line shapes using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Results: The g factors of the 21+ and 41+ states in 110Sn are g (21+) = +0.29(11) and g (41+) = +0.05(14), respectively. In addition, the g (41+) = +0.27(6) in 106Cd has been measured for the first time. A line-shape analysis yielded τ (110Sn ; 21+) = 0.81(10) ps and a lifetime of τ (110Sn ; 31-) = 0.25(5) ps was calculated from the fully Doppler-shifted γ line. Conclusions: No evidence has been found in 110Sn that would require excitation of protons from the closed Z =50 core.

  12. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  13. Light emitting diode-based nanosecond ultraviolet light source for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Tsutomu; Misawa, Hiroaki

    1995-12-01

    A compact pulsed-light source is devised from an InGaN/AlGaN double heterostructure light-emitting diode (LED). The LED emits a 450-nm (blue) light under conventional dc operation below 30 mA. When a current larger than 50 mA is applied, the intensity of the 450-nm light saturates, but that of the 380-nm light due to the InGaN component continues to increase. This phenomenon is utilized to realize a nanosecond ultraviolet (UV) light source. Under repetitive, large current pulsing (frequency=10 kHz, pulse width=4 ns, peak current=2 A), the peak LED emission shifts from 450 to 380 nm. Intense light pulses (peak value=40 mW) of 4-ns duration were generated. To evaluate the potential of the pulsed LED as an excitation source, the fluorescence lifetime of a quinine-sulfate solution was measured. The observed lifetime characteristics agreed well with the generally accepted behavior.

  14. Lifetime measurements of normal deformed states in {sub 71}{sup 165}Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Andgren, K.; Podolyak, Zs.; Gelletly, W.; Walker, P. M.; Wheldon, C.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Moeller, O.; Pissulla, T.; Xu, F.R.; Algora, A.; Axiotis, M.; Angelis, G. de; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.; Rusu, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Lunardi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Picosecond lifetimes of medium spin states in {sup 165}Lu were measured for the first time. The reaction used to populate the nucleus of interest was {sup 139}La({sup 30}Si,4n){sup 165}Lu at a beam energy of 135 MeV. The beam was provided by the XTU-tandem accelerator of Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy. By using the differential decay curve method, lifetimes of 19 states in four different rotational bands were obtained. Therefrom the B(E2) values and the transitional quadrupole moments were deduced. The obtained Q{sub t} for the different bands are compared with total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations and particle-rotor-model calculations. The TRS calculations predict different axial symmetric shapes for the bands built on the 9/2{sup -}[514], 9/2{sup +}[404], and 1/2{sup -}[541] configurations, with a {gamma} softness for the 9/2{sup -}[514] configuration. This band has also been studied using the particle-rotor model, the results of which, however, are consistent with a triaxial shape with a {gamma} value of -15 degrees.

  15. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. PMID:26397162

  16. Measurement of the 3s3pP31 lifetime in magnesium using a magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, P. L.; Therkildsen, K. T.; Malossi, N.; Jensen, B. B.; van Ooijen, E. D.; Brusch, A.; Müller, J. H.; Hald, J.; Thomsen, J. W.

    2008-06-01

    We demonstrate an accurate method for measuring the lifetime of long-lived metastable magnetic states using a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Through optical pumping, the metastable (3s3p)P31 level is populated in a standard MOT. During the optical pumping process, a fraction of the population is captured in the magnetic quadrupole field of the MOT. When the metastable atoms decay to the (3s2)S10 ground state they are recaptured into the MOT. In this system no alternative cascading transition is possible. The lifetime of the metastable level is measured directly as an exponential load time of the MOT. We have experimentally tested our method by measuring the lifetime of the (3s3p)P31 of M24g . This lifetime has been measured numerous times previously, but with quite different results. Using our method we find the (3s3p)P31 lifetime to be (4.4±0.2)ms . Theoretical values point toward a lower value for the lifetime.

  17. Positronics of radiation-induced effects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kozyukhin, S. A.; Shpotyuk, M.; Ingram, A.; Szatanik, R.

    2015-03-15

    Using As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and AsS{sub 2} glasses as an example, the principal possibility of using positron annihilation spectroscopy methods for studying the evolution of the free volume of hollow nanoobjects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors exposed to radiation is shown. The results obtained by measurements of the positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening of the annihilation line in reverse chronological order are in full agreement with the optical spectroscopy data in the region of the fundamental absorption edge, being adequately described within coordination defect-formation and physical-aging models.

  18. Predicted CALET measurements of electron and positron spectra from 3 to 20 GeV using the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, B. F.

    2014-05-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (X∘) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 X∘ of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the experiment are to measure the electron e+e energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1000 TeV. In this paper we describe how the geomagnetic field at the 51.6° inclination orbit of the ISS can be used to allow CALET to measure the distinct electron and positron fluxes. The positron fraction has been seen to rise above ˜10 GeV by previous experiments (HEAT, AMS-01), and more recently to continue to increase to higher energies (˜80 GeV for PAMELA, ˜200 GeV for Fermi and ˜350 GeV with the best statistics for AMS-02). Utilizing the geomagnetic cutoff, CALET will be able to distinguish electrons and positrons in the ˜3-20 GeV energy range where the positron fraction turns upward to complement existing high statistics measurements.

  19. Measurement of the positron-electron reaction which produces a gamma ray pair in the region psi/3684/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. B.; Beron, B. L.; Carrington, R. L.; Ford, R. L.; Hofstadter, R.; Liberman, A. D.; Martin, T. W.; Oneill, L. H.; Simpson, J. W.; Hilger, E.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure gamma ray pairs produced in the electron-positron reaction in the region of psi(3684) resonance. The apparatus consisted of two identical spectrometers mounted in a collinear configuration about the beam interaction region. Graphs are presented for the coplanarity angle between reconstructed gamma ray directions, for the scattering and energy deposition of gamma rays in the two crystals used, and for the observed rate of annihilation reactions as a function of center of mass energy.

  20. Cosmic-ray positrons from 10 to 20 GeV - A balloon-borne measurement using the geomagnetic east-west asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Dietrich; Tang, Kwork-Kwong

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported for cosmic-ray positrons obtained in a balloon flight of the University of Chicago electron telescope in Hawaii in April 1984. Making use of the east-west asymmetry in the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity, cosmic-ray positrons and negatrons were separated over the range 10-20 GeV. The resulting positron to electron ratio is 12-22 percent, significantly higher than the ratio measured in the 1-10 Gev range by other experiments. This increase appears to suggest that either a primary component of positrons becomes significant above 10 GeV or that the spectrum of primary negatrons decreases above 10 GeV more sharply than that of secondary positrons.

  1. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D.; Wilkinson, Martin G.; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A. E.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening. PMID:25798136

  2. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D; Wilkinson, Martin G; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A E; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  3. Precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Guan, H.; Qian, Y.; Gao, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca. The measurement was performed using a high-efficiency quantum-state detection technique to monitor quantum jumps and a high-precision and highly synchronous measurement sequence for laser control. A feature in our measurement is the pumping rate of the 729-nm laser that was corrected in a real-time way. The 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime was obtained through the measurement of the spontaneous decay rate after incoherent shelving of the ion to the 3 d 3/2 2D state with a wait time. Systematic errors, such as collisions with background gases, heating effects, impurity components, the shelving and pumping rates, and state detection, were carefully analyzed and estimated. We determined an improved value of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime to be τ3 /2=1.195 (8 ) s. Furthermore, the 3 d 3/2 2D →4 s 1/2 2S quadrupole transition matrix element was measured to be Sk i=7.936 (26 ) e a02 , and the ratio between the lifetimes of 3 d 2D3 /2 and 3 d 2D5 /2 was determined to be 1.018(11). Our method can be universally applied to lifetime measurements of other single ions and atoms with a similar structure.

  4. Positron trapping at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dupasquier, A. ); Romero, R.; Somoza, A. )

    1993-10-01

    The standard positron trapping model has often been applied, as a simple approximation, to the interpretation of positron lifetime spectra in situations of diffusion-controlled trapping. This paper shows that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate, and presents a model based on the correct solution of the diffusion equation, in the version appropriate for studying positron trapping at grain boundaries. The model is used for the analysis of new experimental data on positron lifetime spectra in a fine-grained Al-Ca-Zn alloy. Previous results on similar systems are also discussed and reinterpreted. The analysis yields effective diffusion coefficients not far from the values known for the base metals of the alloys.

