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Sample records for positron lifetime measurements

  1. On the method of positron lifetime measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiyama, F.; Shizuma, K.; Nasai, H.; Nishi, M.

    1983-01-01

    A fast-slow coincidence system was constructed for the measurement of positron lifetimes in material. The time resolution of this system was 270 ps for the (60)Co gamma rays. Positron lifetime spectra for 14 kinds of alkali halides were measured with this system. Two lifetime components and their intensities were derived from analyses of the lifetime spectra.

  2. First positron annihilation lifetime measurement of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenares, C.; Howell, R.H.; Ancheta, D.; Cowan, T.; Hanafee, J.; Sterne, P.

    1996-11-21

    We have made the first measurement of defects in an aged sample of {delta} phase, Ga stabilized Pu, using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. This measurement validates the procedure necessary to perform measurements on this highly toxic material and obtain data representative of sample conditions. Comparison of the positron annihilation lifetime analysis of the data with calculated values suggests that He filled vacancies or vacancy clusters dominate the defect population. Such defects are the necessary precursor to void growth and swelling. The evolution of defects resulting from the radioactive decay of Pu during its life in the stockpile is one of the unknown quantities affecting our confidence in predictions of the limit on stockpile components. Radiation damage leads to changes in the size and strength of metals studied for reactor and accelerator use and similar effects may be expected in Pu. The evolution of radiation produced vacancies into larger void structures and accompanying macroscopic swelling may occur in Pu at some age. A detailed understanding of the defects in self irradiated Pu is required to predict the time scale of void swelling and related radiation effects. 1 fig.

  3. Positron lifetime measurements in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, Devendra S.

    1991-01-01

    Positron lifetimes in the isotropic phases of chiral nematic liquid crystal formulations and their mixtures up to the racemic level were measured. The lifetime spectra for all liquid crystal systems were analyzed into three components. Although the individual spectra in the left- and right-handed components are identical, their racemic mixtures exhibit much larger orthopositronium lifetimes; these larger lifetimes indicate the presence of larger microvoids. This result is consistent with the reportedly higher thermodynamic stability and color play range in the racemic mixtures of chiral nematic liquid crystals.

  4. Materials analysis using positron beam lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.; Howell, R. H., Asoka-Kumar, P.; Sterne, P.; Stoeffl, W.

    1998-11-12

    We are using a defect analysis capabilities based on two positron beam lifetime spectrometers: the first is based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator and the second on our high current linac beam. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is routinely used to perform positron lifetime analysis with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick sample specimens. It is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for in situ measurements. A second, low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopy is under development at the LLNL high current positron source. This beam will enable defect-specific, 3-dimensional maps of defect concentration with sub-micron location resolution. When coupled with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes it will enable new levels of defect concentration mapping and defect identification.

  5. Development and Optimization of a Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectrometer to Measure Nanoscale Defects in Solids and Borane Cage Molecules in Aqueous Nitrate Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF A POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME SPECTROMETER TO MEASURE NANOSCALE DEFECTS IN SOLIDS AND BORANE CAGE MOLECULES...DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF A POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME SPECTROMETER TO MEASURE NANOSCALE DEFECTS IN SOLIDS AND BORANE CAGE MOLECULES IN AQUEOUS...RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT/GNE/ENP/08-M05 DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF A POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME SPECTROMETER TO MEASURE NANOSCALE

  6. Study of PRIMAVERA steel samples by positron annihilation spectroscopy technique II - Lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsjak, V.; Grafutin, V.; Ilyukhina, O.; Burcl, R.; Ballesteros, A.; Hähner, P.

    2012-02-01

    In the present article, a positron annihilation lifetime technique was used for the study of VVER-440/230 weld materials, manufactured in the frame of the international PRIMAVERA project on microstructural investigation of the irradiated WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steel. The present results complement our previous report of positron angular correlation experiments and provide in-depth characterization of vacancy type defects behavior under irradiation and thermal treatment. The results give new insight into the previously published atom probe tomography and angular correlation of annihilation radiation studies. The measurements do not show any association of phosphorus or its segregation to the open volume defects investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The embrittlement effects related to the phosphorus seem to be effectively annealed-out during 475 °C thermal treatment and the post annealing microstructure and mechanical properties of the material are consequently affected mostly by agglomerations of vacancy clusters coarsened during thermal treatment.

  7. Evaluation of a microchannel-plate PMT as a potential timing detector suitable for positron lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosev, K.; Butterling, M.; Anwand, W.; Cowan, T.; Hartmann, A.; Heidel, K.; Jungmann, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2010-12-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of a microchannel-plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) as a candidate detector, suitable for positron lifetime studies. Several properties of MCP-PMTs, such as their fast time response, compact size, low susceptibility to magnetic fields, relatively high gain and the low power consumption make them attractive for positron lifetime spectroscopy. The preliminary tests were performed with a 85001-501 Burle Planacon TM photomultiplier tube assembly. Initial measurements were conducted with a pulsed Picosecond Injection Laser (PiLas) system. The engineering sample of the 85001 exhibits a transit-time-spread (TTS) of 110 ps (FWHM). Further timing experiments showing the suitability of the device as Cherenkov detector are presented. For the first time, a conventional positron lifetime spectrum of a Cz-Si probe measured with a spectrometer, where an MCP-PMT detector is included, has been demonstrated.

  8. Low-temperature positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements for single-crystal nickel oxide containing cation vacancies

    SciTech Connect

    Waber, J.T.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Lynn, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements for positron annihilation in substoichiometric nickelous oxide have been made concomitantly from liquid-helium to room temperature. The concentration of cation vacancies is readily controlled by altering the ambient oxygen pressure while annealing the crystals at 1673/sup 0/K. It was found that neither of the three lifetimes observed or their relative intensities varied significantly with the oxygen pressure, and the bulk rate only increased slightly when the specimen was cooled from room to liquid-helium temperatures. These results are interpreted as indicating that some of the positrons are trapped by the existing cation vacancies and a smaller fraction by vacancy clusters.

  9. Vacancy profile in reverse osmosis membranes studied by positron annihilation lifetime measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, A.; Goto, H.; Shintani, T.; Hirose, M.; Suzuki, R.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The positron annihilation technique using a slow positron beam can be used for the study of the vacancy profiles in typical reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this study, the vacancy profile in the polyamide membrane that exhibits a high permselectivity between ions and water was studied using the positron annihilation technique and molecular dynamics simulations. Ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetimes in the surface region of the membranes were evaluated by using a slow positron beam. The diffusion behavior of Na+ and water in the polyamides was simulated by molecular dynamics (MD) methods using the TSUBAME2 supercomputer at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and discussed with the vacancy profile probed by the o-Ps. The results suggested that the large hydration size of Na+ compared to the vacancy size in the polyamides contributes to the increased diffusivity selectivity of water/Na+ that is related to the NaCl desalination performance of the membrane. Both the hydration size of the ions and the vacancy size appeared to be significant parameters to discuss the diffusivity selectivity of water/ions in typical polyamide membranes.

  10. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  11. Positron beam lifetime spectroscopy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.H.; Stern, P.A. |

    1996-10-01

    Defect analysis is needed for samples ranging in thickness from thin films to large engineering parts. We are meeting that need with two positron beam lifetime spectrometers: on on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator and the second on our high current linac beam. The high energy beam spectrometer performs positron lifetime analysis on thick samples which can be encapsulated for containment or for in situ measurements in controlled environments. At our high current beam, we are developing a low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam to enable positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy for defect specific, 3-D maps with sub-micron location resolution. The data from these instruments with the aid of first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes.

  12. Positron annihilation lifetime measurement and X-ray analysis on 120 MeV Au+7 irradiated polycrystalline tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Charu Lata; Kulriya, Pawan Kumar; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Pujari, Pradeep K.; Patil, Yashashri; Mehta, Mayur; Patel, Priyanka; Khirwadkar, Samir S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to simulate radiation damages in tungsten, potential plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors, surrogate approach of heavy ion irradiation on polycrystalline tungsten is employed. Tungsten specimen is irradiated with gold heavy ions of energy 120 MeV at different fluences. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements are carried out on pristine and ion beam irradiated tungsten specimens. The variation in positron annihilation lifetime in ion irradiated specimens confirms evolution of vacancy clusters under heavy ion irradiation. The pristine and irradiated tungsten specimens have also been characterized for their microstructural, structural, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. X-ray diffractograms of irradiated tungsten specimens show structural integrity of polycrystalline tungsten even after irradiation. Nevertheless, the increase in microstrain, electrical resistivity and microhardness on irradiation indicates creation of lattice damages inside polycrystalline tungsten specimen. On the other hand, the thermal diffusivity has not change much on heavy ion irradiation. The induction of damages in metallic tungsten is mainly attributed to high electronic energy loss, which is 40 keV/nm in present case as obtained from SRIM program. Although, concomitant effect of nuclear losses on damage creation cannot be ignored. It is believed that the energy received by the electronic system is being transferred to the atomic system by electron-phonon coupling. Eventually, elastic nuclear collisions and the transfer of energy from electronic to atomic system via inelastic collision is leading to significant defect generation in tungsten lattice.

  13. Method of processing positron lifetime spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Valuev, N.P.; Klimov, A.B.; Zhikharev, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes a method for the processing of spectra of positron annihilation which permits a much more relaible determination of the lifetime during numerical processing of spectra by computer.

  14. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  15. Positron lifetime studies in thermoplastic polyimide test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Stclair, T. L.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were made in two thermoplastic polyimide materials recently developed at Langley. The long component lifetime values in polyimidesulfone samples are 847 + or - 81 Ps (dry) and 764 + or - 91 Ps (saturated). The corresponding values in LARC thermoplastic imides are 1080 + or - 139 Ps (dry) and 711 + or - 96 Ps (saturated). Clearly, the presence of moisture has greater effect on positron lifetime in LARC thermoplastic imides than in the case of polyimidesulfones. This result is consistent with the photomicrographic observations made on frozen water saturated specimens of these materials.

  16. Slow positron beam generator for lifetime studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J. (Inventor); Eftekhari, Abe (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A slow positron beam generator uses a conductive source residing between two test films. Moderator pieces are placed next to the test film on the opposite side of the conductive source. A voltage potential is applied between the moderator pieces and the conductive source. Incident energetic positrons: (1) are emitted from the conductive source; (2) are passed through test film; and (3) isotropically strike moderator pieces before diffusing out of the moderator pieces as slow positrons, respectively. The slow positrons diffusing out of moderator pieces are attracted to the conductive source which is held at an appropriate potential below the moderator pieces. The slow positrons have to pass through the test films before reaching the conductive source. A voltage is adjusted so that the potential difference between the moderator pieces and the conductive source forces the positrons to stop in the test films. Measurable annihilation radiation is emitted from the test film when positrons annihilate (combine) with electrons in the test film.

  17. Position-resolved Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Butterling, M.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2013-06-01

    A new method which allows for position-resolved positron lifetime spectroscopy studies in extended volume samples is presented. In addition to the existing technique of in-situ production of positrons inside large (cm3) bulk samples using high-energy photons up to 16 MeV from bremsstrahlung production, granular position-sensitive photon detectors have been employed. A beam of intense bremsstrahlung is provided by the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear Accelerator with high Brilliance and low Emittance) which delivers electron bunches of less than 10 ps temporal width and an adjustable bunch separation of multiples of 38 ns, average beam currents of 1 mA, and energies up to 40 MeV. Since the generation of bremsstrahlung and the transport to the sample preserves the sharp timing of the electron beam, positrons generated inside the entire sample volume by pair production feature a sharp start time stamp for positron annihilation lifetime studies with high timing resolutions and high signal to background ratios due to the coincident detection of two annihilation photons. Two commercially available detectors from a high-resolution medial positron-emission tomography system are being employed with 169 individual Lu2SiO5:Ce scintillation crystals, each. In first experiments, a positron-lifetime gated image of a planar Si/SiO2 (pieces of 12.5 mm × 25 mm size) sample and a 3-D structured metal in Teflon target could be obtained proving the feasibility of a three dimensional lifetime-gated tomographic system.

  18. Positron beam lifetime spectroscopy of atomic scale defect distributions in bulk and microscopic volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.; Brown, B.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a defect analysis capability based on two positron beam lifetime spectrometers: the first is based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator and the second on our high current linac beam. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational and positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick samples. It is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for {ital in}{ital situ} measurements. A second, low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopies is under development at the LLNL high current positron source. This beam will enable defect specific, 3-D maps of defect concentration with sub-micron location resolution and when coupled with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes it will enable new levels of defect concentration mapping and defect identification.

  19. Moisture determination in composite materials using positron lifetime techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. R.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A technique was developed which has the potential of providing information on the moisture content as well as its depth in the specimen. This technique was based on the dependence of positron lifetime on the moisture content of the composite specimen. The positron lifetime technique of moisture determination and the results of the initial studies are described.

  20. Effect of magnetic field on positron lifetimes of Fe, Co and Ni.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Maekawa, M; Kawasuso, A; Tanimura, N

    2015-06-24

    Positron lifetime spectra of Fe, Co and Ni were measured under magnetic field using a (22)Na source. Very small but distinguishable difference of positron lifetime upon magnetic field reversal was observed suggesting the existence of two bulk lifetimes associated with majority and minority spin electrons. Using two spin-dependent Fe bulk lifetimes, the difference Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation spectra between majority and minority spin electrons were also examined. Agreement between experiment and theory indicates that spin-polarized positron annihilation spectroscopy may have potential in investigation of spin-aligned electron momentum distribution.

  1. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at a superconducting electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Attallah, A. G.; Dornberg, G.; Elsayed, M.; Enke, D.; Hussein, A. E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Liedke, M. O.; Potzger, K.; Trinh, T. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf operates a superconducting linear accelerator for electrons with energies up to 35 MeV and average beam currents up to 1.6 mA. The electron beam is employed for production of several secondary beams including X-rays from bremsstrahlung production, neutrons, and positrons. The secondary positron beam after moderation feeds the Monoenergetic Positron Source (MePS) where positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) and positron annihilation Doppler-broadening experiments in materials science are performed in parallel. The adjustable repetition rate of the continuous-wave electron beams allows matching of the pulse separation to the positron lifetime in the sample under study. The energy of the positron beam can be set between 0.5 keV and 20 keV to perform depth resolved defect spectroscopy and porosity studies especially for thin films.

  2. Single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy with LYSO scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Deller, A.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-08-01

    We have evaluated the application of a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) based detector to single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. We compare this detector directly with a similarly configured PbWO4 scintillator, which is the usual choice for such measurements. We find that the signal to noise ratio obtained using LYSO is around three times higher than that obtained using PbWO4 for measurements of Ps excited to longer-lived (Rydberg) levels, or when they are ionized soon after production. This is due to the much higher light output for LYSO (75% and 1% of NaI for LYSO and PbWO4 respectively). We conclude that LYSO is an ideal scintillator for single-shot measurements of positronium production and excitation performed using a low-intensity pulsed positron beam.

  3. Digitized detection of gamma-ray signals concentrated in narrow time windows for transient positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kinomura, A; Suzuki, R; Oshima, N; O'Rourke, B E; Nishijima, T; Ogawa, H

    2014-12-01

    A pulsed slow-positron beam generated by an electron linear accelerator was directly used for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy without any positron storage devices. A waveform digitizer was introduced to simultaneously capture multiple gamma-ray signals originating from positron annihilation events during a single accelerator pulse. The positron pulse was chopped and bunched with the chopper signals also sent to the waveform digitizer. Time differences between the annihilation gamma-ray and chopper peaks were calculated and accumulated as lifetime spectra in a computer. The developed technique indicated that positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be performed in a 20 μs time window at a pulse repetition rate synchronous with the linear accelerator. Lifetime spectra of a Kapton sheet and a thermally grown SiO2 layer on Si were successfully measured. Synchronization of positron lifetime measurements with pulsed ion irradiation was demonstrated by this technique.

  4. Digitized detection of gamma-ray signals concentrated in narrow time windows for transient positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinomura, A. Suzuki, R.; Oshima, N.; O’Rourke, B. E.; Nishijima, T.; Ogawa, H.

    2014-12-15

    A pulsed slow-positron beam generated by an electron linear accelerator was directly used for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy without any positron storage devices. A waveform digitizer was introduced to simultaneously capture multiple gamma-ray signals originating from positron annihilation events during a single accelerator pulse. The positron pulse was chopped and bunched with the chopper signals also sent to the waveform digitizer. Time differences between the annihilation gamma-ray and chopper peaks were calculated and accumulated as lifetime spectra in a computer. The developed technique indicated that positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be performed in a 20 μs time window at a pulse repetition rate synchronous with the linear accelerator. Lifetime spectra of a Kapton sheet and a thermally grown SiO{sub 2} layer on Si were successfully measured. Synchronization of positron lifetime measurements with pulsed ion irradiation was demonstrated by this technique.

  5. Positron lifetime calculation for the elements of the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Campillo Robles, J M; Ogando, E; Plazaola, F

    2007-04-30

    Theoretical positron lifetime values have been calculated systematically for most of the elements of the periodic table. Self-consistent and non-self-consistent schemes have been used for the calculation of the electronic structure in the solid, as well as different parametrizations for the positron enhancement factor and correlation energy. The results obtained have been studied and compared with experimental data, confirming the theoretical trends. As is known, positron lifetimes in bulk show a periodic behaviour with atomic number. These calculations also confirm that monovacancy lifetimes follow the same behaviour. The effects of enhancement factors used in calculations have been commented upon. Finally, we have analysed the effects that f and d electrons have on positron lifetimes.

  6. Positron annihilation lifetime study of polyvinylpyrrolidone for nanoparticle-stabilizing pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Shpotyuk, O; Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Ingram, A; Shpotyuk, Y

    2016-01-05

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied to characterize free-volume structure of polyvinylpyrrolidone used as nonionic stabilizer in the production of many nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. The polymer samples with an average molecular weight of 40,000 g mol(-1) were pelletized in a single-punch tableting machine under an applied pressure of 0.7 GPa. Strong mixing in channels of positron and positronium trapping were revealed in the polyvinylpyrrolidone pellets. The positron lifetime spectra accumulated under normal measuring statistics were analysed in terms of unconstrained three- and four-term decomposition, the latter being also realized under fixed 0.125 ns lifetime proper to para-positronium self-annihilation in a vacuum. It was shown that average positron lifetime extracted from each decomposition was primary defined by long-lived ortho-positronium component. The positron lifetime spectra treated within unconstrained three-term fitting were in obvious preference, giving third positron lifetime dominated by ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation in a polymer matrix. This fitting procedure was most meaningful, when analysing expected positron trapping sites in polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized nanocomposite pharmaceuticals.

  7. Positron lifetime spectroscopy for investigation of thin polymer coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1993-01-01

    In the aerospace industry, applications for polymer coatings are increasing. They are now used for thermal control on aerospace structures and for protective insulating layers on optical and microelectronic components. However, the effectiveness of polymer coatings depends strongly on their microstructure and adhesion to the substrates. Currently, no technique exists to adequately monitor the quality of these coatings. We have adapted positron lifetime spectroscopy to investigate the quality of thin coatings. Results of measurements on thin (25-micron) polyurethane coatings on aluminum and steel substrates have been compared with measurements on thicker (0.2-cm) self-standing polyurethane discs. In all cases, we find positron lifetime groups centered around 560 psec, which corresponds to the presence of 0.9-A(exp 3) free-volume cells. However, the number of these free-volume cells in thin coatings is larger than in thick discs. This suggests that some of these cells may be located in the interfacial regions between the coatings and the substrates. These results and their structural implications are discussed in this report.

  8. A modified positron lifetime spectrometer as method of non-destructive testing in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Q.; Shi, J. J.; Jiang, J.; Liu, X. B.; Wang, R. S.; Wu, Y. C.

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims to develop a new non-destructive testing (NDT) method using positron annihilation spectroscopy, a powerful tool to detect vacancy-type defects and defect's chemical environment. A positron NDT system was designed and constructed by modifying the "sandwich" structure of sample-source-sample in the conventional positron lifetime spectrometer. The positron lifetime spectra of one single sample can be measured and analyzed by subtracting the contribution of a reference sample. The feasibility and reliability of the positron NDT system have been tested by analyzing nondestructively deformation damage caused by mechanical treatment in metals and steels. This system can be used for detecting defects and damage in thick or large-size samples without cutting off the sample materials, as well as for detecting two-dimensional distribution of defects.

  9. Positron lifetime studies in vinyl polymers of medical importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Marques, M. F.; Gordo, P. M.; Gil, C. Lopes; Kajcsos, Zs.; Gil, M. H.; Mariz, M. J.; de Lima, A. P.

    2003-10-01

    Vinyl polymers used as artificial lens implants in ophthalmology were investigated by positron lifetime spectroscopy. The structure of these polymers with free volumes offers the possibility of charging them with anti-inflammatory drugs for sustained release. A correlation between the amount of normalised free volume and the ratio of the methyl methacrylate to ethyl-hexyl-acrylate, used as polymerisation monomers, was found.

  10. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-01

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  11. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-17

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  12. Open volume in bioadhesive detected by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rätzke, Klaus; Wiegemann, Maja; Shaikh, Muhammad Qasim; Harms, Stephan; Adelung, Rainer; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Barnacles attach to a wide variety of surfaces underwater and show substrate-specific adhesion mechanisms. Investigating and understanding these mechanisms is a key for developing new technical adhesives. We expected open volume (porosity) at the sub-nanometre scale to occur in barnacle adhesive. With positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) it is possible to detect porosity at the nanometre scale by determining the lifetime of positrons. This method has not been applied to bioadhesives so far. We showed that PALS is a suitable technique for the investigation of the barnacle base and its adhesive with respect to open volume. The results were interpreted using a standard model adapted from polymers. We thereby estimated pore sizes of 0.5 nm.

  13. A novel design for a variable energy positron lifetime spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Zhang, J. D.; Cheng, C. C.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.

    2008-10-01

    We present computer simulations of a new design of a variable energy positron lifetime beam that uses for a start signal the secondary electron emission from a 25-nm thick carbon foil (C-foil) located in front of the sample. A needle of ˜30 μm diameter is positioned on-axis right behind the foil, creating a radial electric field that deflects the secondary electrons radially outward so as to miss the sample and to hit the micro-channel plate (MCP) detector placed down beam. The MCP signal provides the start signal for the positron lifetime spectrometer. A grid can be further introduced between the sample holder and the MCP to yield a cleaner signal by preventing the positrons with large transmitted scattering angle from hitting the MCP. The cylindrical symmetry of this design reduces the experimental complexity and offers good timing resolution. We show that the design is robust against the transmitted energy and angle of the secondary electrons and positrons.

  14. Detection of vacancy defects in gallium arsenide by positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saarinen, K.; Kuisma, S.; Hautojaervi, P.

    1996-12-01

    Vacancy-related native defects were studied in semi-insulating GaAs by positron life-time measurements. Both gallium and arsenic vacancies are observed at concentrations of 10{sup 15} - 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The experiments in the dark after illumination manifest the vacancy nature of the metastable state of the EL2 center.

  15. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  17. Study of Chemical Carcinogens by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.; Karasev, A. O.

    2013-11-01

    We have used positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to study the carcinogens C21H20BrN3, C4H7Cl2O4P, CCl4, CHCl3, AlF3, C8H12N4O, C6H4Cl2 and the non-carcinogens H2O, AlCl3, CH2Cl2, C2H6OS. We have established a correlation between the annihilation characteristics of the studied compounds and their degree of carcinogenicity.

  18. Analysis of positron annihilation lifetime data by numerical laplace inversion with the program CONTIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Roger B.; Zhu, Yongkang

    1990-05-01

    The performance of the program CONTIN [Stephen W. Provencher, Comput. Phys. Commun. 27 (1982) 229], modified to solve Fredholm integral equations with convoluted kernels of the type that occur in the deconvolution and analysis of positron annihilation lifetime data, is investigated with computer-simulated test data. The method avoids direct determination of the instrument resolution function by employing the decay curve of a reference material with a well-known single lifetime. CONTIN employs a constrained, regularized least-squares analysis to calculate a continuous annihilation-rate probability density function (pdf) which is the most parsimonious solution that is consistent with the experimental data and prior knowledge. The performance of the algorithm for extracting positron annihilation lifetime information was evaluated by using several measures of the information content of the data described by Schrader and Usmar [in: Positron Annihilation Studies of Fluids, ed. S. Sharma (World Scientific, Singapore, 1988) p. 215]. The quality of the CONTIN reconstruction of the annihilation-rate pdf is strongly dependent on the information content of the data and is greatly improved as the total number of counts in the data set is increased. Nevertheless, the method provides excellent estimates of the intensities and mean lifetimes of peaks in the annihilation-rate pdf, even when the total counts in the data set are relatively low (10 5-10 6). The sensitivity of the algorithm to systematic errors in the data, including errors in the instrument resolution function, shifts in the positron of the zero-time channel of the sample and reference data and contamination of the reference decay by additional lifetime components was also evaluated. Errors in the FWHM of the instrument resolution function and shifts in the zero time channel as small as {1}/{10}to{1}/{5} of the channel width of the instrument generate additional spurious peaks in the annihilation-rate pdf and

  19. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of ZnO bulk samples

    SciTech Connect

    Zubiaga, A.; Plazaola, F.; Garcia, J. A.; Tuomisto, F.; Munoz-Sanjose, V.; Tena-Zaera, R.

    2007-08-15

    In order to gain a further insight into the knowledge of point defects of ZnO, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was performed on bulk samples annealed under different atmospheres. The samples were characterized at temperatures ranging from 10 to 500 K. Due to difficulties in the conventional fitting of the lifetime spectra caused by the low intensity of the defect signals, we have used an alternative method as a solution to overcome these difficulties and resolve all the lifetime components present in the spectra. Two different vacancy-type defects are identified in the samples: Zn vacancy complexes (V{sub Zn}-X) and vacancy clusters consisting of up to five missing Zn-O pairs. In addition to the vacancies, we observe negative-ion-type defects, which are tentatively attributed to intrinsic defects in the Zn sublattice. The effect of the annealing on the observed defects is discussed. The concentrations of the V{sub Zn}-X complexes and negative-ion-type defects are in the 0.2-2 ppm range, while the cluster concentrations are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower.

  20. Degradation of electron-irradiated polyethylene studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, K.; Oka, T.; Kino, Y.; Sekine, T.

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of electron beam irradiated high-density polyethylene was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), micro-FT-IR, and gel fraction measurements. The obtained results indicated that ortho-positronium intensity is influenced not only by the irradiation but also the post oxidation, which illustrates that PALS may be a promising tool to monitor/evaluate the degradation of polyethylene induced by irradiation and long-term storage.

  1. Transitions and relaxations in gamma-irradiated polypropylene studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djourelov, N.; Suzuki, T.; Shantarovich, V. P.; Dobreva, T.; Ito, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The changes in the relaxation and transition temperatures in PP due to gamma irradiation in a vacuum were measured by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. It was shown that the gamma and beta relaxation temperatures, as well as the melting point follow the changes in the crystallinity with the irradiation dose. For the glass transition temperatures and premelting point, after irradiation dose of 88 kGy, an inverse of the changes was observed.

  2. Voids in mixed-cation silicate glasses: Studies by positron annihilation lifetime and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Reben, M; Golis, E; Filipecki, J; Sitarz, M; Kotynia, K; Jeleń, P; Grelowska, I

    2014-08-14

    PALS in comparison with FTIR studies have been applied to investigate the structure of different oxide glasses. Three components of the positron lifetime τ (τ1 para- and τ3 ortho-positronium and τ2 intermediate lifetime component) and their intensities were obtained. The results of the calculation of mean values of positron lifetimes for the investigated glasses showed the existence of a long-living component on the positron annihilation lifetime spectra. From the Tao-Eldrup formula we can estimate the size of free volume. On the basis of the measurements we can conclude that the size and fraction of free volume reaches the biggest value for the fused silica glass. The degree of network polymerisation increases void size.

  3. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Gaugliardo, P.; Farnan, I.; Zhang, M.; Vance, E. R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R. B.; Mudie, S.; Buckman, S. J.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼1019 α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter.

  4. Applicability of the MCPNX particle transport code for determination of the source correction effect in positron lifetime measurements on thin polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Urban-Klaehn

    2007-09-01

    The method presented herein uses the MCNPX Monte Carlo particle transport code to track individual positrons and other particles through geometry that accounts for the detectors, backing foils, samples and sources with their actual sizes, positions and material characteristics. Polymer material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with different thickness of films served as samples. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and the MCNPX simulation of source correction effects for varied positron sources and different film thicknesses validates the applicability of the MCNPX code.

  5. On the potential of positron lifetime spectroscopy for the study of early stages of zeolites formation from their amorphous precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosnar, S.; Kosanović, C.; Subotić, B.; Bosnar, D.; Kajcsos, Zs.; Liszkay, L.; Lohonyai, L.; Molnár, B.; Lázár, K.

    2007-02-01

    The applicability of positron lifetime (LT) spectroscopy to the study of progress of formation of Secondary Building Units (SBU) in gels yielding in FAU and LTA type zeolites was investigated. Samples were prepared from aluminosilicate gels with various degrees of local structural order. LT measurements were performed at room temperature in air and in vacuum. Coexistence of annihilation modi with long lifetime components was shown; a correlation with precursors of nucleation and type of exchanged ions was also indicated.

  6. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  7. A slow positron beam generator for lifetime studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; St.clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    A slow positron beam generator using well-annealed polycrystalline tungsten moderators and a Na-22 positron source was developed. A 250 micro c source, deposited on a 2.54 micron thick aluminized mylar, is sandwiched between two (2.54 cm x 2.54 cm x 0.0127 cm) tungsten pieces. Two (2.54 cm x 2.54 cm x t cm) test polymer films insulate the two tungsten moderator pieces from the aluminized mylar source holder (t=0.00127 to 0.0127). A potential difference of 10 to 100 volts--depending on the test polymer film thickness (t)--is applied between the tungsten pieces and the source foil. Thermalized positrons diffusing out of the moderator pieces are attracted to the source foil held at an appropriate potential below the moderator pieces. These positrons have to pass through the test polymer films before they can reach the source foil. The potential difference between the moderator pieces and the aluminized mylar is so adjusted as to force the positrons to stop in the test polymer films. Thus the new generator becomes an effective source of positrons for assaying thin polymer films for their molecular morphology.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Pater, Ruth H.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1996-01-01

    Thermoset and thermoplastic polyimides have complementary physical and mechanical properties. Whereas thermoset polyimides are brittle and generally easier to process, thermoplastic polyimides are tough but harder to process. A combination of these two types of polyimides may help produce polymers more suitable for aerospace applications. Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (S-IPN) of thermoset LaRC(TM)-RP46 and thermoplastic LaRC(TM)-IA polyimides were prepared in weight percent ratios ranging from 100:0 to 0:100. Positron lifetime measurements were made in these samples to correlate their free volume features with physical and mechanical properties. As expected, positronium atoms are not formed in these samples. The second lifetime component has been used to infer the positron trap dimensions. The 'free volume' goes through a minimum at a ratio of about 50:50, and this suggests that S-IPN samples are not merely solid solutions of the two polymers. These data and related structural properties of the S-IPN samples are discussed.

  9. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  10. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Taira, Y; Toyokawa, H; Kuroda, R; Yamamoto, N; Adachi, M; Tanaka, S; Katoh, M

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  11. [Positron annihilation lifetime spectrometry (PALS) and its pharmaceutical applications].

    PubMed

    Sebe, István; Szabó, Barnabás; Zelkó, Romána

    2012-01-01

    PALS is one of the most widely used "nuclear probe" techniques for the tracking of the structural characteristics of materials. The method is based on the matter-energy equivalence principle recognized by Einstein: the electrons and positrons as particle-antiparticle pairs disappear in mutual destruction of particles, they annihilate with high-energy gamma-radiation, thus "particle-energy transition" occurs. The properties of the resulting radiation exactly correspond to the relevant properties of the electron and positron preceding the annihilation. Since electrons occur in all types of materials, the phenomenon of positron annihilation can play in any environment; consequently the method can be used for the analysis of each type of materials (crystalline and amorphous, organic and inorganic, biotic and abiotic). The present paper provides an overview of the theoretical physical background, the practical realization and evaluation of methods, their limitations, and summarizes the pharmaceutical applications published in recent years.

  12. Characterization of interfaces in Binary and Ternary Polymer Blends by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    A miscible blend is a single-phase system with compact packing of the polymeric chains/segments due configuration/conformational changes upon blending. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) is the most employed method to ascertain whether the blend is miscible or immiscible. Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS) has been employed in recent times to study miscibility properties of polymer blends by monitoring the ortho-Positronium annihilation lifetimes as function of composition. However, just free volume monitoring and the DSC methods fail to provide the composition dependent miscibility of blends. To overcome this limitation, an alternative approach based on hydrodynamic interactions has been developed to derive this information using the same o-Ps lifetime measurements. This has led to the development of a new method of measuring composition dependent miscibility level in binary and ternary polymer blends. Further, the new method also provides interface characteristics for immiscible blends. The interactions between the blend components has a direct bearing on the strength of adhesion at the interface and hence the hydrodynamic interaction. Understanding the characteristic of interfaces which decides the miscibility level of the blend and their end applications is made easy by the present method. The efficacy of the present method is demonstrated for few binary and ternary blends.

  13. Positron lifetime studies on 8 MeV electron-irradiated n-type 6H silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. H.; Lam, T. W.; Ling, C. C.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.; De-Sheng, Hang; Huimin, Weng

    2004-11-01

    The positron lifetime technique was employed to study vacancy-type defects in 8 MeV electron-irradiated n-type 6H silicon carbide. A long-lifetime component having a characteristic lifetime of 223-232 ps was observed in the irradiated sample and was attributed to the VCVSi divacancy. Other positron traps, which dominated at low temperatures, were observed to compete with the VCVSi for trapping positrons. A positron trapping model involving a positron shallow trap, a negatively charged monovacancy and the VCVSi divacancy was found to give a good description of the temperature-dependent positron lifetime data of the 1200 °C annealed sample. The identity of the monovacancy could not be unambiguously determined, but its lifetime was found to be in the range 160-172 ps.

  14. Lifetime measurements in 100Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinopoulos, T.; Petkov, P.; Goasduff, A.; Arici, T.; Astier, A.; Atanasova, L.; Axiotis, M.; Bonatsos, D.; Detistov, P.; Dewald, A.; Eller, M. J.; Foteinou, V.; Gargano, A.; Georgiev, G.; Gladnishki, K.; Gottardo, A.; Harissopulos, S.; Hess, H.; Kaim, S.; Kocheva, D.; Kusoglu, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Ljungvall, J.; Lutter, R.; Matea, I.; Melon, B.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Nannini, A.; Petrache, C. M.; Petrovici, A.; Provatas, G.; Reiter, P.; Rocchini, M.; Roccia, S.; Seidlitz, M.; Siebeck, B.; Suzuki, D.; Warr, N.; De Witte, H.; Zerrouki, T.

    2017-01-01

    The nucleus 100Ru appears to be a good candidate for the E(5) critical point symmetry which describes the U(5)-SO(6) shape phase transition. To investigate this point with respect to the electromagnetic transition strengths, lifetime measurements of its yrast states have been performed using the recoil distance Doppler shift technique as well as the Doppler shift attenuation method. As a result, the lifetimes of the yrast 2+, 4+, and 8+ states were determined. The deduced transition strengths are compared to the E(5) predictions as well as to the results of excited Vampir and shell-model calculations.

  15. Lifetime measurements in 180Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. M.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Li, C. B.; Gao, Z. C.; Li, G. S.; Chen, F. Q.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, S. P.; Zhong, J.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, H. W.; Luo, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Lifetimes of the yrast states in 180Pt have been measured from 4+ to 8+ using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. These states were populated by the reaction 156Gd(28Si,4 n )180Pt at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The differential decay curve method was applied to determine the lifetimes from experimental coincidence data. The B (E 2 ) values extracted from lifetimes increase with increasing spin, implying rotor behavior, but do not show the typical shape coexistence where the B (E 2 ) values present a rapid increase at very low spins. Calculations based on the triaxial projected shell model were performed for the yrast states in 180Pt and the results of both energies and E 2 transition probabilities reproduce the experimental data very well. The result also shows that a better description of the yrast band in 180Pt requires consideration of the γ degree of freedom.

  16. Lifetime measurements in 162Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprahamian, A.; Lesher, S. R.; Casarella, C.; Börner, H. G.; Jentschel, M.

    2017-02-01

    Background: The nature of oscillations or excitations around the equilibrium deformed nuclear shape remains an open question in nuclear structure. The 162Dy nucleus is one of the most extensively studied nuclei with the (n ,γ ), (n ,e- ), (α ,2 n ) reactions and most recently the (p ,t ) pickup reaction adding 11 0+ states to an excitation energy of 2.8 MeV to an already-well-developed level scheme. However, a major shortfall for a better understanding of the nature of the plethora of bands and levels in this nucleus has been the lack of lifetime measurements. Purpose: To determine the character of the low-lying excited bands in this 162Dy nucleus, we set out to measure the level lifetimes. Method: Lifetimes were measured in the 162Dy nucleus following neutron capture using the Gamma-Ray-Induced Doppler (GRID) broadening technique at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. Results: In total, we have measured the lifetimes of 12 levels belonging to a number of excited positive- and negative-parity bands in the low-lying spectrum of the 162Dy nucleus. The lifetime of the Kπ=2+ bandhead at 888.16 keV was previously measured. We confirm this value and measure lifetimes of the 3+ and 4+ members of this band yielding B (E 2 ) values that are consistent with a single γ -vibrational phonon of several Weisskopf units. The first excited Kπ=4+ band, with a bandhead at 1535.66 keV, is strongly connected to the Kπ=2+ band with enhanced collective B (E 2 ) values and it is consistent with a double phonon vibrational (γ γ ) excitation. Lifetime of Kπ=0+ band members have also been measured, including the 4Kπ=02+ state at 1574.29 keV and the 2Kπ= 03+ state at 1728.31 keV. This latter state also displays the characteristics of a double phonon excitation built on the Kπ=2+ band. Conclusions: We discuss our findings in terms of the presence or absence of collective quadrupole and octupole vibrational excitations. We find two positive-parity excited bands at 1535

  17. Prediction of the stability of polymeric matrix tablets containing famotidine from the positron annihilation lifetime distributions of their physical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Szente, Virág; Süvegh, Károly; Marek, Tamás; Zelkó, Romána

    2009-04-05

    The aim of the present work was to elucidate the impact of the structural changes of polymeric excipients during the course of storage on the drug release stability of tablets containing different polymers. Matrix tablets were formulated with famotidine as a model drug, using polyvinylpyrrolidone and carbopol matrix. Dissolution tests were carried out before and after storing the tablets under stress conditions for different time intervals. Parameters characterizing the release kinetics of matrix tablets, just as difference and similarity factors, were calculated to compare the release profiles as a function of storage time. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements were carried out to track the structural changes of the physical mixtures containing polymers during the course of storage. The changes in the positron lifetime distribution curves of the famotidine-polymer mixtures were in good correlation with the significant changes of release parameters of tablets. Thus the method would be a valuable tool for the screening of possible destabilizing interactions in the preformulation phase.

  18. The study of synthetic food dyes by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    By method of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), substances are food dyes were studied: E-102 (Tartrazine), E-124 (Ponso 4R), E 132 (Indigo carmine), E-133 (Brilliant Blue), E-151 (Black Shiny). They are examined for the presence of carcinogenic properties. The difference between dyes having explicit carcinogenic properties and mutagenic properties (non-explicit carcinogens) is established.

  19. Novel method for stratum corneum pore size determination using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yoshiaki; Shimazu, Akira; Sadzuka, Yasuyuki; Sonobe, Takashi; Itai, Shigeru

    2008-06-24

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is a powerful tool for the investigation of microstructure. Three main classes of materials, metals, semiconductors and polymers, have been studied by using this technique. But, relatively few investigations have been performed in the biological sciences. PALS provides important information on pore properties and free volume at the molecular level. Our PALS study showed that Yucatan miniature pig stratum corneum separated with heat and trypsin digestion had a longer positron annihilation lifetime than cyclodextrins. This indicates that the stratum corneum has larger pores and/or free volume than cyclodextrins, whose pores have a diameter of 0.5-0.8 nm and a torus height of 0.79 nm. Positron annihilation spectroscopy may be developed as a new technique for the detection of nano-pore properties and free volume in the biological sciences.

  20. Positron annihilation lifetime evaluation of thermal cycling effects in atactic polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Kasbekar, A.D.; Jones, P.L.

    1989-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is an atomic-level probing technique that has been shown to be extremely sensitive to vacancy-type defects in a wide variety of solids. In amorphous and semicrystalline polymers this technique is uniquely sensitive to free-volume-based structural changes such as the glass transition. As such, PALS complements conventional macroscopic polymer characterization techniques. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to investigate the thermal-cycling characteristics of two different-molecular-weight atactic polystyrene reins. Annealed compression-molded samples were thermally cycled over the temperature range 253 to 393 K with PAL spectra taken in 10 K increments upon both cooling and heating. The longest-lived component lifetime and intensity, indicative of orthopositronium pick-off, exhibit thermal dependencies that can be interpreted in a manner consistent with anticipated free-volume changes associated with structural transitions.

  1. Positron annihilation spectroscopy with magnetically analyzed beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Lifetime measurements with magnetically analyzed positron beams were made in condensed media with uniform and non-uniform properties. As expected, the lifetime values with magnetically analyzed positron beams in uniform targets are similar to those obtained with conventional positron sources. The lifetime values with magnetically analyzed beams in targets which have non-uniform properties vary with positron energy and are different from the conventional positron source derived lifetime values in these targets.

  2. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)-Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS).

    PubMed

    Jeazet, Harold B Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-10-25

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model.

  3. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    PubMed Central

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  4. Construction of a surface positronium lifetime spectroscopy apparatus with a spin-polarized low energy positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, M.; Wada, K.; Miyashita, A.; Kawasuso, A.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a surface positronium (Ps) lifetime spectrometer. A spin-polarized slow positron beam is generated by a sodium-22 source and a solid krypton moderator and transported to the sample chamber by electrostatic lenses. The incident energy is adjusted by a retarding potential using a deceleration tube. For the lifetime measurement, the start signal is obtained from a secondary-electron detector installed in front of the sample. The stop signal is detected by a scintillation detector for annihilation gamma rays. As a performance test, Ps lifetime measurements were carried out and clear decay curves derived from ortho-Ps self-annihilation were successfully observed. This system might be used for the estimation of the spin polarization at the surface of ferromagnetic materials.

