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Sample records for post infective bowel

  1. Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome: mechanistic insights into chronic disturbances following enteric infection.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Jennifer K; Bhargava, Amol; Buret, Andre G

    2014-04-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonly encountered chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. Approximately 10% of IBS patients can trace the onset of their symptoms to a previous a bout of infectious dysentery. The appearance of new IBS symptoms following an infectious event is defined as post-infectious-IBS. Indeed, with the World Health Organization estimating between 2 and 4 billion cases annually, infectious diarrheal disease represents an incredible international healthcare burden. Additionally, compounding evidence suggests many commonly encountered enteropathogens as unique triggers behind IBS symptom generation and underlying pathophysiological features. A growing body of work provides evidence supporting a role for pathogen-mediated modifications in the resident intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier integrity, effector cell functions, and innate and adaptive immune features, all proposed physiological manifestations that can underlie GI abnormalities in IBS. Enteric pathogens must employ a vast array of machinery to evade host protective immune mechanisms, and illicit successful infections. Consequently, the impact of infectious events on host physiology can be multidimensional in terms of anatomical location, functional scope, and duration. This review offers a unique discussion of the mechanisms employed by many commonly encountered enteric pathogens that cause acute disease, but may also lead to the establishment of chronic GI dysfunction compatible with IBS.

  2. Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome: Mechanistic insights into chronic disturbances following enteric infection

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Jennifer K; Bhargava, Amol; Buret, Andre G

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonly encountered chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. Approximately 10% of IBS patients can trace the onset of their symptoms to a previous a bout of infectious dysentery. The appearance of new IBS symptoms following an infectious event is defined as post-infectious-IBS. Indeed, with the World Health Organization estimating between 2 and 4 billion cases annually, infectious diarrheal disease represents an incredible international healthcare burden. Additionally, compounding evidence suggests many commonly encountered enteropathogens as unique triggers behind IBS symptom generation and underlying pathophysiological features. A growing body of work provides evidence supporting a role for pathogen-mediated modifications in the resident intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier integrity, effector cell functions, and innate and adaptive immune features, all proposed physiological manifestations that can underlie GI abnormalities in IBS. Enteric pathogens must employ a vast array of machinery to evade host protective immune mechanisms, and illicit successful infections. Consequently, the impact of infectious events on host physiology can be multidimensional in terms of anatomical location, functional scope, and duration. This review offers a unique discussion of the mechanisms employed by many commonly encountered enteric pathogens that cause acute disease, but may also lead to the establishment of chronic GI dysfunction compatible with IBS. PMID:24744587

  3. Impact of the alterations in the interstitial cells of Cajal on intestinal motility in post-infection irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Zhou, Xu-Chun; Lan, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are basic components of gastrointestinal motility. However, changes in ICC and their role in post‑infection irritable bowel syndrome (PI‑IBS) remain to be elucidated. To observe the impact of alterations in the ICC on intestinal motility in a PI‑IBS mouse model, female C57BL\\6 mice were infected by the oral administration of 400 Trichinella spiralis larvae. The abdominal withdrawal reflex, intestine transportation time (ITT), grain numbers, Bristol scores, wet/dry weights and the percentage water content of the mice feces every 2 h were used to assess changes in the intestinal motor function. The intestines were excised and sectioned for pathological and histochemical examination. These intestines were also used to quantify the protein and mRNA expression of c‑kit. The C57BL\\6 mouse can act as a PI‑IBS model at day 56 post‑infection. Compared with the control mice, the ITT was shorter, the grain numbers, Bristol scores, wet weights and water contents of the mice feces were higher and the dry weights were unchanged in the PI‑IBS mice. The protein and mRNA expression levels of c‑kit were upregulated in the entire PI‑IBS mouse intestines. Following immunohistochemical staining, the increased number of c‑kit‑positive cells were detected predominantly in the submucosa and myenteron. These results suggested that the alterations of the ICC resulted in the changes of the intestinal motility patterns in the PI‑IBS mouse models induced by Trichinella spiralis infection, which may be the main mechanism underlying intestinal motility disorders in PI‑IBS.

  4. Infections in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, Enrique; Albillos Martínez, Agustín; López-Sanromán, Antonio

    2017-05-10

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease constitute a population with a special predisposition to develop bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Iatrogenic immunosuppression, frequent contact with healthcare facilities and surgical interventions are some of the risk factors that explain why these infections are one of the main causes of morbi-mortality in this disease. Some of these infections follow a subtle and paucisymptomatic evolution; their diagnosis and management may become a real challenge for the attending physician if their screening is not systematized or they are not considered in the differential diagnosis. The objective of this review is to provide an update from a practical and concise perspective on the knowledge regarding the epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the most common infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. An unusual case of small bowel obstruction post caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Marchocki, Z; Brennan, DJ; Mak, C; O’Riordan, M; Greene, RA

    2011-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a very rare complication post-caesarean section (CS). Herniation of small bowel through the rectus muscle with an intact sheath is extremely rare. We present a case of SBO after an uncomplicated c-section and an uneventful early postoperative course. PMID:24972397

  6. Role of infection in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin C

    2007-01-01

    Infection by pathogenic organisms leads to mucosal damage and disruption of the gut's extensive commensal flora, factors which may lead to prolonged bowel dysfunction. Six to 17% of unselected irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients believe their symptoms began with an infection, which is supported by prospective studies showing a 4%-31% incidence of postinfectious IBS-(PI) following bacterial gastroenteritis. The wide range of incidence can be accounted for by differences in risk factors, which include in order of magnitude; severity of initial illness > bacterial toxigenicity > hypochondriasis, depression and neuroticism, and adverse life events in the previous 3 months. PI-IBS has been reported after Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Shigella infections. Serial biopsies after Campylobacter jejuni gastroenteritis show an initial inflammatory infiltrate, with an increase in enterochromaffin (EC) cells, which in most cases subsides over the next 6 months. Those who go on to develop IBS show increased numbers of EC and lymphocyte cell counts at 3 months compared with those who do not develop IBS. Interleukin-1beta mRNA levels are increased in the mucosa of those who develop PI-IBS, who also show increased gut permeability. Recover can be slow, with approximately 50% still having symptoms at 5 years. Recent studies suggest an increase in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokine production in unselected IBS, an abnormality that may be ameliorated by probiotic treatment. The role of small-bowel bacterial overgrowth in IBS is controversial, but broad-spectrum antibiotics do have a temporary benefit in some patients. More acceptable long-term treatments altering gut flora are awaited with interest.

  7. Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician’s tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients’ education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections. PMID:25110408

  8. Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-08-07

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician's tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients' education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections.

  9. Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) after infection with Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O104:H4: A cohort study with prospective follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Löwe, Bernd; Broicher, Wiebke; Riegel, Björn; Fraedrich, Katharina; von Wulffen, Moritz; Gappmayer, Kerrin; Wegscheider, Karl; Treszl, András; Rose, Matthias; Layer, Peter; Lohse, Ansgar W

    2015-01-01

    Background In May/June 2011, the new Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strain O104:H4 caused the severest outbreak ever recorded of hemorrhagic enterocolitis in 3842 patients in Germany. Objectives As bacterial enterocolitis is an established risk factor of subsequent irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), we aimed to estimate prevalence and incidence of post-infectious (PI)-IBS after six and 12 months in a cohort of STEC O104:H4 patients and to prospectively identify associated somatic and psychometric risk factors. Methods A total of 389 patients were studied prospectively at baseline and at six and 12 months after STEC infection using STEC disease-related questionnaires and validated instruments for IBS (Rome III) and psychological factors. Frequencies and logistic regression models using multiple imputations were applied to assess predictor variables. Results Prevalence of IBS increased from 9.8% prior to STEC infection to 23.6% at six and 25.3% at 12 months after STEC infection. In patients without IBS symptoms prior to STEC infection, incidence of new IBS was 16.9%. Logistic regression models indicated higher somatization and anxiety scores as risk factors for, and mesalazine treatment during, STEC infection as the only significant protective factor against IBS. No other factor analyzed, including disease severity, showed an association. Conclusions PI-IBS rates following this unusually severe STEC outbreak were similar to what has been observed after other infectious gastroenteritis outbreaks. Our findings suggest that mesalazine may have reduced the risk of subsequent PI-IBS. As altered mucosal immune activity is a pivotal pathogenic factor in PI-IBS, our observation of a potential protective effect of mesalazine might be explained by its known modulatory action on mucosal immunity, and may warrant further investigation. PMID:26966532

  10. Cytomegalovirus infection associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Britta

    2017-05-01

    Refractory colitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease is a complicated clinical disorder that might, in some patients, even necessitate surgery. Hence the diagnosis of additional complications is of utmost importance. Colitis mediated by cytomegalovirus is one such complication. The high seroprevalence and latent nature of cytomegalovirus, with the possibility of viral replication without mediating disease, poses a real challenge for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus-mediated colitis. The challenge in daily clinical practice is to distinguish cytomegalovirus replication from cytomegalovirus-mediated colitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who have refractory colitis. This Review discusses the scientific literature and provides a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combination of Oral Antibiotics and Mechanical Bowel Preparation Reduces Surgical Site Infection in Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ohman, Kerri A; Wan, Leping; Guthrie, Tracey; Johnston, Bonnie; Leinicke, Jennifer A; Glasgow, Sean C; Hunt, Steven R; Mutch, Matthew G; Wise, Paul E; Silviera, Matthew L

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a common complication after colorectal surgery. An infection prevention bundle (IPB) was implemented to improve outcomes. A standardized IPB that included the administration of oral antibiotics with a mechanical bowel preparation, preoperative shower with chlorhexidine, hair removal and skin preparation in holding, antibiotic wound irrigation, and a "clean-closure" protocol was implemented in January 2013. Data from the American College of Surgeons NSQIP were analyzed at a single academic institution to compare pre-IPB and post-IPB SSI rates. In January 2014, a prospective database was implemented to determine compliance with individual IPB elements and their effect on outcomes. For the 24 months pre-IPB, the overall SSI rate was 19.7%. During the 30 months after IPB implementation, the SSI rate decreased to 8.2% (p < 0.0001). A subset of 307 patients was identified in both NSQIP and our prospective compliance databases. Elements of IPB associated with decreased SSI rates included preoperative shower with chlorhexidine (4.6% vs 16.2%; p = 0.005), oral antibiotics (3.4% vs 15.4%; p < 0.001), and mechanical bowel preparation (4.4% vs 14.3%; p = 0.008). Patients who received a full bowel preparation of both oral antibiotics and a mechanical bowel preparation had a 2.7% SSI rate compared with 15.8% for all others (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, full bowel preparation was independently associated with significantly fewer SSI (adjusted odds ratio 0.2; 95% CI 0.1 to 0.9; p = 0.006). Implementation of an IPB was successful in decreasing SSI rates in colorectal surgery patients. The combination of oral antibiotics with a mechanical bowel preparation was the strongest predictor of decreased SSI. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  12. Adhesive Escherichia coli in inflammatory bowel disease and infective diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, D. A.; Axon, A. T.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical features of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are similar to those of infections of the bowel, although their cause is uncertain. Many bacteria that cause intestinal diseases adhere to the gut mucosa, and adhesion of pathogenic Escherichia coli is resistant to D-mannose. The adhesive properties of isolates of E coli were assessed by assay of adhesion to buccal epithelial cells with mannose added. The isolates were obtained from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (50 with a relapse of ulcerative colitis, nine with ulcerative colitis in remission, 13 with Crohn's disease, and 11 with infectious diarrhoea not due to E coli) and 22 controls. The median index of adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (the proportion of cells with more than 50 adherent bacteria) for E coli from patients with ulcerative colitis in relapse was significantly higher (43%) than that for controls (5%) and patients with infectious diarrhoea (14%). The index was not significantly different among isolates from patients with ulcerative colitis in relapse, Crohn's disease (53%), and ulcerative colitis in remission (30%). If an index of adhesion of greater than 25% is taken as indicating an adhesive strain 86% of isolates of E coli from patients with inflammatory bowel disease were adhesive compared with 27% from patients with infective diarrhoea and none from controls. The adhesive properties of the isolates from patients with inflammatory bowel disease were similar to those of pathogenic intestinal E coli, raising the possibility that they may have a role in the pathogenesis of the condition; the smaller proportion of adhesive isolates in patients with infective diarrhoea due to other bacteria suggests that the organism may be of primary importance rather than arising secondarily. Images a PMID:3044496

  13. Clostridium difficile Infection in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Oliva-Hemker, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are disproportionately susceptible to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and the incidence is increasing. There has also been growing recognition of asymptomatic C. difficile colonization in pediatric IBD, which can sometimes be very difficult to distinguish from symptomatic C. difficile–associated disease in this population. In this study, we discuss the current knowledge of C. difficile infection in children with IBD, reviewing epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes that often differ from the adult IBD population, and discuss the complexities and dilemmas of diagnosing and treating CDI in pediatric IBD. PMID:26689599

  14. Clostridium difficile infection in children with inflammatory bowel disease: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Pituch, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, immune-mediated disease of the gastrointestinal tract that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. Questions about the role of infections in the development and exacerbations of inflammatory bowel disease remain unanswered. Among numerous bacteria that have been linked to IBD, the most frequently associated is Clostridium difficile. Clinical symptoms of C. difficile infection and an exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease are often indistinguishable. In cases of diarrhea in patients with IBD and C. difficile infection, antibiotic treatment is recommended. This review attempts to summarize C. difficile infection's epidemiology and clinical features and describes current evidence on treatment of C. difficile infection in children with IBD.

  15. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections after bladder surgery: is mechanical bowel preparation necessary?

    PubMed

    Casperson, Kelly J; Fronczak, Carolyn M; Siparsky, Georgette; O'Donnell, Colin; Gundeti, Mohan S; Campbell, Jeffrey B; Wilcox, Duncan T

    2011-10-01

    We investigated whether children with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt who undergo mechanical bowel preparation before bladder reconstruction with bowel have a lower rate of infection than children who do not undergo preoperative bowel preparation. We performed an institutional review board approved, retrospective chart review of the incidence of ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections after bladder reconstruction using bowel and compared infection rates using Fisher's exact test. Mean ± SD followup was 2.9 ± 2.3 years. Between 2003 and 2009, 31 patients with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt underwent bladder reconstruction using bowel, of whom 19 (61%) and 12 (39%) did and did not undergo mechanical bowel preparation, respectively. There was no significant difference in gender or age at surgery between the 2 groups. Infection developed in 3 children (9.6%) within 2 months postoperatively, including 2 (10.5%) with and 1 (8.3%) without bowel preparation (2-tailed p = 1.0). There was no significant difference in the shunt infection rate between patients with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt who did and did not undergo preoperative bowel preparation. Our results add to the current literature suggesting that bowel preparation is unnecessary even in patients with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clostridium difficile Infection and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sinh, Preetika; Barrett, Terrence A.; Yun, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has significantly increased in the last decade in the United States adding to the health care burden of the country. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher prevalence of CDI and worse outcomes. In the past, the traditional risk factors for CDI were exposure to antibiotics and hospitalizations in elderly people. Today, it is not uncommon to diagnose CDI in a pregnant women or young adult who has no risk factors. C. difficile can be detected at the initial presentation of IBD, during a relapse or in asymptomatic carriers. It is important to keep a high index of suspicion for CDI in IBD patients and initiate prompt treatment to minimize complications. We summarize here the changing epidemiology, pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical features, and treatment of CDI in IBD. PMID:21915178

  17. A statewide colectomy experience: the role of full bowel preparation in preventing surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Edward K; Sheetz, Kyle H; Bonn, Julie; DeRoo, Scott; Lee, Christopher; Stein, Isaac; Zarinsefat, Arya; Cai, Shijie; Campbell, Darrell A; Englesbe, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    To assess the utility of full bowel preparation with oral nonabsorbable antibiotics in preventing infectious complications after elective colectomy. Bowel preparation before elective colectomy remains controversial. We hypothesize that mechanical bowel preparation with nonabsorbable oral antibiotics is associated with a decreased rate of postoperative infectious complications when compared with no bowel preparation. Patient and clinical data were obtained from the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative-Colectomy Best Practices Project. Propensity score analysis was used to match elective colectomy cases based on primary exposure variable-full bowel preparation (mechanical bowel preparation with nonabsorbable oral antibiotics) or no bowel preparation (neither mechanical bowel preparation given nor nonabsorbable oral antibiotic given). The primary outcomes for this study were occurrence of surgical site infection and Clostridium difficile colitis. In total, 2475 cases met the study criteria. Propensity analysis created 957 paired cases (n = 1914) differing only by the type of bowel preparation. Patients receiving full preparation were less likely to have any surgical site infection (5.0% vs 9.7%; P = 0.0001), organ space infection (1.6% vs 3.1%; P = 0.024), and superficial surgical site infection (3.0% vs 6.0%; P = 0.001). Patients receiving full preparation were also less likely to develop postoperative C difficile colitis (0.5% vs 1.8%, P = 0.01). In the state of Michigan, full bowel preparation is associated with decreased infectious complications after elective colectomy. Within this context, the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative recommends full bowel preparation before elective colectomy.

  18. Pyometra presenting in conjunction with bowel cancer in a post-menopausal women: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Soleymani majd, Hooman; Watermeyer, Sean; Ismail, Lamiese

    2008-01-01

    This case describes a 71 year old, post-menopausal woman who developed vaginal discharge. This complaint ultimately led to the discovery of bowel cancer in conjunction with a large sterile pyometra. The pyometra was not due to genital malignancy. The most likely conclusion is that the pyometra may have arisen as an inflammatory response to the adjacent bowel pathology. This case report highlights the need for clinicians to consider non-gynaecological cancer as a possible cause for otherwise unexplained pyometra. PMID:18606021

  19. Nocardia infections among immunomodulated inflammatory bowel disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Cândida; Rocha-Pereira, Nuno; Sarmento, António; Magro, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Human nocardiosis, caused by Nocardia spp., an ubiquitous soil-borne bacteria, is a rare granulomatous disease close related to immune dysfunctions. Clinically can occur as an acute life-threatening disease, with lung, brain and skin being commonly affected. The infection was classically diagnosed in HIV infected persons, organ transplanted recipients and long term corticosteroid treated patients. Currently the widespread use of immunomodulators and immunossupressors in the treatment of inflammatory diseases changed this scenario. Our purpose is to review all published cases of nocardiosis in immunomodulated patients due to inflammatory diseases and describe clinical and laboratory findings. We reviewed the literature concerning human cases of nocardiosis published between 1980 and 2014 in peer reviewed journals. Eleven cases of nocardiosis associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) prescription (9 related with infliximab and 2 with adalimumab) were identified; 7 patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 4 had rheumatological conditions; nocardia infection presented as cutaneous involvement in 3 patients, lung disease in 4 patients, hepatic in one and disseminated disease in 3 patients. From the 10 cases described in IBD patients 7 were associated with anti-TNF and 3 with steroids and azathioprine. In conclusion, nocardiosis requires high levels of clinical suspicion and experience of laboratory staff, in order to establish a timely diagnosis and by doing so avoid worst outcomes. Treatment for long periods tailored by the susceptibility of the isolated species whenever possible is essential. The safety of restarting immunomodulators or anti-TNF after the disease or the value of prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole is still debated. PMID:26074688

  20. Management of inflammatory bowel disease with Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    D’Aoust, Julie; Battat, Robert; Bessissow, Talat

    2017-01-01

    AIM To address the management of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) in the setting of suspected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-flare. METHODS A systematic search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases by independent reviewers identified 70 articles including a total of 932141 IBD patients or IBD-related hospitalizations. RESULTS In those with IBD, CDI is associated with increased morbidity, including subsequent escalation in IBD medical therapy, urgent colectomy and increased hospitalization, as well as excess mortality. Vancomycin-containing regimens are effective first-line therapies for CDI in IBD inpatients. No prospective data exists with regards to the safety or efficacy of initiating or maintaining corticosteroid, immunomodulator, or biologic therapy to treat IBD in the setting of CDI. Corticosteroid use is a risk factor for the development of CDI, while immunomodulators and biologics are not. CONCLUSION Strong recommendations regarding when to initiate IBD specific therapy in those with CDI are precluded by a lack of evidence. However, based on expert opinion and observational data, initiation or resumption of immunosuppressive therapy after 48-72 h of targeted antibiotic treatment for CDI may be considered. PMID:28785153

  1. Long-term Clinical Course of Post-infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome After Shigellosis: A 10-year Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Young Hoon; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lim, Hyun Chul; Park, Jae Jun; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A limited number of studies are available regarding the long-term natural history of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). We aimed to investigate the long-term clinical course of PI-IBS. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted from a 2001 shigellosis outbreak in a Korean hospital with about 2000 employees. A cohort of 124 hospital employees who were infected by Shigella sonnei due to contaminated food in the cafeteria, and 105 sex- and age-matched, non-infected, controls were serially followed for their bowel symptoms by questionnaire surveys for 10 years. Results The Shigella-infected cohort showed significantly higher odds ratio for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) at 1-year (11.90; 95% CI, 1.49–95.58) and 3-year (3.93; 95% CI, 1.20–12.86) follow-up, compared to their controls. However, corresponding odds ratio for PI-IBS was not significantly increased at 5-year (1.88; 95% CI, 0.64–5.54) and 8-year (1.87; 95% CI, 0.62–5.19) follow-up. At 10-year follow-up survey, the prevalence of IBS was similar for the Shigella-infected cohort and their controls (23.3% versus 19.7%, P = 0.703). Risk factors which were independently associated with PI-IBS among the Shigella-infected cohort included younger age, previous history of functional bowel disorder, and longer duration of diarrhea at baseline. Conclusions Patients who were infected by Shigella sonnei experienced significantly increased risk of IBS until 3 years after shigellosis, and modestly increased risk until 8 years, but showed similar risk of IBS with uninfected controls at 10 years post-infection. PI-IBS is quite a chronic disorder, and follows a long-term natural course. PMID:26908484

  2. Aberrant mucosal lymphocyte number and subsets in the colon of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Johanna; Rangel, Ignacio; Kumawat, Ashok K; Hultgren-Hörnquist, Elisabeth; Brummer, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by chronic abdominal symptoms such as pain, discomfort, and altered bowel habits. A subset of IBS patients, denoted as post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) patients, develop symptoms after an enteric infection. Distinct abnormalities in the gut mucosa, including mucosal inflammation, have been proposed to contribute to or be the cause of PI-IBS. This study investigated lymphocyte subsets in PI-IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Ten PI-IBS patients and nine healthy controls participated. All PI-IBS patients met the Rome III diagnostic criteria for IBS and reported sustained symptoms at least 1 year after an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Intraepithelial lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs), isolated from mucosal tissue samples, were stained and analyzed for a comprehensive set of cell markers using flow cytometry. The number of LPLs in PI-IBS was significantly increased compared to those in healthy controls (p < 0.05). PI-IBS patients showed significantly increased proportions of CD45RO(+) CD4(+) activated/memory T cells (p < 0.05) and double-positive CD4(+) CD8(+) cells (p < 0.05), respectively, in the lamina propria. The number of CD19(+) LPLs was decreased in PI-IBS patients compared to healthy controls (p < 0.001). This study presents new evidence that PI-IBS is associated with a sustained aberrant mucosal immune response and support future studies of anti-inflammatory or immune-modulating treatments in these patients.

  3. Post-Laminectomy Wound Infections: Colonized Seromas Mimicking Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Abruzzo, Eileen D; Schoch, Paul E

    2014-02-14

    Post-operative laminectomy wounds are frequently accompanied by seromas. Post-operative wound drainage may be colonized or infected. The differentiation of wound colonization from infection is difficult for non-infectious disease physicians. External chart reviewers classified 31/1531 laminectomies (over three years) as post-operative wound infections. We re-evaluated these cases using infectious disease criteria, i.e., while pathogens may be cultured from both colonized and infected wounds, only wound infections have a purulent discharge with abundant white blood cells (WBCs) on Gram stain. Colonized wounds have positive wound cultures but no/few WBCs on Gram stain. We found only 11/31 actual wound infections, the remainder were not bona fide wound infections, but were colonized seromas. Post-laminectomy colonized seromas that are culture positive for one or more organisms often mimic wound infections. In the era of public reporting of nosocomial infections, it is important that external reviewers differentiate colonization from infection to provide regulatory agencies with accurate data.

  4. Mycotic Infection post ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Ayerza, Miguel; Carbo, Lisandro; Sanchez, Marisa; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Muscolo, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: There are several studies in literature of septic arthritis after the ACL arthroscopic reconstruction related to bacterial germs. However, fungi infection is likely infrequent generating a massive bone loss with a catastrophic result. The purpose of this study was to describe preventive measures to decrease the mycotic infection after ACL reconstruction. Methods: Since 2005, we have diagnosed and treated 22 immunocompetent patients who underwent a surgery of an ACL lesion in other institutions in the country. Form these cases, we analyzed 19 which developed mycotic infection and an oncologic debridement was performed to control the pathology. In this series, we considered the initial surgery, the number of toilettes performed until their referral, magnitude of bone loss and final outcome. There were 5 other patients who consulted for mucormycosis, who finally were treated in other hospitals. Results: Epidemiology of mucormycosis is not clear. The exact cause is unknown due to heterogeneous data, different places and surgeons, facilities and type of surgical instruments in this series. In spite of not knowing the cause of the infection, several alternatives were evaluated in a non systematic way. Most of them related to the surgery room, sterilization place of the surgical tools, use of sterilizing liquids, cleanliness of lumen and cannulated bits. Instruments used during surgery were also evaluated: fields, shaver blades, drill types, ACL reconstruction fixation method. It is doubtful if the type of graft to reconstruct the ACL had any relation with infections. Among ideal preventive measures, the following are described: Surgery room with temperature and humidity control. Not using sterilizing liquids. Optimal preparation of surgical tools with adequate cleanliness of lumen and cannulated bits performed by adequate personnel. Sterilize in the same place where the surgery will be performed. Use of adequate instruments. The use of the central third of

  5. Does Preoperative Bowel Preparation Reduce Surgical Site Infections During Elective Ventral Hernia Repair?

    PubMed

    Krpata, David M; Haskins, Ivy N; Phillips, Sharon; Prabhu, Ajita S; Rosenblatt, Steven; Poulose, Benjamin K; Rosen, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    To date, little is known about the benefits of preoperative bowel preparation in patients undergoing elective ventral hernia repair (VHR). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of preoperative bowel preparation on 30-day wound events in patients undergoing elective VHR using the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative (AHSQC). All patients undergoing elective VHR from January 2013 through January 2016 were identified within the AHSQC. Patients undergoing emergency VHR and those with a CDC wound class IV were excluded from our analysis. Patients were divided into 2 groups: Clean (CDC wound class I) and Contaminated (CDC wound classes II and III). The association of preoperative bowel preparation with 30-day wound events was investigated using logistic regression modeling. A total of 3,709 patients met inclusion criteria; 3,101 (83.6%) had CDC wound class I, and 608 (16.4%) had CDC wound classes II or III. Within the Clean group, patients who underwent preoperative bowel preparation were significantly more likely to experience a surgical site infection (SSI), surgical site occurrence (SSO), and surgical site occurrence requiring procedural intervention (SSOPI). Within the Contaminated group, patients who underwent preoperative bowel preparation were significantly more likely to experience an SSOPI. The use of preoperative bowel preparation in patients undergoing elective VHR does not reduce the risk of 30-day wound events. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [IMPACT OF PREOPERATIVE BOWEL PREPARATION ON PREVENTION OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Minako; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-07-01

    Preoperative preparation of the bowel includes two methods, mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) to remove gross feces and oral antibiotic bowel preparation (OABP) to reduce the colonic bacterial load. MBP and OABP have been performed since the 1940s to 1950s. MBP is routinely performed to reduce the morbidity and mortality of elective colorectal surgery and has been a surgical dogma since the early 1970s. However, numerous prospective, randomized, controlled trials and meta-analyses have questioned the need for MBP in elective colorectal surgery, and a meta-analysis showed that significantly more anastomotic leaks were found after MBP. OABP decreases postoperative infectious complications considerably, although the results differ with the type of antibiotic used. Recently, several large retrospective studies have demonstrated that MBP plus OABP is associated with reduced postoperative infectious complications including surgical site infection rates after elective colorectal surgery. Further prospective, randomized trials of MBP and OABP alone and in combination should be conducted.

  7. Risk of post-operative complications associated with anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tauseef; Yun, Laura; Rubin, David T

    2012-01-01

    There have been increasing concerns regarding the safety of perioperative anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) α agents. We performed a literature review to evaluate the post-operative complications associated with perioperative anti-TNF use in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A comprehensive review was performed with a literature search utilizing Pub Med, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases according to published guidelines. To date, there are only data for infliximab. There are three published studies which have assessed post-operative complications with perioperative infliximab use in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), four studies in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and one study on both CD and UC patients. Two out of the three studies in CD patients showed no increased post-operative complications associated with perioperative infliximab. Two out of four studies in UC patients also did not show an increase in post-operative complications, and the combined study with CD and UC patients did not show an increased risk as well. Study results could not be combined secondary to significant differences in study designs, patient population and definition of their endpoints. There appears to be a risk of post-operative complications associated with TNF therapy in some patients. Based on these data, careful patient selection and prospective data collection should be performed. PMID:22294822

  8. Investigation of Small Bowel Abnormalities in HIV-Infected Patients Using Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Eiji; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Hosono, Kuhihiro; Ueda, Atsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    HIV infection is reportedly associated with an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and can cause HIV enteropathy, which occurs independently of opportunistic infections. However, the characteristics of small bowel abnormalities attributable to HIV infection are rarely investigated. In the present study, we assessed the intestinal mucosal changes found in HIV-infected patients and compared them with the mucosa of healthy control subjects using capsule endoscopy (CE). Three of the 27 HIV-infected patients harbored gastrointestinal opportunistic infections and were thus excluded from subsequent analyses. The endoscopic findings of CE in HIV-infected patients were significantly higher than those in control subjects (55% versus 10%, P = 0.002); however, most lesions, such as red spots or tiny erosions, were unlikely to cause abdominal symptoms. After validating the efficacy of CE for the diagnosis of villous atrophy, we found that the prevalence of villous atrophy was 54% (13/24) among HIV-infected patients. Interestingly, villous atrophy persisted in patients receiving long-term antiretroviral therapy, though most of them exhibited reconstituted peripheral blood CD4+ T cells. Although we could not draw any conclusions regarding the development of small bowel abnormalities in HIV-infected patients, our results may provide some insight regarding the pathogenesis of HIV enteropathy. PMID:28408924

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue 6 years after giardia infection: a controlled prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hanevik, Kurt; Wensaas, Knut-Arne; Rortveit, Guri; Eide, Geir Egil; Mørch, Kristine; Langeland, Nina

    2014-11-15

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders and fatigue may follow acute infections. This study aimed to estimate the persistence, prevalence, and risk of irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue 6 years after Giardia infection. We performed a controlled prospective study of a cohort of 1252 individuals who had laboratory-confirmed Giardia infection during a waterborne outbreak in 2004. In total, 748 cohort cases (exposed) and 878 matched controls responded to a postal questionnaire 6 years later (in 2010). Responses were compared to data from the same cohort 3 years before (in 2007). The prevalences of irritable bowel syndrome (39.4%) by Rome III criteria and chronic fatigue (30.8%) in the exposed group 6 years after giardiasis were significantly elevated compared with controls, with adjusted relative risks (RRs) of 3.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-3.9) and 2.9 (95% CI, 2.3-3.4), respectively. In the exposed group, the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome decreased by 6.7% (RR, 0.85 [95% CI, .77-.93]), whereas the prevalence of chronic fatigue decreased by 15.3% from 3 to 6 years after Giardia infection (RR, 0.69 [95% CI, .62-.77]). Giardia exposure was a significant risk factor for persistence of both conditions, and increasing age was a risk factor for persisting chronic fatigue. Giardia infection in a nonendemic setting is associated with an increased risk for irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue 6 years later. The prevalences of both conditions decrease over time, indicating that this intestinal protozoan parasite may elicit very long-term, but slowly self-limiting, complications. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  10. Bag and loop small bowel contouring strategies differentially estimate small bowel dose for post-hysterectomy women receiving pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Melody J; Kirk, Maura; Zhai, Huifang; Lin, Lilie L

    2016-07-01

    Background Small bowel (SB) dose-volume relationships established during initial computed tomography (CT) simulations may change throughout therapy due to organ displacement and motion. We investigated the impact of organ motion on SB dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in women with gynecologic malignancies treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and compared PBS SB DVHs to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods Post-hysterectomy patients (n = 11) treated for gynecologic cancers were enrolled on an image-guided proton therapy protocol involving CT simulation with full (CTF) and empty (CTE) bladders and weekly/biweekly on-treatment scans. IMRT plans were generated for comparative analysis. SB was contoured as bowel loops or bowel bag. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for matched-pair comparisons of SB, bladder, and rectum dose-volumes between CT scans and between PBS and IMRT plans. Results In PBS loops analysis, on-treatment DVH was significantly higher than CTF for doses <45 Gy (p < 0.05), and not significantly different than CTE. Specifically, V15 for loops was higher on-treatment (median 240 cm(3)) compared to CTF (median 169 cm(3), p = 0.03). In PBS bag analysis, on-treatment DVH was not significantly different from CTF across all dose ranges. Bowel bag V45 was not significantly different between on-treatment (median 540 cm(3)) and CTF (median 499 cm(3), p = 0.53). Decreasing bladder volume was associated with increasing V15 for loops and V45 for bowel bag (p < 0.005, both). Comparing PBS and IMRT, PBS resulted in significantly lower DVHs at low dose regions (<38 Gy) and higher DVHs at high dose regions (42.5-45.5 Gy) in both loops and bag analysis. IMRT plans demonstrated higher on-treatment SB loop DVHs and only minimal differences in bowel bag DVHs compared to CTF. Conclusions SB DVHs were well estimated by CTF bowel bag and underestimated by CTF loops in the setting of inconsistent

  11. Gastrointestinal infections and the development of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Herbert L

    2011-10-01

    Approximately 10% of the millions of persons with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGDs) including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) had their illness onset following an acute bout of infectious diarrhea and are referred to as having postinfectious (PI) FGD or PI-IBS. Recent studies have helped to identify the pathogenesis and natural history of these disorders. Groups of patients with acute diarrhea or dysentery (passage of grossly bloody stools) are being followed for development of PI-IBS. Persistent mucosal inflammation, air trapping in the gut, and alteration of intestinal motility contribute to the disease symptoms in genetically susceptible persons. The prognosis of postinfectious forms of IBS is more favorable compared with people with idiopathic forms of the disorder. With full characterization of postdiarrhea forms of FGDs, we should be able to define the mechanisms of disease early in the course of chronic illness and to better understand the more common idiopathic forms of the disease. We are likely to identify specific alteration of gut pathophysiology in postinfectious FGDs and to then classify them not as a poorly characterized group of functional disorders but as specific gastrointestinal disorders.

  12. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infected cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.

  13. Endemic fungal infections in inflammatory bowel disease associated with anti-TNF antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Miguel E; Farraye, Francis A; Di Palma, Jack A

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are susceptible to complications from pharmacologic treatment of their disease. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors are being used increasingly in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and can be associated with adverse events, including common infections, and rarely the development of serious life-threatening opportunistic infections. TNF-α inhibitors have the ability to prevent an effective patient granulomatous response, and this may be associated with an increased risk of developing mycobacterial and certain fungal infections, including histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis, endemic in several parts of the United States. The concern for invasive fungal infection was realized during clinical trials and further demonstrated after the marketing of TNF-α inhibitors. Because of this awareness, the Food and Drug Administration developed an adverse event-reporting system to capture cases of infections associated with the use of TNF-α inhibitors. These opportunistic fungi have a great degree of regional variability, and it has been very difficult to quantify the incidence of infection in patients treated with TNF-α inhibitors. Currently, there are no formal guidelines regarding the use of TNF-α inhibitors and these fungal infections. Considering that gastroenterologists have embraced the use TNF-α inhibitors as a valuable armamentarium in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, they must be aware of therapy-related infectious complications, including appropriate diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive strategies. In this article, we explore the association of these fungal entities in relation to the TNF-α inhibitor therapy by considering information provided in the gastroenterology, infectious diseases, rheumatology, and transplant literature. Finally, we provide some recommendations on diagnosis and treatment.