  5. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosive molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    McKenzie-Coe, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-08-21

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailor the stability of the molecular adduct complex. The flexibility of TIMS to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments/low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with high confidence levels.

  6. Differential recoil-distance lifetime measurement of the 21+ state in 74Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, C.; Iwasaki, H.; Whitmore, K.; Loelius, C.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J.; Gade, A.; Langer, C.; Lunderberg, E.; Recchia, F.; Stroberg, R.; Walz, C.; Weisshaar, D.; Wadsworth, R.; Lemasson, A.; Braunroth, T.; Dewald, A.; Lee, I. Y.; Bancroft, C.; Barofsky, D.; Lloyd, J.; Westerberg, A.; Wimmer, K.

    2013-10-01

    The structure of 74Rb has received much attention because of its unique location in the nuclear chart. It lies in a region of rapid increase of E2 strength along the N = Z line between 72Kr and 76Sr, and coexistence between prolate and oblate shapes is known to be present in neighboring 74Kr. These observations make the understanding of collectivity in 74Rb highly desirable, but in contrast to neighboring nuclei, little is known about the nature of 74Rb beyond its level scheme. To address this problem, we have performed an experiment to measure the lifetime of the 21+state in 74Rb using a previously undemonstrated differential plunger technique. This was accomplished using the new NSCL TRIPLEX plunger in combination with GRETINA, taking advantage of the latter system's capabilities to achieve sufficient resolution for the new technique. Results will be presented and implications for the structure of 74Rb will be discussed.

  7. High-spin lifetime measurements in the N=Z nucleus Kr72

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoiu, C.; Svensson, C. E.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Austin, R. A. E.; Carpenter, M. P.; Dashdorj, D.; Finlay, P.; Freeman, S. J.; Garrett, P. E.; Greene, J.; Grinyer, G. F.; Görgen, A.; Hyland, B.; Jenkins, D.; Johnston-Theasby, F.; Joshi, P.; Machiavelli, A. O.; Moore, F.; Mukherjee, G.; Phillips, A. A.; Reviol, W.; Sarantites, D. G.; Schumaker, M. A.; Seweryniak, D.; Smith, M. B.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Wadsworth, R.

    2007-04-01

    High-spin states in the N=Z nucleus Kr72 have been populated in the Ca40(Ca40, 2α)Kr72 fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV using the Gammasphere array for γ-ray detection coupled to the Microball array for charged particle detection. The previously observed bands in Kr72 were extended to an excitation energy of ˜24 MeV and angular momentum of 30ℏ. Using the Doppler shift attenuation method the lifetimes of high-spin states were measured for the first time. Excellent agreement between the results of calculations within the isovector mean field theory and experiment is observed both for rotational and deformation properties. No enhancement of quadrupole deformation expected in the presence of isoscalar t=0 np pairing is observed. Current data do not show any evidence for the existence of the isoscalar np pairing.

  8. Lifetime Measurement of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} State in {sup 20}C

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, M.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Paschalis, S.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Gros, S.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Lee, I. Y.; Starosta, K.; Baugher, T.; Gade, A.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Voss, P.; Walsh, K. A.; Bazin, D.; Grinyer, G. F.; Weisshaar, D.

    2011-09-02

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state in the near-dripline nucleus {sup 20}C. The deduced value of {tau}{sub 2{sub 1}{sup +}}=9.8{+-}2.8(stat){sub -1.1}{sup +0.5}(syst) ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2;2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub g.s.}{sup +})=7.5{sub -1.7}{sup +3.0}(stat){sub -0.4}{sup +1.0}(syst) e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

  9. Lifetime measurement of the first excited 2+ state in 108Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, T.; Qi, C.; Ghazi Moradi, F.; Cederwall, B.; Johnson, A.; Liotta, R.; Wyss, R.; Al-Azri, H.; Bloor, D.; Brock, T.; Wadsworth, R.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hauschild, K.; Herzan, A.; Jacobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Nieminen, P.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Go, S.; Ideguchi, E.; Cullen, D. M.; Procter, M. G.; Braunroth, T.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Hackstein, M.; Litzinger, J.; Rother, W.

    2011-10-01

    The lifetime of the first excited 2+ state in the neutron deficient nuclide 108Te has been measured for the first time, using a combined recoil decay tagging and recoil distance Doppler shift technique. The deduced reduced transition probability is B(E2;0g.s.+→2+)=0.39-0.04+0.05e2b2. Compared to previous experimental data on neutron deficient tellurium isotopes, the new data point constitutes a large step (six neutrons) toward the N=50 shell closure. In contrast to what has earlier been reported for the light tin isotopes, our result for tellurium does not show any enhanced transition probability with respect to the theoretical predictions and the tellurium systematics including the new data is successfully reproduced by state-of-the-art shell model calculations.

  10. Measuring protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Day, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The method of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative approach that can be used to detect Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The use of FLIM to measure the FRET that results from the interactions between proteins labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs) inside living cells provides a non-invasive method for mapping interactomes. Here, the use of the phasor plot method to analyze frequency domain (FD) FLIM measurements is described, and measurements obtained from cells producing the 'FRET standard' fusion proteins are used to validate the FLIM system for FRET measurements. The FLIM FRET approach is then used to measure both homologous and heterologous protein-protein interactions (PPI) involving the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). C/EBPα is a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, and localizes to heterochromatin where it interacts with the heterochromatin protein 1 alpha (HP1α). The FLIM-FRET method is used to quantify the homologous interactions between the FP-labeled basic leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα. Then the heterologous interactions between the C/EBPa BZip domain and HP1a are quantified using the FRET-FLIM method. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. PMID:23806643

  11. Measurement of the bottom hadron lifetime at the Z{sup 0} resonancce

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, D.H.

    1992-06-01

    We have measured the bottom hadron lifetime from b{bar b} events produced at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Using the precision vertex detectors of the Mark II detector at the Stanford Linear Collider, we developed an impact parameter tag to identify bottom hadrons. The vertex tracking system resolved impact parameters to 30 {mu}m for high momentum tracks, and 70 {mu}m for tracks with a momentum of 1 GeV. We selected B hadrons with an efficiency of 40% and a sample purity of 80%, by requiring there be at least two tracks in a single jet that significantly miss the Z{sup 0} decay vertex. From a total of 208 hadronic Z{sup 0} events collected by the Mark II detector in 1990, we tagged 53 jets, of which 22 came from 11 double-tagged events. The jets opposite the tagged ones, referred as the ``untagged`` sample, are rich in B hadrons and unbiased in B decay times. The variable {Sigma}{delta} is the sum of impact parameters from tracks in the jet, and contains vital information on the B decay time. We measured the B lifetime from a one-parameter likelihood fit to the untagged {Sigma}{delta} distribution, obtaining {tau}{sub b} = 1.53{sub {minus}0.45}{sup +0.55}{plus_minus}0.16 ps which agrees with the current world average. The first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error was dominated by uncertainties in the track resolution function. As a check, we also obtained consistent results using the {Sigma}{delta} distribution from the tagged jets and from the entire hadronic sample without any bottom enrichment.

  12. Measurement of the bottom hadron lifetime at the Z sup 0 resonancce

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, D.H.

    1992-06-01

    We have measured the bottom hadron lifetime from b{bar b} events produced at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Using the precision vertex detectors of the Mark II detector at the Stanford Linear Collider, we developed an impact parameter tag to identify bottom hadrons. The vertex tracking system resolved impact parameters to 30 {mu}m for high momentum tracks, and 70 {mu}m for tracks with a momentum of 1 GeV. We selected B hadrons with an efficiency of 40% and a sample purity of 80%, by requiring there be at least two tracks in a single jet that significantly miss the Z{sup 0} decay vertex. From a total of 208 hadronic Z{sup 0} events collected by the Mark II detector in 1990, we tagged 53 jets, of which 22 came from 11 double-tagged events. The jets opposite the tagged ones, referred as the untagged'' sample, are rich in B hadrons and unbiased in B decay times. The variable {Sigma}{delta} is the sum of impact parameters from tracks in the jet, and contains vital information on the B decay time. We measured the B lifetime from a one-parameter likelihood fit to the untagged {Sigma}{delta} distribution, obtaining {tau}{sub b} = 1.53{sub {minus}0.45}{sup +0.55}{plus minus}0.16 ps which agrees with the current world average. The first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error was dominated by uncertainties in the track resolution function. As a check, we also obtained consistent results using the {Sigma}{delta} distribution from the tagged jets and from the entire hadronic sample without any bottom enrichment.