  5. Diffusion of permanent liquid dye molecules in human hair investigated by positron lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekara, M N; Ranganathaiah, C

    2009-02-15

    The diffusion behavior of a commercial permanent liquid hair dye in human hair has been investigated using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and gravimetric sorption method. The positron technique makes it possible to non-invasively characterize the angstrom sized free volume holes in hair, which are supposed to be express pathways for diffusion of small molecules. The o-Ps lifetime parameters tau3 and I3 decrease rapidly during the first 60 min of sorption time. The overall decrease in o-Ps lifetime (tau3) was well over 200 ps and o-Ps intensity (I3) drops by 3.5%. These positron results are explained in terms of dye molecules filling the free volume holes and hair morphology. The dye penetrates the cuticle rapidly, but slowly in cortex. The first hour of dyeing appears to be the most effective period of deposition of dye molecules within hair. These results are well corroborated by the sorption results which suggest that the dye diffusion is essentially a diffusion controlled (i.e. Fickian) process, with no observable relaxation effects. In the latter part of the sorption, where positron parameters remain almost constant, mass increase might be due to surface adhesion. These two stages of sorption are well separated by the positron technique. The sorption curve also yielded an average value of apparent diffusivity of the dye in hair. From this study, we conclude that the free volume theory and positron technique, widely used in polymer research, may expediently be used to understand hair properties, more importantly diffusion of dye molecules.

  6. The assessment of pore connectivity in hierarchical zeolites using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy: instrumental and morphological aspects.

    PubMed

    Zubiaga, Asier; Warringham, Robbie; Boltz, Marilyne; Cooke, David; Crivelli, Paolo; Gidley, David; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier; Mitchell, Sharon

    2016-04-07

    Recent studies demonstrated the power of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) to characterise the connectivity and corresponding effectiveness of hierarchical pore networks in zeolites. This was based on the fractional escape of ortho-positronium (Ps), formed within the micropore framework, to vacuum. To further develop this technique, here we assess the impact of the positron implantation energy and of the zeolite crystal size and the particle morphology. Conventional measurements using fast positrons and beam measurements applying moderated positrons both readily distinguish purely microporous ZSM-5 zeolites comprised of single crystals or crystal aggregates. Unlike beam measurements, however, conventional measurements fail to discriminate model hierarchical zeolites with open or constricted mesopore architectures. Several steps are taken to rationalise these observations. The dominant contribution of Ps diffusion to the PALS response is confirmed by capping the external surface of the zeolite crystals with tetraethylorthosilicate, which greatly enhances the sensitivity to the micropore network. A one-dimensional model is constructed to predict the out-diffusion of Ps from a zeolite crystal, which is validated experimentally by comparing coffin-shaped single crystals of varying size. Calculation of the trends expected on the application of fast or moderated positrons indicates that the distinctions in the initial distribution of Ps at the crystal level cannot explain the limited sensitivity of the former to the mesopore architecture. Instead, we propose that the greater penetration of fast positrons within the sample increases the probability of Ps re-entry from intercrystalline voids into mesopores connected with the external surface of zeolite crystals, thereby reducing their fractional escape.

  7. Lifetime Measurement of 26O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redpath, Thomas; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An interesting property of some neutron-unbound systems is true two-neutron emission where the neutrons are emitted simultaneously as opposed to a sequential decay through an intermediate state. Since neutrons are only affected by the angular momentum barrier, the timescale for this process is much shorter than for two proton emission which is dominated by the Coulomb barrier. One such case is 26O where a very low decay energy was measured and the two valence neutrons are expected to occupy d-wave orbitals. Also, the ground state of 25O is located 700 keV higher. In a first experiment, the MoNA collaboration extracted a lifetime of 4 .5-1 . 5 + 1 . 1 (stat) +/- 3(syst) ps with a confidence level of 82%. Recently, an experiment dedicated to measuring the 26O lifetime in order to improve the confidence level of the measurement was performed at NSCL. The experiment utilized a newly developed segmented target which increased the statistics without degrading the resolution. Preliminary results will be presented. NSF PHY-1002511, DOE-NNSA DE-NA0000979.

  8. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  9. Utility of positron annihilation lifetime technique for the assessment of spectroscopic data of some charge-transfer complexes derived from N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Adam, Abdel Majid A; Sharshar, T; Saad, Hosam A; Eldaroti, Hala H

    2014-03-25

    In this work, structural, thermal, morphological, pharmacological screening and positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed on the interactions between a N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (NEDA·2HCl) donor and three types of acceptors to characterize these CT complexes. The three types of acceptors include π-acceptors (quinol and picric acid), σ-acceptors (iodine) and vacant orbital acceptors (tin(IV) tetrachloride and zinc chloride). The positron annihilation lifetime parameters were found to be dependent on the structure, electronic configuration, the power of acceptors and molecular weight of the CT complexes. The positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be used as a probe for the formation of charge-transfer (CT) complexes.

  10. Utility of positron annihilation lifetime technique for the assessment of spectroscopic data of some charge-transfer complexes derived from N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.; Sharshar, T.; Saad, Hosam A.; Eldaroti, Hala H.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, structural, thermal, morphological, pharmacological screening and positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed on the interactions between a N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (NEDA·2HCl) donor and three types of acceptors to characterize these CT complexes. The three types of acceptors include π-acceptors (quinol and picric acid), σ-acceptors (iodine) and vacant orbital acceptors (tin(IV) tetrachloride and zinc chloride). The positron annihilation lifetime parameters were found to be dependent on the structure, electronic configuration, the power of acceptors and molecular weight of the CT complexes. The positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be used as a probe for the formation of charge-transfer (CT) complexes.

  11. Resolving Nuclear Reactor Lifetime Extension Questions: A Combined Multiscale Modeling and Positron Characterization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B; Asoka-Kumar, P; Denison, A; Glade, S; Howell, R; Marian, J; Odette, G; Sterne, P

    2004-04-06

    The objective of this work is to determine the chemical composition of nanometer precipitates responsible for irradiation hardening and embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels, which threaten to limit the operating lifetime of nuclear power plants worldwide. The scientific approach incorporates computational multiscale modeling of radiation damage and microstructural evolution in Fe-Cu-Ni-Mn alloys, and experimental characterization by positron annihilation spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering. The modeling and experimental results are

  12. Thermal stability of nanocrystalline Cu studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kai; Li, Hui; Pang, JinBiao; Wang, Zhu

    2012-06-01

    Thermal stability of nanocrystalline Cu prepared by compacting nanoparticles (mean grain size about 50 nm) under high pressure has been studied by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A gradual increase of mean grain size in the sample is observed with an increase in ageing time at 180°C, indicating an increase of volume fraction of the ordered regions. Furthermore, during the ageing, the increase in average size of the vacancy clusters in grain boundaries is confirmed by the positron lifetime results. The recrystallization is observed at the temperature of about 180°C, and becomes significant above 650°C. Three annealing stages, which are at the intervals 180-400°C, 400-650°C and 650-900°C have been characterized by positron average lifetime. The average volume of the defects almost remains constant in the interval 400-650°C but becomes considerably smaller in the interval 650-900°C.

  13. Free volumes studies in Thymoquinone and Carvone β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Marques, M. F.; Gordo, P. M.; Moreira da Silva, A.

    2013-06-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy is used to study free volume in β-cyclodextrin with the encapsulation of thymoquinone and S-carvone, in samples covering the guest to host fraction range from 1:0.1 to 1:1. The results clearly indicate the presence of long lifetime components related to Ps-formation. Although the behavior of the two guests is different, in both cases the results indicate the formation of 1:1 cyclodextrin inclusion compounds. Data show that the addition of carvone to β-cyclodextrin results in a decrease of the o-Ps lifetime corresponding to a reduction of the average radius of cavities from 2.41 Å to 2.29 Å, whereas the addition of thymoquine decreases the radius from 2.57 Å to 2.35 Å. In turn, the intensity varied from 20.55 to 19.20% and from 20.83 to 0.41%, respectively.

  14. Electron irradiated liquid encapsulated Czochralski grown undoped gallium antimonide studied by positron lifetime spectroscopy and photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S. K.; Lui, M. K.; Ling, C. C.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.; Li, K. F.; Cheah, K. W.; Gong, M.; Hang, H. S.; Weng, H. M.

    2004-09-01

    Electron irradiated undoped liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) grown GaSb samples were studied by positron lifetime spectroscopy (PLS) and photoluminescence (PL). In addition to the 315 ps component reported in the previous studies, another defect with a lifetime of 280 ps was also identified in the present electron irradiated samples. The bulk lifetime of the GaSb material was found to be 258 ps. The VGa,280 ps and the VGa,315 ps defects were associated with two independent Ga vacancy related defects having different microstructures. The well known 777 meV PL signal (usually band A) was also observed in the electron irradiated undoped GaSb samples. The band A intensity decreases with increasing electron irradiation dosage and it disappears after the 300 °C annealing regardless of the irradiation dosage. The origin of the band A signal is also discussed.

  15. Proposed parameter-free model for interpreting the measured positron annihilation spectra of materials using a generalized gradient approximation.

    PubMed

    Barbiellini, Bernardo; Kuriplach, Jan

    2015-04-10

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy is often used to analyze the local electronic structure of materials of technological interest. Reliable theoretical tools are crucial to interpret the measured spectra. Here, we propose a parameter-free gradient correction scheme for a local-density approximation obtained from high-quality quantum Monte Carlo data. The results of our calculations compare favorably with positron affinity and lifetime measurements, opening new avenues for highly precise and advanced positron characterization of materials.

  16. Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

  17. Photo-degradation of Lexan polycarbonate studied using positron lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareesh, K.; Pandey, A. K.; Meghala, D.; Ranganathaiah, C.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-02-01

    The free volume properties of pristine and UV irradiated Lexan polycarbonate have been investigated using Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS). The decrease in o-Ps life time and free volume size of irradiated sample is attributed to free volume modification and formation of more stable free radicals. These free radicals are formed due to the breakage of C-O bonds in Lexan polycarbonate after irradiation. This is also supported by the decrease in the intensity of C-O bond after exposure to UV-radiation as studied from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and it also shows that benzene ring does not undergo any changes after irradiation.

  18. Characterization of γ-irradiated polymethyl methacrylate by means of mechanical properties and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiolo, G. H.; Somoza, A.; Goyanes, S. N.; Consolati, G.; Marzocca, A. J.

    1999-08-01

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to assess the effect of γ irradiation on the ``structural'' state and the corresponding inelastic deformation behavior of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Uniaxial and constant strain rate compression tests were conducted over a range of strain rates at room temperature on glassy polymer specimens of PMMA subjected to different γ-irradiation doses. Measurements of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy were performed on samples before the compression test in an attempt to correlate free volume content with yield stress. A kinetic law of plastic flow considering a local shear transformation in a small volume Ω is used to represent the observed mechanical behavior. The density and size of the clusters are found for the material subjected to different irradiation dose. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was also used to estimate the size and number density of free volume sites in the polymer specimens. The dependence of both magnitudes with the irradiation dose follows those of the plastic cluster of volume Ω. Both results provide experimental evidence that the density and the size of high free volume sites can be used as an internal state variable for characterizing the mechanical state of glassy polymers.

  19. Preliminary studies on a variable energy positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, P. Y.; Cheung, C. K.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.

    2006-02-01

    There are many advantages in being able to perform positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) using a variable energy positron beam, the most obvious being the easy identification of different defect types at different depths. The difficulty in conducting variable energy (VE) PALS studies lies in the fact that a "start" signal is required to signal the entry of the positron into the target. Two methods have been used to overcome this problem, namely the bunching technique, which employs radio frequency (RF) cavities and choppers, and secondly the use of secondary electrons emitted from the target. The latter technique is in terms of experimental complexity much simpler, but has in the past suffered from poor time resolution (typically ˜500 ps). In this work, we present a series of computer simulations of a design based on the secondary electron emission from thin C-foils in transmission mode which shows that significant improvements in time resolution can be made with resolutions ˜200 ps being in principle possible.

  20. Measurement of Rydberg positronium fluorescence lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the fluorescence lifetimes of positronium (Ps) atoms with principal quantum numbers n =10 -19 . Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states were produced via a two-color two-step 1 3S→2 3P→n 3S/n measured time-of-flight distributions were used to determine the mean lifetimes of the Rydberg levels, yielding values ranging from 3 μ s to 26 μ s . Our data are in accord with the expected radiative lifetimes of Rydberg-Stark states of Ps.

  1. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  2. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  3. Structural study of polymer hydrogel contact lenses by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and UV-vis-NIR methods.

    PubMed

    Filipecki, J; Kocela, A; Korzekwa, P; Miedzinski, R; Filipecka, K; Golis, E; Korzekwa, W

    2013-08-01

    A study has been conducted in order to determine presence of free volume gaps in the structure of structure of polymer hydrogel contact lenses made in phosphoryl choline technology and of the degree of defect of its structure. The study was made by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. As a result of the conducted measurements, curves were obtained, which described numbers of counts of the acts of annihilation in the time function. The conducted studies revealed existence of three components τ(1), τ(2) and τ(3). The τ(3) component is attributed to the pick-off annihilation of o-Ps orthopositronium trapping by free volume gaps and provides information about geometrical parameters of the volumes. At the same time, the UV-vis-NIR spectrometry examination was conducted on the same samples in the spectral range 200-1,000 nm.

  4. Confined water in controlled pore glass CPG-10-120 studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šauša, O.; Mat'ko, I.; Illeková, E.; Macová, E.; Berek, D.

    2015-06-01

    The solidification and melting of water confined in the controlled pore glass (CPG) with average pore size 12.6 nm has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The fully-filled sample of CPG by water as well as the samples of CPG with different content of water were used. The measurements show the presence of amorphous and crystalline phases of water in this type and size of pores, freezing point depression of a confined liquid and presence of certain transitions at lower temperatures, which could be detected only for cooling regime. The localization of confined water in the partially filled pores of CPG at room temperature was studied.

  5. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Iori, M.; Ayan, A.S.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, L.J.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 {+-} 19 reconstructed {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in the {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} decay modes. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is measured to be 65 {+-} 13(stat) {+-} 9(sys) fs.

  6. Effect of water on glass transition in starch/sucrose matrices investigated through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep Kumar; Zaydouri, Abdelhadi; Roudaut, Gaëlle; Duplâtre, Gilles

    2011-11-21

    Glass transition is studied through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) in maize starch matrices containing 10 (batch STS10) and 20 (STS20) w/w% sucrose, as a function of temperature (T) and water content (c(w)). To circumvent important losses of water upon heating while recording the PALS spectra, a new method is developed: instead of a series of measurements of τ(3), the triplet positronium lifetime, at different T, the latter is kept constant and the series relates to c(w), which is left to decrease at a constant rate. Similarly to the changes in τ(3) with T, the τ(3)vs. c(w) plots obtained show a smooth linear increase until a break, denoting the occurrence of glass transition, followed by a sharper increase. The gradients appear to be independent of T. The variation of the glass transition temperature, T(g), with c(w) shows a broad sigmoid with a large linear central part; as expected from the plasticising effect of sucrose, the plot for STS20 lies some 10 K below that for STS10. Results from differential scanning calorimetry for STS20 yield T(g) values some 15 K higher than from PALS. On the basis of the general shape of the τ(3)vs. T variations, a general equation is set for τ(3)(T, c(w)), leading one to expect a similar shape for τ(3)vs. c(w), as experimentally observed.

  7. Free volume evolution in 50 MeV Li3+ ion-irradiated polymers studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Paramjit; Kumar, Rajesh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2013-02-01

    This article is aimed at studying the effect of ion irradiation on free volume of polyethersulphone (PES) and polyamide nylon-6 (PN-6) polymers by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). Free volume properties of polymeric materials change with swift heavy ion irradiation. Free volume is found to have a strong correlation with the macroscopic properties of the polymer. PALS has recently emerged as a unique non-destructive and non-interfering nano-probe, capable of measuring the free volume hole size in polymers with high detection efficiency. PES and PN-6 polymer films of thickness of 250 μm were irradiated with Li3+ ions of energy 50 MeV from the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. PES films were irradiated to the fluences of 1011, 1012, 1013 and 1014 ions/cm2, whereas PN-6 films were irradiated to the fluences of 1011, 1012 and 1013 ions/cm2. The average free volume and fractional free volume obtained from the long-lived component, attributed to ortho-positronium lifetime, are found to vary with the variation of fluence in both the cases.

  8. DSAM Lifetime Measurements in {sup 119}Xe

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Scraggs; E.S. Paul; A.J. Boston; C.J. Chiara; D.B. Fossan; C. Fox; D.R. LaFosse; P.J. Nolan; T. Koike; K. Starosta; A. Walker; A.V. Afanasjev; I. Ragnarsson

    1999-12-31

    Lifetime measurements of states in the yrast band of {sup 119}Xe have been performed using a Doppler broadened lineshape analysis. Preliminary results, in the range 27/2{sup -}{<=}I{pi}{<=}43/2{sup -}, indicate a transition quadrupole moment of approximately 2.9 eb, which corresponds to a prolate rotor with deformation {epsilon}{sub 2}{approx}0.17.

  9. B-lifetime measurements at the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, H. |; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    During the run period from May 1992 to begin of June 1993 the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has recorded {approx} 21.4 pb{sup {minus}1} of p{anti p} collider data at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. For this run the detector had been upgraded which significantly enhanced its b-physics capabilities. The upgrades include a high precision Silicon VerteX detector (SVX) which enables CDF to reconstruct the decay vertex and decay length of b-hadrons. In this article the author reports on several measurements of the lifetime of b-flavored hadrons. The determination of the average b-lifetime using inclusive J/{psi}`s, the measurement of the B{sup {+-}} and B{sup 0} lifetimes by reconstructing exclusive final states including a J/{psi} or {psi}(2S) and a measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson lifetime exploiting the decay: B{sub s} {yields} l{nu}D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} l{nu}{phi}{pi}{sup +} {yields} l{nu}K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}.

  10. On estimating mean lifetimes by a weighted sum of lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosper, Harrison Bertrand

    1987-10-01

    Given N lifetime measurements an estimate of the mean lifetime can be obtained from a weighted sum of these measurements. We derive exact expressions for the probability density function, the moment-generating function, and the cumulative distribution function for the weighted sum. We indicate how these results might be used in the estimation of particle lifetimes. The probability distribution function of Yost for the distribution of lifetime measurements with finite measurement error is our starting point.

  11. Clay particles - potential of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) for studying interlayer spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, N.; Guagliardo, P.; Williams, J.; Musumeci, A.; Martin, D.; Smith, S. V.

    2011-01-01

    Characterisation of clays is generally achieved by traditional methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, clays are often difficult to characterise due to lack of long-range order, thus these tools are not always reliable. Because interlayer spacing in clays can be adjusted to house molecules, there is growing interest to use these materials for drug delivery. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was examined as an alternative tool to characterise a series of well-known clays. XRD of two layered double hydroxides; MgAl-LDH and MgGd-LDH, natural hectorite, fluoromica and laponite, and their PALS spectra were compared. XRD data was used to calculate the interlayer d- spacing in these materials and results show a decrease in interlayer spacing as the heavy metal ions are substituted for those of large ionic radii. Similar results were obtained for PALS data. This preliminary study suggests PALS has potential as a routine tool for characterising clay particles. Further work will examine the sensitivity and reliability of PALS to percent of metal doping and hydration in clay microstructure.

  12. Supramolecular interactions between triphenylphosphine oxide and benzamide evaluated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Fulgêncio, F.; Oliveira, A. M.; Andrade, A. C. A.; Melo, A. C. A.; Yoshida, M. I.; Windmöller, D.; Magalhães, W. F.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, intermolecular interactions between triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) and benzamide (BZM) has been studied in solid state by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and supported by several analytical techniques (in solid state and in solution) and by computational modeling (in gaseous phase). Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) in ethyl acetate solvent showed that complexation is a stepwise process, with 2:1 and 1:1 TPPO/BZM stoichiometries, both driven by entropy. HPLC analysis of isolated single crystal confirmed the existence of a 2:1 TPPO/BZM crystalline complex in solid state. The results of thermal analysis (TGA, DTA and DSC) and FTIR spectroscopy showed that the interactions in the complexes are relatively weaker than those found in pure precursors. Finally, PALS showed higher positronium formation probability (I3) at [TPPO0.62·BZM0.38] and [TPPO0.25·BZM0.75] molar fractions, corroborating the existence of two stoichiometries for the TPPO/BZM system and suggesting greater electronic availability of n- and π-electrons in heterosynton complexes, as resulting of interactions, bring forward new evidences of the participation of electronic excited states on the positronium formation mechanism.

  13. Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2007-05-22

    Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

  14. Physical Selectivity of Molecularly Imprinted polymers evaluated through free volume size distributions derived from Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasang, T.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    The technique of imprinting molecules of various sizes in a stable structure of polymer matrix has derived multitudes of applications. Once the template molecule is extracted from the polymer matrix, it leaves behind a cavity which is physically (size and shape) and chemically (functional binding site) compatible to the particular template molecule. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) is a well known technique to measure cavity sizes precisely in the nanoscale and is not being used in the field of MIPs effectively. This method is capable of measuring nanopores and hence suitable to understand the physical selectivity of the MIPs better. With this idea in mind, we have prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with methacrylicacid (MAA) as monomer and EGDMA as cross linker in different molar ratio for three different size template molecules, viz. 4-Chlorophenol (4CP)(2.29 Å), 2-Nephthol (2NP) (3.36 Å) and Phenolphthalein (PP) (4.47Å). FTIR and the dye chemical reactions are used to confirm the complete extraction of the template molecules from the polymer matrix. The free volume size and its distribution have been derived from the measured o-Ps lifetime spectra. Based on the free volume distribution analysis, the percentage of functional cavities for the three template molecules are determined. Percentage of functional binding cavities for 4-CP molecules has been found out to be 70.2% and the rest are native cavities. Similarly for 2NP it is 81.5% and nearly 100% for PP. Therefore, PALS method proves to be very precise and accurate for determining the physical selectivity of MIPs.

  15. Phase fluorometry for semiconductor lifetime measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Alexander R.; Laghumavarapu, Ramesh B.; Imangholi, Babak; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor; Malloy, Kevin J.

    2007-02-01

    Understanding and quantifying nonradiative recombination is a critical factor for the successful laser cooling of semiconductors. The usual approach to measuring the nonradiative lifetime employs pulsed photoexcitation and monitors the luminescence decay via time-resolved photon counting. We present an alternative approach that employs phase fluorometry with a lock-in amplifier. A sinusoidally modulated diode laser is used for excitation. Lifetime data are extracted from the frequency dependent phase shift and amplitude response of the photolumi-nescence signal, detected by a photomultiplier tube. Samples studied include high quality AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs and GaInP/GaAs/GaInP double heterostructures, grown by MBE and MOCVD. Data over a temperature range from 10 to 300 K is compared with results obtained in time-domain measurements.

  16. DSAM lifetime measurements in {sup 119}Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Scraggs, H. C.; Paul, E. S.; Boston, A. J.; Fox, C.; Nolan, P. J.; Walker, A.; Chiara, C. J.; Fossan, D. B.; LaFosse, D. R.; Koike, T.; Starosta, K.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Ragnarsson, I.

    1999-11-16

    Lifetime measurements of states in the yrast band of {sup 119}Xe have been performed using a Doppler broadened lineshape analysis. Preliminary results, in the range 27/2{sup -}{<=}I{sup {pi}}{<=}43/2{sup -}, indicate a transition quadrupole moment of approximately 2.9 eb, which corresponds to a prolate rotor with deformation {epsilon}{sub 2}{approx_equal}0.17.

  17. Detection of atomic scale changes in the free volume void size of three-dimensional colorectal cancer cell culture using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Axpe, Eneko; Lopez-Euba, Tamara; Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-β. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro.

  18. Characteristics of vinyl-ester and carbon fiber composite dry and wet probe by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Mahmoud; Granata, Richard D.

    2015-03-01

    Carbon fiber composites of vinylester resins, Derakane 8084 and 510A, were studied dry and after water exposure. In this study, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to investigate the free volume fraction and the size of the free volume voids within the polymer matrix. The relative free volume (fractions replae by of positron lifetime intensities) in VE8084 polymer and in VE510A (Space) polymer were 35.2% and 13.8%, respectively. The free volume lifetime and intensities were determined as a function of the polymer thickness and significant differences were observed in both polymers with versus without post-curing. The effects of water uptake in these materials were also determined by PALS. Water uptake showed a 2% change in intensity of the longer lifetime (1.85 ns) in VE8084 polymer and in VE510A about 1.8%. The longer lifetime intensities in the wet composites were 17.1% in the 8084 polymer and its carbon fiber composite and 7.1% in the 510A polymer and its carbon fiber composite. For composite with 8084 polymer saturated (0.33% water gain) with seawater at 40 or 60 °C, no change in the longer lifetime intensity was observed which indicates no water entered the free volume voids (indicates replace by and) some differences between composite and neat polymer. For 510A resin the third lifetime intensity dropped from 7.1% to 3.9% indicating 48% of the free volume filled with water in the composite only after saturation with seawater with respect to dry one.

  19. Ionization levels of As vacancies in as-grown GaAs studied by positron-lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saarinen, K.; Hautojaervi, P.; Lanki, P. ); Corbel, C. )

    1991-11-15

    The properties of the native monovacancy defects are systematically investigated by positron-lifetime measurements in {ital n}-type GaAs with carrier concentrations of {ital n}=10{sup 15--}10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. The native defects present two ionization levels at {ital E}{sub {ital C}}{minus}30 meV and {ital E}{sub {ital C}}{minus}140 meV. The first corresponds to a charge transition 1{minus}{r arrow}0 and the second to 0{r arrow}1+. The transitions are attributed to ionizations of As vacancy, which may be isolated or part of a complex. In a simple identification of the defect with {ital V}{sub As}, the ionization level at {ital E}{sub {ital C}}{minus}30 meV is attributed to the transition {ital V}{sub As}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital V}{sub As}{sup 0} and the ionization level at {ital E}{sub {ital C}}{minus}140 meV to the transition {ital V}{sub As}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital V}{sub As}{sup +}. The results show further that the configuration of {ital V}{sub As}{sup {minus}} is strongly relaxed inwards compared to the structure of {ital V}{sub As}{sup 0}.

  20. Positron scattering measurements for application to medical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James

    2015-09-01

    While the use of positrons in medical imaging is now well established, there is still much to learn regarding the transport of positrons through the body, and the subsequent damage induced. Current models of dosimetry use only a crude approximation of the collision physics involved, and at low energies misrepresent the thermalisation process to a considerable degree. Recently, collaborative work has commenced to attempt to refine these models, incorporating a better representation of the underlying physics and trying to gain a better understanding of the damage done after the emission of a positron from a medical radioisotope. This problem is being attacked from several different angles, with new models being developed based upon established techniques in plasma and swarm physics. For all these models, a realistic representation of the collision processes of positrons with relevant molecular species is required. At the Australian National University, we have undertaken a program of measurements of positron scattering from a range of molecules that are important in biological systems, with a focus on analogs to DNA. This talk will present measurements of positron scattering from a range of these molecules, as well as describing the experimental techniques employed to make such measurements. Targets have been measured that are both liquid and solid at room temperature, and new approaches have been developed to get absolute cross section data. The application of the data to various models of positron thermalisation will also be described.

  1. Cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum measured by PAMELA.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Bianco, A; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S A; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S J; Stockton, J C; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2013-08-23

    Precision measurements of the positron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the propagation of cosmic rays and the nature of particle sources in our Galaxy. The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray positron flux and fraction that extends previously published measurements up to 300 GeV in kinetic energy. The combined measurements of the cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum and fraction provide a unique tool to constrain interpretation models. During the recent solar minimum activity period from July 2006 to December 2009, approximately 24,500 positrons were observed. The results cannot be easily reconciled with purely secondary production, and additional sources of either astrophysical or exotic origin may be required.

  2. Ultracold neutron detector for neutron lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Vassiljev, A.; Ivanov, E.; Ilyin, D.; Krivshich, A.; Serebrov, A.

    2017-02-01

    The gas-filled detector of ultracold neutrons has been designed and constructed for the spectrometer of the neutron lifetime measurements at the ILL, Grenoble, France. The detector has been successfully tested and is currently being used at this spectrometer. We could show that minimization of the ;wall; effect is a key factor to ensure efficient background suppression and to maximize the detection efficiency. This effect is primarily related to the composition of the gas mixture, which crucially depends on the neutron velocity spectrum.

  3. Cholesterol-Ceramide Interactions in Phospholipid and Sphingolipid Bilayers As Observed by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    García-Arribas, Aritz B; Axpe, Eneko; Mujika, Jon Iñaki; Mérida, David; Busto, Jon V; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Lopez, Xabier; García, Jose Ángel; Ugalde, Jesus M; Plazaola, Fernando; Goñi, Félix M

    2016-05-31

    Free volume voids in lipid bilayers can be measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This technique has been applied, together with differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the effects of cholesterol (Chol) and ceramide (Cer) on free volume voids in sphingomyelin (SM) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. Binary lipid samples with Chol were studied (DPPC:Chol 60:40, SM:Chol 60:40 mol ratio), and no phase transition was detected in the 20-60 °C range, in agreement with calorimetric data. Chol-driven liquid-ordered phase showed an intermediate free volume void size as compared to gel and fluid phases. For SM and SM:Cer (85:15 mol:mol) model membranes measured in the 20-60 °C range the gel-to-fluid phase transition could be observed with a related increase in free volume, which was more pronounced for the SM:Cer sample. MD simulations suggest a hitherto unsuspected lipid tilting in SM:Cer bilayers but not in pure SM. Ternary samples of DPPC:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) and SM:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) were measured, and a clear pattern of free volume increase was observed in the 20-60 °C because of the gel-to-fluid transition. Interestingly, MD simulations showed a tendency of Cer to change its distribution along the membrane to make room for Chol in ternary mixtures. The results suggest that the gel phase formed in these ternary mixtures is stabilized by Chol-Cer interactions.

  4. Positron annihilation lifetime studies of changes in free volume on some biorelevant nitrogen heterocyclic compounds and their S-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, K R; Khodair, A I; Shaban, S Y

    2015-11-01

    A series of N-heterocyclic compounds was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy as well as Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) at room temperature. The results showed that the formation probability and life time of ortho-positronium in this series are structure and electron-donation character dependent, and can give more information about the structure. The DBAR provides direct information about the change of core and valance electrons as well as the number of defect types present in these compounds.

  5. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  6. Lifetime Measurement of HgCdTe Semiconductor Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    measurement of minority carrier lifetime using the photoconductive decay method. This experiment was conducted to analyze the minority carrier lifetime of...lifetime, photoconductive decay. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 18 19a. NAME OF...the photoconductive decay method was used. To measure the lifetime of the HgCdTe samples using the photoconductive decay method, samples of HgCdTe

  7. Lifetime measurements in {sup 133}Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Emediato, L.G.; Rao, M.N.; Medina, N.H.; Seale, W.A.; Botelho, S.; Ribas, R.V.; Oliveira, J.R.; Cybulska, E.W.; Espinoza-Quinones, F.R.; Guimaraes, V.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Acquadro, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    Lifetimes of low-lying levels in the one- and three-quasiparticle bands in {sup 133}Ce have been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift technique. The E2 transition strengths extracted for the negative parity yrast states are well described by the triaxial-rotor-plus-quasiparticle and the geometrical models, but the interacting-boson-plus-fermion predictions are too small by about a factor of 3. The B(M1) values extracted for the levels in the positive parity three-quasiparticle band are consistent with the previous {nu}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}g{sub 7/2} configuration assignment to this band. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Infrared, Raman, 1H NMR, thermal and positron annihilation lifetime studies of Pb(II), Sn(II), Sb(III), Bi(III)-barbital complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Sharshar, T.

    2012-05-01

    Metal complexes of Pb(II), Sn(II), Sb(III) and Bi(III) with a barbital sodium were synthesized and characterized by several techniques, including elemental analysis (C, H and N), molar conductance measurements, infrared, Raman, 1H NMR, positron annihilation lifetime and thermogravimetric analysis. Reactions of barbital sodium (NaL) with salts of Pb(NO3)2, SnCl2ṡ2H2O, SbCl3 and BiCl3 affords four novel mononuclear complexes [Pb(HL)2], [Sn(L)(H2O)], [Sb(HL)(L)] and [Bi(HL)(L)]. In complexes of Pb(II), Sb(III) and Bi(III), the molar ratio of metal-to-ligand is 1:2. Both of Sb(III) and Bi(III) complexes have six coordination via two molecules of barbital (HL and L), one of them deprotonated NH. The Pb(II) complex has a central metal ion adopts tetradentate fashion which surrounded by two (HL) barbital moieties. The elemental analysis shows that Sn(II) complex is tetradentate 1:1 ratio, chelated through oxygen sbnd O of (ONa), deprotonated (sbnd NH) and one coordinated water molecule. The positron annihilation lifetime parameters were found to be dependent on the structure, electronic configuration and molecular weight of metal complexes.

  9. Precision lifetime measurements in light exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces have had a profound impact on our understanding of nuclei. They have shed light on topics such as the origin of effective forces (like spin-orbit and tensor interactions) and the mechanisms behind cluster and pairing correlations. New precise data are required to both better parameterize the three body forces and to improve numerical methods. A sensitive probe of the structure of light nuclei comes from their electromagnetic transition rates. A refined Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM) will be outlined which is used to precisely measure lifetimes in light nuclei and helps to reduce and quantity systematic uncertainties in the measurement. Using this careful DSAM, we have made a series of precise measurements of electromagnetic transition strengths in Li isotopes, A =10 nuclei, and the exotic halo nucleus, 12Be. Various phenomena, such as alpha clustering and meson-exchange currents, can be investigated in these seemingly simple systems, while the collection of data spanning stable to neutron-rich, allows us to probe the influence of additional valence neutrons. This talk will report on what has been learned, and the challenges that lie in the future, both in experiment and theory, as we push to describing and measuring even more exotic systems. Work supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  10. Confronting recent AMS-02 positron fraction and Fermi-LAT extragalactic γ-ray background measurements with gravitino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carquín, Edson; Díaz, Marco A.; Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Panes, Boris; Viaux, Nicolás

    2016-03-01

    Recent positron flux fraction measurements in cosmic-rays (CR) made by the AMS-02 detector confirm and extend the evidence on the existence of a new (yet unknown) source of high energy electrons and positrons. We test the gravitino dark matter of bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric models as this electrons/positrons source. Being a long lived weak-interacting and spin 3/2 particle, it offers several particularities which makes it an attractive dark matter candidate. We compute the electron, positron and γ-ray fluxes produced by each gravitino decay channel as it would be detected at the Earth's position. Combining the flux from the different decay modes we are able to reproduce AMS-02 measurements of the positron fraction, as well as the electron and positron fluxes, with a gravitino dark matter mass in the range 1-3 TeV and lifetime of ˜1.0-0.7×1026 s. The high statistics measurement of electron and positron fluxes, and the flattening in the behaviour of the positron fraction recently found by AMS-02 allow us to determine that the preferred gravitino decaying mode by the fit is W±τ∓, unlike previous analyses. Then we study the viability of these scenarios through their implication in γ-ray observations. For this we use the Extragalactic γ-ray Background recently reported by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration and a state-of-the-art model of its known contributors. Based on the γ-ray analysis we exclude the gravitino parameter space which provides an acceptable explanation of the AMS-02 data. Therefore, we conclude that the gravitino of bilinear R-parity violating models is ruled out as the unique primary source of electrons and positrons needed to explain the rise in the positron fraction.

  11. Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

  12. Lifetime Measurements and Deformation in ^79Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Y. K.; Kaye, R. A.; Arora, S. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Baldwin, T.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Cooper, M. W.; Hoffman, C. R.; Pavan, J.; Wiedeking, M.; D"Oring, J.; Sun, Y.; Gerbick, S. M.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Riley, L. A.

    2006-10-01

    High-spin states in ^79Sr were produced following the ^54Fe(^28Si, 2pn) fusion-evaporation reaction using a beam energy of 90 MeV at the Florida State University (FSU) Tandem-Linac facility, and the resulting de-exciting γ rays were detected with the FSU Ge array of 10 Compton-suppressed detectors. The ^54Fe target was thick enough so that all of the synthesized nuclei could stop completely in the target, resulting in Doppler-shifted γ-ray line shapes that could be analyzed using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. In all, 23 lifetimes were measured in three separate band structures using this method, and then used to infer transition quadrupole moments (Qt) and quadrupole deformations (β2) using the rotational model. The results show good qualitative agreement with the predictions of both cranked Woods-Saxon (CWS) and projected shell model (PSM) calculations. The band based on a d5/2 single-particle orbit, verified in this study through γ- γ coincidences, intensity measurements, and directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) ratios, was found to have the largest average deformation (β2,ave= 0.41) among the three bands, in agreement with the CWS and PSM predictions. Supported in part by the NSF and the OWU SSRP.

  13. Lifetime Measurements and Deformation in ^79Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Y. K.; Kaye, R. A.; Arora, S. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Baldwin, T.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Cooper, M. W.; Hoffman, C. R.; Pavan, J.; Wiedeking, M.; D"Oring, J.; Sun, Y.; Gerbick, S. M.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Riley, L. A.

    2006-10-01

    High-spin states in ^79Sr were produced following the ^54Fe(^28Si, 2pn) fusion-evaporation reaction using a beam energy of 90 MeV at the Florida State University (FSU) Tandem-Linac facility, and the resulting de-exciting γ rays were detected with the FSU Ge array of 10 Compton-suppressed detectors. The ^54Fe target was thick enough so that all of the synthesized nuclei could stop completely in the target, resulting in Doppler-shifted γ-ray line shapes that could be analyzed using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. In all, 23 lifetimes were measured in three separate band structures using this method, and then used to infer transition quadrupole moments (Qt) and quadrupole deformations (β2) using the rotational model. The results show good qualitative agreement with the predictions of both cranked Woods-Saxon (CWS) and projected shell model (PSM) calculations. The band based on a d5/2 single-particle orbit, verified in this study through γ- γ coincidences, intensity measurements, and directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) ratios, was found to have the largest average deformation (β2,ave = 0.41) among the three bands, in agreement with the CWS and PSM predictions.

  14. Application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) to study the nanostructure in amphiphile self-assembly materials: phytantriol cubosomes and hexosomes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aurelia W; Fong, Celesta; Waddington, Lynne J; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-01-21

    Self-assembled amphiphile nanostructures of colloidal dimensions such as cubosomes and hexosomes are of interest as delivery vectors in pharmaceutical and nanomedicine applications. Translation would be assisted through a better of understanding of the effects of drug loading on the internal nanostructure, and the relationship between this nanostructure and drug release profile. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is sensitive to local microviscosity and is used as an in situ molecular probe to examine the Q2 (cubosome) → H2 (hexosome) → L2 phase transitions of the pharmaceutically relevant phytantriol-water system in the presence of a model hydrophobic drug, vitamin E acetate (VitEA). It is shown that the ortho-positronium lifetime (τ) is sensitive to molecular packing and mobility and this has been correlated with the rheological properties of individual lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases. Characteristic PALS lifetimes for L2 (τ4∼ 4 ns) ∼ H2 (τ4∼ 4 ns) > Q(2 Pn3m) (τ4∼ 2.2 ns) are observed for the phytantriol-water system, with the addition of VitEA yielding a gradual increase in τ from τ∼ 2.2 ns for cubosomes to τ∼ 3.5 ns for hexosomes. The dynamic chain packing at higher temperatures and in the L2 and H2 phases is qualitatively less "viscous", consistent with rheological measurements. This information offers increased understanding of the relationship between internal nanostructure and species permeability.

  15. Positron annihilation studies of recrystallization in the subsurface zone induced by friction in magnesium—effect of the inhomogeneity on measured positron annihilation characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, Jerzy

    2014-02-01

    The discussion of the positron annihilation studies of crystal structure defects, like vacancies, dislocations, grain boundaries and the defect depth profile, is presented. The role of the positron implantation depth and positron diffusion in such studies has been considered in detail. For description of the measured annihilation characteristics the proposed theoretical models take into account both effects. The annealing studies of defects created in pure magnesium by compression or dry sliding-wear were used for demonstration of the discussed thesis. The positron lifetime measurements were applied for monitoring open volume defects behavior. It was demonstrated that annealing at the temperature of about 300 °C removes the defects created by compression. Application of the proposed model to description of the data obtained allows to determine the activation energy of the grain boundary mobility in pure magnesium equal to Q=0.56±0.18 eV. However, defects created by the dry sliding are not completely annealed up to the temperature of 500 °C. The defect depth profile induced by dry sliding evolves with the annealing temperature in such a way that at the worn surface concentration of defects gradually decreases but at the depth between 60 and 100 μm the generation of new defects takes place at temperature of 150 and 225 °C. Above 300 °C the defects still are extended up to the depth of about 80 μm.

  16. Lifetime measurement of high spin states in (75) Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, Javid; Trivedi, T.; Maurya, K.; Mehrotra, I.; Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Jain, H. C.; Negi, D.; Mahanto, G.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S.; Pancholi, S.C.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Yang, Y-C; Sun, Y.; Dahl, A.; Raju, M.K.; Appannababu, S.; Kumar, S.; Choudhury, D.; Jain, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    The lifetimes of high spin states of {sup 75}Kr have been determined via {sup 50}Cr ({sup 28}Si, 2pn) {sup 75}Kr reaction in positive parity band using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The transition quadrupole moments Q deduced from lifetime measurements have been compared with {sup 75}Br. Experimental results obtained from lifetime measurement are interpreted in the framework of projected shell model.

  17. An outline of positron measurements of superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Fluss, M.J.

    1991-03-01

    Positron measurements on superconducting oxides have gone through an evolution from divergent results of low statistical precision on samples of suspect quality to convergent results of higher statistical precision on high quality samples. We outline the elements affecting the progress of these experiments and questions that can be addressed at our present state of the art. 11 refs.

  18. Hydrolytic Degradation of Poly(L-Lactide-co-Glycolide) Studied by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy and Other Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamuła, E.; Dryzek, E.; Dobrzyński, P.

    2006-11-01

    Changes of the poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) structure as a function of degradation time in phosphate-buffered saline for 7 weeks were investigated by gel permeation chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Surface properties as wettability by sessile drop and topography by atomic force microscopy were also characterized. Chain-scission of polyester bonds in hydrolysis reaction causes a quite uniform decrease in molecular weight, and finally results in an increase in semicrystallinity. Molecular composition of the copolymer and water contact angle do not change considerably during degradation time. Atomic force microscopy studies suggest that the copolymer degrades by "in bulk" mechanism. The average size of the molecular-level free volume holes declines considerably after one week of degradation and remains constant till the sixth week of degradation. The free volume fraction decreases as a function of degradation time.

  19. A study of inter-crystallite spaces in some polycrystalline inorganic systems using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantarovich, V. P.; Suzuki, T.; Ito, Y.; Kondo, K.; Gustov, V. W.; Melikhov, I. V.; Berdonosov, S. S.; Ivanov, L. N.; Yu, R. S.