  14. [Infection post Excimer Laser Corneal Refractive Surgery].

    PubMed

    Hieda, Osamu; Sotozono, Chie; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    To report the cases with severe infection post excimer laser refractive surgery. This study involved 6 eyes of 4 women (mean age 38 years, range : 27-51 years) who underwent excimer laser corneal refractive surgery. In all 4 cases, the respective primary causative organisms of the infection were quinolone-resistant methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, quinolone-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, yeast type fungus, and in 1 case, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. We initiated topical antibiotics or intensive antifungal treatment, yet due to severe inflammation and ophthalmalgia, analgesic drugs were needed. An average hospitalization period was 38.5 days (range : 22-77 days), and the best spectacle-corrected visual acuity was 0.5 or more than 0.5 post discharge. In the treatment of severe corneal infection post refractive surgery, it is important to identify the primary causative organism. If the response to the initial treatment is poor, such patients should immediately be referred to a special clinic to obtain a better visual outcome.

  15. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    DOE PAGES

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infectedmore » cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.« less

  16. Distribution and Phenotype of Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spieker, Tilmann; Herbst, Hermann

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of colon mucosa, particularly in inflammatory bowel diseases. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are thought to differ in T-helper lymphocyte composition and cytokine secretion patterns. Some of the implicated cytokines are growth factors for EBV-infected cells. We examined colon mucosa for differences in the distribution and phenotype of EBV-infected cells. Colon tissues with Crohn’s disease (n = 31) or ulcerative colitis (n = 25) and controls (n = 60) were characterized by in situ hybridization and immunohistology for six EBV gene products as indicators of latent and replicative EBV infection. The cells were additionally phenotyped by combined detection of the EBV transcripts and B- or T-cell antigens. B lymphocytes predominated as the site of latent EBV infection in the colon and were most numerous in ulcerative colitis. In active ulcerative colitis, EBV-positive lymphocytes accumulated under and within the epithelium and displayed evidence for replicative infection. The patterns of mucosal EBV gene expression indicate local impairment of virus-specific T-cell responses in active ulcerative colitis. Detection of EBV may help to discriminate between active ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory bowel diseases. Colon mucosa is a potential site of EBV replication and may be relevant for EBV transmission. PMID:10880375

  17. An Update on Post-infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Role of Genetics, Immune Activation, Serotonin and Altered Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Ching

    2012-01-01

    The literature on post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is reviewed with special emphasis on recent new data. Further accounts of this phenomenon continue to be reported following a range of infections including giardiasis as well as viral and bacterial gastroenteritis. Risk factors such as severity of initial illness, female gender together with adverse psychological factors have been confirmed. Recent evidence of a genetic predisposition needs replication. Animal studies suggest activation of mast cells and inflammation driven impairment of serotonin transporter may be important, which are findings supported by some recent human studies in IBS with diarrhoea. Experimentally induced inflammation leads to damage and remodelling of enteric nerves. Similar changes have been reported in IBS patients with increase in nerves expressing transient receptor potential cation channel V1. While changes in microbiota are very likely this area has yet to be explored using modern techniques. Since the prognosis is for slow improvement, treatments should currently target the key symptoms of diarrhoea and abdominal pain. Future therapies aimed at correcting underlying mechanisms including immune activation and serotonin excess are currently being explored and may provide better treatments in the future. PMID:22837873

  18. Post-transplantation Infections in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Arze, S; Arze, L; Abecia, C

    2016-03-01

    Over 26 years, we found 46 infectious episodes in 350 kidney transplant recipients. Fifteen were urinary tract infections, recurrent in 4 patients. There were 8 cytomegalovirus infections, three of them fatal when intravenous (IV) ganciclovir was not available. Seven patients had a reactivation of tuberculosis (TB) in the pleura, cervical spine, lumbar spine, knee, ankle, skin and peritoneum, respectively, and were all resolved satisfactorily with conventional anti-TB therapy. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of acyclovir developed an extensive herpes zoster infection in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was resolved with the use of oral acyclovir, and 1 had a disseminated herpes simplex infection resolved with the use of IV acyclovir. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with trimethoprim sulfa developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was fatal in one of them. In 2 patients, we found a Nocardia infection, confined to the lung, which was cured in one of the cases and systemic and fatal in the other. Two patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of nystatin developed esophageal candidiasis in the 1st 6 months after transplantation. One patient developed infective endocarditis in a stenotic bicuspid aortic valve and died 10 years later after another incident of infective endocarditis at the prosthetic aortic valve. Two patients developed an extensive condyloma at the penis, perianal region, and perineum owing to human papillomavirus, requiring extensive surgical resection and podophyllin applications. Another patient developed fatal post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease due to Epstein-Barr virus infection 15 years after transplantation. One patient developed a severe and fatal mucocutaneous leishmaniasis with no response to conventional antimonial therapy. It is interesting to note that despite Chagas disease being endemic

  19. Relevance of fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin in the post-operative management of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Caccaro, Roberta; Angriman, Imerio; D'Incà, Renata

    2016-03-27

    The role of fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin has been extensively studied in many areas of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients' management. The post-operative setting in both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients has been less investigated although few promising results come from small, cross-sectional studies. Therefore, the current post-operative management still requires endoscopy 6-12 mo after intestinal resection for CD in order to exclude endoscopic recurrence and plan the therapeutic strategy. In patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy, endoscopy is required whenever symptoms includes the possibility of pouchitis. There is emerging evidence that fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin are useful surrogate markers of inflammation in the post-operative setting, they correlate with the presence and severity of endoscopic recurrence according to Rutgeerts' score and possibly predict the subsequent clinical recurrence and response to therapy in CD patients. Similarly, fecal markers show a good correlation with the presence of pouchitis, as confirmed by endoscopy in operated UC patients. Fecal calprotectin seems to be able to predict the short-term development of pouchitis in asymptomatic patients and to vary according to response to medical treatment. The possibility of both fecal markers to used in the routine clinical practice for monitoring IBD patients in the post-operative setting should be confirmed in multicentric clinical trial with large sample set. An algorithm that can predict the optimal use and timing of fecal markers testing, the effective need and timing of endoscopy and the cost-effectiveness of these as a strategy of care would be of great interest.

  20. Relevance of fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin in the post-operative management of inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Caccaro, Roberta; Angriman, Imerio; D’Incà, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The role of fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin has been extensively studied in many areas of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients’ management. The post-operative setting in both Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients has been less investigated although few promising results come from small, cross-sectional studies. Therefore, the current post-operative management still requires endoscopy 6-12 mo after intestinal resection for CD in order to exclude endoscopic recurrence and plan the therapeutic strategy. In patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy, endoscopy is required whenever symptoms includes the possibility of pouchitis. There is emerging evidence that fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin are useful surrogate markers of inflammation in the post-operative setting, they correlate with the presence and severity of endoscopic recurrence according to Rutgeerts’ score and possibly predict the subsequent clinical recurrence and response to therapy in CD patients. Similarly, fecal markers show a good correlation with the presence of pouchitis, as confirmed by endoscopy in operated UC patients. Fecal calprotectin seems to be able to predict the short-term development of pouchitis in asymptomatic patients and to vary according to response to medical treatment. The possibility of both fecal markers to used in the routine clinical practice for monitoring IBD patients in the post-operative setting should be confirmed in multicentric clinical trial with large sample set. An algorithm that can predict the optimal use and timing of fecal markers testing, the effective need and timing of endoscopy and the cost-effectiveness of these as a strategy of care would be of great interest. PMID:27022446

  1. [Management of post-abortum infections].

    PubMed

    Lamy, C; Mezan de Malartic, C; Perdriolle, E; Gauchotte, E; Villeroy-de-Galhau, S; Delaporte, M-O; Morel, O; Judlin, P

    2012-12-01

    In countries where induced abortions are legal and medically supervised, the frequency of post-abortion infections is low and maternal death is infrequent. Nevertheless, short and long term consequences of post-abortion infections must be addressed. Sexually transmitted pathogens are frequently in cause here. Risk factors include in particular young age (less than 24 years), low socioeconomic level, late pregnancy, nulliparity, and history of previous untreated pelvic inflammatory disease. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and an inflammatory syndrome occurring within 2 to 3 weeks after spontaneous or induced abortion. A pelvic ultrasound is recommended in order to ensure the uterus vacuity and to look for a possible pelvic abscess, and bacteriological samples must be performed. Management consists in a regimen combining two antibiotics intravenously, with the possible addition of intravenous heparin in case of pelvic thrombophlebitis. Antibiotics can be discontinued 48 h of a clinical improvement and further treatment by oral route brings no benefit. Intrauterine retention associated with post-abortion endometritis must be addressed either by medical or surgical method. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Post-Infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome, an Inflammation-Immunological Model with Relevance for Other IBS and Functional Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This review presents studies that support an inflammation-immunological model for the pathogenesis of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and highlights recent studies that support a similar disease model in non-post-infectious IBS, in particular, diarrhoea-predominant IBS, as well as in post-infectious functional dyspepsia. These recent studies are highlighted to demonstrate that one line of research in functional gastrointestinal disorders has moved away from the old psychosomatic concepts. It is hoped that this will encourage future students of this field to explore the role of immunological events. PMID:20535323

  3. Motility Response to Colonic Distention is Increased in Post-infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome (PI-IBS)

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Motoyori; Palsson, Olafur S.; van Tilburg, Miranda A.L.; Gangarosa, Lisa M.; Fukudo, Shin; Whitehead., William E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute intestinal infection leads to persistent intestinal smooth muscle hypercontractility and pain hypersensitivity after resolution of the infection in animal models. We investigated whether post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) is associated with abnormalities in phasic contractions of the colon, smooth muscle tone and pain sensitivity compared to non-PI-IBS (NI-IBS) or healthy controls (HC). Methods 218 Rome III positive IBS patients and 43 healthy controls participated. IBS patients were designated PI-IBS if their IBS symptoms began following an episode of gastroenteritis characterized by 2 or more of: fever, vomiting, or diarrhea. Pain threshold to phasic distentions of the descending colon was assessed using a barostat. Colonic motility was assessed with the barostat bag minimally inflated to the individual operating pressure (IOP), at 20 mmHg above the IOP, and following a test meal. IBS symptom severity and psychological symptoms were assessed by the IBS Severity Scale (IBS-SS) and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18). Key Results Twenty-two (10.1%) met criteria for PI-IBS. Both IBS and HC groups showed a significant increase in motility index during intraluminal distention and following meals. The magnitude of the response to distention above (orad to) the balloon was significantly greater in PI-IBS compared with NI-IBS (p<0.05) or HC (p<0.01). Differences between PI-IBS and NI-IBS were not significant for IBS symptom severity, pain threshold, barostat bag volumes, or any psychological score on the BSI-18. Conclusions & Inferences Patients with PI-IBS have greater colonic hypercontractility than NI-IBS. We speculate that sustained mild mucosal inflammation may cause this colonic irritability. PMID:24602083

  4. [Effect of Preoperative Bowel Preparation on Surgical Site Infection in Liver Surgery].

    PubMed

    Orimo, Tatsuya; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Yokoo, Hideki; Kakisaka, Tatsuhiko; Wakayama, Kenji; Tsuruga, Yosuke; Kamachi, Hirofumi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2015-11-01

    In our institute, the protocol for preoperative bowel preparation before liver surgery has been changed from polyethylene glycol lavage (NiflecR: N group) to magnesium citrate (MagcorolR: M group). Ninety patients who underwent hepatectomy without reconstruction of the bile duct, gastorectomy, or colorectal resection from 2012 to 2013 were enrolled in this study. The impacts of preoperative bowel preparation were compared between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of surgical procedure, operative time, bleeding amount, and duration of postoperative hospital stay. Surgical-site infection did not occur in both groups. There were no significant differences in the white blood cell count and platelet count of the patients in both groups. The C-reactive protein level in the M group was significantly lower than that in the N group on days 1, 3, and 5 after the operation, whereas the ammonia level in the M group was significantly lower than that in the N group on day 5 after the operation. It is possible to simplify preoperative bowel preparation associated with liver surgery while ensuring appropriate safety.

  5. The role of infection in inflammatory bowel disease: initiation, exacerbation and protection.

    PubMed

    Lidar, Merav; Langevitz, Pnina; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, a collective term for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a chronic, immune-mediated disease of the gastrointestinal tract that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. The role of infection in the development of inflammatory bowel disease is underscored by various clinical observations, such as the delayed age of onset, suggesting that childhood exposure to pathogens is essential, and the clinical improvement that follows decreasing bacterial intestinal load. Over the years, many a pathogen has been linked to the development and exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease, notably; Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Chlamydia as well as viruses such as measles, mumps, rubella, Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus. Presently, leading theories of disease pathogenesis suggest loss of immune tolerance to normal commensal bacteria coupled with excessive exposure to bacterial antigenic products. This review describes the most commonly implicated pathogens in the causation of IBD and presents the evidence supporting their pathogenic role as well as data that offset their importance.

  6. Clostridium difficile infection in inflammatory bowel disease: challenges in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying M; Stone, Christian D

    2017-04-01

    The problem of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has reached epidemic proportions, particularly in industrialized nations. The pathophysiology, disease course and the potential complications are well appreciated in the general hospitalized patient. However, when CDI occurs in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a number of distinct differences in the diagnosis and clinical management of the infection in this population should be appreciated by gastroenterologists, hospitalists and other care providers. This review highlights the unique aspects of CDI when it occurs in IBD patients with an emphasis on the challenge of distinguishing persistent infection from exacerbation of underlying chronic colitis. An understanding of how CDI may differ in presentation and how management should be altered can prevent serious and life-threatening complications.

  7. Benefits of Bowel Preparation Beyond Surgical Site Infection: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Althumairi, Azah A; Canner, Joseph K; Pawlik, Timothy M; Schneider, Eric; Nagarajan, Neeraja; Safar, Bashar; Efron, Jonathan E

    2016-12-01

    To examine whether the administration of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) plus oral antibiotic bowel preparation (OABP) was associated with reduced surgical site infections (SSIs), which in turn leads to a reduction of non-SSI-related postoperative complications. Administration of MBP/OABP before elective colectomy reduces the incidence of SSI. We hypothesized that reduction of SSI is on causal pathway between the use of MBP/OABP and the reduction of other postoperative complications. The study population consisted of all colectomy cases in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Colectomy Targeted Participant Use Data File for 2012 and 2013. Postoperative outcomes were compared based on the type of bowel preparation: none, MBP only, OABP only, and MBP plus OABP adjusting for other covariates. The cohort included 19,686 patients. Of these 5060 (25.7%) patients did not receive any form of bowel preparation, 8020 (40.7%) received MBP only, 641 (3.3%) received OABP only, and 5965 (30.3%) received MBP plus OABP. Patients who received MBP plus OABP had a lower incidence of superficial SSI, deep SSI, organ space SSI, any SSI, anastomotic leak, postoperative ileus, sepsis, readmission, and reoperation compared with patients who received neither (all P < 0.01). The reduction in SSI incidence was associated with a reduction in wound dehiscence, anastomotic leak, pneumonia, prolonged requirement of mechanical ventilator, sepsis, septic shock, readmission, and reoperation. Combined MBP plus OABP before elective colectomy was associated with reduced SSI, which ultimately was associated with a reduction in non-SSI-related complications.

  8. Incidence of bloodstream infections in small bowel transplant recipients receiving selective decontamination of the digestive tract: A single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, David; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Goldschmidt, Monique; Hemmelgarn, Trina; Courter, Joshua; Nathan, Jaimie D.; Alonso, Maria; Tiao, Greg; Fei, Lin; Kocoshis, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing small bowel transplantation are susceptible to postoperative CLABSI. SDD directed against enteric microbes is a strategy for reducing CLABSI. We hypothesized that SDD reduces the frequency of CLABSI, infections outside the bloodstream, and allograft rejection during the first 30 days following transplant. A retrospective chart review of 38 pediatric small bowel transplant recipients at CCHMC from 2003 to 2011 was conducted. SDD antimicrobials were oral colistin, tobramycin, and amphotericin B. The incidence of CLABSI, infections outside the bloodstream, and rejection episodes were compared between study periods. The incidence of CLABSI did not difier between study periods (6.9 CLABSI vs. 4.6 CLABSI per 1000 catheter days; p = 0.727), but gram positives and Candida predominated in the first 30 days. Incidence of bacterial infections outside the bloodstream did not differ (p = 0.227). Rejection occurred more frequently during the first month following transplant (p = 0.302). SDD does not alter the incidence of CLABSI, bacterial infections outside the bloodstream, or allograft rejection in the immediate 30 days post-transplantation. However, SDD does influence CLABSI organism types (favoring gram positives and Candida) and Candidal infections outside the bloodstream. PMID:26332092

  9. The intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and Clostridium difficile infection: is there a relationship with inflammatory bowel disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Justyna; Palagani, Vindhya

    2013-01-01

    Gut microbiota is a compilation of microorganisms dwelling in the entire mammalian gastrointestinal tract. They display a symbiotic relationship with the host contributing to its intestinal health and disease. Even a slight fluctuation in this equipoise may be deleterious to the host, leading to many pathological conditions like Clostridium difficile infection or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we focus on the role of microbial dysbiosis in initiation of C. difficile infection and IBD, and we also touch upon the role of specific pathogens, particularly C. difficile, as causative agents of IBD. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms activated by C. difficile that contribute to the development and exacerbation of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23320050

  10. Comparing Mechanical Bowel Preparation With Both Oral and Systemic Antibiotics Versus Mechanical Bowel Preparation and Systemic Antibiotics Alone for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection After Elective Colorectal Surgery: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Song, Xue; Chen, Liang-Zhou; Lin, Zhi-Dong; Zhang, Xue-Li

    2016-01-01

    The discussion on the role of mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics in elective colorectal surgery is still ongoing. This meta-analysis aimed to determine whether oral systemic antibiotics with mechanical bowel preparation are superior to systemic antibiotics and mechanical bowel preparation for prophylaxis of bacterial infection during elective colorectal operation. Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library were searched using the terms oral, antibiotics/antimicrobial, colorectal/rectal/colon/rectum, and surgery/operation. All of the available randomized controlled trials that compared the efficacy of combined oral and systemic antibiotics and mechanical bowel preparation with systemic antibiotics alone and mechanical bowel preparation in colorectal surgery and defined surgical site infection based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria were included. All of the statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.2 software. A fixed model was used if there was no evidence of heterogeneity; otherwise, a random-effects model was used. We focused on incidence of surgical site infection among the groups. Seven randomized controlled trials that consisted of 1769 cases were eligible for analysis. We found that both total surgical site infection and incisional surgical site infection were significantly reduced in patients who received oral systemic antibiotics and mechanical bowel preparation compared with patients who received systemic antibiotics alone and mechanical bowel preparation (total: 7.2% vs 16.0%, p < 0.00001; incisional: 4.6% vs 12.1%, p < 0.00001). However, no significant difference was detected in the rate of organ/space surgical site infection (4.0% vs 4.8%; p = 0.56) after elective colorectal surgery. The meta-analysis was limited by the risk of bias because a majority of the studies did not use the blinding method. Oral systemic antibiotics and mechanical bowel preparation significantly lowered the incidence of surgical

  11. Infection among adult small bowel and multivisceral transplant recipients in the 30-day postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Primeggia, J; Matsumoto, C S; Fishbein, T M; Karacki, P S; Fredette, T M; Timpone, J G

    2013-10-01

    Intestinal transplantation is a potential option for patients with short gut syndrome (SGS), and infection is common in the postoperative period. The aim of our study was to identify the incidence and characteristics of bacterial and fungal infections of adult small bowel or multivisceral (SB/MV) transplantation recipients in the 30-day postoperative period. This retrospective chart review assessed the incidence and characteristics of bacterial and fungal infections in patients who underwent SB/MV transplant at our center between April 2004 and November 2008. Patient data were retrieved from computerized databases, flow-charts, and medical records. A total of 40 adult patients with a mean age of 38.7 ± 13.4 years received transplants during this period: 27 patients received isolated SB, 12 received MV, and 1 received SB and kidney. Our immunosuppressive regimen included basiliximab for induction, and tacrolimus, sirolimus, and methylprednisolone for maintenance therapy. The most common indications for transplant were SGS, intestinal ischemia, Crohn's disease, trauma, motility disorders, and Gardner's syndrome. We report a 30-day postoperative infection rate of 57.5% and mean time to first infection of 10.78 ± 8.99 days. A total of 36 infections were documented in 23 patients. Of patients who developed infections, 56.5% developed 1 infection, 30.4% developed 2 infections, and 13% developed 3 infections. The most common site of infection was the abdomen, followed by blood, urine, lung, and wound infection. The isolates were gram-negative bacteria in 49.3%, gram-positive bacteria in 39.4%, and 11.3% were fungi. The most common organisms were Pseudomonas (19%), Enterococcus (15%), and Escherichia coli (13%). Overall, 47% of infections were due to drug-resistant pathogens; 31% of E. coli and Klebsiella species were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms, 36% of Pseudomonas was multidrug resistant (MDR), 75% of Enterococcus was vancomycin resistant

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Papamichael, Konstantinos; Konstantopoulos, Panagiotis; Mantzaris, Gerassimos J

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most widely spread infectious diseases in humans. It can cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies and has been associated with extra-gastric disorders. H. pylori elicit a chronic systemic inflammatory response which, under certain conditions, may trigger autoimmune reactions and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Although the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, it is thought to result from complex interactions between environmental factors and microbiota in the gut of individuals who are genetically susceptible. Several bacterial and viral agents have been implicated in the aetiology of IBD. In theory, H. pylori infection could be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD by inducing alterations in gastric and/or intestinal permeability or by causing immunological derangements resulting in absorption of antigenic material and autoimmunity via various immunological pathways. Similar mechanisms may also be responsible for the co-existence of IBD with other autoimmune diseases and/or extra-intestinal manifestations. However, the epidemiological data fail to support this association. In fact, various studies indicate that the prevalence of H. pylori infection is low in patients with IBD, suggesting a protective role for this infection in the development of IBD. In this report, we aim to shed light on proposed mechanisms and confounding factors underlying the potential link between H. pylori infection and IBD. PMID:24914359

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease in Asians: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Wei; Ji, Hong-Zan; Yang, Miao-Fang; Wu, Lin; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in an Asian population. METHODS: The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for observational studies published up until June 2014, without language restrictions. Additional references were obtained from reviewed articles. RESULTS: Ten studies involving 1299 IBD patients and 1817 controls were included in the meta-analysis (24.9% of IBD patients had H. pylori infection vs 48.3% of the controls). The pooled risk ratio for H. pylori infection in IBD patients compared with controls was 0.48 (95%CI: 0.43-0.54; P < 0.001). There was no significant heterogeneity in the included studies (I2 = 21%). Egger’s linear regression indicated that there was no significant publication bias (P = 0.203). CONCLUSION: The H. pylori infection rate in Asian IBD patients is significantly lower than in non-IBD patients, indicating that infection protects against the development of IBD. PMID:25914487

  14. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A+B+ strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  15. Epidemiological investigation of Candida species causing bloodstream infection in paediatric small bowel transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Suhr, Mallory J; Gomes-Neto, João Carlos; Banjara, Nabaraj; Florescu, Diana F; Mercer, David F; Iwen, Peter C; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2017-06-01

    Small bowel transplantation (SBT) can be a life-saving medical procedure. However, these recipients experience high risk of bloodstream infections caused by Candida. This research aims to characterise the SBT recipient gut microbiota over time following transplantation and investigate the epidemiology of candidaemia in seven paediatric patients. Candida species from the recipients' ileum and bloodstream were identified by internal transcribed spacer sequence and distinguished to strain by multilocus sequence typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. Antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream isolates was determined against nine antifungals. Twenty-two ileostomy samples harboured at least one Candida species. Fungaemia were caused by Candida parapsilosis, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida pelliculosa. All but three bloodstream isolates showed susceptibility to all the antifungals tested. One C. glabrata isolate showed multidrug resistance to itraconazole, amphotericin B and posaconazole and intermediate resistance to caspofungin. Results are congruent with both endogenous (C. albicans, C. glabrata) and exogenous (C. parapsilosis) infections; results also suggest two patients were infected by the same strain of C. parapsilosis. Continuing to work towards a better understanding of sources of infection-particularly the exogenous sources-would lead to targeted prevention strategies. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. A Potential Role of Salmonella Infection in the Onset of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Bárbara M.; Paduro, Carolina A.; Salazar, Geraldyne A.; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J.; Sebastián, Valentina P.; Riedel, Claudia A.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Bueno, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes a set of pathologies that result from a deregulated immune response that may affect any portion of the gastrointestinal tract. The most prevalent and defined forms of IBD are Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Although the etiology of IBD is not well defined, it has been suggested that environmental and genetic factors contribute to disease development and that the interaction between these two factors can trigger the pathology. Diet, medication use, vitamin D status, smoking, and bacterial infections have been proposed to influence or contribute to the onset or development of the disease in susceptible individuals. The infection with pathogenic bacteria is a key factor that can influence the development and severity of this disease. Here, we present a comprehensive review of studies performed in human and mice susceptible to IBD, which supports the notion that infection with bacterial pathogens, such as Salmonella, could promote the onset of IBD due to permanent changes in the intestinal microbiota, disruption of the epithelial barrier and alterations of the intestinal immune response after infection. PMID:28293241

  17. Clinical significance of cytomegalovirus infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Elena; Carrera, Elisa; Manzano, Rebeca; Lopez-Sanroman, Antonio

    2013-01-07

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is common in humans. The virus then enters a "latency phase" and can reactivate to different stimuli such as immunosuppression. The clinical significance of CMV infection in inflammatory bowel disease is different in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). CMV does not interfere in the clinical course of CD. However, CMV reactivation is frequent in severe or steroid-resistant UC. It is not known whether the virus exacerbates the disease or simply appears as a bystander of a severe disease. Different methods are used to diagnose CMV colitis. Diagnosis is classically based on histopathological identification of viral-infected cells or CMV antigens in biopsied tissues using haematoxylin-eosin or immunohistochemistry, other tests on blood or tissue samples are currently being investigated. Polymerase chain reaction performed in colonic mucosa has a high sensitivity and a positive result could be associated with a worse prognosis disease; further studies are needed to determine the most appropriate strategy with positive CMV-DNA in colonic mucosa. Specific endoscopic features have not been described in active UC and CMV infection. CMV colitis is usually treated with ganciclovir for several weeks, there are different opinions about whether or not to stop immunosuppressive therapy. Other antiviral drugs may be used. Multicenter controlled studies would needed to determine which subgroup of UC patients would benefit from early antiviral treatment.

  18. Effects of cytomegalovirus infection on the prognosis of inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Xia; Ma, Cheng-Yan; Zhang, Jian-Guo; He, Feng; Liu, Qing-Min; Cheng, Aibin; Liu, Tiejun; Zhang, Junwei; Wang, Jianjun; Bu, Xuan; Xie, Yuxi; Diao, Zengli; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection on the prognosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Various databases were searched using a combination of keywords associated with CMV infection and IBD. Subsequent to the selection of relevant studies in line with strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, a meta-analysis was conducted using the Stata 12.0 software. A total of 195 studies were initially retrieved, including 28 studies in Chinese and 167 in English. Following the exclusion of unsuitable studies, 7 cohort studies with 374 IBD patients were included in the meta-analysis. The results of the present study identified significant differences between patients with and without CMV infection regarding the disease duration of IBD [standardized mean difference, −0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI), −1.19 to −0.43; P<0.001], the efficacy of corticosteroid therapy [relative risk (RR), 1.24; 95% CI, 1.02–1.49; P=0.029], the colectomy rate (RR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.03–4.40; P=0.042) and the incidence of severe IBD (RR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.04–1.67; P=0.022). Considering the IBD onset area, patients with CMV infection may have higher susceptibility to pancolitis (RR, 1.31; 95% CI; 1.01–1.72; P=0.045); however, no difference in susceptibility to left-sided IBD was observed between patients with or without CMV infection (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.72–1.30; P=0.828). In conclusion, CMV infection may be associated with the disease duration, efficacy of corticosteroid therapy, colectomy rate, severe IBD incidence and disease location of IBD; thus, the presence of CMV infection may be considered as an important biomarker for determining the prognosis of IBD. PMID:27882151

  19. Infection-related hospitalizations in the first year after inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Michael Kwan-Lung; Ng, Siew C; Mak, Lung-Yi; Li, Michael K; Lo, Fu Hang; Ng, Carmen Ka Man; Lao, Wai Cheung; Tsang, Steve; Chan, Kam Hon; Hui, Yee Tak; Shan, Edwin Hok Shing; Loo, Ching Kong; Hui, Aric J; To, Wai Pan; Hung, Ivan F; Leung, Wai K

    2016-09-01

    With the rapid increase in the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Asia, the natural course of the early phase of disease in these patients remains poorly defined. This study aimed to determined the incidence and characteristics of infection-related hospitalization in the first year in patients newly diagnosed with IBD in Hong Kong SAR, China. Patients newly diagnosed with IBD and enrolled in the territory-wide Hong Kong IBD Registry were identified. Details of their hospitalization within the first 12 months after diagnosis were retrieved and analyzed. Altogether 433 newly diagnosed IBD patients were enrolled, including 188 with Crohn's disease (CD), 230 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 15 with IBD-unclassified (IBD-U). Among them, 110 (25.4%) had at least one unscheduled hospitalization in the first year and 34 (7.9%) had infection-related hospitalization, leading to 43 (23.4%) of total hospitalizations. Gastrointestinal tract (30.2%), respiratory tract (34.9%) and skin and soft tissues (11.6%) were the most common sites of infection. Bacterial and viral infections accounted for 46.7% and 20.8% of hospitalizations for infection, respectively. Common identified pathogens included Clostridium difficile (16.3%) and Cytomegalovirus (11.6%). Multivariate analysis found that patient's age (odds ratio [OR] 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.06) and the presence of comorbidity (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.05-5.13) were significantly associated with hospitalization from infection in IBD patients. Infection-related hospitalizations were found in 7.9% of newly diagnosed IBD patients within the first year after diagnosis in Hong Kong, which accounted for about one-quarter of all unscheduled hospitalizations. Elder patients with concurrent illnesses were at higher risk. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons

  20. Specificities of the intestinal microbiota in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Harry; Jegou, Sarah; McQuitty, Claire; Straub, Marjolene; Leducq, Valentin; Landman, Cecilia; Kirchgesner, Julien; Le Gall, Guillaume; Bourrier, Anne; Nion-Larmurier, Isabelle; Cosnes, Jacques; Seksik, Philippe; Richard, Mathias L; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2017-08-08

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common complication in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and has been associated with poor IBD outcome. Intestinal microbiota composition in IBD patients with CDI has not been specifically evaluated to date. The fecal microbiota of 56 IBD patients, including 8 in flare with concomitant CDI, 24 in flare without CDI, and 24 in remission, as well as 24 healthy subjects, was studied using 16S sequencing. Analysis was performed using the Qiime pipeline. Compared to IBD patients without CDI, IBD patients with CDI had more pronounced dysbiosis with higher levels of Ruminococcus gnavus and Enterococcus operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and lower levels of Blautia and Dorea OTUs. Correlation network analysis suggested a disrupted ecosystem in IBD patients in flare, particularly in those with CDI. In patients with IBD, CDI is associated with a more pronounced intestinal dysbiosis with specific alterations in intestinal microorganisms.