  13. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  14. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Tm I and Tm II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Xinghao; Yu, Qi; Li, Yongfan; Gao, Yang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 88 levels of Tm I in the energy range 22 791.176-48 547.98 cm-1 and 29 levels of Tm II in the range 27 294.79-65 612.85 cm-1 were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-ablation plasma. The lifetime values obtained are in the range from 15.4 to 7900 ns for Tm I and from 36.5 to 1000 ns for Tm II. To the best of our knowledge, 77 lifetimes of Tm I and 22 lifetimes of Tm II are reported for the first time. Good agreements between the present results and the previous experimental values were achieved for both Tm I and Tm II.

  15. CFCI3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime and Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-01-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95 - 230 nm) and temperature (216 - 296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The obtained global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 +- 0.7 years (2 sigma uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current spectrum recommendations

  16. CFCl3 (CFC-11): UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence measurements and the impact on its atmospheric lifetime and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-09-01

    (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95-230 nm) and temperature (216-296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than that currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The calculated global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 ± 0.7 years (2σ uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current UV spectrum recommendations.

  17. On Possible Interpretations of the High Energy Electron-Positron Spectrum Measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Profumo, S.; Strong, A.W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bloom, E.D.; Bregeon, J.; Di Bernardo, G.; Gaggero, D.; Giglietto, N.; Kamae, T.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Moiseev, A.A.; Morselli, A.; Ormes, J.F.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pohl, M.; Razzano, M.; Sgro, C.

    2009-05-15

    The Fermi-LAT experiment recently reported high precision measurements of the spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons-plus-positrons (CRE) between 20 GeV and 1 TeV. The spectrum shows no prominent spectral features, and is significantly harder than that inferred from several previous experiments. Here we discuss several interpretations of the Fermi results based either on a single large scale Galactic CRE component or by invoking additional electron-positron primary sources, e.g. nearby pulsars or particle Dark Matter annihilation. We show that while the reported Fermi-LAT data alone can be interpreted in terms of a single component scenario, when combined with other complementary experimental results, specifically the CRE spectrum measured by H.E.S.S. and especially the positron fraction reported by PAMELA between 1 and 100 GeV, that class of models fails to provide a consistent interpretation. Rather, we find that several combinations of parameters, involving both the pulsar and dark matter scenarios, allow a consistent description of those results. We also briefly discuss the possibility of discriminating between the pulsar and dark matter interpretations by looking for a possible anisotropy in the CRE flux.

  18. Measurement of the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} using a lifetime tag and momentum-weighted track charge

    SciTech Connect

    The SLD Collaboration

    1995-08-01

    We present a direct measurement of the parity-violating parameter A{sub b} by analyzing the left-right forward-backward asymmetry of b quarks in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} Z{sup o} {yields} b{bar b}. The SLD experiment observes hadronic decays of Z{sup o} bosons produced at resonance in collisions of longitudinally polarized electrons and unpolarized positrons at the SLC. Heavy flavor decays of the Z{sup o} are identified by taking advantage of the long lifetime of B hadrons, the small, stable SLC beam spot, and precise tracking from SLD. The asymmetry A{sub b} is measured with a self-calibrating technique employing momentum-weighted track charge from both hemispheres in the tagged events. From our 1994--1995 sample of 3.6 pb{sup {minus}1} of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation data with a luminosity-weighted average e{sup {minus}} polarization of 77.3%, and our 1993 sample of 1.8 pb{sup {minus}1} with a luminosity-weighted polarization of 63.1%, we obtain A{sub b}(preliminary) = 0.843 {plus_minus} 0.046(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.051(syst.).

  19. Measurement of the B meson Lifetimes with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Uozumi, Satoru

    2006-01-01

    The lifetimes of the B-, $\\bar{B}$0 and $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mesons are measured using partially reconstructed semileptonic decays. Following semileptonic decay processes and their charge conjugates are used for this analysis: B-/B0 → ℓ-vD0X; B-/B0 → ℓ-vD*+X; B$0\\atop{s}$ → ℓ-vD $+\\atop{s}$x, where ℓ- denotes either a muon or electron. The data are collected during 2002-2004 by the 8 GeV single lepton triggers in CDF Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Corresponding integrated luminosity is about 260 and 360 pbℓ-1 used for the B-/B0 and B$0\\atop{s}$ lifetime analyses, respectively. With the single lepton triggers, events which contain a muon or electron with a transverse momentum greater than 8 GeV/c are selected. For these lepton candidates, further lepton identification cuts are applied to improve purity of the B semileptonic decay signal. After the lepton selection, three types of charm mesons associated with the lepton candidates are reconstructed. Following exclusive decay modes are used for the charm meson reconstruction: D0 → K-π+; D*+ → D0π$+\\atop{s}$, followed by D0→ K-π+; D$+\\atop{s}$ → Φπ++K-. Here π$+\\atop{s}$ denotes a slow pion from D*+ decay. Species of the reconstructed charm meson identify the parent B meson species. However in the B-/B0 semileptonic decays, both mesons decay into the identical lepton + D0 final state. To solve this mixture of the B components in the D0 sample, they adopt the following method: First among the inclusive D0 sample, they look for the D*+ → D0 π$+\\atop{s}$ signal. The inclusive D

  20. Positron microprobe at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka, P; Howell, R; Stoeffl, W

    1998-11-01

    The electron linac based positron source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. We are building a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with sub-micron resolution. The widely spaced and intense positron packets from the tungsten moderator at the end of the 100 MeV LLNL linac are captured and trapped in a magnetic bottle. The positrons are then released in 1 ns bunches at a 20 MHz repetition rate. With a three-stage re-moderation we will compress the cm-sized original beam to a 1 micro-meter diameter final spot on the target. The buncher will compress the arrival time of positrons on the target to less than 100 ps. A detector array with up to 60 BaF2 crystals in paired coincidence will measure the annihilation radiation with high efficiency and low background. The energy of the positrons can be varied from less than 1 keV up to 50 keV.

  1. Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Steven W.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

  2. Measurement of the B-cmeson lifetime in the decay B-c→J/ψπ⁻

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2013-01-02

    The lifetime of the B-c meson is measured using 272 exclusive B-c→J/ψ(→μ⁺μ⁻)π⁻ decays reconstructed in data from proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb⁻¹ recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The lifetime of the B-cmeson is measured to be τ(B-c)=0.452±0.048(stat)±0.027(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the B-c meson lifetime in a fully reconstructed hadronic channel, and it agrees with previous results and has comparable precision.

  3. The TRIple PLunger for EXotic beams TRIPLEX for excited-state lifetime measurement studies on rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, H.; Dewald, A.; Braunroth, T.; Fransen, C.; Smalley, D.; Lemasson, A.; Morse, C.; Whitmore, K.; Loelius, C.

    2016-01-01

    A new device, the TRIple PLunger for EXotic beams (TRIPLEX), has been developed for lifetime measurement studies with rare isotope beams. This plunger device holds up to three metal foils in the beam path and facilitates the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique to measure lifetimes of nuclear excited states in the range of 1 ps to 1 ns. The unique design allows independent movement of the target and the second degrader with respect to a fixed first degrader in between, enabling advanced experimental approaches, such as the differential recoil distance method and the double recoil distance method. The design and control of the device are presented in this paper, together with simulated performances of the new applications. As an example of actual experiments, results from the lifetime measurement of the neutron-rich 17C isotope performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory are shown.

  4. Positron sensing of distribution of defects in depth materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchishin, A. I.; Kupchishin, A. A.; Voronova, N. A.; Kirdyashkin, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    It was developed a non-destructive method of positron sensing, which allows to determine the distribution of defects in the depth of the material. From the analysis we can conclude that the angular distribution curves of annihilation photons (well as and on the characteristics in experiments on the lifetime, 3γ - angular correlation, Doppler effect) is influenced by three main factors: a) The distribution of defects in the depth of the material, their dimensions as well as parameters of the interaction of positrons with defects. With increasing the concentration of defects the intensity Jγ(a, ξ) varies more; b) Modification of the energy spectrum of slow positrons due to the influence of defects, wherein the spectrum of positrons becomes softer, and the average energy of the positron annihilation is reduced; c) Deformation of the momentum distribution of the electrons in the region of defect. The energy spectrum of electrons is also becomes softer, and the average energy of the electrons (on which positrons annihilate) is less. The experimentally were measured spectra of photons in the zone of annihilation and were calculated the distribution of defects in depth for a number of metals.