    2007-02-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used for calculation of number density and effective sizes of free volume holes (inter-crystallite spaces) in polycrystal CaSO 4, CaCO 3 (vaterit) and Ca 10(PO 4) 6(OH) 2 (apatite). The effect of substitution of two-valence Ca(II) for three-valence Eu(III) on annihilation characteristics of apatite, studied together with the data on thermo-stimulated luminescence (TSL) and low-temperature sorption of gas (N 2), helped to elucidate mechanism of positronium atom (Ps) localization in the free volume holes and perform corresponding calculations. It came out that PALS is more sensitive to inter-crystallite sites (10 16 cm -3) in polycrystallites than to the free volume holes in polymer glasses (10 19 cm -3). This is due to higher mobility of the precursor of localized Ps in crystallites.

  20. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section B; Microstructural Characterization of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Pater, Ruth H.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1998-01-01

    Thermoset and thermoplastic polyimides have complementary physical/mechanical properties. Whereas thermoset polyimides are brittle and generally easier to process, thermoplastic polyimides are tough but harder to process. It is expected that a combination of these two types of polyimides may help produce polymers more suitable for aerospace applications. Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (S-IPNs) of thermoset LaRC(Trademark)-RP46 and thermoplastic LARC(Trademark)-IA polyimides were prepared in weight percent ratios ranging from 100:0 to 0: 100. Positron lifetime measurements were made in these samples to correlate their free volume features with physical/mechanical properties. As expected, positronium atoms are not formed in these samples. The second life time component has been used to infer the positron trap dimensions. The "free volume" goes through a minimum at about 50:50 ratio, suggesting that S-IPN samples are not merely solid solutions of the two polymers. These data and related structural properties of the S-IPN samples have been discussed in this paper.

  1. Photon correlation system for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, C. G.; Murray, J. G.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1995-07-01

    The construction and testing of a dual-channel photon correlator is reported for the frequency domain imaging of fluorescence lifetimes using photon-counting detection. A light source modulated at radio frequency excites fluorescence, which is detected using an imaging single-photon detector. After discrimination, single-photon events are processed in parallel by the correlation circuit, the purpose of which is to allow both the mean phase delay and the demodulation of fluorescence to be calculated relative to a reference signal derived from the modulated excitation source. Outputs from the correlator are integrated in a computer, resulting in accumulation of images which have been statistically filtered by sine and cosine transforms, and which can be manipulated within the computer to generate a resultant image where contrast depends on fluorescence lifetime rather than fluorescence intensity.

  2. Ion induced modification in free volume in PN-6 and PES polymers by positron annihilation lifetime studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2007-03-01

    The irradiation of polymeric materials with swift heavy ions (SHI) results in a change of their free volume properties which have strong correlation with their macroscopic properties. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been developed into a powerful characterization tool for the study of free volume and free volume fraction in polymers. Polyamide nylon-6 (PN-6) and polyethersulphone (PES) films of thickness of 250 μm were irradiated with C5+ ions of energy 70 MeV from 15 UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, India. PN-6 films were irradiated to the fluences of 1011, 1012 and 1013 ions/cm2 whereas PES films were irradiated to the fluences of 9.3 × 1011, 9.3 × 1012 and 1.2 × 1013 ions/cm2. Characterization of the effect of ion irradiation on free volume has been done by PALS. The average free volume and fractional free volume obtained from long lived component, attributed to ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime, are found to decrease with the fluence in both the cases. With increasing fluence, scissioned segments cross-link randomly, resulting in a decrease of average free volume due to overlapping of tracks.

  3. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gamal, S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (Vf) in DAM-ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ3 and Vf increases while I3 slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ3, Vf and I3 are higher in CR-39 than DAM-ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently Vf increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and Vf in the polymer. A relationship between Vf and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  4. Relative Defect Density Measurements of Laser Shock Peened 316L Stainless Steel Using Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus A. Gagliardi; Bulent H. Sencer; A. W. Hunt; Stuart A. Maloy; George T. Gray III

    2011-12-01

    The surface of an annealed 316L stainless steel coupon was laser shock peened and Vickers hardness measurements were subsequently taken of its surface. This Vickers hardness data was compared with measurements taken using the technique of positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy. When compared, a correlation was found between the Vickers hardness data measurements and those made using Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Although materials with a high defect density can cause the S-parameter measurements to saturate, variations in the Sparameter measurements suggest that through further research the Doppler broadening technique could be used as a viable alternative to measuring a material's hardness. In turn, this technique, could be useful in industrial settings where surface hardness and surface defects are used to predict lifetime of components.

  5. Free volume anomalies in mixed-cation glasses revealed by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS).

    PubMed

    Ingram, Malcolm D; Pas, Steven J; Cramer, Cornelia; Gao, Yong; Hill, Anita J

    2005-04-21

    PALS experiments reveal a minimum in ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetimes and a maximum in the corresponding intensities that emerge when mixed-cation (Li/Na) borate glasses are heated from ambient temperatures up to 473 K. These free volume 'anomalies' appear to be a true manifestation of the mixed alkali effect (MAE). They are consistent with a mechanism of ion transport involving cooperation between hops of unlike cations, resulting in increased disturbance of the glass network. The result lends support to the dynamic structure model.

  6. Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime by Counting Trapped Protons

    PubMed Central

    Wietfeldt, F. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fei, X.; Snow, W. M.; Greene, G. L.; Pauwels, J.; Eykens, R.; Lamberty, A.; Van Gestel, J.

    2005-01-01

    We measured the neutron decay lifetime by counting in-beam neutron decay recoil protons trapped in a quasi-Penning trap. The absolute neutron beam fluence was measured by capture in a thin 6LiF foil detector with known efficiency. The combination of these measurements gives the neutron lifetime: τn = (886.8 ± 1.2 ± 3.2) s, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic) in nature. This is the most precise neutron lifetime determination to date using an in-beam method. PMID:27308145

  7. Measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-12-15

    We report a measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel Bs(0) --> Ds- mu+ nuX (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. Using 5176 reconstructed Ds- mu+ signal events, we have measured the Bs(0) lifetime to be tau(Bs(0))=1.398+/-0.044(stat)(-0.025)(+0.028)(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime to date.

  8. Neutron lifetime measurements using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Serebrov, A. P.; Varlamov, V. E.; Kharitonov, A. G.; Fomin, A. K.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Taldaev, R. R.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Pokotilovski, Yu. N.; Geltenbort, P.

    2008-09-15

    Our experiment using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the neutron lifetime is reviewed. Ultracold neutrons were trapped in a material bottle covered with perfluoropolyether. The neutron lifetime was deduced from comparison of UCN losses in the traps with different surface-to-volume ratios. The precise value of the neutron lifetime is of fundamental importance to particle physics and cosmology. In this experiment, the UCN storage time is brought closer to the neutron lifetime than in any experiments before: the probability of UCN losses from the trap was only 1% of that for neutron {beta} decay. The neutron lifetime obtained, 878.5{+-}0.7{sub stat}{+-}0.3{sub sys} s, is the most accurate experimental measurement to date.

  9. High energy beam lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Hartley, J.; Cowan, T.E.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a positron lifetime defect analysis capability based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational with a 60 mCi {sup 22}Na source providing a current of 7 10{sup 5} positrons per second. Lifetime data are derived from a thin plastic transmission detector providing an implantation time and a BaF{sub 2} detector to determine the annihilation time. Positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick sample specimens at counting rates in excess of 2000 per second. The instrument is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for in situ measurements.

  10. Lifetime measurement of the 9s level of atomic francium.

    PubMed

    Aubin, S; Gomez, E; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D

    2003-11-01

    We use two-photon resonant excitation and time-correlated single-photon counting techniques on a sample of 210Fr atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optical trap to measure the lifetime of the 9s excited level. Direct measurement of the decay through the 7P(3/2) level at 851 nm yields a lifetime of 107.53 +/- 0.80 ns.

  11. Measuring positron-atom binding energies through laser-assisted photorecombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surko, C. M.; Danielson, J. R.; Gribakin, G. F.; Continetti, R. E.

    2012-06-01

    Described here is a proposed experiment to use laser-assisted photorecombination of positrons from a trap-based beam and metal atoms in the gas phase to measure positron-atom binding energies. Signal rates are estimated, based in part upon experience studying resonant annihilation spectra using a trap-based positron beam.

  12. Improved measurements of the B0 and B+ meson lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K. J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Beck, G. A.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H. M.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R. M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Bürgin, R.; Burgard, C.; Capdevielle, N.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D. G.; Chu, S. L.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clayton, J. C.; Clowes, S. G.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Darling, C.; de Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L. A.; Deng, H.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M. S.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Duboscq, J. E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dunwoody, U. C.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Elcombe, P. A.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H. G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fanti, M.; Fath, P.; Fierro, M.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Fischer, P.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fukui, H.; Fürtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gaidot, A.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Goldberg, J.; Gingrich, D. M.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Hagemann, J.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Heflin, E.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hilse, T.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Jui, C.; Karlen, D.; Kanzaki, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; King, B.; King, J.; Kirk, J.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lauber, J.; Layter, J. G.; Leblanc, P.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Leroy, C.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X. C.; Ludwig, J.; Luig, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mättig, P.; Maur, U.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T. J.; McNab, A. I.; Meijers, F.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Müller, U.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Palmonari, F.; Pansart, J. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, M. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Przysiezniak, H.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Rigby, D.; Rison, M. G.; Robins, S. A.; Robinson, D.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schröder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schütz, P.; Schulz, M.; Schwick, C.; Schwiening, J.; Scott, W. G.; Settles, M.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Starks, M.; Stegmann, C.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Strom, D.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Tecchio, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tesch, N.; Thomson, M. A.; Tousignant, O.; Towers, S.; Tscheulin, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Vasseur, G.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, D. L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Ward, J. J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, P.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Winterer, V.-H.; Wlodek, T.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yeaman, A.; Yekutieli, G.; Yurko, M.; Zacek, V.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.

    1995-09-01

    Updated measurements of the B0 and B+ meson lifetimes are presented. From a data sample of 1.72 million hadronic Z0 decays recorded during the period 1991 to 1993, a sample of approximately 1000 semileptonic B meson decays containing a D0, D+ or D*+ has been isolated. From the distribution of decay times in the different samples the lifetimes of the B0 and B+ mesons are determined to be 1.53±0.12±0.08 ps and 1.52±0.14±0.09 ps, respectively, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The ratio of the B+ to B0 lifetimes is measured to be 0.99±0.14{-0.04/+0.05}, confirming expectations that the lifetimes are similar.

  13. Simulations of <1 0 0> edge and 1/2<1 1 1> screw dislocations in α-iron and tungsten and positron lifetime calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staikov, P.; Djourelov, N.

    2013-03-01

    Dislocations in BCC metals are of crucial importance for understanding behavior of fusion materials. In this study model positron lifetime quantum-mechanical calculations have been carried out in the two-component density functional theory (DFT) in local density approximation (LDA) for perfect iron and tungsten lattices, lattices with <1 0 0> edge and 1/2<1 1 1> screw dislocations and several cases in which dislocations interact with a vacancy, bi-vacancy and vacancies containing hydrogen or helium atoms. The core structures of the dislocations have been obtained by MD-simulations using Mendelev and Ackland potentials for iron and Finnis-Sinclair potential for tungsten. The calculated values for iron are 153 ps for edge dislocation and 124 ps for screw dislocation, while for tungsten are 161 and 130 ps, respectively. We report new results for screw dislocation showing that minor dilation of the lattice volume associated with second-order elasticity theory influences the calculated positron lifetime.

  14. Microwave irradiation induced modifications on the interfaces in SAN/EVA/PVC and PVAc/BPA/PVP ternary polymer blends: Positron lifetime study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinesh, Meghala; Chikkakuntappa, Ranganathaiah

    2013-09-01

    Ternary polymer blends of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate)/poly(vinyl chloride) (SAN/EVA/PVC) and poly(vinyl acetate)/bisphenol A/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVAc/BPA/PVP) with different compositions have been prepared by solvent casting method and characterized by positron lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry DSC. Phase modifications have been induced by irradiating the blends with microwave radiation. These changes have been monitored by measuring the free-volume content in the blends. The results clearly show improved interactions between the constituent polymers of the blends upon microwave irradiation. However, the free-volume data and DSC measurements are found to be inadequate to reveal the changes at the interfaces and the interfaces determine the final properties of the blend. For this we have used hydrodynamic interaction (αij) approach developed by us to measure strength of hydrodynamic interaction at the interfaces. These results show that microwave irradiation stabilizes the interfaces if the blend contains strong polar groups. SAN/EVA/PVC blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from -3.18 to -4.85 at composition 50/35/15 upon microwave irradiation and PVAc/BPA/PVP blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from -3.81 to -7.57 at composition 20/50/30 after irradiation.

  15. Design of a compact, low-price, lifetime measuring instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.; Moeller, Reinhard; Tafeit, Erwin

    1994-08-01

    The technical requirements for a small, rugged, and moderately- priced device for measuring fluorescence lifetimes have been investigated. The suitability and performance of various lifetime measuring schemes were compared. Based on these investigations a compact time-domain instrument was developed allowing measurement of fluorescence decays with a time resolution well below 1 ns. A semiconductor laser (frequency-doubled, if necessary) is used as a light source. Detection is done with a miniaturized photomultiplier. In favorable cases measurement of a fluorescent decay curve is accomplished within less than one minute.

  16. New Millisecond Isomer Lifetime Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, M. Nelson, R.O.; Fotiades, N.; O'Donnell, J.M.

    2014-06-15

    New half-life measurements have been made of the millisecond isomers {sup 71m}Ge, {sup 114m2}I, {sup 208m}Bi, {sup 88m1}Y, {sup 88m2}Y, and {sup 75m}As populated in neutron-induced reactions. These measurements were made using the unique time structure of the LANSCE/WNR neutron source, by observing the γ-ray decays of the isomers during the time between the LANSCE proton macropulses. Two different LANSCE proton beam time structures were used. The GEANIE array of HPGe detectors was used to detect the γ-ray decays.

  17. Measurement and Perturbation of Morphogen Lifetime: Effects on Gradient Shape

    PubMed Central

    Drocco, Jeffrey A.; Grimm, Oliver; Tank, David W.; Wieschaus, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Protein lifetime is of critical importance for most biological processes and plays a central role in cell signaling and embryonic development, where it impacts the absolute concentration of signaling molecules and, potentially, the shape of morphogen gradients. Early conceptual and mathematical models of gradient formation proposed that steady-state gradients are established by an equilibration between the lifetime of a morphogen and its rates of synthesis and diffusion, though whether gradients in fact reach steady state before being read out is a matter of controversy. In any case, this class of models predicts that protein lifetime is a key determinant of both the time to steady state and the spatial extent of a gradient. Using a method that employs repeated photoswitching of a fusion of the morphogen Bicoid (Bcd) and the photoconvertible fluorescent protein Dronpa, we measure and modify the lifetime of Dronpa-Bcd in living Drosophila embryos. We find that the lifetime of Bcd is dynamic, changing from 50 min before mitotic cycle 14 to 15 min during cellularization. Moreover, by measuring total quantities of Bcd over time, we find that the gradient does not reach steady state. Finally, using a nearly continuous low-level conversion to the dark state of Dronpa-Bcd to mimic the effect of increased degradation, we demonstrate that perturbation of protein lifetime changes the characteristic length of the gradient, providing direct support for a mechanism based on synthesis, diffusion, and degradation. PMID:22004733

  18. Developing and Testing a Bayesian Analysis of Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    FRET measurements can provide dynamic spatial information on length scales smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Several methods exist to measure FRET between fluorophores, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), which relies on the reduction of fluorescence lifetime when a fluorophore is undergoing FRET. FLIM measurements take the form of histograms of photon arrival times, containing contributions from a mixed population of fluorophores both undergoing and not undergoing FRET, with the measured distribution being a mixture of exponentials of different lifetimes. Here, we present an analysis method based on Bayesian inference that rigorously takes into account several experimental complications. We test the precision and accuracy of our analysis on controlled experimental data and verify that we can faithfully extract model parameters, both in the low-photon and low-fraction regimes. PMID:28060890

  19. Measurement of Metastable Lifetimes of Highly-Charged Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is part of a series of measurements of metastable lifetimes of highly-charged ions (HCIs) which contribute to optical absorption, emission and energy balance in the Interstellar Medium (ISM), stellar atmospheres, etc. Measurements were carried out using the 14-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at the JPL HCI facility. The ECR provides useful currents of charge states such as C(sup(1-6)+), Mg(sup(1-6)+) and Fe(sup(1-17)+). In this work the HCI beam is focused into a Kingdon electrostatic ion trap for measuring lifetimes via optical decays.

  20. A New Precision Measurement of the Lifetime of ^19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah; Pattie, Robert; Back, Henning; Young, Albert; Dammalapati, Umakanth; de, Subhadeep; Dendooven, Peter; Dermois, Otto; Huisman, Leo; Jungmann, Klaus; Mol, Aran; Gerco Onderwater, C.; Rogachevskiy, Andrey; Sohani, Moslem; Traykov, Emil; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans

    2008-04-01

    The mixed 12^+->12^+ decay of ^19Ne is an important system for studies of the weak interaction. A measurement of the lifetime of this decay at the 10-4 level combined with the measured value of the β-asymmetry enables a determination of Vud that rivals the precision obtained from 0^+->0^+ superallowed Fermi beta decays. The lifetime is currently known to a precision of about 0.08%, and by utilizing the unique capabilities of the Trapped Radioactive Isotopes: μicro-laboratories for fundamental Physics (TRIμP) facility at the Kernfysich Versneller Instituut (KVI), we can improve this precision by up to a factor of three. We describe recent progress towards a high-precision lifetime measurement and present preliminary results.

  1. Progress toward a new beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerheide, Shannon Fogwell; BL2 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Neutron beta decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. A precise value of the neutron lifetime is important for consistency tests of the Standard Model and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis models. The beam neutron lifetime method requires the absolute counting of the decay protons in a neutron beam of precisely known flux. Recent work has resulted in improvements in both the neutron and proton detection systems that should permit a significant reduction in systematic uncertainties. A new measurement of the neutron lifetime using the beam method is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. The projected uncertainty of this new measurement is 1 s. An overview of the measurement, its current status, and the technical improvements will be discussed.

  2. Progress toward a new beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerheide, Shannon Fogwell

    2016-09-01

    Neutron beta decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. A precise value of the neutron lifetime is important for consistency tests of the Standard Model and Big Bang Nucleosysnthesis models. The beam neutron lifetime method requires the absolute counting of the decay protons in a neutron beam of precisely known flux. Recent work has resulted in improvements in both the neutron and proton detection systems that should permit a significant reduction in systematic uncertainties. A new measurement of the neutron lifetime using the beam method will be performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. The projected uncertainty of this new measurement is 1 s. An overview of the measurement and the technical improvements will be discussed.

  3. Measuring Carrier Lifetime in GaAs by Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1986-01-01

    Luminescence proposed as nondestructive technique for measuring Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination lifetime GaAs. Sample irradiated, and luminescence escapes through surface. Measurement requires no mechanical or electrical contact with sample. No ohmic contacts or p/n junctions needed. Sample not scrapped after tested.

  4. Measurement of the K meson lifetime with the KLOE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KLOE Collaboration; Ambrosino, F.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bacci, C.; Beltrame, P.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Bowring, D.; Branchini, P.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Ceradini, F.; Chi, S.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; de Lucia, E.; de Santis, A.; de Simone, P.; de Zorzi, G.; dell'Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Falco, S.; di Micco, B.; Doria, A.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franzini, P.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Gorini, E.; Graziani, E.; Incagli, M.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leone, D.; Martini, M.; Massarotti, P.; Mei, W.; Meola, S.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Müller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nguyen, F.; Palutan, M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perfetto, F.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Spadaro, T.; Testa, M.; Tortora, L.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Xu, G.

    2005-10-01

    We present a measurement of the K lifetime using the KLOE detector. From a sample of ˜4×10KK pairs following the reaction ee→ϕ→KK we select ˜15×10K→πππ decays tagged by K→ππ events. From a fit of the proper time distribution we find τ=(50.92±0.17±0.25) ns. This is the most precise measurement of the K lifetime performed to date.

  5. Measurement of femtosecond atomic lifetimes using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träbert, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Two types of experiment are described that both employ an electron beam ion trap for the production of highly charged ion species with the aim of then measuring atomic level lifetimes in the femtosecond range. In one experiment (done by Beiersdorfer et al. some time ago), the lifetime measurement depends on the associated line broadening. In a recent string of experiments at Linac Coherent Light Source Stanford, the HI-LIGHT collaboration employed pump-probe excitation using the FEL as a short-pulse X-ray laser.

  6. HEAO 3 measurements of the atmospheric positron annihilation line

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, W.A.; Ling, J.C.; Jacobson, A.S.

    1981-12-01

    All spectra measured with the High Energy resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Experiment (HEAO C-1) on the third High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO 3) contain a strong line at 511 keV resulting from positron annihilation. This line originates in the instrument itself, the earth's atmosphere, and cosmic sources, possibly including the diffuse cosmic background. In order to understand the emission from cosmic sources, the atmospheric positron annihilation line emission has been determined as a function of geomagnetic latitude and zenith angle. Although the intensity of the line increases with increasing latitude, it was found that variations with zenith angle can be satisfactorily explained only if the atmospheric emission exhibits significant limb darkening. The atmospheric line has an energy of 511.07 +- 0.10 keV and a net width of 2.29 +- 0.30 keV FWHM. Characteristics of the instrument background have allowed an upper limit of 9.4 x 10/sup -3/ photons/cm/sup 2/-sec-sr to be placed on any narrow (< or approx. =3 keV) diffuse cosmic emission at 511 keV.

  7. Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ron D.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, Stephen J.; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

  8. Lifetime measurement of the 8s level in francium

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Galvan, A. Perez

    2005-06-15

    We measure the lifetime of the 8s level of {sup 210}Fr atoms on a magneto-optically trapped sample with time-correlated single-photon counting. The 7P{sub 1/2} state serves as the resonant intermediate level for two-step excitation of the 8s level completed with a 1.3-{mu}m laser. Analysis of the fluorescence decay through the 7P{sub 3/2} level gives 53.30{+-}0.44 ns for the 8s level lifetime.

  9. Low-spin lifetime measurements in {sup 74}Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Svensson, C. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Ragnarsson, I.; Andreoiu, C.; Appelbe, D. E.; Austin, R. A. E.; Cameron, J. A.; Waddington, J. C.; Ball, G. C.; Hodgson, D. F.; Smith, M. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Moore, F.; Mukherjee, G.; Seweryniak, D.

    2008-02-15

    The nucleus {sup 74}Kr has been populated in the {sup 40}Ca({sup 40}Ca,2p{alpha}){sup 74}Kr fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV and studied using the Gammasphere and Microball multidetector arrays. The lifetimes for low-spin states in the ground-state and two signature-split negative-parity bands were determined using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. These results are discussed together with the lifetimes measured for the high-spin states of these bands and compared with theoretical calculations.

  10. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at JPARC: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Kenji; Ino, Takashi; Taketani, Kaoru; Yamada, Takahito; Katayama, Ryo; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yamashita, Satoru; Sakakibara, Risa; Sugino, Tomoaki; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyuki; Otono, Hidetoshi; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Seki, Yoshichika; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is an important parameter for a test of the Standard Model of elementary particles, as well for the production of light mass nuclei in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two principally different approaches to measure the neutron lifetime: In-beam methods and storage of ultracold neutron. At present, there is a discrepancy of 8.4 sec (3.8 sigma) between the two methods. We are performing a new In-beam experiment with an intense pulsed neutron source at J-PARC, which has different systematic uncertainties from the previous experiments. We introduce the overview of the experiment and report present status.

  11. Measuring Luminescence Lifetime With Help of a DSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, J. D. S.

    2009-01-01

    An instrument for measuring the lifetime of luminescence (fluorescence or phosphorescence) includes a digital signal processor (DSP) as the primary means of control, generation of excitation signals, and analysis of response signals. The DSP hardware in the present instrument makes it possible to switch among a variety of operating modes by making changes in software only.

  12. Measurement of masses and lifetimes of B hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Filthaut, F.; /Nijmegen U.

    2007-05-01

    We present recent measurements by the CDF and D{O} Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider on the masses and lifetimes of B hadrons. The results are compared to predictions based on Heavy Quark Effective Theory, lattice gauge theory, and quark models.

  13. Lifetime measurement of excited states in /sup 105/Ag

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, V.K.; Govil, I.M.

    1986-11-01

    The levels up to about 2.1 MeV in /sup 105/Ag were excited via /sup 105/Pd(p,n..gamma..) reaction. For the first time, lifetimes of energy levels at 1023, 1042, 1097, 1166, 1243, 1295, 1328, 1386, 1442, 1543, 1558, 1587, 1719, 1923, and 2081 keV have been measured using the Doppler shift attenuation technique.

  14. Free volume in imidazolium triflimide ([C{sub 3}MIM][NTf{sub 2}]) ionic liquid from positron lifetime: Amorphous, crystalline, and liquid states

    SciTech Connect

    Dlubek, G.; Beichel, W.; Bulut, S.; Pogodina, N.; Krossing, I.; Friedrich, Ch.

    2010-09-28

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is used to study the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C{sub 3}MIM][NTf{sub 2}] in the temperature range between 150 and 320 K. The positron decay spectra are analyzed using the routine LifeTime-9.0 and the size distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer-size holes) is calculated. This distribution is in good agreement with Fuerth's classical hole theory of liquids when taking into account Fuerth's hole coalescence hypothesis. During cooling, the liquid sample remains in a supercooled, amorphous state and shows the glass transition in the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime at 187 K. The mean hole volume varies between 70 A{sup 3} at 150 K and 250 A{sup 3} at 265-300 K. From a comparison with the macroscopic volume, the hole density is estimated to be constant at 0.20x10{sup 21} g{sup -1} corresponding to 0.30 nm{sup -3} at 265 K. The hole free volume fraction varies from 0.023 at 185 K to 0.073 at T{sub m}+12 K=265 K and can be estimated to be 0.17 at 430 K. It is shown that the viscosity follows perfectly the Cohen-Turnbull free volume theory when using the free volume determined here. The heating run clearly shows crystallization at 200 K by an abrupt decrease in the mean <{tau}{sub 3}> and standard deviation {sigma}{sub 3} of the o-Ps lifetime distribution and an increase in the o-Ps intensity I{sub 3}. The parameters of the second lifetime component <{tau}{sub 2}> and {sigma}{sub 2} behave parallel to the o-Ps parameters, which also shows the positron's (e{sup +}) response to structural changes. During melting at 253 K, all lifetime parameters recover to the initial values of the liquid. An abrupt decrease in I{sub 3} is attributed to the solvation of e{sup -} and e{sup +} particles. Different possible interpretations of the o-Ps lifetime in the crystalline state are briefly discussed.

  15. Inhomogeneous dephasing masks coherence lifetimes in ensemble measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Griffin, Graham B.; Engel, Gregory S.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2012-04-28

    An open question at the forefront of modern physical sciences is what role, if any, quantum effects may play in biological sensing and energy transport mechanisms. One area of such research concerns the possibility of coherent energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Spectroscopic evidence of long-lived quantum coherence in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment protein complexes (PPCs), along with theoretical modeling of PPCs, has indicated that coherent energy transport might boost efficiency of energy transport in photosynthesis. Accurate assessment of coherence lifetimes is crucial for modeling the extent to which quantum effects participate in this energy transfer, because such quantum effects can only contribute to mechanisms proceeding on timescales over which the coherences persist. While spectroscopy is a useful way to measure coherence lifetimes, inhomogeneity in the transition energies across the measured ensemble may lead to underestimation of coherence lifetimes from spectroscopic experiments. Theoretical models of antenna complexes generally model a single system, and direct comparison of single system models to ensemble averaged experimental data may lead to systematic underestimation of coherence lifetimes, distorting much of the current discussion. In this study, we use simulations of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to model single complexes as well as averaged ensembles to demonstrate and roughly quantify the effect of averaging over an inhomogeneous ensemble on measured coherence lifetimes. We choose to model the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex because that system has been a focus for much of the recent discussion of quantum effects in biology, and use an early version of the well known environment-assisted quantum transport model to facilitate straightforward comparison between the current model and past work. Although ensemble inhomogeneity is known to lead to shorter lifetimes of observed oscillations (simply inhomogeneous spectral

  16. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-06

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  17. Excited state lifetime measurements of ytterbium in indium phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desrocher, David

    1989-12-01

    The AFIT Time Resolved Photoluminescence (TRPL) lab was disassembled, relocated and rebuilt with improvements to layout and performance. Excited state lifetime measurements of ytterbium implanted in indium phosphide were conducted using the new lab. Effects of sample temperature, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) time and RTA temperature on the lifetimes of the 1.002 microns Yb3+ line were examined. Lifetime measurements of Er, Pr and Tm in GaAs were also attempted. Ytterbium concentrations were 3 x 10(exp 13) ions/sq cm, implanted at an ion energy of 1 MeV in semi-insulating InP substrate. Sample temperatures ranged from 4.2 to 90K. Annealing times ranged from 1 to 25 seconds on samples annealed at 850 C. Annealing temperatures ranged from 400 to 850 C, with RTA times of 15 seconds. The excitation source was a nitrogen-pumped dye laser with primary wavelength at 580 nm. A germanium photodiode detector was selected to eliminate the long time constant associated with available S1 power supplies and to enable detection at the near infrared wavelengths of the other rare earths. Data acquisition was accomplished with a boxcar averager and a microcomputer equipped with acquisition hardware and software. Thermal quenching was clearly observed in lifetimes at increasing sample temperatures, most dramatically at above 50 C. The results would be very helpful in device fabrication/operation considerations, and some of the sample preparation parameters may be equally applicable for other RE doped III-V semiconductors.

  18. A Measurement of the Bs Lifetime at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, Sinead

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the proper lifetime of the B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF experiment at Fermilab. The B$0\\atop{s}$ meson lifetime is measured in its semileptonic decay mode, B$0\\atop{s}$ → ℓ+vD$-\\atop{s}$. The D$-\\atop{s}$ meson candidates are reconstructed in the decay mode D$-\\atop{s}$ → Φπ, with Φ → K+K-, in a trigger sample which requires a muon or an electron and another track which has a large impact parameters. The large impact parameter track is required by the silicon vertex trigger which is an innovative triggering device which has not previously been used in lifetime measurements. A total of 905 ± B$0\\atop{s}$ candidates are reconstructed in a sample which has an integrated luminosity of 140 pb-1 using data gathered between February 2002 and August 2003. The pseudo-proper lifetime distribution of these candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit. This fit takes into account the missing momentum carried by the neutrino and the bias caused by requiring a track with large impact parameter by modeling these effects in simulations. The fit yields the result for the B$0\\atop{s}$ proper lifetime: cτ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 419 ± 28$+16\\atop{-13}$ μm and τ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 1.397 ± 0.093$+0.053\\atop{-0.043}$ ps where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  19. A Measurement of the D+(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferi, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P. /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-04-01

    A high statistics measurement of the D{sub s}{sup +} lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. They describe the analysis of the two decay modes, D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0}K{sup +}, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 {+-} 5.5(stat.) {+-} 5.1(syst.) is using 8961 {+-} 105 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and 4680 {+-} 90 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0} K{sup +} decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average.

  20. Measurement of the Lambdab0 lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewin, M; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-11-02

    We report a measurement of the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime using a sample corresponding to 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment in 2002-2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The Lambda(b)(0) baryon is reconstructed via the decay Lambda(b)(0)-->micronuLambda(c)(+)X. Using 4437+/-329 signal candidates, we measure the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime to be tau(Lambda(b)(0))=1.290(-0.110)(+0.119)(stat)(-0.091)(+0.087)(syst) ps, which is among the most precise measurements in semileptonic Lambda(b)(0) decays. This result is in good agreement with the world average value.

  1. The “accumulation effect” of positrons in the stack of foils, detected by measurements of the positron implantation profile

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-12-14

    The profiles of positrons implanted from the radioactive source {sup 22}Na into a stack of foils and plates are the subject of our experimental and theoretical studies. The measurements were performed using the depth scanning of positron implantation profile method, and the theoretical calculations using the phenomenological multi-scattering model (MSM). Several stacks consisting of silver, gold and aluminum foils, and titanium and germanium plates were investigated. We notice that the MSM describes well the experimental profiles; however when the stack consisting of silver and gold foils, the backscattering and linear absorption coefficients differ significantly from those reported in the literature. We suggest the energy dependency of the backscattering coefficient for silver and gold. In the stacks which comprise titanium and germanium plates, there were observed the features, which indicate the presence of the “accumulation effect” in the experimental implantation profile. This effect was previously detected in implantation profiles in Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 tool kit, and it consists in higher localization of positrons close the interface. We suppose that this effect can be essential for positron annihilation in any heterogeneous materials.

  2. Measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D.E.

    1986-06-01

    This thesis reports a measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks. It is based on data taken with the DELCO detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV. The decays of hadrons containing bottom quarks are tagged in hadronic events by the presence of electrons with a large component of momentum transverse to the event axis. Such electrons are identified in the DELCO detector by an atmospheric pressure Cherenkov counter assisted by a lead/scintillator electromagnetic shower counter. The lifetime measured is 1.17 psec, consistent with previous measurements. This measurement, in conjunction with a limit on the non-charm branching ratio in b-decay obtained by other experiments, can be used to constrain the magnitude of the V/sub cb/ element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix to the range 0.042 (+0.005 or -0.004 (stat.), +0.004 or -0.002 (sys.)), where the errors reflect the uncertainty on tau/sub b/ only and not the uncertainties in the calculations which relate the b-lifetime and the element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix.

  3. High Precision Measurement of the ^19Ne Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah; Back, H. O.; Boswell, M. S.; Crowell, A. S.; Howell, C. R.; Kidd, M. F.; Pattie, R. W., Jr.; Young, A. R.; Dendooven, P. G.; Giri, G. S.; van der Hoek, D. J.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W. L.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Santra, B.; Shidling, P. D.; Sohani, M.; Versolota, O. O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2009-10-01

    Recently, a rigorous review of the T=12 mirror transitions has identified several systems which can contribute to high precision tests exploring deviations from the Standard Model's description of the electroweak interaction. Arguably, one of the best candidates is the &+circ; decay of ^19Ne to ^19F. In this system, the main contribution to the uncertainty of extracted Standard Model parameters is due to the measured value of the lifetime of the decay. In March 2009, a high precision measurement of the lifetime of ^19Ne was made by a collaboration between the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) and the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) at the Trapped Radioactive Isotopes: Microlaboratories for Fundamental Physics (Triμp) facility. An overview of the experiment and preliminary results will be presented.

  4. Fast-timing lifetime measurement of 152Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhold, J.; Kern, R.; Lizarazo, C.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V.; Jolos, R. V.; Bucurescu, D.; Florea, N.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Lica, R.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Mihai, R.; Mitu, I. O.; Negret, A.; Nita, C.; Olacel, A.; Pascu, S.; Stroe, L.; Toma, S.; Turturica, A.

    2016-10-01

    The lifetime τ (02+) of 152Gd has been measured using fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) with an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detectors. 152Gd was produced via an (α ,n ) reaction on a gold backed 149Sm target. The measured lifetime of τ (02+) =96 (6 ) ps corresponds to a reduced transition strength of B (E 2 ;02+→21+) =111 (7 ) W.u. and an E 0 transition strength of ρ2(E 0 ) =39 (3 ) ×10-3 to the ground state. This result provides experimental support for the validity of a correlation that would be a novel indicator for a quantum phase transition (QPT).

  5. Measurement of the lifetime difference between Bs mass eigenstates.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dörr, C; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ehlers, J; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guenther, M; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; NcNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P A Movilla; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-03-18

    We present measurements of the lifetimes and polarization amplitudes for B(0)(s)-->J/psiphi and B(0)(d)-->J/psiK(*0) decays. Lifetimes of the heavy and light mass eigenstates in the B(0)(s) system are separately measured for the first time by determining the relative contributions of amplitudes with definite CP as a function of the decay time. Using 203+/-15 B(0)(s) decays we obtain tau(L) = (1.05(+0.16)(-0.13) +/- 0.02) ps and tau(H) = (2.07(+0.58)(-0.46) +/- 0.03) ps. Expressed in terms of the difference DeltaGamma(s) and average Gamma(s), of the decay rates of the two eigenstates, the results are DeltaGamma(s)/Gamma(s) = (65(+25)(-33) +/- 1)% and DeltaGamma(s) = (0.47(+0.19)(-0.24) +/- 0.01) ps(-1).

  6. Drug release profiles and microstructural characterization of cast and freeze dried vitamin B12 buccal films by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Barnabás; Kállai, Nikolett; Tóth, Gergő; Hetényi, Gergely; Zelkó, Romána

    2014-02-01

    Solvent cast and freeze dried films, containing the water-soluble vitamin B12 as model drug were prepared from two polymers, sodium alginate (SA), and Carbopol 71G (CP). The proportion of the CP was changed in the films. The microstructural characterization of various samples was carried out by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The drug release kinetics of untreated and stored samples was evaluated by the conventionally applied semi-empirical power law. Correlation was found between the changes of the characteristic parameters of the drug release and the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime values of polymer samples. The results indicated that the increase of CP concentration, the freeze-drying process and the storage at 75% R.H. decreased the rate of drug release. The PALS method enabled the distinction between the micro- and macrostructural factors influencing the drug release profile of polymer films.

  7. Lifetime Measurement in the Yrast Band of 119I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, Yu. N.; Pasternak, A. A.; Srebrny, J.; Droste, Ch.; Hagemann, G. B.; Juutinen, S.; Morek, T.; Piiparinen, M.; Podsvirova, E. O.; Toermaenen, S.; Starosta, K.; Virtanen, A.; Wasilewski, A. A.

    1999-05-01

    The lifetime of levels in the yrast band of 119I were measured by DSAM and RDM using the 109Ag (13C,3n) reaction at E=54 MeV. The detailed description of data analysis including the stopping power determination and estimation of side feeding time is given. A modified method of RDM data analysis --- Recoil Distance Doppler Shape Attenuation (RDDSA) is used.

  8. Lifetime measurements probing triple shape coexistence in 175Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, H.; Joss, D. T.; Grahn, T.; Page, R. D.; Carroll, R. J.; Dewald, A.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hackstein, M.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Labiche, M.; Leino, M.; Lumley, N.; Maierbeck, P.; Nyman, M.; Nieminen, P.; O'Donnell, D.; Ollier, J.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Pissulla, T.; Rahkila, P.; Revill, J. P.; Rother, W.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Rigby, S. V.; Sarén, J.; Sapple, P. J.; Scheck, M.; Scholey, C.; Simpson, J.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Venhart, M.

    2011-11-01

    Lifetimes of the low-lying excited states in the very neutron-deficient nucleus 175Au have been measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method using γ-ray spectra obtained with the recoil-decay tagging technique. Transition quadrupole moments and reduced transition probabilities extracted for this odd-Z nucleus indicate the existence of three different shapes and the competition between collective and noncollective structures.

  9. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9-(Methylaminomethyl

  10. Lifetime measurements and shape coexistence in {sup 144}Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Procter, M. G.; Cullen, D. M.; Niclasen, B.; Mason, P. J. R.; Rigby, S. V.; Dare, J. A.; Lumley, N. M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Puurunen, A.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Saren, J.

    2010-05-15

    The known level scheme of {sup 144}Dy has been extended and lifetime measurements have been made with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. Reduced transition probabilities and deformations have been determined for four low-lying transitions. These states form part of the first observed band crossing, giving information on the change in nuclear deformation resulting from the rearrangement of h{sub 11/2} protons in the nucleus. Two bands built upon excited 10{sup +} states have been assigned pi(h{sub 11/2}){sup 2} prolate and nu(h{sub 11/2}){sup -2} oblate configurations with tau=12(2)ps and 0.01lifetimes are reasoned to be a result of shape coexistence at low energy and moderate spin. A known four-quasiparticle dipole band has been extended to higher spin and lifetime measurements suggest a long-lived bandhead state. In this case, the excited states in the band may be consistent with a shears model interpretation of a magnetic dipole rotor. However, the measured B(M1)/B(E2) branching ratios reveal a larger than expected deformed rotational component compared with that in the analogous band in the lower mass isotone {sup 142}Gd.

  11. Lifetime measurements and shape coexistence in Dy144

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procter, M. G.; Cullen, D. M.; Scholey, C.; Niclasen, B.; Mason, P. J. R.; Rigby, S. V.; Dare, J. A.; Dewald, A.; Greenlees, P. T.; Iwasaki, H.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Lumley, N. M.; Möller, O.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Pissulla, T.; Puurunen, A.; Rahkila, P.; Rother, W.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sarén, J.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.

    2010-05-01

    The known level scheme of Dy144 has been extended and lifetime measurements have been made with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. Reduced transition probabilities and deformations have been determined for four low-lying transitions. These states form part of the first observed band crossing, giving information on the change in nuclear deformation resulting from the rearrangement of h11/2 protons in the nucleus. Two bands built upon excited 10+ states have been assigned π(h11/2)2 prolate and ν(h11/2)-2 oblate configurations with τ=12(2)ps and 0.01<τ≲16ns, respectively. These long lifetimes are reasoned to be a result of shape coexistence at low energy and moderate spin. A known four-quasiparticle dipole band has been extended to higher spin and lifetime measurements suggest a long-lived bandhead state. In this case, the excited states in the band may be consistent with a shears model interpretation of a magnetic dipole rotor. However, the measured B(M1)/B(E2) branching ratios reveal a larger than expected deformed rotational component compared with that in the analogous band in the lower mass isotone Gd142.

  12. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm-1 and 37,518 cm-1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm-1.

  13. A Precise measurement of the B0(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-04-01

    The authors report a measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{nu}X (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. They have reconstructed 5176 D{sub s}{sup -} {mu}{sup +} signal events, where the D{sub s}{sup -} is identified via the decay D{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}, followed by {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. Using these events, they have measured the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to be {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 1.398 {+-} 0.044 (stat){sub -0.025}{sup +0.028}(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to date.

  14. Free volume of an epoxy resin and its relation to structural relaxation: Evidence from positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlubek, Günter; Hassan, E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Pionteck, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The microstructure of the free volume and its temperature dependence in the epoxy resin diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) have been examined using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS, 80-350K , 10-5Pa ) and pressure-volume-temperature (PVT, 293-470K , 0.1-200MPa ) experiments. Employing the Simha-Somcynsky lattice-hole theory (S-S eos), the excess (hole) free volume fraction h and the specific free and occupied volumes, Vf=hV and Vocc=(1-h)V , were estimated. From the PALS spectra analyzed with the new routine LT9.0 the hole size distribution, its mean, ⟨vh⟩ , and mean dispersion, σh , were calculated. ⟨vh⟩ varies from 35to130Å3 . From a comparison of ⟨vh⟩ with V and Vf , the specific hole number Nh' was estimated to be independent of the temperature [Nh(300K)=Nh'/V=0.65nm-3] . From comparison with reported dielectric and viscosity measurements, we found that the structural relaxation slows down faster than the shrinkage of the hole free volume Vf would predict on the basis of the free volume theory. Our results indicate that the structural relaxation in DGEBA operates via the free-volume mechanism only when liquidlike clusters of cells of the S-S lattice appear which contain a local free volume of ˜1.5 or more empty S-S cells. The same conclusion follows from the pressure dependency of the structural relaxation and Vf . It is shown that PALS mirrors thermal volume fluctuations on a subnanometer scale via the dispersion in the ortho-positronium lifetimes. Using a fluctuation approach, the temperature dependency of the characteristic length of dynamic heterogeneity, ξ , is estimated to vary from ξ=1.9nm at Tg to 1.0nm at T/Tg>1.2 . A model was proposed which relates the spatial structure of the free volume as concluded from PALS to the known mobility pattern of the dynamic glass transition at low (cooperative α -relaxation) and high ( a -relaxation) temperatures. We discuss possible reasons for the differences between the

  15. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  16. Updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-23

    We present an updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD. 4316 {tau}-pair events, selected from a 150k Z{sup 0} data sample, are analyzed using three techniques: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The measurement benefits from the small and stable interaction region at the SLC and the precision CCD pixel vertex detector of the SLD. The combined result is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) fs.