  1. What is the best way to manage screening for infections and vaccination of inflammatory bowel disease patients?

    PubMed Central

    Andrisani, Gianluca; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Marzo, Manuela; Felice, Carla; Pugliese, Daniela; Papa, Alfredo; Guidi, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of biological agents and immunomodulators for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections, in particular of viral or bacterial etiology. Despite the existence of international guidelines, many gastroenterologists have not adopted routine screening and vaccination in those patients with IBD, which are candidate for biologic therapy. Available strategies to screen, diagnose and prevent bacterial and viral infections in patients with IBD prior to start biological therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:27602239

  2. Giardia lamblia infection in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Grazioli, Barbara; Matera, Giovanni; Laratta, Costanza; Schipani, Giuseppina; Guarnieri, Giovanni; Spiniello, Ester; Imeneo, Maria; Amorosi, Andrea; Focà, Alfredo; Luzza, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia) infection in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and dyspepsia and to establish which is the most accurate test to diagnose the infection in this setting. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-seven patients who consecutively attended the Outpatient Gastroenterology Clinic for the first time between January 2002 and December 2003 due to symptoms of IBS and/or dyspepsia were recruited. All patients underwent clinical evaluation, first-step haematology and chemistry tests, serologic assays for celiac disease, lactose-H2 breath test, abdominal ultrasonography, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Helicobacter pylori status was evaluated. In patients with symptoms of IBS older than 45 years, colonoscopy was also performed. In all patients, duodenal biopsies and stool samples were examined for trophozoites and cysts of G. lamblia by several methods. RESULTS: G. lamblia was identified in 9 patients. The following diagnoses were also made: IBS (100/137, 73%), functional dyspepsia (62/137, 45%), organic dyspepsia (33/137, 24%), and lactose intolerance (75/137, 55%). A significant association was found between giardiasis and H pylori infection (χ2 = 6.632, OR = 12.4, CI = 1.5-68.1). There were no symptoms that reliably allowed the recognition of giardiasis. Direct search of the parasite in duodenal biopsy and stool sample examinations gave concordant results in all cases while histological examination of duodenal biopsies displayed a low sensitivity (e.g., 22.2%). CONCLUSION: In this consecutive series, diagnosis of G. lamblia infection accounted for 6.5% of patients with IBS and dyspepsia. Duodenal biopsies for diagnosis of giardiasis may be unnecessary if stool sample examination is performed. PMID:16610003

  3. Preoperative prognostic nutritional index predicts postoperative surgical site infections in gastrointestinal fistula patients undergoing bowel resections

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiongyuan; Wang, Gefei; Ren, Jianan; Ren, Huajian; Li, Guanwei; Wu, Xiuwen; Gu, Guosheng; Li, Ranran; Guo, Kun; Deng, Youming; Li, Yuan; Hong, Zhiwu; Wu, Lei; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have implied a prognostic value of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) in postoperative septic complications of elective colorectal surgeries. However, the evaluation of PNI in contaminated surgeries for gastrointestinal (GI) fistula patients is lack of investigation. The purpose of this study was to explore the predictive value of PNI in surgical site infections (SSIs) for GI fistula patients undergoing bowel resections. A retrospective review of 290 GI patients who underwent intestinal resections between November 2012 and October 2015 was performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify risk factors for SSIs, and receiver operating characteristic cure was used to quantify the effectiveness of PNI. SSIs were diagnosed in 99 (34.1%) patients, with incisional infection identified in 54 patients (18.6%), deep incisional infection in 13 (4.5%), and organ/space infection in 32 (11.0%). receiver operating characteristic curve analysis defined a PNI cut-off level of 45 corresponding to postoperative SSIs (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.72, 76% sensitivity, 55% specificity). Furthermore, a multivariate analysis indicated that the PNI < 45 [odd ratio (OR): 2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09–4.61, P = 0.029] and leukocytosis (OR: 3.70, 95% CI: 1.02–13.42, P = 0.046) were independently associated with postoperative SSIs. Preoperative PNI is a simple and useful marker to predict SSIs in GI fistula patients after enterectomies. Measurement of PNI is therefore recommended in the routine assessment of patients with GI fistula receiving surgical treatment. PMID:27399098

  4. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Higgins, Peter D. R.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for the US healthcare system, and frequently complicates the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD are more likely to be colonized with C. difficile and develop active infection than the general population. They are also more likely to have severe CDI and develop subsequent complications such as IBD flare, colectomy, or death. Even after successful initial treatment and recovery, recurrent CDI is common. Management of CDI in IBD is fraught with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, since the clinical presentations of CDI and IBD flare have considerable overlap. Fecal microbiota transplantation can be successful in curing recurrent CDI when other treatments have failed, but may also trigger IBD flare and this warrants caution. New, experimental treatments including vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and non-toxigenic strains of C. difficile offer promise but are not yet available for clinicians. A better understanding of the complex relationship between the gut microbiota, CDI, and IBD is needed. PMID:27120571

  5. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Children With Bladder and Bowel Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Keren, Ron; Gotman, Nathan; Docimo, Steven G.; Mathews, Ranjiv; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Ivanova, Anastasia; Mattoo, Tej K.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Carpenter, Myra A.; Pohl, Hans G.; Greenfield, Saul

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little generalizable information is available on the outcomes of children diagnosed with bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD) after a urinary tract infection (UTI). Our objectives were to describe the clinical characteristics of children with BBD and to examine the effects of BBD on patient outcomes in children with and without vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). METHODS: We combined data from 2 longitudinal studies (Randomized Intervention for Children With Vesicoureteral Reflux and Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation) in which children <6 years of age with a first or second UTI were followed for 2 years. We compared outcomes for children with and without BBD, children with and without VUR, and children with VUR randomly assigned to prophylaxis or placebo. The outcomes examined were incidence of recurrent UTIs, renal scarring, surgical intervention, resolution of VUR, and treatment failure. RESULTS: BBD was present at baseline in 54% of the 181 toilet-trained children included; 94% of children with BBD reported daytime wetting, withholding maneuvers, or constipation. In children not on antimicrobial prophylaxis, 51% of those with both BBD and VUR experienced recurrent UTIs, compared with 20% of those with VUR alone, 35% with BBD alone, and 32% with neither BBD nor VUR. BBD was not associated with any of the other outcomes investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Among toilet-trained children, those with both BBD and VUR are at higher risk of developing recurrent UTIs than children with isolated VUR or children with isolated BBD and, accordingly, exhibit the greatest benefit from antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:26647376

  6. Substance P and the regulation of inflammation in infections and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, J V

    2015-02-01

    Substance P (SP) and its natural analogue hemokinin-1 (HK1) are produced by lymphocytes and macrophages, and at times B cells. These peptides are an important component of the immune response during several infections and in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The synthesis of SP and HK1 in leucocytes is subject to immune regulation. IL12 and IL23 stimulate T cells and macrophages to make SP respectively. The cytokines driving HK1 production are not presently defined. These peptides act through a shared receptor called neurokinin-1. T cells, macrophages and probably other immune cell types can express this receptor. Several cytokines IL12, IL18 and TNFα as well as T-cell antigen receptor activation induce neurokinin-1 receptor expression on T cells, while IL10 blocks receptor display. TGFβ delays internalization of the SP/neurokine-1R complex on T cells resulting in stronger receptor signalling. One of the functions of SP and neurokinin-1 receptor is to enhance T cell IFNγ and IL17 production, amplifying the proinflammatory response. Thus, SP and HK1 have overlapping functions and are part of a sophisticated immune regulatory circuit aimed at amplifying inflammation at mucosal surfaces and in other regions of the body as shown in animal models of infection and IBD. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Small Bowel Transplant

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    velocity with no catch-up growth. The quality of life after SBT was reported to be comparable to that of patients on home enteral nutrition. A study found that while the parents of pediatric SBT recipients reported significant limitations in the physical and psychological well being of the children compared with normal school children, the pediatric SBT recipients themselves reported a quality of life similar to other school children. Survival was found to be better in transplants performed since 1991. Patient survival was associated with the type of organ transplanted with better survival in isolated small bowel recipients. Adverse Events Despite improvement in patient and graft survival rates, small bowel transplant is still associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Infection with subsequent sepsis is the leading cause of death (51.3%). Bacterial, fungal and viral infections have all been reported. The most common viral infections are cytomegalorvirus (18-40%) and Epstein-Barr virus. The latter often led to ß-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Graft rejection is the second leading cause of death after SBT (10.4%) and is responsible for 57% of graft removal. Acute rejection rates ranged from 51% to 83% in the major programs. Most of the acute rejection episodes were mild and responded to steroids and OKT3. Antilymphocyte therapy was needed in up to 27% of patients. Isolated small bowel allograft and positive lymphocytotoxic cross-match were found to be risk factors for acute rejection. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease occurred in 21% of SBT recipients and accounted for 7% of post-transplant mortality. The frequency was higher in pediatric recipients (31%) and in adults receiving composite visceral allografts (25%). The allograft itself is often involved in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. The reported incidence of host versus graft disease varied widely among centers (0% - 14%). Surgical complications were reported to

  8. Lactase persistence, NOD2 status and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection associations to Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Elguezabal, Natalia; Chamorro, Susana; Molina, Elena; Garrido, Joseba M; Izeta, Ander; Rodrigo, Luis; Juste, Ramón A

    2012-06-28

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), which includes both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is caused by a complex interplay involving genetic predisposition, environmental factors and an infectious agent. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is a promising pathogen candidate since it produces a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants that resembles CD in humans. MAP is a ubiquitous microorganism, although its presence in the food chain, especially in milk from infected animals, is what made us think that there could be an association between lactase persistence (LP) and IBD. The LCT mutation has brought adaptation to dairy farming which in turn would have increased exposure of the population to infection by MAP. NOD2 gene mutations are highly associated to CD. In our study, CD and UC patients and controls from the North of Spain were genotyped for the lactase gene (LCT) and for three NOD-2 variants, R702W, G908R and Cins1007fs. MAP PCR was carried out in order to assess MAP infection status and these results were correlated with LCT and NOD2 genotypes. As for LP, no association was found with IBD, although UC patients were less likely to present the T/T-13910 variant compared to controls, showing a higher C-allele frequency and a tendency to lactase non-persistence (LNP). NOD2 mutations were associated to CD being the per-allele risk higher for the Cins1007fs variant. MAP infection was more extended among the healthy controls (45.2%) compared to CD patients (21.38%) and UC patients (19.04%) and this was attributed to therapy. The Asturian CD cohort presented higher levels of MAP prevalence (38.6%) compared to the Basque CD cohort (15.5%), differences also attributed to therapy. No interaction was found between MAP infection and LCT or NOD2 status. We conclude that LP is not significantly associated with IBD, but that MAP infection and NOD2 do show not mutually interacting associations with IBD.

  9. Lactase persistence, NOD2 status and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection associations to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), which includes both Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is caused by a complex interplay involving genetic predisposition, environmental factors and an infectious agent. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is a promising pathogen candidate since it produces a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants that resembles CD in humans. MAP is a ubiquitous microorganism, although its presence in the food chain, especially in milk from infected animals, is what made us think that there could be an association between lactase persistence (LP) and IBD. The LCT mutation has brought adaptation to dairy farming which in turn would have increased exposure of the population to infection by MAP. NOD2 gene mutations are highly associated to CD. Methods In our study, CD and UC patients and controls from the North of Spain were genotyped for the lactase gene (LCT) and for three NOD-2 variants, R702W, G908R and Cins1007fs. MAP PCR was carried out in order to assess MAP infection status and these results were correlated with LCT and NOD2 genotypes. Results As for LP, no association was found with IBD, although UC patients were less likely to present the T/T−13910 variant compared to controls, showing a higher C-allele frequency and a tendency to lactase non-persistence (LNP). NOD2 mutations were associated to CD being the per-allele risk higher for the Cins1007fs variant. MAP infection was more extended among the healthy controls (45.2%) compared to CD patients (21.38%) and UC patients (19.04%) and this was attributed to therapy. The Asturian CD cohort presented higher levels of MAP prevalence (38.6%) compared to the Basque CD cohort (15.5%), differences also attributed to therapy. No interaction was found between MAP infection and LCT or NOD2 status. Conclusions We conclude that LP is not significantly associated with IBD, but that MAP infection and NOD2 do show not mutually interacting associations

  10. Post partum infections: A review for the non-OBGYN

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, E

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of infections in the puerperium (post partum period) is not well understood and remains underestimated because surveillance systems are often limited to the acute care setting. The most common source of persistent fever after delivery is genital tract infection for which diagnosis remains mostly clinical and antibiotic treatment empiric. This review will emphasize surgical site infections (SSIs) and endometritis. Septic thrombo-phlebitis, mastitis, urinary tract infections and rare infections will be covered in less detail. Puerperal sepsis will not be reviewed. PMID:27512432

  11. Post partum infections: A review for the non-OBGYN.

    PubMed

    Dalton, E; Castillo, E

    2014-09-01

    The epidemiology of infections in the puerperium (post partum period) is not well understood and remains underestimated because surveillance systems are often limited to the acute care setting. The most common source of persistent fever after delivery is genital tract infection for which diagnosis remains mostly clinical and antibiotic treatment empiric. This review will emphasize surgical site infections (SSIs) and endometritis. Septic thrombo-phlebitis, mastitis, urinary tract infections and rare infections will be covered in less detail. Puerperal sepsis will not be reviewed.

  12. Microbial signatures in post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome--toward patient stratification for improved diagnostics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Jalanka, Jonna; Salonen, Anne; Fuentes, Susana; de Vos, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial and heterogeneous disorder estimated to affect over 10% of the Western population. A subset of the patients reports the start of the disease after an episode of gastroenteritis. The alterations in the intestinal microbiota of the post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) patients were recently investigated in a British cohort and shown to differentiate from the healthy controls and resemble that of diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) patients. The altered 27 genus-like groups created a microbial signature, which could be used to objectively stratify patients and healthy controls. In this addendum, we combine the microbiota data derived from the British cohort with that of a recently reported Swedish PI-IBS cohort. Remarkably, robust and reproducible microbiota signatures were observed in these PI-IBS patients. We discuss these results with attention on the emerging role of microbiota in the classification, development and treatment of PI-IBS.

  13. Combined therapy for post-irradiation infection

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, T.B.; Madonna, G.S.; Ledney, G.D.; Brook, I.

    1989-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to bacterial infection, probably by translocation from the intestinal flora, can be a lethal complication for 2-3 weeks after exposure to ionizing radiation. Antibiotics alone do not provide adequate therapy for induced infections in neutropenic mice. Because some substances that are derived from bacterial cell walls activate macrophages and stimulate nonspecific resistance to infection, such agents might be used to prevent or treat postirradiation infections. In this study, a cell-wall glycolipid, trehalose dimycolate (TDM), was evaluated together with a third-generation cephalosporin, ceftriaxone, for their separate and combined effects on survival of B6D2F1 female mice that were exposed to the sublethal dose of 7.0 Gy Co radiation and challenged s.c. with lethal doses of Klebsiella pneumoniae. A single injection of TDM inoculated i.p. 1 hr postirradiation increased 30-day survival to 80% after a lethal challenge by K. pneumoniae 4 days later. When the challenge dose of K. pneumoniae was increased to 5000 Ld 50/30 on Day 4, all mice died.

  14. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Affects the Outcome of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Khoruts, Alexander; Rank, Kevin M; Newman, Krista M; Viskocil, Kimberly; Vaughn, Byron P; Hamilton, Matthew J; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    A significant fraction of patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) can break the cycle of CDI recurrence and can be performed without evaluation of the colon. We evaluated the efficacy of colonoscopic FMT in patients with and without IBD, and whether we could identify IBD in patients during this procedure. We collected clinical meta-data and colonoscopy results from 272 consecutive patients that underwent FMT for recurrent CDI at the University of Minnesota from 2008 through 2015. Patients had at least 2 spontaneous relapses of CDI following their initial episode and did not clear the infection after 1 extended antibiotic regimen. We collected random mucosal biopsies from patients' right colons to identify lymphocytic or collagenous colitis during the FMT procedure. Failure or success in clearing CDI was determined within or at 2 months after the FMT. Of patients undergoing FMT, 15% had established IBD and 2.6% were found to have IBD during the FMT procedure. A single colonoscopic FMT cleared CDI from 74.4% of patients with IBD and 92.1% of patients without IBD (P = .0018). Patients had similar responses to FMT regardless of immunosuppressive therapy. More than one-quarter of patients with IBD (25.6%) had a clinically significant flare of IBD after FMT. Lymphocytic colitis was documented in 7.4% of patients with endoscopically normal colon mucosa; only 3 of these patients (20%) required additional treatment for colitis after clearance of CDI. Based on an analysis of 272 patients, FMT is somewhat less effective in clearing recurrent CDI from patients with IBD, compared with patients without IBD, regardless of immunosuppressive therapy. More than 25% of patients with IBD have a disease flare following FMT. Lymphocytic colitis did not affect the outcome of FMT, but a small fraction of these patients required pharmacologic treatment after the procedure. Copyright

  15. Antibiotics for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection in Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Horton, Henry A; Dezfoli, Seper; Berel, Dror; Hirsch, Julianna; Ippoliti, Andrew; McGovern, Dermot; Kaur, Manreet; Shih, David; Dubinsky, Marla; Targan, Stephan R; Fleshner, Phillip; Vasiliauskas, Eric A; Grein, Jonathan; Murthy, Rekha; Melmed, Gil Y

    2014-09-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), namely ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), have worse outcomes with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), including increased readmissions, colectomy, and death. Oral vancomycin is recommended for the treatment of severe CDI, while metronidazole is the standard of care for nonsevere infection. We aimed to assess treatment outcomes of CDI in IBD. We conducted a retrospective observational study of inpatients with CDI and IBD from January 2006 through December 2010. CDI severity was assessed using published criteria. Outcomes included readmission for CDI within 30 days and 12 weeks, length of stay, colectomy, and death. A total of 114 patients met inclusion criteria (UC, 62; CD, 52). Thirty-day readmissions were more common among UC than CD patients (24.2% versus 9.6%; P=0.04). Same-admission colectomy occurred in 27.4% of UC patients and 0% of CD patients (P<0.01). Severe CDI was more common among UC than CD patients (32.2% versus 19.4%; P=0.12) but not statistically significant. Two patients died from CDI-associated complications (UC, 1; CD, 1). Patients with UC and nonsevere CDI had fewer readmissions and shorter lengths of stay when treated with a vancomycin-containing regimen compared to those treated with metronidazole (30-day readmissions, 31.0% versus 0% [P=0.04]; length of stay, 13.62 days versus 6.38 days [P=0.02]). Patients with UC and nonsevere CDI have fewer readmissions and shorter lengths of stay when treated with a vancomycin-containing regimen relative to those treated with metronidazole alone. Patients with ulcerative colitis and CDI should be treated with vancomycin.

  16. Biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: A review of post-marketing experience.

    PubMed

    Deiana, Simona; Gabbani, Tommaso; Annese, Vito

    2017-01-14

    Biologic compounds are obtained from living organisms or cell cultures by means of biotechnology methods. A similar biologic drug, commonly called biosimilar, is a product copied by a native approved biologic drug whose license has expired. Biosimilar drugs usually are marketed at a lower price and provide important financial savings for public healthcare systems. Some differences between biosimilars and original biologic drugs might exist but they are acceptable if they fall within defined "boundaries of tolerance": differences in some features between the two molecules are considered important only if clinical relevant. Considering that the efficacy of the innovator biologic drug has already been established, the clinical studies required for approval of a biosimilar could be reduced compared with those required for the approval of the originator. In this review, real life data available in inflammatory bowel disease patients treated with biosimilars are reported, documenting in general satisfactory outcomes, sustained efficacy and no sign of increased immunogenicity, although, further controlled data are awaited.

  17. Thromboprophylaxis is associated with reduced post-hospitalization venous thromboembolic events in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Cagan, Andrew; Gainer, Vivian S.; Cheng, Su-Chun; Cai, Tianxi; Scoville, Elizabeth; Konijeti, Gauree G; Szolovits, Peter; Shaw, Stanley Y; Churchill, Susanne; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Kohane, Isaac; Liao, Katherine P.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE); those who require hospitalization have particularly high risk. Few hospitalized patients with IBD receive thromboprophylaxis. We analyzed the frequency of VTE following IBD-related hospitalization, risk factors for post-hospitalization VTE, and the efficacy of prophylaxis in preventing post-hospitalization VTE. Methods In a retrospective study, we analyzed data from a multi-institutional cohort of patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis and at least 1 IBD-related hospitalization. Our primary outcome was a VTE event. All patients contributed person time from the date of the index hospitalization to development of VTE, subsequent hospitalization, or end of follow-up. Our main predictor variable was pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for potential confounders were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results From a cohort of 2788 patients with at least 1 IBD-related hospitalization, 62 patients developed VTE following discharge (2%). Incidences of VTE at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days after the index hospitalization were 3.7/1000, 4.1/1000, 5.4/1000, and 9.4/1000 person-days respectively. Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis during the index hospital stay was associated with a significantly lower risk of post-hospitalization VTE (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22–0.97). Increased numbers of co-morbidities (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.16–1.47) and need for corticosteroids before hospitalization (HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.02 –2.87) were also independently associated with risk of VTE. Length of hospitalization or surgery during index hospitalization was not associated with post-hospitalization VTE. Conclusions Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis during IBD-related hospitalization is associated with reduced risk of post-hospitalization VTE. PMID:24632349

  18. Male accessory gland infection frequency in infertile patients with chronic microbial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vicari, E; Calogero, A E; Condorelli, R A; Vicari, L O; La Vignera, S

    2012-04-01

    Recently, we reported an increased prevalence of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) in patients with prostatitis syndromes (PS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) compared with patients with PS alone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of male accessory gland infections (MAGI) in patients with CBP plus IBS and to compare the sperm parameters of patients with or without MAGI. Fifty consecutive patients with the following criteria were enrolled: (i) infertility; (ii) diagnosis of CBP; and (iii) diagnosis of IBS according to the Rome III criteria. The following two aged-matched control groups were also studied: infertile patients with CBP alone (n = 56) and fertile men (n = 30) who fathered a child within the previous 3 months. Patients and controls underwent to an accurate anamnesis, administration of the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and the Rome III questionnaires for prostatitis and IBS, respectively, physical examination, and semen analysis. A significantly higher frequency of MAGI was found in patients with CBP plus IBS (82.0%) compared with the patients with CBP alone (53.6%) or the fertile men (0%). The presence of MAGI in the patients with CBP plus IBS was associated with a significantly lower sperm concentration, total number, and forward motility, and with a higher seminal leucocyte concentration compared with the patients with CBP alone and MAGI. Sperm normal morphology was similar in the groups of patients. All sperm parameters did not differ significantly in both the groups of patients without MAGI. The patients with CBP plus IBS had a significantly higher frequency of MAGI compared with the patients with CBP alone. This was associated with worse sperm parameters and, hence, poorer reproductive prognosis. We suggest to search for the presence of IBS in the patients with PS and in particular when CBP and/or worse sperm parameters are present. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2011 European

  19. Clostridium difficile infection in acute flares of inflammatory bowel disease: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Harry; Lalande, Valérie; Landman, Cecilia; Bourrier, Anne; Nion-Larmurier, Isabelle; Rajca, Sylvie; Kirchgesner, Julien; Seksik, Philippe; Cosnes, Jacques; Barbut, Frédéric; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common complication in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and has been associated with poor IBD outcome. The aims of our study were to look for predictive factors of CDI in patients hospitalized for IBD flare and to evaluate a rapid testing strategy in this population. Consecutive patients hospitalized for IBD flare in Saint-Antoine Hospital (Paris, France) were prospectively tested for CDI with a defined strategy involving rapid testing and reference methods. Risk factors for CDI were investigated and performances of diagnostic tests were evaluated. C. difficile testing was performed at admission in 461 hospitalizations for IBD flare. CDI was diagnosed in 35 cases (7.6%) and non-toxigenic C. difficile was identified in 10 cases (2.2%). In multivariate analysis, UC phenotype was associated with CDI (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.03-4.6, p=0.047). Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) test had a 97.1% sensitivity and a 100% negative predictive value for CDI diagnosis but a positive predictive value of 79.1%. Enzyme immunoassay (EIA)-based toxin detection (C. Diff Quik Chek complete(®), Alere) had a poor sensitivity and diagnosis was rescued by toxin PCR in 100% of cases. CDI is frequent in patients hospitalized for IBD flare. Clinical parameters do not help for the diagnosis and rapid testing should be performed in all patients. Currently, a negative result of an EIA-based toxin search associated with a positive GDH test cannot rule out a CDI and should not delay initiation of specific treatment in case of severe symptoms or high presumption. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Our experience with prevention of infection in patients post splenectomy.].

    PubMed

    Gruntová, Irena; Janousek, Stanislav; Parízková, Radana; Chalupa, Pavel

    2005-04-01

    Splenectomy significantly impairs the immunity of the body; in a certain proportion of the patients this may cause the so-called OPSI (overwhelming post-splenectomy infection) syndrome, i. e. incidence of fulminant life-threatening infections. Even today, despite highly efficacious sophisticated antibiotics, this condition is burdened with very high mortality. In our paper we describe the management and preventive measures in splenectomized subjects at the Department of Infectious Diseases of the Teaching Hospital Brno.

  1. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Gastrointestinal Parasite Infection in a Developing Nation Environment

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Douglas R.; Benshoff, Matthew; Cáceres, Mercedes; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Cortes, Loreto; Martin, Christopher F.; Schmulson, Max; Peña, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Postinfectious IBS is defined in the industrialized world as IBS onset following a sentinel gastrointestinal infection. In developing nations, where repeated bacterial and parasitic gastrointestinal infections are common, the IBS pathophysiology may be altered. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between intestinal parasite infection and IBS in the “nonsterile” developing world environment. IBS subjects were identified from a population-based sample of 1624 participants using the Rome II Modular Questionnaire. Stool samples from cases and randomly selected controls were examined for ova and parasites. Logistic regression models explored the relationship between IBS and parasite infection. The overall IBS prevalence among participants was 13.2% (9.3% males, 15.9% females). There was no difference in parasite carriage between IBS cases and controls, 16.6% versus 15.4% (P = 0.78), nor among IBS subtypes. The pathophysiology of post-infectious IBS may be altered in the developing world as compared to industrialized nations and warrants investigation. PMID:22474433

  2. Biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: A review of post-marketing experience

    PubMed Central

    Deiana, Simona; Gabbani, Tommaso; Annese, Vito

    2017-01-01

    Biologic compounds are obtained from living organisms or cell cultures by means of biotechnology methods. A similar biologic drug, commonly called biosimilar, is a product copied by a native approved biologic drug whose license has expired. Biosimilar drugs usually are marketed at a lower price and provide important financial savings for public healthcare systems. Some differences between biosimilars and original biologic drugs might exist but they are acceptable if they fall within defined “boundaries of tolerance”: differences in some features between the two molecules are considered important only if clinical relevant. Considering that the efficacy of the innovator biologic drug has already been established, the clinical studies required for approval of a biosimilar could be reduced compared with those required for the approval of the originator. In this review, real life data available in inflammatory bowel disease patients treated with biosimilars are reported, documenting in general satisfactory outcomes, sustained efficacy and no sign of increased immunogenicity, although, further controlled data are awaited. PMID:28127193

  3. Contributing variables to post mastectomy tissue expander infection.

    PubMed

    Leyngold, Mark M; Stutman, Ross L; Khiabani, Kayvan T; Shah, Himansu; Fong, Elvis; Ho, Chih-Hsiang; Zamboni, William A

    2012-01-01

    Tissue expander breast reconstruction is a common post mastectomy breast procedure performed by plastic surgeons. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence of breast reconstruction prosthetic infection, relate patient characteristics with increased rate of infection, and analyze the influence of postoperative complications to expander/implant infection. A retrospective, single-institution chart review of 195 women with post mastectomy tissue expander/implant reconstructions performed from 2006 through 2008 was conducted. Total periprosthetic infection rate was calculated. Patient factors, operative technique, and noninfectious complications were analyzed and related to increased periprosthetic infection rate. A binary logistic regression model was fitted using periprosthetic infection as the dependent variable and 12 patient characteristics as independent variables, followed by a step-wise model for best fit with a limited number of independent variables. The overall periprosthetic infection rate per patient over the 2 year period was 5.1%. The incidence of periprosthetic infection per reconstructed breast was 3.2%. Odds ratio estimates indicated that the presence of cellulitis increased the odds of periprosthetic infection more than 200 times (p = <0.0001), and inpatient procedures increased the odds 16 times (p = 0.02). Other variables (i.e., age > 65, DM, flap necrosis, smoking, dehiscence, AlloDerm, etc) failed to reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). Postoperative breast cellulitis and inpatient status appear to be significant risk factors for increased periprosthetic infection. No significant increase in periprosthetic infection rate was noted with other variables in this model. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Acute Sleep Deprivation Enhances Post-Infection Sleep and Promotes Survival during Bacterial Infection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Williams, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep is known to increase as an acute response to infection. However, the function of this behavioral response in host defense is not well understood. To address this problem, we evaluated the effect of acute sleep deprivation on post-infection sleep and immune function in Drosophila. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Methods and Results: Flies were subjected to sleep deprivation before (early DEP) or after (late DEP) bacterial infection. Relative to a non-deprived control, flies subjected to early DEP had enhanced sleep after infection as well as increased bacterial clearance and survival outcome. Flies subjected to late DEP experienced enhanced sleep following the deprivation period, and showed a modest improvement in survival outcome. Continuous DEP (early and late DEP) throughout infection also enhanced sleep later during infection and improved survival. However, improved survival in flies subjected to late or continuous DEP did not occur until after flies had experienced sleep. During infection, both early and late DEP enhanced NFκB transcriptional activity as measured by a luciferase reporter (κB-luc) in living flies. Early DEP also increased NFκB activity prior to infection. Flies that were deficient in expression of either the Relish or Dif NFκB transcription factors showed normal responses to early DEP. However, the effect of early DEP on post-infection sleep and survival was abolished in double mutants, which indicates that Relish and Dif have redundant roles in this process. Conclusions: Acute sleep deprivation elevated NFκB-dependent activity, increased post-infection sleep, and improved survival during bacterial infection. Citation: Kuo TH, Williams JA. Acute sleep deprivation enhances post-infection sleep and promotes survival during bacterial infection in Drosophila. SLEEP 2014;37(5):859-869. PMID:24790264

  5. Study of animal-borne infections in the mucosas of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and population-based controls.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Charles N; Nayar, Gopi; Hamel, Andre; Blanchard, James F

    2003-11-01

    Crohn's disease may be triggered by an infection, and it is plausible to consider that such an infection may be animal borne and ingested with our food. There has been considerable interest in the past in determining whether Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. avium) might be the etiologic agent in Crohn's disease since it causes a disease in cattle that is similar to Crohn's disease in humans. We aimed to determine if there was an association between Crohn's disease and infection with M. avium or other zoonotic agents and compared the findings with those for patients with ulcerative colitis, unaffected siblings of Crohn's disease patients, or population-based controls without inflammatory bowel disease. Patients under age 50 years with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, unaffected siblings of patients, or healthy controls drawn from a population-based age- and gender-matched registry were enrolled in a study in which subjects submitted to a questionnaire survey and venipuncture. A nested cohort underwent colonoscopy plus biopsy. Samples were batched and submitted to PCR for the detection of M. avium and other zoonotic agents known to cause predominately intestinal disease in cattle, sheep, or swine. Only one patient with ulcerative colitis, no patients with Crohn's disease, and none of the sibling controls were positive for M. avium, whereas 6 of 19 healthy controls were positive for M. avium. Since the control subjects were significantly older than the case patients, we studied another 11 patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were older than age 50 years, and another single subject with ulcerative colitis was positive for M. avium. One other subject older than age 50 years with ulcerative colitis was positive for circovirus, a swine-borne agent of infection. In conclusion, by performing PCR with mucosal samples from patients with Crohn's disease and controls, no association between Crohn's disease and infection with M. avium or any of the

  6. Combined preoperative mechanical bowel preparation with oral antibiotics significantly reduces surgical site infection, anastomotic leak, and ileus after colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Ravi Pokala; Murray, Alice C A; Chiuzan, Cody; Estrada, David; Forde, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    To clarify whether bowel preparation use or its individual components [mechanical bowel preparation (MBP)/oral antibiotics] impact specific outcomes after colorectal surgery. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-targeted colectomy data initiated in 2012 capture information on the use/type of bowel preparation and colorectal-specific complications. For patients undergoing elective colorectal resection, the impact of preoperative MBP and antibiotics (MBP+/ABX+), MBP alone (MBP+/ABX-), and no bowel preparation (no-prep) on outcomes, particularly anastomotic leak, surgical site infection (SSI), and ileus, were evaluated using unadjusted/adjusted logistic regression analysis. Of 8442 patients, 2296 (27.2%) had no-prep, 3822 (45.3%) MBP+/ABX-, and 2324 (27.5%) MBP+/ABX+. Baseline characteristics were similar; however, there were marginally more patients with prior sepsis, ascites, steroid use, bleeding disorders, and disseminated cancer in no-prep. MBP with or without antibiotics was associated with reduced ileus [MBP+/ABX+: odds ratio (OR) = 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48-0.68; MBP+/ABX-: OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.68-0.91] and SSI [MBP+/ABX+: OR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.32-0.48; MBP+/ABX-: OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.69-0.93] versus no-prep. MBP+/ABX+ was also associated with lower anastomotic leak rate than no-prep [OR = 0.45 (95% CI: 0.32-0.64)]. On multivariable analysis, MBP with antibiotics, but not without, was independently associated with reduced anastomotic leak (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.35-0.94), SSI (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.31-0.53), and postoperative ileus (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56-0.90). These data clarify the near 50-year debate whether bowel preparation improves outcomes after colorectal resection. MBP with oral antibiotics reduces by nearly half, SSI, anastomotic leak, and ileus, the most common and troublesome complications after colorectal surgery.

  7. Vaccination coverage of children with inflammatory bowel disease after an awareness campaign on the risk of infection.

    PubMed

    Fleurier, Aude; Pelatan, Cecile; Willot, Stephanie; Ginies, Jean-Louis; Breton, Estelle; Bridoux, Laure; Segura, Jean-Francois; Chaillou, Emilie; Jobert, Agathe; Darviot, Estelle; Cagnard, Benoit; Delaperriere, Nadege; Grimal, Isabelle; Carre, Emilie; Wagner, Anne-Claire; Sylvestre, Emmanuelle; Dabadie, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Children with inflammatory bowel disease are at risk of vaccine-preventable diseases mostly due to immunosuppressive drugs. To evaluate coverage after an awareness campaign informing patients, their parents and general practitioner about the vaccination schedule. Vaccination coverage was firstly evaluated and followed by an awareness campaign on the risk of infection via postal mail. The trial is a case-control study on the same patients before and after the awareness campaign. Overall, 92 children were included. A questionnaire was then completed during a routine appointment to collect data including age at diagnosis, age at data collection, treatment history, and vaccination status. Vaccination rates significantly increased for vaccines against diphtheria-tetanus-poliomyelitis (92% vs. 100%), Haemophilus influenzae (88% vs. 98%), hepatitis B (52% vs. 71%), pneumococcus (36% vs. 57%), and meningococcus C (17% vs. 41%) (p<0.05). Children who were older at diagnosis were 1.26 times more likely to be up-to-date with a minimum vaccination schedule (diphtheria-tetanus-poliomyelitis, pertussis, H. influenzae, measles-mumps-rubella, tuberculosis) (p=0.002). Informing inflammatory bowel disease patients, their parents and general practitioner about the vaccination schedule via postal mail is easy, inexpensive, reproducible, and increases vaccination coverage. This method reinforces information on the risk of infection during routine visits. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intestinal cytomegalovirus infection in patients hospitalized for exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease: a 10-year tertiary referral center experience.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Annika; Rosenstiel, Simon; Schnitzler, Paul; Hinz, Ulf; Rehlen, Tobias; Kadmon, Martina; Ehehalt, Robert; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Zawierucha, Anna

    2015-06-01

    This 10-year retrospective cohort study aims to determine the prevalence and risk factors of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in inpatients with exacerbated inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). All patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology of the University Hospital Heidelberg for IBD exacerbation between January 2004 and June 2013 were enrolled. To identify the risk factors of CMV infection, infected individuals were compared with those with excluded infection. Among 297 patients with exacerbated IBD, 21 had confirmed CMV infection and 79 had excluded CMV infection, whereas the remaining patients had not been sufficiently tested for CMV. Taking into account only sufficiently tested individuals, the prevalence of CMV infection was 22.7% in ulcerative colitis and 16.0% in Crohn's disease. The occurrence of CMV infection was associated with the following variables at admission: age of 30 years or more [odds ratio (OR) 14.29; P=0.004], disease duration less than 60 months (OR 7.69; P=0.011), a blood leukocyte count less than 11/nl (OR 4.49; P=0.041), and immunosuppressive therapy (OR 6.73; P=0.0129). CMV-positive patients remained in the hospital longer than noninfected patients (P=0.0009). In the CMV-positive cohort, a 66-year-old woman died of CMV pneumonia and sepsis, whereas there was no death in the CMV-negative cohort. Immunuosuppressive therapy and age older than 30 years were identified as the main risk factors for the development of CMV infection in exacerbated IBD. Because of the risk of death, diagnostics of CMV infection should especially be initiated in older patients on immunosuppressive therapy.

  9. Altered faecal and mucosal microbial composition in post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome patients correlates with mucosal lymphocyte phenotypes and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Sundin, J; Rangel, I; Fuentes, S; Heikamp-de Jong, I; Hultgren-Hörnquist, E; de Vos, W M; Brummer, R J

    2015-02-01

    A subset of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients, denoted post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS), develop symptoms after an enteric infection. Bacterial dysbiosis and mucosal inflammation have been proposed to be involved in the pathophysiology of this entity. To characterise the mucosal and faecal microbiota in PI-IBS, general IBS and healthy controls, and to investigate associations between the microbiota and the mucosal immune system. Mucosal biopsies and faeces were collected from 13 PI-IBS patients, 19 general IBS patients and 16 healthy controls. Global bacterial composition was determined by generating 16S rRNA amplicons that were examined by phylogenetic microarray hybridisation, principal component and redundancy analysis. We correlated previously reported lymphocyte proportions with the microbiota. Faecal microbiota composition of PI-IBS patients differed significantly from both general IBS patients and healthy controls (P < 0.02). Both mucosal (P < 0.01) and faecal (P = 0.05) microbial diversity were reduced in PI-IBS compared to healthy controls. In the intraepithelial lymphocytes the previously published proportion of CD8(+) CD45RA(+) was negatively correlated with mucosal microbial diversity (P < 0.005). The previously published number of lamina propria lymphocytes was negatively correlated with mucosal microbial diversity (P < 0.05). Faecal microbial diversity was significantly negatively correlated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (P < 0.05). We present data that distinguishes the intestinal microbiota of PI-IBS patients from that of both general IBS patients and HC. The microbial composition is significantly associated with the HADs score and alterations in lymphocyte subsets proportions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Reactive arthritis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, D; Mangualde, J; Cremers, I; Oliveira, A P

    2014-01-01

    Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup of infection-associated arthritis which occurs after genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract infection in genetically susceptible hosts. Studies have proposed Salmonella, Shigella or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a well recognised best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella goldcoast enteritis, mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis.

  11. Bowel Preparation before Elective Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anjali S.; Kelleher, Deirdre C.; Sigle, Gavin W.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical bowel preps were initially thought to decrease the bacterial load of the colon and therefore decrease infection. Traditional bowel preps include osmotic, laxative, and combination regimen. Data demonstrate that mechanical bowel preps are generally equivalent; however, the addition of oral antibiotics may further reduce the risk of infection. Recent data suggest that mechanical bowel preparations may not be necessary, and that dietary restrictions before surgery may also be obsolete. In this review, the authors address the types of mechanical bowel preparations (MBPs), differences in outcomes between MBPs, the role of oral antibiosis and enemas, the benefits of no MBP, and dietary preparations for elective colon and rectal surgery. PMID:24436665

  12. Acute sleep deprivation enhances post-infection sleep and promotes survival during bacterial infection in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Williams, Julie A

    2014-05-01

    Sleep is known to increase as an acute response to infection. However, the function of this behavioral response in host defense is not well understood. To address this problem, we evaluated the effect of acute sleep deprivation on post-infection sleep and immune function in Drosophila. Laboratory. Drosophila melanogaster. Flies were subjected to sleep deprivation before (early DEP) or after (late DEP) bacterial infection. Relative to a non-deprived control, flies subjected to early DEP had enhanced sleep after infection as well as increased bacterial clearance and survival outcome. Flies subjected to late DEP experienced enhanced sleep following the deprivation period, and showed a modest improvement in survival outcome. Continuous DEP (early and late DEP) throughout infection also enhanced sleep later during infection and improved survival. However, improved survival in flies subjected to late or continuous DEP did not occur until after flies had experienced sleep. During infection, both early and late DEP enhanced NFκB transcriptional activity as measured by a luciferase reporter (κB-luc) in living flies. Early DEP also increased NFκB activity prior to infection. Flies that were deficient in expression of either the Relish or Dif NFκB transcription factors showed normal responses to early DEP. However, the effect of early DEP on post-infection sleep and survival was abolished in double mutants, which indicates that Relish and Dif have redundant roles in this process. Acute sleep deprivation elevated NFκB-dependent activity, increased post-infection sleep, and improved survival during bacterial infection.