  5. SU-E-T-230: Measurement of Proton-Activated Positron Emission with PRESAGE 3-D Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M; Mawlawi, O; Ibbott, G; Adamovics, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measurement of positron emission following proton beam irradiation of a target has been studied as a method of in-vivo dosimetry. Relative dosimetry studies between a phantom and treatment plan are susceptible to range uncertainties from material heterogeneities and setup error. By using the radiochromic polyurethane dosimeter PRESAGE, we can correlate the proton dose distribution to the PET activity measurement within a single detector. The PRESAGE formulation used was developed for high-LET proton radiotherapy, has similar density and RLSP to tissue, and consists of a greater carbon component, which gives it a higher positron signal than many other 3D detectors. Methods: Three cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters were irradiated semi-uniformly to 500 cGy with 180- MeV protons. The beam was directed along the dosimeter axis and delivered a 2-cm SOBP at the center of the dosimeter. The dosimeters were rushed to a nearby PET/CT where imaging began within 15 minutes, less than a single half-life of 11C. A 3-hr measurement captured the full activation decay. Afterwards, the dose profiles were measured by optical-CT. A direct comparison between the measured dose and the positron emission was performed using CERR software. Results: The correlations between dose distributions and PET activity were consistent with previous studies in that the proximal region of the SOBP displayed the highest activity. The spatial distributions between the dose and activity were similar. Along the central axis of the beam, we found a shift in the distal 80% of 1 cm. The lateral profile showed good agreement between dose and activity. PET imaging times between 30-min and 3-hrs showed <5% discrepancy. Conclusion: PRESAGE dosimeters offer a strong and unique potential to accurately correlate dosimetric and PET activation information. Implementation in an anthropomorphic phantom could be used to study representative treatment plans. NIH grant 5R01CA100835.

  6. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X. -Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10−11 to 10−10 cm3 s−1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V−1 s−1). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles. PMID:27477058

  7. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    DOE PAGES

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navratil, P.; Roth, R.; Langhammer, J.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Barryman, J. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Dohet-Eraly, J.; et al

    2015-12-18

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1/2+ and 5/2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B(M1;1/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 1.04+0.03–0.12 × 10–2μ2N and B(M1;5/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 7.12+1.27–0.96 × 10–2μ2N. The quenched M1 transition strength for the 1/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, with respect to the 5/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. Furthermore, the current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  8. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X. -Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-08-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10–11 to 10–10 cm3 s–1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V–1 s–1). Measured here,more » steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. As a result, we suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles.« less

  9. Fitness measures in selection analyses: sensitivity to the overall number of offspring produced in a lifetime.

    PubMed

    Dugdale, H L; Nouvellet, P; Pope, L C; Burke, T; Macdonald, D W

    2010-02-01

    Age at first (alpha) and last (omega) breeding are important life-history traits; however, the direction and strength of selection detected on traits may vary depending on the fitness measure used. We provide the first estimates of lifetime breeding success (LBS) and lambda(ind) (the population growth rate of an individual) of European badgers Meles meles, by genotyping 915 individuals, sampled over 18 years, for 22 microsatellites. Males are slightly larger than females, and the opportunity for selection was slightly greater for males, as predicted. lambda(ind) and LBS both performed well in predicting the number of grand-offspring, and both detected selection for a late omega, until the age of eight. Differential selection (S'(alpha)) for an early alpha, however, was only detected using LBS, not with lambda(ind). In declining populations (lambda(ind) < 1) selection favours reproduction later in life, whereas early reproduction is selected in increasing populations (lambda(ind) > 1). As 41% of badgers were assigned only one offspring (lambda(ind) < 1), whereas 40% were assigned more than two (lambda(ind) > 1), this cancelled out S'(alpha) measured by lambda(ind). PMID:20002246

  10. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-08-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10-11 to 10-10 cm3 s-1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V-1 s-1). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles.

  11. Comparison of Minority Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Superstrate and Substrate CdTe PV Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, T. A.; Dhere, R. G.; Duenow, J. N.; Kuciauskas, D.; Kanevce, A.; Bergeson, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss typical and alternative procedures to analyze time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements of minority carrier lifetime (MCL) with the hope of enhancing our understanding of how this technique may be used to better analyze CdTe photovoltaic (PV) device functionality. Historically, TRPL measurements of the fast recombination rate (t{sub 1}) have provided insightful correlation with broad device functionality. However, we have more recently found that t{sub 1} does not correlate as well with smaller changes in device performance, nor does it correlate well with performance differences observed between superstrate and substrate CdTe PV devices. This study presents TRPL data for both superstrate and substrate CdTe devices where both t{sub 1} and the slower TRPL decay (t{sub 2}) are analyzed. The study shows that changes in performance expected from small changes in device processing may correlate better with t{sub 2}. Numerical modeling further suggests that, for devices that are expected to have similar drift field in the depletion region, effects of changes in bulk MCL and interface recombination should be more pronounced in t{sub 2}. Although this technique may provide future guidance to improving CdS/CdTe device performance, it is often difficult to extract statistically precise values for t{sub 2}, and therefore t{sub 2} data may demonstrate significant scatter when correlated with performance parameters.

  12. Comparison of Minority Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Superstrate and Substrate CdTe PV Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, T. A.; Dhere, R. G.; Duenow, J. N.; Kuciauskas, D.; Kanevce, A.; Bergeson, J. D.

    2011-07-01

    We discuss typical and alternative procedures to analyze time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements of minority carrier lifetime (MCL) with the hope of enhancing our understanding of how this technique may be used to better analyze CdTe photovoltaic (PV) device functionality. Historically, TRPL measurements of the fast recombination rate (t1) have provided insightful correlation with broad device functionality. However, we have more recently found that t1 does not correlate as well with smaller changes in device performance, nor does it correlate well with performance differences observed between superstrate and substrate CdTe PV devices. This study presents TRPL data for both superstrate and substrate CdTe devices where both t1 and the slower TRPL decay (t2) are analyzed. The study shows that changes in performance expected from small changes in device processing may correlate better with t2. Numerical modeling further suggests that, for devices that are expected to have similar drift field in the depletion region, effects of changes in bulk MCL and interface recombination should be more pronounced in t2. Although this technique may provide future guidance to improving CdS/CdTe device performance, it is often difficult to extract statistically precise values for t2, and therefore t2 data may demonstrate significant scatter when correlated with performance parameters.

  13. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Yi, H T; Wu, X; Haroldson, R; Gartstein, Y N; Rodionov, Y I; Tikhonov, K S; Zakhidov, A; Zhu, X-Y; Podzorov, V

    2016-01-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10(-11) to 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1)) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles. PMID:27477058

  14. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  15. Positron annihilation and ESR study of irradiation-induced defects in silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Tabata, M.; Fujinami, M.; Ito, Y.; Sunaga, H.; Okada, S.; Yamaguchi, S.

    1996-08-01

    The angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR), positron lifetime and electron spin resonance (ESR) have been measured on fused and synthetic silica glass samples before and after irradiation with fast neutrons up to a dose of 8.6 × 10 18 n/cm 2 at about 150°C or with 3 MeV electrons up to a dose of 1 × 10 18 e/cm 2 below 50°C. The ACAR curves are deconvoluted into two Gaussian components: a narrow and a broad component. The narrow component is due to self-annihilation of ortho-state of positronium (p-Ps) formed in "intrinsic" structural voids with radius of about 0.3 nm, while the broad component comes from pick-off annihilation of ortho-Ps and annihilation of positrons with valence electrons presumably associated with oxygen. Detailed post-irradiation experiments reveal that two kinds of positron trapping centers (defects) are introduced. Both kinds of the defects give almost the same broad component and markedly suppress Ps formation. This suggests that they are oxygen related centers. The first type defects with the positron lifetime of about 0.25 ns anneal out at 400-500°C, while the second type defects with lifetime of 0.47 ns recover after annealing at about 600°C. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were also made on the same samples to detect irradiation-induced paramagnetic center (defects): E' centers, peroxyradicals (POR) and non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC). The correspondence between the positron trapping centers and the ESR-active paramagnetic centers is not straightforward, partly because positrons can be trapped not only at the paramagnetic defects but also at diamagnetic defects. However, possible relations between these positron trapping centers and the paramagnetic defects are discussed.