  17. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  18. Precision lifetime measurements of the 2p levels in lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Kurtz, C.; Tanner, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    These measurements are motivated by the theoretical challenges posed by lithium. The three-electron lithium atom is one of the simplest atomic systems with which to test atomic structure calculations. Recently, there were several ab initio calculations of the lithium 2s-2p oscillator strengths, which agree to 0.15%. However, the theoretical results differ by 5 sigma from the precise fast-beam-laser lifetime measurement of Gaupp and Andra (Berlin). Hence the need for a new independent and precise measurement. Improvements were added to the fast beam laser techniques developed for cesium in order to measure the lithium 2p state lifetime. Although the technique is similar to that of cesium, the lithium atom presents a few new complications. Since the atom is lighter, it travels more quickly through the interaction and detection regions. Therefore, the 670 nm wavelength requires a dye laser to produce sufficient intensity to populate the excited state. Unfortunately, the intensity of the dye laser is inherently less stable than that of a diode laser. Another complication is that the ion-beam intensity is much more sensitive to fluctuations in the accelerating voltage. Two detectors were added: one to monitor the ion-beam intensity, and the other to monitor the laser power. With the information from the additional detectors, a new data analysis scheme was developed. Sufficient data were taken to evaluate the benefits of the new detectors. No additional work is planned at Argonne for this experiment.

  19. Electron Beam Lifetime in SPEAR3: Measurement and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Huang, X.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; /Pavilon Tech., Austin

    2007-12-19

    In this paper we report on electron beam lifetime measurements as a function of scraper position, RF voltage and bunch fill pattern in SPEAR3. We then outline development of an empirical, macroscopic model using the beam-loss rate equation. By identifying the dependence of loss coefficients on accelerator and beam parameters, a numerically-integrating simulator can be constructed to compute beam decay with time. In a companion paper, the simulator is used to train a parametric, non-linear dynamics model for the system [1].

  20. Direct Lifetime Measurements of the Excited States in 72Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolos, K.; Miller, D.; Grzywacz, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Al-Shudifat, M.; Bazin, D.; Bingham, C. R.; Braunroth, T.; Cerizza, G.; Gade, A.; Lemasson, A.; Liddick, S. N.; Madurga, M.; Morse, C.; Portillo, M.; Rajabali, M. M.; Recchia, F.; Riedinger, L. L.; Voss, P.; Walters, W. B.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    The lifetimes of the first excited 2+ and 4+ states in 72>Ni were measured at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method, a model-independent probe to obtain the reduced transition probability. Excited states in 72Ni were populated by the one-proton knockout reaction of an intermediate energy 73Cu beam. γ -ray-recoil coincidences were detected with the γ -ray tracking array GRETINA and the S800 spectrograph. Our results provide evidence of enhanced transition probability B (E 2 ;2+→0+) as compared to 68Ni, but do not confirm the trend of large B (E 2 ) values reported in the neighboring isotope 70Ni obtained from Coulomb excitation measurement. The results are compared to shell model calculations. The lifetime obtained for the excited 41+ state is consistent with models showing decay of a seniority ν =4 , 4+ state, which is consistent with the disappearance of the 8+ isomer in 72Ni.

  1. Lifetime measurements in 166Re: Collective versus magnetic rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. J.; Cederwall, B.; Doncel, M.; Peng, J.; Chen, Q. B.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhao, P. W.; Meng, J.; Bäck, T.; Jakobsson, U.; Auranen, K.; Bönig, S.; Drummond, M.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.; HerzáÅ, A.; Joss, D. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Leino, M.; McPeake, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Partanen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Sayǧı, B.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Taylor, M. J.; Thornthwaite, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Xiao, Z. G.

    2016-03-01

    Lifetimes of excited states in the neutron-deficient odd-odd nucleus 166Re have been measured for the first time using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The measured lifetime for the (8-) state; τ =480 (80) ps, enabled an assessment of the multipolarities of the γ rays depopulating this state. Information on electromagnetic transition strengths were deduced for the γ -ray transitions from the (9-),(10-), and (11-) states, and in the case of the (10-) and (11-) states limits on the B (M 1 ) and B (E 2 ) strengths were estimated. The results are compared with total Routhian surface predictions and semiclassical calculations. Tilted-axis cranking calculations based on a relativistic mean-field approach (TAC-RMF) have also been performed in order to test the possibility of magnetic rotation in the 166Re nucleus. While the TAC-RMF calculations predict a quadrupole-deformed nuclear shape with similar β2 deformation as obtained by using the TRS model, it was found that the experimental electromagnetic transition rates are in better agreement with a collective-rotational description.

  2. Direct lifetime measurements of the excited states in Ni72

    DOE PAGES

    Kolos, K.; Miller, D.; Grzywacz, R.; ...

    2016-03-22

    The lifetimes of the first excited 2+ and 4+ states in 72Ni were measured at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method, a model-independent probe to obtain the reduced transition probability. Excited states in 72Ni were populated by the one-proton knockout reaction of an intermediate energy 73Cu beam. γ-ray-recoil coincidences were detected with the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA and the S800 spectrograph. Our results provide evidence of enhanced transition probability B(E2;2+ → 0+) as compared to 68Ni, but do not confirm the trend of large B(E2) values reported in the neighboring isotope 70Ni obtained from Coulomb excitationmore » measurement. The results are compared to shell model calculations. Here, the lifetime obtained for the excited 4+1 state is consistent with models showing decay of a seniority ν = 4, 4+ state, which is consistent with the disappearance of the 8+ isomer in 72Ni.« less

  3. Positron annihilation spectroscopy on a beam of positrons the LEPTA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmanova, E. V.; Eseev, M. K.; Kobets, A. G.; Meshkov, I. N.; Orlov, O. S.; Sidorin, A. A.; Siemek, K.; Horodek, P.

    2016-12-01

    The results and possibilities of the samples surfaces research by the Doppler method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) for a monochromatic beam of positrons at the LEPTA facility are presented in this paper. Method with high-resolution sensitivity to defects like vacancies and dislocations allows scanning of the surface and near-surface sample layers to a depth of several micrometers by the method of Doppler broadening of annihilation lines. The opportunities for the development of a PAS method based on the measurement of the positron lifetime in the sample irradiated by ordered flow of positrons from the injector of accelerator complex LEPTA at JINR are discussed.

  4. Mass and lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei in storage rings.

    PubMed

    Franzke, Bernhard; Geissel, Hans; Münzenberg, Gottfried

    2008-01-01

    Mass and lifetime measurements lead to the discovery and understanding of basic properties of matter. The isotopic nature of the chemical elements, nuclear binding, and the location and strength of nuclear shells are the most outstanding examples leading to the development of the first nuclear models. More recent are the discoveries of new structures of nuclides far from the valley of stability. A new generation of direct mass measurements which allows the exploration of extended areas of the nuclear mass surface with high accuracy has been opened up with the combination of the Experimental Storage Ring ESR and the FRragment Separator FRS at GSI Darmstadt. In-flight separated nuclei are stored in the ring. Their masses are directly determined from the revolution frequency. Dependent on the half-life two complementary methods are applied. Schottky Mass Spectrometry SMS relies on the measurement of the revolution frequency of electron cooled stored ions. The cooling time determines the lower half-life limit to the order of seconds. For Isochronous Mass Spectrometry IMS the ring is operated in an isochronous ion-optical mode. The revolution frequency of the individual ions coasting in the ring is measured using a time-of-flight method. Nuclides with lifetimes down to microseconds become accessible. With SMS masses of several hundreds nuclides have been measured simultaneously with an accuracy in the 2 x 10(-7)-range. This high accuracy and the ability to study large areas of the mass surface are ideal tools to discover new nuclear structure properties and to guide improvements for theoretical mass models. In addition, nuclear half-lives of stored bare and highly charged ions have been measured. This new experimental development is a significant progress since nuclear decay characteristics are mostly known for neutral atoms. For bare and highly charged ions new nuclear decay modes become possible, such as bound-state beta decay. Dramatic changes in the nuclear lifetime

  5. Lifetime measurements by open circuit voltage decay in GaAs and InP diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhimnathwala, H. G.; Tyagi, S. D.; Bothra, S.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetimes in the base of solar cells made on GaAs and InP were measured by the open-circuit voltage decay method. The measurement technique and the conditions under which the minority carrier lifetimes can be measured are described. Minority carrier lifetimes ranging from 1.6 to 34 ns in InP of different doping concentrations were measured. A minority carrier lifetime of 6 ns was measured in n-type GaAs, which agrees well with the lifetime of 5.7 ns measured by transient microwave reflection.

  6. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy in materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1988-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) has emerged as a powerful technique for research in condensed matter. It has been used extensively in the study of metals, ionic crystals, glasses and polymers. The present review concentrates on applications of positron lifetime measurements for elucidation of the physicochemical structure of polymers.

  7. Measurement of the B0 and B- meson lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Graugés, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L. M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Boix, G.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A. E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Thomson, E.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Robertson, N. A.; Giehl, I.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Heister, A.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Yuan, C.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Cranmer, K.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2000-01-01

    The lifetimes of the B0 and B- mesons are measured using a sample of about four million hadronic /Z decays collected from 1991 to 1995 with the Aleph detector at LEP. The data sample has been recently reprocessed, achieving a substantial improvement in the tracking performance. Semileptonic decays of B0 and B- mesons are partially reconstructed by identifying events containing a lepton with an associated D*+ or D0 meson. The proper time of the /B meson is estimated from the measured decay length and the momentum of the /D-lepton system. A fit to the proper time of 1880 D*+l- and 2856 D0l- candidates yields the following results: τB^0=1.518+/-0.053+/-0.034 ps, τB^-=1.648+/-0.049+/-0.035 ps, τB^-/τB^0=1.085+/- 0.059+/-0.018.

  8. Lifetime Measurement of the 229Th nuclear isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiferle, Benedict; von der Wense, Lars; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2017-01-01

    The first excited isomeric state of 229Th possesses the lowest energy among all known excited nuclear states. The expected energy is accessible with today's laser technology and in principle allows for a direct optical laser excitation of the nucleus. The isomer decays via three channels to its ground state (internal conversion, γ decay, and bound internal conversion), whose strengths depend on the charge state of Thm229 . We report on the measurement of the internal-conversion decay half-life of neutral Thm229 . A half-life of 7 ±1 μ s has been measured, which is in the range of theoretical predictions and, based on the theoretically expected lifetime of ≈1 04 s of the photonic decay channel, gives further support for an internal conversion coefficient of ≈1 09, thus constraining the strength of a radiative branch in the presence of internal conversion.

  9. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample. 17 figs.

  10. Determination of the activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations in plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy by positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Mohammed; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Badawi, Emad A.; Abdel-Rahman, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations of plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime technique. Plastic deformation using a hydraulic press produces mainly dislocations and may produce point defects. The type of defect was studied by isochronal annealing which determines the temperature range of recovery of each type. Only one type of defect (dislocations) was observed for the investigated sample and was found to be recovered within the range 455-700 K. Isothermal annealing by slow cooling was performed through this range and used in determination of the activation enthalpy of migration of dislocations which was found to be 0.26 ± 0.01 eV.

  11. Effect of storage on microstructural changes of Carbopol polymers tracked by the combination of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Barnabás; Süvegh, Károly; Zelkó, Romána

    2011-09-15

    Different types of Carbopols are frequently applied excipients of various dosage forms. Depending on the supramolecular structure, their water sorption behaviour could significantly differ. The purpose of the present study was to track the supramolecular changes of two types of Carbopol polymers (Carbopol 71G and Ultrez 10NF) alone and in their physical mixture with a water-soluble drug, vitamin B(12), as a function of storage time. The combination of FT-IR spectroscopy, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler-broadening spectroscopy was applied to follow the effect of water uptake on the structural changes. Our results indicate that water-induced interactions between polymeric chains can be sensitively detected. This enables the prediction of stability of dosage forms in the course of storage.

  12. Dislocation Substructure in the Cold-Rolled Ni-20 Mass Pct Cr Alloy Analyzed by X-ray Diffraction, Positron Annihilation Lifetime, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Mitsuharu; Inoue, Koji

    2016-12-01

    The systematic change in the dislocation density and characteristics that develop under cold rolling as a simulated deformation was studied in order to examine the fundamental behavior of dislocations in terms of the dislocation substructure formation. In particular, the dislocation density was quantified by X-ray line profile analysis (XLPA), which is effective for quantifying the dislocation density and character; positron annihilation lifetime (PAL), which is sensitive to vacancy-type lattice defects; the Bailey-Hirsch equation from the hardness (Hv); and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The strain dependency of the dislocation density analyzed by XLPA, PAL, TEM, and Hv showed a similar tendency with an increase in the dislocation. In particular, the dislocation density by XLPA had good agreement with the results of TEM at low strain levels and with PAL at high strain levels. As a result, a combination of these techniques successfully showed the behavior of the dislocation substructure.

  13. Positron studies in catalysis research. Final report, September 1993-- May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    During the past 20 months, we have completed our positron microscope and performed several studies in our nonmicroscopic depth-profiling positron spectrometer which should ultimately be applicable to catalysis. These studies involve using depth-profiled positron spectrometers to observe the growth dynamics of metal silicides on silicon substrates and to observe defects in glassy polymer surfaces and thin films, and the use of bulk positron lifetime measurements to observe pore-size variations in zeolites.

  14. Packing and mobility of hydrocarbon chains in phospholipid lyotropic liquid crystalline lamellar phases and liposomes: characterisation by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS).

    PubMed

    Dong, Aurelia W; Fong, Celesta; Waddington, Lynne J; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-01-07

    Lipid lamellar mesophases and their colloidal dispersions (liposomes) are increasingly being deployed in vivo as drug delivery vehicles, and also as models of biological membranes in fundamental biophysics studies. The permeability and diffusion of small molecules such as drugs is accommodated by a change in local curvature and molecular packing (mesophase behaviour) of the bilayer membrane molecules. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is capable of providing in situ molecular level information on changes in free volume and void space arising from such changes in a non-perturbative manner. In this work PALS was used to systematically characterise the temperature-induced melting transitions (Tm) of saturated and unsaturated phospholipid-water systems while systematically varying lipid chain length, as both bulk lamellar mesophase and as aqueous colloidal dispersions (liposomes). A four-component fit of the data was used that provides separate PALS lifetimes for the aqueous (τ3) and organic domains (τ4). The oPs lifetime (τ4), for the lamellar phases of DSPC (C18:0), DPPC (C16:0), DMPC (C14:0) and DLPC (C12:0) was found to be independent of chain length, with characteristic lifetime value τ4 ∼ 3.4 ns. τ4 is consistently larger in the dispersed liposomes compared to the bulk mesophases, suggesting that the hydrocarbon chains are more mobile. The use of contemporary and consistent analytical approaches as described in this study is the key to future deployment of PALS to interrogate the in situ influence of drugs on membrane and cellular microenvironments.

  15. Lifetime measurements and magnetic rotation in 107Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, S. H.; Ma, H. L.; Zhu, L. H.; Wu, X. G.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, B.; Li, G. S.; Li, C. B.; Hu, S. P.; Cao, X. P.; Yu, B. B.; Xu, C.; Cheng, Y. Y.

    2014-01-01

    The excited states in 107Ag were populated through the heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction 100Mo (11B, 4n) 107Ag at a beam energy of 46 MeV. Lifetimes of high-spin states in 107Ag have been measured through the Doppler shift attenuation method. The deduced B (M1) values, gradually decreasing with increasing spin, clearly demonstrate that both the yrast positive-parity band and the yrast negative-parity band in 107Ag are magnetic rotation bands. Furthermore, experimental deduced B (M1) values for the yrast positive-parity band are compared with the predictions of the particle rotor model. The approximate agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental results further confirms the mechanism of magnetic rotation for the yrast positive-parity band. In addition, a systematic investigation shows the evolution of the magnetic rotation mechanism in the A ≈110 mass region.

  16. Measurement of picosecond lifetimes in neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, S.; Kröll, Th.; Régis, J.-M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Blanc, A.; Bruce, A. M.; Fraile, L. M.; de France, G.; Hartig, A.-L.; Henrich, C.; Ignatov, A.; Jentschel, M.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Köster, U.; Lalkovski, S.; Lozeva, R.; Mach, H.; Mǎrginean, N.; Mutti, P.; Paziy, V.; Regan, P. H.; Simpson, G. S.; Soldner, T.; Thürauf, M.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Warr, N.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Lifetimes of nuclear excited states in fission fragments have been studied in the past following isotope separation, thus giving access mainly to the fragments' daughters and only to long-lived isomeric states in the primary fragments. For the first time now, short-lived excited states in the primary fragments, produced in neutron-induced prompt fission of 235U and 241Pu, were studied within the EXILL&FATIMA campaign at the intense neutron-beam facility of the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. Purpose: We aim to investigate the quadrupole collective properties of neutron-rich even-even 138,140,142Xe isotopes lying between the double shell closure N =82 and Z =50 and a deformed region with octupole collectivity. Method: The γ rays emitted from the excited fragments were detected with a mixed array consisting of 8 HPGe EXOGAM Clover detectors (EXILL) and 16 LaBr3(Ce) fast scintillators (FATIMA). The detector system has the unique ability to select the interesting fragment making use of the high resolution of the HPGe detectors and determine subnanosecond lifetimes using the fast scintillators. For the analysis the generalized centroid difference method was used. Results: We show that quadrupole collectivity increases smoothly with increasing neutron number above the closed N =82 neutron shell. Our measurements are complemented by state-of-the-art theory calculations based on shell-model descriptions. Conclusions: The observed smooth increase in quadrupole collectivity is similar to the evolution seen in the measured masses of the xenon isotopic chain and is well reproduced by theory. This behavior is in contrast to higher Z even-even nuclei where abrupt change in deformation occurs around N =90 .

  17. Positron studies in catalysis research. Progress report, September 1993--April 1994, and final report, 15 January 1990--14 January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    During the past eight months, the authors have made progress in several areas relevant to the eventual use of positron techniques in catalysis research. They have come closer to the completion of their positron microscope, and at the same time have performed several studies in their non-microscopic positron spectrometer which should ultimately be applicable to catalysis. The current status of the efforts in each of these areas is summarized in the following sections: Construction of the positron microscope (optical element construction, data collection software, and electronic sub-assemblies); Doppler broadening spectroscopy of metal silicide; Positron lifetime spectroscopy of glassy polymers; and Positron lifetime measurements of pore-sizes in zeolites.

  18. Precise Measurement of the 21+ Level Lifetime in 12Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; Merchan, E.; Prasher, V. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Weisshaar, D.; Gade, A.; Bader, V. M.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Loelius, C.; Lunderberg, E. M.; Morse, C.; Recchia, F.; Whitmore, K.

    2013-10-01

    For many years, it has been suggested that 12Be exhibits a breakdown of the N = 8 shell gap. This reflects the tension between the propensity for alpha-clustering in beryllium, with 12Be appearing as a 2-alpha dumb bell bound by a cloud of four poorly bound neutrons, and a more conventional Shell Model picture with the N = 8 neutrons filling the p-shell and holding the nucleus to a near spherical shape. To provide a better understanding of the extent of the breakdown of the N = 8 shell gap, the lifetime of the first 2+ state in 12Be was measured using intermediate-energy inelastic scattering of a 12Be beam combined with the Doppler Shift attenuation method. Gamma rays emitted at the target position were measured with GRETINA in coincidence with reaction residues detected in the S800 spectrometer at NSCL. Three different targets were measured, allowing for consistency checks and a better understanding of systematic effects. Preliminary results on the B(E2) transition strength from the first 2+ state will be presented. Work supported by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10946 and Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  19. Neutron Lifetime Measurement Using Magnetically Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffer, Craig; Huffman, P. R.; Schelhammer, K. W.; Dewey, M. S.; Huber, M. G.; Hughes, P. P.; Mumm, H. P.; Thompson, A. K.; Coakley, K.; Yue, A. T.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    The neutron beta-decay lifetime is important in both nuclear astrophysics and in understanding weak interactions in the framework of the Standard Model. An experiment based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research was designed to address statistical and systematic limitations of former measurements. In our approach, a beam of 0.89 nm neutrons is incident on a superfluid 4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. Some of the neutrons are subsequently downscattered by single phonons in the helium to low energies (< 100 neV) and those in the appropriate spin state become trapped. The inverse process, upscattering of UCN, is suppressed by the low phonon density in the < 300 mK helium, allowing the neutron to travel undisturbed through the helium. When the neutron decays the energetic electron produces a scintillation signal in the helium that is detected in real time using photomultiplier tubes. The current measurement is limited by larger than expected systematic corrections. We will discuss the result of the latest dataset and comment on the potential of future measurements.

  20. The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: Bc lifetime measured using the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine

    2008-09-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb-1 of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the Bc± meson is studied in the Bc± → J/Ψμ± + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/Ψ + μ invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 ± 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: τ(Bc±) = 0.448-0.036+0.038(stat) ± 0.032(sys) ps.

  1. c, b, and tau lifetime measurements in e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments at e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage rings have successfully measured the tau and D/sup 0/ lifetimes and set interesting limits on the B lifetime. So far, the conventional wisdom has prevailed. The tau lifetime is consistent with prediction; there is no sign (but little sensitivity) of a violation of universality. The charmed particle lifetimes are roughly as expected, but richer in their phenomenology than anticipated. The B lifetime is still unknown. The experimental art is developing rapidly. Several experiments have by now installed vertex detectors. Measurements of charmed particle lifetimes from e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments will complement the work that has been done at fixed target machines. Measurements of tau and B lifetimes may be the exclusive province of e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments for the next few years. (WHK)

  2. Detection of Mg17Al12 precipitates in deformed thermal-aged AZ91 alloy by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Y.; Del Río, J.

    2004-02-01

    Positron-annihilation lifetime measurements are used to study the influence of Mg17Al12 precipitates in mechanical properties of deformed magnesium alloys containing 9 wt% Al and 1wt% Zn. Deformations are performed at room temperature on untreated and thermal-aged samples, and the response of the positron lifetime to the deformation degree is studied. Measurements reveal that changes in the average positron lifetime are very small on both samples. The slight increase of positron lifetime in deformed samples, seems to be related with the unfavourable orientation of Mg17Al12 precipitates in the magnesium matrix to produce work hardening, as it has shown by other authors through TEM observations. Further isothermal annealing experiments, on samples that are previously deformed, illustrate almost a complete recovery of the positron lifetime on untreated samples at 375 K and on age-hardened samples at 433 K.

  3. Characterization of a sucrose/starch matrix through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy: unravelling the decomposition and glass transition processes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep Kumar; Roudaut, Gaëlle; Fabing, Isabelle; Duplâtre, Gilles

    2010-11-14

    The triplet state of positronium, o-Ps, is used as a probe to characterize a starch-20% w/w sucrose matrix as a function of temperature (T). A two-step decomposition (of sucrose, and then starch) starts at 440 K as shown by a decrease in the o-Ps intensity (I(3)) and lifetime (τ(3)), the latter also disclosing the occurrence of a glass transition. Upon sucrose decomposition, the matrix acquires properties (reduced size and density of nanoholes) that are different from those of pure starch. A model is successfully established, describing the variations of both I(3) and τ(3) with T and yields a glass transition temperature, T(g) = (446 ± 2) K, in spite of the concomitant sucrose decomposition. Unexpectedly, the starch volume fraction (as probed through thermal gravimetry) decreases with T at a higher rate than the free volume fraction (as probed through PALS).

  4. The multi-scattering model for calculations of positron spatial distribution in the multilayer stacks, useful for conventional positron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-08-21

    The spatial distribution of positrons emitted from radioactive isotopes into stacks or layered samples is a subject of the presented report. It was found that Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using GEANT4 code are not able to describe correctly the experimental data of the positron fractions in stacks. The mathematical model was proposed for calculations of the implantation profile or positron fractions in separated layers or foils being components of a stack. The model takes into account only two processes, i.e., the positron absorption and backscattering at interfaces. The mathematical formulas were applied in the computer program called LYS-1 (layers profile analysis). The theoretical predictions of the model were in the good agreement with the results of the MC simulations for the semi infinite sample. The experimental verifications of the model were performed on the symmetrical and non-symmetrical stacks of different foils. The good agreement between the experimental and calculated fractions of positrons in components of a stack was achieved. Also the experimental implantation profile obtained using the depth scanning of positron implantation technique is very well described by the theoretical profile obtained within the proposed model. The LYS-1 program allows us also to calculate the fraction of positrons which annihilate in the source, which can be useful in the positron spectroscopy.

  5. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  6. Accurate Alternative Measurements for Female Lifetime Reproductive Success in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trinh T. X.; Moehring, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Fitness is an individual’s ability to survive and reproduce, and is an important concept in evolutionary biology. However, accurately measuring fitness is often difficult, and appropriate fitness surrogates need to be identified. Lifetime reproductive success, the total progeny an organism can produce in their lifetime, is thought to be a suitable proxy for fitness, but the measure of an organism’s reproductive output across a lifetime can be difficult or impossible to obtain. Here we demonstrate that the short-term measure of reproductive success across five days provides a reasonable prediction of an individual's total lifetime reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lifetime reproductive success of a female that has only mated once is not correlated to the lifetime reproductive success of a female that is allowed to mate multiple times, demonstrating that these measures should not serve as surrogates nor be used to make inferences about one another. PMID:26125633

  7. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  8. Measurement of the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the semileptonic decay channel.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-03-06

    Using approximately 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, we measure the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the Bc-/+-->J/psimicro+/-+X final state. A simultaneous unbinned likelihood fit to the J/psi+micro invariant mass and lifetime distributions yields a signal of 881+/-80(stat) candidates and a lifetime measurement of tau(Bc+/-)=0.448(-0.036)(+0.038)(stat)+/-0.032(syst) ps.

  9. Measuring positron-atom binding energies through laser-assisted photo-recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surko, C. M.; Danielson, J. R.; Continetti, R. E.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2013-05-01

    Trap-based positron beams are important for a range of atomic physics experiments. They have, for example, enabled the measurement of positron binding energies for over 60 molecules to date. However, in spite of numerous, accurate theoretical predictions, there have been no experiments to study positron attachment to atoms, due primarily to the difficulty of forming these attached states in two-body collisions. Described here is the proposal for an experiment to use laser-assisted photo-recombination (LAPR) of positrons and metal atoms in the vapor phase to study positron binding to atoms. This experiment relies on the development of a new hot-cell apparatus to provide a collision chamber for metal vapors. Signal rates are estimated for zinc atoms using 0 . 35 eV photons. Important facets of the design of the experiment are based upon experience studying resonant annihilation spectra of molecules using a trapped based beam. Work supported by NSF grant PHY 10-68023.

  10. Microstructure variation in fused silica irradiated by different fluence of UV laser pulses with positron annihilation lifetime and Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zhu, Qihua; Chen, Jun; Wang, B. Y.; Ju, Xin

    2016-10-01

    We present an original study on the non-destructive evaluation of the microstructure evolution of fused silica induced by pulsed UV laser irradiation at low fluence (less than 50% Fth). Positron annihilation spectroscopy discloses that the spatial size of the vacancy cluster is increased exponentially with the linearly elevated laser fluence. Particularly, the vacancy cluster size in bulk silica is significantly increased by 14.5% after irradiated by pulsed 355 nm laser at F = 14 J/cm2 (50% Fth), while the void size varies only ∼2%. UV laser-excited Raman results suggest that the bond length and average bond angle of Sisbnd Osbnd Si bridging bond are both slightly reduced. Results reveals that the rearrangement process of (Sisbnd O)n fold rings and breakage of the Sisbnd O bridging bond in bulk silica occurred during pulsed UV laser irradiation. The micro-structural changes were taken together to clarify the effect of sub-threshold laser fluence on material stability of silica glass. The obtained data provide important information for studying material stability and controlling the lifetime of fused silica optics for high power laser system.

  11. Characterization of free volume during vulcanization of styrene butadiene rubber by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical test.

    PubMed

    Marzocca, A J; Cerveny, S; Salgueiro, W; Somoza, A; Gonzalez, L

    2002-02-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect on the free volume of the advance of the cross-linking reaction in a copolymer of styrene butadiene rubber by sulfur vulcanization. The dynamic modulus and loss tangent were evaluated over samples cured for different times at 433 K by dynamic mechanical tests over a range of frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz at temperatures between 200 and 300 K. Using the William-Landel-Ferry relationship, master curves were obtained at a reference temperature of 298 K and the coefficients c(0)(1) and c(0)(2) were evaluated. From these parameters the dependence of the free volume on the cure time is obtained. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was also used to estimate the size and number density of free volume sites in the material. The spectra were analyzed in terms of continuous distributions of free volume size. The results suggest an increase of the lower free volume size when cross linking takes place. Both techniques give similar results for the dependence of free volume on the time of cure of the polymer.

  12. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Brogland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV, We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV,

  13. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Ackemann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting Earth's shadow, which, is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 and 200 Ge V. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 Ge V range. The three new spectral points between 100 and 200 GeV are consistent with a fraction that is continuing to rise with energy.

  14. Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othmer, S.; Chen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plate arrays. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results are compared with those obtained using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

  15. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy Study of Barnett Shale Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameena, Fnu; Alsleben, Helge; Quarles, Carroll A.

    Measurements are reported of positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening parameters on 14 samples of Barnett shale core selected from 196 samples ranging from depths of 6107 to 6402 feet. The Barnett shale core was taken from EOG well Two-O-Five 2H located in Johnson county TX. The selected samples are dark clay-rich mudstone consisting of fine-grained clay minerals. The samples are varied in shape, typically a few inches long and about 1/2 inch in width and thickness, and are representative of the predominant facies in the core. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), petrographic analysis and geochemical analysis of total organic carbon (TOC) were already available for each of the selected samples. The lifetime data are analyzed in terms of three lifetime components with the shortest lifetime fixed at 125 ps. The second lifetime is attributed to positron annihilation in the bulk and positron trapping; and the third lifetime is due to positronium. Correlations of the lifetimes, intensities, the average lifetime and S and W parameters with TOC, XRF and XRD parameters are discussed. The observed correlations suggest that positron spectroscopy may be a useful tool in characterizing shale.

  16. Anomalously high lifetimes measured by quasi-steady-state photoconductance in advanced solar cell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhl, Mattias; Chan, Catherine; Abbott, Malcolm D.; Trupke, Thorsten

    2013-12-01

    Quasi-Steady-State Photoconductance is widely used in photovoltaics industry to measure the effective minority carrier lifetime of silicon wafers, a key material parameter affecting final solar cell efficiency. When interpreting photoconductance based lifetime measurements, it is important to account for various artefacts that can cause an over-estimation of the carrier lifetime, such as minority carrier trapping. This paper provides experimental evidence for another artefact in photoconductance lifetime measurements, affecting samples that have a conductive layer that is interrupted by lines of the opposite polarity doping, forming laterally alternating regions of p/n doping. This structure often appears in the emitter region of samples used to monitor the lifetime of interdigitated back contact cells. The cause of this artefact is linked to a reduction in the measured dark conductance. Experimental data are presented that suggest this is due to the formation of a phototransistor type structure on the samples surface, resulting in variations in conductivity under different illumination levels.

  17. High current pulsed positron microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.; Kumar, A.; Sterne, P.A.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.

    1997-05-01

    We are developing a low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopy to provide a new defect analysis capability at the 10{sup 10} e{sup +}s{sup -l} beam at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron linac. When completed, the pulsed positron microprobe will enable defect specific, 3-dimensional maps of defect concentrations with sub-micron resolution of defect location. By coupling these data with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes and positron implantation profiles we will both map the identity and concentration of defect distributions.

  18. Positron annihilation studies of organic superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, H.L.; Lou, Y.; Ali, E.H.

    1994-09-01

    The positron lifetimes of two organic superconductors, {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br, are measured as a function of temperature across {Tc}. A drop of positron lifetime below {Tc} is observed. Positron-electron momentum densities are measured by using 2D-ACAR to search for the Fermi surface in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. Positron density distributions and positron-electron overlaps are calculated by using the orthogonalized linear combination atomic orbital (OLCAO) method to interprete the temperature dependence due to the local charge transfer which is inferred to relate to the superconducting transition. 2D-ACAR results in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br are compared with theoretical band calculations based on a first-principles local density approximation. Importance of performing accurate band calculations for the interpretation of positron annihilation data is emphasized.

  19. A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers is described. This method consists of a wet chemical treatment (surface cleaning, oxidation in solution, and measurement in HF solution) to passivate the silicon surfaces, a laser diode array for carrier excitation, and a microwave bridge measuring system which is more sensitive than the microwave systems used previously for lifetime measurement. Representative experimental data are presented to demonstrate this technique. The result reveals that this method is useful for the determination of bulk lifetime of commercial silicon wafers.

  20. Detection of Ga vacancies in electron irradiated GaAs by positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hautojaervi, P.; Moser, P.; Stucky, M.; Corbel, C.; Plazaola, F.

    1986-03-24

    Positron lifetime measurements have been used to study the recovery of electron irradiated GaAs between 77 and 800 K. Below room temperature positrons are trapped by vacancies in Ga sublattices. The Ga vacancies recover between 200 and 350 K.

  1. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  2. BEAM LIFETIME AND EMITTANCE GROWTH MEASUREMENTS OF GOLD BEAMS IN RHIC AT STORAGE.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; DREES,A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; CONNOLLY,R.; FLILLER,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    During stores of gold beams, longitudinal and transverse beam sizes were recorded. Longitudinal profiles were obtained with a wall current monitor. Transverse profiles were reconstructed from gold-gold collision rates at various relative transverse beam positions. The total beam lifetime was measured with a beam current transformer, the bunched beam lifetime with the wall current monitor. Diffusion rates in the beam halo were determined from the change in the loss rate when a scraper is retracted. The measurements are used to determine the lifetime limiting effects. Beam growth measurements are compared with computations of beam-growth times from intra-beam scattering.

  3. Toward tests of QED and CPT with improved electron and positron g-factor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitski, Elise; Dorr, Joshua; Fogwell Hoogerheide, Shannon; Gabrielse, Gerald

    2013-05-01

    We describe progress toward improved measurements of the electron and positron g-factors using quantum jump spectroscopy between the lowest quantum states of either particle trapped in a 100 mK cylindrical Penning trap. In a new apparatus--designed for improved stability and a better geometry for cavity-assisted sideband cooling--we have trapped a single electron, driven and observed single cyclotron transitions, and trapped positrons in a loading trap. This should enable measurements of both g-factors with better than the 0.28 ppt precision of the best electron value (the most precise measurement of a fundamental property of an elementary particle), thereby improving the positron value by a factor of more than 15., These measurements, in combination with QED theory relating the electron g-factor to α, will improve on the most precise determination of α, the fine structure constant. The comparison of this value with an independent measurement of α is the most precise test of QED. The comparison of the e- and e+ g-factors will improve upon the best test of CPT symmetry in a lepton system. This work is supported by the NSF

  4. Characterizing microstructural changes in ferritic steels by positron annihilation spectroscopy: Studies on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari Babu, S.; Rajkumar, K. V.; Hussain, S.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C. S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Applicability of positron annihilation spectroscopy in probing the microstructural changes in ferritic steels has been investigated with thermal treatment studies on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, during 300-1273 K. Positron lifetime results are compared with those of ultrasonic velocity and hardness techniques with two initial microstructural conditions i.e., normalized and tempered condition as well as only normalized condition. In first case, positron lifetime is found to be sensitive to small changes in metal carbide precipitation which could not be probed by other two techniques. In later case, positron lifetime is found to be sensitive to defect annealing until 673 K and in distinguishing the growth and coarsening of metal carbide precipitation stages during 773-1073 K. The present study suggests that by combining positron lifetime, ultrasonic velocity and hardness measurements, it is possible to distinguish distinct microstructures occurring at different stages.

  5. A lifetime in photochemistry; some ultrafast measurements on singlet states.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David

    2016-06-01

    We describe here the development of time-correlated single-photon counting techniques from the early use of spark discharge lamps as light sources through to the use of femtosecond mode-locked lasers through the personal work of the author. We used laser-excited fluorescence in studies on energy migration and rotational relaxation in synthetic polymer solutions, in biological probe molecules and in supersonic jet expansions. Time-correlated single-photon counting was the first method used in early fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and we outline the development of this powerful technique, with a comparison of techniques including wide-field microscopy. We employed these modern forms of FLIM to study single biological cells, and applied FLIM also to gain an understanding the distribution in tissue, and fates of photosensitizer molecules used in photodynamic therapy. We also describe the uses and instrumental design of laser systems for the study of ultrafast time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy.

  6. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  7. A lifetime in photochemistry; some ultrafast measurements on singlet states

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, David

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the development of time-correlated single-photon counting techniques from the early use of spark discharge lamps as light sources through to the use of femtosecond mode-locked lasers through the personal work of the author. We used laser-excited fluorescence in studies on energy migration and rotational relaxation in synthetic polymer solutions, in biological probe molecules and in supersonic jet expansions. Time-correlated single-photon counting was the first method used in early fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and we outline the development of this powerful technique, with a comparison of techniques including wide-field microscopy. We employed these modern forms of FLIM to study single biological cells, and applied FLIM also to gain an understanding the distribution in tissue, and fates of photosensitizer molecules used in photodynamic therapy. We also describe the uses and instrumental design of laser systems for the study of ultrafast time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:27436979

  8. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  9. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  10. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  11. Studies of the Processing of Single Words Using Positron Tomographic Measures of Cerebral Blood Flow Change.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    BLOOD FLOW CHANGE Steven E. Petersen, Peter T. Fox, Michael I. Posner, Marcus Raichle McDonnell Center for Studies of Higher Brain Function...Single Words Using Positron Emission Tomographic Measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow Change *= ’I PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) * Petersen, Steven E. 13a. TYPE OF...CHANGE Steven E. Petersen, Peter T. Fox, Michael I. Posner, Marcus E. Raichle INTRODUCTION Language is an essential characteristic of the human

  12. Electroweak measurements in electron-positron collisions at W-boson-pair energies at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; DELPHI Collaboration; L3 Collaboration; OPAL Collaboration; LEP Electroweak Working Group 1

    2013-11-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3 fb-1 collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 GeV to 209 GeV.

  13. Noninvasive measurement of regional myocardial glucose metabolism by positron emission computed tomography. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1980-06-01

    While the results of regional myocardial glucose metabolism measurements using positron emission computed tomography (/sup 13/N-ammonia) are promising, their utility and value remains to be determined in man. If this technique can be applied to patients with acute myocardial ischemia or infarction it may permit delineation of regional myocardial segments with altered, yet still active metabolism. Further, it may become possible to evaluate the effects of interventions designed to salvage reversibly injured myocardium by this technique.

  14. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in {sup 69}As

    SciTech Connect

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczynski, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Angelis, G. de; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 69}As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  15. Precise Measurement of the Positron Asymmetry in the Decay of Spin-polarized 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenker, Benjamin; Melconian, Dan; Behling, Spencer; Mehlman, Michael; Behr, John; Craiciu, Ioana; Gorelov, Alexandre; McNeil, James; Smale, Scott; Warner, Claire; Anholm, Melissa; Gwinner, Gerald; Ashery, Daniel; Cohen, Iuliana

    2016-09-01

    Precise low-energy measurements in nuclear β-decay provide constraints on possible physics beyond the standard model complementary to high-energy collider experiments. We report the most precise measurement of the positron asymmetry from a polarized nucleus to-date. At the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap, atoms of the positron emitter 37K are confined in an alternating-current magneto-optical trap and spin-polarized to 99 . 13 +/- 0 . 09 % via optical pumping. The use of atom-trapping techniques allows for an exceptionally open geometry with the decay products escaping the trapping region unperturbed by the trapping potential. We detect the emitted positrons in a pair of symmetric detectors placed along the polarization axis to measure the asymmetry in situ. The analysis was performed blind and considers β-scattering and other systematic effects. The results place limits on the mass of a hypothetical W boson coupling to right-handed neutrinos as well as contribute to an independent determination of the Vud element of the CKM matrix. U.S. DOE, the Israel Science Foundation, and NSERC . TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  16. Measuring electron-positron annihilation radiation from laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Tommasini, R.; Seely, J.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Pereira, N.; Gregori, G.; Falk, K.; Mithen, J.; Murphy, C. D.

    2012-10-15

    We investigated various diagnostic techniques to measure the 511 keV annihilation radiations. These include step-wedge filters, transmission crystal spectroscopy, single-hit CCD detectors, and streaked scintillating detection. While none of the diagnostics recorded conclusive results, the step-wedge filter that is sensitive to the energy range between 100 keV and 700 keV shows a signal around 500 keV that is clearly departing from a pure Bremsstrahlung spectrum and that we ascribe to annihilation radiation.

  17. B physics: measurement of the lifetime difference between b_s mass eigenstates

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-28

    We present measurements of the lifetimes and polarization amplitudes for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K*{sup 0} decays. Lifetimes of the heavy (H) and light (L) mass eigenstates in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system are separately measured for the first time by determining the relative contributions of amplitudes with definite CP as a function of the decay time.

  18. Lifetime measurements in an electrostatic ion beam trap using image charge monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rahinov, Igor; Toker, Yoni; Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk

    2012-03-15

    A technique for mass-selective lifetime measurements of keV ions in a linear electrostatic ion beam trap is presented. The technique is based on bunching the ions using a weak RF potential and non-destructive ion detection by a pick-up electrode. This method has no mass-limitation, possesses the advantage of inherent mass-selectivity, and offers a possibility of measuring simultaneously the lifetimes of different ion species with no need for prior mass-selection.