  13. Oral Antibiotic Bowel Preparation Significantly Reduces Surgical Site Infection Rates and Readmission Rates in Elective Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Morris, Melanie S; Graham, Laura A; Chu, Daniel I; Cannon, Jamie A; Hawn, Mary T

    2015-06-01

    To determine the relationship between oral antibiotic bowel preparation (OABP) and surgical site infection (SSI) rates in a national colectomy cohort. OABP for elective colorectal surgery has fallen out of favor. Large cohort studies show that OABP is associated with a 50% reduction in SSI after colectomy. A retrospective analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program colectomy cohort from 2011 to 2012 was performed to examine the association between use of OABP and outcomes of SSI, length of stay (LOS), and readmission after elective colectomy. Univariate and multivariable analyses for SSI were performed. The cohort included 8415 colorectal operations of which 5291 (62.9%) had a minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approach. Overall, 25.6% had no bowel preparation, 44.9% had mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) only, and 29.5% received OABP. The SSI rate was 11.1%, and it varied by preparation type: 14.9% no preparation, 12.0% MBP, and 6.5% OABP (P < 0.001). OABP group had significantly shorter hospital LOS: (median = 4, interquartile range: 3-6) versus other preparations (median LOS = 5) (P < 0.001). Readmission rates were lowest in OABP (8.1%) and highest in the no preparation group (11.8%). Multivariable logistic regressions found OABP associated with lower SSI [adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) = 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36-0.59]. Stratified models found OABP protective for SSI for both open procedures (ORadj = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.30-0.53) and MIS procedures (ORadj = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.36-0.65). OABP is associated with reduced SSI rates, shorter LOS, and fewer readmissions. Adoption of OABP before elective colectomy would reduce SSI without effecting LOS. The practice of MBP alone should be abandoned.

  14. Does bowel preparation for inflammatory bowel disease surgery matter?

    PubMed

    Shwaartz, C; Fields, A C; Sobrero, M; Divino, C M

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if bowel preparation influences outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease undergoing surgery. The database of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Procedure Targeted Colectomy, from 2012 to 2014 was analyzed. Inflammatory bowel disease patients undergoing colorectal resection with or without bowel preparation were included in the study. In all, 3679 patients with inflammatory bowel disease were identified. 42.5% had no bowel preparation, 21.5% had mechanical bowel preparation only, 8.8% had oral antibiotic bowel preparation only and 27.2% had combined mechanical and oral antibiotic preparation. Combined mechanical and oral antibiotic preparation is associated with lower rates of anastomotic leak, ileus, surgical site infection, organ space infection, wound dehiscence and sepsis/septic shock. Combined mechanical and oral antibiotic preparation for inflammatory bowel disease patients undergoing colectomy is associated with decreased rates of surgical site infection, anastomotic leak, ileus. Combined bowel preparation should be the standard of care for inflammatory bowel disease patients undergoing colorectal resection. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. Lack of Association Found between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Multicenter Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Feng; Xiong, Man; Ma, Zonghui; Huang, Senxiong; Li, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) is still controversial. Here we performed a retrospective study to explore this issue. Methods. A total of 502 inpatients with Rome III confirmed IBS-D and known H. pylori status from 8 hospitals were enrolled. H. pylori-positive patients, hospitalized in the recent year, were followed up to evaluate the effects of H. pylori eradication on IBS-D clinical course. Results. Of the 502 IBS-D patients, 206 were H. pylori-positive, with an infection rate that has no significant difference with that of the general population in Guangdong province (p = 0.348). For patients followed up, no significant differences were noted as to overall symptoms (p = 0.562), abdominal pain/discomfort (p = 0.777), bloating (p = 0.736), stool frequency (p = 0.835), or stool characteristics (p = 0.928) between the H. pylori-eradicated group and the control group. The results were the same in long-term follow-up patients except the improvement of bloating, which showed that the bloating score in the H. pylori-eradicated group was significantly lower (p = 0.047). Conclusions. No significant correlation between H. pylori infection and IBS-D was noted. Overall, IBS-D patients may not benefit from H. pylori eradication. PMID:27493660

  16. Herbal prescription Chang'an II repairs intestinal mucosal barrier in rats with post-inflammation irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-yun; Su, Min; Zheng, Yong-qiu; Wang, Xiao-ge; Kang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Zhu, En-lin; Bian, Zhao-xiang; Tang, Xu-dong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The herbal prescription Chang'an II is derived from a classical TCM formula Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang for the treatment of liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency syndrome of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study we investigated the effects of Chang'an II on the intestinal mucosal immune barrier in a rat post-inflammation IBS (PI-IBS) model. Methods: A rat model of PI-IBS was established using a multi-stimulation paradigm including early postnatal sibling deprivation, bondage and intrarectal administration of TNBS. Four weeks after TNBS administration, the rats were treated with Chang'an II (2.85, 5.71 and 11.42 g·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 14 d. Intestinal sensitivity was assessed based on the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores and fecal water content. Open field test and two-bottle sucrose intake test were used to evaluate the behavioral changes. CD4+ and CD8+ cells were counted and IL-1β and IL-4 levels were measured in intestinal mucosa. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate ultrastructural changes of the intestinal mucosal barrier. Results: PI-IBS model rats showed significantly increased AWR reactivity and fecal water content, and decreased locomotor activity and sucrose intake. Chang'an II treatment not only reduced AWR reactivity and fecal water content, but also suppressed the anxiety and depressive behaviors. Ultrastructural study revealed that the gut mucosal barrier function was severely damaged in PI-IBS model rats, whereas Chang'an II treatment relieved intestinal mucosal inflammation and repaired the gut mucosal barrier. Furthermore, PI-IBS model rats showed a significantly reduced CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in lamina propria and submucosa, and increased IL-1β and reduced IL-4 expression in intestinal mucosa, whereas Chang'an II treatment reversed PI-IBS-induced changes in CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio and expression of IL-1β and IL-4. Conclusion: Chang'an II treatment protects the intestinal mucosa against PI-IBS through anti

  17. Herbal prescription Chang'an II repairs intestinal mucosal barrier in rats with post-inflammation irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-yun; Su, Min; Zheng, Yong-qiu; Wang, Xiao-ge; Kang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Zhu, En-lin; Bian, Zhao-xiang; Tang, Xu-dong

    2015-06-01

    The herbal prescription Chang'an II is derived from a classical TCM formula Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang for the treatment of liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency syndrome of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study we investigated the effects of Chang'an II on the intestinal mucosal immune barrier in a rat post-inflammation IBS (PI-IBS) model. A rat model of PI-IBS was established using a multi-stimulation paradigm including early postnatal sibling deprivation, bondage and intrarectal administration of TNBS. Four weeks after TNBS administration, the rats were treated with Chang'an II (2.85, 5.71 and 11.42 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), ig) for 14 d. Intestinal sensitivity was assessed based on the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores and fecal water content. Open field test and two-bottle sucrose intake test were used to evaluate the behavioral changes. CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were counted and IL-1β and IL-4 levels were measured in intestinal mucosa. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate ultrastructural changes of the intestinal mucosal barrier. PI-IBS model rats showed significantly increased AWR reactivity and fecal water content, and decreased locomotor activity and sucrose intake. Chang'an II treatment not only reduced AWR reactivity and fecal water content, but also suppressed the anxiety and depressive behaviors. Ultrastructural study revealed that the gut mucosal barrier function was severely damaged in PI-IBS model rats, whereas Chang'an II treatment relieved intestinal mucosal inflammation and repaired the gut mucosal barrier. Furthermore, PI-IBS model rats showed a significantly reduced CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio in lamina propria and submucosa, and increased IL-1β and reduced IL-4 expression in intestinal mucosa, whereas Chang'an II treatment reversed PI-IBS-induced changes in CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio and expression of IL-1β and IL-4. Chang'an II treatment protects the intestinal mucosa against PI-IBS through anti

  18. Distinction of infected and non-infected post-surgical incisions with In-111-WBC scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.; Hinkle, G.H.; Olsen, J.O.

    1985-05-01

    To determine if In-111-WBCs scintigraphy can distinguish between healing and infection in post-surgical wounds, a prospective study was performed in patients with 3-14 day old surgical incisions. Eighteen patients (11 males and 7 females) were scanned 24 hrs after injection of 0.5 mCi of In-111 labeled autologous leukocytes. The scan findings were correlated with blood and/wound cultures results and diagnosis at time of discharge. Incisional uptake of In-111-WBCs was noted in 9 patients with infected surgical wounds and was absent in those 9 patients with non-infected surgical wounds. The results of the authors' study show that In-111-WBCs do not accumulate in non-infected surgical incisions. This confirms their previous findings in rats. The high specificity of In-111 leukocytes imaging makes it a valuable study in the evaluation of post-operative patients with suspected surgical wound infections. In-111 WBCs scintigraphy can distinguish between normal healing and infection at the site of recent (3-14 days) surgical incisions.

  19. Post operative infection, pyrexia and perioperative antimicrobial drug use in surgical colic patients.

    PubMed

    Freeman, K D; Southwood, L L; Lane, J; Lindborg, S; Aceto, H W

    2012-07-01

    Infections are common complications in post operative colic patients. It is the impression of some surgeons that pyrexia in the early post operative period is a sign of infection and appropriate timing of perioperative antimicrobials will decrease the incidence of post operative infection. To determine the association between 1) post operative pyrexia and development of infection and 2) perioperative antimicrobial drug use and infection rate in post operative colic patients. Medical records of patients undergoing surgical treatment for colic were reviewed. Horses recovering from surgery and surviving >48 h were included. Data relating to case details, duration of surgery, post operative infection, peri- and post operative antimicrobial administration, presence, intensity and duration of pyrexia, were recorded. Data were analysed using standard statistical methods for simple comparisons between groups and by logistic regression for more complex comparisons. One-hundred-and-thirteen horses were included in the final analyses, 48 (43%) of which were diagnosed with a post operative infection. Duration of surgery and anaesthesia were associated with post operative infection. Eighty-five percent of horses (n = 96) exhibited pyrexia (rectal temperature >38.3°C) post operatively. Peak temperature >39.2°C, time post surgery to peak temperature >48 h and duration of pyrexia >48 h were significantly associated with infection. In a combined model, time to first pyrexic >48 h post surgery, peak temperature and time to peak >48 h were equally weighted and the model's positive predictive value for post operative infection was 72%. Timing and dose rate of preoperative antimicrobials were not associated with infection but duration of post operative antimicrobial drug use was. Slight to mild pyrexia (38-39.4°C) in the early post operative period is not necessarily associated with impending bacterial infection in colic patients and the use of antimicrobials in these patients may

  20. Modulation of inflammatory bowel disease in a mouse model following infection with Trichinella spiralis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection of mice with Trichinella spiralis redirects the mucosal immune system from a Th1 to a protective Th2 response with a reduction in the severity of trinitrobenzesulfonic acid-induced colonic damage. T. spiralis infection induced IL-10 production in a dose-dependent manner in oxazolone (OXZ)-...

  1. Increased risk of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) infection among patients hospitalized for inflammatory bowel disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Leung, Wesley; Weizman, Adam V

    2011-06-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) infection has become an increasingly common hospital-acquired infection in U.S. hospitals. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently require hospitalization and therefore may be at increased risk of nosocomial infections. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) to identify admissions for IBD (n = 116,842) between 1998 and 2004. We compared the prevalence of VRE in this group to that of non-IBD gastrointestinal (GI) inpatients and general inpatients and assessed for associations between VRE and hospital mortality, length of stay, and total charges. The crude VRE prevalence was 2.1/10,000 in hospitalized IBD patients, 1.3/10,000 in non-IBD GI patients, and 0.9/10,000 in general inpatients. After adjustment for confounders, IBD inpatients were at increased risk of VRE compared to the non-IBD GI (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.65; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-2.64) and general inpatient (aOR 2.37; 95% CI: 1.31-4.27) groups. Among IBD patients, there was a higher prevalence of VRE infection in those who had surgery (4.4/10,000 versus 1.7/10,000; P < 0.04) and total parenteral nutrition (6.9/10,000 versus 1.8/10,000; P < 0.003). VRE infection was not associated with an increase in mortality (0% versus 0.7%, P = 0.8); however, it was associated with 3-fold higher total hospital charges ($63,517 versus $21,918 USD; P < 0.0001) and increased average length of stay in hospital (16.1 versus 6.1 days; P < 0.0001). Hospitalized IBD patients have increased susceptibility to VRE that is associated with increased economic burden. This study reinforces the importance of measures to prevent nosocomial infection, particularly in the vulnerable IBD population. Copyright © 2010 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  2. Endowashers: an overlooked risk for possible post-endoscopic infections

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Assadian, Ojan; Poldrack, Rosmarie; Duty, Oliver; Schwarzer, Heinrich; Möller, Hiltraud; Kober, Paul; Räther, Malte; Schröder, Lutz Werner; Sinha, Jeanette; Lerch, Markus M.; Kramer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Prevention of post-endoscopy infections is an important objective to assure patient safety. Endowashers, or high throughput irrigation water pumps, are a frequently used device on endoscopes. Recommendations published by professional bodies and regulatory health agencies cover not only adequate reprocessing of fiber-endoscopes but also state accepted methods of regular microbial sampling. Although major instruments like endoscopes are covered by these recommendations, other devices used as optional add-ons for endoscopes are not included. Objective: The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the potential for endowashers to act as a possible source of infection. Method: 24 endowashers were sampled. Sterile rinse-water was pumped through the endowasher and tested microbiologically according to standardised tests. Sampling was performed in 18 hospitals, including 2 university teaching hospitals, in northern Germany. If endowashers were contaminated, devices were reprocessed and re-tested. Results: Of 44 samples, 6 (14%) were contaminated with pathogens of up to >20,000 cfu/ml. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other Gram-negative non-fermenters such as Stenotrophomonas spp. (18x) and Acinetobacter spp. (2x), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (1x), Enterobacter cloacae (1x), Candida albicans (1x), Serratia spp. (1x), Streptococcus spp. (1x) and others (2x). Conclusion: Endowashers can be a potential source of infection. Despite their common use, they are not routinely sampled microbiologically. Endowashers should be clearly mentioned in respective guidelines and routine quality control sampling of endowashers should be part of such recommendations. If endowashers are not monitored regularly, devices with single-use hoses should be used. PMID:22242094

  3. Bowel incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... control of their bowels. Exercises to make the anal and pelvic muscles stronger can help the bowels ... Gynecological, prostate, or rectal surgery. Injury to the anal muscles due to childbirth (in women). Nerve or ...

  4. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out of ... what you eat and drink. Sometimes a bowel movement isn't normal. Diarrhea happens when stool passes ...

  5. Selective bowel decontamination for the prevention of infection in acute myelogenous leukemia: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Gun; Choi, Su Mi; Choi, Jung Hyun; Yoo, Jin Hong; Park, Yoon Hee; Kim, Yoo Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang Ki; Kim, Hee Je; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Jong Wook; Min, Woo Sung; Shin, Wan Shik; Kim, Chun Choo

    2002-03-01

    Infection is still a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients receiving chemotherapy. Recently the main cause of infection has changed from gram-negative to gram-positive bacteria and the resistance to antibiotics has increased. This study aimed to access the effectiveness of antimicrobial prophylaxis (AP) with orally absorbable antibiotics. Ninety-five AML patients receiving chemotherapy at Catholic Hemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Center from March 1999 to July 1999 were randomly divided into the AP group (250 mg ciprofloxacin twice a day, 150 mg roxithromycin twice a day, 50 mg fluconazole once a day) and the control group for a prospective analysis. The incidence of fever was 82.6% in the AP group and 91.6% in the control group (p = 0.15). Though classification and sites of infections showed no difference between the two groups, the catheter associated infection occurred more frequently in the AP group in significance. The time interval between initiation of chemotherapy and onset of fever, white blood cell (WBC) count at the onset of fever, duration of leukopenia (WBC < 1,000/mm3), duration of systemic antibiotic therapy, mortality due to infection and hospitalization period from the data starting chemotherapy showed no differences between the two groups. Infections due to gram negative bacteria decreased to 33.3% in the AP group (vs. 92% in the control group), but infections due to gram positive bacteria increased to 66.7% (vs. 8% in the control group). Gram negative bacteria showed 100% resistance to ciprofloxacin in the AP group and gram-positive bacteria showed 90-100% resistance to erythromycin, regardless of the presence of AP. The AP could not reduce the occurrence of infection or infection associated death in AML patients receiving chemotherapy. On considering increased gram-positive infection and resistance to fluoroquinolone and macrolide, routine prescription of AP should be reconsidered. Further

  6. Combined Mechanical and Oral Antibiotic Bowel Preparation Reduces Incisional Surgical Site Infection and Anastomotic Leak Rates After Elective Colorectal Resection: An Analysis of Colectomy-Targeted ACS NSQIP.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, John E; Mantyh, Christopher R; Sun, Zhifei; Migaly, John

    2015-08-01

    To determine the association between preoperative bowel preparation and 30-day outcomes after elective colorectal resection. Patients from the 2012 Colectomy-Targeted American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) database who underwent elective colorectal resection were included for analysis and assigned to 1 of 4 groups based on the type of preoperative preparation they received [combined mechanical and oral antibiotic preparation (OAP), mechanical preparation only, OAP only, or no preoperative bowel preparation]. The association between preoperative bowel preparation status and 30-day postoperative outcomes was assessed using multivariate regression analysis to adjust for a robust array of patient- and procedure-related factors. A total of 4999 patients were included for this study [1494 received (29.9%) combined mechanical and OAP, 2322 (46.5%) received mechanical preparation only, 91 (1.8%) received OAP only, and 1092 (21.8%) received no preoperative preparation]. Compared to patients receiving no preoperative preparation, patients who received combined preparation demonstrated a lower 30-day incidence of postoperative incisional surgical site infection (3.2% vs 9.0%, P < 0.001), anastomotic leakage (2.8% vs 5.7%, P = 0.001), and procedure-related hospital readmission (5.5% vs 8.0%, P = 0.03). The outcomes of patients who received either mechanical or OAP alone did not differ significantly from those who received no preparation. Combined bowel preparation with mechanical cleansing and oral antibiotics results in a significantly lower incidence of incisional surgical site infection, anastomotic leakage, and hospital readmission when compared to no preoperative bowel preparation.

  7. Predictors of late bowel toxicity using three different methods of contouring in patients undergoing post-operative radiation for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Supriya; Krishnatry, Rahul; Dora, Tapas; Kannan, Sadhna; Thomas, Biji; Sonawone, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Paul, Siji; Phurailatpam, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the correlation between dose-volume histogram derived from three bowel contouring methods and late toxicity in patients undergoing post-operative radiation therapy (PORT) for cervical cancer. From June 2010 to May 2013, 103 patients undergoing PORT were included. Three different contouring methods were used: (a) individual small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops, (b) total bowel (TB; including SB and LB) and (c) peritoneal cavity (PC). The volume of SB, LB, TB and PC receiving 15, 30 and 40 Gy was calculated. Acute and late bowel toxicities were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse events v. 3.0. Receiver operating characteristic curve identified thresholds predicting late toxicity with the highest specificity. All data were dichotomized across these thresholds. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using SPSS(®) v. 20 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY; formerly SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). On univariate analysis, V30 PC ≥ 900 cm(3) (p = 0.01), V40 PC ≥ 750 cm(3) (p = 0.03) and V40 TB ≥ 280 cm(3) (p = 0.03) and use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.03) predicted grade ≥II acute toxicity. On multivariate analysis, use of concurrent chemotherapy [odds ratio (OR) 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-11.1, p = 0.03] and V30 PC ≥ 900 cm(3) (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1-5.5, p = 0.05) predicted acute grade ≥II toxicity. On univariate analysis for late toxicity, SB (V30 ≥ 190 cm(3), p = 0.009; V40 ≥ 150 cm(3), p = 0.03), LB (V15 ≥ 250 cm(3), p = 0.04), V40 PC (V40 ≥ 750 cm(3), p = 0.001) and presence of acute grade ≥III toxicity (p = 0.006), treatment technique (three-dimensional conformal radiation or intensity modulated radiotherapy, p = 0.02) predicted more than or equal to grade ll late bowel toxicity. On multivariate analysis, only body mass index ≥25 kg m(-2) (OR 7.3, 95% CI 1.6-31.6, p = 0.008) and

  8. Predictors of late bowel toxicity using three different methods of contouring in patients undergoing post-operative radiation for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krishnatry, Rahul; Dora, Tapas; Kannan, Sadhna; Thomas, Biji; Sonawone, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Paul, Siji; Phurailatpam, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the correlation between dose–volume histogram derived from three bowel contouring methods and late toxicity in patients undergoing post-operative radiation therapy (PORT) for cervical cancer. Methods: From June 2010 to May 2013, 103 patients undergoing PORT were included. Three different contouring methods were used: (a) individual small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops, (b) total bowel (TB; including SB and LB) and (c) peritoneal cavity (PC). The volume of SB, LB, TB and PC receiving 15, 30 and 40 Gy was calculated. Acute and late bowel toxicities were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse events v. 3.0. Receiver operating characteristic curve identified thresholds predicting late toxicity with the highest specificity. All data were dichotomized across these thresholds. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using SPSS® v. 20 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY; formerly SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Results: On univariate analysis, V30 PC ≥ 900 cm3 (p = 0.01), V40 PC ≥ 750 cm3 (p = 0.03) and V40 TB ≥ 280 cm3 (p = 0.03) and use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.03) predicted grade ≥II acute toxicity. On multivariate analysis, use of concurrent chemotherapy [odds ratio (OR) 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–11.1, p = 0.03] and V30 PC ≥ 900 cm3 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1–5.5, p = 0.05) predicted acute grade ≥II toxicity. On univariate analysis for late toxicity, SB (V30 ≥ 190 cm3, p = 0.009; V40 ≥ 150 cm3, p = 0.03), LB (V15 ≥ 250 cm3, p = 0.04), V40 PC (V40 ≥ 750 cm3, p = 0.001) and presence of acute grade ≥III toxicity (p = 0.006), treatment technique (three-dimensional conformal radiation or intensity modulated radiotherapy, p = 0.02) predicted more than or equal to grade ll late bowel toxicity. On multivariate analysis, only body mass index ≥25 kg m−2 (OR 7.3, 95% CI 1.6–31

  9. Trichinella spiralis infection alters small bowel motor activity in the fed state.

    PubMed

    Cowles, V E; Sarna, S K

    1991-09-01

    The effect of Trichinella spiralis infection on small intestinal transit and motor activity in the fed state during the intestinal phase of infection was studied. Contractions were recorded by strain gauge transducers, and mean transit time was measured by marker dilution technique. The mean amplitude and area of individual phasic contractions decreased, but no change occurred in their mean duration during trichinosis. The total amplitude and area of phasic contractions also decreased; this was caused by a decrease in the frequency of contractions as well as a decrease in the mean parameters. The reduction in the total duration was entirely caused by the decrease in frequency. The reduction in the total parameters of all contractions was the result of a reduction in the same parameters for both propagating and nonpropagating contractions. However, the decrease in the parameters of propagating contractions was much greater. Also, there was a decrease in the distance of propagation of phasic contractions. The transit time as a result of phasic contractions increased during T. spiralis infection. Additionally, T. spiralis infection induced giant migrating contractions in the fed state that were never observed during control. Chyme was propelled very rapidly and effectively by giant migrating contractions. The findings of the present study suggest that during diarrhea induced by T. spiralis infection, the phasic contractions may act to decrease transit and, hence, allow more contact time for absorption of water and nutrients. However, this response may be counter-balanced by giant migrating contractions that rapidly propel chyme into the colon and compound the diarrhea associated with T. spiralis infection.

  10. Modulation of inflammatory bowel disease in a mouse model following infection with Trichinella spiralis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Liu, M Y; Wang, X L; Liu, X L; Yang, Y; Zou, H B; Sun, S M; Yu, L; Rosenthal, B; Shi, H N; Boireau, P; Wu, X P

    2013-05-20

    Infection of mice with Trichinella spiralis redirects the mucosal immune system from a Th1 to a protective Th2 response with a reduction in the severity of trinitrobenzesulfonic acid-induced colonic damage. T. spiralis infection induced IL-10 production in a dose-dependent manner in oxazolone (OXZ)-induced colitis. This phenomenon may be responsible for the lack of efficacy of T. spiralis in the treatment of OXZ-induced colitis. These results indicate that if the source of increased IL-10 production is identified and addressed, T. spiralis may alter the Th2 response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbiota, gastrointestinal infections, low-grade inflammation, and antibiotic therapy in irritable bowel syndrome: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Schmulson, M; Bielsa, M V; Carmona-Sánchez, R; Hernández, A; López-Colombo, A; López Vidal, Y; Peláez-Luna, M; Remes-Troche, J M; Tamayo, J L; Valdovinos, M A

    2014-01-01

    Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) prevalence, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), altered microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and antibiotic therapy in IBS are all controversial issues. To conduct an evidence-based review of these factors. A review of the literature was carried out up to July 2012, with the inclusion of additional articles as far as August 2013, all of which were analyzed through the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) system. 1.There is greater SIBO probability in IBS when breath tests are performed, but prevalence varies widely (2-84%). 2.The gut microbiota in individuals with IBS is different from that in healthy subjects, but a common characteristic present in all the patients has not been established. 3.The incidence and prevalence of PI-IBS varies from 9-10% and 3-17%, respectively, and the latter decreases over time. Bacterial etiology is the most frequent but post-viral and parasitic cases have been reported. 4.A sub-group of patients has increased enterochromaffin cells, intraepithelial lymphocytes, and mast cells in the intestinal mucosa, but no differences between PI-IBS and non-PI-IBS have been determined. 5.Methanogenic microbiota has been associated with IBS with constipation. 6.Rifaximin at doses of 400mg TID/10days or 550mg TID/14days is effective treatment for the majority of overall symptoms and abdominal bloating in IBS. Retreatment effectiveness appears to be similar to that of the first cycle. Further studies are required to determine the nature of the gut microbiota in IBS and the differences in low-grade inflammation between PI-IBS and non-PI-IBS. Rifaximin has shown itself to be effective treatment for IBS, regardless of prior factors. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Infection of Brindley sacral anterior root stimulator by Pseudomonas aeruginosa requiring removal of the implant: long-term deleterious effects on bowel and urinary bladder function in a spinal cord injury patient with tetraplegia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We report infection of Brindley sacral anterior root stimulator in a spinal cord injury patient, who ultimately required removal of the implant. The consequences of failed implantation were severe constipation, and loss of reflex penile erection and bladder emptying. Case presentation A male patient, born in 1973, fell off the balcony while on holidays in Crete in 1993 and developed complete tetraplegia at C-5 level. In 1996, deafferentation of sacral nerve roots 2, 3 and 4 were carried out bilaterally. Brindley sacral anterior root stimulator was implanted. On eleventh post-operative day, blood stained fluid came out of sacral wound. Microbiology of exudates showed growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, sensitive to gentamicin. As discharge of serosanguinous fluid persisted, sacral wound was explored. In March 1997, induration and craggy swelling were noted at the site of receiver. There was discharge from the surgical wound in the back. Wound swab grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The receiver was taken out. Cables were retrieved and tunnelled in left flank. Laminectomy wound was left open. In May 1997, cables were removed from left flank through the laminectomy wound. Grommet was sliced down as much as possible without producing leak of cerebrospinal fluid. Histoacryl glue was used over the truncated grommet as a sealing agent. Microbiology of end of S-2 and S-3 cables showed growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which was sensitive to gentamicin. End of S-4 cable showed scanty growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella aerogenes. Review of this patient in January 1999 revealed presence of sinuses in dorsal wound exuding purulent material. The wound was explored; grommet and electrodes were removed. The consequences of failed implantation were severe constipation and loss of reflex penile erection and bladder emptying. This patient had to spend increasing amount of time for bowels management. Faecal incontinence limited his mobility. The problem with his

  13. Prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viral infections in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in north India

    PubMed Central

    Harsh, Parnita; Gupta, Vipin; Kedia, Saurabh; Bopanna, Sawan; Pilli, Sucharita; Surendernath; Makharia, Govind Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often require immunosuppressive therapy and blood transfusions and therefore are at a high risk of contracting infections due to hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the present study, we assessed the prevalence of these infections in patients with IBD. Methods This retrospective study included 908 consecutive patients with IBD (ulcerative colitis [UC], n=581; Crohn's disease [CD], n=327) who were receiving care at a tertiary care center. Ninety-five patients with intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) were recruited as disease controls. Prospectively maintained patient databases were reviewed for the prevalence of HBV surface antigen, anti-HCV antibodies, and HIV (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method). HCV RNA was examined in patients who tested positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Prevalence data of the study were compared with that of the general Indian population (HBV, 3.7%; HCV, 1%; HIV, 0.3%). Results The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV was 2.4%, 1.4%, and 0.1%, respectively, in the 908 patients with IBD. Among the 581 patients with UC, 2.2% (12/541) had HBV, 1.7% (9/517) had HCV, and 0.2% (1/499) had HIV. Among the 327 patients with CD, 2.8% (8/288) had HBV, 0.7% (2/273) had HCV, and 0% (0/277) had HIV. One patient with CD had HBV and HCV coinfection. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV in patients with ITB was 5.9% (4/67), 1.8% (1/57), and 1.2% (1/84), respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV in north Indian patients with IBD is similar to the prevalence of these viruses in the general community. Nonetheless, the high risk of flare after immunosuppressive therapy mandates routine screening of patients with IBD for viral markers. PMID:28239319

  14. Association between tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors and risk of serious infections in people with inflammatory bowel disease: nationwide Danish cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Björn; Friis-Møller, Nina; Andersson, Mikael; Jess, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether people with inflammatory bowel disease treated with tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors are at increased risk of serious infections. Design Nationwide register based propensity score matched cohort study. Setting Denmark, 2002-12. Participants The background cohort eligible for matching comprised 52 392 people with inflammatory bowel disease, aged 15 to 75 years, of whom 4300 were treated with TNF-α inhibitors. To limit confounding, a two stage matching method was applied; firstly matching on age, sex, disease duration, and inflammatory bowel disease subtype, and secondly matching on propensity scores (1:1 ratio); this yielded 1543 people treated with TNF-α inhibitors and 1543 untreated to be included in the analyses. Main outcome measures The main outcome was any serious infection, defined as a diagnosis of infection associated with hospital admission. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for two risk periods (90 and 365 days after the start of TNF-α inhibitor treatment). Hazard ratios of site specific serious infections were obtained solely for the 365 days risk period. Results Within the 90 days risk period, 51 cases of infection were observed in users of TNF-α inhibitors (incidence rate 14/100 person years), compared with 33 cases in non-users (9/100 person years), yielding a hazard ratio of 1.63 (95% confidence interval 1.01 to 2.63). Within the risk period of 365 days, the hazard ratio was 1.27 (0.92 to 1.75). In analyses of site specific infections, the hazard ratio was above 2 for several of the subgroups but only reached statistical significance for skin and soft tissue infections (2.51, 1.23 to 5.12). Conclusions This nationwide propensity score matched cohort study suggests an increased risk of serious infections associated with use of TNF-α inhibitors within the first 90 days of starting treatment and a subsequent decline in risk. This calls for increased clinical awareness of potential

  15. Imbalanced shift of cytokine expression between T helper 1 and T helper 2 (Th1/Th2) in intestinal mucosa of patients with post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Zhang, Yangde; Deng, Zhansheng

    2012-07-20

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional bowel disorder. The post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) occurs in IBS patients with a history of intestinal infection preceding the onset of symptoms. However, the underlying cause of PI-IBS is not fully understood, and the purpose of this study was to investigate the immune regulatory mechanism of PI-IBS. Participants enrolled in this study were divided into three groups including PI-IBS patients (n = 20), IBS patients without a history of infection (non-PI-IBS, n = 18), and healthy controls (n = 20). The expression levels of the Th1-derived cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12, and the Th2-derived cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in the mucosal specimens, and in the ascending colon, the descending colon, and the rectal segments were measured by RT-PCR and western blot. The IFN-γ mRNA levels in the intestinal mucosa were significantly higher in the PI-IBS group than in the non-PI-IBS or control group (both P < 0.05), but there was no difference between the non-PI-IBS and control groups. A trend toward IFN-γ protein upregulation was found in the PI-IBS group, while the IL-12 and IL-4 mRNA and protein levels were not different between any groups. The IL-10 mRNA and protein levels in the PI-IBS group were both significantly lower than in the non-PI-IBS or control groups (P < 0.05, respectively), but there was no difference between the non-PI-IBS and control groups. There were no differences in the cytokine mRNA and protein levels among the ascending colon, the descending colon, and the rectum of all groups. An increase in IFN-γ levels and a decrease in IL-10 levels were found in the intestinal mucosa of PI-IBS patients, suggesting that the infection may affect the Th1/Th2 balance. Thus, the dysregulation of the immune response is likely an important cause of IBS.

  16. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection in inflammatory bowel disease: Need for mucosal viral load measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Paolucci, Stefania; Campanini, Giulia; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the best diagnostic technique and risk factors of the human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A cohort of 40 IBD patients (17 refractory) and 40 controls underwent peripheral blood and endoscopic colonic mucosal sample harvest. Viral infection was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and correlations with clinical and endoscopic indexes of activity, and risk factors were investigated. RESULTS: All refractory patients carried detectable levels of HCMV and/or EBV mucosal load as compared to 13/23 (56.5%) non-refractory and 13/40 (32.5%) controls. The median DNA value was significantly higher in refractory (HCMV 286 and EBV 5.440 copies/105 cells) than in non-refractory (HCMV 0 and EBV 6 copies/105 cells; P < 0.05 and < 0.001) IBD patients and controls (HCMV and EBV 0 copies/105 cells; P < 0.001 for both). Refractory patients showed DNA peak values ≥ 103 copies/105 cells in diseased mucosa in comparison to non-diseased mucosa (P < 0.0121 for HCMV and < 0.0004 for EBV), while non-refractory patients and controls invariably displayed levels below this threshold, thus allowing us to differentiate viral colitis from mucosal infection. Moreover, the mucosal load positively correlated with the values found in the peripheral blood, whilst no correlation with the number of positive cells at immunohistochemistry was found. Steroid use was identified as a significant risk factor for both HCMV (P = 0.018) and EBV (P = 0.002) colitis. Finally, a course of specific antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was successful in all refractory patients with HCMV colitis, whilst refractory patients with EBV colitis did not show any improvement despite steroid tapering and discontinuation of the other medications. CONCLUSION: Viral colitis appeared to contribute to mucosal lesions in refractory IBD, and its correct diagnosis and management require

  17. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection in inflammatory bowel disease: need for mucosal viral load measurement.