  16. Toward the measurement of multiple fluorescence lifetimes in flow cytometry: maximizing multi-harmonic content from cells and microspheres.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Patrick; Naivar, Mark A; Houston, Jessica P

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful means for in vitro cellular analyses where multi-fluorescence and multi-angle light scattering can indicate unique biochemical or morphological features of single cells. Yet, to date, flow cytometry systems have lacked the ability to capture complex fluorescence dynamics due to the transient nature of flowing cells. In this contribution we introduce a simple approach for measuring multiple fluorescence lifetimes from a single cytometric event. We leverage square wave modulation, Fourier analysis, and high frequency digitization and show the ability to resolve more than one fluorescence lifetime from fluorescently-labelled cells and microspheres. Illustration of a flow cytometer capable of capturing multiple fluorescence lifetime measurements; creating potential for multi-parametric, time-resolved signals to be captured for every color channel. PMID:25727072

  17. Toward the measurement of multiple fluorescence lifetimes in flow cytometry: maximizing multi-harmonic content from cells and microspheres.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Patrick; Naivar, Mark A; Houston, Jessica P

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful means for in vitro cellular analyses where multi-fluorescence and multi-angle light scattering can indicate unique biochemical or morphological features of single cells. Yet, to date, flow cytometry systems have lacked the ability to capture complex fluorescence dynamics due to the transient nature of flowing cells. In this contribution we introduce a simple approach for measuring multiple fluorescence lifetimes from a single cytometric event. We leverage square wave modulation, Fourier analysis, and high frequency digitization and show the ability to resolve more than one fluorescence lifetime from fluorescently-labelled cells and microspheres. Illustration of a flow cytometer capable of capturing multiple fluorescence lifetime measurements; creating potential for multi-parametric, time-resolved signals to be captured for every color channel.

  18. TR-LIF LIFETIME MEASUREMENTS AND HFR+CPOL CALCULATIONS OF RADIATIVE PARAMETERS IN VANADIUM ATOM (V I)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Jiang, L. Y.; Shang, X.; Tian, Y. S.; Dai, Z. W.; Quinet, P.; Palmeri, P.; Zhang, W. E-mail: Pascal.quinet@umons.ac.be

    2014-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 79 levels belonging to the 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s5p, 3d {sup 4}5p, and 3d {sup 3}4s4d configurations of V I with energy from 26,604.807 to 46,862.786 cm{sup –1} have been measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) spectroscopy in laser-produced plasma. The lifetime values reported in this paper are in the range of 3.3-494 ns, and the uncertainties of these measurements are within ±10%. A good agreement was obtained with previous data. HFR+CPOL calculations have been performed and used to combine the calculated branching fractions with the available experimental lifetimes to determine semi-empirical transition probabilities for 784 V I transitions.

  19. Phases and defects in 2-norbornylene. A positron study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgardzińska, B.; Gorgol, M.; Goworek, T.

    2016-08-01

    Positron lifetime spectra were measured in solid and liquid phases of 2-norbornylene. No accumulation of excess electrons in the brittle phase was observed. The vacancy activation enthalpy in plastic phase was found equal (0.13 ± 0.02) eV. The temperature dependence of positronium lifetime in the bulk deviates from expectations of two-state model; it can be explained by an assumption that some of positronium atoms are created directly in vacancies (not transferred from the bulk). The macroscopic surface tension of liquid norbornylene at 330 K is estimated as (23.1-26.6) mN/m.

  20. Volatility of organic molecular markers used for source apportionment analysis: measurements and implications for atmospheric lifetime.

    PubMed

    May, Andrew A; Saleh, Rawad; Hennigan, Christopher J; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-11-20

    Molecular markers are organic species used to define fingerprints for source apportionment of ambient fine particulate matter. Traditionally, these markers have been assumed to be stable in the atmosphere. This work investigates the gas-particle partitioning of eight organic species used as molecular markers in receptor models for biomass burning (levoglucosan), motor vehicles (5α-cholestane, n-hexacosane, n-triacontane, 1,2-benz[a]anthracene, coronene), and meat cooking (cholesterol, oleic acid). Experiments were conducted using a thermodenuder to measure the evaporation of single component particles. The data were analyzed using the integrated volume method to determine saturation concentrations and enthalpies of vaporization for each compound. The results indicate that appreciable quantities (>10%) of most of these markers exist in the gas phase under typical atmospheric conditions. Therefore, these species should be considered semivolatile. Predictions from a chemical kinetics model indicate that gas-particle partitioning has important effects on the atmospheric lifetime of these species. The atmospheric decay of semivolatile compounds proceeds much more rapidly than nonvolatile compounds because gas-phase oxidation induces evaporation of particle-phase material. Therefore, both gas-particle partitioning and chemical reactions need to be accounted for when semivolatile molecular markers are used for source apportionment studies. PMID:23013599

  1. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; 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    2014-07-18

    Using a proton-proton collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, about 3800 Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-), Ξ(c)(+)) → pK(-)π(+) signal decays are reconstructed. From this sample, the first measurement of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon lifetime is made, relative to that of the Λ(b)(0) baryon. The mass differences M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) and M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) are also measured with precision more than 4 times better than the current world averages. The resulting values are τ(Ξ(b)(0))/τ(Λ)(b)(0)) = 1.006 ± 0.018 ± 0.010,M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) = 172.44 ± 0.39 ± 0.17 MeV/c(2),M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) = 181.51 ± 0.14 ± 0.10 MeV/c(2),where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The relative rate of Ξ(b)(0) to Λ(b)(0) baryon production is measured to be f(Ξ)(b)(0))/f(Λ)(b)(0))B(Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-))/B(Λ(b)(0) → Λ(c)(+)π(-))B(Ξ(c)(+) → pK(-)π(+))/B(Λ(c)(+) → pK(-)}π(+)) = (1.88 ± 0.04 ± 0.03) × 10(-2),where the first factor is the ratio of fragmentation fractions, b → Ξ(b)(0) relative to b → Λ(b)(0). Relative production rates as functions of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity are also presented. PMID:25083633

  2. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; 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Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-07-18

    Using a proton-proton collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, about 3800 Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-), Ξ(c)(+)) → pK(-)π(+) signal decays are reconstructed. From this sample, the first measurement of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon lifetime is made, relative to that of the Λ(b)(0) baryon. The mass differences M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) and M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) are also measured with precision more than 4 times better than the current world averages. The resulting values are τ(Ξ(b)(0))/τ(Λ)(b)(0)) = 1.006 ± 0.018 ± 0.010,M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) = 172.44 ± 0.39 ± 0.17 MeV/c(2),M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) = 181.51 ± 0.14 ± 0.10 MeV/c(2),where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The relative rate of Ξ(b)(0) to Λ(b)(0) baryon production is measured to be f(Ξ)(b)(0))/f(Λ)(b)(0))B(Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-))/B(Λ(b)(0) → Λ(c)(+)π(-))B(Ξ(c)(+) → pK(-)π(+))/B(Λ(c)(+) → pK(-)}π(+)) = (1.88 ± 0.04 ± 0.03) × 10(-2),where the first factor is the ratio of fragmentation fractions, b → Ξ(b)(0) relative to b → Λ(b)(0). Relative production rates as functions of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity are also presented.

  3. Compact solid-state CMOS single-photon detector array for in vivo NIR fluorescence lifetime oncology measurements

    PubMed Central

    Homulle, H. A. R.; Powolny, F.; Stegehuis, P. L.; Dijkstra, J.; Li, D.-U.; Homicsko, K.; Rimoldi, D.; Muehlethaler, K.; Prior, J. O.; Sinisi, R.; Dubikovskaya, E.; Charbon, E.; Bruschini, C.