  19. Measurement of the [Formula: see text] meson lifetime using [Formula: see text] decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Cartelle, P Alvarez; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Gutierrez, O Aquines; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manzali, M; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spinella, F; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    The lifetime of the [Formula: see text] meson is measured using semileptonic decays having a [Formula: see text] meson and a muon in the final state. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of [Formula: see text], are collected by the LHCb detector in [Formula: see text] collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The measured lifetime is [Formula: see text]where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  20. Neutron Detection Improvements for Measurement of Neutron Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manus, Gregory; Liu, Chen-Yu; Salvat, Daniel; Cude, Christopher; Hanson, Aaron; Sawtelle, Sonya

    2010-11-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) have energies low enough to be confined in material and magnetic traps, yet it makes transmission into typical neutron detectors a nontrivial task. The neutron lifetime experiment at LANL may require improvements to a standard ionization chamber detector or an entirely different approach to UCN detection [1]. We compare Si and Zr ionization chamber windows to their Al counterparts. Si's smooth surface and uniform bulk density reduces the total elastic scattering cross-section. Zr's mechanical strength enables thinner, more transparent detector windows than Al. Also, various geometries of electrode grid planes are simulated in Garfield and built. Furthermore, to minimize time and spectrum dependent systematic errors of collection efficiency, we bypass transporting the UCN from trap to detector by detecting UCN directly in the trap. Here we empty BF3 and Ar into the trap where UCN capture in B releases Li and α particles detected by their ionization of Ar. The B capture also emits a gamma which can be detected. Details and progress will be presented at the conference. [4pt] [1] Nucl Instrum Meth A 599 (2009) 82-92

  1. Brain energy metabolism and dopaminergic function in Huntington's disease measured in vivo using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Leenders, K L; Frackowiak, R S; Quinn, N; Marsden, C D

    1986-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with typical Huntington's disease was investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography. Regional cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction, oxygen and glucose utilisation, L-Dopa uptake, and dopamine (D2) receptor binding were measured using several positron-labelled tracers. CT showed slight atrophy of the head of caudate but no cortical atrophy, although distinct frontal lobe dysfunction was present on psychometric testing. Oxygen and glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow were decreased in the striata and to a lesser extent in frontal cortex. Cerebral blood flow was in the low normal range throughout the remainder of the brain. A normal metabolic ratio was found in all regions, since the changes in glucose utilisation paralleled those in oxygen consumption. The capacity of the striatum to store dopamine as assessed by L-[18F]-fluorodopa uptake was normal, but dopamine (D2) receptor binding was decreased when compared to normal subjects.

  2. Brain energy metabolism and dopaminergic function in Huntington's disease measured in vivo using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Leenders, K.L.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Quinn, N.; Marsden, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with typical Huntington's disease was investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography. Regional cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction, oxygen and glucose utilization, L-Dopa uptake, and dopamine (D2) receptor binding were measured using several positron-labelled tracers. CT showed slight atrophy of the head of caudate but no cortical atrophy, although distinct frontal lobe dysfunction was present on psychometric testing. Oxygen and glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow were decreased in the striata and to a lesser extent in frontal cortex. Cerebral blood flow was in the low normal range throughout the remainder of the brain. A normal metabolic ratio was found in all regions, since the changes in glucose utilization paralleled those in oxygen consumption. The capacity of the striatum to store dopamine as assessed by L-( YF)-fluorodopa uptake was normal, but dopamine (D2) receptor binding was decreased when compared to normal subjects.

  3. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  4. Measurement of the Lambda b lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panikashvili, N; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-05

    We have measured the Lambda b lifetime using the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda, based on 1.2 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed Lambda b decays, where the J/psi and Lambda are identified via the decays J/psi --> mu+ mu- and Lambda --> ppi, we measured the Lambda b lifetime to be tau(Lambda b)=1.218 (+0.130)/(-0.115) (stat) +/- 0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B0 lifetime in the decay B0 --> J/psi(mu+ mu-)K(0)/(S)(pi+ pi-) to be tau(B0)=1.501 (+0.078)/(-0.074) (stat) +/- 0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of tau(Lambda b)/tau(B0)=0.811 (+0.096)/(-0.087) (stat) +/- 0.034(syst).

  5. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  6. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Gd I levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xue; Zhou, Chunxiao; Dai, Zhenwen

    2017-04-01

    Natural radiative lifetimes for 27 excited levels of Gd I in the energy range from 28215.140 to 43963.900 cm-1 were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique in an atom beam produced by laser-induced plasma. All the lifetimes obtained in this paper range from 8.4 to 833 ns with the uncertainties within ten percent. A comparison with a few previously reported values was performed and good agreement between them was achieved. To our best knowledge, 18 lifetimes of Gd I are reported for the first time.

  7. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  8. Lifetime measurements using the Jefferson Lad Load-Lock Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    J. Grames; P. Adderley; M. Baylac; J. Brittian; D. Charles; J. Clark; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker; M. Stutzman; K. Surles-Law

    2000-10-07

    Lifetime measurements of bulk GaAs using a 100 kV load-lock electron gun and beam line were made. Initial tests used anodized samples to study lifetime under various conditions (gun vacuum, laser spot location, activated area). Subsequent tests used a mechanical mask to limit the active area and included improved monitoring of the gun chamber and beam line vacuum pressure. Results of these measurements support claims made at past workshops, namely photocathode lifetime improves when gun vacuum is enhanced and when electron emission from the edge of the photocathode is eliminated. The dependence upon laser spot location is less certain. Tests studying lifetime at higher beam intensity (I ~ 8 mA) have begun.

  9. Lifetime of Ionic Vacancy Created in Redox Electrode Reaction Measured by Cyclotron MHD Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Osaka, Tetsuya; Mogi, Iwao; Asanuma, Miki; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Aogaki, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    The lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in ferricyanide-ferrocyanide redox reaction have been first measured by means of cyclotron magnetohydrodynamic electrode, which is composed of coaxial cylinders partly exposed as electrodes and placed vertically in an electrolytic solution under a vertical magnetic field, so that induced Lorentz force makes ionic vacancies circulate together with the solution along the circumferences. At low magnetic fields, due to low velocities, ionic vacancies once created become extinct on the way of returning, whereas at high magnetic fields, in enhanced velocities, they can come back to their initial birthplaces. Detecting the difference between these two states, we can measure the lifetime of ionic vacancy. As a result, the lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in the oxidation and reduction are the same, and the intrinsic lifetime is 1.25 s, and the formation time of nanobubble from the collision of ionic vacancies is 6.5 ms. PMID:26791269

  10. Simultaneous one-dimensional fluorescence lifetime measurements of OH and CO in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Malin; Ehn, Andreas; Christensen, Moah; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-04-01

    A method for simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of two species along a line is described. The experimental setup is based on picosecond laser pulses from two tunable optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier systems together with a streak camera. With an appropriate optical time delay between the two laser pulses, whose wavelengths are tuned to excite two different species, laser-induced fluorescence can be both detected temporally and spatially resolved by the streak camera. Hence, our method enables one-dimensional imaging of fluorescence lifetimes of two species in the same streak camera recording. The concept is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime measurements of CO and OH in a laminar methane/air flame on a Bunsen-type burner. Measurements were taken in flames with four different equivalence ratios, namely ϕ = 0.9, 1.0, 1.15, and 1.25. The measured one-dimensional lifetime profiles generally agree well with lifetimes calculated from quenching cross sections found in the literature and quencher concentrations predicted by the GRI 3.0 mechanism. For OH, there is a systematic deviation of approximately 30 % between calculated and measured lifetimes. It is found that this is mainly due to the adiabatic assumption regarding the flame and uncertainty in H2O quenching cross section. This emphasizes the strength of measuring the quenching rates rather than relying on models. The measurement concept might be useful for single-shot measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of several species pairs of vital importance in combustion processes, hence allowing fluorescence signals to be corrected for quenching and ultimately yield quantitative concentration profiles.

  11. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia; Mulholland, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. A precise value for the neutron lifetime is required for consistency tests of the Standard Model and is needed to predict the primordial 4 He abundance from the theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. An effort has begun for an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with an projected <=0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE office of Science, NIST and NSF.

  12. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Boreham, Alexander; Pikkemaat, Jens; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Kuehne, Christian; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Dernedde, Jens; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-12-24

    Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS) were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine). The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin) and a human complement protein (C1q) to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM). Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue.

  13. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  15. Measurement of electron-positron spectrum in high-energy cosmic rays in the PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelin, A. V.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S. A.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A. A.; Mayorov, A. G.; Malakhov, V. V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Menn, W.; Merge, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Rossetto, L.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-08-01

    At present the existing data on the cosmic ray electron energy spectra in the high energy range are fragmented, and the situation is exacerbated by their small number. In the satellite PAMELA experiment measurements at high energies are carried out by the calorimeter. The experimental data accumulated for more than 8 years of measurements, with the information of the calorimeter, the neutron detector and the scintillation counters made it possible to obtain the total spectrum of high-energy electrons and positrons in energy range 0.3-3 TeV.

  16. First working group meeting on the minority carrier diffusion length/lifetime measurement: Results of the round robin lifetime/diffusion length tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cudzinovic, M; Sopori, B

    1995-11-01

    As was noted in the cover letter that accompanied the samples, the eleven bare silicon samples were from various manufacturers. Table I lists the codes for the samples and the manufacturer of each sample. It also notes if the sample was single or poly-crystalline. The samples had been polished on one side before being sent out for measurements, but no further processing was done. The participants of the study were asked to measure either the lifetime or diffusion length of each of the samples using their standard procedure. Table II shows the experimental conditions used by the groups who measured diffusion length. All the diffusion length measurements were performed using the Surface Photovoltage method (SPV). Table M shows the experimental conditions for the lifetime measurements. All the lifetime measurements were made using the Photoconductance Decay method (PCD) under low level injection. These tables show the diameter of the spot size used during the measurement (the effective sampling area), the locations where measurements were taken, and the number of measurements taken at each location. Table N shows the results of the measurements. The table is divided into diffusion length and lifetime measurements for each sample. The values listed are the average values reported by each group. One of the immediate artifacts seen in the data is the large variation in the lifetime measurements. The values from MIT and Mobil are generally close. However, the measurements from NCSU are typically an order of magnitude lower.

  17. Quantum well intersubband lifetimes measured by mid-IR pump-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, G.L.; Sung, B.; Proctor, M.

    1995-12-31

    Semiconductor quantum wells exhibit quantum-confined electronic energy levels, or subbands, that are similar to one-dimensional {open_quotes}particle in a box{close_quotes} wavefunctions. The light effective mass of electrons allows large spatial extents of the wavefunctions and concomitantly large dipole overlaps between states. These large dipoles have been exploited in a variety of experiments including nonlinear frequency conversion, infrared photodetection, and lasing. A key parameter for many devices is the upper state lifetime. The decay of carriers in the upper state is believed to be dominated by optical phonon scattering and lifetimes on-the order of 1ps are expected. While Raman and saturation measurements have shown good agreement with theory, direct pump-probe measurements have reported longer lifetimes, partially due to carrier heating. In this paper, we discuss our mid-IR (5{mu}m) pump-probe measurements of intersubband lifetimes, performed at the Stanford Picosecond Free Electron Laser Center. At low excitation densities we observe lifetimes of about 1.5 ps, in good agreement with phonon theory. At high excitation densities the lifetime increases to 3.5 ps, demonstrating the transition from the low- to high-excitation agree.

  18. Single-photon transmission measurements in positron tomography using 137Cs.

    PubMed

    Yu, S K; Nahmias, C

    1995-07-01

    Transmission measurements are an essential step in the quantification of radioisotope distributions in vivo using positron tomographic techniques. The development of a new technique for measuring transmission data that relies on the detection of photons in 'singles' mode rather than 'coincidence' mode no longer restricts the choice of transmission sources to those that decay by positron emission. The motivation for using the 'singles' mode of operation is the substantial increase in count rate that can be achieved. This corresponds to a great increase in the statistical accuracy of the transmission data. We propose 137Cs as a suitable isotope for this purpose. 137Cs is more economical than 68Ge, the traditional source used for transmission measurements, in terms of longer half-life and lower financial cost. 137Cs can be used for transmission measurements without any recalibration of the tomograph, and the estimated spatial resolution is comparable to that obtained using annihilation photons. A simple extrapolation method is developed, which allows extrapolation of the attenuation coefficients measured at 662 keV to 511 keV. A dual-energy-window technique, whereby correction can be made on-the-fly during acquisition, is used for scatter correction. The measured linear attenuation coefficients agree with predicted values.

  19. Bulk defect analysis with a high-energy positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J. H.; Howell, R. H.; Sterne, P. A.

    1998-09-23

    A program using a positron beam to probe defects in bulk materials has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides non-destructive analysis of average defect size and concentration. A 3 MeV positron beam is supplied by Sodium-22 at the terminal of a Pelletron accelerator. The high-energy beam allows large (greater than or equal to 1 cm2) engineering samples to be measured in air or even sealed in an independent environment. A description of the beam-PALS system will be presented along with a summary of recent measuremen

  20. Speciation of uranium and doping induced defects in Gd1.98U0.02Zr2O7: Photoluminescence, X-ray photoelectron and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.; Reghukumar, C.; Pathak, Nimai; Sudarshan, K.; Tyagi, D.; Mohapatra, M.; Pujari, P. K.; Kadam, R. M.

    2017-02-01

    Based on photoluminescence spectroscopy it was inferred that uranium stabilizes as both U(IV) as well as U(VI) in Gd2Zr2O7 which was also corroborated using X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS). Absence of equidistant vibronic structure in emission spectrum of Gd1.98U0.02Zr2O7 confirmed that U(VI) stabilizes in the form of UO66-. Based on luminescence lifetime it was inferred that majority of UO66- stabilizes at both Gd3+/Zr4+ whereas U4+ stabilizes only at Zr4+ sites. The positron lifetime doesn't change on uranium doping indicating the formation of antisite defect. Infact it is this antisite defect in Gd1.98U0.02Zr2O7 which favours the stabilization of its fluorite phase.

  1. Measurement of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime in Ds⁺π⁻ decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-24

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to Ds⁺π⁻, to that of the B¯⁰ meson. The pp collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1  fb(-1), collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010±0.010±0.008 for this ratio with the known B¯⁰ lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific B¯s⁰ lifetime to be τ(B¯s⁰ )=1.535±0.015±0.014  ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  2. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; García, J.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a 241Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data.

  3. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode

    PubMed Central

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; García, J.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a 241Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data. PMID:25729405

  4. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode.

    PubMed

    Ariño-Estrada, G; Chmeissani, M; de Lorenzo, G; Kolstein, M; Puigdengoles, C; García, J; Cabruja, E

    2014-12-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a (241)Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data.

  5. Measurement of human cerebral blood flow with (15O)butanol and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Berridge, M.S.; Adler, L.P.; Nelson, A.D.; Cassidy, E.H.; Muzic, R.F.; Bednarczyk, E.M.; Miraldi, F. )

    1991-09-01

    Although H2(15)O is widely used for CBF measurement by positron tomography, it underestimates CBF, especially at elevated flow rates. Several tracers, including butanol, overcome this problem, but the short half-life of 15O provides advantages that cause water to remain the tracer of choice. The authors report the first use and evaluation of 15O-labeled butanol for CBF measurement. Flow measurements made in a similar fashion with water and butanol at 10-min intervals were compared in normal volunteers under resting and hypercapnic conditions. Regional analysis showed good agreement between the tracers at low flows, and significant underestimation of flow by water relative to butanol in regions of elevated flow. The observed relationship between the tracers and the curve-fitted permeability-surface area product for water (133 ml.100 g-1.min-1) follow the known relationship between water and true flow. These observations indicate that (15O)-butanol provided accurate measurements of human regional CBF under conditions of elevated perfusion. They conclude that butanol is a convenient and accurate method for routine CBF determination by positron emission tomography.

  6. Electronic correlations in vanadium revealed by electron-positron annihilation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Josef Andreas; Benea, Diana; Appelt, Wilhelm H.; Ceeh, Hubert; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Leitner, Michael; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Chioncel, Liviu

    2017-02-01

    The electronic structure of vanadium measured by angular correlation of electron-positron annihilation radiation (ACAR) is compared with the predictions of the combined density functional and dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). Reconstructing the momentum density from five two-dimensional projections we were able to determine the full Fermi surface and found excellent agreement with the DMFT calculations. In particular, we show that the local, dynamic self-energy corrections contribute to the anisotropy of the momentum density and need to be included to explain the experimental results.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of doping concentration and carrier lifetime in silicon using terahertz time-domain transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, M.; Matheisen, C.; Nagel, M.; Knoch, J.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present a measurement approach enabling the simultaneous determination of sheet resistance and carrier lifetime in semiconductor samples. It is based on a classic Terahertz (THz) time-domain transmission spectroscopy scheme extended by quasi-steady state optical excitation. The carrier lifetime is determined by contactless THz probing of the increase in sheet conductance associated with quasi-steady-state excitation. Combining a successive etch-back of the surface with repeated THz measurements yields a depth profile of the doping concentration and the carrier lifetime, which is important for the optimization of the emitter of solar cells, for instance. The viability of our approach is demonstrated by investigating a phosphorous doped emitter of a silicon solar cell with the THz approach and comparing the results with electrochemical capacitance voltage measurements.

  8. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at J- PARC: TPC and DAQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takahito; Katayama, Ryo; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yamashita, Satoru; Sakakibara, Risa; Sugino, Tomoaki; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyukio; Otono, Hidetoshi; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Seki, Yoshichika; Mishima, Kenji; Taketani, Kaoru; Ino, Takashi; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is an important parameter for Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The best neutron lifetime measurements have uncertainties at the 0.1% level; however, they differ by 3.8 sigma. In order to resolve this discrepancy, we plan to measure the neutron lifetime using a method originally developed by Kossakowski et al. which is different from the other 0.1% accuracy experiments. In our method, which uses a pulsed cold neutron beam at J-PARC, the electrons from the beta decay of the neutron are detected with a time projection chamber (TPC). A small amount of 3He is added to the gas mixture in order to simultaneously measure the neutron flux. We report on the recent upgrade of the TPC and the Data Acquisition System which were used to take data during the period of February-June 2014.

  9. A Precision Measurement Of The Neutral Pion Lifetime: The PRIMEX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Miskimen, Rory

    2008-10-13

    The PRIMEX collaboration at Jefferson Lab is completing an experimental analysis to obtain a precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Results from the experiment will be presented and comparisons made with the chiral anomaly prediction and NLO calculations. An extension of the experiment to 12 GeV for measurements of the {eta} and {eta}' radiative widths is discussed.

  10. Application of Positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy to the Measurement of the Uniformity of Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, C. A.; Sheffield, Thomas; Stacy, Scott; Yang, Chun

    2009-03-10

    The uniformity of rubber-carbon black composite materials has been investigated with positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS). The number of grams of carbon black (CB) mixed into one hundred grams of rubber, phr, is used to characterize a sample. A typical concentration for rubber in tires is 50 phr. The S parameter measured by DBS has been found to depend on the phr of the sample as well as the type of rubber and carbon black. The variation in carbon black concentration within a surface area of about 5 mm diameter can be measured by moving a standard Na-22 or Ge-68 positron source over an extended sample. The precision of the concentration measurement depends on the dwell time at a point on the sample. The time required to determine uniformity over an extended sample can be reduced by running with much higher counting rate than is typical in DBS and correcting for the systematic variation of S parameter with counting rate. Variation in CB concentration with mixing time at the level of about 0.5% has been observed.

  11. On the Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using Ultracold Neutrons in a Vacuum Quadrupole Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. David; Penttila, S. I.

    2005-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime (~886 s) with an accuracy of 10−4. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a prototype UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100/cm3 [1]. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10−4 in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic uncertainty in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap. PMID:27308151

  12. On the measurement the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons in a vacuum quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J. D.; Penttila, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime ({approx}882 s) with an accuracy of 10{sup -4}. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of UCNs confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at LANL has developed a prototype ultra-cold neutron UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100 UCN/cm{sup 3}. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10{sup -4} in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic error in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap.

  13. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  14. Lifetime measurement of the metastable 2 3P 0 state in He-like uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toleikis, S.; Manil, B.; Bednarz, G.; Berdermann, E.; Beyer, H. F.; Bosch, F.; Bräuning-Demian, A.; Gumberidze, A.; Indelicato, P.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Marrus, R.; Mokler, P. H.; Stachura, Z.; Stöhlker, T.; Warczak, A.

    2005-07-01

    The lifetime of the 2 3P0 state in He-like uranium has been measured in a beam-foil time-of-flight experiment at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung accelerator facility with the result τ(2 3P0) = 58.2(9.5) ps. With the measured lifetime it is possible to derive a value of Δ E2s Lamb = 76. 3 ± 20. 6 eV for the n = 2 Lamb shift in uranium.

  15. New lifetime measurements in the stable semimagic Sn isotopes using the Doppler-shift attenuation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, A.; Walker, J.; Leske, J.; Speidel, K.-H.; Stuchbery, A. E.; East, M.; Boutachkov, P.; Cederkäll, J.; Doornenbal, P.; Egido, J. L.; Ekström, A.; Gerl, J.; Gernhäuser, R.; Goel, N.; Górska, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Maier-Komor, P.; Modamio, V.; Naqvi, F.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Schaffner, H.; Schwengner, R.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2011-09-01

    Precise measurements of lifetimes in the picosecond range of excited states in the stable even-A Sn isotopes 112,114,116,122Sn have been performed using the Doppler shift attenuation technique. For the first excited 2+ states in 112Sn, 114Sn and 116Sn the E2 transition strengths deduced from the measured lifetimes are in disagreement with the previously adopted values. They indicate a shallow minimum at N = 66 in contrast to the maximum at mid-shell predicted by modern shell model calculations.

  16. Measurement of the ratio of B+ and B0 meson lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schukin, A A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shephard, W D; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbrück, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2005-05-13

    The ratio of the B+ and B0 meson lifetimes was measured using data collected in 2002-2004 by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These mesons were reconstructed in B-->mu(+)nuD(*-)X decays, which are dominated by B0 and B-->mu(+)nuD 0X decays, which are dominated by B+. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be tau(+)/tau(0)=1.080+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.014(syst).

  17. Measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime using the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-07-07

    We present a measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime in the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue using the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. From a sample of about of 360 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV, we reconstruct J/Psie+ pairs with invariant mass in the kinematically allowed range 4< M(J/Psie) < 6 GeV/c2. A fit to the decay-length distribution of 238 signal events yields a measured Bc+ meson lifetime of 0.463(-0.065)(+0.073)(stat) +/- 0.036(syst) ps.

  18. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  19. Positron annihilation in the near surface of room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirade, T.; O’Rourke, B. E.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Positronium (Ps; a bound state of an electron and a positron) formation in insulating materials is explained by the spur reaction model. According to the model, electron and/or positron mobility affects the yield of Ps formation. A vertical slow positron beam was used to investigate the surface of a room temperature ionic liquid, N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMPA-TFSI). Measurement of positron lifetimes indicated a higher Ps formation probability in near surface of TMPA-TFSI than in the bulk. This result suggests that the electron (and positron) mobility in the near surface may be larger than that in the bulk. Moreover, the longest annihilation lifetime of triplet Ps (ortho-Ps) in the near surface was found to be shorter than that measured in the bulk liquid. Ortho-Ps lifetimes in liquids are well correlated with the surface tension with a shorter lifetime corresponding to higher surface tension. The higher Ps formation yield and the shorter ortho-Ps annihilation lifetime were probably caused by the layered structure in near surface of TMPA-TFSI. A vertical slow positron beam is a strong tool to investigate the surface of room temperature ionic liquids.

  20. Interpreting aerosol lifetimes using the GEOS-Chem model and constraints from radionuclide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Pierce, J. R.; Martin, R. V.

    2014-04-01

    Aerosol removal processes control global aerosol abundance, but the rate of that removal remains uncertain. A recent study of aerosol-bound radionuclide measurements after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident documents 137Cs removal (e-folding) times of 10.0-13.9 days, suggesting that mean aerosol lifetimes in the range of 3-7 days in global models might be too short by a factor of two. In this study, we attribute this discrepancy to differences between the e-folding and mean aerosol lifetimes. We implement a simulation of 137Cs and 133Xe into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and examine the removal rates for the Fukushima case. We find a general consistency between modelled and measured e-folding times. The simulated 137Cs global burden e-folding time is about 14 days. However, the simulated mean lifetime of aerosol-bound 137Cs over a 6-month post-accident period is only 1.8 days. We find that the mean lifetime depends strongly on the removal rates in the first few days after emissions, before the aerosols leave the boundary layer and are transported to altitudes and latitudes where lifetimes with respect to wet removal are longer by a few orders of magnitude. We present sensitivity simulations that demonstrate the influence of differences in altitude and location of the radionuclides on the mean lifetime. Global mean lifetimes are shown to strongly depend on the altitude of injection. The global mean 137Cs lifetime is more than one order of magnitude greater for the injection at 7 km than into the boundary layer above the Fukushima site. Instantaneous removal rates are slower during the first few days after the emissions for a free tropospheric versus boundary layer injection and this strongly controls the mean lifetimes. Global mean aerosol lifetimes for the GEOS-Chem model are 3-6 days, which is longer than that for the 137Cs injected at the Fukushima site (likely due to precipitation shortly after Fukushima emissions), but similar to the

  1. Lifetime measurement of excited low-spin states via the (p, p‧ γ) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, A.; Derya, V.; Mineva, M. N.; Petkov, P.; Pickstone, S. G.; Spieker, M.; Zilges, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a method for lifetime measurements in the sub-picosecond regime via the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) following the inelastic proton scattering reaction is presented. In a pioneering experiment we extracted the lifetimes of 30 excited low-spin states of 96Ru, taking advantage of the coincident detection of scattered protons and de-exciting γ-rays as well as the large number of particle and γ-ray detectors provided by the SONIC@HORUS setup at the University of Cologne. The large amount of new experimental data shows that this technique is suited for the measurement of lifetimes of excited low-spin states, especially for isotopes with a low isotopic abundance, where (n ,n‧ γ) or - in case of investigating dipole excitations - (γ ,γ‧) experiments are not feasible due to the lack of sufficient isotopically enriched target material.

  2. Measuring lifetimes of long-lived charged massive particles stopped in LHC detectors.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shoji; Hamaguchi, Koichi; Shirai, Satoshi

    2009-10-02

    Long-lived charged massive particles (CHAMPs) appear in various particle physics models beyond the standard model. In this Letter, we discuss the prospects for studying the stopping and decaying events of such long-lived CHAMPs at the LHC detectors, and show that the lifetime measurement (and the study of decay products) is possible with the LHC detectors for a wide range of the lifetime O(0.1)-O(10(10)) sec, by using periods of no pp collision. Even a short lifetime of order 1 sec can be measured by (i) identifying the stopping event with the on-line event filter, (ii) immediately making a beam-dump signal which stops the pp collision of the LHC, and at the same time (iii) changing the trigger menu to optimize it for the detection of a CHAMP decay in the calorimeter. Other possibilities are also discussed.

  3. The Measurement of Radiative Lifetimes Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence: Experimental Review and Astrophysical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Sneden, C.

    2005-01-01

    One of the standard methods for determining atomic transition probabilities is to combine branching fractions measured using Fourier-transform spectrometry with radiative lifetimes measurements using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). This combination of techniques provides an efficient method for measuring large sets of accurate, absolute transition probabilities. The radiative lifetimes, which provide the overall scaling for the transition probabilities, can be measured routinely to ± 5% accuracy using time-resolved LIF. Although the time-resolved LIF technique we use does not achieve the accuracy of fast-beam LIF, the time-resolved technique does enable us to make measurements at a far greater rate (hundreds of level lifetimes per year). Care must be taken, however, to understand and control the systematic effects in time-resolved LIF measurements to maintain ± 5% accuracy over a wide dynamic range and hundreds of lifetime measurements. Over the last 25 years, we have measured lifetimes for 47 spectra using time-resolved LIF. Our atomic beam source can produce a slow beam of neutral and singly ionized atoms of nearly any element. Lifetimes from 2 ns to ~2 µs can be measured for energy levels ranging from 15,000 to ~60,000 cm-1. In this review we will describe our method of measuring radiative lifetimes with an emphasis on possible errors and techniques used for controlling them. The electronic bandwidth, linearity, and overall fidelity of the fast photomultiplier, cable connections, and transient waveform digitizer are concerns. Possible errors from atomic collisions, radiation trapping, Zeeman quantum beats, hyperfine quantum beats, atoms/ions escaping from the observation region before radiating, and from radiative cascade through lower levels must be understood and controlled. We will then present a recent example of the application of our transition probability data to abundance determinations in the sun and in metal-poor halo stars (Den Hartog E A et al

  4. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  5. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of High Performance Polymer Films under CO2 Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Quarles; John R. Klaehn; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2010-08-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. Different polymers are found to behave differently. Some polymers studied form positronium and some, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those samples that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don’t form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. Some polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO2 pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO2 pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO2 into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm.

  6. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy Of High Performance Polymer Films Under CO{sub 2} Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, C. A.; Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Urban-Klaehn, Jagoda M.

    2011-06-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. The studied polymers are found to behave differently from each other. Some polymers form positronium and others, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those polymers that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don't form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. A few of the studied polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO{sub 2} pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO{sub 2} pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO{sub 2} into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm (45psi).

  7. Measurement of the lifetime of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakova, O I; Yakovlev, A V; Chapovskii, P L

    2008-09-30

    The lifetimes of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap are measured at different populations of the 'bright' and 'dark' hyperfine states of captured atoms. It is found that the lifetime of atoms in the trap decreases if they spend more time in the bright state. A simple explanation of this effect is proposed which is based on the increase in the transport cross section for collisions of thermal rubidium atoms surrounding the trap with cold rubidium atoms upon their electronic excitation. (laser cooling)

  8. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Buican, T.N.

    1993-05-04

    Apparatus and method is described for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochromes in the sample.

  9. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochomes in the sample.

  10. An Undergraduate Experiment on Nuclear Lifetime Measurement Using the Doppler Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    While designed for a senior undergraduate laboratory, the experiment illustrates the principles involved in the various Doppler techniques currently used in nuclear lifetime studies and demonstrates the versatility of the Ge(Li) detector in applications other than direct energy or intensity measurement. (Author/TS)

  11. Doppler-shift attenuation method lifetime measurements in 115Sb and 117Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ilaş, G.; Ivaşcu, M.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C. A.

    1995-08-01

    The lifetimes of several low-lying excited levels in 115Sb and 117Sb have been measured by using the DSA method in the 115,117Sn(p,nγ)115,117Sb reactions, respectively. The structure of these nuclei is discussed in the frame of the interacting boson-fermion model.

  12. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  13. Measurement of the Bs0 → J / ψη lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Gillies, E.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-11-01

    Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the effective lifetime in the Bs0 → J / ψη decay mode, τeff, is measured to be

  14. Measurement of the Masses and Lifetimes of B Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-05-01

    The latest results for the B Hadron sector at the Tevatron Collider are summarized. The properties of B hadrons can be precisely measured at the Tevatron. In particularly they will focus on the masses and lifetimes. The new Tevatron results for the CP violation in B Hadrons are also discussed.

  15. Evaluation of single-photon-counting measurements of excited-state lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Howard E.; Penn, John H.; Carpenter, Clint W.

    1982-01-01

    An extremely short instrumental response function for a single-photon-counting system has been obtained by using a low-jitter photomultiplier tube, fast amplification of the single photoelectron pulse from this photomultiplier, a constant fraction discriminator with a wide bandwidth input, and a stable reference timing signal. This synchronously mode-locked laser system has been shown to be capable of measuring the fluorescence lifetimes of compounds from 66 psec to 4.5 nsec. The estimated error in these determinations is 6% or 10 psec, whichever is greater. This apparatus has proved itself to be superior to the previously used nitrogen flashlamp apparatus for the determination of subnanosecond lifetimes. The validity of using deconvolution to determine lifetimes shorter than the instrumental response function has been verified. PMID:16593174

  16. Measurements of the lifetimes of electron bubbles in large size selected 4HeN- droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fárník, Michal; Samelin, Björn; Toennies, J. Peter

    1999-05-01

    The lifetimes of electron bubbles in large size selected 4HeN- droplets have been measured in a molecular beam experiment to lie between 2ṡ10-3 and 0.2 s in droplets with sizes between N≈105 and 107 atoms, respectively. The dependence of the lifetimes on the electric fields used to size select the droplets, on the energies of the incident electrons, and on the infrared radiation emitted from the apparatus walls were investigated and taken into account. The experimental lifetimes are many orders of magnitude smaller than predicted by earlier theories but consistent with a recent theory published by the authors in Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3892 (1998).

  17. Effect on radiation trapping on measured excited-state lifetimes in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, M.P.

    1996-04-01

    A refractive index matched experimental setup that largely eliminates the effects of radiation trapping on measured excited-state lifetimes in high refractive index solids is presented. An index-matched glass sphere was used to measure the room-temperature lifetimes of {sup 2}F{sub 5/2} in YAG:l%Yb{sup 3+} and {sup 4}I{sub 1/2} in YLF:5%Er{sup 3+}, yielding the record low values of 948.9{plus_minus}0.6 {mu}s and 3.85{plus_minus}0.01 ms, respectively. It is concluded that lifetimes from non index-matched experiments are most likely to be significantly over estimated in high refractive-index solids for excited states with a large radiative component to the ground-state multiplet and a high reabsorption cross section. The presented technique is easily applicable to room-temperature excited-state lifetime measurements of many luminescent solids.

  18. High resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III

    1980-02-22

    This document represents a progress report and renewal proposal for the contract DEAS 09 79 ER10434 between the USDOE and USC. During the time from 1 July 1979 to 1 March 1980, the large 35% intrinsic Ge detector was purchased and tested, and the new hyperpure Ge detector for positron end-point-energy measurements was designed and fabricated by ORTEC. It was delivered just prior to January 1, 1980. Measurements using this special equipment began in January 1980. During this period, a new effort in the measurement of short nuclear lifetimes was completed, and nuclear structure measurements of /sup 206/Rn nd /sup 208/Rn were completed. The results of these efforts are described in the text. A search for the Post Doctoral Research Associate was started last summer and the position will be filled on or about 1 March 1980. The first experiments to measure positron end-point-energies were proposed to the ORIC scheduling committee, and measurements will begin in March 1980. Theoretical efforts describe accurately the interference of annihilation radiation with positron end-point-energy measurements were begun.

  19. Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

    2008-05-01

    Measurement of the bulk minority-carrier lifetime (T{sub b}) by optical methods, such as photocurrent decay or quasi-steady-state photoconductance (QSSPC), is strongly influenced by surface recombination. Several techniques are known to lower the effective surface recombination velocity, including the following: use of oxidation, floating N/P junction, SiN:H layer, HF immersion, and use of iodine in ethanol or methanol (I-E solution). Using I-E appears to be very simple and does not require any high-temperature treatment such as oxidation, diffusion, or nitridation processes, which can change T{sub b}. However, this is not a preferred procedure within the photovoltaic community because it is difficult to obtain same T{sub b} values reproducibly, particularly when the wafer lifetime is long. The objectives are: (1) Investigate various reasons why lifetime measurements may be irreproducible using I-E solution passivation. (2) Study the influence of the strength of iodine in the ethanol solution, wafer-cleaning procedures, influence of the wafer container during lifetime measurements, and the stability of I-E. (3) Compare lifetimes of wafers (having different T{sub b}) by various techniques such as QSSPC and transient photoconductive decay using short laser pulses of different light intensity; (4) Make minority-carrier diffusion length (L) measurements by a surface photovoltage technique, and to use T{sub b} and L data to determine diffusivity (D) values for various impurity and defect concentrations, using the relationship L{sup 2} = D* T{sub b}.

  20. Reliability and validity of an internet-based questionnaire measuring lifetime physical activity.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Mary A; Ratzlaff, Charles; Doerfling, Paul; Kopec, Jacek

    2010-11-15

    Lifetime exposure to physical activity is an important construct for evaluating associations between physical activity and disease outcomes, given the long induction periods in many chronic diseases. The authors' objective in this study was to evaluate the measurement properties of the Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire (L-PAQ), a novel Internet-based, self-administered instrument measuring lifetime physical activity, among Canadian men and women in 2005-2006. Reliability was examined using a test-retest study. Validity was examined in a 2-part study consisting of 1) comparisons with previously validated instruments measuring similar constructs, the Lifetime Total Physical Activity Questionnaire (LT-PAQ) and the Chasan-Taber Physical Activity Questionnaire (CT-PAQ), and 2) a priori hypothesis tests of constructs measured by the L-PAQ. The L-PAQ demonstrated good reliability, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.67 (household activity) to 0.89 (sports/recreation). Comparison between the L-PAQ and the LT-PAQ resulted in Spearman correlation coefficients ranging from 0.41 (total activity) to 0.71 (household activity); comparison between the L-PAQ and the CT-PAQ yielded coefficients of 0.58 (sports/recreation), 0.56 (household activity), and 0.50 (total activity). L-PAQ validity was further supported by observed relations between the L-PAQ and sociodemographic variables, consistent with a priori hypotheses. Overall, the L-PAQ is a useful instrument for assessing multiple domains of lifetime physical activity with acceptable reliability and validity.

  1. Measurement of short lifetimes in highly-charged ions using a two-foil target

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Dunford, R.W.; Gemmell, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    One of the frontiers in the study of the atomic physics of highly-charged ions is the measurement of lifetimes in the 100 fs to 10 ps regime. The standard technique for measuring lifetimes of states in highly-charged ions is the beam-foil time-of-flight method in which the intensity of an emission line is monitored as a function of the separation between the exciting foil and the portion of the beam being viewed by the detector. This method becomes increasingly difficult as the decay lengths of the states of interest become shorter. At a typical beam velocity of 10% of the speed of light, the beam travels 30 microns in a picosecond. The standard beam-foil time-of-flight method necessitates observation of the decay radiation within one or two decay lengths from the foil while preventing the detectors from observing the beam spot at the foil. For short-lived states this requires tight collimation of the detector with a resulting loss in solid angle. We are developing a method for measuring ultrashort atomic lifetimes utilizing a two-foil target. As a specific case to demonstrate the feasibility of our method, we are studying the decay of the 2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} level in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. This level has a calculated lifetime of 9.5 ps which corresponds to a decay length of 380 {mu}m. For krypton, theory predicts that 90% of the 2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} states decay via M2 radiation to the ground state. A measurement of the lifetime of this state would contribute to an important current problem which concerns the understanding of atomic structure when both electron correlations and relativistic effects are simultaneously important.

  2. Monte Carlo modelling of positron transport in real world applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanović, S.; Banković, A.; Šuvakov, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2014-05-01

    Due to the unstable nature of positrons and their short lifetime, it is difficult to obtain high positron particle densities. This is why the Monte Carlo simulation technique, as a swarm method, is very suitable for modelling most of the current positron applications involving gaseous and liquid media. The ongoing work on the measurements of cross-sections for positron interactions with atoms and molecules and swarm calculations for positrons in gasses led to the establishment of good cross-section sets for positron interaction with gasses commonly used in real-world applications. Using the standard Monte Carlo technique and codes that can follow both low- (down to thermal energy) and high- (up to keV) energy particles, we are able to model different systems directly applicable to existing experimental setups and techniques. This paper reviews the results on modelling Surko-type positron buffer gas traps, application of the rotating wall technique and simulation of positron tracks in water vapor as a substitute for human tissue, and pinpoints the challenges in and advantages of applying Monte Carlo simulations to these systems.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify sub-cellular oxygen measurements in live macrophage during bacterial invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragavon, Joe; Amiri, Megdouda; Marteyn, Benoit; Sansonetti, Philipe; Shorte, Spencer

    2011-03-01

    Fluorophore concentration, the surrounding microenvironment, and photobleaching greatly influence the fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore, increasing the difficulty to directly observe micro-environmental factors such as pH and oxygen. However, the fluorescence lifetime of a fluorophore is essentially independent of both the fluorophore concentration and photobleaching, providing a viable alternative to intensity measurements. The development of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) allows for the direct measurement of the microenvironment surrounding a fluorophore. Pt-porphyrin is a fluorophore whose optical properties include a very stable triplet excited state. This energy level overlaps strongly with the ground triplet state of oxygen, making the phosphorescent lifetime directly proportional to the surrounding oxygen concentration. Initial experiments using this fluorophore involved the use of individual microwells coated with the porphyrin. Cells were allowed to enter the micro-wells before being sealed to create a diffusionally isolated volume. The decrease in the extracellular oxygen concentration was observed using FLI. However, this isolation technique provides only the consumption rate but cannot indicate the subcellular oxygen distribution. To improve upon this, live macrophages are loaded with the porphyrin and the fluorescence lifetime determined using a Lambert Instruments Lifa-X FLI system. Initial results indicate that an increase in subcellular oxygen is observed upon initial exposure to invasive bacteria. A substantial decrease in oxygen is observed after about 1 hour of exposure. The cells remain in this deoxygenated state until the bacteria are removed or cell death occurs.

  4. New lifetime measurements in Pd109 and the onset of deformation at N=60

    DOE PAGES

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; ...

    2015-12-14

    We measured several new subnanosecond lifetimes in 109Pd using the fast-timing βγ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A = 109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. We obtained lifetimes for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7/2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements.more » Finally, the available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N = 60 which is related to the strong p-n interaction between πg9/2 and νg7/2 valence nucleons expected in this region.« less

  5. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at J-PARC:Incident Beam Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Risa; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Sugino, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Satoru; Katayama, Ryo; Yamada, Takahito; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Otono, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyuki; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Ino, Takashi; Mishima, Kenji; Taketani, Kaoru; Seki, Yoshichika; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is one of the important parameters in the estimation of the abundance of the light elements in the early universe through the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). The accuracy of 0.1% is desired in the neutron lifetime to quantitatively discuss the BBN in combination with the observation of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave. We have started a lifetime measurement with pulsed neutrons at J-PARC/BL05. To measure the lifetime, we detect the decay electrons from the bunched neutrons and the incident neutron flux in the TPC at the same time. By diluting a small amount of 3He gas into the TPC, the incident flux is estimated by counting protons via 3He(n,p)3H reactions. The accuracy of the selection of 3He(n,p)3H events and the influence of the contamination of nitrogen gas are the major systematic errors. In this paper, the estimation of the systematic error in the incident flux is reported.