    PubMed

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Paolucci, Stefania; Campanini, Giulia; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-02-14

    To evaluate the best diagnostic technique and risk factors of the human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A cohort of 40 IBD patients (17 refractory) and 40 controls underwent peripheral blood and endoscopic colonic mucosal sample harvest. Viral infection was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and correlations with clinical and endoscopic indexes of activity, and risk factors were investigated. All refractory patients carried detectable levels of HCMV and/or EBV mucosal load as compared to 13/23 (56.5%) non-refractory and 13/40 (32.5%) controls. The median DNA value was significantly higher in refractory (HCMV 286 and EBV 5.440 copies/10(5) cells) than in non-refractory (HCMV 0 and EBV 6 copies/10(5) cells; P < 0.05 and < 0.001) IBD patients and controls (HCMV and EBV 0 copies/10(5) cells; P < 0.001 for both). Refractory patients showed DNA peak values ≥ 10(3) copies/10(5) cells in diseased mucosa in comparison to non-diseased mucosa (P < 0.0121 for HCMV and < 0.0004 for EBV), while non-refractory patients and controls invariably displayed levels below this threshold, thus allowing us to differentiate viral colitis from mucosal infection. Moreover, the mucosal load positively correlated with the values found in the peripheral blood, whilst no correlation with the number of positive cells at immunohistochemistry was found. Steroid use was identified as a significant risk factor for both HCMV (P = 0.018) and EBV (P = 0.002) colitis. Finally, a course of specific antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was successful in all refractory patients with HCMV colitis, whilst refractory patients with EBV colitis did not show any improvement despite steroid tapering and discontinuation of the other medications. Viral colitis appeared to contribute to mucosal lesions in refractory IBD, and its correct diagnosis and management require quantitative real

  18. Changes in microbial ecology after fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent C. difficile infection affected by underlying inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sahil; Vazquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; González, Antonio; Weiss, Sophie; Schmidt, Bradley; Muñiz-Pedrogo, David A; Rainey, John F; Kammer, Patricia; Nelson, Heidi; Sadowsky, Michael; Khoruts, Alexander; Farrugia, Stefan L; Knight, Rob; Pardi, Darrell S; Kashyap, Purna C

    2017-05-15

    Gut microbiota play a key role in maintaining homeostasis in the human gut. Alterations in the gut microbial ecosystem predispose to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and gut inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from a healthy donor can restore gut microbial diversity and pathogen colonization resistance; consequently, it is now being investigated for its ability to improve inflammatory gut conditions such as IBD. In this study, we investigated changes in gut microbiota following FMT in 38 patients with CDI with or without underlying IBD. There was a significant change in gut microbial composition towards the donor microbiota and an overall increase in microbial diversity consistent with previous studies after FMT. FMT was successful in treating CDI using a diverse set of donors, and varying degrees of donor stool engraftment suggesting that donor type and degree of engraftment are not drivers of a successful FMT treatment of CDI. However, patients with underlying IBD experienced an increased number of CDI relapses (during a 24-month follow-up) and a decreased growth of new taxa, as compared to the subjects without IBD. Moreover, the need for IBD therapy did not change following FMT. These results underscore the importance of the existing gut microbial landscape as a decisive factor to successfully treat CDI and potentially for improvement of the underlying pathophysiology in IBD. FMT leads to a significant change in microbial diversity in patients with recurrent CDI and complete resolution of symptoms. Stool donor type (related or unrelated) and degree of engraftment are not the key for successful treatment of CDI by FMT. However, CDI patients with IBD have higher proportion of the original community after FMT and lack of improvement of their IBD symptoms and increased episodes of CDI on long-term follow-up.

  19. [Hepon, promoter of local immunity in the complex therapy of dysfunctional microflora in bowel disorders].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Ruchkina, I N

    2003-01-01

    The promoter of local immunity Heponum contributes to the restoration of eubiosis and normalization of showings of the immune status in patients with post-infection IBS. It is recommended to include Heponum in the complex therapy of chronic bowels diseases with the purpose of the restoration of normal microbiocenosis.

  20. Betadine irrigation and post-craniotomy wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunal S.; Goldenberg, Brandon; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Object The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of betadine irrigation in preventing postoperative wound infection in cranial neurosurgical procedures. Methods A total of 473 consecutive cranial neurosurgical procedures, including craniotomies and burr hole procedures were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had either antibiotic irrigation or dilute betadine plus antibiotic irrigation prior to skin closure. Infection was determined by purulence noted on reoperation and confirmed with bacterial growth culture. One and three month postoperative infection rates were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared tests. Results This study included 404 patients. Betadine was used in 117 (29.0%). At 1 month after surgery, there was no difference in the rate of wound infection between the two groups (1.7% each). However, at 90 days, the betadine group had a 2.6% infection rate compared with 3.8% in the antibiotic group, indicating a 33% decrease in infection rates with the addition of betadine (p=.527). The small sample size of the study produced a low power and high beta error. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, betadine decreased postoperative infection rates compared with antibiotic prophylaxis alone at 90 days but not 30 days. This was not statistically significant, but a larger sample size would lower the beta error and decrease confounding bias associated with group heterogeneity. The potential for betadine, a cheap, low toxicity antimicrobial, to decrease infection rates and reoperations for infection warrants a larger multicenter trial. PMID:24529229

  1. Pandemic and post-pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Díaz, Emili; Vidaur, Loreto; Torres, Antoni; Laborda, Cesar; Granada, Rosa; Bonastre, Juan; Martín, Mar; Insausti, Josu; Arenzana, Angel; Guerrero, Jose Eugenio; Navarrete, Ines; Bermejo-Martin, Jesus; Suarez, David; Rodriguez, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    There is a vast amount of information published regarding the impact of 2009 pandemic Influenza A (pH1N1) virus infection. However, a comparison of risk factors and outcome during the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period has not been described. A prospective, observational, multi-center study was carried out to evaluate the clinical characteristics and demographics of patients with positive RT-PCR for H1N1 admitted to 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs). Data were obtained from the 2009 pandemic and compared to the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period. Nine hundred and ninety-seven patients with confirmed An/H1N1 infection were included. Six hundred and forty-eight patients affected by 2009 (pH1N1) virus infection and 349 patients affected by the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period were analyzed. Patients during the post-pandemic period were older, had more chronic comorbid conditions and presented with higher severity scores (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)) on ICU admission. Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period received empiric antiviral treatment less frequently and with delayed administration. Mortality was significantly higher in the post-pandemic period. Multivariate analysis confirmed that haematological disease, invasive mechanical ventilation and continuous renal replacement therapy were factors independently associated with worse outcome in the two periods. HIV was the only new variable independently associated with higher ICU mortality during the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period. Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period had an unexpectedly higher mortality rate and showed a trend towards affecting a more vulnerable population, in keeping with more typical seasonal viral infection.

  2. Pandemic and post-pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) infection in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a vast amount of information published regarding the impact of 2009 pandemic Influenza A (pH1N1) virus infection. However, a comparison of risk factors and outcome during the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period has not been described. Methods A prospective, observational, multi-center study was carried out to evaluate the clinical characteristics and demographics of patients with positive RT-PCR for H1N1 admitted to 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs). Data were obtained from the 2009 pandemic and compared to the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period. Results Nine hundred and ninety-seven patients with confirmed An/H1N1 infection were included. Six hundred and forty-eight patients affected by 2009 (pH1N1) virus infection and 349 patients affected by the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period were analyzed. Patients during the post-pandemic period were older, had more chronic comorbid conditions and presented with higher severity scores (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)) on ICU admission. Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period received empiric antiviral treatment less frequently and with delayed administration. Mortality was significantly higher in the post-pandemic period. Multivariate analysis confirmed that haematological disease, invasive mechanical ventilation and continuous renal replacement therapy were factors independently associated with worse outcome in the two periods. HIV was the only new variable independently associated with higher ICU mortality during the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period. Conclusion Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period had an unexpectedly higher mortality rate and showed a trend towards affecting a more vulnerable population, in keeping with more typical seasonal viral infection. PMID:22126648

  3. Prior inpatient admission increases the risk of post-operative infection in hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zachary M; Chidi, Alexis P; Goswami, Julie; Han, Katrina; Simmons, Richard L; Rosengart, Matthew R; Tsung, Allan

    2015-12-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HPB) operations have a high incidence of post-operative nosocomial infections. The aim of the present study was to determine whether hospitalization up to 1 year before HPB surgery is associated with an increased risk of post-operative infection, surgical-site infection (SSI) and infection resistant to surgical chemoprophylaxis. A retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing HPB surgeries between January 2008 and June 2013 was conducted. A multivariable logistic regression model was used for controlling for potential confounders to determine the association between pre-operative admission and post-operative infection. Of the 1384 patients who met eligibility criteria, 127 (9.18%) experienced a post-operative infection. Pre-operative hospitalization was independently associated with an increased risk of a post-operative infection [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.46] and SSI (aOR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.07-2.97). Pre-operative hospitalization was also associated with an increased risk of post-operative infections resistant to standard pre-operative antibiotics (OR: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.06-6.59) and an increased risk of resistant SSIs (OR: 3.99, 95% CI: 1.25-12.73). Pre-operative hospitalization is associated with an increased incidence of post-operative infections, often with organisms that are resistant to surgical chemoprophylaxis. Patients hospitalized up to 1 year before HPB surgery may benefit from extended spectrum chemoprophylaxis. © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  4. Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gore, Richard M; Silvers, Robert I; Thakrar, Kiran H; Wenzke, Daniel R; Mehta, Uday K; Newmark, Geraldine M; Berlin, Jonathan W

    2015-11-01

    Small bowel obstruction and large bowel obstruction account for approximately 20% of cases of acute abdominal surgical conditions. The role of the radiologist is to answer several key questions: Is obstruction present? What is the level of the obstruction? What is the cause of the obstruction? What is the severity of the obstruction? Is the obstruction simple or closed loop? Is strangulation, ischemia, or perforation present? In this presentation, the radiologic approach to and imaging findings of patients with known or suspected bowel obstruction are presented.

  5. Expect the Unexpected: Mycobacterial Infection in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mohan M; Wade, Roshan N; Bava, Surendar S

    2017-01-01

    Orthopaedic Surgeons rarely encounter mycobacterial infections in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) patients. We present series of two cases to create awareness among clinicians to expect the unexpected. Tuberculosis typical/ atypical is a hidden culprit in catch clinical situations when chronic infection is Suspected, but the lab investigations are negative in persistently symptomatic patients. In such situations clinicians should suspect atypical or complex mycobacterial infections and evaluate the patients accordingly. Clinical suspicion, evaluation, isolation and treatment of atypical or complex mycobacterial infections with sensitive chemotherapy, leads to complete resolution of infection and full functional rehabilitation.

  6. Pharmacokinetic comparison of berberine in rat plasma after oral administration of berberine hydrochloride in normal and post inflammation irritable bowel syndrome rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zipeng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Ruijie; Wang, Yinghan; Guo, Yan; Yang, Qing; Zhang, Haixian; Dong, Yu; Weng, Xiaogang; Gao, Shuangrong; Zhu, Xiaoxin

    2014-01-02

    In the present study, post inflammation irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) rats were firstly established by intracolonic instillation of acetic acid with restraint stress. Then the pharmacokinetics of berberine in the rat plasma were compared after oral administration of berberine hydrochloride (25 mg/kg) to normal rats and PI-IBS rats. Quantification of berberine in the rat plasma was achieved by using a sensitive and rapid UPLC-MS/MS method. Plasma samples were collected at 15 different points in time and the pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed by WinNonlin software. Compared with the normal group, area under the plasma concentration vs. time curve from zero to last sampling time (AUC0-t) and total body clearance (CL/F) in the model group significantly increased or decreased, (2039.49 ± 492.24 vs. 2763.43 ± 203.14; 4999.34 ± 1198.79 vs. 3270.57 ± 58.32) respectively. The results indicated that the pharmacokinetic process of berberine could be altered in PI-IBS pathological conditions.

  7. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Berberine in Rat Plasma after Oral Administration of Berberine Hydrochloride in Normal and Post Inflammation Irritable Bowel Syndrome Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zipeng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Ruijie; Wang, Yinghan; Guo, Yan; Yang, Qing; Zhang, Haixian; Dong, Yu; Weng, Xiaogang; Gao, Shuangrong; Zhu, Xiaoxin

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, post inflammation irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) rats were firstly established by intracolonic instillation of acetic acid with restraint stress. Then the pharmacokinetics of berberine in the rat plasma were compared after oral administration of berberine hydrochloride (25 mg/kg) to normal rats and PI-IBS rats. Quantification of berberine in the rat plasma was achieved by using a sensitive and rapid UPLC-MS/MS method. Plasma samples were collected at 15 different points in time and the pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed by WinNonlin software. Compared with the normal group, area under the plasma concentration vs. time curve from zero to last sampling time (AUC0–t) and total body clearance (CL/F) in the model group significantly increased or decreased, (2039.49 ± 492.24 vs. 2763.43 ± 203.14; 4999.34 ± 1198.79 vs. 3270.57 ± 58.32) respectively. The results indicated that the pharmacokinetic process of berberine could be altered in PI-IBS pathological conditions. PMID:24451127

  8. Treatment of Early Post-op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Approximately 10%-40% of severe fractures fixed with internal fixation develop a deep wound infection during the healing process. Thus, the overall...stable while the bone heals . Approximately 10%-40% of severe fractures fixed with internal fixation develop a deep wound infection during the... healing process. Thus, the overall goals of this study are to (1) evaluate the effect of treatment of post-op wound infection in long bones after

  9. Post-traumatic and post-surgical Absidia corymbifera infection in a young, healthy man.

    PubMed

    Tiong, William H C; Ismael, T; McCann, J

    2006-01-01

    Absidia corymbifera infection in a healthy individual is rare. Most of the infection occurs in immunocompromised patients or diabetic patients. Cutaneous and subcutaneous mucormycosis have been increasingly reported in the literature as a result of massive trauma with contaminated wounds. We present a case of cutaneous mucormycosis in a healthy, young patient after surgical amputation for a crush injury of the leg. We also highlight the importance of the high index of clinical suspicion in the diagnosis and treatment of this fungal infection in the hype of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in hospital setting these days. Despite an initial life-saving amputation, it was inadequate to ensure the eradication of A. corymbifera infection. A second amputation was required with parenteral liposomal amphotericin B to achieve a satisfactory cure.

  10. Mechanisms of immunity in post-exposure vaccination against Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bradfute, Steven B; Anthony, Scott M; Stuthman, Kelly S; Ayithan, Natarajan; Tailor, Prafullakumar; Shaia, Carl I; Bray, Mike; Ozato, Keiko; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever that is characterized by rapid viral replication, coagulopathy, inflammation, and high lethality rates. Although there is no clinically proven vaccine or treatment for Ebola virus infection, a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine is effective in mice, guinea pigs, and non-human primates when given pre-infection. In this work, we report that VLPs protect Ebola virus-infected mice when given 24 hours post-infection. Analysis of cytokine expression in serum revealed a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in mice given VLPs post-exposure compared to infected, untreated mice. Using knockout mice, we show that VLP-mediated post-exposure protection requires perforin, B cells, macrophages, conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), and either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Protection was Ebola virus-specific, as marburgvirus VLPs did not protect Ebola virus-infected mice. Increased antibody production in VLP-treated mice correlated with protection, and macrophages were required for this increased production. However, NK cells, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were not required for post-exposure-mediated protection. These data suggest that a non-replicating Ebola virus vaccine can provide post-exposure protection and that the mechanisms of immune protection in this setting require both increased antibody production and generation of cytotoxic T cells.

  11. Wound infection rates: the importance of definition and post-discharge wound surveillance.

    PubMed

    Byrne, D J; Lynch, W; Napier, A; Davey, P; Malek, M; Cuschieri, A

    1994-01-01

    The importance of definition and post-discharge wound surveillance on reported wound infection rates have been studied, using data taken from a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of the effect of whole body disinfection on postoperative wound infection rates. All patients admitted for an elective clean or potentially contaminated surgical procedure over a 32-month period were recruited into the study. Of the 3733 patients recruited, 3466 completed the study. Wound infection (which is defined for this study) is the main outcome that was examined. The effect of careful post-discharge follow-up of patients to look for wound infections was analysed for age, wound type and presence or absence of a drain. Sixty percent of postoperative wound infections occurred after discharge. A rising wound infection rate with increasing age was observed in the in-hospital cohort whereas the incidence of outpatient wound infections declined with age. This finding is attributed to the longer in-hospital stay encountered in patients above 50 years old (median, 3 vs. 5 days, P < 0.00001). Although clean operations had a significantly lower in-hospital infection rate, potentially contaminated procedures had a lower outpatient infection rate. A similar picture was observed in other subgroups of operations including horizontal versus vertical wounds and use of drains. When assessing reported wound infection rates, the definition of wound infection used and the extent of follow-up must be known to enable accurate assessment of the results.

  12. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis following infective endocarditis: Amenable to immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Mantan, M.; Sethi, G. R.; Batra, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis develops in about 20% patients with infective endocarditis (IE), but is mostly asymptomatic. Heavy proteinuria or derangement of kidney functions is uncommon. We report here a child with IE and proliferative glomerulonephritis who manifested as significant proteinuria that recovered on treatment with immunosupressants. PMID:24049276

  13. Antimicrobials in the Management of Post-Irradiation Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    infection due to Gram-negative bacteria in the immunocompromised host generally in- volves the use of an aminoglycoside in combination with a beta ...pefloxacin in irradiated C3H/HeN mice: Correction with glucan therapy. Antimicrob Agents Chemother; 37:1882–9, 1993. [Rozenberg-Arska 1985] Rozenberg

  14. Case 7: highly infected post-surgical wound.

    PubMed

    von Hallern, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Following treatment with antibiotics and surgical incision, which resulted in the release of putrid exudate, the wound was rinsed thoroughly with octenisept and covered with an antimicrobial dressing. This regimen successfully eradicated the infection, with full healing occurring in 6 weeks.

  15. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Want to Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Irritable Bowel Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Irritable Bowel Syndrome Print A ... to minimize or prevent these symptoms. What Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a fairly common ...

  16. Allograft biopsy findings in patients with small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jamie; Dawson, David W; Dry, Sarah; French, Samuel W; Naini, Bita V; Wang, Hanlin L

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the incidence of post-transplant complications including acute cellular rejection (ACR), infection, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in mucosal allograft biopsies in patients with small bowel transplant at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed pathology reports from 5675 small bowel allograft biopsies from 99 patients and analyzed the following: indications for biopsy, frequency and grade of ACR, the presence of infectious agents, results of workup for potential PTLD, results of C4d immunohistochemistry (IHC), features of chronic mucosal injury, and findings in concurrent native bowel biopsies. Findings from 42 allograft resection specimens were also correlated with prior biopsy findings. Indeterminate, mild, moderate, and severe ACR were seen in 276 (4.9%), 409 (7.2%), 100 (1.8%), and 207 (3.6%) of biopsies, respectively. Although ACR may show histologic overlap with mycophenolate mofetil toxicity, we found the analysis of concurrent native bowel biopsies to be helpful in this distinction. Adenovirus was the most common infectious agent seen (11%), and we routinely performed adenovirus IHC on biopsies. Eighteen patients (18%) developed PTLD, 83% of which were EBV associated, but only 28% of PTLD cases were diagnosed on mucosal allograft biopsies. C4d IHC did not correlate with the presence of donor-specific antibodies in limited cases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Parasitosis and irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Catalina; Herrera, Valentina; Pérez de Arce, Edith; Gil, Luis Carlos; Madrid, Ana María; Valenzuela, Lucía; Beltrán, Caroll J

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract characterised by multi-factorial aetiology. In IBS physiopathology are involved diverse factors between them biological, psychosocial, and environmental components which affect the immune activation status of gut mucosa. Among these factors is recognized the intestinal parasitosis. Post-infection IBS (PI-IBS) is recognised as a subgroup of functional disorders whose symptoms onset appear after a symptomatic intestinal infection caused by microbial agents. There are few studies regarding of relationship between IBS and intestinal parasitosis in Chile. However, is has been well described a positive association between IBS and Blastocystis hominis infections, one of prevalent parasites in Chile. In other countries, is also described a relationship between IBS and amebiasis and giardiasis. Both, characterized by a common mode of transmission through water as well as contaminated food. Because the high prevalence of parasitosis in our country it is necessary to expand the association studies to clarify the strength of the parasites ethiology in IBS.

  18. Bowel Retraining: Strategies for Establishing Bowel Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jump to Topic Biofeedback Bowel Retraining Dietary Fiber Fruit Juice Laxatives Tips on Finding a Doctor Bowel training ... Treatment Treatment Overview Biofeedback Bowel Retraining Dietary Fiber Fruit Juice Hirschsprung's Disease Laxatives Stool Form Guide Tips on ...

  19. Infection control systems in transition: the challenges for post-Soviet Bloc countries.

    PubMed

    Ider, B-E; Adams, J; Morton, A; Whitby, M; Clements, A

    2012-04-01

    Just two decades ago, 30 of today's countries in Europe and Asia had socialist governments under Soviet dominance or direct administration. Intensive health system reforms have altered infection control in many of these countries. However, much of the literature from these countries is difficult to access by international scientists. To summarize existing infection control policies and practices in post-Soviet Bloc countries. In addition to PubMed and Google search engines, we explored local websites and grey literature. In total, 192 references published in several languages were reviewed. Infection control in these countries is in the midst of transition. Three groups of countries were identified. First, Eastern European and Baltic countries building surveillance systems for specific pathogens and antibiotic use; second, European post-Soviet Bloc countries focusing on the harmonization of recently established infection control infrastructure with European surveillance programmes; third, countries such as those formerly in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Mongolia and post-conflict Eastern European countries that are in the first stages of reform. Poor commitment, resource scarcity and shortages of expertise were identified. Underreporting of official infection control statistics is widespread. Guidance from international organizations has been crucial in initiating and developing contemporary infection control programmes. More support from the international community will be needed for the third group of countries, where infection control has remained a neglected issue. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. All rights reserved.

  20. High risk of urinary tract infections in post-operative gynaecology patients: a retrospective case analysis.

    PubMed

    Crosby-Nwaobi, R R; Faithfull, S

    2011-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the incidence and risk factors related to the occurrence of urinary tract infections (UTIs), post surgery, in women being treated for a gynaecological cancer. A retrospective case analysis of 215 women was conducted using data collected via case review with domains covering known risk factors for the occurrence of urinary infections. Bacteriuria was defined as greater than 10(5) colony-forming units per millilitre. A total of 30.7% of women had a UTI post-operatively. Among these, 75.7% infections were Escherichia coli. Having a catheter in situ for ≤3 days was found to be slightly significant in the formation of a UTI post-operatively (U= 3878, P < 0.05). Having a catheter in situ for ≥7 days was found to be highly significant (χ(2) (1) = 6.602, P < 0.01), with an odds ratio of 2.44. A positive correlation was found between the duration of the catheter in situ and type of UTI (τ= .251, P < 0.01). Although urinary catheterisation is known to be related to hospital-acquired infection, a shorter duration of catheterisation may reduce the risk of possible infection post surgery. Oncology teams need to be more aware of this risk, identify women more likely to be catheterised for longer and use preventative strategies for managing infection, such as silver nitrite-lined catheters.

  1. Hepatitis B virus infection in post-vaccination South Africa: Occult HBV infection and circulating surface gene variants

    PubMed Central

    Amponsah-Dacosta, Edina; Lebelo, Ramokone L.; Rakgole, J. Nare; Selabe, Selokela G.; Gededzha, Maemu P.; Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H.; Powell, Eleanor A.; Blackard, Jason T.; Mphahlele, M. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the HBV surface (S) gene variants circulating in the South African population after nearly two decades of universal hepatitis B vaccination. Study design From a previous serosurvey, 201 serum samples with serological evidence of exposure to HBV were identified and these were stratified into post- and pre-vaccine introduction populations. For all samples, HBV DNA was screened and quantified using a real-time PCR assay and results analysed together with HBV serological markers. Where HIV results were available, subset analysis was performed. The HBV S gene was PCR-amplified and sequences analysed for a total of 37 isolates. Results The prevalence of occult HBV infection reduced from 70.4% in the pre-vaccine introduction era to 66.0% post-vaccine introduction. There was an association between HIV infection and an increase in prevalence of occult HBV infection within the post-vaccine introduction population, although this was not statistically significant. Furthermore, sequence analysis revealed the following HBV subgenotypes; A1 (n = 34), A2 (n = 2) and a rare D4 isolate. HBV S gene variants, including diagnostic escape mutants were isolated. Conclusion There was a decline in the prevalence of occult HBV infection in post-vaccination South Africa, although the disease burden remains significant in the HIV co-infected population. After nearly two decades of a universal hepatitis B vaccination programme, no positive selection of vaccine escape mutants were observed. PMID:25600597

  2. Hepatitis B virus infection in post-vaccination South Africa: occult HBV infection and circulating surface gene variants.

    PubMed

    Amponsah-Dacosta, Edina; Lebelo, Ramokone L; Rakgole, J Nare; Selabe, Selokela G; Gededzha, Maemu P; Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H; Powell, Eleanor A; Blackard, Jason T; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the HBV surface (S) gene variants circulating in the South African population after nearly two decades of universal hepatitis B vaccination. From a previous serosurvey, 201 serum samples with serological evidence of exposure to HBV were identified and these were stratified into post- and pre-vaccine introduction populations. For all samples, HBV DNA was screened and quantified using a real-time PCR assay and results analysed together with HBV serological markers. Where HIV results were available, subset analysis was performed. The HBV S gene was PCR-amplified and sequences analysed for a total of 37 isolates. The prevalence of occult HBV infection reduced from 70.4% in the pre-vaccine introduction era to 66.0% post-vaccine introduction. There was an association between HIV infection and an increase in prevalence of occult HBV infection within the post-vaccine introduction population, although this was not statistically significant. Furthermore, sequence analysis revealed the following HBV subgenotypes; A1 (n=34), A2 (n=2) and a rare D4 isolate. HBV S gene variants, including diagnostic escape mutants were isolated. There was a decline in the prevalence of occult HBV infection in post-vaccination South Africa, although the disease burden remains significant in the HIV co-infected population. After nearly two decades of a universal hepatitis B vaccination programme, no positive selection of vaccine escape mutants were observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Discharge and infection in retinoblastoma post-enucleation sockets

    PubMed Central

    Mourits, Daphne L; Hartong, Dyonne T; Budding, Andries E; Bosscha, Machteld I; Tan, H Stevie; Moll, Annette C

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the causes and treatment options for socket discharge and infection in patients enucleated for retinoblastoma (Rb). Methods A questionnaire was filled out by (parents of) ocular prosthesis-wearing patients with a history of enucleation as treatment for Rb. We collected data on patients’ characteristics, cleaning habits of the prosthesis, frequency of socket irritation, discharge, and infection, and use of antibiotics. With ordinal logistic regression analysis, factors related to the outcome parameters (frequency of irritation, mucoid and purulent discharge) were identified. In a subset of young asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, a swab culture of the socket was performed to determine the presence of microorganisms. Results A total of 186 patients or their parents (mean age of the patients: 17.3 years, ranging from 0.8 to 88.3 years) filled out the questionnaire. Irritation, mucoid discharge, and purulent discharge were frequently (once a month or more often) experienced in 75 (39.5%), 127 (66.8%), and 15 (13.2%) sockets, respectively. Younger age was associated with a higher frequency of mucoid and purulent discharge. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, gender, age at surgery, cleaning frequency, and nocturnal wear were not associated with the outcome parameters. In a subgroup of 26 patients, the sockets were swabbed and cultured. All symptomatic patients had a positive bacterial culture versus 15% (2/13) of the asymptomatic patients (P<0.001). Common cold was correlated with both symptoms and presence of bacteria. Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus were the species most frequently cultured. Conclusion Ocular prosthesis-wearing patients often experienced mucoid discharge, and less often irritation and socket infection. These complaints were found to decrease with increasing age, but did not seem to be influenced by cleaning or wearing habits. Symptomatic sockets, with and without discharge, were correlated with the presence

  4. Potential Vaccines and Post-Exposure Treatments for Filovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Brian M.; Trefry, John C.; Biggins, Julia E.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Honko, Anna N.; Smith, Darci R.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2012-01-01

    Viruses of the family Filoviridae represent significant health risks as emerging infectious diseases as well as potentially engineered biothreats. While many research efforts have been published offering possibilities toward the mitigation of filoviral infection, there remain no sanctioned therapeutic or vaccine strategies. Current progress in the development of filovirus therapeutics and vaccines is outlined herein with respect to their current level of testing, evaluation, and proximity toward human implementation, specifically with regard to human clinical trials, nonhuman primate studies, small animal studies, and in vitro development. Contemporary methods of supportive care and previous treatment approaches for human patients are also discussed. PMID:23170176

  5. Potential vaccines and post-exposure treatments for filovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Brian M; Trefry, John C; Biggins, Julia E; Hensley, Lisa E; Honko, Anna N; Smith, Darci R; Olinger, Gene G

    2012-09-01

    Viruses of the family Filoviridae represent significant health risks as emerging infectious diseases as well as potentially engineered biothreats. While many research efforts have been published offering possibilities toward the mitigation of filoviral infection, there remain no sanctioned therapeutic or vaccine strategies. Current progress in the development of filovirus therapeutics and vaccines is outlined herein with respect to their current level of testing, evaluation, and proximity toward human implementation, specifically with regard to human clinical trials, nonhuman primate studies, small animal studies, and in vitro development. Contemporary methods of supportive care and previous treatment approaches for human patients are also discussed.

  6. Lactobacillus casei DG and its postbiotic reduce the inflammatory mucosal response: an ex-vivo organ culture model of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Compare, Debora; Rocco, Alba; Coccoli, Pietro; Angrisani, Debora; Sgamato, Costantino; Iovine, Barbara; Salvatore, Umberto; Nardone, Gerardo

    2017-04-14

    The evidence on the role of gut microbiota in post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) is convincing. Lactobacillus spp. positively affect IBS symptoms, although the mechanisms through which probiotics exert their beneficial effects are largely unknown. The aim of the study is to evaluate the role of Lactobacillus casei DG (LC-DG) and its postbiotic (PB) in modulating the inflammatory/immune-response in PI-IBS in an ex-vivo organ culture model. Ex vivo cultures of ileal and colonic mucosa from 10 PI-IBS, diarrhea predominant subtype (D) patients, and 10 healthy controls (HC) were treated with LPS, LC-DG and PB. Interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 mRNA levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4) protein expression by Western blotting. At baseline, IL-1α, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels as well as TLR-4 protein expression were significantly higher while IL-10 mRNA levels were lower in PI-IBS D than in HC in both ileum and colon. LC-DG and PB significantly reduced the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TLR-4 while increased that of IL-10 after LPS stimulation. The protective effect was more pronounced for PB than LC-DG treatment. LC-DG and its PB attenuate the inflammatory mucosal response in an ex-vivo organ culture model of PI-IBS D.

  7. Cytokine Response after Stimulation with Key Commensal Bacteria Differ in Post-Infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome (PI-IBS) Patients Compared to Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Sundin, Johanna; Rangel, Ignacio; Repsilber, Dirk; Brummer, Robert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Microbial dysbiosis and prolonged immune activation resulting in low-grade inflammation and intestinal barrier dysfunction have been suggested to be underlying causes of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in cytokine response between mucosal specimens of PI-IBS patients and healthy controls (HC) after ex vivo stimulation with key anaerobic bacteria. Methods Colonic biopsies from 11 PI-IBS patients and 10 HC were stimulated ex vivo with the commensal bacteria Bacteroides ovatus, Ruminococcus gnavus, Akkermansia muciniphila, Subdoligranulum variabile and Eubacterium limosum, respectively. The cytokine release (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α and IFN-γ) in stimulation supernatants was analyzed using the LUMINEX assay. Comparison of cytokine release between PI-IBS patients and healthy controls was performed taking both unstimulated and bacterially stimulated mucosal specimens into account. Key Results IL-13 release from mucosal specimens without bacterial stimulation was significantly lower in PI-IBS patients compared to HC (p < 0.05). After stimulation with Subdoligranulum variabile, IL-1β release from PI-IBS patients was significantly increased compared to HC (p < 0.05). Stimulation with Eubacterium limosum resulted in a significantly decreased IL-10 release in HC compared to PI-IBS patients (p < 0.05) and a tendency to decreased IL-13 release in HC compared to PI-IBS patients (p = 0.07). Conclusions & Inferences PI-IBS patients differ from HC with regard to cytokine release ex vivo after stimulation with selected commensal bacteria. Hence, our results support that the pathogenesis of PI-IBS comprises an altered immune response against commensal gut microbes. PMID:26366730

  8. [Review and guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of post-natal cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Alarcón Allen, A; Baquero-Artigao, F

    2011-01-01

    Postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in the newborn can occur from exposure to maternal cervical secretions during birth, ingestion of breast milk, transfusion of blood products or transmission by body fluids of infected people. Breast milk is the main source of infection, given the high rate of CMV-positive mothers excreting CMV in milk. Freezing reduces the risk of CMV transmission by breastfeeding, although it does not eliminate it completely. Pasteurisation prevents such transmission, but it can alter the immunological properties of breast milk. Postnatal CMV infection is usually asymptomatic, as it normally results from viral reactivation in the mother, and the neonate is born with protective antibodies. However, in the very low birth weight premature infant the amount of transferred antibodies is smaller and a symptomatic infection can occur. Symptomatic post-natal CMV infection in the newborn typically causes hepatitis, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia or sepsis-like syndrome. Pneumonitis and enteritis are less common, but very characteristic. Diagnosis is based on urine virus detection at the time of onset of symptoms. Postnatal CMV infection in the newborn generally resolves spontaneously without antiviral treatment. Ganciclovir should be reserved for severe cases. Unlike congenital CMV disease, post-natal CMV infection in the preterm infant does not seem to be associated with hearing loss or abnormal neuro-development in long term follow-up.

  9. Bowel Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. It is not a normal part of aging. Causes include Constipation Damage to muscles or nerves of the anus and rectum Diarrhea Pelvic support problems Treatments include changes in diet, medicines, bowel training, or surgery. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  10. Landscape of post-transcriptional gene regulation during hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Schwerk, Johannes; Jarret, Abigail P.; Joslyn, Rochelle C.; Savan, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a pivotal role in various gene regulatory networks including, but not limited to metabolism, embryogenesis and immune responses. Different mechanisms of post-transcriptional regulation, which can act individually, synergistically, or even in an antagonistic manner have been described. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is notorious for subverting host immune responses and indeed exploits several components of the host’s post-transcriptional regulatory machinery for its own benefit. At the same time, HCV replication is post-transcriptionally targeted by host cell components to blunt viral propagation. This review discusses the interplay of post-transcriptional mechanisms that affect host immune responses in the setting of HCV infection and highlights the sophisticated mechanisms both host and virus have evolved in the race for superiority. PMID:25890065

  11. Impact of pretransplant rifaximin therapy on early post-liver transplant infections.

    PubMed

    Esfeh, Jamak Modaresi; Hanouneh, Ibrahim A; Koval, Christine E; Kovacs, Christopher; Dalal, Deepan S; Ansari-Gilani, Kianoush; Confer, Bradley D; Eghtesad, Bijan; Zein, Nizar N; Menon, K V Narayanan

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections are major causes of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation (LT). The role of intestinal decontamination in the prevention of post-LT infections is controversial. Rifaximin is widely used for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. The effect of rifaximin on post-LT infections is unknown. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of rifaximin therapy in the pretransplant period on early bacterial infections (EBIs) and fungal infections within the first 30 days after LT. All adult patients who underwent LT at our institution (January 2009 to July 2011) were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patients receiving antibiotics other than pretransplant protocol antibiotics were excluded. Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on the presence or absence of rifaximin therapy for at least 2 days before LT. Infections were defined by the isolation of any bacterial or fungal organisms within 30 days of LT. Multivariate regression analysis, Student t tests, and Pearson's chi-square tests were used to compare the 2 groups. Two hundred sixty-eight patients were included, and 71 of these patients (26.5%) were on rifaximin at the time of LT. The 2 groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, race, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. There were no significant differences in the rates of EBIs (30% for the non-rifaximin group and 25% for the rifaximin group, P = 0.48) or fungal infections between the 2 groups. There was no increase in antimicrobial resistance among the infecting organisms. There was no difference in survival between the rifaximin and non-rifaximin groups (98% versus 97%, P = 0.36). In conclusion, the use of rifaximin in the pre-LT period was not associated with an increased risk of bacterial or fungal infections in the early post-LT period.