    2016-01-01

    In near infrared fluorescence-guided surgical oncology, it is challenging to distinguish healthy from cancerous tissue. One promising research avenue consists in the analysis of the exogenous fluorophores’ lifetime, which are however in the (sub-)nanosecond range. We have integrated a single-photon pixel array, based on standard CMOS SPADs (single-photon avalanche diodes), in a compact, time-gated measurement system, named FluoCam. In vivo measurements were carried out with indocyanine green (ICG)-modified derivatives targeting the αvβ3 integrin, initially on a genetically engineered mouse model of melanoma injected with ICG conjugated with tetrameric cyclic pentapeptide (ICG−E[c(RGD f K)4]), then on mice carrying tumour xenografts of U87-MG (a human primary glioblastoma cell line) injected with monomeric ICG−c(RGD f K). Measurements on tumor, muscle and tail locations allowed us to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo lifetime measurements with the FluoCam, to determine the characteristic lifetimes (around 500 ps) and subtle lifetime differences between bound and unbound ICG-modified fluorophores (10% level), as well as to estimate the available photon fluxes under realistic conditions. PMID:27231622

  4. Compact solid-state CMOS single-photon detector array for in vivo NIR fluorescence lifetime oncology measurements.

    PubMed

    Homulle, H A R; Powolny, F; Stegehuis, P L; Dijkstra, J; Li, D-U; Homicsko, K; Rimoldi, D; Muehlethaler, K; Prior, J O; Sinisi, R; Dubikovskaya, E; Charbon, E; Bruschini, C

    2016-05-01

    In near infrared fluorescence-guided surgical oncology, it is challenging to distinguish healthy from cancerous tissue. One promising research avenue consists in the analysis of the exogenous fluorophores' lifetime, which are however in the (sub-)nanosecond range. We have integrated a single-photon pixel array, based on standard CMOS SPADs (single-photon avalanche diodes), in a compact, time-gated measurement system, named FluoCam. In vivo measurements were carried out with indocyanine green (ICG)-modified derivatives targeting the αvβ 3 integrin, initially on a genetically engineered mouse model of melanoma injected with ICG conjugated with tetrameric cyclic pentapeptide (ICG-E[c(RGD f K)4]), then on mice carrying tumour xenografts of U87-MG (a human primary glioblastoma cell line) injected with monomeric ICG-c(RGD f K). Measurements on tumor, muscle and tail locations allowed us to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo lifetime measurements with the FluoCam, to determine the characteristic lifetimes (around 500 ps) and subtle lifetime differences between bound and unbound ICG-modified fluorophores (10% level), as well as to estimate the available photon fluxes under realistic conditions. PMID:27231622

  5. Intracellular pH measurements made simple by fluorescent protein probes and the phasor approach to fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Antonella; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Storti, Barbara; Beltram, Fabio; Bizzarri, Ranieri

    2012-05-25

    A versatile pH-dependent fluorescent protein was applied to intracellular pH measurements by means of the phasor approach to fluorescence lifetime imaging. By this fit-less method we obtain intracellular pH maps under resting or altered physiological conditions by single-photon confocal or two-photon microscopy.

  6. Optical measurements of trap state density and minority carrier lifetime in GaAs heterostructures grown at varying rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haughn, Chelsea; Schmieder, Kenneth; Zide, Joshua; Barnett, Allen; Ebert, Chris; Opila, Robert; Doty, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Semiconductor growth rates are a critical factor for production costs and can have a significant impact on electrical properties. We use time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to characterize the effective lifetime of carriers in gallium arsenide - indium gallium phosphide (GaAs/InGaP) double heterostructures grown at varying rates. We measure the PL decay time as a function of laser fluence and extract an approximate trap state density by fitting this data with the Shockely-Read-Hall model of carrier recombination. Using the approximate trap densities, we then calculate minority carrier lifetimes for a range of doping conditions. The results suggest that the increased density of trap states associated with a two-fold increase in growth rate are less limiting to carrier lifetime than doping at the levels required for devices. The techniques and analysis developed here can be applied for rapid, non-destructive quantification of trap state densities in materials grown under varying conditions.

  7. Measurement of the Lambda(b) lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda(b) ---> J / psi Lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime using the exclusive decay {lambda}{sub b}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}, based on 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed {lambda}{sub b} decays, where the J/{psi} and {lambda} are identified via the decays J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {lambda}{yields}p{pi}, we measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime to be {tau}({lambda}{sub b})=1.218{sub -0.115}{sup +0.130}(stat){+-}0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B{sup 0} lifetime in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}({mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})K{sub S}{sup 0}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) to be {tau}(B{sup 0})=1.501{sub -0.074}{sup +0.078}(stat){+-}0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of {tau}({lambda}{sub b})/{tau}(B{sup 0})=0.811{sub -0.087}{sup +0.096}(stat){+-}0.034(syst = )

  8. Picosecond planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of OH A 2 ( 2) lifetime and energy transfer in atmospheric pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Frank C.; Nielsen, Tim; Burrows, Michael; Andresen, Peter

    1997-08-01

    A picosecond, excimer-Raman laser (268 nm, 400 ps FWHM) was used for laser sheet excitation of OH in the (2, 0) band. The fluorescence was detected with a fast-gated, intensified camera (400-ps gate width). The effective collisional lifetime of the spectrally integrated fluorescence was measured in two dimensions by shifting the intensifier gate across the decay curve. The average lifetime is 2.0 ns for a stoichiometric methane air flame with spatial variations of 10 . Shorter collisional lifetimes were measured for rich flame conditions that are due to a higher number density of the quenchers. Vibrational energy transfer (VET) was observed in premixed methane air and methane oxygen flames by putting the fast-gated camera behind a spectrometer. The spectrum of the methane air flame shows strong VET in contrast with the methane oxygen flame. This is because N 2 is a weak electronic quencher but a strong VET agent. By fitting the measured time dependence of the different vibrational populations ( 2, 1, 0) to a four-level model, rate constants for quenching and VET were determined. For the lower states ( 0, 1) our results are in good agreement with literature values. For a prediction of a spectrally integrated, collisional lifetime in a known collisional environment it is important to consider not only the quenching but also the amount of energy transfer in the excited state as well as the spectral detection sensitivity.

  9. Measurement of the Inclusive B-Lifetime Using $\\rm {J/\\psi}$'s at the CDF Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Hans-Joachim; /RWTH Aachen U.

    1993-08-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the average B hadron lifetime using a high statistics sample of B {yields} J/{psi}X decays produced in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The integrated luminosity of the sample is 10.1 pb{sup -1} recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). In this analysis the decay vertex of the decay J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} as reconstructed by a silicon vertex detector is used to extract the lifetime from the data. This measurement is the average over all b-hadrons produced weighted by the product of their branching ratios into J/{psi} and their production cross sections. We find the following value for the average b hadron lifetime: {tau}{sub B} = 1.46 {+-} 0.06(stat.) {+-} 0.06(syst.) ps. This is the first measurement of the b-hadron lifetime at a hadron collider. It demonstrates that it is possible to access the large b-quark production cross section in p{bar p} collisions and to achieve high statistics even in modes which have small product branching ratios as in this case: BR(B {yields} J/{psi}X) {center_dot} BR(J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = 7.7 x 10{sup -4}.

  10. Positron annihilation and magnetic properties studies of copper substituted nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargar, Z.; Asgarian, S. M.; Mozaffari, M.

    2016-05-01

    Single phase copper substituted nickel ferrite Ni1-xCuxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5) nanoparticles were synthesized by the sol-gel method. TEM images of the samples confirm formation of nano-sized particles. The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction patterns showed that lattice constant increase with increase in copper content from 8.331 for x = 0.0 to 8.355 Å in x = 0.5. Cation distribution of samples has been determined by the occupancy factor, using Rietveld refinement. The positron lifetime spectra of the samples were convoluted into three lifetime components. The shortest lifetime is due to the positrons that do not get trapped by the vacancy defects. The second lifetime is ascribed to annihilation of positrons in tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) sites in spinel structure. It is seen that for x = 0.1 and 0.3 samples, positron trapped within vacancies in A sites, but for x = 0.0 and 0.5, the positrons trapped and annihilated within occupied B sites. The longest lifetime component attributed to annihilation of positrons in the free volume between nanoparticles. The obtained results from coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) confirmed the results of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and also showed that the vacancy clusters concentration for x = 0.3 is more than those in other samples. Average defect density in the samples, determined from mean lifetime of annihilated positrons reflects that the vacancy concentration for x = 0.3 is maximum. The magnetic measurements showed that the saturation magnetization for x = 0.3 is maximum that can be explained by Néel's theory. The coercivity in nanoparticles increased with increase in copper content. This increase is ascribed to the change in anisotropy constant because of increase of the average defect density due to the substitution of Cu2+ cations and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Cu2+ cations. Curie temperature of the samples reduces with increase in copper content which

  11. Heavy flavor lifetimes and lifetime differences

    SciTech Connect

    Jonas Rademacker

    2003-09-17

    The authors give an overview of heavy flavour lifetime measurements, focusing on recent results from the Tevatron and the B factories. In the first part of this article we summarize the status and latest measurements of B-hadron lifetimes and lifetime ratios, including some recent result from the Tevatron and the B factories, and compare those results with the predictions from Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE). Future prospects for lifetime measurements at the B factories and the Tevatron are discussed. In the second part, we review the status and prospects of measuring the difference between the lifetimes of the two CP eigenstates in the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system.