  6. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optomechanics in a handheld form factor. We examined the characteristics of the optomechanics with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (from LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  7. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optical mount in a hand-held form factor. We examined the characteristics of the 3D printed optical system with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  8. Atmospheric lifetime of caesium-137 as an estimate of aerosol lifetime -quantified from global measurements in the months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iren Kristiansen, Nina; Stohl, Andreas; Wotawa, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Radionuclides like caesium-137 (137Cs) can be emitted to the atmosphere in great quantities during nuclear accidents and are of significant health impact. A global set of radionuclide measurements collected over several months after the accidental release from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 has been used to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs. Lifetime is here defined as the e-folding time scale (the time interval in which the exponential decay of the 137Cs quantity has decreased by factor of e). The estimated atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs can also be used as an estimate of the lifetime of aerosols in the atmosphere. This is based on the fact that 137Cs attaches to the ambient accumulation-mode (AM) aerosols and trace their fate in the atmosphere. The 137Cs "tags" the AM aerosols and both the 137Cs and AM aerosols are removed simultaneously from the atmosphere by scavenging within clouds, precipitation and dry deposition. The 137Cs emitted from Fukushima attached mainly to sulphate aerosols in the size range 0.1-2 μm diameter. Measured 137Cs activity concentrations from several stations spread mostly over the Northern Hemisphere were evaluated, and the decrease in activity concentrations over time (after correction for radioactive decay) reflects the removal of aerosols by wet and dry deposition. Corrections for air mass transport were made using measurements of the noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe) which was also released during the accident. This noble gas does not attach to the aerosols and was thus used as a passive tracer of air mass transport. The atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs was estimated to 10.0-13.9 days during April and May 2011. This represents the atmospheric lifetime of a "background" AM aerosol well mixed in the extratropical northern hemisphere troposphere. It is expected that the lifetime of this vertically mixed background aerosol is longer than the lifetime of fresh AM aerosols directly emitted from surface sources

  9. Measurement of the B(s) lifetime using semileptonic decays with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun

    The measurement of the lifetime of the B0s meson has great importance and is of special interest. The first motivation is to check the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE) predictions for the B meson lifetimes. Besides testing HQE, the lifetime of the b quark is directly related to the CKM matrix element Vcb; the B meson lifetime measurement thus gives a good probe of the weak decay mechanics of the heavy hadrons. The B0s meson is of special interest because of the expected B0sB¯0 s mixing with large oscillation frequency, which can be expressed in terms of Deltam, the mass difference of the two mass eigenstates of the B0s meson. The B0s mesons contain short and long lived components, the light (L) and heavy (H) eigenstates, BL and BH . They differ not only in their masses Deltam = mL - mH, but also in their widths DeltaGamma = GammaL - Gamma H, which is expected to be large enough to be measurable. In flavor-specific decays, such as the semileptonic decay in this analysis, the B0s will have equal fractions of BL and BH when generated. A superposition of two exponentials thus results with decay width Gammas +/- DeltaGamma s/2. When fitting to a single exponential we obtain a measure of the flavor-specific lifetime: tB0s fs=1Gs 1+DGs/2G s21- DGs/2Gs 2 Hence by measuring tau( B0s )fs, in combination with other measurements, we can reduce the significant correlations between the average B0s lifetime tau( B0s ) = 1Gs and DeltaGammas/Gamma s, and determine them more precisely. In this dissertation, the lifetime of the B0s meson is measured using partially reconstructed semileptonic decays. The following semileptonic decay processes (and their charge conjugates) are used in this analysis: B0s→l++D- s+X where l denotes either a muon or an electron, and the Ds decays into D-s→f+p -,f→K++K- D-s→K*0 +K-,K*0→K+ +p- D-s→p ++p-+p- The data were collected during the years 2002 to 2005 using 4 GeV lepton plus displaced track triggers (lepton+SVT) by the CDF Collaboration at

  10. Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation measurements on 3d and 4f ferromagnets using polarized positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasuso, A.; Maekawa, M.; Fukaya, Y.; Yabuuchi, A.; Mochizuki, I.

    2012-01-01

    We measured the Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) spectra of 3d (Fe, Co, and Ni) and 4f (Gd, Tb, and Dy) ferromagnets under a magnetic field by using spin-polarized positrons from a 68Ge-68Ga source. The results showed that the DBAR spectra of these metals have notably different magnetic-field dependences. The differences among Fe, Co, and Ni reflect that the upper minority spin bands of Fe and Co are nearly empty while those of Ni are still mostly occupied. For the rare-earth metals instead of the inner 4f electrons, 5d electrons that mediate the exchange interaction of the 4f electrons are primarily responsible for the magnetic-field effects on the DBAR spectra. Furthermore, the magnetic-field effects on the DBAR spectra of Gd, Tb, and Dy vanished above the Curie temperatures of the magnetic-phase transition for these metals.

  11. Calculations and measurements for the SLAC SLC positron return quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Early, R.A.; Cobb, J.K.

    1986-09-01

    The three-dimensional magnetostatic computer program TOSCA, running on the NMFECC CRAY X-MP computer, was used to compute the integral of gradient length for the SLC type QT4 positron return line quadrupole magnet. Since the bore diameter of the magnet is 12.7 centimeters, and the length is only 10.16 centimeters, three dimensional effects are important. POISSON calculations were done on a two-dimensional model to obtain magnetic shimming which assured enough positive twelve pole to offset end effects, while TOSCA was used to estimate the effective length of the quadrupole. No corrections were required on the magnet as built. Measurements showed that the required integrated gradient was achieved for the given current, and that integrated higher harmonics were generally less than 0.1% of the quadrupole component.

  12. Measurement of radiation dose to the thyroid using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Ott, R J; Batty, V; Webb, B S; Flower, M A; Leach, M O; Clack, R; Marsden, P K; McCready, V R; Bateman, J E; Sharma, H

    1987-03-01

    Measurements of the functioning volume of thyroid tissue have been made in 22 patients undergoing radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis, using a prototype multiwire proportional counter positron camera. Tomographic images were produced of the distribution of 124I in the thyroid. Functioning volumes were found to be in the range 21-79 cm3 with volume errors of the order of +/- 4% to +/- 14%. Radioiodine uptake varied from 28% to 98%. Using a value of 6 days for the effective half-life of radioiodine in hyperactive thyroids, radiation doses from a standard therapy administration of 75 MBq of 131I varied from 11 to 48 Gy (compared with a recommended 50-70 Gy). In five cases PET imaging showed a non-uniform distribution of radioiodine in thyroids thought to have uniform uptake from conventional pinhole scintigraphy.

  13. High-resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear-structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III.

    1981-02-28

    Extensive data analysis and theoretical analysis has been done to complete the extensive decay scheme investigation of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Fr and the level structures of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Rn. A final version of a journal article is presented in preprint form. Extensive Monte Carlo calculations have been made to correct the end point energies of positron spectra taken with intrinsic Ge detectors for annihilation radiation interferences. These calculations were tested using the decay of /sup 82/Sr which has previously measured positron branches. This technique was applied to the positron spectra collected at the on-line UNISOR isotope separator. The reactions used were /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;p2n)/sup 77/Rb and /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;pn)/sup 78/Rb. Values for 5, ..gamma..-..beta../sup +/ coincidence positron end point energies are given for the decay of /sup 77/Rb. The implied Q-value is 5.075 +- 0.010 MeV. A complete paper on the calculated corrections is presented. A flow chart of a more complete program which accounts for positrons scattering out of the detector and for bremsstralung radiation is also presented. End-point energies of four ..beta../sup +/ branches in /sup 77/Rb are given as well as a proposed energy level scheme of /sup 75/Kr based on ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidence data taken at UNISOR.

  14. [The analysis of sinusoidal modulated method used for measuring fluorescence lifetime].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ying; Huang, Shi-hua

    2007-12-01

    This paper has built a system with a sinusoidal modulated LED as the excitation source. Such exciter was used upon the sample Eu2 L'3 x nH2O (L' = C4H4O4). Both the excitation light and the 5Do-7F2 emission of Eu3+ ion were measured. Fluorescence lifetime, which approximate to 0.680 ms, can then be obtained from the measured excitation and fluorescence waveforms by non-linear least square curve fitting based on the principle of phase-shift measurement of fluorescence lifetime. Data processing methods considering respectively the high order harmonics in the modulation and multi-exponential decay of the fluorescence were discussed. A method of utilizing Fourier series expandedness to amendatory the result was put forward. Accordingly, the applicability for phase-shift method was expanded as well as a more exact result was acquired.

  15. New precision lifetime measurement of the first excited state of 12Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, C. J.; Morse, C.; Chowdhury, P.; Merchan, E.; Prasher, V. S.; McCutchan, E. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Sonzogni, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Gade, A.; Loelius, C.; Lunderberg, E.; Recchia, F.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2016-09-01

    12Be presents an important opportunity for nuclear structure studies. It has a canonically magic number of neutrons, N = 8, but on the other hand the beryllium isotopes are well-known for their α-clustering behavior. 12Be is at the limit of computationally feasible GFMC ab initio calculations, and is experimentally accessible for the purposes of making precision measurements. Although recent experiments indicate that 12Be favors the development of clustering over magicity, the electromagnetic decay properties of this system are poorly constrained due to the single measurement (_30% uncertainty) of the B(E2; 2+-0+) value. Here we present a new precise measurement of the 2+ state lifetime using GRETINA at NSCL. We find that the lifetime is about a factor of two shorter than previously reported, so even more collective and clustered then expected. The implications for the structure of 12Be will be discussed.

  16. Interpretation of recent positron-electron measurements between 20 and 800 MeV. [interplanetary cosmic ray solar modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerin, C. J.; Hartman, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Recently measured positron and negatron spectra are discussed with regard to the problem of solar modulation. At energies above 180 MeV, the spherically symmetric Fokker-Planck equation with a diffusion coefficient proportional to particle rigidity provides reasonable fits to both the positron and total electron data. At energies below 180 MeV, the data are consistent with a continuation of the same diffusion coefficient and a local source of negatrons or with a change in the diffusion coefficient to a constant value.

  17. Measuring the carrier lifetime by using a quasi-optical millimeter- and THz-wave system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Mun Seok; Sawant, Ashwini; Lee, Kyu-Sup; Yu, Nan Ei; Choi, EunMi

    2017-02-01

    The existing method for contactless measurement of the photoconductivity decay time is limited in terms of sample selection according to the injection level or doping density. To solve this problem and improve the measurement sensitivity, we developed a quasi-optical photoconductivity decay (QO-PCD) technique based on millimeter- and terahertz-wave technology. A semi-insulating silicon (Si) wafer was used in a proof-of-concept experiment with the proposed QO-PCD system to find the initial excess carrier density and carrier lifetime based on the Drude-Zener model with a single decay function. The initial excess carrier density and carrier lifetime were measured to be 1.5 × 1015 cm-3 and 30.6 μs, respectively, in semi-insulating Si wafer (460 μm thickness). A 2D areal measurement of the decay time of the Si wafer was experimentally obtained. The proposed QO-PCD technique can provide more reliable and sensitive carrier lifetime measurement data for semiconductor wafers, which may impact the fields of photovoltaic solar cells and power electronics.

  18. Contamination and gettering evaluation by lifetime measurements during single crystal cell processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, R.; Moehlecke, A.; Alonso, J.; Tobias, I.; Luque, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this work, the effects of contamination and gettering through two fabrication processes of monocrystalline solar cells are evaluated using lifetime measurements. The processes characterized were developed to produce n{sup +}pp{sup +} and p{sup +}nn{sup +} solar cells with phosphorus/aluminum and boron/phosphorus. The experiments indicate that in the laboratory environment, the lifetime degradation is influenced by the number of thermal processes. The gettering produced by aluminum in n{sup +}pp{sup +} cell processing and by phosphorus (with heavy doping) in p{sup +}nn{sup +} cell processing enhances the base lifetime. Slight phosphorus diffusion without supersaturation conditions, performed in the n{sup +}pp{sup +} process, does not produce sufficient gettering and has lower effect on the lifetime than boron diffusions that produce some gettering too. Also, the authors discovered that gettering is strongly reduced when local aluminum back surface field regions are formed in the rear face in a failed attempt of reducing the BSF recombination.

  19. Molecular rotor measures viscosity of live cells via fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuimova, Marina K; Yahioglu, Gokhan; Levitt, James A; Suhling, Klaus

    2008-05-28

    The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the 4,4'-difluoro-4-bora-5-(p-oxoalkyl)phenyl-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (1) show a strong correlation with the viscosity of the medium due to the viscosity-dependent twisting of the 5-phenyl group, which gives access to the dark nonemissive excited state. We propose a sensitive and versatile method for measuring the local microviscosity in biological systems, based on the determination of the fluorescence lifetime of 1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) performed on live cells incubated with 1 demonstrates the distinct intracellular lifetime of the molecular rotor of 1.6 +/- 0.2 ns corresponding to the intracellular viscosity of ca. 140 cP. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of 1 in cells confirms insignificant binding of the fluorophore. The viscosity value obtained in the present study is considerably higher than that of water and of cellular cytoplasm. The high viscosity of intracellular compartments is likely to play an important role in vital intracellular processes, including the rate of diffusion of reactive oxygen species, causing programmed cell destruction.

  20. Lifetime measurement of a collision complex using ion cyclotron double resonance - H2C6N2(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, Vincent G.; Sen, Atish D.; Huntress, Wesley T., Jr.; Mcewan, Murray J.

    1991-01-01

    In the ion-molecule reaction between HC3N(+) and HC3N, the lifetime of the collision complex (H2C6N2+)-asterisk was long enough that ion cyclotron double-resonance techniques could be used to probe the distribution of the lifetimes of the collision complex. The mean lifetime of the collision complex at room temperature was measured as 180 microsec with a distribution ranging from 60 to 260 microsec as measured at the half-heights in the distribution. Lifetimes of this magnitude with respect to unimolecular dissociation allow for some stabilization of the collision complex by the slower process of infrared photon emission.

  1. NEW APPROACHES: Measurement of the mean lifetime of cosmic ray muons in the A-level laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Peter; Costich, David; O'Sullivan, Sean

    1998-09-01

    The Turning Points in Physics module from the NEAB A-level Modular Physics syllabus requires students to have an understanding of relativistic time dilation and offers the measurement of the mean lifetime of cosmic ray muons as an example of supporting experimental evidence. This article describes a direct measurement of muon lifetime carried out in the A-level laboratory.

  2. Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes reasons that lifetime measurments may be irreproducible using iodine-in-ethanol (I-E) passivation. Possible factors include the strength of the iodine in ethanol solution, wafer cleaning procedures, influence of wafer container during lifetime measurement, and stability of I-E.

  3. Direct fluorination of phenolsulfonphthalein: a method for synthesis of positron-emitting indicators for in vivo pH measurement.

    PubMed

    Kachur, Alexander V; Popov, Anatoliy V; Karp, Joel S; Delikatny, E James

    2013-05-01

    We report a reaction of direct electrophilic fluorination of phenolsulfonphthalein at mild conditions. This reaction affords the synthesis of novel positron-emitting (18)F-labeled pH indicators. These compounds are useful for non-invasive in vivo pH measurement in biological objects.

  4. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξb⁻ baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-12-12

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)⁻ baryon using about 1800 Ξ(b)⁻ decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb⁻¹ collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the Ξ(b)⁻→Ξ(c)⁰π⁻, Ξ(c)⁰→pK⁻K⁻π⁺ channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the Λ(b)⁰→Λ(c)⁺π⁻ mode as a reference. We measure M(Ξ(b)⁻)-M(Λ(b)⁰)=178.36±0.46±0.16  MeV/c², (τ(Ξ(b)⁻)/τ(Λ(b)⁰)=1.089±0.026±0.011, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the Ξ(b)⁻ mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations.

  5. A new plunger device to measure lifetimes of unbound states in tagged exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Procter, M. G.; Smith, A. J.; Twist, V.; Jones, P. M.; Nieminen, P.; Grahn, T.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.

    2012-09-01

    A new plunger device has been designed and is being built at the University of Manchester to measure lifetimes of unbound states in exotic nuclei approaching the proton drip-line. The device is designed to work in both vacuum and gas environments and will be used in conjunction with the gas filled separator RITU and the vacuum-mode separator MARA at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. This will enable the accurate measurement of excited state lifetimes identified via isomer and charged-particle tagging. The plunger will be used to address many key facets of nuclear structure physics with particular emphasis on the effect of deformation on proton emission rates.

  6. Lifetime measurements using the CLARA-PRISMA setup around the {sup 48}Ca doubly-magic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; Fioretto, E.; Grodner, E.; Mason, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Mengoni, D.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Ur, C. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Lunardi, S.; Scarlassara, F.; Dewald, A.

    2008-11-11

    The lifetimes of the first excited states of nuclei around the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been determined using a novel method that combines the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) method with the CLARA-PRISMA spectrometers. This is the first time such a method is applied to measure lifetimes of neutron-rich nuclei populated via a multinucleon transfer reaction. This novel method and some preliminary results on lifetimes are presented.

  7. Determination of ππ scattering lengths from measurement of ππ atom lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeva, B.; Afanasyev, L.; Benayoun, M.; Benelli, A.; Berka, Z.; Brekhovskikh, V.; Caragheorgheopol, G.; Cechak, T.; Chiba, M.; Chliapnikov, P. V.; Ciocarlan, C.; Constantinescu, S.; Costantini, S.; Curceanu (Petrascu), C.; Doskarova, P.; Dreossi, D.; Drijard, D.; Dudarev, A.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fungueiriño Pazos, J. L.; Gallas Torreira, M.; Gerndt, J.; Gianotti, P.; Goldin, D.; Gomez, F.; Gorin, A.; Gorchakov, O.; Guaraldo, C.; Gugiu, M.; Hansroul, M.; Hons, Z.; Hosek, R.; Iliescu, M.; Karpukhin, V.; Kluson, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Kokkas, P.; Komarov, V.; Kruglov, V.; Kruglova, L.; Kulikov, A.; Kuptsov, A.; Kuroda, K. I.; Lamberto, A.; Lanaro, A.; Lapshin, V.; Lednicky, R.; Leruste, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopez Aguera, A.; Lucherini, V.; Maki, T.; Manuilov, I.; Marin, J.; Narjoux, J. L.; Nemenov, L.; Nikitin, M.; Nunez Pardo, T.; Okada, K.; Olchevskii, V.; Pazos, A.; Pentia, M.; Penzo, A.; Perreau, J. M.; Plo, M.; Ponta, T.; Rappazzo, G. F.; Riazantsev, A.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Rodriguez Fernandez, A.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronjin, V. M.; Rykalin, V.; Saborido, J.; Santamarina, C.; Schacher, J.; Schuetz, C.; Sidorov, A.; Smolik, J.; Takeutchi, F.; Tarasov, A.; Tauscher, L.; Tobar, M. J.; Trojek, T.; Trusov, S.; Utkin, V.; Vázquez Doce, O.; Vlachos, S.; Voskresenskaya, O.; Vrba, T.; Willmott, C.; Yazkov, V.; Yoshimura, Y.; Zhabitsky, M.; Zrelov, P.

    2011-10-01

    The DIRAC experiment at CERN has achieved a sizeable production of ππ atoms and has significantly improved the precision on its lifetime determination. From a sample of 21 227 atomic pairs, a 4% measurement of the S-wave ππ scattering length difference |a-a||syst-0.0073+0.0078)Mπ-1 has been attained, providing an important test of Chiral Perturbation Theory.

  8. Lifetime measurements in 71Ge and a new interacting boson-fermion model interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, N.; Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ur, C. A.; Lobach, Yu. N.

    1999-08-01

    The lifetimes of twelve low spin excited states have been measured in 71Ge using the Doppler shift attenuation method in the 71Ga(p,nγ) reaction at 3.0 and 3.5 MeV incident energy. New interacting boson-fermion model calculations for this nucleus account well for the properties of all its levels known up to about 1.5 MeV excitation.

  9. Doppler-shift attenuation method lifetime measurements of low-lying states in 111In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ilaş, G.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, N.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C. A.

    1996-11-01

    The lifetimes of nine low-lying excited states in 111In have been measured with the Doppler-shift attenuation method in the 111Cd(p,nγ) reaction. A comparison of experimental quantities with predictions based on the interacting boson-fermion model unravels the states due to the coupling of a g9/2 proton hole to the quadrupole vibrations of the core.

  10. Carrier Lifetime Measurement in n(-) 4H-SiC Epilayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    limitations of Si -based technology. However, in spite of the progress that has been made in both materials growth and device fabrication, material...lifetime measurement techniques have been primarily fo- cused on Si and on electrical techniques that are directly applicable to device structures...compared to experi- ment. A. Transient free carrier absorption The TFCA technique has been applied in Si Refs. 18–20 as well as in SiC.21–23 In this

  11. Line identification and lifetime measurements in the XUV and soft X-ray regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1979-01-01

    A summary of the data acquired concerning line identification and lifetime measurements in the xuv and soft X-ray regions for a variety of both resonance transitions and forbidden transitions in ions of astrophysical interest is provided. Particular attention is called to a few papers which appeared in the Astrophysical Journal. These are of special relevance to specific astrophysical data needs. The many experiments completed in areas related to but somewhat outside the confines of the project title are mentioned.

  12. Study of excitation transfer in laser dye mixtures by direct measurement of fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Dienes, A.

    1973-01-01

    By directly measuring the donor fluorescence lifetime as a function of acceptor concentration in the laser dye mixture Rhodamine 6G-Cresyl violet, we found that the Stern-Volmer relation is obeyed, from which the rate of excitation transfer is determined. The experimental results indicate that the dominant mechanism responsible for the efficient excitation transfer is that of resonance transfer due to long range dipole-dipole interaction.

  13. Positron-rubidium scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A 5-state close-coupling calculation (5s-5p-4d-6s-6p) was carried out for positron-Rb scattering in the energy range 3.7 to 28.0 eV. In contrast to the results of similar close-coupling calculations for positron-Na and positron-K scattering the (effective) total integrated cross section has an energy dependence which is contrary to recent experimental measurements.

  14. Improved generalized gradient approximation for positron states in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriplach, Jan; Barbiellini, Bernardo

    2014-04-01

    Several first-principles calculations of positron-annihilation characteristics in solids have added gradient corrections to the local-density approximation within the theory by Arponen and Pajanne [Ann. Phys. (NY) 121, 343 (1979), 10.1016/0003-4916(79)90101-5] since this theory systematically overestimates the annihilation rates. As a further remedy, we propose to use gradient corrections for other local-density approximation schemes based on perturbed hypernetted chain and on quantum Monte Carlo results. Our calculations for various metals and semiconductors show that the proposed schemes generally improve the positron lifetimes when they are confronted with experiment. We also compare the resulting positron affinities in solids with data from slow-positron measurements.

  15. Measurement and verification of positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by target nuclear fragment reactions in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi; Saijo, Nagahiro; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to verify the characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by proton irradiation. Methods: Proton therapy using a beam on-line PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp), which the authors developed, is provided at the National Cancer Center Kashiwa, Japan. BOLPs-RGp is a monitoring system that can confirm the activity distribution of the proton irradiated volume by detection of a pair of annihilation gamma rays coincidentally from positron emitter nuclei generated by the target nuclear fragment reactions between irradiated proton nuclei and nuclei in the human body. Activity is measured from a start of proton irradiation to a period of 200 s after the end of the irradiation. The characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated in a patient's body were verified by the measurement of the activity distribution at each treatment site using BOLPs-RGp. Results: The decay curves for measured activity were able to be approximated using two or three half-life values regardless of the treatment site. The activity of half-life value of about 2 min was important for a confirmation of the proton irradiated volume. Conclusions: In each proton treatment site, verification of the characteristics of the generated positron emitter nuclei was performed by using BOLPs-RGp. For the monitoring of the proton irradiated volume, the detection of {sup 15}O generated in a human body was important.

  16. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted.

  17. Subcellular localization-dependent changes in EGFP fluorescence lifetime measured by time-resolved flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ali Vaziri; Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Li, Wenyan; Houston, Jessica P.; Houston, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular protein transport and localization to subcellular regions are processes necessary for normal protein function. Fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to track movement and determine localization within a cell. Currently, fluorescence microscopy combined with image processing is most often used to study protein movement and subcellular localization. In this contribution we evaluate a high-throughput time-resolved flow cytometry approach to correlate intracellular localization of human LC3 protein with the fluorescence lifetime of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Subcellular LC3 localization to autophagosomes is a marker of the cellular process called autophagy. In breast cancer cells expressing native EGFP and EGFP-LC3 fusion proteins, we measured the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of (i) diffuse EGFP (ii) punctate EGFP-LC3 and (iii) diffuse EGFP-ΔLC3 after amino acid starvation to induce autophagy-dependent LC3 localization. We verify EGFP-LC3 localization with low-throughput confocal microscopy and compare to fluorescence intensity measured by standard flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate that time-resolved flow cytometry can be correlated to subcellular localization of EGFP fusion proteins by measuring changes in fluorescence lifetime. PMID:24010001

  18. Measurement of the $B^-$ lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-04-01

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B{sup -} using the mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}. The B{sup -} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup -}} = 1.663 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  19. Measurement of the B- lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Huffman, B. T.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N. L.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-02-01

    The collection of a large number of B-hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II Detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper-decay-time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias, and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper, we present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty due to the differences between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B- using the mode B-→D0π-. The B- lifetime is measured as τB-=1.663±0.023±0.015ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  20. Effect of positron source irradiation on positronium annihilation in fine powdered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Z. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation were measured as a function of time to study the irradiation effect by 22Na positron source in fine powdered alumina. The γ-Al2O3 samples were put in a vacuum chamber with a pressure of about 10-6 Torr and were cooled down to 10 K by a closed-cycle helium gas refrigerator. The irradiation of γ-Al2O3 samples by positron source was taken for a duration of about two days immediately after the sample was cooled down. After that, the sample was subjected to a warm up process from 10 K to 300 K with a step of 10 K. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectra were measured simultaneously during these processes. Two long lifetime components corresponding to ortho-positronium annihilation were observed. A significant shortening of these long lifetime components and a large increase in S parameter is observed during irradiation. It is supposed that positron source irradiation creates a large number of paramagnetic centers on the surface of the γ-Al2O3 grains, which induce spin conversion quenching of positronium. The irradiation induced paramagnetic centers are unstable above 70 K and are nearly annealed out when the temperature rises to 190 K. After warming up of the sample to room temperature, the positron lifetime spectrum is identical to that before irradiation. It was also found that after irradiation, a medium long lifetime component of about 5 ns appears, of which the intensity increases with increasing irradiation time. This may be originated from the formation of the surface o-Ps state. This surface o-Ps state is also inhibited at elevated temperatures. Our results indicate that positronium is a very sensitive probe for the surface defects in porous materials.

  1. Beam-laser lifetime measurements for some selected levels in singly ionized thulium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Georg; McCurdy, Michelle M.; Pinnington, Eric H.

    1999-11-01

    The lifetimes of 16 levels in Tm II have been measured using the fast-beam-laser technique to resolve the disagreement between time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements recently published by Anderson, Den Hartog, and Lawler [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 13, 2382 (1996)] and a new relativistic Hartree-Fock calculation by Quinet, Palmeri, and Biémont [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 62, 625 (1999)]. In all cases except one, our results support the previous measurement, but with a higher precision.

  2. On the uncertainty in single molecule fluorescent lifetime and energy emission measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; Mccollom, Alex D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least square methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67% of those can be noise and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probably density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. the ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background nose and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  3. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  4. Mechanical durability of polymeric coatings studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy: correlation between cyclic loading and free volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Peng, Q.; Huang, Y. Y.; Zhang, R.; Mallon, P. E.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.; Wu, Y.; Richardson, J. R.; Sandreczki, T. C.; Jean, Y. C.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2002-06-01

    The mechanical durability of seven commercially polymeric coatings is investigated using slow positron beam techniques to monitor changes in sub-nanometer defects during the process of cyclic loading. Doppler broadened energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were performed as a function of the slow positron energy at different periods of cycling loading. The positron annihilation dada show that both S-defect parameter and o-positronium (Ps) lifetime decrease as the loading cycle increases. The results indicate a loss of free volumes due to the loss of mechanical durability by cyclic loading. A direct correlation between the loss of S-defect parameter and the period of loading cycle is observed. This is interpreted as that durability of polymeric coatings is controlled by the atomic level free volumes. It is shown that the slow positron beam is a very successful probe in detecting the very early stages of coating degradation due to mechanical processes.

  5. Measurement of cosmic ray positron and negatron spectra between 50 and 800 MeV. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of cosmic ray positrons and negatrons at energies between 50 and 800 MeV. Comparisons of the separate positron and negatron spectra observed near the earth with their expected intensities in interstellar space can be used to investigate the complex (and variable) interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the expanding solar wind. The present measurements, which have established finite values or upper limits for the positron and negatron spectral between 50 and 800 MeV, have confirmed earlier evidence for the existence of a dominant component of negatrons from primary sources in the galaxy. The present results are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that the positron component is in fact mainly attributable to collisions between cosmic ray nuclei and the interstellar gas. The estimate of the absolute intensities confirm the indications from neutron monitors that in 1972 the interplanetary cosmic ray intensities were already recovering toward their high levels observed in 1965.

  6. Ruby crystal for demonstrating time- and frequency-domain methods of fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Danielle E; Majumdar, Zigurts K; Heiss, Gregor J; Clegg, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    We present experiments that are convenient and educational for measuring fluorescence lifetimes with both time- and frequency-domain methods. The sample is ruby crystal, which has a lifetime of about 3.5 milliseconds, and is easy to use as a class-room demonstration. The experiments and methods of data analysis are used in the lab section of a class on optical spectroscopy, where we go through the theory and applications of fluorescence. Because the fluorescence decay time of ruby is in the millisecond region, the instrumentation for this experiment can be constructed easily and inexpensively compared to the nanosecond-resolved instrumentation required for most fluorescent compounds, which have nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. The methods are applicable to other luminescent compounds with decay constants from microseconds and longer, such as transition metal and lanthanide complexes and phosphorescent samples. The experiments, which clearly demonstrate the theory and methods of measuring temporally resolved fluorescence, are instructive and demonstrate what the students have learned in the lectures without the distraction of highly sophisticated instrumentation.

  7. Photoluminescence spectroscopy and lifetime measurements from self assembled semiconducting quantum dot- metal nanoparticle hybrid arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridas, M.; Basu, J. K.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate how the emission properties of a hybrid array consisting of semiconducting quantum dot (QD) and metal nanoparticles (NP) can be controlled by varying the density and distance between QD and NP independently. Our hybrid system consists of chemically synthesized cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs) and polymer capped gold nanoparticles (Au NP) embedded in a block copolymer matrix having the topology of cylinders oriented perpendicular to the substrate. We have prepared hybrid arrays with two different densities of CdSe QDs (ρQD) each having same Au NP densities (ρAu) . The photoluminescence measurements (PL) from such hybrid system shows enhancement in emission with increase in ρAu , compared to the CdSe QD film and the enhancement factor is lower for hybrid films with high ρQD . The lifetime measurement shows double exponent PL decay with systematic reduction in exciton lifetime for hybrid arrays with respect to ρAu . The film with high ρQD shows larger reduction in lifetime. Similarly, the amplitudes of the two relaxations switch over with increase in ρAu . It is clear that the shorter time becomes the dominant relaxation mode with increasing ρAu . Observed phenomena have been explained in terms of exciton plasmon interaction .

  8. Apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K.; Johnston, Steven W.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearity for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  9. Direct Measurement of the Radiative Lifetime of Vibrationally Excited OH Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y.T. van de; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard; Loo, Mark P.J. van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2005-07-01

    Neutral molecules, isolated in the gas phase, can be prepared in a long-lived excited state and stored in a trap. The long observation time afforded by the trap can then be exploited to measure the radiative lifetime of this state by monitoring the temporal decay of the population in the trap. This method is demonstrated here and used to benchmark the Einstein A coefficients in the Meinel system of OH. A pulsed beam of vibrationally excited OH radicals is Stark decelerated and loaded into an electrostatic quadrupole trap. The radiative lifetime of the upper {lambda}-doublet component of the X {sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2}, v=1, J=3/2 level is determined as 59.0{+-}2.0 ms, in good agreement with the calculated value of 58.0{+-}1.0 ms.

  10. CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Ξ$+\\atop{c}$ lifetime measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, Ugur

    2003-12-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the Ξ$+\\atop{c}$ lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 ± 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of Ξ$+\\atop{c}$ as 427 ± 31 ± 13 fs.

  11. A new measurement of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons with the Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfreda, Alberto; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present an updated measurement of the cosmic-ray electron and positron spectrum between 7 GeV and 2 TeV, based on 7 years of data collected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The LAT is the first space-based instrument to directly explore the region above 1 TeV. At such high energies, the shape of the spectrum can provide useful information about the origin and propagation of cosmic-ray electrons in the nearby Galactic space. The best fit to the spectrum that we measure is given by a broken power-law, with the break located at 53 +/-8 GeV. Such break, however, is not significant when all the systematic uncertainties are taken into account. Above 50 GeV our data are well described by a single power law with a spectral index of 3.07 +/- 0.02 (stat + syst) +/- 0.06 (energy scale). An exponential cut-off lower than 1.7 TeV is excluded at 95% CL.

  12. Precision measurement of the positron asymmetry of laser-cooled, spin-polarized 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melconian, Dan; Fenker, B.; Behr, J. A.; Anholm, M.; Ashery, D.; Behling, R. S.; Cohen, I.; Craiciu, I.; Gorelov, A.; Gwinner, G.; McNeil, J.; Mehlman, M.; Smale, S.; Warner, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    Precision low-energy measurements in nuclear β decay can be used to provide constraints on possible physics beyond the standard model, complementing searches at high-energy colliders. The short-lived isotope 37K was produced at ISAC-TRIUMF and confined in an alternating magneto-optical trap before being spin-polarized to 99.13(9)% via optical pumping. Our system allows for an exceptionally open geometry with the decay products escaping with their momenta unperturbed by the shallow trapping potential. The emitted positrons are detected in a pair of symmetric detectors placed along the polarization axis to measure the β asymmetry. The analysis was performed blind and considers β-scattering as well as other systematic effects. The results place limits on the mass of a hypothetical W boson coupling to right-handed neutrinos as well as contribute to an independent determination of the Vud element of the CKM matrix. The β asymmetry result as well as improvements and future plans will be described. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Israel Science Foundation.

  13. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and decay modes of hadrons at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2010-05-01

    The Tevatron provides 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions and allows for collection of rich b-hadron samples to the two experiments CDF and D0. The study of heavy flavor properties represents a fruitful opportunity to investigate the flavor sector of the Standard Model (SM) and to look for hints of New Physics (NP). Here we report the first measurement of polarization amplitudes in B{sub s}{sup 0} charmless decays, world leading results on b-hadron lifetimes, and measurements of several other properties of b-hadrons.

  14. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Y.; Higashi, N.; Igarashi, Y.; Iwashita, Y.; Ino, T.; Katayama, R.; Kitaguchi, M.; Kitahara, R.; Matsumura, H.; Mishima, K.; Nagakura, N.; Oide, H.; Otono, H.; Sakakibara, R.; Shima, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Sugino, T.; Sumi, N.; Sumino, H.; Taketani, K.; Tanaka, G.; Tanaka, M.; Tauchi, K.; Toyoda, A.; Tomita, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamashita, S.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoshioka, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with 6Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  15. Prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime based on measurement of I- V curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashov, V. S.; Nikolski, K. N.; Baturin, A. S.; Sheshin, E. P.

    2003-06-01

    A technique is presented, which allows the prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime without long-term direct measurements of cathode parameters stability. This technique is based on periodic measurements of cathode I- V characteristics. Moreover, it allows performing a post-experiment optimization for the appropriate choice of the feedback system to provide a stable operation during a long time. The proposed technique was applied to study the emission properties of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) and thermo-enlarged graphite (TEG). For the given cathodes, the characteristic time of the cathode destruction was estimated.

  16. Surface recombination velocity and lifetime in InP measured by transient microwave reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothra, S.; Tyagi, S. D.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are determined in organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)-grown InP by a contactless microwave technique. For lightly doped n-type InP, a surface recombination velocity of 5000 cm/s is measured. However, in solar cells with a heavily doped n-type emitter a surface recombination velocity of 1 x 10 to the 6th cm/s is observed. Possible reasons for this due to surface pinning are discussed. The effects of various chemical treatments and SiO on the surface recombination velocity are measured.

  17. Effects of process parameters on the defects in graphene oxide-polyaniline composites investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rana, Utpal; Nambissan, P M G; Malik, Sudip; Chakrabarti, Kuntal

    2014-02-21

    Graphene oxide (GO)-polyaniline (PANI) composites were prepared with different relative abundance of PANI and GO by in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of GO and ammonium persulphate at different temperatures. In the process, GO also got reduced to graphene. Positron lifetimes and coincidence Doppler broadening of the electron-positron annihilation gamma ray spectra originating from the composite samples were measured and the results are reported. The positron lifetimes indicated the presence of very large size defects in the form of vacancy clusters within the samples. Another interesting observation was the increase of relative intensity of the defect specific positron lifetime component when an increase in relative abundance of PANI led to increased reduction of GO to graphene. The reduction also shrank the volume occupied by GO and the free volume thereby released added to the overall defect concentration, resulting in a simultaneous increase of the intensity of the positron lifetime component. The variation of the positron lifetime and its intensity with the synthesis temperature suggested an optimum temperature suitable for the process. The above observations are corroborated by other experimental investigations like electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electrical conductivity.

  18. High resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III

    1982-02-28

    Research progress in briefly described, and details are presented in the attached preprints and reprints: (1) precision mass differences in light rubidium and krypton isotopes utilizing beta endpoint measurements; (2) precision mass measurements utilizing beta endpoints; (3) Monte Carlo calculations predicting the response of intrinsic GE detectors to electrons and positrons; and (4) reactor antineutrino spectra and nuclear spectroscopy of isotopes far from beta stability. (WHK)

  19. Measurement of the lifetimes of the neutral and charged D mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Gladney, L.D.

    1985-03-01

    Results are presented on the use of a high-resolution drift chamber in the Mark II Detector at PEP to measure the lifetimes of D/sup 0/ and D/sup + -/ mesons produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at 29 GeV. Based on a sample of 74 events for the D/sup 0/ mesons and 23 events for the D/sup + -/ mesons, the lifetimes are found to be tau/sub D/sup 0/ = 4.7/sub -0.8//sup +0.9/ +- 0.5 x 10/sup -13/ s; tau/sub D/sup + -// = 8.9/sub -2.7//sup +3.8/ +- 1.3 x 10/sup -13/ s. The ratio of these lifetimes, tau/sub D/sup 0///tau/sub D/sup + -// = 1.9/sub -0.7//sup +0.9/ +- 0.3, indicates that the decays of these mesons cannot be explained by the simple spectator model of charmed particle decay.

  20. Electron lifetime measurement using cosmic ray muons at the MicroBooNE LArTPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddage, Varuna Crishan; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    MicroBooNE, a 170 ton liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) located on the Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB), is designed to both probe neutrino physics phenomena and further develop the LArTPC detector technology. MicroBooNE is the largest currently operating LArTPC detector and began collecting data in Fall 2015. LArTPCs are imaging detectors that offer exceptional capabilities for studying neutrinos. A fundamental requirement for the performance of such detectors is to maintain electronegative contaminants such as oxygen and water at extremely low concentrations, which otherwise can absorb the ionization electrons. The impurity levels in liquid argon can be estimated from the drift electron lifetime as they are inversely proportional to each other. This talk presents a measurement of the drift electron lifetime using cosmic ray muon data collected by MicroBooNE. An interpretation of the observed drift electron lifetime as a function of time indicates that the electron attenuation due to impurities in the liquid argon is negligible during normal operations, implying that the argon purification and gas recirculation system in MicroBooNE is performing successfully.

  1. Studies on the Use of Liquid Surface Passivation for Lifetime Measurements on Good-Quality Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Devayajanam, S.; Rupnowski, P.; Shet, S.; Sopori, B. L.; Ravindra, N. M.; Caskey, D.; Chang, J.; Covington, J.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated several liquid passivants, viz. solutions of iodine ethanol (IE), quinhydrone methanol (QHM), and potassium cyanide (KCN), for measuring minority-carrier lifetime. Lifetime was measured by the WCT-100 (Sinton Instruments) and WT-2000 (Semilab). Our results show that both IE and QHM passivation are reliable mechanisms. We also find that the KCN solution is moderately passivating on oxidized surfaces, but is only minimally effective on bare Si surfaces. This paper presents details of our studies. In particular, the effect of illumination on IE-passivated surfaces and possible reasons for variations in lifetime measurement are discussed.

  2. Measurement of the inclusive b-lifetime using Jp's at the CDF-experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Hans; Benjamin, Doug

    1996-05-01

    We present the measurement of the average lifetime of b-hadrons produced in pbarp collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV weighted by their branching ratios into J/ψ We use dimuon data which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ≈ 90 pb-1 recorded with the CDF-detector during the 1994 to 95 running period. After all selection cuts and background subtraction we are left with a high statistics sample of 62656 J/ψ decaying into μ^+μ^- reconstructed in the CDF Silicon VerteX detector (SVX) where 17.8% of these events come from b-decays. We measure the average B lifetime to be 1.52 ; ± 0.015; (stat);^+0.038_-0.027;(sys); ps (preliminary). The precision of this measurement is significantly improved compared to the inclusive lifetime measurement published previously using ≈ 10 pb-1 of data recorded in 91-92. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC03-76SF00098. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DEFG03-95-ER-40938. ^*We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation.

  3. Design and construction of a Vertex Chamber and measurement of the average B-Hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-10-01

    Four parameters describe the mixing of the three quark generations in the Standard Model of the weak charged current interaction. These four parameters are experimental inputs to the model. A measurement of the mean lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks, or B-Hadrons, constrains the magnitudes of two of these parameters. Measurement of the B-Hadron lifetime requires a device that can measure the locations of the stable particles that result from B-Hadron decay. This device must function reliably in an inaccessible location, and survive high radiation levels. We describe the design and construction of such a device, a gaseous drift chamber. Tubes of 6.9 mm diameter, having aluminized mylar walls of 100 ..mu..m thickness are utilized in this Vertex Chamber. It achieves a spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m, and a resolution in extrapolation to the B-Hadron decay location of 87 ..mu..m. Its inner layer is 4.6 cm from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams. The Vertex Chamber is situated within the MAC detector at PEP. We have analyzed botht he 94 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity accumulated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the Vertex Chamber in place as well as the 210 pb/sup -1/ accumulated previously. We require a lepton with large momentum transverse to the event thrust axis to obtain a sample of events enriched in B-Hadron decays. The distribution of signed impact parameters of all tracks in these events is used to measure the B-Hadron flight distance, and hence lifetime. 106 refs., 79 figs., 20 tabs.

  4. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  5. Application of positron annihilation and Raman spectroscopies to the study of perovskite type materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebennikov, D.; Ovchar, O.; Belous, A.; Mascher, P.

    2010-12-01

    Defect properties of perovskite type materials, Ba3B'Nb2O9 (where B'=Mg, Zn, or Co), with near-stoichiometric compositions were studied by positron annihilation and Raman spectroscopies. Theoretical simulations of stoichiometric perovskites revealed a dependence of the positron bulk lifetime on the degree of ordering. In Ba3MgNb2O9 (BMN) the positron bulk lifetime for a completely disordered structure is 195 ps versus 237 ps for a completely ordered one. The predicted bulk lifetimes for Ba3ZnNb2O9 (BZN) and Ba3CoNb2O9 (BCN), with Pm3¯m symmetries are 193 ps and 194 ps, respectively. It was found that deviation from stoichiometry results in the appearance of secondary Ba- and Nb-rich phases, which according to theoretical simulations have bulk lifetimes much longer than that of the host material. Positron lifetime spectroscopy was used to monitor changes in the concentration of these second phases. The difference between predicted defect lifetimes and the bulk values for the studied perovskites was less than 70 ps. This and the likely small concentrations made it impossible to discern the presence of point defects in the samples. Raman measurements demonstrated the presence of a particular mode that could be attributed to the formation of a 1:1 phase, the size of which is limited by requirements for charge compensation. The existence of an internal electric field between charged 1:1 nanoregions and the rest of material creates conditions for preferential positron annihilation that influence the obtained positron lifetime values. For BZN type materials it was found that the degree of 1:2 cation ordering decreases by increasing the sintering temperature to above 1400 °C.