  12. Passive immunisation of post-weaned piglets using hyperimmune serum against experimental Haemophilus parasuis infection.

    PubMed

    Nedbalcova, K; Kucerova, Z; Krejci, J; Tesarik, R; Gopfert, E; Kummer, V; Leva, L; Kudlackova, H; Ondriasova, R; Faldyna, M

    2011-10-01

    The protective role of hyperimmune serum in the prevention of Haemophilus parasuis infections in post-weaned piglets was assessed by experimental challenge. The hyperimmune serum was obtained from a pig vaccinated with a commercial vaccine against Glässer's disease. Thirty-eight weaned piglets were divided into four groups: three groups were immunised intramuscularly with 10 ml of hyperimmune serum and one group consisted of unimmunised control animals. All piglets were subsequently infected intraperitoneally with H. parasuis serotype 5 at different times after immunisation. The use of hyperimmune serum provided the piglets with partial protection against experimental infection. The levels of protection indirectly depend on time between serum inoculation and challenge infection. The best protection of piglets against experimental infection was obtained in the group immunised 1 week before inoculation; the same group in which the highest levels of antibodies were detected at the time of challenge. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of Post-Hospital Infections in Adults Requiring Home Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Vivian M.; Griffith, Daniel P.; Blumberg, Henry M.; Dave, Nisha J.; Battey, Cynthia H.; McNally, Therese A.; Easley, Kirk A.; Galloway, John R.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Limited data are available on the incidence and risk factors for infection among patients requiring home parenteral nutrition (HPN). Methods Retrospective study of 101 consecutive adults (63 female, 38 male) discharged on HPN from Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, GA. New bloodstream infections (BSI) requiring re-hospitalization and other infections were evaluated. Results Most infections (75%) developed during the initial 6 months after hospital discharge; rates of BSI were particularly high during the first four months. A total of 56 patients (55.4%) developed a total of 102 BSIs (11.5 BSI/1000 catheter-days). Most BSIs were attributed to Gram positive organisms (46%) including coagulase-negative staphylococcus, staphylococcus aureus, enterococcus species, and others, followed by Candida species (20%) and Gram negative organisms (13%). Twenty-one percent of BSIs were polymicrobial. The BSI incidence rate ratio (IRR) was significantly increased for patients with mean pre-hospital discharge blood glucose (BG) concentrations in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile; IRR 2.4; P = 0.017). Patients with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) versus non-PICC central venous catheters had significantly higher rates of BSI (p = 0.018). Thirty-nine (38.6%) patients developed 81 non-BSI infections, including pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and surgical site infections. Post-discharge PN dextrose, lipid, and total calorie doses were unrelated to BSI but variably related to the rate of non-BSI. Conclusions Adult HPN patients exhibit a very high incidence of post-hospital infections. Higher mean BG levels during pre-discharge hospitalization and use of PICCs at discharge are associated with an increased risk of BSI in the post-discharge home setting. PMID:22858199

  14. Protective role of IL-1β against post-arthroplasty Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bernthal, Nicholas M.; Pribaz, Jonathan R.; Stavrakis, Alexandra I.; Billi, Fabrizio; Cho, John S.; Ramos, Romela Irene; Francis, Kevin P.; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Miller, Lloyd S.

    2011-01-01

    MyD88 is an adapter molecule that is used by both IL-1R and TLR family members to initiate downstream signaling and promote immune responses. Given that IL-1β is induced after S. aureus infections and TLR2 is activated by S. aureus lipopeptides, we hypothesized that IL-1β and TLR2 contribute to MyD88-dependent protective immune responses against post-arthroplasty S. aureus infections. To test this hypothesis, we used a mouse model of a post-arthroplasty S. aureus infection to compare the bacterial burden, biofilm formation and neutrophil recruitment in IL-1β-deficient, TLR2-deficient and wildtype mice. By using in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we found that the bacterial burden in IL-1β-deficient mice was 26-fold higher at 1 day after infection and remained 3- to 10-fold greater than wildtype mice through day 42. In contrast, the bacterial burden in TLR2-deficient mice did not differ from wildtype mice. In addition, implants harvested from IL-1β-deficient mice had more biofilm formation and 14-fold higher adherent bacteria compared with those from wildtype mice. Finally, IL-1β-deficient mice had ~50% decreased neutrophil recruitment to the infected postoperative joints than wildtype mice. Taken together, these findings suggest a mechanism by which IL-1β induces neutrophil recruitment to help control the bacterial burden and the ensuing biofilm formation in a post-surgical joint. PMID:21445990

  15. Bariatric surgery complications leading to small bowel transplant: a report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Abdal Raheem, Sulieman; Deen, Omer J; Corrigan, Mandy L; Parekh, Neha; Quintini, Cristiano; Steiger, Ezra; Kirby, Donald F

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is a major chronic disease affecting the U.S. population. Bariatric surgery has consistently shown greater weight loss and improved outcomes compared with conservative therapy. However, complications after bariatric surgery can be catastrophic, resulting in short bowel syndrome with a potential risk of intestinal failure, ultimately resulting in the need for a small bowel transplant. A total of 6 patients became dependent on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) after undergoing bariatric surgery at an outside facility. Four of the 6 patients required evaluation for small bowel transplant; 2 of the 6 patients were successfully managed with parenteral nutrition and did not require further small bowel transplant evaluation. Catheter-related bloodstream infection, a serious complication of HPN, occurred in 3 patients despite extensive patient education on catheter care and use of ethanol lock. Two patients underwent successful small bowel transplantation, 1 died before transplant could be performed, and 1 was listed for a multivisceral transplantation. Surgical procedures to treat morbid obesity are common and growing in popularity but are not without risk of serious complications, including intestinal failure and HPN dependency. Despite methods to prevent complications, failure of HPN may lead to the need for transplant evaluation. In selected cases, the best therapeutic treatment may be a small bowel transplant to resolve irreversible, post-bariatric surgery intestinal failure.

  16. Immune reconstitution post allogeneic transplant and the impact of immune recovery on the risk of infection.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-11-16

    Infection is the leading cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This occurs as a result of dysfunction to the host immune system from the preparative regimen used prior to HCT, combined with a delay in reconstitution of the donor-derived immune system after HCT. In this article, we elaborate on the process of immune reconstitution post-HCT that begins with the innate system and is followed by recovery of adaptive immunity. Simultaneously, we describe how the tempo of immune reconstitution influences the risk of various infections. We explain some of the key differences in immune reconstitution and the consequent risk of infections in recipients of peripheral blood stem cell, bone marrow or umbilical cord blood grafts. Other factors that impact on immune recovery are also highlighted. Finally, we allude to various strategies that are being tested to enhance immune reconstitution post-HCT.

  17. Bowel Obstruction: Sonographic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hollerweger, A; Wüstner, M; Dirks, K

    2015-06-01

    Learning objectives: Sonographic examination concept in the case of suspicion of bowel obstruction. Recognition of the sonographic criteria of a bowel obstruction. Ability to detect the level of a bowel obstruction. Sonographic detection of typical causes of bowel obstruction. Detection of sonographic signs of complicated bowel obstruction. Ability to sonographically define important differential diagnoses. Further diagnostic procedures in unclear situations.

  18. History of Depressive and Anxiety Disorders and Paroxetine Response in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Post Hoc Analysis From a Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David M.; Han, Changsu; Krulewicz, Stan; Pae, Chi-Un; Peindl, Kathleen; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Masand, Prakash S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Although irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is highly comorbid with depressive and anxiety disorders, information on the clinical implications of this comorbidity is limited. We investigated whether a history of depressive and/or anxiety disorders was associated with response to treatment in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release (CR) in IBS. Method: Seventy-two IBS subjects (diagnosed using Rome II criteria) were recruited from August 2003 to November 2005 and randomly assigned to receive flexibly dosed paroxetine CR (dose, 12.5–50 mg/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI-Plus version) was used to ascertain current (exclusionary) or past diagnoses of depressive and anxiety disorders. Subjective depression, anxiety, and stress were assessed at entry and throughout the trial using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Severity of IBS symptoms was determined by the Composite Pain Score (CPS), administered via Interactive Voice Response System, and the Clinical Global Impressions scale (CGI). The primary outcome was treatment response defined as ≥ 25% reduction in CPS from randomization to end of treatment. A post hoc analysis (multivariate logistic regression) was done to evaluate whether a history of depressive and/or anxiety disorder was associated with response to medication. Results: Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics (CPS, BDI, BAI, PSS, CGI scores) were similar between groups (history of depressive/anxiety disorder vs. no history). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, treatment response was not predicted by history of depressive and/or anxiety disorder (OR = 0.58, CI = 0.29 to 1.68, p = .32) or drug status (paroxetine CR vs. placebo) (OR = 1.26, CI = 0.68 to 3.21, p = .19). Drug status was significantly associated with the secondary outcome variable of treatment response

  19. [Does the hospital cost of care differ for inflammatory bowel disease patients with or without gastrointestinal infections? A case-control study].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C; Köhler, F; Kräplin, T; Hartmann, M; Lerch, M M; Stallmach, A

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal Infections have been implicated as possible causes of exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or risk factors for severe flares in general. The introduction of the G-DRG reimbursement system has greatly increased the pressure to provide cost effective treatment in German hospitals. Few studies have compared the costs of treating IBD patients with or without gastrointestinal infections and none of them have specifically considered the German reimbursement situation. We performed a single center case-control retrospective chart review from 2002 to 2011 of inpatients with IBD (Department of Internal Medicine IV, University Hospital Jena) with an exacerbation of their disease. The presence of gastrointestinal infections (Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, adeno-, rota-, norovirus and Clostridium difficile) was assessed in all inpatients with Cohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD patients with gastrointestinal infections (n = 79) were matched for age to IBD patients who were negative for gastrointestinal pathogens (n = 158). Patient level costing (PLC) was used to express the total cost of hospital care for each patient; PLC comprised a weighted daily bed cost plus cost of all medical services provided (e. g., endoscopy, microbiology, pathology) calculated according to an activity-based costing approach. All costs were discounted to 2012 values. Gastrointestinal infections in IBD patients were not associated with an increase in mortality (0%); however, they were associated with 2.3-fold higher total hospital charges (6499.10 € vs. 2817.00 €; p = 0.001) and increased length of stay in hospital (14.5 vs. 9.4 days; p <  0.0001). Despite increased reimbursement by DRG for IBD patients with gastrointestinal infections compared to patients without infections (3833.90 € vs. 2553.50 €; p = 0.005), hospital care in these patients was substantially underfunded (deficit -2496.80 € vs. -433.10 €) because of

  20. Risks for opportunistic tuberculosis infection in a cohort of 873 patients with inflammatory bowel disease receiving a tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Byun, Ja Min; Lee, Chang Kyun; Rhee, Sang Youl; Kim, Hyo-Jong; Im, Jong Pil; Park, Dong Il; Eun, Chang Soo; Jung, Sung-Ae; Shin, Jeong Eun; Lee, Kang-Moon; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2015-03-01

    Real-world epidemiological data on tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) receiving TNF-α inhibitors are scarce. We investigated the risks for and case characteristics of TB in a large cohort of IBD patients treated with TNF-α inhibitors in Korea, where TB is endemic. We performed an observational study on all TB cases identified in a cohort of 873 IBD subjects treated with TNF-α inhibitors from January 2001 to December 2013. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of TB was calculated using data from the matched general population. A total of 25 newly developed TB cases were identified in the cohort (pulmonary TB, 84% [21/25]; extrapulmonary TB, 16% [4/25]). The adjusted SIR of TB was 41.7 (95% confidence interval, 25.3-58.0), compared with that of the matched general population. Nineteen of the 25 patients (76%) developed TB within 2-62 months of initiation of TNF-α inhibitor treatment despite screening negative for latent TB infection (LTBI), whereas three patients with LTBI (12%, 3/25) developed TB 3 months after completion of chemoprophylaxis. The outcomes of TB treatment were mostly favorable, although one death from peritoneal TB was noted. The type of TNF-α inhibitor prescribed (infliximab) was a significant predictor of TB (p = 0.033). TNF-α inhibitor treatment strikingly increases the risk of TB infection in an IBD population from a TB endemic area. Continuous evaluation of the development of de novo TB infection in IBD patients subjected to long-term TNF inhibitor therapy is mandatory.

  1. Probiotic agents in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guslandi, M

    2007-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain and alterations in bowel habits. Several pathogenetic factors, such as altered intestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, serotonin system abnormalities and psychic disturbances have been identified. Recently, a pathogenetic role of intestinal microflora has been shown in IBS: viral or bacterial infection can trigger post-infectious IBS; some patients have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; the composition of patients' enteric flora is altered; and minimal inflammatory changes, consistent with the pro-inflammatory role of bacteria, have been demonstrated. Probiotics may, therefore, offer a rational therapeutic approach to IBS. The data available on the use of probiotics in IBS are still limited and results of controlled clinical trials are contradictory because they have been performed using different species, dosages, treatment durations and end-points for results evaluation. A critical evaluation of the therapeutic role of the various probiotics in IBS is presented in this article.

  2. Surgical site infections following craniotomy focusing on possible post-operative acquisition of infection: prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sneh-Arbib, O; Shiferstein, A; Dagan, N; Fein, S; Telem, L; Muchtar, E; Eliakim-Raz, N; Rubinovitch, B; Rubin, G; Rappaport, Z H; Paul, M

    2013-12-01

    Neurosurgery is characterized by a prolonged risk period for surgical site infection (SSI), mainly related to the presence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains. We aimed to examine factors associated with post-neurosurgical SSIs, focusing on post-operative factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted in a single center over a period of 18 months in Israel. Included were adult patients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated craniotomy, including craniotomies with external CSF drainage or shunts. SSIs were defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for healthcare-associated infections. All patients were followed up for 90 days and those with foreign body insertion for 1 year. We compared patients with and without SSI. A multivariable regression analysis for SSI was conducted including uncorrelated variables significantly associated with SSI. A total of 502 patients were included, with 138 (27.5%) undergoing emergent or urgent craniotomy. The overall SSI rate was 5.6% (28 patients), of which 3.2% (16 patients) were intracerebral. Non-elective surgery, external CSF drainage/monitoring devices, re-operation, and post-operative respiratory failure were independently associated with subsequent SSI. External CSF devices was the only significant risk factor for intracerebral SSIs (p < 0.001). Internal shunts or other foreign body insertions were not associated with SSIs. A phenotypically identical isolate to that causing the SSI was isolated from respiratory secretions prior to the SSI in 4/9 patients with microbiologically documented intracerebral SSIs. Patients with SSIs had longer hospital stay, poorer functional capacity on discharge, and higher 90-day mortality. We raise the possibility of post-operative infection acquisition through external CSF devices. Standard operating procedures for their maintenance are necessary.

  3. The Impact of Azathioprine-Associated Lymphopenia on the Onset of Opportunistic Infections in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vögelin, Marius; Biedermann, Luc; Frei, Pascal; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Zeitz, Jonas; Sulz, Michael C.; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Thiopurines are known to cause lymphopenia (<1,500 lymphocytes/μl). As severe lymphopenia (<500C/μl) is associated with opportunistic infections, we investigated severity of thiopurine-related lymphopenia and development of opportunistic infections in our tertiary referral centre. Methods We retrospectively screened medical records of 1,070 IBD patients and identified 100 individuals that developed a total of 161 episodes of lymphopenia during thiopurine treatment between 2002 and 2014. Occurrence of opportunistic infections was documented. A control group consisted of IBD patients receiving thiopurines but without developing lymphopenia. Results Of a total of 161 episodes of lymphopenia, 23% were severe (<500C/μl). In this subgroup, thiopurine dosing was modified in 64% (dosage reduction: 32%, medication discontinued: 32%). We identified 9 cases (5.5%) of opportunistic infections, of which only two occurred during severe lymphopenia. One opportunistic infection (4.5%) was identified in the control group. No association was found between opportunistic infections and severity of lymphopenia. All patients who suffered from opportunistic infections were receiving additional immunosuppressive medication. Conclusion Our patients treated with thiopurines rarely developed severe lymphopenia and opportunistic infections did not occur more often than in the control group. A careful monitoring of lymphocytes and prophylactic adjustment of thiopurine therapy might contribute to this low incidence. PMID:27214202

  4. Post-renal transplant infections: single-center experience from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Iliyasu, G; Abdu, A; Dayyab, F M; Tiamiyu, A B; Habib, Z G; Adamu, B; Habib, A G

    2016-08-01

    Infections are the leading cause of hospitalization and mortality in transplant recipients. Nigeria has a growing number of renal transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of infections in renal allograft recipients in one of the major renal transplant centers in Nigeria. All case records of renal allograft recipients on follow-up were retrieved. Those that had infection at any time after transplantation were selected. Demographic and clinical information was collected and analyzed. Thirty-three case records were analyzed, out of which 24/33 (72.7%) were males, with a mean age of 42.3 years (± 7.38). The median duration of developing infection post transplant was 270 days (range 2-2190). Most of the infections occurred after 6 months in 15/33 (45.5%). Urinary tract infection was the most common infection, noted in 13/33 (39.4%), followed by pneumonia, which was seen in 12 (33.3%), 9/12 (75%) of which were culture-positive. There were 2 cases (5.6%) of tuberculosis and 1 case (2.8%) of cytomegalovirus colitis. Out of the 9 culture-positive pneumonia cases, 6 (66.7%) were caused by gram-negative pathogens, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most common isolate seen in 3/9 (33.3%) of the patients. Among those with urinary tract infection, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species were isolated with equal proportion in 3/13 (23.1%), while Enterococcus faecalis was the most common isolate in 4/13 (30.8%). Overall infection-related mortality was 10/33 (30.3%), out of which 5/10 (50%) of deaths were from pneumonia. Post-transplant infection surveillance must be strengthened. The role of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria in post-renal transplant infection in Nigeria needs to be evaluated. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... work? How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? Who gets inflammatory bowel disease? How is inflammatory ... top How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? When the small intestine becomes inflamed, as in ...

  6. [Implementation of a post-discharge surgical site infection system in herniorrhaphy and mastectomy procedures].

    PubMed

    San Juan Sanz, Isabel; Díaz-Agero-Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo-Rodela, Ana; Pita López, María José; Oliva Iñiguez, Lourdes; Monge-Jodrá, Vicente

    2014-10-01

    Monitoring surgical site infection (SSI) performed during hospitalization can underestimate its rates due to the shortening in hospital stay. The aim of this study was to determine the actual rates of SSI using a post-discharge monitoring system. All patients who underwent herniorraphy or mastectomy in the Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2011 were included. SSI data were collected prospectively according to the continuous quality improvement indicators (Indicadores Clinicos de Mejora Continua de la Calidad [INCLIMECC]) monitoring system. Post-discharge follow-up was conducted by telephone survey. A total of 409patients were included in the study, of whom 299 underwent a herniorraphy procedure, and 110 underwent a mastectomy procedure. For herniorrhaphy, the SSI rate increased from 6.02% to 7.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 21.7% of SSI). For mastectomy, the SSI rate increased from 1.8% to 3.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 50% of SSI). Post-discharge monitoring showed an increased detection of SSI incidence. Post-discharge monitoring is useful to analyze the real trend of SSI, and evaluate improvement actions. Post-discharge follow-up methods need to standardised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Post-harvest proteomics of grapes infected by Penicillium during withering to produce Amarone wine.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Marilinda; Mainente, Federica; Zapparoli, Giacomo; Cecconi, Daniela; Simonato, Barbara

    2016-05-15

    The study of withered grape infection by Penicillium, a potentially toxigenic fungus, is relevant to preserve grape quality during the post-harvest dehydration process. This report describes the first proteomic analysis of Amarone wine grapes, infected by two strains of Penicillium expansum (Pe1) and Penicillium crustosum (Pc4). Protein identification by MS analysis allowed a better understanding of physiological mechanisms underlying the pathogen attack. The Pe1 strain had a major impact on Vitis vinifera protein expression inducing pathogenesis-related proteins and other protein species involved in energy metabolism. A greater expression of new Penicillium proteins involved in energy metabolism and some protein species related to redox homeostasis has been observed on grapes infected by Pc4 strain. Moreover, the new induced proteins in infected grapes could represent potential markers in withered grapes, thus creating the chance to develop case-sensitive prevention strategies to inhibit fungal growth.

  8. Effectiveness of Prophylactic Antibiotics against Post-Ureteroscopic Lithotripsy Infections: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Wen; Yang, Stephen Shei-Dei; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Chang, Shang-Jen

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotic therapy in reducing the incidence of post-ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URL) infections. A systemic search of PubMED was performed to identify all randomized trials that compared the incidence of post-operative infections in patients without pre-operative urinary tract infections who underwent URL with and without a single dose of prophylactic antibiotics. The data were analyzed using Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager (RevMan, version 5.2). The endpoints of the analysis were pyuria (>10 white blood cells/high-power field), bacteriuria (urine culture with bacteria >10(5) colony-forming units/mL), and febrile urinary tract infections (fUTIs), defined as a body temperature of >38°C with pyuria or meaningful bacteriuria within 1 wk after the operation. In total, four trials enrolling 500 patients met the inclusion criteria and were subjected to meta-analysis. Prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduced post-URL pyuria (risk ratios [RR] 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.82) and bacteriuria (RR 0.26; 95% CI 0.12-0.60; p=0.001). Patients who received prophylactic antibiotics tended to have lower rates of fUTI, although the difference was not statistically significant. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy can reduce the incidence of pyuria and bacteriuria after URL. However, because of the low incidence of post-URL fUTIs, we failed to show that a single dose of prophylactic antibiotics can reduce the rate of such infections significantly.

  9. Bowel Retraining: Strategies for Establishing Bowel Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Survey Results Treatment Treatment Overview Biofeedback Bowel Retraining Dietary Fiber Fruit Juice Hirschsprung's Disease Laxatives Stool Form Guide ... Survey Results Treatment Treatment Overview Biofeedback Bowel Retraining Dietary Fiber Fruit Juice Hirschsprung's Disease Laxatives Stool Form Guide ...

  10. Viability and infectivity of Ichthyophonus sp. in post-mortem Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, Richard M.; Hart, Lucas M.; Lewandowski, Naomi; Hershberger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyophonus-infected Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, were allowed to decompose in ambient seawater then serially sampled for 29 days to evaluate parasite viability and infectivity for Pacific staghorn sculpin, Leptocottus armatus. Ichthyophonus sp. was viable in decomposing herring tissues for at least 29 days post-mortem and could be transmitted via ingestion to sculpin for up to 5 days. The parasite underwent morphologic changes during the first 48 hr following death of the host that were similar to those previously reported, but as host tissue decomposition progressed, several previously un-described forms of the parasite were observed. The significance of long-term survival and continued morphologic transformation in the post-mortem host is unknown, but it could represent a saprozoic phase of the parasite life cycle that has survival value for Ichthyophonus sp.

  11. Developing therapies to treat hepatitis C infection in post-liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Lim, Joseph K

    2017-02-01

    Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains the most common indication for liver transplant in the United States (US) with almost universal HCV recurrence in the post-liver transplant setting. Previous interferon (IFN)-related efficacy and tolerability concerns about worsening liver function have limited treatment options for many patients with HCV-associated decompensated liver disease and post-liver transplant recipients. However, the last decade has seen a seen a radical shift in the management of HCV with multiple direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatments that provide more effective, all-oral, IFN-free alternatives. Areas covered: This review will serve to highlight the various pharmacotherapies available to clinicians for patients with HCV recurrence post-liver transplant. A brief history of prior regimens is provided with evidence for newer treatments presented. Also detailed are updated guidelines from societal organizations. Finally, timing of HCV treatment is discussed as the decision to treat patients in a pre or post-liver transplant setting remains challenging. Expert opinion: While there are many potential available therapies for HCV recurrence in the post-liver transplant setting, daclatasvir/sofosbuvir and ledipasvir/sofosbuvir have been the most extensively studied. Newer, pangenotypic generation drugs require more evidence before routine utilization in post-liver transplant recipients.

  12. Post-Caesarean Section Surgical Site Infection Surveillance Using an Online Database and Mobile Phone Technology.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Eliana; McIsaac, Corrine; MacDougall, Bhreagh; Wilson, Douglas; Kohr, Rosemary

    2017-08-01

    Obstetric surgical site infections (SSIs) are common and expensive to the health care system but remain under reported given shorter postoperative hospital stays and suboptimal post-discharge surveillance systems. SSIs, for the purpose of this paper, are defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (1999) as infection incurring within 30 days of the operative procedure (in this case, Caesarean section [CS]). Demonstrate the feasibility of real-life use of a patient driven SSIs post-discharge surveillance system consisting of an online database and mobile phone technology (surgical mobile app - how2trak) among women undergoing CS in a Canadian urban centre. Estimate the rate of SSIs and associated predisposing factors. Prospective cohort of consecutive women delivering by CS at one urban Canadian hospital. Using surgical mobile app-how2trak-predetermined demographics, comorbidities, procedure characteristics, and self-reported symptoms and signs of infection were collected and linked to patients' incision self-portraits (photos) on postpartum days 3, 7, 10, and 30. A total of 105 patients were enrolled over a 5-month period. Mean age was 31 years, 13% were diabetic, and most were at low risk of surgical complications. Forty-six percent of surgeries were emergency CSs, and 104/105 received antibiotic prophylaxis. Forty-five percent of patients (47/105) submitted at least one photo, and among those, one surgical site infection was detected by photo appearance and self-reported symptoms by postpartum day 10. The majority of patients whom uploaded photos did so multiple times and 43% of them submitted photos up to day 30. Patients with either a diagnosis of diabetes or self-reported Asian ethnicity were less likely to submit photos. Post-discharge surveillance for CS-related SSIs using surgical mobile app how2trak is feasible and deserves further study in the post-discharge setting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Treatment of Early Post-Op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Severe fractures are common in modern warfare with fractures ...being fixed via internal fixation of plates and screws to hold the fracture stable while the bone heals. Approximately 10%-40% of severe fractures ...effect of treatment of post-op wound infection in long bones after fracture fixation or joint fusion and either: (Group 1) operative debridement and

  14. Partial titanium mesh explantation cured post-cranioplasty implant-associated scalp infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Li, Wenchen; Chen, Dawei; Fu, Shuanglin; Gao, Yanli; Li, Ri; Meng, Fanyang; Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Shuyan

    2017-10-01

    Titanium mesh cranioplasty is routinely used worldwide for skull defect patients given its advantages, such as stability and biocompatibility. However, there are very few reports concerning the treatment of implant-associated scalp infection, which is one of the most common complications. The aim of the study is to retrospectively evaluate a novel operation technique for the treatment of titanium mesh-associated scalp infection post-cranioplasty, namely partial titanium mesh explantation (PTME). A retrospective study was conducted in all patients who underwent surgical treatment for implant-associated scalp infection from January 2012 to September 2016 in our hospital. In total, 17 patients were selected for study analysis among 231 patients who underwent cranioplasty. The treatment success rate of PTME was 85.7%. There was no statistically significant difference in demographics and characteristics except for follow-up length of time between the PTME group and TTME (total titanium mesh explantation) group (Non-paired Student's t-test, P=0.037). While, The PTME group exhibited a significantly reduced skull defect area post-operation compared with the TTME group (Non-paired Student's t-test, P=0.002). Moreover, post-PTME skull area also exhibited a significantly reduced skull defect area compared with the pre-cranioplasty area in the same patient (Non-paired Student's t-test, P=0.006). Compared with traditional surgical treatment of implant-associated scalp infection, PTME combined with strict debridement and antibiotic therapy can cure implant-associated scalp infection. Moreover, PTME could preserve sufficient titanium mesh for brain protection and cosmesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of Pre-Transplant Bacterial Infections on Post-Operative Outcomes in Patients after Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Im-Kyung; Park, Joon Seong; Ju, Man Ki

    In contrast to studies evaluating the negative effect of bacterial infections on clinical outcomes after liver transplantation, there is little evidence with regard to pre-transplant bacterial infections. We aimed to investigate the impact of pre-transplant bacterial infections on post-transplant outcomes in patients after liver transplantation. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 33 consecutive patients who underwent primary liver transplantations. Patients were divided into two groups based on the occurrence of a bacterial infection within the 30 days before transplantation. Of the 33 patients, 23 patients did not have pre-transplant bacterial infections, while 10 patients did have pre-transplant bacterial infections. Pre-transplant bacterial infections were urinary tract infections (n = 4), spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (n = 3), and one each of pneumonia, bacteremia, and cellulitis. There were no differences in clinical characteristics between the two groups. Post-operative clinical outcomes, including post-operative bacterial infection, intensive-care unit re-admission, 30-day re-hospitalization, and 90-day mortality rate were not significantly different between the two groups. The two-year overall survival rate was 76.7% in patients with pre-transplant infections and 80.0% in those without pre-transplant infections. Patients with pre-transplant bacterial infections did not have inferior clinical outcomes, compared with those without pre-transplant bacterial infections.

  16. A Comparative Study of Treatment-Emergent Adverse Events Following Use of Common Bowel Preparations Among a Colonoscopy Screening Population: Results from a Post-Marketing Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Anastassopoulos, Kathryn; Farraye, Francis A; Knight, Tyler; Colman, Sam; Cleveland, Mark vB; Pelham, Russell W

    2016-10-01

    Colonoscopy may be one of the most frequent elective procedures in older adults and is associated with a low occurrence of complications. However, reduction of risks attributable to the bowel preparation may be achieved with the use of effective and safer products. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) associated with SUPREP(®) [oral sulfate solution (OSS)] and other common prescription bowel preparations (non-OSS). This real-world, observational study used de-identified health insurance claims and laboratory results to identify TEAEs in the 3 months following screening colonoscopy in adults with a prescription for a bowel preparation in the prior 60 days. The unadjusted and adjusted (controlling for patient risk factors) cumulative incidences of TEAEs were estimated using Kaplan-Meier and Poisson regression, respectively. Among patients ≥45 years, the overall cumulative incidence was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in the OSS cohort than in the non-OSS cohort (unadjusted: 2.31 vs. 2.89 %; adjusted: 1.61 vs. 1.95 %), with significantly lower acute cardiac conditions (1.56 vs. 1.90 %; p < 0.001), renal failure/other serious renal diseases (OSS: 0.21 %, non-OSS: 0.32 %; p < 0.001), and serum electrolyte abnormalities (OSS: 0.39 %, non-OSS: 0.49 %; p = 0.017). There were no significant differences between cohorts in death, seizure disorders, aggravation of gout, and ischemic colitis. Results were similar in the adjusted cumulative incidences. In actual use, the overall cumulative incidence of TEAEs was significantly lower in the OSS cohort, demonstrating that OSS is as safe as, or possibly safer than, non-OSS prescription bowel preparations.

  17. Characterization of histone post-translational modifications during virus infection using mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kulej, Katarzyna; Avgousti, Daphne C; Weitzman, Matthew D; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2015-11-15

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that necessarily rely on hijacking cellular resources to produce viral progeny. The success of viral infection requires manipulation of host chromatin in order to activate genes useful for production of viral proteins as well as to suppress antiviral responses. Host chromatin manipulation on a global level is likely reliant on modulation of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histone proteins. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool to quantify and identify novel histone PTMs, beyond the limitations of site-specific antibodies. Here, we employ MS to investigate global changes in histone PTM relative abundance in human cells during infection with adenovirus. Our method reveals several changes in histone PTM patterns during infection. We propose that this method can be used to uncover global changes in histone PTM patterns that are universally modulated by viruses to take over the cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Surgical site infection after caesarean section: space for post-discharge surveillance improvements and reliable comparisons.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Federica; Piselli, Pierluca; Pittalis, Silvia; Ruscitti, Luca E; Cimaglia, Claudia; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Puro, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) after caesarean section (CS) represent a substantial health system concern. Surveying SSI has been associated with a reduction in SSI incidence. We report the findings of three (2008, 2011 and 2013) regional active SSI surveillances after CS in community hospital of the Latium region determining the incidence of SSI. Each CS was surveyed for SSI occurrence by trained staff up to 30 post-operative days, and association of SSI with relevant characteristics was assessed using binomial logistic regression. A total of 3,685 CS were included in the study. A complete 30 day post-operation follow-up was achieved in over 94% of procedures. Overall 145 SSI were observed (3.9% cumulative incidence) of which 131 (90.3%) were superficial and 14 (9.7%) complex (deep or organ/space) SSI; overall 129 SSI (of which 89.9% superficial) were diagnosed post-discharge. Only higher NNIS score was significantly associated with SSI occurrence in the regression analysis. Our work provides the first regional data on CS-associated SSI incidence, highlighting the need for a post-discharge surveillance which should assure 30 days post-operation to not miss data on complex SSI, as well as being less labour intensive.

  19. Post-surgical infections and perioperative antibiotics usage in pediatric genitourinary procedures.

    PubMed

    Ellett, Justin; Prasad, Michaella M; Purves, J Todd; Stec, Andrew A

    2015-12-01

    Post-surgical infections (PSIs) are a source of preventable perioperative morbidity. No guidelines exist for the use of perioperative antibiotics in pediatric urologic procedures. This study reports the rate of PSIs in non-endoscopic pediatric genitourinary procedures at our institution. Secondary aims evaluate the association of PSI with other perioperative variables, including wound class (WC) and perioperative antibiotic administration. Data from consecutive non-endoscopic pediatric urologic procedures performed between August 2011 and April 2014 were examined retrospectively. The primary outcome was the rate of PSIs. PSIs were classified as superficial skin (SS) and deep/organ site (D/OS) according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, and urinary tract infection (UTI). PSIs were further stratified by WC1 and WC2 and perioperative antibiotic usage. A relative risk and chi-square analysis compared PSI rates between WC1 and WC2 procedures. A total of 1185 unique patients with 1384 surgical sites were reviewed; 1192 surgical sites had follow-up for inclusion into the study. Ten total PSIs were identified, for an overall infection rate of 0.83%. Of these, six were SS, one was D/OS, and three were UTIs. The PSI rate for WC1 (885 sites) and WC2 (307 sites) procedures was 0.34% and 2.28%, respectively, p < 0.01. Relative risk of infection in WC2 procedures was 6.7 (CI 1.75-25.85, p = 0.0055). The rate of infections in WC1 procedures was similar between those receiving and not receiving perioperative antibiotics (0.35% vs. 0.33%). All WC2 procedures received antibiotics. Post-surgical infections are associated with significant perioperative morbidity. In some studies, PSI can double hospital costs, and contribute to hospital length of stay, admission to intensive care units, and impact patient mortality. Our study demonstrates that the rate of PSI in WC1 operations is low, irrespective of whether the patient received perioperative antibiotics (0

  20. Post-operative complications after caesarean section in HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Simone; Bentivoglio, Giorgio

    2003-10-01

    This retrospective study evaluated complications associated with caesarean section in HIV-infected women. For each HIV-positive patient ( n=45) a control group of ten seronegative women ( n=450) was matched for age, number of foetuses, gestational age, indication for caesarean section, status of the membranes and kind of anaesthesia. All women delivered in the same hospital using a uniform protocol. We evaluated the duration of stay in hospital after operation, the need for antibiotics after caesarean section, the incidence of minor postoperative complications (mild anaemia, mild temperature or fever 24 h after surgery, wound haematoma or infection, urinary tract infection, endometritis) and major postoperative complications (severe anaemia, pneumonia, pleural effusion, peritonitis, sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, thromboembolism). Most HIV-positive women (64.5%) had a complicated recovery after surgery. A higher incidence of major and minor postoperative complications were observed in the HIV-positive group than in the control group. There was a statistically significant greater incidence of mild anaemia, mild temperature or fever, urinary tract infection and pneumonia in the HIV-positive group. HIV-positive women with less than 500x10(6) CD4(+) lymphocytest/l had higher post-caesarean section morbidity than HIV-positive women with more than 500x10(6) CD4(+) lymphocytest/l. The median duration of hospital stay was significantly higher in the HIV-positive group (median 7 days) than in the HIV-negative group (median 4 days). The rate of HIV vertical transmission was 8.8%. Higher post-caesarean section morbidity was found in HIV-positive women than in controls. Unfortunately, the HIV-positive women (with low CD4 lymphocytes counts), whose infants theoretically will benefit most from caesarean delivery, are also the women who are most likely to experience post-operative complications.