  12. Study of the effect of annealing on defects in Fe Mn Si Cr Ni C alloy by slow positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Khaled. M.; De Baerdemaeker, J.; Van Caenegem, N.; Segers, D.; Houbaert, Y.

    2008-10-01

    FeMnSi shape memory alloys (SMAs) have received much attention as one-way SMAs due to their cost-effectiveness. Variable-energy (0-30 keV) positron beam studies have been carried out on a Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni-C alloy with different degrees of deformation. Doppler broadening profiles of the positron annihilation as a function of incident positron energy were shown to be quite sensitive to defects introduced by deformation. The variation of the nature and the concentration of defects are studied as a function of isochronal annealing temperature. These results are correlated with the data measured with the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The positron annihilation results are compared to XRD and optical microscopy (OM).

  13. Measurement of the B¯(s)(0) effective lifetime in the J/ψf0(980) final state.

    PubMed

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Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; 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Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-10-12

    The effective lifetime of the B ¯(s)(0) meson in the decay mode B¯(s)(0)→J/ψf(0)(980) is measured using 1.0 fb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the LHCb detector. The result is 1.700±0.040±0.026 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. As the final state is CP-odd, and CP violation in this mode is measured to be small, the lifetime measurement can be translated into a measurement of the decay width of the heavy B¯(s)(0) mass eigenstate, Γ(H)=0.588±0.014±0.009 ps(-1). PMID:23102295

  14. Measurement of the B¯(s)(0) effective lifetime in the J/ψf0(980) final state.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-10-12

    The effective lifetime of the B ¯(s)(0) meson in the decay mode B¯(s)(0)→J/ψf(0)(980) is measured using 1.0 fb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the LHCb detector. The result is 1.700±0.040±0.026 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. As the final state is CP-odd, and CP violation in this mode is measured to be small, the lifetime measurement can be translated into a measurement of the decay width of the heavy B¯(s)(0) mass eigenstate, Γ(H)=0.588±0.014±0.009 ps(-1).

  15. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  16. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  17. Lifetimes in neutron-rich Nd isotopes measured by Doppler profile method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    Lifetimes of the rotational levels in neutron-rich even-even Nd isotopes were deduced from the analysis of the Doppler broadened line shapes. The experiment was performed at Daresbury with the Eurogam array, which at that time consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. The source was in the form of a 7-mm pellet which was prepared by mixing 5-mg; {sup 248}Cm and 65-mg KCl and pressing it under high pressure. Events for which three or more detectors fired were used to construct a cubic data array whose axes represented the {gamma}-ray energies and the contents of each channel the number of events with that particular combination of {gamma}-ray energies. From this cubic array, one-dimensional spectra were generated by placing gates on peaks on the other two axes. Gamma-ray spectra of even-even Nd isotopes were obtained by gating on the transitions in the complimentary Kr fragments. The gamma peaks de-exciting states with I {>=} 12 h were found to be broader than the instrumental line width due to the Doppler effect. The line shapes of they-ray peaks were fitted separately with a simple model for the feeding of the states and assuming a rotational band with constant intrinsic quadruple moment and these are shown in Fig. I-27. The quadrupole moments thus determined were found to be in good agreement with the quadrupole moments measured previously for lower spin states. Because of the success of this technique for the Nd isotopes, we intend to apply this technique to the new larger data set collected with the Eurogam II array. The results of this study were published.

  18. Developing A New Test Stand For Lifetime Measurements Using A Narrow Gap Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuitt, Omani; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Morris, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) recently won a proposal "The First Four-Year Physics and Astronomy Degree at the University of the Virgin Islands; A new Era in Caribbean Participation in NASA Science" in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The proposal included building a detector life-test chamber at UVI to support the degree program as well as assist NASA by running tests on detector components and reporting the results.The team at GSFC is developing X-ray polarimeters that can be used in detecting and imaging astrophysical sources such as black holes and neutron stars. The purpose of our research is to understand the effects that the degradation of gas has on the performance of the detectors. The current generation of time projection polarimeter incorporates a narrow gap detector assembled with epoxy. The addition of the epoxy allows a smaller gap with the minimal amount of changes from the original design, enhancing the performance of the detectors.With the use of epoxy, lifetime measurements have to be made to see how the epoxy detectors compared to previous iterations. We have been studying the effects on the narrow gap detector in the Mahaffey chamber in order to determine whether the epoxy affects the cleanliness of the gas. Tests have been conducted with a residual gas analyzer (RGA) in order to monitor the cleanliness of the gas inside of the Mahaffey chamber while being baked out. Results show that the detector is in fact getting cleaner as time progresses. The plan is to recreate a detector that meets the performance criteria for 2 years and has minimal degradation.

  19. Design and characterization of a pulsed x-ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Blankespoor, S.C. |

    1993-12-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, the author and his colleagues have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 HA maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 {times} 10{sup 7} photons at 650 nm per {approximately}100 ps pulse, with up to 10{sup 7} pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray photon energy, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. They measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 6} and 3 {times} 10{sup 6} photons/sec/steradian at tube biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented.

  20. The radiation measurement applied to beam lifetime study on the synchrotron radiation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuxiong; Li, Juexin; Liu, Zuping; Cui, Yonggang; Gong, Guanghua; Shao, Beibei

    2003-06-01

    To collect beam loss information from an accelerator radiation field is helpful to machine study and operation. For a synchrotron radiation storage ring, shower electrons give a distinct clue to loss location and a BLM-XS model detector is suitable to detect them. Recently, we set up a new beam loss monitoring system by this method for National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) storage ring. It does not interfere with the vacuum chamber and machine operation. Different from other systems, the detectors are used in pairs, fixed on opposite sides of the chamber separately. Some interesting phenomena about beam lifetime were observed. We located exactly where an excessive beam loss took place during ramping process and solved the problem. It was proved that gas accumulated at the front ends of photo-beam lines strongly impacted the electron beam and led to beam lifetime decreases. The cause of beam lifetime decrease because of superconducting wiggler is discussed.

  1. CFCl3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, M.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both a major ozone-depleting substance and a potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95-230 nm) and temperature (216-296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D coupled chemistry-radiation-dynamics model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The modeled global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 × 0.7 years (2σ uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current UV spectrum recommendations. CFCl 3 (CFC-11) 2-D model results: Left: Global annually averaged loss rate coefficient (local lifetime) and photolysis and reaction contributions (see legend). Middle: Molecular loss rate and uncertainty limits; the slow and fast profiles were calculated using the 2σ uncertainty estimates in the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum from this work. Right: CFC-11 concentration profile. CFC-11 loss process contribution to the overall local lifetime uncertainty (2σ) calculated using the 2-D model (see text). Left: Results obtained from this work. Right: Results obtained using model input from Sander et al. [2011] and updates in SPARC [2013].

  2. Precision Measurement of the Mass and Lifetime of the Ξb0 Baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Using a proton-proton collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, about 3800 Ξb0→Ξc+π-, Ξc+→pK-π+ signal decays are reconstructed. From this sample, the first measurement of the Ξb0 baryon lifetime is made, relative to that of the Λb0 baryon. The mass differences M(Ξb0)-M(Λb0) and M(Ξc+)-M(Λc+) are also measured with precision more than 4 times better than the current world averages. The resulting values are τ/Ξb0τΛb0=1.006±0.018±0.010,M(Ξb0)-M(Λb0)=172.44±0.39±0.17 MeV /c2,M(Ξc+)-M(Λc+)=181.51±0.14±0.10 MeV /c2,where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The relative rate of Ξb0 to Λb0 baryon production is measured to be f/Ξb0fΛb0B(Ξ/b0→Ξc+π-)B(Λb0→Λc+π-)B(Ξ/c+→pK-π+)B(Λc+→pK-π+)=(1.88±0.04±0.03)×10-2,where the first factor is the ratio of fragmentation fractions, b→Ξb0 relative to b→Λb0. Relative production rates as functions of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity are also presented.