  6. Test-Retest Repeatability of Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements using Rubidium-82 Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efseaff, Matthew

    Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proposed for routine myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification. Few studies have investigated the test-retest repeatability of this method. Same-day repeatability of rest MBF imaging was optimized with a highly automated analysis program using image-derived input functions and a dual spillover correction (SOC). The effects of heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and subject hemodynamics on test-retest repeatability were investigated at rest and during hyperemic stress. Factors affecting rest MBF repeatability included gender, suspected coronary artery disease, and dual SOC (p < 0.001). The best repeatability coefficient for same-day rest MBF was 0.20 mL/min/g using a six-minute scan-time, iterative reconstruction, dual SOC, resting rate-pressure-product (RPP) adjustment, and a left atrium image-derived input function. The serial study repeatabilities of the optimized protocol in subjects with homogeneous RPPs and tracer infusion profiles was 0.19 and 0.53 mL/min/g at rest and stress, and 0.95 for stress / rest myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Subjects with heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and hemodynamic conditions had significantly less repeatable MBF measurements at rest, stress, and stress/rest flow reserve (p < 0.05).

  7. Optimization of a Scintillator for the Measurement of Positrons from Trapped, Polarized 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Erin; Melconian, Dan

    2011-10-01

    Precision beta decay experiments can be used to test the Standard Model via their value of correlation parameters. The TRINAT Collaboration is performing such an experiment using a source of polarized 37K from a magneto optical trap. The momentum of an emitted positron will be detected using a Silicon strip detector backed by a plastic scintillator. The goal of my research was to optimize the readout of the scintillator by testing different experimental setups. The front face and sides of the scintillator and light guide were wrapped with various reflective materials to find which maximized the light output. We found that one layer of Teflon tape on the front face with a loose wrapping of 3M-ESR (Enhanced Spectral Reflector) on the sides was optimal. We then tested the position dependence of this detector by moving a collimated source of betas across the front face, showing only a (5.9 +/- 0.5)% reduction in light collection at the edge compared to the center. The product of this work will be used in the upcoming TRINAT experiment measuring the beta asymmetry of 37K.

  8. Enhanced positron trapping by Ag nanoclusters at low temperatures: A challenge of positron sensitivity to quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, B.; Qi, N.; Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Z. Q.; Liu, H. Q.; Yi, D. Q.; Tang, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Microstructure evolution of three Al-Ag alloys with different Ag contents (1 wt. % Ag, 5 wt. % Ag, and 15 wt. % Ag) was studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy during the aging process. In situ measurements of the positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation indicate the fast formation of Ag-rich clusters during natural aging of the alloys. The formation of Ag-rich clusters was further confirmed by coincidence Doppler broadening measurements. The Ag signal reflected by the Coincidence Doppler broadening spectrum increases with increasing Ag content and is further enhanced after subsequent artificial aging at 140 °C. This might be due to the increase in the size of Ag clusters. The temperature dependence of the Doppler broadening spectra between 10 K and 290 K was measured for the Al-Ag alloys after natural and artificial aging. Detrapping of positrons from Ag clusters with increasing temperature was observed for all the three Al-Ag alloys after natural aging and for the Al-1 wt. % Ag after artificial aging. This indicates that Ag clusters act as shallow positron trapping centers. The thermal detrapping of positrons becomes ambiguous with increasing Ag content in the alloy and is nearly invisible in the artificially aged Al-5 wt. % Ag and Al-15 wt. % Ag. The positron binding energy of the Ag cluster is roughly estimated to be about 18.8 meV and 50 meV in the Al-1 wt. % Ag sample after natural aging and artificial aging at 140 °C, respectively, which suggests that the confinement of positrons in the quantum-dot like state depends on the size or chemical composition of clusters. Theoretical calculations confirm positron trapping by Ag nanoclusters, and the confinement of positrons is enhanced with increasing Ag cluster size.

  9. Positron annihilation study on free volume of amino acid modified, starch-grafted acrylamide copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, K. R.; Al-Sigeny, S.; Sharshar, T.; El-Hamshary, H.

    2006-05-01

    Free volume measurements using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was performed for uncrosslinked and crosslinked starch-grafted polyacrylamide, and their modified amino acid samples including some of their iron(III) complexes. The measurements were performed at room temperature. The analysis of lifetime spectra yielded mostly three lifetime components. It was observed that the values of the short lifetime component τ1 are slightly higher than the lifetime associated with the self-decay of para-positronium atoms in polymers. The free volume was probed using ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation lifetime parameters. The mean free volume has also been calculated from the lifetime data. The avrage value of this parameter of the crosslinked polymer were found to be higher than those of the uncrosslinked polymer.

  10. Magnetic moment and lifetime measurements of Coulomb-excited states in Cd106

    DOE PAGES

    Benczer-Koller, N.; Kumbartzki, G. J.; Speidel, K. -H.; ...

    2016-09-06

    The Cd isotopes are well studied, but experimental data for the rare isotopes are sparse. At energies above the Coulomb barrier, higher states become accessible. Remeasure and supplement existing lifetimes and magnetic moments of low-lying states in 106Cd. Methods: In an inverse kinematics reaction, a 106Cd beam impinging on a 12C target was used to Coulomb excite the projectiles. The high recoil velocities provide a unique opportunity to measure g factors with the transient-field technique and to determine lifetimes from lineshapes by using the Doppler-shift-attenuation method. Large-scale shell-model calculations were carried out for 106Cd. As a result, the g factorsmore » of the 2+1 and 4+1 states in 106Cd were measured to be g(2+1) = +0.398(22) and g(4+1) = +0.23(5). A lineshape analysis yielded lifetimes in disagreement with published values. The new results are τ(106Cd; 2+1) = 7.0(3) ps and τ(106Cd; 4+1) = 2.5(2) ps. The mean life τ(106Cd; 2+2) = 0.28(2) ps was determined from the fully-Doppler-shifted γ line. Mean lives of τ(106Cd; 4+3) = 1.1(1) ps and τ(106Cd; 3–1) = 0.16(1) ps were determined for the first time. In conclusion, the newly measured g(4+1) of 106Cd is found to be only 59% of the g(2+1). This difference cannot be explained by either shell-model or collective-model calculations.« less

  11. Magnetic moment and lifetime measurements of Coulomb-excited states in 106Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benczer-Koller, N.; Kumbartzki, G. J.; Speidel, K.-H.; Torres, D. A.; Robinson, S. J. Q.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Allmond, J. M.; Fallon, P.; Abramovic, I.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bevins, J. E.; Crawford, H. L.; Guevara, Z. E.; Hurst, A. M.; Kirsch, L.; Laplace, T. A.; Lo, A.; Matthews, E. F.; Mayers, I.; Phair, L. W.; Ramirez, F.; Wiens, A.

    2016-09-01

    Background: The Cd isotopes are well studied, but experimental data for the rare isotopes are sparse. At energies above the Coulomb barrier, higher states become accessible. Purpose: Remeasure and supplement existing lifetimes and magnetic moments of low-lying states in 106Cd. Methods: In an inverse kinematics reaction, a 106Cd beam impinging on a 12C target was used to Coulomb excite the projectiles. The high recoil velocities provide a unique opportunity to measure g factors with the transient-field technique and to determine lifetimes from lineshapes by using the Doppler-shift-attenuation method. Large-scale shell-model calculations were carried out for 106Cd. Results: The g factors of the 21+ and 41+ states in 106Cd were measured to be g (21+)=+0.398 (22 ) and g (41+)=+0.23 (5 ) . A lineshape analysis yielded lifetimes in disagreement with published values. The new results are τ (106Cd;21+)=7.0 (3 )ps and τ (106Cd;41+)=2.5 (2 )ps . The mean life τ (106Cd;22+)=0.28 (2 )ps was determined from the fully-Doppler-shifted γ line. Mean lives of τ (106Cd;43+)=1.1 (1 )ps and τ (106Cd;31-)=0.16 (1 )ps were determined for the first time. Conclusions: The newly measured g (41+) of 106Cd is found to be only 59% of the g (21+) . This difference cannot be explained by either shell-model or collective-model calculations.

  12. Experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility: lifetime products for large sample of pixilated CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadawale, S. V.; Shanmugam, M.; Purohit, Shishir; Acharya, Y. B.; Sudhakar, Manju

    2012-07-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) is thought to be a primary work horse for hard X-ray astronomy in future. Due to the relatively large band-gap, it offers near room temperature operation while maintaining much better energy resolution then scintillator detectors operating in similar energy range. Further, CZT detectors are available in the form of pixilated detectors with area up to few cm2 and hence it is possible to realize very large detector area by having an array of such pixilated CZT detectors. However, it is well known that the energy spectrum of mono-energetic X-ray measured by CZT detectors does not have a Gaussian shape but has significant low-energy tail. This is mainly due to relatively poor mobility and small life time of the charge carriers, particularly of holes, in the CZT crystals. Thus, in order to understand spectral response for a large array of CZT detectors consisting of multiple elements / pixels, it is essential to characterize the mobility-lifetime products of charge carriers for each individual elements / pixels. Here we present experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility-lifetime products for large sample of multi-pixel CZT detectors. The mobility-lifetime products are measured by simultaneously fitting a ‘CZT line’ model to pixel wise spectra of 122 keV X-rays from 57Co at three different bias voltages. These were carried out as a part of selection of CZT detector modules for the “High Energy X-ray spectrometer (HEX)” onboard Indian moon mission - Chandrayaan-1.

  13. Measurements of nuclear-level lifetimes by the Doppler techniques with large multidetector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A. A.

    2008-07-15

    This is a brief review of the investigations carried out by scientists from the Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (St. Petersburg) within the framework of international projects for the study of the structure of high-spin nuclear states using heavy-ion beams and arrays of tens and hundreds of detectors for recording gamma rays and charged particles. The development and results of measurements of nuclear-level lifetime by Doppler techniques in the range 10{sup -14}-10{sup -9} s are discussed.

  14. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosives molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailors the stability of the molecular adduct complex. TIMS flexibility to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments / low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with higher confidence levels. PMID:26153567

  15. Differential lifetime measurements and identical superdeformed bands in {sup 192,194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, E.F.; Amro, H.; Lauritsen, T.; Janssens, R.V.; Khoo, T.L.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Amro, H.; Blumenthal, D.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fischer, S.M.; Hackman, G.; Nisius, D.; Hannachi, F.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Korichi, A.; Asztalos, S.; Clark, R.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Stephens, F.S.; Becker, J.A.; Bernstein, L.; Farris, L.P.; Henry, E.A.

    1997-05-01

    High-precision lifetime measurements have been performed in superdeformed (SD) bands of {sup 192,194}Hg with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Intrinsic quadrupole moments Q{sub 0} were extracted for three SD bands in {sup 194}Hg and for the yrast SD band in {sup 192}Hg. Within experimental uncertainties, all four SD bands have equal Q{sub 0} values. These results provide constraints on differences in Q{sub 0} values between the {open_quotes}identical{close_quotes} SD bands {sup 194}Hg(3) and {sup 192}Hg(1). {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Measurement requirements and techniques for degradation studies and lifetime prediction testing of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Derringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Tests of weathering and aging behavior are being developed to characterize the degradation and predict the lifetimes of low-cost photovoltaic arrays. Environmental factors which affect array performance include UV radiation, thermal energy, water, oxygen (generally involved in synergistic effects with UV radiation or high temperatures), physical stress, pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and ozone), abrasives and dirt. A survey of photovoltaic array testing has shown the need to establish quantitative correlations between certain measurable properties (carbonyl formation, glass transition temperature, and molecular weight change) and modes of degradation and failure.

  17. Positron annihilation study on hafnium metals given various treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Duck Ki; Kang, Myung Soo ); Yoon, Young Ku )

    1993-08-01

    The positron annihilation technique that enables measurements of positron lifetime, two-photon angular correlation and Doppler broadening due to annihilation radiation has been established for studies of the electronic configuration and defect properties in solids. In metals, positrons can be trapped at vacancies and their agglomerates as well as at dislocations, but not at interstitials. Because of these interactions, the positron annihilation method can be applied to studies of the behavior of dislocations during annealing of plastically deformed metals. Furthermore, it is possible by measurements of annihilation characteristics to identify defects such as vacancies, dislocations and vacancy-clusters, and to determine spatial dimensions of defects. In this work, positron annihilation measurements for annealed, cold worked, annealed and then quenched, and cold worked and then cathodically hydrogen charged hafnium specimens were made to obtain information on (a) positron annihilation characteristics of hafnium metal, (b) role of vacancy-type defects on hydrogen charging, (c) defects produced during hydrogen charging and (d) recovery of lattice defects in hafnium and effects of hydrogen on defects recovery upon annealing.

  18. Limiting factors of room-temperature nonradiative photoluminescence lifetime in polar and nonpolar GaN studied by time-resolved photoluminescence and slow positron annihilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichibu, S. F.; Uedono, A.; Onuma, T.; Sota, T.; Haskell, B. A.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2005-01-01

    Room-temperature nonradiative lifetime (τnr) of the near-band-edge excitonic photoluminescence (PL) peak in {0001} polar, (112¯0), (11¯00), and (001) nonpolar GaN was shown to increase with the decrease in density or size of Ga vacancies (VGa) and with the decrease in gross density of point defects including complexes, leading to the increase in the PL intensity. As the edge threading dislocation density decreased, density or size of VGa tended to decrease and τnr tended to increase. However, there existed remarkable exceptions. The results indicate that nonradiative recombination process is governed not by single point defects, but by certain defects introduced with the incorporation of VGa, such as VGa-defect complexes.

  19. Neutron Lifetime Measurement Initiated at J-PARC/MLF/BL05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Genki; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Otono, Hidetoshi; Sumi, Naoyuki; Yamashita, Satoru; Katayama, Ryo; Yamada, Takahito; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Shimizu, Hirohiko; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Sakakibara, Risa; Sugino, Tomoaki; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Ino, Takashi; Mishima, Kenji; Taketani, Kaoru; Seki, Yoshichika; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime τn is one of the important parameters for the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) which predicts an abundance of the light elements in the early universe. However, the He/(H+He) ratio recently measured by Izotov et al. has been deviated from that of the BBN prediction. Thus a precise τn measurement is desired. Historically, there are two methods for τn measurement, and there exists 3.8 σ deviation between their results. We are therefore conducting the τn measurement at the J-PARC/MLF/BL05 by using a third method. In this experiment we count the number of decay electrons by using Time Projection Chamber (TPC). We expect 1% accuracy with the collected data in JFY 2014. In this presentation, we will report some analysis results and future plan.

  20. Positronics of radiation-induced effects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kozyukhin, S. A.; Shpotyuk, M.; Ingram, A.; Szatanik, R.

    2015-03-15

    Using As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and AsS{sub 2} glasses as an example, the principal possibility of using positron annihilation spectroscopy methods for studying the evolution of the free volume of hollow nanoobjects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors exposed to radiation is shown. The results obtained by measurements of the positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening of the annihilation line in reverse chronological order are in full agreement with the optical spectroscopy data in the region of the fundamental absorption edge, being adequately described within coordination defect-formation and physical-aging models.

  1. A measurement of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime at the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, Marcus Philip

    2007-07-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the lifetime of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ baryon, performed using data from proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ-$\\bar{v}$μX was reconstructed in approximately 1.3 fbμ-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector in 2002-2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A signal of 4437 ± 329 Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ- pairs was obtained, and the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime was measured using a binned X2 fit, which gives a value {tau}(Λ$0\\atop{b}$) = 1.290$+0.091\\atop{-1.110}$(stat)$+0.085\\atop{-0.091}$(syst) ps. This result is consistent with the world average and is one of the most precise measurements of this quantity.

  2. Recoil Distance Method Lifetime Measurements in 107Cd and 103Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andgren, K.; Ashley, S. F.; Regan, P. H.; McCutchan, E. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Amon, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Clark, R. M.; Erduran, M. N.; Gürdal, G.; Keyes, K. L.; Meyer, D. A.; Papenberg, A.; Pietralla, N.; Plettner, C.; Rainovski, G.; Ribas, R. V.; Thomas, N. J.; Vinson, J.; Warner, D. D.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.

    2006-04-01

    Preliminary lifetime values have been measured for a number of near-yrast states in the odd-A transitional nuclei 107Cd and 103Pd. The reaction used to populate the nuclei of interest was 98Mo(12C,3nxα)107Cd, 103Pd, with the beam delivered by the tandem accelerator of the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at an incident beam energy of 60 MeV. Our experiment was aimed at the investigation of collective excitations built on the unnatural parity, ν h11/2 orbital, specifically by measuring the B(E2) values of decays from the excited levels built on this intrinsic structure, using the Doppler Recoil Distance Method. We report lifetimes and associated transition probabilities for decays from the 15/2- and the 19/2- states in 107Cd and the first measurement of the 15/2- state in 103Pd. These results suggest that neither a simple rotational or vibrational interpretation is sufficient to explain the observed structures.

  3. A Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Lifetime via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The neutral pion radiative width has been measured to 8.411 eV ± 1.8% + 1.13% - 1.70% (lifetime = 7.826 ± 0.14 + 0.088 - 0.133 x 10-17 s) utilizing the Primakoff effect and roughly 4.9 to 5.5 GeV photons at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. The Hall B Photon Tagger, the Hall B Pair Spectrometer, a state of the art Hybrid Calorimter enabled precision incident photon energy measurement, photon flux measurement, and neutral pion identification, respectively. With these and other hardware and software tools, elastic neutral pion yields were extracted from the data. A well developed and understood simulation calculated geometric and software cut efficiency curves. The simulation also provided photo-pion production response functions to fit the experimental cross sections and extract the Primakoff cross section and thus the neutral pion radiative width and lifetime. Future work includes improving understanding of the nuclear incoherent process and any other background sources of elastic neutral pions in this data.

  4. Measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ωb- baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A proton-proton collision data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by LHCb at √{s }=7 and 8 TeV, is used to reconstruct 63 ±9 Ωb-→Ωc0π-, Ωc0→p K-K-π+ decays. Using the Ξb-→Ξc0π-, Ξc0→p K-K-π+ decay mode for calibration, the lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of the Ωb- baryon are measured to be τΩb-/τΞb-=1.11 ±0.16 ±0.03 , τΩb-=1.78 ±0.26 ±0.05 ±0.06 ps , where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and from the calibration mode (for τΩb- only). A measurement is also made of the mass difference, mΩb--mΞb-, and the corresponding Ωb- mass, which yields mΩb--mΞb-=247.4 ±3.2 ±0.5 MeV /c2 , mΩb-=6045.1 ±3.2 ±0.5 ±0.6 MeV /c2 . These results are consistent with previous measurements.

  5. Measurement of the Bs(0) → Ds-Ds+ and Bs(0) → D-Ds+ effective lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Warrington, N; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-03-21

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the B(s)(0) meson in the decay B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ effective lifetime is 1.379 ± 0.026 ± 0.017 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light B(s)(0) mass eigenstate of ΓL = 0.725 ± 0.014 ± 0.009 ps(-1). The B(s)(0) lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific B(s)(0)→ D-Ds+ decay to be 1.52 ± 0.15 ± 0.01 ps.

  6. Positron trapping at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dupasquier, A. ); Romero, R.; Somoza, A. )

    1993-10-01

    The standard positron trapping model has often been applied, as a simple approximation, to the interpretation of positron lifetime spectra in situations of diffusion-controlled trapping. This paper shows that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate, and presents a model based on the correct solution of the diffusion equation, in the version appropriate for studying positron trapping at grain boundaries. The model is used for the analysis of new experimental data on positron lifetime spectra in a fine-grained Al-Ca-Zn alloy. Previous results on similar systems are also discussed and reinterpreted. The analysis yields effective diffusion coefficients not far from the values known for the base metals of the alloys.

  7. Bulk Materials Analysis Using High-Energy Positron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Glade, S C; Asoka-Kumar, P; Nieh, T G; Sterne, P A; Wirth, B D; Dauskardt, R H; Flores, K M; Suh, D; Odette, G R

    2002-11-11

    This article reviews some recent materials analysis results using high-energy positron beams at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We are combining positron lifetime and orbital electron momentum spectroscopic methods to provide electron number densities and electron momentum distributions around positron annihilation sites. Topics covered include: correlation of positron annihilation characteristics with structural and mechanical properties of bulk metallic glasses, compositional studies of embrittling features in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel, pore characterization in Zeolites, and positron annihilation characteristics in alkali halides.

  8. Measuring excited state lifetime of Rb atoms with pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Boiko, D. L.

    2015-08-31

    A technique for measuring the excited state lifetime τ{sub ex} of optical transitions in alkali atoms is presented. It is a form of pump-probe technique based on time-resolved optical transmission through the atomic vapor cell. This technique can serve as an alternative to the traditionally used time-resolved photofluorescence methods when measuring alkali vapor cells with heavily quenched fluorescence, where the τ{sub ex} is expected to be on the order of a few nanoseconds, and the highly sensitive fluorescence detectors with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution that are required may not be available. We use this technique to measure the τ{sub ex} of Rb atoms in vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures.

  9. Present and future experiments using bright low-energy positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Bright slow positron beams enable not only experiments with drastically reduced measurement time and improved signal-to-noise ratio but also the realization of novel experimental techniques. In solid state physics and materials science positron beams are usually applied for the depth dependent analysis of vacancy-like defects and their chemical surrounding using positron lifetime and (coincident) Doppler broadening spectroscopy. For surface studies, annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy allows the analysis of the elemental composition in the topmost atomic layer, and the atomic positions at the surface can be determined by positron diffraction with outstanding accuracy. In fundamental research low-energy positron beams are used for the production of e.g. cold positronium or positronium negative ions. All the aforementioned experiments benefit from the high intensity of present positron beam facilities. In this paper, we scrutinize the technical constraints limiting the achievable positron intensity and the available kinetic energy at the sample position. Current efforts and future developments towards the generation of high intensity spin-polarized slow positron beams paving the way for new positron experiments are discussed.

  10. Measurement of lifetimes in Fe,6462,Co,6361 , and 59Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klintefjord, M.; Ljungvall, J.; Görgen, A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Blazhev, A.; Clément, E.; de France, G.; Delaroche, J.-P.; Désesquelles, P.; Dewald, A.; Doherty, D. T.; Fransen, C.; Gengelbach, A.; Georgiev, G.; Girod, M.; Goasduff, A.; Gottardo, A.; Hadyńska-KlÈ©k, K.; Jacquot, B.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Korichi, A.; Lemasson, A.; Libert, J.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Navin, A.; Nyberg, J.; Pérez-Vidal, R. M.; Roccia, S.; Sahin, E.; Stefan, I.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Zielińska, M.; Barrientos, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Boston, A.; Charles, L.; Ciemala, M.; Dudouet, J.; Eberth, J.; Gadea, A.; González, V.; Harkness-Brennan, L.; Hess, H.; Jungclaus, A.; Korten, W.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Million, B.; Pullia, A.; Ralet, D.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Salsac, M. D.; Sanchis, E.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.

    2017-02-01

    Lifetimes of the 41+ states in Fe,6462 and the 11 /21- states in Co,6361 and 59Mn were measured at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) facility by using the Advanced Gamma Tracking Array (AGATA) and the large-acceptance variable mode spectrometer (VAMOS++). The states were populated through multinucleon transfer reactions with a 238U beam impinging on a 64Ni target, and lifetimes in the picosecond range were measured by using the recoil distance Doppler shift method. The data show an increase of collectivity in the iron isotopes approaching N =40 . The reduction of the subshell gap between the ν 2 p1 /2 and ν 1 g9 /2 orbitals leads to an increased population of the quasi-SU(3) pair (ν 1 g9 /2,ν 2 d5 /2 ), which causes an increase in quadrupole collectivity. This is not observed for the cobalt isotopes with N <40 for which the neutron subshell gap is larger due to the repulsive monopole component of the tensor nucleon-nucleon interaction. The extracted experimental B (E 2 ) values are compared with large-scale shell-model calculations and with beyond-mean-field calculations with the Gogny D1S interaction. A good agreement between calculations and experimental values is found, and the results demonstrate in particular the spectroscopic quality of the Lenzi, Nowacki, Poves, and Sieja (LNPS) shell-model interaction.

  11. A new differentially pumped plunger device to measure excited-state lifetimes in proton emitting nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Smith, A. J.; McFarlane, A.; Twist, V.; Alharshan, G. A.; Procter, M. G.; Braunroth, T.; Dewald, A.; Ellinger, E.; Fransen, C.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.; Joss, D. T.; Saygi, B.; McPeake, C. G.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Uusitalo, J.

    2013-04-01

    A new plunger device has been designed and built to measure the lifetimes of unbound states in exotic nuclei beyond the proton drip-line. The device has been designed to work in both vacuum and dilute-gas environments made possible through the introduction of a low-voltage stepping motor. DPUNS will be used in conjunction with the gas-filled separator RITU and the vacuum separator MARA at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, to measure the lifetimes of excited states with low population cross-sections. This is achieved by eliminating the need for a carbon foil to isolate the helium gas of RITU from the beam line thus reducing the background from beam-foil reactions. The inclusion of a high-sampling rate data acquisition card increases further the sensitivity of the device. The plunger will be used to address many key facets of nuclear structure physics with particular emphasis on the effect of deformation on proton emission rates.

  12. Interferences in and lifetime measurement of a resonance electronic Raman effect using tunable pulsed laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicollin, D.; Koningstein, J. A.

    1980-07-01

    The excitation profile for the intensity of electronic Raman transitions of terbium aluminum garnet (TbAlG) in the spectral range of 483.0-680.0 nm is reported. The electronic Raman transitions take place between the crystal field levels of the split 7F 6 ground manifold of TbAlG with shifts of 73 cm -1 and 83 cm -1 and the electronic Raman process is induced with tunable pulsed and fixed wavelength cw lasers. The tunability of the former was employed to obtain detailed information of the behaviour of the Raman intensity if the wavelength of the exciting source is tuned throughout the region of 483.0-490.0 nm where 5Da 4 ← 7F 6 absorptions of TbAlG occur and the data reveal the occurrence of interference effects. We also report measurements of the shape of the pulse — due to resonance enhanced electronic Raman scattered light — in real time. These studies reveal that the lifetime of the resonating state (which is responsible for the enhancement of the Raman intensity) as determined from the tailing end of the said pulse is within experimental error equal to the lifetime τ = 33.5 ± 1 μs of this state measured in a direct way from the intensity decay of an appropriate fluorescence transition of TbAlG.

  13. Precision excited-state lifetime measurements of neutron-rich Li isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, C.; Lister, C. J.; Wilson, G. L.; McCutchan, E. A.; Hackman, G.; Bowry, M.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Evitts, L. J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Henderson, J.; Kurkjian, A.; Measures, J. P.; Moukaddam, M.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Smallcombe, J.; Smith, J. K.; Southall, D.; Williams, M.; Mitchell, A. J.; Wu, C. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Recent successes with ab initio calculations are allowing increasingly subtle nuclear phenomena to be investigated, such as Δ-isobar and meson exchange effects which are necessary to reproduce M 1 properties of nuclei. In order to guide such explorations, precise experimental data are required to discriminate between various theoretical descriptions. The lithium isotopes, which are dominated by M 1 spin-flip transitions, provide an ideal testing ground for such studies. We have performed lifetime measurements of the excited states of 7,8Li, as well as explored the feasibility of such an experiment on 9Li, to provide precise data on the M 1 transition matrix elements in these nuclei. The experiment used the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method to measure the lifetimes at TRIUMF with TIGRESS, with the excited states populated by inverse (d , p) reactions. Preliminary results from the analysis will be presented. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Grants DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  14. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  15. Measurement of the Average $B^{0}_{s}$ Lifetime in the Decay $B^{0}_{s} \\to J/\\Psi\\Phi$

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, Thilo

    2003-01-01

    The lifetime difference between the long (CP odd) and short (CP even) lived components of the Bg meson is currently predicted to be of the order of 10 % in the Standard Model. It has been suggested that the decay Bg —>• J/\\|> 4) is predominantly CP even and thus the measured average lifetime could be shorter than the lifetime measured in the inclusive decay modes. We present a measurement of the average lifetime of the 6° meson in its decay Eg —>• J/4> cj), with J/\\|) —> M.+ M.~ and cj) —>• K+K-. During January 2002 and August 2003 the CDF experiment at the Tevatron has been exposed to about 135 pb" 1 of pp collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of A/S = 1.96 TeV. In the data sample collected with the J/\\Jj dimuon trigger we fully reconstruct about 125 Bg —> J/\\J) (J) candidates with precision silicon information. This is currently the largest exclusive Bg sample. We perform a fit to the proper decay time information to extract the average Bg lifetime and simultaneously use the mass information to disentangle signal from background. For cross-checks we measure the lifetime in the higher statistics modes Bj -» J/\\J> K* and B° —> J/4> K*°, which both have similar decay topologies and kinematics. We obtain r(B°s -> J/\\|> cf>) = (1.31±5:l3(stat.) ± 0.02(syst.)) ps , which is currently the best single measurement of the Bg lifetime and is consistent with other measurements. This result is not accurate enough to establish the existence of a possible significant lifetime difference between the CP odd and even states.

  16. Positron microprobe at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka, P; Howell, R; Stoeffl, W

    1998-11-01

    The electron linac based positron source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. We are building a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with sub-micron resolution. The widely spaced and intense positron packets from the tungsten moderator at the end of the 100 MeV LLNL linac are captured and trapped in a magnetic bottle. The positrons are then released in 1 ns bunches at a 20 MHz repetition rate. With a three-stage re-moderation we will compress the cm-sized original beam to a 1 micro-meter diameter final spot on the target. The buncher will compress the arrival time of positrons on the target to less than 100 ps. A detector array with up to 60 BaF2 crystals in paired coincidence will measure the annihilation radiation with high efficiency and low background. The energy of the positrons can be varied from less than 1 keV up to 50 keV.

  17. Positron annihilation in superconducting 123 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, M.; Manuel, A.A.; Erb, A. . Dept. of Physics of Condensed Matter)

    1998-12-20

    After a brief review of the theory of angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR), the authors illustrate experimental principles and give examples of successful determination of electron momentum density (EMD) and of positron lifetime in solids. The central question which the authors try to answer concerns the contribution of positron spectroscopy to the knowledge and understanding of the new high temperature superconducting oxides. They find that in these oxides also, partially filled bands exist and they can observe parts of their Fermi surface and measure lifetimes in accordance with band theoretical calculations. There are characteristic differences, however. The intensity of the anisotropy of the ACAR signal is below theoretical expectation and signals depend on sample preparation. Recent studies by the Geneva group have concerned dependence of the signals on impurities, on oxygen content and on the thermal history of preparation. Of particular interest are correlations between the variations of these signals and between the variations of structural and transport properties in these substances. Besides deliberate additions of impurities, the Geneva group also reports progress in the preparations of samples of highest purity (barium zirconate crucibles). The alloy series Pr[sub x]Y[sub 1[minus]x]Ba[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus][delta

  18. Centrifugal stretching from lifetime measurements in the 170Hf ground state band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. K.; Werner, V.; Terry, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Petkov, P.; Berant, Z.; Casperson, R. J.; Heinz, A.; Henning, G.; Lüttke, R.; Qian, J.; Shoraka, B.; Rainovski, G.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R.

    2013-04-01

    Centrifugal stretching in the deformed rare-earth nucleus 170Hf is investigated using high-precision lifetime measurements, performed with the New Yale Plunger Device at Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University. Excited states were populated in the fusion-evaporation reaction 124Sn(50Ti,4n)170Hf at a beam energy of 195 MeV. Recoil distance doppler shift data were recorded for the ground state band through the J=16+ level. The measured B(E2) values and transition quadrupole moments improve on existing data and show increasing β deformation in the ground state band of 170Hf. The results are compared to descriptions by a rigid rotor and by the confined β-soft rotor model.

  19. Lifetime measurement for the possible antimagnetic rotation band in 101Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Hayakawa, T.; Oshima, M.; Toh, Y.; Osa, A.; Matsuda, M.; Shizuma, T.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Kusakari, H.; Morikawa, T.; Gan, Z. G.; Czosnyka, T.

    2015-08-01

    Lifetime measurements were made for the ν h11 /2 band in 101Pd , which had been interpreted as a possible antimagnetic rotation band based on the comparison of I -ω behavior with the calculation of a semiclassical particle-rotor model in our previous study. Doppler broadened line shapes were analyzed for the decaying γ rays in the band following the reaction 68Zn (37Cl ,1p3n)101Pd . The semiclassical particle-rotor model was modified to reproduce both the I -ω plot and the B (E 2 ) behavior simultaneously for the antimagnetic rotation bands in Pd and Cd nuclei, for which B (E 2 ) values had been measured so far. Reasonable agreements between the experiment and the calculation were obtained. It is concluded that the lower part of the ν h11 /2 band in 101Pd can be interpreted as an antimagnetic rotor.

  20. RDDS lifetime measurements of low-lying superdeformed states in {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, R.; Dewald, A.; Kruecken, R.

    1996-12-31

    The lifetimes of three low-lying states in the superdeformed (SD) yrast band of {sup 194}Hg were measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. The deduced transition quadrupole moments, Q{sub t}, equal those extracted from a DSAM measurement for the high-lying states of the band corroborate the assumption that the decay out of SD bands does not strongly affect the structure of the corresponding states. By a simple mixing-model the decay can be described assuming a very small admixture of normal-deformed (ND) states to the decaying SD states. The deduced ND mixing amplitudes for the yrast SD bands in {sup 192,194}Hg and {sup 194}Pb are presented along with average transition quadrupole moments for the lower parts of the excited SD bands.

  1. SPS Outstanding Student Award for Undergraduate Research Talk: Lifetime Measurements and Deformation in 79Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Kaye, Robert; Arora, S. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Doring, J.; Sun, Y.; Baldwin, T. D.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Cooper, M. W.; Gerbick, S. M.; Wiedeking, M.; Hoffman, C. R.; Pavan, J.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Riley, L. A.

    2008-04-01

    High-spin states in ^79Sr were produced following the ^54Fe(^28Si, 2pn) fusion-evaporation reaction using a beam kinetic energy of 90 MeV at the Florida State University (FSU) Tandem-Linac particle accelerator facility, and the resulting de-exciting γ rays were detected with the FSU array of 10 Compton-suppressed high-purity Ge detectors comprised of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The synthesized nuclei were stopped completely in the target, resulting in Doppler-shifted γ-ray line shapes that could be analyzed using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The experimental line shapes were acquired at detection angles of 35 and 145 , and the resulting Doppler-shifted peaks were analyzed to extract the lifetime of their parent states. In all, 23 lifetimes were measured in three separate band structures using this method, and then used to infer transition quadrupole moments (Qt) and quadrupole deformations (β2) using the rotational model. The resulting Qt values indicated a high degree of collectivity and deformation in all three observed sequences of excited states (bands) with only a modest decline in collectivity with increasing angular momentum. The results show good qualitative agreement with the predictions of both cranked Woods-Saxon (CWS) and projected shell model (PSM) calculations. In addition, the pattern of excited energy states and their de-exciting gamma-ray transitions (level scheme) was re-examined and compared to the most recent study of ^79Sr using γ-γ coincidence measurements, intensity measurements, and directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) ratios in addition to the lifetime measurements. Overall, the level scheme was verified, with the exception of the re-arrangement of one transition. The band based on the intrinsic d5/2 single-particle orbital from the shell model, was found to have the largest average deformation (β2,ave = 0.41) among the three observed bands, in agreement with the CWS and PSM

  2. Shot noise as a measure of the lifetime and energy splitting of Majorana bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, Hai-Feng; Guo, Zhen; Ke, Sha-Sha; Zhang, Huai-Wu; Guo, Yong

    2015-04-28

    We propose a scheme to measure the lifetime and energy splitting of a pair of Majorana bound states at the ends of a superconducting nanowire by using the shot noise in a dynamical channel blockade system. A quantum dot is coupled to one end of the wire and connected with two electron reservoirs. It is found that a finite Majorana energy splitting tends to produce a super-Poissonian shot noise, while Majorana relaxation process relieves the dynamical channel blockade and suppresses the noise Fano factor. When the dot energy level locates in the middle of the gap of topological superconductor, the Fano factor is independent on Majorana lifetime and Majorana energy splitting is thus extracted. For a finite energy splitting, we could evaluate the Majorana relaxation rate from the suppression of Fano factor. Under a realistic condition, the expected resolution of Majorana energy splitting and its relaxation rate calculated from our model are about 1μeV and 0.01−1μeV, respectively.

  3. Lifetime Measurements of ^170Hf and a test of the Confined Beta Soft Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. K.; Werner, V.; Heinz, A.; Terry, J. R.; Qian, J.; Winkler, R.; Casperson, R.; Williams, E.; Berant, Z.; L"Uttke, R.; Shoraka, B.; Henning, G.

    2009-10-01

    Significant deviations from rigid rotor model energy level predictions have been known to occur in rare earth nuclei. Recently, it was shown these deviations may be caused by centrifugal stretching effects within the nucleus [1]. New geometrical models have been proposed that account for centrifugal stretching, such as the confined beta soft model (CBS). We present the results from a high precision lifetime experiment performed with the New Yale Plunger Device at WNSL, Yale University. The ground state band of ^170Hf was measured through the J=12^+ level using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift method. Excited states were populated in the ^124Sn(^50Ti,γ)^170Hf fusion evaporation reaction. Using the lifetimes, the B(E2) values and the quadrupole deformation parameter are determined. Centrifugal stretching is observed as an increased deviation in energy at higher spins in 170Hf. These results are compared to theoretical predictions from the CBS rotor model. Supported by grant DE-FG02-91ER40609.[4pt] [1] Costin et al, Phys.Rev. C 79, 024307 (2009)

  4. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-05

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  5. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D.; Wilkinson, Martin G.; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A. E.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening. PMID:25798136

  6. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D; Wilkinson, Martin G; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A E; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  7. Precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Guan, H.; Qian, Y.; Gao, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca. The measurement was performed using a high-efficiency quantum-state detection technique to monitor quantum jumps and a high-precision and highly synchronous measurement sequence for laser control. A feature in our measurement is the pumping rate of the 729-nm laser that was corrected in a real-time way. The 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime was obtained through the measurement of the spontaneous decay rate after incoherent shelving of the ion to the 3 d 3/2 2D state with a wait time. Systematic errors, such as collisions with background gases, heating effects, impurity components, the shelving and pumping rates, and state detection, were carefully analyzed and estimated. We determined an improved value of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime to be τ3 /2=1.195 (8 ) s. Furthermore, the 3 d 3/2 2D →4 s 1/2 2S quadrupole transition matrix element was measured to be Sk i=7.936 (26 ) e a02 , and the ratio between the lifetimes of 3 d 2D3 /2 and 3 d 2D5 /2 was determined to be 1.018(11). Our method can be universally applied to lifetime measurements of other single ions and atoms with a similar structure.

  8. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed.

  9. Microscopic imaging of intracellular calcium in live cells using lifetime-based ratiometric measurements of Oregon Green BAPTA-1.

    PubMed

    Lattarulo, Carli; Thyssen, Diana; Kuchibholta, Kishore V; Hyman, Bradley T; Bacskaiq, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger that has important functions in normal neuronal function. The pathology of Alzheimer's disease has been shown to alter calcium homeostasis in neurons and astrocytes. Several calcium dye indicators are available to measure intracellular calcium within cells, including Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB-1). Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we adapted this single wavelength calcium dye into a ratiometric dye to allow quantitative imaging of cellular calcium. We used this approach for in vitro calibrations, single-cell microscopy, high-throughput imaging in automated plate readers, and in single cells in the intact living brain. While OGB is a commonly used fluorescent dye for imaging calcium qualitatively, there are distinct advantages to using a ratiometric approach, which allows quantitative determinations of calcium that are independent of dye concentration. Taking advantage of the distinct lifetime contrast of the calcium-free and calcium-bound forms of OGB, we used time-domain lifetime measurements to generate calibration curves for OGB lifetime ratios as a function of calcium concentration. In summary, we demonstrate approaches using commercially available tools to measure calcium concentrations in live cells at multiple scales using lifetime contrast. These approaches are broadly applicable to other fluorescent readouts that exhibit lifetime contrast and serve as powerful alternatives to spectral or intensity readouts in multiplexing experiments.

  10. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed. PMID:28091553

  11. Positron sensing of distribution of defects in depth materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchishin, A. I.; Kupchishin, A. A.; Voronova, N. A.; Kirdyashkin, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    It was developed a non-destructive method of positron sensing, which allows to determine the distribution of defects in the depth of the material. From the analysis we can conclude that the angular distribution curves of annihilation photons (well as and on the characteristics in experiments on the lifetime, 3γ - angular correlation, Doppler effect) is influenced by three main factors: a) The distribution of defects in the depth of the material, their dimensions as well as parameters of the interaction of positrons with defects. With increasing the concentration of defects the intensity Jγ(a, ξ) varies more; b) Modification of the energy spectrum of slow positrons due to the influence of defects, wherein the spectrum of positrons becomes softer, and the average energy of the positron annihilation is reduced; c) Deformation of the momentum distribution of the electrons in the region of defect. The energy spectrum of electrons is also becomes softer, and the average energy of the electrons (on which positrons annihilate) is less. The experimentally were measured spectra of photons in the zone of annihilation and were calculated the distribution of defects in depth for a number of metals.

  12. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosive molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    McKenzie-Coe, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-08-21

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailor the stability of the molecular adduct complex. The flexibility of TIMS to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments/low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with high confidence levels.

  13. Lifetime measurements of yrast states in {sup 162}Yb and {sup 166}Hf

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchan, E.A.; Casten, R.F.; Ai, H.; Amro, H.; Heinz, A.; Meyer, D.A.; Plettner, C.; Qian, J.; Ressler, J.J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R.; Zamfir, N.V.; Babilon, M.; Brenner, D.S.; Guerdal, G.; Hughes, R.O.; Thomas, N.J.

    2006-03-15

    Lifetime measurements of yrast levels in {sup 162}Yb and {sup 166}Hf were performed using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method in coincidence mode. Excited states in {sup 162}Yb and {sup 166}Hf were populated via the reactions {sup 116}Cd({sup 50}Ti, 4n) and {sup 122}Sn({sup 48}Ti, 4n), respectively. The resulting B(E2) values are compared with the X(5) critical point model predictions and interacting boson approximation (IBA) model calculations. The X(5) model provides a reasonable description of the yrast B(E2) values in {sup 166}Hf, whereas the IBA fails to reproduce the transition strengths from the higher spin levels. In {sup 162}Yb, some transitions agree with the X(5) predictions while others are more consistent with the predictions of the IBA or a deformed symmetric rotor.