  1. Operative Start Time Does Not Affect Post-Operative Infection Risk.

    PubMed

    Guidry, Christopher A; Davies, Stephen W; Willis, Rhett N; Dietch, Zachary C; Shah, Puja M; Sawyer, Robert G

    2016-10-01

    Surgical care is delivered 24 h a day at most institutions. Alarmingly, some authors have found that certain operative start times are associated with greater morbidity and mortality rates. This effect has been noted in both the public and private sector. Although some of these differences may be related to process, they may also be caused by the human circadian rhythm and corresponding changes in host defenses. We hypothesized that the time of day of an operation would impact the frequency of certain post-operative outcomes significantly. Cases at a single tertiary-care center reported to the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program over a 10-year period were identified. Operative start times were divided into six-hour blocks, with 6 am to noon serving as the reference. Standard univariable techniques were applied. Multivariable logistic regression with mixed effects modeling then was used to determine the relation between operative start times and infectious outcomes, controlling for surgeon clustering. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.01. A total of 21,985 cases were identified, of which 2,764 (12.6%) were emergency procedures. Overall, 9.7% (n = 2,142) of patients experienced some post-operative infectious complication. Seventy percent of these infections (n = 1,506) were surgical site infections. On univariable analysis considering all cases, nighttime and evening operations had higher rates of post-operative infections than those in performed during the day (9.1% from 6 am to noon; 9.7% from noon to 6 pm; 14.8% from 6 pm to midnight; and 14.4% from midnight to 6 am; p < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, operative start time was not associated with the risk of post-operative infection, even when emergency cases were considered independently. Our data suggest that operative start times have no correlation with post-operative infectious complications. Further work is required to identify the source of

  2. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus administered post-exposure averts the lethal sequelae of respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Percopo, Caroline M; Rice, Tyler A; Brenner, Todd A; Dyer, Kimberly D; Luo, Janice L; Kanakabandi, Kishore; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Domachowske, Joseph B; Keicher, Jesse D; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2015-09-01

    We reported previously that priming of the respiratory tract with immunobiotic Lactobacillus prior to virus challenge protects mice against subsequent lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM). We present here the results of gene microarray which document differential expression of proinflammatory mediators in response to PVM infection alone and those suppressed in response to Lactobacillus plantarum. We also demonstrate for the first time that intranasal inoculation with live or heat-inactivated L. plantarum or Lactobacillus reuteri promotes full survival from PVM infection when administered within 24h after virus challenge. Survival in response to L. plantarum administered after virus challenge is associated with suppression of proinflammatory cytokines, limited virus recovery, and diminished neutrophil recruitment to lung tissue and airways. Utilizing this post-virus challenge protocol, we found that protective responses elicited by L. plantarum at the respiratory tract were distinct from those at the gastrointestinal mucosa, as mice devoid of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10, exhibit survival and inflammatory responses that are indistinguishable from those of their wild-type counterparts. Finally, although L. plantarum interacts specifically with pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and NOD2, the respective gene-deleted mice were fully protected against lethal PVM infection by L. plantarum, as are mice devoid of type I interferon receptors. Taken together, L. plantarum is a versatile and flexible agent that is capable of averting the lethal sequelae of severe respiratory infection both prior to and post-virus challenge via complex and potentially redundant mechanisms. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Diabetic foot infections: Current treatment and delaying the 'post-antibiotic era'.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for diabetic foot infections requires properly diagnosing infection, obtaining an appropriate specimen for culture, assessing for any needed surgical procedures and selecting an empiric antibiotic regimen. Therapy will often need to be modified based on results of culture and sensitivity testing. Because of excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics for treating diabetic foot infections, resistance to the usually employed bacteria has been increasing to alarming levels. This article reviews recommendations from evidence-based guidelines, informed by results of systematic reviews, on treating diabetic foot infections. Data from the pre-antibiotic era reported rates of mortality of about 9% and of high-level leg amputations of about 70%. Outcomes have greatly improved with appropriate antibiotic therapy. While there are now many oral and parenteral antibiotic agents that have demonstrated efficacy in treating diabetic foot infections, the rate of infection with multidrug-resistant pathogens is growing. This problem requires a multi-focal approach, including providing education to both clinicians and patients, developing robust antimicrobial stewardship programmes and using new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies. Recently, new methods have been developed to find novel antibiotic agents and to resurrect old treatments, like bacteriophages, for treating these difficult infections. Medical and political leaders have recognized the serious global threat posed by the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. By a multipronged approach that includes exerting administrative pressure on clinicians to do the right thing, investing in new technologies and encouraging the profitable development of new antimicrobials, we may be able to stave off the coming 'post-antibiotic era'. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Utility of post-urinary tract infection imaging in patients with normal prenatal renal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Jun; Parajuli, Nirmala; Sharma, Preeti; Nanda, Maya; Shah, Rina; Gershel, Jeffrey; Rauch, Daniel A

    2012-03-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends renal ultrasound (RUS) and voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) for all infants after a first urinary tract infection (UTI). However, many congenital renal anomalies are identified by a prenatal US. At the present time, there are no data regarding the yield of post-UTI imaging among infants who have a documented normal prenatal US. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients <1 year of age with a first UTI who had normal kidneys noted on prenatal US to determine the frequency of abnormal findings. Abnormal RUS and VCUG results were noted in 5.1% (24 of 471) and 20.4% (75 of 368) of infants, respectively. While the abnormal US rate is significantly less than what has been previously reported, the frequency of abnormal VCUGs is similar. These results suggest that a post-UTI RUS may not be needed if the prenatal US was normal. However, a VCUG continues to be indicated.

  5. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections: improving post-insertion catheter care.

    PubMed

    Shapey, I M; Foster, M A; Whitehouse, T; Jumaa, P; Bion, J F

    2009-02-01

    Patients with central venous catheters (CVCs) are at increased risk of bloodstream infections and sepsis-related death. CVC-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are costly and account for a significant proportion of hospital-acquired infections. The aim of this audit was to assess current practice and staff knowledge of CVC post-insertion care and therefore identify aspects of CVC care with potential for improvement. We conducted a prospective audit over 28 consecutive days at a university teaching hospital investigating current practice of CVC post-insertion care in wards with high CVC usage. A multiple choice questionnaire on best practice of CVC insertion and care was distributed among clinical staff. Rates of breaches in catheter care and CRBSIs were calculated and statistical significance assumed when P<0.05. Data was recorded from 151 CVCs in 106 patients giving a total of 721 catheter days. In all, 323 breaches in care were identified giving a failure rate of 44.8%, with significant differences between intensive care unit (ICU) and non-ICU wards (P<0.001). Dressings (not intact) and caps and taps (incorrectly placed) were identified as the major lapses in CVC care with 158 and 156 breaches per 1000 catheter days, respectively. During the study period four CRBSIs were identified, producing a CRBSI rate of 5.5 per 1000 catheter days (95% confidence interval: 0.12-10.97). There are several opportunities to improve CVC post-insertion care. Future interventions to improve reliability of care should focus on implementing best practice rather than further education.

  6. In Situ Aortic Reconstruction with Femoral Vein after Post-EVAR Infection.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hong Kyung; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Taeseung

    2014-06-01

    A 78-year-old male presented with early gastric cancer and a 5.5 cm-sized infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, detected during regular screening. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) was performed first, followed by laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. After gastrectomy, the patient underwent computed tomography (CT) scan due to persistent fever, which showed increased perigraft fluid collection around the right iliac limb graft. Echocardiography also revealed mitral valve vegetation, consistent with infective endocarditis. Despite intensive antibiotic treatment, the patient had persistent fever and showed fluid extension to the psoas muscle on CT scan. On the 49th post operative day (POD) after EVAR, stent graft explantation and aortic reconstruction with the left superficial femoral vein was performed. Ligation of the right iliac artery for infection control and simultaneous femoro-femoral bypass was also performed. The patient was discharged on the 46th POD after graft removal without any events.

  7. Changes in Serological Immunology Measures in UK and Kenyan Adults Post-controlled Human Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Susanne H.; Llewellyn, David; Silk, Sarah E.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Elias, Sean C.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Kamuyu, Gathoni; Juma, Elizabeth A.; Magiri, Charles; Muia, Alfred; Jin, Jing; Spencer, Alexandra J.; Longley, Rhea J.; Mercier, Thomas; Decosterd, Laurent; Long, Carole A.; Osier, Faith H.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Ogutu, Bernhards; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Marsh, Kevin; Draper, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The timing of infection is closely determined in controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies, and as such they provide a unique opportunity to dissect changes in immunological responses before and after a single infection. The first Kenyan Challenge Study (KCS) (Pan African Clinical Trial Registry: PACTR20121100033272) was performed in 2013 with the aim of establishing the CHMI model in Kenya. This study used aseptic, cryopreserved, attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites administered by needle and syringe (PfSPZ Challenge) and was the first to evaluate parasite dynamics post-CHMI in individuals with varying degrees of prior exposure to malaria. Methods: We describe detailed serological and functional immunological responses pre- and post-CHMI for participants in the KCS and compare these with those from malaria-naïve UK volunteers who also underwent CHMI (VAC049) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01465048) using PfSPZ Challenge. We assessed antibody responses to three key blood-stage merozoite antigens [merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1), apical membrane protein 1 (AMA1), and reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (RH5)] and functional activity using two candidate measures of anti-merozoite immunity; the growth inhibition activity (GIA) assay and the antibody-dependent respiratory burst activity (ADRB) assay. Results:Clear serological differences were observed pre- and post-CHMI by ELISA between malaria-naïve UK volunteers in VAC049, and Kenyan volunteers who had prior malaria exposure. Antibodies to AMA1 and schizont extract correlated with parasite multiplication rate (PMR) post-CHMI in KCS. Serum from volunteer 110 in KCS, who demonstrated a dramatically reduced PMR in vivo, had no in vitro GIA prior to CHMI but the highest level of ADRB activity. A significant difference in ADRB activity was seen between KCS volunteers with minimal and definite prior exposure to malaria and significant increases were seen in ADRB activity post-CHMI in Kenyan

  8. Hospital discharge abstracts have limited accuracy in identifying occurrence of Clostridium difficile infections among hospitalized individuals with inflammatory bowel disease: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harminder; Nugent, Zoann; Yu, B. Nancy; Lix, Lisa M.; Targownik, Laura; Bernstein, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Background Hospital discharge databases are used to study the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) among hospitalized patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CDI in IBD is increasingly important and accurately estimating its occurrence is critical in understanding its comorbidity. There are limited data on the reliability of the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD-10) (now widely used in North America) CDI code in determining occurrence of CDI among hospitalized patients. We compared the performance of ICD-10 CDI coding to laboratory confirmed CDI diagnoses. Methods The University of Manitoba IBD Epidemiology Database was used to identify individuals with and without IBD discharged with CDI diagnoses between 07/01/2005 and 3/31/2014. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of ICD-10 CDI code was compared to laboratory CDI diagnoses recorded in a province wide CDI dataset. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed to test the predictors of diagnostic inaccuracy of ICD-10 CDI code. Results There were 273 episodes of laboratory confirmed CDI (hospitalized and non-hospitalized) among 7396 individuals with IBD and 536 among 66,297 matched controls. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of ICD-10 CDI code in discharge abstracts was 72.8%, 99.6%, 64.1% and 99.7% among those with IBD and 70.8%, 99.9%, 79.0% and 99.9% among those without IBD. Predictors of diagnostic inaccuracy included IBD, older age, increased co-morbidity and earlier years of hospitalization. Conclusions Identification of CDI using ICD-10 CDI code in hospital discharge abstracts may not identify up to 30% of CDI cases, with worse performance among those with IBD. PMID:28199401

  9. Identification and transcriptional profile of multiple genes in the posterior kidney of Nile tilapia at 6h post bacterial infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in response of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to bacterial infection, suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization technique was used to identify upregulated genes in the posterior kidney of Nile tilapia at 6h post infection with Aeromonas hydrophi...

  10. Urinary tract infections and post-operative fever in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Jorge; Smith, Arthur; Geavlete, Petrisor; Shah, Hemendra; Kural, Ali Riza; de Sio, Marco; Amón Sesmero, José H; Hoznek, András; de la Rosette, Jean

    2013-10-01

    To review the incidence of UTIs, post-operative fever, and risk factors for post-operative fever in PCNL patients. Between 2007 and 2009, consecutive PCNL patients were enrolled from 96 centers participating in the PCNL Global Study. Only data from patients with pre-operative urine samples and who received antibiotic prophylaxis were included. Pre-operative bladder urine culture and post-operative fever (>38.5°C) were assessed. Relationship between various patient and operative factors and occurrence of post-operative fever was assessed using logistic regression analyses. Eight hundred and sixty-five (16.2%) patients had a positive urine culture; Escherichia coli was the most common micro-organism found in urine of the 350 patients (6.5%). Of the patients with negative pre-operative urine cultures, 8.8% developed a fever post-PCNL, in contrast to 18.2% of patients with positive urine cultures. Fever developed more often among the patients whose urine cultures consisted of Gram-negative micro-organisms (19.4-23.8%) versus those with Gram-positive micro-organisms (9.7-14.5%). Multivariate analysis indicated that a positive urine culture (odds ratio [OR] = 2.12, CI [1.69-2.65]), staghorn calculus (OR = 1.59, CI [1.28-1.96]), pre-operative nephrostomy (OR = 1.61, CI [1.19-2.17]), lower patient age (OR for each year of 0.99, CI [0.99-1.00]), and diabetes (OR = 1.38, CI [1.05-1.81]) all increased the risk of post-operative fever. Limitations include the use of fever as a predictor of systemic infection. Approximately 10% of PCNL-treated patients developed fever in the post-operative period despite receiving antibiotic prophylaxis. Risk of post-operative fever increased in the presence of a positive urine bacterial culture, diabetes, staghorn calculi, and a pre-operative nephrostomy.

  11. Post Liposuction Mycobacterium Abscessus Surgical Site Infection in a Returned Medical tourist Complicated by a Paradoxical Reaction During Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Siong H.; Noonan, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacterial skin and soft tissue infections are known to complicate cosmetic surgical procedures. Treatment consists of more surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing. Paradoxical reactions occurring during antibiotic therapy can further complicate treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist and occurrence of paradox during treatment. PMID:26753088

  12. Post Liposuction Mycobacterium Abscessus Surgical Site Infection in a Returned Medical tourist Complicated by a Paradoxical Reaction During Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hui, Siong H; Noonan, Lisa; Chavada, Ruchir

    2015-12-22

    Rapidly growing mycobacterial skin and soft tissue infections are known to complicate cosmetic surgical procedures. Treatment consists of more surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing. Paradoxical reactions occurring during antibiotic therapy can further complicate treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist and occurrence of paradox during treatment.

  13. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D.; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A.; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain–gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  14. Antiviral therapy with entecavir combined with post-exposure "prime-boost" vaccination eliminates duck hepatitis B virus-infected hepatocytes and prevents the development of persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, D S; Boyle, D; Feng, F; Reaiche, G Y; Kotlarski, I; Colonno, R; Jilbert, A R

    2008-04-10

    Short-term antiviral therapy with the nucleoside analogue entecavir (ETV), given at an early stage of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection, restricts virus spread and leads to clearance of DHBV-infected hepatocytes in approximately 50% of ETV-treated ducks, whereas widespread and persistent DHBV infection develops in 100% of untreated ducks. To increase the treatment response rate, ETV treatment was combined in the current study with a post-exposure "prime-boost" vaccination protocol. Four groups of 14-day-old ducks were inoculated intravenously with a dose of DHBV previously shown to induce persistent DHBV infection. One hour post-infection (p.i.), ducks were primed with DNA vaccines that expressed DHBV core (DHBc) and surface (pre-S/S and S) antigens (Groups A, B) or the DNA vector alone (Groups C, D). ETV (Groups A, C) or water (Groups B, D) was simultaneously administered by gavage and continued for 14 days. Ducks were boosted 7 days p.i. with recombinant fowlpoxvirus (rFPV) strains also expressing DHBc and pre-S/S antigens (Groups A, B) or the FPV-M3 vector (Groups C, D). DHBV-infected hepatocytes were observed in the liver of all ducks at day 4 p.i. with reduced numbers in the ETV-treated ducks. Ducks treated with ETV plus the control vectors showed restricted spread of DHBV infection during ETV treatment, but in 60% of cases, infection became widespread after ETV was stopped. In contrast, at 14 and 67 days p.i., 100% of ducks treated with ETV and "prime-boost" vaccination had no detectable DHBV-infected hepatocytes and had cleared the DHBV infection. These findings suggest that ETV treatment combined with post-exposure "prime-boost" vaccination induced immune responses that eliminated DHBV-infected hepatocytes and prevented the development of persistent DHBV infection.

  15. Memory T cell responses targeting the SARS coronavirus persist up to 11 years post-infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Chia, Adeline; Tan, Anthony T; Jadi, Ramesh S; Leong, Hoe Nam; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-04-12

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious infectious disease which first emerged in late 2002, caused by a then novel human coronavirus, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The virus is believed to have originated from bats and transmitted to human through intermediate animals such as civet cats. The re-emergence of SARS-CoV remains a valid concern due to the continual persistence of zoonotic SARS-CoVs and SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs) in bat reservoirs. In this study, the screening for the presence of SARS-specific T cells in a cohort of three SARS-recovered individuals at 9 and 11 years post-infection was carried out, and all memory T cell responses detected target the SARS-CoV structural proteins. Two CD8(+) T cell responses targeting the SARS-CoV membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins were characterized by determining their HLA restriction and minimal T cell epitope regions. Furthermore, these responses were found to persist up to 11 years post-infection. An absence of cross-reactivity of these CD8(+) T cell responses against the newly-emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was also demonstrated. The knowledge of the persistence of SARS-specific celullar immunity targeting the viral structural proteins in SARS-recovered individuals is important in the design and development of SARS vaccines, which are currently unavailable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pinimenthol ointment in patients suffering from upper respiratory tract infections - a post-marketing observational study.

    PubMed

    Kamin, Wolfgang; Kieser, Meinhard

    2007-12-01

    In order to gain further experience regarding the tolerability of Pinimenthol ointment(1) in adolescents (> or = 12 years) and adults suffering from upper respiratory tract infections, a post-marketing observational study was performed. In this study, data of 3060 patients were collected (64.9% prospectively over an individual observation period of 5-14 days, 35.1% retrospectively). The prospective documentation also comprised data concerning treatment effects. Sample size of the post-marketing observational study was calculated in the way that adverse drug reactions with an event probability of at least 1:1000 would occur within the study at least once with a probability of 95%. Most patients suffered from cold, acute or chronic bronchitis, bronchial catarrh or hoarseness. Pinimenthol ointment was prescribed to inunction (29.6%), inhalation (17.3%) or inunction and inhalation (53.1%), respectively. The mean duration of study participation was 8.0 +/- 3.4 days. The tolerability was rated as excellent or good by 96.7% of physicians and 95.7% of patients. A total of 22 patients (0.7%) reported adverse drug reactions which mostly affected the skin or mucus membrane and therefore correspond to the expected adverse effects profile of Pinimenthol ointment. The treatment effect was mostly judged as excellent or good (physicians: 88.3%; patients: 88.1%). In conclusion, the study confirms Pinimenthol ointment as a well tolerated therapy option for upper respiratory tract infections in both adolescents and adults.

  17. A pre- and post-intervention study of infection control in equine hospitals in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Karin; Grönlund, Ulrika

    2014-08-22

    Detection of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in horses in Sweden has increased attention on infection control (IC) in equine hospitals. This study established baseline data on IC programmes within such settings, evaluated compliance with some IC procedures before and after an education intervention, and examined barriers to compliance.The study was carried out between 2008 and 2011 in four Swedish equine hospitals. Data on current IC of each hospital, purchase data on hand sanitisers and disposable gloves per patient, and direct observations of compliance with procedures were monitored pre- and post-intervention. The intervention comprised a lecture on common IC and a review of each hospital's current procedures. For comparison, retrospective purchase data were reviewed. A questionnaire on individual compliance, experiences and opinions of IC was issued to employees. Three hospitals completed the study, while the fourth reported its IC procedures and completed the questionnaire. Actual numbers of procedures, content and level of documentation differed among the hospitals. Similarities were poor or absent IC implementation strategy, lack of active surveillance of compliance with procedures and no monitoring of such as nosocomial infections. Among the hospitals which completed the study, two reported pre-intervention observation of compliance, while all three reported post-intervention observations. The purchase data showed trends for changes over time, although not uniformly related to the intervention. One hospital demonstrated a significant post-intervention increase in compliance with glove procedures, accompanied by a non-significant post-intervention increase in purchases figures. Compliance with dress code and personal appearance was high in all three hospitals (92-100%), while compliance with hand hygiene procedures was generally poorer. Barriers to compliance cited in the questionnaire (data from four hospitals) included

  18. A pre- and post-intervention study of infection control in equine hospitals in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in horses in Sweden has increased attention on infection control (IC) in equine hospitals. This study established baseline data on IC programmes within such settings, evaluated compliance with some IC procedures before and after an education intervention, and examined barriers to compliance. The study was carried out between 2008 and 2011 in four Swedish equine hospitals. Data on current IC of each hospital, purchase data on hand sanitisers and disposable gloves per patient, and direct observations of compliance with procedures were monitored pre- and post-intervention. The intervention comprised a lecture on common IC and a review of each hospital’s current procedures. For comparison, retrospective purchase data were reviewed. A questionnaire on individual compliance, experiences and opinions of IC was issued to employees. Results Three hospitals completed the study, while the fourth reported its IC procedures and completed the questionnaire. Actual numbers of procedures, content and level of documentation differed among the hospitals. Similarities were poor or absent IC implementation strategy, lack of active surveillance of compliance with procedures and no monitoring of such as nosocomial infections. Among the hospitals which completed the study, two reported pre-intervention observation of compliance, while all three reported post-intervention observations. The purchase data showed trends for changes over time, although not uniformly related to the intervention. One hospital demonstrated a significant post-intervention increase in compliance with glove procedures, accompanied by a non-significant post-intervention increase in purchases figures. Compliance with dress code and personal appearance was high in all three hospitals (92-100%), while compliance with hand hygiene procedures was generally poorer. Barriers to compliance cited in the questionnaire (data from four

  19. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a problem that affects the large intestine. It can cause abdominal cramping, bloating, and a change in bowel ... go back and forth between the two. Although IBS can cause a great deal of discomfort, it ...

  20. Are Your Bowels Moving?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have sensitive bowels — a common problem doctors call irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is also called spastic colon, mucous colitis, or ... Tummy pain is the most common problem of IBS. Also, people with IBS can have diarrhea, constipation, ...

  1. Prevalence of Bowel Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding ... Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding ...

  2. [Prevention of post-operative infection in heart surgery with extracorporeal circulation (apropos of 295 cases)].

    PubMed

    Hubscher, C; Coulombe, G; Oksenhendler, G; Laborde, F; Soyer, R; Winckler, C

    1979-01-01

    From April 1977 to November 1978, 295 patients were operated on using artificial circulation. 31 p. 100 of these developed a post-operative infectious complication, 7.3 p. 100 being of a serious nature (3.3 p. 100 suffered from mediastinitis, and 4 p. 100 from septicaemia). The organisms responsible are, in the case of the mediastinal infections the staphylococcus Citreus, and Gram negative bacilli in the case of the septicaemias. A retrospective analysis shows that there are two successive periods and that in the course of the second there is a decrease in the occurence of all of the infections and particularly in the cases of mediastinitis. This improvment would seem on superficial analysis to correspond with a change in the preventive antibiotic treatment, the cephradine--gentamicin combination having replaced penicillin G. However, the statistical study shows that other factors were altered between the two periods (type of antiseptic, duration of treatments, time of postoperative intubation) and that these equally contributed to the fall in the incidence of infection. In the light of this study, it would seem that if prophylactic antibiotic treatment essentially directed against staphylococci has a place in cardiac surgery with artificial circulation, it can only be regarded as one of several preventive factors. The statistical data gathered so far is not sufficient to prove the efficacy of this treatment.

  3. Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds: fresh, open wounds: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics, primary wound closure nearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics older wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid) older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic®), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid). For each kind of bite wound, the patient’s tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account. PMID:20941334

  4. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Casciani, Emanuele; Vincentiis, Chiara De; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel (SB) has always been challenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times (fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations. PMID:26339463

  5. Impact of the post-weaning parasitism history on an experimental Haemonchus contortus infection in Creole goat kids.

    PubMed

    Ceï, W; Mahieu, M; Philibert, L; Arquet, R; Alexandre, G; Mandonnet, N; Bambou, J C

    2015-01-15

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infections have an important negative impact on small ruminant production. The selection of genotypes resistant to these parasitic infections is a promising alternative control strategy. Thus, resistance against GIN is an important component of small ruminant breeding schemes, based on phenotypic measurements of resistance in immune mature infected animals. In this study we evaluated both the impact of the post-weaning parasitism history on the response to an experimental Haemonchus contortus infection of resistant and susceptible Creole kids chosen on the basis of their estimated breeding value, and the interaction with the kid's genetic status. During the post-weaning period (from 3 months until 7 months of age) Creole kids were reared at pasture according to four different levels of a mixed rotational stocking system with Creole cattle: 100% (control), 75% (GG75), 50% (GG50), and 25% (GG25) of the total stocking rate of the pasture. The level of infection of the kids decreased significantly at 50% and 25% of the total stocking rate. After the post-weaning period at pasture, at 11 months of age kids were experimentally infected with H. contortus. The faecal egg counts (FEC) were significantly lower in the groups showing the highest FEC at pasture. This result suggests that a degree of protection against an experimental H. contortus infection occurred during the post-weaning period and was dependant on the level of parasitism. Interestingly, no interaction was observed between this level of protection and the genetic status. In conclusion, the level of post-weaning natural parasitism history at pasture would not influence the genetic status evaluation. More generally our results suggest that it would be better to expose kids to a high level of gastrointestinal parasitism during the post-weaning period in order to increase the basal level of resistance thereafter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Infections in patients undergoing craniotomy: risk factors associated with post-craniotomy meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kourbeti, Irene S; Vakis, Antonis F; Ziakas, Panayiotis; Karabetsos, Dimitris; Potolidis, Evangelos; Christou, Silvana; Samonis, George

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The authors performed a prospective study to define the prevalence and microbiological characteristics of infections in patients undergoing craniotomy and to clarify the risk factors for post-craniotomy meningitis. METHODS Patients older than 18 years who underwent nonstereotactic craniotomies between January 2006 and December 2008 were included. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and microbiological data were systemically recorded. Patient characteristics, craniotomy type, and pre- and postoperative variables were evaluated as risk factors for meningitis RESULTS Three hundred thirty-four procedures were analyzed (65.6% involving male patients). Traumatic brain injury was the most common reason for craniotomy. Almost 40% of the patients developed at least 1 infection. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) was the most common infection recorded (22.5%) and Acinetobacter spp. were isolated in 44% of the cases. Meningitis was encountered in 16 procedures (4.8%), and CSF cultures were positive for microbial growth in 100% of these cases. Gram-negative pathogens (Acinetobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloaceae, Proteus mirabilis) represented 88% of the pathogens. Acinetobacter and Klebsiella spp. demonstrated a high percentage of resistance in several antibiotic classes. In multivariate analysis, the risk for meningitis was independently associated with perioperative steroid use (OR 11.55, p = 0.005), CSF leak (OR 48.03, p < 0.001), and ventricular drainage (OR 70.52, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Device-related postoperative communication between the CSF and the environment, CSF leak, and perioperative steroid use were defined as risk factors for meningitis in this study. Ventilator-associated pneumonia was the most common infection overall. The offending pathogens presented a high level of resistance to several antibiotics.

  7. Bowel function after bowel surgery: morphine with ketamine or placebo; a randomized controlled trial pilot study.

    PubMed

    McKay, W P; Donais, P

    2007-10-01

    Morphine decreases gut peristalsis, and ketamine decreases morphine use after surgery, and does not slow peristalsis. Thus, the combination should result in faster return of bowel function after surgery than morphine alone. A double-blind randomized controlled trial of saline vs. ketamine with intravenous patient-controlled-analgesia morphine for post-operative pain control was conducted on 42 patients having bowel resection. Bowel function was assessed by auscultation, time to passage of flatus and stool, and time to first retained oral intake; pain by visual analog scale. Time to return of all four measures of bowel function was the primary outcome. Despite a ketamine dose that in other studies had decreased morphine use without side-effects, there was no difference in bowel function, pain control, or morphine use between the two groups. Ketamine resulted in hallucinations in six out of 19 patients, with none in the placebo group (P =0.018). Low-dose ketamine was not efficacious for hastening return of bowel function, or for decreasing post-operative pain after surgery for bowel resection. It resulted in hallucinations in some patients. Those reporting hallucinations all wished to remain in the study.

  8. Male accessory gland infection frequency in infertile patients with chronic microbial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: transrectal ultrasound examination helps to understand the links.

    PubMed

    Vicari, Enzo; Calogero, Aldo E; Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Lucia O; La Vignera, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of male accessory gland infection (MAGI) in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) plus irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to compare the sperm parameters of patients with or without MAGI. In addition, another objective of this study was to evaluate the ultrasound characterization of the anatomical space between the posterior wall of the prostate and the anterior wall of the rectum using transrectal ultrasonography. Fifty consecutive patients with the following criteria were enrolled: 1) infertility, 2) diagnosis of CBP, and 3) diagnosis of IBS according to the Rome III criteria. The following 2 age-matched control groups were also studied: infertile patients with CBP alone (n = 56) and fertile men (n = 30) who had fathered a child within the previous 3 months. Patients and controls underwent an accurate patient history; administration of the National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index and the Rome III questionnaires for prostatitis and IBS, respectively; physical examination; semen analysis; and transrectal ultrasound evaluation (limited to patients with CBP and IBS or CBP alone). A significantly higher frequency of MAGI was found in patients with CBP plus IBS (82.0%) compared with patients with CBP alone (53.6%) or fertile men (0%). The presence of MAGI in patients with CBP plus IBS was associated with a significantly lower sperm concentration, total number, and forward motility, and with a higher seminal leukocyte concentration compared with patients with CBP alone and MAGI. Sperm normal morphology was similar in the groups of patients. All sperm parameters did not differ significantly in both groups of patients without MAGI. With ultrasound evaluation, a significantly higher frequency of dilatation of prostatic venous plexus was found in patients with CBP plus IBS (75%) compared with patients with CBP alone (10%). Patients with CBP plus IBS had a significantly higher frequency of

  9. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  10. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  11. Localization of Ascaridia galli larvae in the jejunum of chickens 3 days post infection.

    PubMed

    Luna-Olivares, Luz Adilia; Ferdushy, Tania; Kyvsgaard, Niels Christian; Nejsum, Peter; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Roepstorff, Allan; Iburg, Tine Moesgaard

    2012-04-30

    The normal habitat of the parasitic stages of Ascaridia galli is in the small intestine of poultry but the exact localization is poorly understood. Therefore, a histological study was conducted in order to localize the larvae during the early phase of infection. Six layer pullets seven-week old were infected orally with 20,000 embryonated A. galli eggs each, whereas four chickens were left as un-infected controls. At necropsy 3 days after infection the first half of jejunum/ileum was divided into two equally sized sections (J1 and J2). After taking samples for histology from the middle of J1 and J2 and the junction between these determined JX, the two sections were subjected to parasitological examination. A higher number of A. galli larvae were recovered from section J2 than J1 and the majority of larvae were recovered from the most profound layers. Based on histology 144 larvae were identified and their location was noted. The highest number of larvae was observed in the JX sample as compared to J1 and J2 (P<0.001). Most of them were located in the profound crypt zone of the mucosa (51%) as compared to the other zones (P<0.05). The number of larvae was higher in the lumen (63%) compared to the epithelium (32%) and lamina propria (5%) (P<0.001). A significantly higher number of eosinophils were found in lamina propria of the infected group compared to the control group (P<0.001). This experiment clearly showed that only few larvae had penetrated the epithelium and were positioned in the lamina propria at 3 days post infection. It was far more common that the larvae were localized within the epithelium or in the lumen of the crypts. It is therefore suggested that at least in this early phase "mucosal phase" is a more appropriate term to be used for the A. galli larval localization as compared to the term "histotrophic phase" currently used in many textbooks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of procedure on the post-operative infection risk of patients after elective colon surgery.

    PubMed

    Blitzer, David N; Davis, John M; Ahmed, Nasim; Kuo, Yen-Hong; Kuo, Yen-Liang

    2014-12-01

    Post-operative infection impacts the quality of patient care, prolongs the length of hospital stay, and utilizes more health care resources. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of surgical site infection among three major surgical procedures for treating patients with colon pathology. The location of colon resection impacts the post-operative infection rate. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by using the 2006 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Adult patients (age ≥18 yr) with colon diseases are the population of interest. The disease status and procedures were categorized according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). Patients with a primary diagnosis of diverticulosis of the colon without hemorrhage (ICD-9-CM codes: 562.11 and 562.12) or malignant neoplasm of the colon (ICD-9-CM codes: 153.x, where x represents the possible digits within this ICD-9-CM code category), with procedures of open and other right hemicolectomy (ORH; ICD-9-CM code: 45.73) or open and other left hemicolectomy (OLH; ICD-9-CM code: 45.75), or open and other sigmoidectomy (OS; ICD-9-CM code: 45.76) were included for this study. The primary measured outcome for the study was surgical site infection. There were an estimated 26,381 ORH procedures, 9,558 OLH procedures, and 31,656 OS procedures performed in 2006. There was a significant difference among procedures with respect to their age distributions (mean [standard error]: ORH vs. OLH vs. OS=70.5 [0.2] vs. 63.8 [0.3] vs. 59.5 [0.2] yr, p<0.0001) and the gender distributions (female percentage ORH vs. OLH vs. OS=56.1% vs. 51.5% vs. 50.9%, p<0.0001). There was a significant difference among the surgical procedures (infection rates: ORH vs. OLH vs. OS=2.9% vs. 5.6% vs. 4.9%, p<0.0001). From a logistic regression model, after controlling for age, gender, primary diagnosis, comorbidities, and hospital teaching status, OLH had a higher chance of SSI (adjusted odds

  13. Predictive factors of post-discharge surgical site infections among patients from a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Adriana Estela Biasotti; Cavalcante, Ricardo de Souza; Pavan, Erika Cibele Pereira; Freitas, Elaine da Silva; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) often manifest after patients are discharged and are missed by hospital-based surveillance. We conducted a case-reference study nested in a prospective cohort of patients from six surgical specialties in a teaching hospital. The factors related to SSI were compared for cases identified during the hospital stay and after discharge. Among 3,427 patients, 222 (6.4%) acquired an SSI. In 138 of these patients, the onset of the SSI occurred after discharge. Neurological surgery and the use of steroids were independently associated with a greater likelihood of SSI diagnosis during the hospital stay. Our results support the idea of a specialty-based strategy for post-discharge SSI surveillance.