  3. Analysis of the photo voltage decay /PVD/ method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in P-N junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    The photo voltage decay (PVD) method for the measurement of minority carrier lifetimes in P-N junction solar cells with cell thickness comparable to or even less than the minority carrier diffusion length is examined. The method involves the generation of free carriers in the quasi-neutral bulk material by flashes of light and the monitoring of the subsequent decay of the induced open-circuit voltages as the carriers recombine, which is dependent on minority carrier recombination lifetime. It is shown that the voltage versus time curve for an ordinary solar cell (N(+)-P junction) is proportional to the inverse minority carrier lifetime plus a factor expressing the ratio of diffusion length to cell thickness. In the case of an ideal back-surface-field cell (N(+)-P-P(+) junction) however, the slope is directly proportional to the inverse minority carrier lifetime. It is noted that since most BSF cells are not ideal, possessing a sizable back surface recombination velocity, the PVD measurements must be treated with caution and supplemented with other nonstationary methods.

  4. Lifetime Characterization of Electro-Luminescence Based Pressure-Sensitive Paint System for Unsteady Flow Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Yoshimi; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2012-11-01

    Electro-luminescence based pressure-sensitive paint (EL-PSP) system uses an EL as an illumination source for a PSP measurement. EL can be directly applied onto a PSP model to eliminate a remote illumination. This gives a uniform illumination on a PSP model without moving/re-directing the illumination. The temperature dependency can be reduced by the opposite temperature dependency of the EL and PSP. At present, the system is demonstrated in a steady flow field. To extend the system for capturing an unsteady flow field, a fast responding PSP and the lifetime characterization of the system are required. The former can be achieved by using a porous PSP. The latter is discussed in the present presentation. The EL-PSP system needs an AC input to illuminate the EL, which gives a pulsed/periodic excitation to a PSP. This limits the acquisition timing of the flow field; a frequent timing can resolve a fast unsteady flow field. The lifetime of the PSP emission can be related to the pressure. The lifetime decays of the EL and PSP are measured to discuss the lifetime characterization of the system.

  5. Measuring OH Reaction Rate Constants and Estimating the Atmospheric Lifetimes of Trace Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orkin, Vladimir; Kurylo, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Reactions with hydroxyl radicals and photolysis are the main processes dictating a compound's residence time in the atmosphere for a majority of trace gases. In case of very short-lived halocarbons their reaction with OH dictates both the atmospheric lifetime and active halogen release. Therefore, the accuracy of OH kinetic data is of primary importance for the comprehensive modeling of a compound's impact on the atmosphere, such as in ozone depletion (i.e., the Ozone Depletion Potential, ODP) and climate change (i.e., the Global Warming Potential, GWP), each of which are dependent on the atmospheric lifetime of the compound. We have demonstrated the ability to conduct very high accuracy determinations of OH reaction rate constants over the temperature range of atmospheric interest, thereby decreasing the uncertainty of kinetic data to 2-3%. The atmospheric lifetime of a well-mixed compound due to its reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl radicals can be estimated by using a simple scaling procedure that is based on the results of field observations of methyl chloroform concentrations and detailed modeling of the OH distribution in the atmosphere. The currently available modeling results of the atmospheric fate of various trace gases allow for an improved understanding of the ability and accuracy of simplified semi-empirical estimations of atmospheric lifetimes. These aspects will be illustrated in this presentation for a variety of atmospheric trace gases.

  6. Measuring OH Reaction Rate Constants and Estimating the Atmospheric Lifetimes of Trace Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orkin, V. L.; Kurylo, M. J., III

    2014-12-01

    Reactions with hydroxyl radicals and photolysis are the main processes dictating a compound's residence time in the atmosphere for a majority of trace gases. In case of very short-lived halocarbons their reaction with OH dictates both the atmospheric lifetime and active halogen release. Therefore, the accuracy of OH kinetic data is of primary importance for the comprehensive modeling of a compound's impact on the atmosphere, such as in ozone depletion (i.e., the Ozone Depletion Potential, ODP) and climate change (i.e., the Global Warming Potential, GWP), each of which are dependent on the atmospheric lifetime of the compound. We have demonstrated the ability to conduct very high accuracy determinations of OH reaction rate constants over the temperature range of atmospheric interest, thereby decreasing the uncertainty of kinetic data to 2-3%. The atmospheric lifetime of a tropospherically well-mixed compound due to its reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl radicals can be estimated by using a simple scaling procedure that is based on the results of field observations of methyl chloroform concentrations and detailed modeling of the OH distribution in the atmosphere. The currently available modeling results of the atmospheric fate of various trace gases allow for an improved understanding of the ability and accuracy of simplified semi-empirical estimations of atmospheric lifetimes. These aspects will be illustrated in this presentation for a variety of atmospheric trace gases.

  7. Azadioxatriangulenium: exploring the effect of a 20 ns fluorescence lifetime in fluorescence anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogh, Sidsel A.; Bora, Ilkay; Rosenberg, Martin; Thyrhaug, Erling; Laursen, Bo W.; Just Sørensen, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Azaoxatriangulenium (ADOTA) has been shown to be highly emissive despite a moderate molar absorption coefficient of the primary electronic transition. As a result, the fluorescence lifetime is ~20 ns, longer than all commonly used red fluorescent organic probes. The electronic transitions in ADOTA are highly polarised (r 0  =  0.38), which in combination with the long fluorescence lifetime extents the size-range of biomolecular weights that can be detected in fluorescence polarisation-based experiments. Here, the rotational dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) are monitored with three different ADOTA derivatives, differing only in constitution of the reactive linker. A detailed study of the degree of labelling, the steady-state anisotropy, and the time-resolved anisotropy of the three different ADOTA-BSA conjugates are reported. The fluorescence quantum yields (ϕ fl) of the free dyes in PBS solution are determined to be ~55%, which is reduced to ~20% in the ADOTA-BSA conjugates. Despite the reduction in ϕ fl, a ~20 ns intensity averaged lifetime is maintained, allowing for the rotational dynamics of BSA to be monitored for up to 100 ns. Thus, ADOTA can be used in fluorescence polarisation assays to fill the gap between commonly used organic dyes and the long luminescence lifetime transition metal complexes. This allows for efficient steady-state fluorescence polarisation assays for detecting binding of analytes with molecular weights of up to 100 kDa.

  8. Studies of 3He polarization losses during NMR and EPR measurment and Polarized 3He target cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Peibo

    2014-09-01

    The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but three other kinds of losses are inevitable: losses during Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) sweep, losses due to flux change caused by different cell orientation with respect to RF fields and physical losses. Fortunately there is only flux change in NMR measurements. The second part of my work presents the study of cell lifetime improvement. The polarization decreases in a process called relaxation exponentially. The lifetime of a cell is how long it can keep its polarization. The typical lifetime of cells produced in our lab is about 22 hours. With a newly designed vacuum system. The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but

  9. Moisture dependence of positron annihilation spectra in nylon-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Clair, Terry L. ST.; Holt, William H.; Mock, Willis

    1984-04-01

    Positron annihilation time spectra have been measured in nylon-6 specimens as a function of their moisture content. The measured average longlife component lifetime values are: 1722 ± 47 ps (dry), 1676 ± 40 ps (14.6% saturation value), 1719 ± 26 ps (29.3% saturation value), 1720 ± 35 ps (50% of saturation value), 1857 ± 35 ps (78.1% of saturation value) and 1936 ± 57 ps (saturated). It is noted that the longlife component lifetime at first decreases and then increases with increasing moisture content in the specimens. This behavior is quite different from that observed in earlier studies of various epoxy, polyamide, and polyimide materials, where the longlife components lifetime decreased linearly with increasing moisture content. The longlife component intensity on the other hand, decreases steadily as the moisture content increases from 0 to 100% of the saturation value. A possible explanation for these anomalous features is discussed.

  10. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  11. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy. PMID:25279616

  12. (Anti)hypertriton lifetime puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang

    2016-05-01

    Most calculations on the lifetime of (anti)hypertriton gave a similar lifetime which is close to the lifetime of free Λ decays. However, recent measurements on (anti)hypertriton lifetime demonstrate a much short lifetime. All results for (anti)hypertriton