  14. Measurement of the B(0) and B(+) meson lifetimes with fully reconstructed hadronic final states.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D W; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weideman, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, L; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Vaugnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; De Silva, A; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-11-12

    The B(0) and B(+) meson lifetimes have been measured in e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected in 1999 and 2000 with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. Events are selected in which one B meson is fully reconstructed in a hadronic final state while the second B meson is reconstructed inclusively. A combined fit to the B(0) and the B(+) decay time difference distributions yields tau(B(0)) = 1.546+/-0.032(stat)+/-0.022(syst) ps, tau(B(+)) = 1.673+/-0.032(stat)+/-0.023(syst) ps, and tau(B(+))/tau(B(0)) = 1.082+/-0.026(stat)+/-0.012(syst).

  15. Shape coexistence from lifetime and branching-ratio measurements in 68,70Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, B. P.; Prokop, C. J.; Liddick, S. N.; Al-Shudifat, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Chen, J.; Chiara, C. J.; David, H. M.; Dombos, A. C.; Go, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Harker, J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Larson, N.; Lauritsen, T.; Lewis, R.; Quinn, S. J.; Recchia, F.; Spyrou, A.; Suchyta, S.; Walters, W. B.; Zhu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Shape coexistence near closed-shell nuclei, whereby states associated with deformed shapes appear at relatively low excitation energy alongside spherical ones, is indicative of the rapid change in structure that can occur with the addition or removal of a few protons or neutrons. Near 68Ni (Z = 28, N = 40), the identification of shape coexistence hinges on hitherto undetermined transition rates to and from low-energy 0+ states. In 68,70Ni, new lifetimes and branching ratios have been measured. These data enable quantitative descriptions of the 0+ states through the deduced transition rates and serve as sensitive probes for characterizing their nuclear wave functions. The results are compared to, and consistent with, large-scale shell-model calculations which predict shape coexistence. With the firm identification of this phenomenon near 68Ni, shape coexistence is now observed in all currently accessible regions of the nuclear chart with closed proton shells and mid-shell neutrons.

  16. Lifetime Measurement of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} State in {sup 20}C

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, M.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Paschalis, S.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Gros, S.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Lee, I. Y.; Starosta, K.; Baugher, T.; Gade, A.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Voss, P.; Walsh, K. A.; Bazin, D.; Grinyer, G. F.; Weisshaar, D.

    2011-09-02

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state in the near-dripline nucleus {sup 20}C. The deduced value of {tau}{sub 2{sub 1}{sup +}}=9.8{+-}2.8(stat){sub -1.1}{sup +0.5}(syst) ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2;2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub g.s.}{sup +})=7.5{sub -1.7}{sup +3.0}(stat){sub -0.4}{sup +1.0}(syst) e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

  17. Lifetime measurement of the 2(1)+ state in 20C.

    PubMed

    Petri, M; Fallon, P; Macchiavelli, A O; Paschalis, S; Starosta, K; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Cartegni, L; Clark, R M; Crawford, H L; Cromaz, M; Dewald, A; Gade, A; Grinyer, G F; Gros, S; Hackstein, M; Jeppesen, H B; Lee, I Y; McDaniel, S; Miller, D; Rajabali, M M; Ratkiewicz, A; Rother, W; Voss, P; Walsh, K A; Weisshaar, D; Wiedeking, M; Brown, B A

    2011-09-02

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2(1)+ state in the near-dripline nucleus 20C. The deduced value of τ(2(1)+)=9.8±2.8(stat)(-1.1)(+0.5)(syst)  ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2; 2(1)+→0(g.s.)+)=7.5(-1.7)(+3.0)(stat)(-0.4)(+1.0)(syst)  e2  fm4 in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

  18. Determining a fluorophore's transition dipole moment from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solvents of varying refractive index.

    PubMed

    Chung, Pei-Hua; Tregidgo, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-11-11

    The transition dipole moment of organic dyes PM546 and rhodamine 123 is calculated from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solutions of different refractive index. A model proposed by Toptygin et al (2002 J. Phys. Chem. B 106 3724-34) provides a relationship between the radiative rate constant and refractive index of the solvent, and allows the electronic transition dipole moments to be found: it is (7.1  ±  1.1) D for PM546 which matches that found in the literature, and (8.1  ±  0.1) D for rhodamine 123. Toptygin's model goes further in predicting the shape of the fluorescent dye and here we predict the shape of PM546 and rhodamine 123 to be ellipsoidal.

  19. SU-E-T-230: Measurement of Proton-Activated Positron Emission with PRESAGE 3-D Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M; Mawlawi, O; Ibbott, G; Adamovics, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measurement of positron emission following proton beam irradiation of a target has been studied as a method of in-vivo dosimetry. Relative dosimetry studies between a phantom and treatment plan are susceptible to range uncertainties from material heterogeneities and setup error. By using the radiochromic polyurethane dosimeter PRESAGE, we can correlate the proton dose distribution to the PET activity measurement within a single detector. The PRESAGE formulation used was developed for high-LET proton radiotherapy, has similar density and RLSP to tissue, and consists of a greater carbon component, which gives it a higher positron signal than many other 3D detectors. Methods: Three cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters were irradiated semi-uniformly to 500 cGy with 180- MeV protons. The beam was directed along the dosimeter axis and delivered a 2-cm SOBP at the center of the dosimeter. The dosimeters were rushed to a nearby PET/CT where imaging began within 15 minutes, less than a single half-life of 11C. A 3-hr measurement captured the full activation decay. Afterwards, the dose profiles were measured by optical-CT. A direct comparison between the measured dose and the positron emission was performed using CERR software. Results: The correlations between dose distributions and PET activity were consistent with previous studies in that the proximal region of the SOBP displayed the highest activity. The spatial distributions between the dose and activity were similar. Along the central axis of the beam, we found a shift in the distal 80% of 1 cm. The lateral profile showed good agreement between dose and activity. PET imaging times between 30-min and 3-hrs showed <5% discrepancy. Conclusion: PRESAGE dosimeters offer a strong and unique potential to accurately correlate dosimetric and PET activation information. Implementation in an anthropomorphic phantom could be used to study representative treatment plans. NIH grant 5R01CA100835.

  20. Measurement of the bottom hadron lifetime at the Z sup 0 resonancce

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, D.H.

    1992-06-01

    We have measured the bottom hadron lifetime from b{bar b} events produced at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Using the precision vertex detectors of the Mark II detector at the Stanford Linear Collider, we developed an impact parameter tag to identify bottom hadrons. The vertex tracking system resolved impact parameters to 30 {mu}m for high momentum tracks, and 70 {mu}m for tracks with a momentum of 1 GeV. We selected B hadrons with an efficiency of 40% and a sample purity of 80%, by requiring there be at least two tracks in a single jet that significantly miss the Z{sup 0} decay vertex. From a total of 208 hadronic Z{sup 0} events collected by the Mark II detector in 1990, we tagged 53 jets, of which 22 came from 11 double-tagged events. The jets opposite the tagged ones, referred as the untagged'' sample, are rich in B hadrons and unbiased in B decay times. The variable {Sigma}{delta} is the sum of impact parameters from tracks in the jet, and contains vital information on the B decay time. We measured the B lifetime from a one-parameter likelihood fit to the untagged {Sigma}{delta} distribution, obtaining {tau}{sub b} = 1.53{sub {minus}0.45}{sup +0.55}{plus minus}0.16 ps which agrees with the current world average. The first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error was dominated by uncertainties in the track resolution function. As a check, we also obtained consistent results using the {Sigma}{delta} distribution from the tagged jets and from the entire hadronic sample without any bottom enrichment.

  1. Measurement of the bottom hadron lifetime at the Z{sup 0} resonancce

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, D.H.

    1992-06-01

    We have measured the bottom hadron lifetime from b{bar b} events produced at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Using the precision vertex detectors of the Mark II detector at the Stanford Linear Collider, we developed an impact parameter tag to identify bottom hadrons. The vertex tracking system resolved impact parameters to 30 {mu}m for high momentum tracks, and 70 {mu}m for tracks with a momentum of 1 GeV. We selected B hadrons with an efficiency of 40% and a sample purity of 80%, by requiring there be at least two tracks in a single jet that significantly miss the Z{sup 0} decay vertex. From a total of 208 hadronic Z{sup 0} events collected by the Mark II detector in 1990, we tagged 53 jets, of which 22 came from 11 double-tagged events. The jets opposite the tagged ones, referred as the ``untagged`` sample, are rich in B hadrons and unbiased in B decay times. The variable {Sigma}{delta} is the sum of impact parameters from tracks in the jet, and contains vital information on the B decay time. We measured the B lifetime from a one-parameter likelihood fit to the untagged {Sigma}{delta} distribution, obtaining {tau}{sub b} = 1.53{sub {minus}0.45}{sup +0.55}{plus_minus}0.16 ps which agrees with the current world average. The first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error was dominated by uncertainties in the track resolution function. As a check, we also obtained consistent results using the {Sigma}{delta} distribution from the tagged jets and from the entire hadronic sample without any bottom enrichment.

  2. CFCl3 (CFC-11): UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence measurements and the impact on its atmospheric lifetime and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-09-01

    (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95-230 nm) and temperature (216-296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than that currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The calculated global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 ± 0.7 years (2σ uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current UV spectrum recommendations.

  3. CFCI3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime and Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-01-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95 - 230 nm) and temperature (216 - 296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The obtained global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 +- 0.7 years (2 sigma uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current spectrum recommendations

  4. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  5. Four-dimensional positron age-momentum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Ulrich; Löwe, Benjamin; Dickmann, Marcel; Mitteneder, Johannes; Sperr, Peter; Egger, Werner; Reiner, Markus; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-11-01

    We have performed first four-dimensional age-momentum correlation (4D-AMOC) measurements at a pulsed high intensity positron micro beam and determined the absolute value of the three-dimensional momentum of the electrons annihilating with the positrons in coincidence with the positron age in the sample material. We operated two position sensitive detectors in coincidence to measure the annihilation radiation: a pixelated HPGe-detector and a microchannel plate image intensifier with a CeBr3 scintillator pixel array. The transversal momentum resolution of the 4D-AMOC setup was measured to be about 17 × 10-3 {m}0c (FWHM) and was circa 3.5 times larger than the longitudinal momentum resolution. The total time resolution was 540 ps (FWHM). We measured two samples: a gold foil and a carbon tape at a positron implantation energy of 2 keV. For each sample discrete electron momentum states and their respective positron lifetimes were extracted.

  6. Direct measurement of S2 -- S0 fluorescence lifetimes and anisotropy of tetraphenylporphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, Gagik G.; Tran-Thi, Thu-Hoa; Gustavsson, Thomas

    1999-12-01

    Various tetraphenylporphyrins (zinc, magnesium, free base) were excited to the upper electronic levels of the Soret band with the second harmonic of a mode-locked Ti-sapphire laser (394 nm). An up-conversion fluorescence set-up with the time resolution of 120 fs was used to measure the decay times of the S2 fluorescence in conjunction with the risetime of the S1 fluorescence. The depopulation of the excited electronic state S2 was studied as a function of the metal ion and the solvent. The lifetimes of the electronic S2 level, measured for ZnTPP and MgTPP in different solvents were (tau) equals 1.4 - 3.4 ps. The depopulation channel from S2 to S1 was studied by measuring simultaneously the decay of S2 and the rise of S1 fluorescence. The rate constant of the process can be correlated to the energy gap between the S2 and S1 levels, which depends on the nature of the metal ions and solvents. The rotational dynamics in the Soret band was also studied by measuring the anisotropy of S2 ---> S0 fluorescence. The anisotropy decay of S2 fluorescence was found to be biexponential, with a fast component around 100 fs and a slow one (t >> 10 ps), attributed to the partial dephasing of the degenerate energy levels of the S2 state and to rotational diffusion, respectively.

  7. Measurement of the B meson Lifetimes with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Uozumi, Satoru

    2006-01-01

    The lifetimes of the B-, $\\bar{B}$0 and $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mesons are measured using partially reconstructed semileptonic decays. Following semileptonic decay processes and their charge conjugates are used for this analysis: B-/B0 → ℓ-vD0X; B-/B0 → ℓ-vD*+X; B$0\\atop{s}$ → ℓ-vD $+\\atop{s}$x, where ℓ- denotes either a muon or electron. The data are collected during 2002-2004 by the 8 GeV single lepton triggers in CDF Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Corresponding integrated luminosity is about 260 and 360 pbℓ-1 used for the B-/B0 and B$0\\atop{s}$ lifetime analyses, respectively. With the single lepton triggers, events which contain a muon or electron with a transverse momentum greater than 8 GeV/c are selected. For these lepton candidates, further lepton identification cuts are applied to improve purity of the B semileptonic decay signal. After the lepton selection, three types of charm mesons associated with the lepton candidates are reconstructed. Following exclusive decay modes are used for the charm meson reconstruction: D0 → K-π+; D*+ → D0π$+\\atop{s}$, followed by D0→ K-π+; D$+\\atop{s}$ → Φπ++K-. Here π$+\\atop{s}$ denotes a slow pion from D*+ decay. Species of the reconstructed charm meson identify the parent B meson species. However in the B-/B0 semileptonic decays, both mesons decay into the identical lepton + D0 final state. To solve this mixture of the B components in the D0 sample, they adopt the following method: First among the inclusive D0 sample, they look for the D*+ → D0 π$+\\atop{s}$ signal. The inclusive D

  8. Study of radiation damage in ODS steels by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, I.; Bouhaddane, A.; Dománková, M.; Slugeň, V.; Wall, D.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Microstructure of various oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels with 15% chromium content was studied in term of vacancy defects presence and their accumulation after defined irradiation treatment, respectively. Studied materials originated from Kyoto University and studied via IAEA collaborative project. Samples were characterized “as received” by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and their microstructure was examined by transmission electron microscopy as well. Samples were afterwards irradiated in Washington State University Nuclear Radiation Center via a strong gamma source (6TBq). Damage induced by gamma irradiation was evaluated by positron lifetime measurements in emphasis on defect accumulation in the materials. We have demonstrated strong defect production induced by gamma irradiation which results from positron measurement data.

  9. Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Steven W.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

  10. Positron annihilation and constant photocurrent method measurements on a-Si:H films: A comparative approach to defect identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordo, P. M.; Ferreira Marques, M. F.; Lopes Gil, C.; de Lima, A. P.; Lavareda, G.; Nunes de Carvalho, C.; Amaral, A.; Kajcsos, Zs.

    2007-02-01

    Defect structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-films was studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), whereas the density of states below the Fermi level was measured by constant photocurrent method (CPM). Divacancies and large vacancy clusters were identified as the main defects present in these films, with relative concentrations strongly dependent on the rf-power. Correlation between PAS, CPM results and I( V) characteristics of solar cells suggests the creation of energy levels above the Fermi energy, not observable by CPM, related to large vacancy clusters.

  11. Measurement of the B-cmeson lifetime in the decay B-c→J/ψπ⁻

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; ...

    2013-01-02

    The lifetime of the B-c meson is measured using 272 exclusive B-c→J/ψ(→μ⁺μ⁻)π⁻ decays reconstructed in data from proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb⁻¹ recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The lifetime of the B-cmeson is measured to be τ(B-c)=0.452±0.048(stat)±0.027(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the B-c meson lifetime in a fully reconstructed hadronic channel, and it agrees with previous results and has comparable precision.

  12. The TRIple PLunger for EXotic beams TRIPLEX for excited-state lifetime measurement studies on rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, H.; Dewald, A.; Braunroth, T.; Fransen, C.; Smalley, D.; Lemasson, A.; Morse, C.; Whitmore, K.; Loelius, C.

    2016-01-01

    A new device, the TRIple PLunger for EXotic beams (TRIPLEX), has been developed for lifetime measurement studies with rare isotope beams. This plunger device holds up to three metal foils in the beam path and facilitates the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique to measure lifetimes of nuclear excited states in the range of 1 ps to 1 ns. The unique design allows independent movement of the target and the second degrader with respect to a fixed first degrader in between, enabling advanced experimental approaches, such as the differential recoil distance method and the double recoil distance method. The design and control of the device are presented in this paper, together with simulated performances of the new applications. As an example of actual experiments, results from the lifetime measurement of the neutron-rich 17C isotope performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory are shown.

  13. Free Volume Structure of Acrylic-Type Dental Nanocomposites Tested with Annihilating Positrons.

    PubMed

    Shpotyuk, Olha; Ingram, Adam; Shpotyuk, Oleh

    2016-12-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy in lifetime measuring mode exploring conventional fast-fast coincidence ORTEC system is employed to characterize free volume structure of commercially available acrylic-type dental restorative composite Charisma® (Heraeus Kulzer GmbH, Germany). The measured lifetime spectra for uncured and light-cured composites are reconstructed from unconstrained x3-term fitting and semi-empirical model exploring x3-x2-coupling decomposition algorithm. The governing channel of positron annihilation in the composites studied is ascribed to mixed positron-Ps trapping, where Ps decaying in the third component is caused entirely by input from free-volume holes in polymer matrix, while the second component is defined by free positron trapping in interfacial free-volume holes between filler nanoparticles and surrounded polymer matrix. Microstructure scenario of the photopolymerization shrinkage includes cross-linking of structural chains in polymer matrix followed by conversion of bound positron-electron (positronium) traps in positron-trapping interfacial free-volume voids in a vicinity of agglomerated filler nanoparticles.

  14. Free Volume Structure of Acrylic-Type Dental Nanocomposites Tested with Annihilating Positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, Olha; Ingram, Adam; Shpotyuk, Oleh

    2016-11-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy in lifetime measuring mode exploring conventional fast-fast coincidence ORTEC system is employed to characterize free volume structure of commercially available acrylic-type dental restorative composite Charisma® (Heraeus Kulzer GmbH, Germany). The measured lifetime spectra for uncured and light-cured composites are reconstructed from unconstrained x3-term fitting and semi-empirical model exploring x3-x2-coupling decomposition algorithm. The governing channel of positron annihilation in the composites studied is ascribed to mixed positron-Ps trapping, where Ps decaying in the third component is caused entirely by input from free-volume holes in polymer matrix, while the second component is defined by free positron trapping in interfacial free-volume holes between filler nanoparticles and surrounded polymer matrix. Microstructure scenario of the photopolymerization shrinkage includes cross-linking of structural chains in polymer matrix followed by conversion of bound positron-electron (positronium) traps in positron-trapping interfacial free-volume voids in a vicinity of agglomerated filler nanoparticles.

  15. First Result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: Precision Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5-350 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Alberti, G.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Anderhub, H.; Arruda, L.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Baret, B.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Basili, A.; Batalha, L.; Bates, J.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Biland, A.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bolmont, J.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Boudoul, G.; Bourquin, M.; Brun, P.; Buénerd, M.; Burger, J.; Burger, W.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, C. R.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chernoplyiokov, N.; Chikanian, A.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Commichau, V.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Costado Dios, M. T.; Coste, B.; Crespo, D.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirkoz, B.; Dennett, P.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Diao, X. H.; Diago, A.; Djambazov, L.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Dubois, J. M.; Duperay, R.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; van Es, J.; Esser, H.; Falvard, A.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Flood, K.; Foglio, R.; Fohey, M.; Fopp, S.; Fouque, N.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallilee, M.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García, J.; García-López, R.; García-Tabares, L.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gentile, S.; Gervasi, M.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Girard, L.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy-Henningsen, C.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Grechko, A.; Gross, A.; Guerri, I.; de la Guía, C.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Hauler, F.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Heilig, J.; Hermel, R.; Hofer, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Hungerford, W.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Jongmanns, M.; Journet, L.; Jungermann, L.; Karpinski, W.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Koulemzine, A.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lauritzen, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, M. W.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; León Vargas, H.; Lepareur, V.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Lipari, P.; Lin, C. H.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, Y. S.; Lucidi, S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luo, J. Z.; Lustermann, W.; Lv, S.; Madsen, J.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masciocchi, F.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Menichelli, M.; Mereu, I.; Millinger, M.; Mo, D. C.; Molina, M.; Mott, P.; Mujunen, A.; Natale, S.; Nemeth, P.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oh, S.; Oliva, A.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Park, W. H.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Pauw, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Perrin, E.; Pessina, G.; Pierschel, G.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pochon, J.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Porter, S.; Pouxe, J.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. N.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ren, Z. L.; Ricol, J. S.; Riihonen, E.; Rodríguez, I.; Roeser, U.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rossi, L.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sabellek, A.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Santos, B.; Saouter, P.; Sarchioni, M.; Schael, S.; Schinzel, D.; Schmanau, M.; Schwering, G.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Siedling, R.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Steuer, M.; Stiff, K.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Sun, X. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tassan-Viol, J.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Titus, C.; Tomassetti, N.; Toral, F.; Torsti, J.; Tsai, J. R.; Tutt, J. C.; Ulbricht, J.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vargas Trevino, M.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Vergain, M.; Verlaat, B.; Vescovi, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viertel, G.; Volpini, G.; Wang, D.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Wallraff, W.; Weng, Z. L.; Willenbrock, M.; Wlochal, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, K. Y.; Wu, Z. S.; Xiao, W. J.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. G.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, M. M.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8×106 positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ˜250GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena.

  16. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-08-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10-11 to 10-10 cm3 s-1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V-1 s-1). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles.

  17. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; ...

    2016-08-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10–11 to 10–10 cm3 s–1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V–1 s–1). Measured here,more » steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. As a result, we suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles.« less

  18. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X. -Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10−11 to 10−10 cm3 s−1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V−1 s−1). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles. PMID:27477058

  19. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X. -Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-08-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10–11 to 10–10 cm3 s–1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V–1 s–1). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. As a result, we suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles.

  20. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    DOE PAGES

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navratil, P.; ...

    2015-12-18

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1/2+ and 5/2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B(M1;1/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 1.04+0.03–0.12 × 10–2μ2N and B(M1;5/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 7.12+1.27–0.96 × 10–2μ2N. The quenched M1 transition strength for the 1/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, with respect to the 5/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. Furthermore, the current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  1. Validity of the Lifetime Drinking History: A Comparison of Retrospective and Prospective Quantity-Frequency Measures*

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Laura B.; Jacob, Theodore; Haber, Jon Randolph

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The Lifetime Drinking History (LDH) has been used to examine alcohol use throughout the life span. Given its retrospective nature, it is important to examine the validity of the assessment. Method: Building on previous work establishing the reliability and validity of the LDH, the current study examined a sample of 1,295 men in the Vietnam Era Twin Registry. The men were assessed retrospectively with the LDH in 2000, at an average age of 51. The drinking patterns of these same men were also assessed prospectively in four prior studies, taking place in 1987, 1990, 1992, and 1995. Results: Validity of the LDH was examined by comparing the correspondence between the prospective and retrospective quantity-frequency measures and reported age at first regular drinking. Correlations between the retrospective and prospective assessments were high for age at first regular drinking (.42-.58) and quantity-frequency measures (.47-.69), although some mean differences in the amount of consumption existed. Conclusions: Results support the use of the LDH in reporting phases of drinking across the life span. PMID:19261242

  2. Comparison of Minority Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Superstrate and Substrate CdTe PV Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, T. A.; Dhere, R. G.; Duenow, J. N.; Kuciauskas, D.; Kanevce, A.; Bergeson, J. D.

    2011-07-01

    We discuss typical and alternative procedures to analyze time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements of minority carrier lifetime (MCL) with the hope of enhancing our understanding of how this technique may be used to better analyze CdTe photovoltaic (PV) device functionality. Historically, TRPL measurements of the fast recombination rate (t1) have provided insightful correlation with broad device functionality. However, we have more recently found that t1 does not correlate as well with smaller changes in device performance, nor does it correlate well with performance differences observed between superstrate and substrate CdTe PV devices. This study presents TRPL data for both superstrate and substrate CdTe devices where both t1 and the slower TRPL decay (t2) are analyzed. The study shows that changes in performance expected from small changes in device processing may correlate better with t2. Numerical modeling further suggests that, for devices that are expected to have similar drift field in the depletion region, effects of changes in bulk MCL and interface recombination should be more pronounced in t2. Although this technique may provide future guidance to improving CdS/CdTe device performance, it is often difficult to extract statistically precise values for t2, and therefore t2 data may demonstrate significant scatter when correlated with performance parameters.

  3. Positron annihilation and magnetic properties studies of copper substituted nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargar, Z.; Asgarian, S. M.; Mozaffari, M.

    2016-05-01

    Single phase copper substituted nickel ferrite Ni1-xCuxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5) nanoparticles were synthesized by the sol-gel method. TEM images of the samples confirm formation of nano-sized particles. The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction patterns showed that lattice constant increase with increase in copper content from 8.331 for x = 0.0 to 8.355 Å in x = 0.5. Cation distribution of samples has been determined by the occupancy factor, using Rietveld refinement. The positron lifetime spectra of the samples were convoluted into three lifetime components. The shortest lifetime is due to the positrons that do not get trapped by the vacancy defects. The second lifetime is ascribed to annihilation of positrons in tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) sites in spinel structure. It is seen that for x = 0.1 and 0.3 samples, positron trapped within vacancies in A sites, but for x = 0.0 and 0.5, the positrons trapped and annihilated within occupied B sites. The longest lifetime component attributed to annihilation of positrons in the free volume between nanoparticles. The obtained results from coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) confirmed the results of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and also showed that the vacancy clusters concentration for x = 0.3 is more than those in other samples. Average defect density in the samples, determined from mean lifetime of annihilated positrons reflects that the vacancy concentration for x = 0.3 is maximum. The magnetic measurements showed that the saturation magnetization for x = 0.3 is maximum that can be explained by Néel's theory. The coercivity in nanoparticles increased with increase in copper content. This increase is ascribed to the change in anisotropy constant because of increase of the average defect density due to the substitution of Cu2+ cations and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Cu2+ cations. Curie temperature of the samples reduces with increase in copper content which

  4. Measurement of B0 and B+ Lifetimes using Semileptonic Decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, David K.

    2010-01-01

    Lifetime measurements for B0 and B+ are presented using semileptonic decays of B mesons from 360 pb-1 of data collected by CDF's lepton plus displaced track trigger. The decays B → ℓνDX, where D is either D +, D0, or D* +, are partially reconstructed from a muon or electron, a displaced track, and a fully reconstructed charm meson. The B 0 and B+ lifetimes are obtained from an unbinned maximum-likelihood fit to the proper decay length distributions. The measured lifetimes are τB 0 = 1.527 ± 0.012(stat.) ± 0.023( syst.)ps and τB + = 1.629 ± 0.013(stat.) ± 0.025( syst.)ps.

  5. TR-LIF LIFETIME MEASUREMENTS AND HFR+CPOL CALCULATIONS OF RADIATIVE PARAMETERS IN VANADIUM ATOM (V I)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Jiang, L. Y.; Shang, X.; Tian, Y. S.; Dai, Z. W.; Quinet, P.; Palmeri, P.; Zhang, W. E-mail: Pascal.quinet@umons.ac.be

    2014-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 79 levels belonging to the 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s5p, 3d {sup 4}5p, and 3d {sup 3}4s4d configurations of V I with energy from 26,604.807 to 46,862.786 cm{sup –1} have been measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) spectroscopy in laser-produced plasma. The lifetime values reported in this paper are in the range of 3.3-494 ns, and the uncertainties of these measurements are within ±10%. A good agreement was obtained with previous data. HFR+CPOL calculations have been performed and used to combine the calculated branching fractions with the available experimental lifetimes to determine semi-empirical transition probabilities for 784 V I transitions.

  6. Toward the measurement of multiple fluorescence lifetimes in flow cytometry: maximizing multi-harmonic content from cells and microspheres.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Patrick; Naivar, Mark A; Houston, Jessica P

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful means for in vitro cellular analyses where multi-fluorescence and multi-angle light scattering can indicate unique biochemical or morphological features of single cells. Yet, to date, flow cytometry systems have lacked the ability to capture complex fluorescence dynamics due to the transient nature of flowing cells. In this contribution we introduce a simple approach for measuring multiple fluorescence lifetimes from a single cytometric event. We leverage square wave modulation, Fourier analysis, and high frequency digitization and show the ability to resolve more than one fluorescence lifetime from fluorescently-labelled cells and microspheres. Illustration of a flow cytometer capable of capturing multiple fluorescence lifetime measurements; creating potential for multi-parametric, time-resolved signals to be captured for every color channel.

  7. Positron annihilation study of proton-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangbing; Wang, Rongshan; Ren, Ai; Huang, Ping; Wu, Yichu; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Chonghong; Wang, Xitao

    2012-10-01

    The microstructures, irradiation-induced defects and changes of mechanical property of Chinese domestic A508-3 steels after proton irradiation were investigated by TEM, positron lifetime, slow positron beam Doppler broadening spectroscopy and hardness measurements. The defects were induced by 240 keV proton irradiation with fluences of 1.25×1017 ions cm-2 (0.26 dpa), 2.5×1017 ions cm-2 (0.5 dpa), and 5.0×1017 ions cm-2 (1.0 dpa). The TEM observation revealed that the as-received steel had typical bainitic-ferritic microstructures. It was also observed that Doppler broadening S-parameter and average lifetime increased with dose level owing to the formation of defects and voids induced by proton irradiation. The correlation between positron parameters and hardness was found.

  8. Total cross sections for positrons scattered elastically from helium based on new measurements of total ionization cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diana, L. M.; Chaplin, R. L.; Brooks, D. L.; Adams, J. T.; Reyna, L. K.

    1990-01-01

    An improved technique is presented for employing the 2.3m spectrometer to measure total ionization cross sections, Q sub ion, for positrons incident on He. The new ionization cross section agree with the values reported earlier. Estimates are also presented of total elastic scattering cross section, Q sub el, obtained by subtracting from total scattering cross sections, Q sub tot, reported in the literature, the Q sub ion and Q sub Ps (total positronium formation cross sections) and total excitation cross sections, Q sub ex, published by another researcher. The Q sub ion and Q sub el measured with the 3m high resolution time-of-flight spectrometer for 54.9eV positrons are in accord with the results from the 2.3m spectrometer. The ionization cross sections are in fair agreement with theory tending for the most part to be higher, especially at 76.3 and 88.5eV. The elastic cross section agree quite well with theory to the vicinity of 50eV, but at 60eV and above the experimental elastic cross sections climb to and remain at about 0.30 pi a sub o sq while the theoretical values steadily decrease.

  9. Characterization of a pulsed x-ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankespoor, S. C.; Derenzo, S. E.; Moses, W. W.; Rossington, C. S.; Ito, M.; Oba, K.

    1994-08-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, we have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 mu A maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 x 10(sup 7) photons at 650 nm per approximately 100 ps pulse, with up to 10(sup 7) pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray energy at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. We measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 x 10(sup 6) and 3 x 10(sup 6) photons/sec/steradian at biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented.

  10. High-spin lifetime measurements in the N=Z nucleus {sup 72}Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Andreoiu, C.; Svensson, C. E.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Austin, R. A. E.; Carpenter, M. P.; Freeman, S. J.; Greene, J.; Moore, F.; Mukherjee, G.; Seweryniak, D.; Dashdorj, D.; Goergen, A.

    2007-04-15

    High-spin states in the N=Z nucleus {sup 72}Kr have been populated in the {sup 40}Ca({sup 40}Ca, 2{alpha}){sup 72}Kr fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV using the Gammasphere array for {gamma}-ray detection coupled to the Microball array for charged particle detection. The previously observed bands in {sup 72}Kr were extended to an excitation energy of {approx}24 MeV and angular momentum of 30({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). Using the Doppler shift attenuation method the lifetimes of high-spin states were measured for the first time. Excellent agreement between the results of calculations within the isovector mean field theory and experiment is observed both for rotational and deformation properties. No enhancement of quadrupole deformation expected in the presence of isoscalar t=0 np pairing is observed. Current data do not show any evidence for the existence of the isoscalar np pairing.

  11. Using the TOF method to measure the electron lifetime in long-drift CdZnTe detectors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Chen, Eric; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Dedic, Václav; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Fried, Jack; Hossain, Anwar; MacKenzie, Jason M.; Sellin, Paul; Taherion, Saeid; Vernon, Emerson; Yang, Ge; El-hanany, Uri; James, Ralph B.

    2016-09-01

    The traditional method for electron lifetime measurements of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors relies on using the Hecht equation. The procedure involves measuring the dependence of the detector response on the applied bias and applying the Hecht equation to evaluate the mu-tau product, which in turn can be converted into the carrier lifetime if the mobility is known. Despite general acceptance of this technique, which is very convenient for comparative testing of different CZT materials, the assumption of a constant electric field inside a detector is unjustified. In the Hecht equation, this assumption means that the drift time would be a linear function of the drift distance. This condition is rarely fulfilled in practice at low applied biases where the Hecht equation is most sensitive to the mu-tau product. As a result, researchers usually take measurements at relatively high biases, which work well in the case of the low mu-tau material, <10-3 cm2/V, but give significantly underestimated values for the case of high mu-tau crystals. In this work, we applied the time-of-flight (TOF) technique to measure the electron lifetimes in long-drift-length (3 cm) standard-grade CZT detectors produced by Redlen Technologies. The TOF-based techniques are traditionally used for monitoring the electronegative impurity concentrations in noble gas detectors by measuring the electron lifetimes. We found the electron mu-tau product of tested crystals is in the range 0.1-0.2 cm2/V, which is an order of the magnitude higher than any value previously reported for CZT material. In this work, we reported the measurement procedure and the results. We will also discuss the applicability criteria of the Hecht equation for measuring the electron lifetime in high mu-tau product CZT.

  12. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-07-18

    Using a proton-proton collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, about 3800 Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-), Ξ(c)(+)) → pK(-)π(+) signal decays are reconstructed. From this sample, the first measurement of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon lifetime is made, relative to that of the Λ(b)(0) baryon. The mass differences M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) and M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) are also measured with precision more than 4 times better than the current world averages. The resulting values are τ(Ξ(b)(0))/τ(Λ)(b)(0)) = 1.006 ± 0.018 ± 0.010,M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) = 172.44 ± 0.39 ± 0.17 MeV/c(2),M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) = 181.51 ± 0.14 ± 0.10 MeV/c(2),where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The relative rate of Ξ(b)(0) to Λ(b)(0) baryon production is measured to be f(Ξ)(b)(0))/f(Λ)(b)(0))B(Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-))/B(Λ(b)(0) → Λ(c)(+)π(-))B(Ξ(c)(+) → pK(-)π(+))/B(Λ(c)(+) → pK(-)}π(+)) = (1.88 ± 0.04 ± 0.03) × 10(-2),where the first factor is the ratio of fragmentation fractions, b → Ξ(b)(0) relative to b → Λ(b)(0). Relative production rates as functions of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity are also presented.

  13. EBIT in the Magnetic Trapping Mode: Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Lifetime Measurements, and Charge Transfer Reactions of Highly Charged Atomic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikhard, L; Beiersdorfer, P; Trabert, E

    2001-07-10

    Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) works as an ion trap even when the electron beam is switched off. We present various experiments that exploit the ''magnetic trapping mode'' for investigations of ion confinement, charge exchange processes, atomic lifetime and ion mass measurements.

  14. Compact solid-state CMOS single-photon detector array for in vivo NIR fluorescence lifetime oncology measurements

    PubMed Central

    Homulle, H. A. R.; Powolny, F.; Stegehuis, P. L.; Dijkstra, J.; Li, D.-U.; Homicsko, K.; Rimoldi, D.; Muehlethaler, K.; Prior, J. O.; Sinisi, R.; Dubikovskaya, E.; Charbon, E.; Bruschini, C.

    2016-01-01

    In near infrared fluorescence-guided surgical oncology, it is challenging to distinguish healthy from cancerous tissue. One promising research avenue consists in the analysis of the exogenous fluorophores’ lifetime, which are however in the (sub-)nanosecond range. We have integrated a single-photon pixel array, based on standard CMOS SPADs (single-photon avalanche diodes), in a compact, time-gated measurement system, named FluoCam. In vivo measurements were carried out with indocyanine green (ICG)-modified derivatives targeting the αvβ3 integrin, initially on a genetically engineered mouse model of melanoma injected with ICG conjugated with tetrameric cyclic pentapeptide (ICG−E[c(RGD f K)4]), then on mice carrying tumour xenografts of U87-MG (a human primary glioblastoma cell line) injected with monomeric ICG−c(RGD f K). Measurements on tumor, muscle and tail locations allowed us to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo lifetime measurements with the FluoCam, to determine the characteristic lifetimes (around 500 ps) and subtle lifetime differences between bound and unbound ICG-modified fluorophores (10% level), as well as to estimate the available photon fluxes under realistic conditions. PMID:27231622

  15. Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes in alkali like systems. Progress report, September 15, 1995--January 15, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes are important to the analysis of data from many areas of physics and provide fundamental atomic structure information. Scientists in the fields of astrophysics, geophysics, and plasma fusion all depend on oscillator strengths to determine the relative abundances of elements. Assessing the operation of discharge lamps and atomic resonance line filters also depends on knowing accurately atomic oscillator strengths. Often relative values of oscillator strengths are measured precisely, but accurate atomic lifetimes are needed to obtain absolute values. In addition, the interpretation of parity nonconservation (PNC) experiments requires accurate knowledge of the atomic structure including radial matrix elements. Many of these scientific needs are addressed theoretically with sophisticated many-electron atomic structure calculations. In this program they address these needs experimentally with a precision that surpasses current theoretical accuracy. The lifetime measurements also play the important roles of assessing the accuracy of many-electron atomic structure calculations and of guiding further theoretical development. Alkali like atoms, with a single electron outside of a closed shell, provide the simplest open shell systems for detailed comparisons between experiment and theory. To date, the research has focused on measurements of excited state lifetimes in neutral alkali systems along with the development of the necessary equipment and techniques for studying alkali-like ionic systems. The accomplishments of this program are summarized in Section 2 and are supported by the reprints and preprints that appear in the Appendix.

  16. Characterization of vacancy defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsharkawy, M. R. M.; Kanda, G. S.; Yakushev, M. V.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.; Keeble, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The photovoltaic performance of Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) materials is commonly assumed to be degraded by the presence of vacancy-related defects. However, experimental identification of specific vacancy defects remains challenging. In this work we report positron lifetime measurements on CIGS crystals with x = 0, and x = 0.05, saturation trapping to two dominant vacancy defect types, in both types of crystal, is observed and found to be independent of temperature between 15-300 K. Atomic superposition method calculations of the positron lifetimes for a range of vacancy defects in CIS and CGS are reported. The calculated lifetimes support the assignment of the first experimental lifetime component to monovacancy or divacancy defects, and the second to trivacancies, or possibly the large In-Se divacancy. Further, the calculated positron parameters obtained here provide evidence that positron annihilation spectroscopy has the capability to identify specific vacancy-related defects in the Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 chalcogenides.

  17. Picosecond planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of OH A 2 ( 2) lifetime and energy transfer in atmospheric pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Frank C.; Nielsen, Tim; Burrows, Michael; Andresen, Peter

    1997-08-01

    A picosecond, excimer-Raman laser (268 nm, 400 ps FWHM) was used for laser sheet excitation of OH in the (2, 0) band. The fluorescence was detected with a fast-gated, intensified camera (400-ps gate width). The effective collisional lifetime of the spectrally integrated fluorescence was measured in two dimensions by shifting the intensifier gate across the decay curve. The average lifetime is 2.0 ns for a stoichiometric methane air flame with spatial variations of 10 . Shorter collisional lifetimes were measured for rich flame conditions that are due to a higher number density of the quenchers. Vibrational energy transfer (VET) was observed in premixed methane air and methane oxygen flames by putting the fast-gated camera behind a spectrometer. The spectrum of the methane air flame shows strong VET in contrast with the methane oxygen flame. This is because N 2 is a weak electronic quencher but a strong VET agent. By fitting the measured time dependence of the different vibrational populations ( 2, 1, 0) to a four-level model, rate constants for quenching and VET were determined. For the lower states ( 0, 1) our results are in good agreement with literature values. For a prediction of a spectrally integrated, collisional lifetime in a known collisional environment it is important to consider not only the quenching but also the amount of energy transfer in the excited state as well as the spectral detection sensitivity.

  18. The effect of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings: accurate measurement of the bearing behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, W.; Boonen, R.; Sas, P.; Moens, D.

    2012-05-01

    Accurate prediction of the lifetime of rolling element bearings is a crucial step towards a reliable design of many rotating machines. Recent research emphasizes an important influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of bearings. However, most lifetime calculations of bearings are based on the classical ISO 281 standard, neglecting this influence. For bearings subjected to highly varying loads, this leads to inaccurate estimations of the lifetime, and therefore excessive safety factors during the design and unexpected failures during operation. This paper presents a novel test rig, developed to analyse the behaviour of rolling element bearings subjected to highly varying loads. Since bearings are very precise machine components, their motion can only be measured in an accurately controlled environment. Otherwise, noise from other components and external influences such as temperature variations will dominate the measurements. The test rig is optimised to perform accurate measurements of the bearing behaviour. Also, the test bearing is fitted in a modular structure, which guarantees precise mounting and allows testing different types and sizes of bearings. Finally, a fully controlled multi-axial static and dynamic load is imposed on the bearing, while its behaviour is monitored with capacitive proximity probes.

  19. Measurement of the Lambda(b) lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda(b) ---> J / psi Lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime using the exclusive decay {lambda}{sub b}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}, based on 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed {lambda}{sub b} decays, where the J/{psi} and {lambda} are identified via the decays J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {lambda}{yields}p{pi}, we measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime to be {tau}({lambda}{sub b})=1.218{sub -0.115}{sup +0.130}(stat){+-}0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B{sup 0} lifetime in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}({mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})K{sub S}{sup 0}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) to be {tau}(B{sup 0})=1.501{sub -0.074}{sup +0.078}(stat){+-}0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of {tau}({lambda}{sub b})/{tau}(B{sup 0})=0.811{sub -0.087}{sup +0.096}(stat){+-}0.034(syst = )

  20. Measurement of the Inclusive B-Lifetime Using $\\rm {J/\\psi}$'s at the CDF Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Hans-Joachim; /RWTH Aachen U.

    1993-08-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the average B hadron lifetime using a high statistics sample of B {yields} J/{psi}X decays produced in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The integrated luminosity of the sample is 10.1 pb{sup -1} recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). In this analysis the decay vertex of the decay J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} as reconstructed by a silicon vertex detector is used to extract the lifetime from the data. This measurement is the average over all b-hadrons produced weighted by the product of their branching ratios into J/{psi} and their production cross sections. We find the following value for the average b hadron lifetime: {tau}{sub B} = 1.46 {+-} 0.06(stat.) {+-} 0.06(syst.) ps. This is the first measurement of the b-hadron lifetime at a hadron collider. It demonstrates that it is possible to access the large b-quark production cross section in p{bar p} collisions and to achieve high statistics even in modes which have small product branching ratios as in this case: BR(B {yields} J/{psi}X) {center_dot} BR(J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = 7.7 x 10{sup -4}.

  1. High Statistics Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardo, L.; Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200 GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  2. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-R