  14. Previous reproductive history and post-natal family planning among HIV-infected women in Ukraine†

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, J.; Malyuta, R.; Semenenko, I.; Pilipenko, T.; Tereshenko, R.; Kulakovskaya, E.; Adejnova, I.; Kvasha, L.; Thorne, C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ukraine has the highest antenatal HIV prevalence in Europe. The national prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) programme has reduced the MTCT rate, but less attention has been given to the prevention of unintended pregnancy among HIV-positive women. Our objectives were to describe the reproductive health, condom use and family planning (FP) practices of HIV-positive childbearing Ukrainian women and to identify factors associated with different methods of post-natal contraception. METHODS HIV-infected childbearing women, diagnosed before or during pregnancy, were enrolled prospectively in a post-natal cohort study in four regional HIV/AIDS centres in Ukraine from December 2007. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with post-natal FP practices. RESULTS Data were available for 371 women enrolled by March 2009; 82% (n = 303) were married or cohabiting, 27% (97 of 363) reported a current HIV-negative sexual partner and 69% were diagnosed with HIV during their most recent pregnancy. Overall, 21% (75 of 349) of women were not using contraception post-natally (of whom 80% reported no current sexual activity), 50% (174 of 349) used condoms, 20% (74 of 349) relied solely/partially on coitus interruptus and 4% used hormonal methods or intrauterine device. Among married/cohabiting women, consistent use of condoms in the previous pregnancy [AOR 1.96 (95%CI 1.06–3.62)], having an HIV-positive partner [AOR 0.42 (0.20–0.87)], current sexual activity [AOR 4.53 (1.19–17.3)] and study site were significantly associated with post-natal condom use; 16% of those with HIV-negative partners did not use condoms. Risk factors for non-use of FP were lack of affordability [AOR 6.34 (1.73–23.2)] and inconsistent use of condoms in the previous pregnancy [AOR 7.25 (1.41–37.2)]. CONCLUSIONS More than 40% of HIV-positive women in this population are at risk of unintended pregnancy and the one in six women in HIV-discordant couples not

  15. Clinical Application of Variation in Replication Kinetics During Episodes of Post-transplant Cytomegalovirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Lodding, I P; Sengeløv, H; da Cunha-Bang, C; Iversen, M; Rasmussen, A; Gustafsson, F; Downing, J G; Grarup, J; Kirkby, N; Frederiksen, C M; Mocroft, A; Sørensen, S S; Lundgren, J D

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in transplant recipients is reported to replicate with a doubling time of 1.2-2 days, and weekly screening is recommended for early diagnosis. We re-evaluated these features in our cohort of transplant recipients. The CMV doubling time of the first CMV infection in the first year post-transplant could be calculated for 193 recipients of haematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation. Factors determining the proportion of recipients with a high diagnostic CMV viral load (≥ 18,200 IU/mL) were explored using mathematical simulation. The overall median doubling time was 4.3 days (IQR 2.5-7.8) and was not influenced by prior CMV immunity, or type of transplantation (p > 0.4). Assuming a fixed doubling time of 1.3 days and screening intervals of 7 or 10 days, 11.1% and 33.3% were projected to have a high CMV viral load at diagnosis, compared to 1.4% and 4.3% if the doubling time varies as observed in our cohort. Consistently, 1.9% of recipients screened weekly had a high diagnostic virus load. Screening intervals can be extended to 10 days in cohorts with comparable CMV doubling time, whereas shorter than 7 days is required in cohorts with shorter doubling times to maintain pre-emptive screening quality.

  16. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  17. Vero cells infected with the Lederle strain of canine distemper virus have increased Fas receptor signaling expression at 15 h post-infection.

    PubMed

    Del Puerto, H L; Martins, A S; Braz, G F; Alves, F; Heinemann, M B; Rajão, D S; Araújo, F C; Martins, S F; Nascimento, D R; Leite, R C; Vasconcelos, A C

    2011-10-18

    We evaluated the expression of the Fas receptor gene in Vero cells infected with the Lederle vaccine strain of canine distemper virus using RT-PCR. Vero cells were plated, and after being grown for 24 h in MEM with 5% FBS, 80-90% confluent monolayer cultures were infected with the virus. The cells were harvested at 3, 6, 9, and 15 h post-infection. Uninfected Vero cells were used as a control. Total RNA was isolated from Vero cells using 1 mL Trizol(®) LS, and RT was performed using 2 μg total RNA. Primer pairs for RT-PCR amplification for the canine distemper virus nucleocapsid gene, the S26 reference gene, and the Vero rFas gene were used to analyze expression in Vero cells. RT-PCR results revealed virus activity at 3, 6, 9, and 15 h in the virus-infected Vero cells. The S26 housekeeping gene was amplified in virus infected and control samples. However, expression of the cell death receptor Fas was detected in Vero cells only at 15 h post-infection. We suggest that the Lederle vaccine induces apoptosis by Fas receptor signaling, possibly through caspase-8 signaling rather than through mitochondrial signaling in the infected cells.

  18. Continuous versus intermittent infusion of cefepime in neurosurgical patients with post-operative intracranial infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huawei; Huang, Shengyue; Zhu, Pengli; Xi, Xiuming

    2014-01-01

    Cefepime is administered as an intermittent infusion (II); however, continuous infusion (CI) may be advantageous because β-lactam antibiotics exhibit time-dependent antibacterial activity. This retrospective, non-randomised, comparative study included 68 neurosurgical patients with post-operative intracranial infections treated with 4g/day cefepime over 24h as a CI (n=34) or 2g every 12h as II (n=34). CI controlled the intracranial infection more rapidly and effectively than II (6.6±1.9 days vs. 7.8±2.6 days; P=0.036). By considering the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to be 4μg/mL and 8μg/mL, the percentage of time when the cefepime plasma or CSF concentrations were higher than the MIC (%T>MIC) was calculated for each patient. For plasma cefepime concentrations, the %T(>MIC) in the CI group was higher than in the II group (for MICs of 8μg/mL, 100% vs. 75%, respectively). The mean calculated area under the curve (AUC) in the CI group was similar to the II group (1197.99±72.15μgh/mL vs. 890.84±140.78μgh/mL; P=0.655). For CSF cefepime concentrations, the %T(>MIC) in the CI group was higher than in the II group (for MICs of 4μg/mL and 8μg/mL, 83.3% and 75% vs. 25% and 0%, respectively). The mean calculated AUC for the CI group was higher than the II group (220.56±13.59μgh/mL vs. 86.34±5.69μgh/mL; P=0.003). Therefore, CI of cefepime significantly enhanced the antibacterial effect and reduced the treatment duration in neurosurgical patients with post-operative intracranial infections.

  19. From IBS to DBS: The Dysbiotic Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benno, Peter; Dahlgren, Atti-La; Befrits, Ragnar; Norin, Elisabeth; Hellström, Per M; Midtvedt, Tore

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of organic disease. We present 2 cases where diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome occurred in association with earlier intestinal infection or antibiotic treatment. Both were successfully treated with instillation of an anaerobic cultivated human intestinal microbiota. Thereafter, they were symptom free for at least 12 months. We now introduce the term dysbiotic bowel syndrome covering cases where a disturbed intestinal microbiota is assumed to be present. We recommend that restoration of the dysbiotic gut microbiota should be first-line treatment in these conditions.

  20. [Neonatal outcome of fetal hyperechogenic bowel].

    PubMed

    Maillet, L; Rudigoz, R C; Buffin, R; Massardier, J; Gaucherand, P; Huissoud, C

    2014-06-01

    Echogenic bowel (EB) represents 1 % of pregnancy and is a risk factor of fetal pathology (infection, cystic fibrosis, aneuploidy). The aim of our study was to determine the fetuses' outcomes with isolated EB. This is a retrospective study of all patients who presented singleton gestations with a fetal isolated echogenic bowel between 2004 and 2011 in two prenatal diagnosis centers. Search of aneuploidy, infection and cystic fibrosis was systematically proposed as well as an ultrasound monitoring. On 109 fetus addressed for isolate echogenic bowel five had other signs associated and 74 had a real isolated echogenic bowel (without dilatation, calcification, intrauterine growth restriction). In 30 cases, the EB was not found. Eighty-five percent of the patients had in the first trimester a screening for trisomy 21. None fetus with isolated EB had trisomy, infection or cystic fibrosis. One fetus died in utero and one newborn died of a metabolic disease without digestive repercussions. The risk of trisomy 21 and the risk to have a serious disease appear low for the fetus with EB. It does not seem necessary to propose a systematic amniocentesis in case of isolated echogenic bowel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Antonella

    2007-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disease of unclear, complex pathophysiology characterised by abdominal pain and discomfort and altered bowel activity. It affects an estimated 10-15% of individuals worldwide and has a large impact on quality of life (QOL) and both direct and indirect healthcare costs. Symptoms of IBS are usually triggered by disruption of gastrointestinal (GI) function secondary to infection, dietary factors, lifestyle changes or psychological stress. While most currently available pharmacological treatments of IBS focus on symptomatic treatment of the syndrome, agents that attempt to address the pathophysiology of the disease, in particular the role of serotonin, have received much attention in recent years. However, there is growing concern that serotonergic agents as a class may be associated with rare, but serious, episodes of ischaemic colitis, with several cases of this complication having been reported in association with use of serotonergic agents that have reached the market. Thus, there remains an important need for safe and effective agents that treat the symptoms of IBS. Otilonium bromide, a spasmolytic agent, has been widely used worldwide and has been found to be effective and safe for managing abdominal pain. Clinical trials indicate that it improves baseline abdominal pain and distension, and is particularly effective in reducing diarrhoea. Combining otilonium bromide with benzodiazepines, such as diazepam, may improve the efficacy of the agent with respect to GI symptoms, while also treating underlying anxiety disorders. More research is required to confirm the efficacy and mechanisms of action associated with this combination therapy in IBS. Safety data from clinical trials and postmarketing sources indicate that otilonium bromide is well tolerated, with a safety profile comparable to placebo in clinical trials and only two reported cases of adverse reactions (urticaria) among 10-year postmarketing data. This article reviews

  2. The Efficacy of Prophylactic Antibiotics on Post-Stroke Infections: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Xiong, Xiao-Yi; Zhang, Qin; Fan, Xiao-Tang; Yang, Qing-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke infections are common complications in acute stroke patients and are associated with an unfavorable functional outcome. However, reports on the effects of prophylactic antibiotics treatment on post-stroke infections are conflicting, especially those on post-stroke pneumonia and outcomes. We searched the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Knowledge databases up through March 11th, 2016. Seven randomized controlled trials including 4261 patients were analyzed among this systematic review and meta-analysis. We found preventive antibiotics treatment at the time of stroke onset did reduce the incidence of infections in adults with acute stroke (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.38–0.85, P = 0.005), including reducing the number of urinary tract infections (OR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.26–0.46, P < 0.001), but did not significantly decrease the rate of post-stroke pneumonia (OR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.73–1.13, P = 0.385). Importantly, antibiotics treatment also showed no significant effect on the number of fatalities among stroke patients (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.90–1.26, P = 0.743) and functional outcome scores on the modified Rankin Scale (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 0.86–3.63, p = 0.124). Our study indicated that preventive antibiotics treatment not reduced the rate of post-stroke pneumonia or mortality, even though decreased the risk of infections, especially urinary tract infections. Thus, preventive antibiotics treatment may not be recommended for acute stroke patients. PMID:27841284

  3. A randomised control trial on the use of topical methicillin in reducing post-operative ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection.

    PubMed

    Theophilus, Sharon Casilda; Adnan, Johari Siregar

    2011-01-01

    A double-blind randomised control study was conducted on all patients who were admitted or referred to the Department of Neurosurgery, Sultanah Aminah Hospital, Johor Bahru, with a diagnosis of hydrocephalus where a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was indicated. The period of study was from November 2005 to May 2007, and the follow-up period was 3 months after surgery. Randomisation was carried out in the operating room prior to the procedure. The scrub nurse selected a sealed envelope, which contained the assignment of each patient to 1 of 2 treatment groups: Group 1 patients were treated with topical methicillin, and Group 2 patients were not treated with topical methicillin. Prophylactic antibiotic, cefuroxime (25 mg/kg) was given intravenously at induction. Standard sterile operative technique was followed in preparing and draping the patients. A total of 90 patients were recruited in the study, and 13 (14.4%) patients developed an infection within 3 months post-operation. Group 1 had a 8.9% risk of infection, and Group 2 had a 20% risk; however, there was no statistically significant post-operative ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) infection reduction with the use of topical methicillin in VPS surgery (P = 0.230). Multivariate analysis showed that only duration of surgery had a significant influence on the incidence of post-operative VPS infection in the non-methicillin group (P = 0.02). The non-methicillin group had an 8 times greater risk of developing post-operative VPS infection than the methicillin group if surgery lasted longer than 1 hour. Topical methicillin had no significance in the reduction of post-operative VPS infection.

  4. A Randomised Control Trial on the Use of Topical Methicillin in Reducing Post-Operative Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Infection

    PubMed Central

    Theophilus, Sharon Casilda; Adnan, Johari Siregar

    2011-01-01

    Background: A double-blind randomised control study was conducted on all patients who were admitted or referred to the Department of Neurosurgery, Sultanah Aminah Hospital, Johor Bahru, with a diagnosis of hydrocephalus where a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was indicated. Methods: The period of study was from November 2005 to May 2007, and the follow-up period was 3 months after surgery. Randomisation was carried out in the operating room prior to the procedure. The scrub nurse selected a sealed envelope, which contained the assignment of each patient to 1 of 2 treatment groups: Group 1 patients were treated with topical methicillin, and Group 2 patients were not treated with topical methicillin. Prophylactic antibiotic, cefuroxime (25 mg/kg) was given intravenously at induction. Standard sterile operative technique was followed in preparing and draping the patients. Results: A total of 90 patients were recruited in the study, and 13 (14.4%) patients developed an infection within 3 months post-operation. Group 1 had a 8.9% risk of infection, and Group 2 had a 20% risk; however, there was no statistically significant post-operative ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) infection reduction with the use of topical methicillin in VPS surgery (P = 0.230). Multivariate analysis showed that only duration of surgery had a significant influence on the incidence of post-operative VPS infection in the non-methicillin group (P = 0.02). The non-methicillin group had an 8 times greater risk of developing post-operative VPS infection than the methicillin group if surgery lasted longer than 1 hour. Conclusion: Topical methicillin had no significance in the reduction of post-operative VPS infection. PMID:22135571

  5. The Efficacy of Prophylactic Antibiotics on Post-Stroke Infections: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Xiong, Xiao-Yi; Zhang, Qin; Fan, Xiao-Tang; Yang, Qing-Wu

    2016-11-14

    Post-stroke infections are common complications in acute stroke patients and are associated with an unfavorable functional outcome. However, reports on the effects of prophylactic antibiotics treatment on post-stroke infections are conflicting, especially those on post-stroke pneumonia and outcomes. We searched the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Knowledge databases up through March 11(th), 2016. Seven randomized controlled trials including 4261 patients were analyzed among this systematic review and meta-analysis. We found preventive antibiotics treatment at the time of stroke onset did reduce the incidence of infections in adults with acute stroke (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.38-0.85, P = 0.005), including reducing the number of urinary tract infections (OR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.26-0.46, P < 0.001), but did not significantly decrease the rate of post-stroke pneumonia (OR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.73-1.13, P = 0.385). Importantly, antibiotics treatment also showed no significant effect on the number of fatalities among stroke patients (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.90-1.26, P = 0.743) and functional outcome scores on the modified Rankin Scale (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 0.86-3.63, p = 0.124). Our study indicated that preventive antibiotics treatment not reduced the rate of post-stroke pneumonia or mortality, even though decreased the risk of infections, especially urinary tract infections. Thus, preventive antibiotics treatment may not be recommended for acute stroke patients.

  6. Sexual risk of HIV infection among expatriates posted in AIDS endemic areas.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, R; van Zessen, G; Houweling, H; Ligthelm, R J; van den Akker, R

    1997-07-15

    To assess the prevalence of HIV infection and related risk factors among Dutch expatriates returning from assignment in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and South and South-east Asia. From July 1994 to January 1996, a questionnaire on the risks of sexual exposure was completed by 864 respondents, and blood samples were taken. Of the 634 men, 41% reported having sex with casual or steady local partners and 11% with casual or steady expatriate partners, during an average stay of 26 months in the previous 3 years. Of the 230 women, these figures were 31 and 24%, respectively. Of the men with local casual partners (29%), 59% paid for sex at least once. For men as well as women, having sexual contacts abroad was associated with younger age, positive intention prior to departure to have sex abroad, being single at departure, and, only for the men, working for a commercial organization, and feelings of loneliness and boredom. Among men, consistent condom use with casual local partners was 69%, and with casual expatriate partners 63%. Among women, these figures were 64 and 48%, respectively. Consistent condom use with steady local or expatriate partners was much lower. Among men, non-consistent condom use with casual partners was more prevalent if they had been abroad for a longer time, condoms were not taken along from The Netherlands, the country where they were posted was Asian, and the estimated HIV prevalence among the local population was lower. Among the women, non-consistent condom use was more prevalent if condoms were not taken along, and if they did not have the intention before departure to have sex abroad. Of the persons from whom blood could be obtained, one man was HIV-positive. Another man who refused to participate in the study indicated that he was HIV-positive. Although 23% of the expatriates had unprotected sex with partners from endemic areas, very few HIV infections were found. In comparison with a previous study among this population carried out in

  7. How to manage the infectious risk under anti-TNF in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Culver, Emma L; Travis, Simon P L

    2010-02-01

    The advent of biological therapy has had a significant impact on the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Nevertheless, anti-TNF-alpha agents are still used with caution, driven by concerns about the risk of infection. Stringent post-marketing surveillance programmes and registries have allowed early recognition of problems, highlighting an increased risk of infectious complications. Although the focus is on biological drugs, other immunomodulators have been less well scrutinised and similarly carry considerable risks of infection. It remains unclear whether the risk of infection from anti-TNF therapy is any different from conventional immunomodulators such as azathioprine or methotrexate, although it appears to be less than that ascribed to corticosteroids. The majority of patients on anti-TNF agents are on concomitant immunosuppressive medication, which makes ascribing risk to a specific drug more difficult. The risk of life-threatening opportunistic infections associated with anti-TNF therapy has obliged us to re-consider methods of prevention of infection and to develop guidelines for risk-stratification of patients with a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. This encompasses vaccination and chemoprevention, appropriate treatment of underlying infection, patient education, travel advice and careful monitoring whilst on anti-TNF therapy. Contingency planning is essential. Implementing these preventative strategies will have an appreciable impact on the organisation of care and on current clinical practice.

  8. [Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a connection?].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2009-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders and is that with the greatest socioeconomic impact worldwide. Diagnosis of IBS is based on clinical criteria that have been modified over time, the Rome II criteria being those that are currently followed. Some of the symptoms of IBS are similar to those in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which can hamper or delay diagnosis. The use of inflammatory markers in stools (such as calprotectin) may help to distinguish between these two entities. A possible connection between IBS and IBD could be based on five points: (i) both disorders have similar symptoms; (ii) symptoms often overlap in the same patients; (iii) IBS and IBD have a common familial aggregation; (iv) some predisposing factors, such as a history of acute gastroenteritis, play a role in both disorders, and (v) importantly, signs of microinflammation are found in the bowels of patients with IBS. With regard to this latter point, an increase in inflammatory cells has been found in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBS and, more specifically, mastocytes have been found to be increased in the jejunum and colon while CD3 and CD25 intraepithelial lymphocytes have be observed to be increased in the colon. Moreover, activated mastocytes are increased near to nerve endings in patients with IBS and this finding has been correlated with the intensity of both intestinal symptoms (abdominal pain) and psychological symptoms (depression and fatigue). A good model of microinflammation is post-infectious IBS, since the timing of the onset of the infectious process is known. In patients with post-infectious IBS, an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes and enterochromaffin cells is initially found, which is reduced over time; consequently, although the symptoms of IBS persist, after 3 years no differences are detected in the number of inflammatory cells between IBS patients and controls. Among the various

  9. The predictors of surgical site infection post cardiac surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Musallam, Eyad

    2014-09-01

    We sought to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiac surgery. We included published, peer-reviewed, English-language, retrospective and prospective studies identified in a search of Medline, CINAHL, and PubMed from 2005 and through February 20, 2012. The studies involved adults (age >18 years) undergoing cardiac surgery (defined by ICD-9 codes) and could be of any study design, in English, published within last 7 years, with data collection taking place in United States within last 10 years. We excluded animal studies, duplicates, summaries, commentaries, editorials, case reports, studies that conducted outside United States, and studies published before last 7 years or studies with data collection take place before last 10 years (2002). Three types of predictors emerge: Predictors of general infection post cardiac surgery, predictors of micro-organisms' specific SSIs and tracheotomy, and allogenic blood transfusion as specific predictors of SSI. Although the reviewed articles cover wide range of SSIs predictors, none of these articles investigate preoperative skin preparation, using pre- and postoperative prophylaxes antibiotics, postoperative wound care (appropriate time for first dressing), and patient nutritional status as a predictors of SSIs after cardiac surgery. Investigating these predictors for SSIs will enhance nurses' understanding of the importance of specific types of nutrition in preventing SSIs and enhancing wound healing, implementing a protocol for the wound care postoperatively, and implementing a protocol for the use of prophylactic antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Large bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... colectomy; Right hemicolectomy; Left hemicolectomy; Hand assisted bowel surgery; Low anterior resection; Sigmoid colectomy; Subtotal colectomy; Proctocolectomy; Colon resection; Laparoscopic colectomy; Colectomy - partial; Abdominal perineal resection

  11. Capnocytophaga canimorsus: an emerging cause of sepsis, meningitis, and post-splenectomy infection after dog bites.

    PubMed

    Butler, T

    2015-07-01

    Newly named in 1989, Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a bacterial pathogen found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats, and is transmitted to humans principally by dog bites. This review compiled all laboratory-confirmed cases, animal sources, and virulence attributes to describe its epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenesis. An estimated 484 patients with a median age of 55 years were reported, two-thirds of which were male. The case-fatality rate was about 26%. Its clinical presentations included severe sepsis and fatal septic shock, gangrene of the digits or extremities, high-grade bacteremia, meningitis, endocarditis, and eye infections. Predispositions were prior splenectomy in 59 patients and alcoholism in 58 patients. Dog bites before illness occurred in 60%; additionally, in 27%, there were scratches, licking, or other contact with dogs or cats. Patients with meningitis showed more advanced ages, higher male preponderance, lower mortality, and longer incubation periods after dog bites than patients with sepsis (p < 0.05). Patients with prior splenectomy presented more frequently with high-grade bacteremia than patients with intact spleens (p < 0.05). The organism possesses virulence attributes of catalase and sialidase production, gliding motility, cytotoxin production, and resistance to killing by serum complement due to its unique lipopolysaccharide. Penicillin is the drug of choice, but some practitioners prefer third-generation cephalosporins or beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations. C. canimorsus has emerged as a leading cause of sepsis, particularly post-splenectomy sepsis, and meningitis after dog bites.

  12. Dynamic changes in circulating and antigen-responsive T-cell subpopulations post-Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, J M; Pollock, D A; Campbell, D G; Girvin, R M; Crockard, A D; Neill, S D; Mackie, D P

    1996-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a threat to animal and human health in several countries. Greater understanding of the immunology of the disease is required to develop improved tests and vaccines. This study has used a model of bovine tuberculosis, established in the natural host, to investigate the dynamic changes that occur in the circulating T-cell subpopulations after infection. When the phenotypic composition of the peripheral blood lymphocytes was determined pre- and post-experimental infection, the response to disease comprised three phases. Firstly, the WC1/gamma delta T cells decreased and then increased, suggesting localization to developing lesions and clonal expansion. Secondly, the CD4:CD8 ratio increased. Thirdly, the CD4:CD8 ratio decreased to less than pre-infection measurements. The latter changes suggested sequential involvement of CD4 and then CD8 T cells. The proportion of cells expressing interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) also increased. Panels of T-cell clones were established at various stages post-infection and all clones that exhibited antigen responsiveness were phenotyped. T-cell clones from early infection were WC1/gamma delta and CD4 in phenotype, while CD8 clones appeared later in infection, eventually becoming dominant. Therefore, from in vivo and in vitro evidence, it was suggested that there is a dynamic progression in the T-cell subpopulations involved dominantly in responses to mycobacteria. PMID:8698385

  13. A new rat model links two contemporary theories in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Mark; Chatterjee, Soumya; Chang, Christopher; Low, Kimberly; Song, Yuli; Liu, Chengxu; Morales, Walter; Ali, Lemeesa; Lezcano, Sheila; Conklin, Jeffery; Finegold, Sydney

    2008-04-01

    Two proposed hypotheses for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are acute gastroenteritis and bacterial overgrowth. We studied whether acute infection with Campylobacter could precipitate bacterial overgrowth in a rat model in order to link the two hypotheses. Sprague-Dawley outbred rats were randomly administered a vehicle or Campylobacter jejuni strain 81-176 by oral gavage. Three months after clearance of the infectious agent, rats had a stool consistency evaluation. After euthanasia, lumenal bacteria counts were measured via quantitative real-time PCR from self-contained segments of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and left colon. Adjacent sections of bowel were fixed in formalin for evaluation of intraepithelial lymphocyte counts. Three months after clearance of Campylobacter infection, 57% of Campylobacter infected rats had some alteration in stool consistency compared to 7.4% in mock-infected controls (P < 0.001). Among the rats that received Campylobacter, 27% had evidence of bacterial overgrowth by PCR. These rats also had the highest prevalence of altered stool form and had lower body weight. Consistent with post-infectious IBS in humans, bacterial overgrowth rats demonstrated a significant increase in rectal and left colon intraepithelial lymphocytes. Acute infection with C. jejuni 81-176 precipitates alterations in stool consistency, bacterial overgrowth and rectal lymphocytosis consistent with findings in IBS patients.

  14. Post-Natal Persistent Infection With Classical Swine Fever Virus in Wild Boar: A Strategy for Viral Maintenance?

    PubMed

    Cabezón, O; Colom-Cadena, A; Muñoz-González, S; Pérez-Simó, M; Bohórquez, J A; Rosell, R; Marco, I; Domingo, M; Lavín, S; Ganges, L

    2017-04-01

    In this study, fifteen wild boar piglets were intranasally inoculated <10 h after birth with the moderately virulent classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strain Catalonia 01. At 5 days post-inoculation, seven other animals within 48 h of birth were put in contact with them. Viral replication and innate and specific immune responses were evaluated. Of the inoculated animals, 46.67% remained post-natally persistently infected and were apparently healthy with neither humoral nor cellular immunological responses specific to CSFV and with high viral loads in their blood, organs and body secretions. Moreover, the present data extend the time period to 48 h after birth when a moderately virulent CSFV strain could lead to post-natal persistent infection given the generation of persistently infected wild boars in the contact group (33.33%). The innate immune response to the virus, as measured by type I IFN-α in serum, was mostly not impaired in the persistently infected wild boars. Interestingly, a decrease and lack of IFN-γ-producing cells against CSFV and PHA was observed. In endemic countries where wild swine species are increasing and low and moderate virulence CSFV strains are prevalent, the possible generation of this form of disease cannot be ruled out. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Post-infective transverse myelitis following Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis with radiological features of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Post-infectious autoimmune demyelination of the central nervous system is a rare neurological disorder typically associated with exanthematous viral infections. We report an unusual presentation of the condition and a previously undocumented association with Streptococcus pneumonia meningitis. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our facility with an acute myelopathy three days after discharge following acute Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis. Imaging studies of the spine ruled out an infective focus and no other lesions were seen within the cord. Diffuse, bilateral white matter lesions were seen within the cerebral hemispheres, and our patient was diagnosed as having a post-infective demyelination syndrome that met the diagnostic criteria for an acute transverse myelitis. Our patient clinically and radiologically improved following treatment with steroids. Conclusions The novel association of a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection with post-infectious autoimmune central nervous system demyelination should alert the reader to the potentially causative role of this common organism, and gives insights into the pathogenesis. The unusual dissociation between the clinical presentation and the location of the radiological lesions should also highlight the potential for the condition to mimic the presentation of others, and stimulates debate on the definitions of acute transverse myelitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and their potential overlap. PMID:22992300

  16. Editorial: Can gluten contribute to irritable bowel syndrome?

    PubMed

    Verdu, Elena F

    2011-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders are the most common gastroenterological problem in our society. Changes in gut function, including pain perception, motility, and intestinal permeability, and low-grade inflammation have been described in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The triggering factors for the described immunity and gut functional changes in patients with IBS are not completely understood. Similarly to post-infective IBS, some patients with IBS symptoms exhibit immunological evidence of gluten sensitivity but have no overt intestinal mucosal injury. They have symptoms that meet the diagnostic criteria for IBS and respond symptomatically to exclusion of gluten from the diet. Thus, gluten sensitivity may be involved in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of IBS patients. Unfortunately, there remain many unanswered questions regarding the mechanistic link between gluten sensitivity and functional gastrointestinal symptoms.

  17. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... your belly area), constipation (when you can't poop), and diarrhea (when you poop too much). If you have irritable bowel syndrome, ... food particles are also known as stool, a bowel movement, or poop. Here's why an intestine gets "irritable." ...

  18. Short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilmore, D W; Robinson, M K

    2000-12-01

    The short bowel syndrome is a symptom complex that occurs in adults who have less than 200 cm of jejunum-ileum remaining after intestinal resection. Similar symptoms are observed in infants and children following massive bowel resection or congenital anomalies and in individuals with longer segments of intestine with severe mucosal disease. Initial care should focus on a thorough excision of nonviable bowel, an exact measurement of the remaining viable bowel, placing all intestine in continuity at the initial or subsequent operation, and controlling initial food intake. With time, adaptation of the remnant intestine occurs, and absorptive function may be maximized by enhancing the enteral diet and minimizing parenteral nutrition. Growth factors and specialized nutrients may also enhance this process. Intestinal transplantation should be considered in selected individuals with the short bowel syndrome who fail intestinal rehabilitation protocols.

  19. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Karen A; Breuer, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents. The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies, and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed, the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population. Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy. Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented. The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16718840

  20. Plasma glutamine levels before cardiac surgery are related to post-surgery infections; an observational study.

    PubMed

    Buter, Hanneke; Koopmans, Matty; Kemperman, Ramses; Jekel, Lilian; Boerma, Christiaan

    2016-11-25

    A low plasma glutamine level was found in 34% of patients after elective cardiothoracic surgery. This could be a result of the inflammation caused by surgical stress or the use of extracorporeal circulation (ECC). But it is also possible that plasma glutamine levels were already lowered before surgery and reflect an impaired metabolic state and a higher likelihood to develop complications. In the present study plasma glutamine levels were measured before and after cardiac surgery and we questioned whether there is a relation between plasma glutamine levels and duration of ECC and the occurrence of postoperative infections. We performed a single-centre prospective, observational study in a closed-format, 20-bed, mixed ICU in a tertiary teaching hospital. We included consecutive patients after elective cardiac surgery with use of extracorporeal circulation. Blood samples were collected on the day prior to surgery and at admission on the ICU. The study was approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (Regional Review Committee Patient-related Research, Medical Centre Leeuwarden, nWMO 115, April 28th 2015). Ninety patients were included. Pre-operative plasma glutamine level was 0.42 ± 0.10 mmol/l and post-operative 0.38 ± 0.09 mmol/l (p < 0.001). There was no relation between duration of extracorporeal circulation or aortic occlusion time and changes in plasma glutamine levels. A logistic regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the presence of a positive culture during the post-operative course and pre-operative plasma glutamine levels (p = 0.04). Plasma glutamine levels are significantly lower just after cardiac surgery compared to pre-operative levels. We did not find a relation between the decrease in plasma glutamine levels and the duration of extracorporeal circulation or aortic clamp time. There was a correlation between pre-operative plasma glutamine levels and the presence of a positive culture after cardiac surgery

  1. Short bowel syndrome: epidemiology and etiology.

    PubMed

    Wales, Paul W; Christison-Lagay, Emily R

    2010-02-01

    Pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS) is most commonly caused by congenital or acquired conditions of the newborn. SBS is associated with an inability of the bowel to adequately absorb water and nutrients in sufficient quantities to meet caloric, fluid, and electrolyte demands, thus necessitating dependence on parenteral nutrition (PN). It is this dependence on PN, that is responsible for the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with SBS, including central venous catheter infections and PN-induced cholestatic liver dysfunction. There are very few estimates of SBS incidence and mortality in the literature. The epidemiology of SBS is reviewed and the limitations of the published literature are discussed.

  2. Post-translational Modification of LipL32 during Leptospira interrogans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Witchell, Timothy D.; Eshghi, Azad; Nally, Jarlath E.; Hof, Rebecca; Boulanger, Martin J.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Ko, Albert I.; Haake, David A.; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis, a re-emerging disease of global importance caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp., is considered the world's most widespread zoonotic disease. Rats serve as asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic Leptospira and are critical for disease spread. In such reservoir hosts, leptospires colonize the kidney, are shed in the urine, persist in fresh water and gain access to a new mammalian host through breaches in the skin. Methodology/Principal Findings Previous studies have provided evidence for post-translational modification (PTM) of leptospiral proteins. In the current study, we used proteomic analyses to determine the presence of PTMs on the highly abundant leptospiral protein, LipL32, from rat urine-isolated L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni compared to in vitro-grown organisms. We observed either acetylation or tri-methylation of lysine residues within multiple LipL32 peptides, including peptides corresponding to regions of LipL32 previously identified as epitopes. Intriguingly, the PTMs were unique to the LipL32 peptides originating from in vivo relative to in vitro grown leptospires. The identity of each modified lysine residue was confirmed by fragmentation pattern analysis of the peptide mass spectra. A synthetic peptide containing an identified tri-methylated lysine, which corresponds to a previously identified LipL32 epitope, demonstrated significantly reduced immunoreactivity with serum collected from leptospirosis patients compared to the peptide version lacking the tri-methylation. Further, a subset of the identified PTMs are in close proximity to the established calcium-binding and putative collagen-binding sites that have been identified within LipL32. Conclusions/Significance The exclusive detection of PTMs on lysine residues within LipL32 from in vivo-isolated L. interrogans implies that infection-generated modification of leptospiral proteins may have a biologically relevant function during the course of infection. Although

  3. Can Taenia solium latent post-oncospheral stages be found in muscle tissue of cysticercosis-infected pigs (Sus scrofa)?

    PubMed

    Rodrìguez, Mary L; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E; Verastegui, Manuela; Bernal, Teresa; Jimenez, Juan A; Garcia, Hector H

    2006-02-01

    The existence of latent Taenia solium post-oncospheral stages in the tissues of infected pigs has been postulated. To assess whether such structures exist and can be detected, we examined muscle samples from cysticercosis-infected and uninfected pigs. Pork samples were homogenized, centrifuged, and resuspended in saline solution. Round microscopic structures of approximately 10 microm with variable refringence were found in the pellets of all samples from both infected and uninfected pigs. These became homogeneously red after staining with Sudan IV and disappeared after ether extraction. The only difference between samples from infected and uninfected pigs was the presence of inflammatory cells and tissue necrosis debris in the former group. Taenia solium oncospheres were stained and observed for comparative purposes, before and after inoculation into pork. Control oncospheres were ellipsoidal, had nucleated basophile cells in their interior, and showed red aggregates on their surfaces when stained with 3% Sudan IV. While rounded microscopical structures similar to those previously reported were found, these differed morphologically from oncospheres, were of a lipid nature, and occurred in both infected and uninfected animals. No evidence supporting the presence of latent post-oncospheral stages of Taenia solium was generated in this series of experiments.

  4. Marital violence and sexually transmitted infections among women in post-revolution Egypt.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Seema

    2017-10-01

    To explore the relationship between past year physical or sexual partner violence against women and women's self-report of sexually transmitted infection (STI) symptoms in post-revolution Egypt; and to examine the effects of men's and women's risky sexual behavioural characteristics and structural dimensions of poverty and gender inequality on this relationship. This study uses the nationally representative cross-sectional demographic and health survey data conducted in 2014. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between past year partner violence and self-report of STI symptoms among currently married women. women's self-report of STI was based on their responses to three questions; whether in the past year they had: got a disease through sexual contact?, a genital sore or ulcer?, or a bad smelling abnormal genital discharge? Women who gave an affirmative response to one or more of these questions were assumed to self-report STI. Almost one-third of women self-reported symptoms of STI. Fourteen percent of women reported they had experienced physical or sexual violence by a male partner in the past 12months. Abused women had a 2.76 times higher odds of self-reported STI symptoms (95% CI 2.25-3.38). The significant relationship between self-reported STI and past year partner violence against women did not alter when adjusting for men's and women's behavioural characteristics and factors related to poverty and gender inequality. Public health interventions that address women's sexual and reproductive health need to consider violence response and prevention strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. C-reactive protein in the detection of post-stroke infections: systematic review and individual participant data analysis.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Alejandro; Vilar-Bergua, Andrea; Guettier, Sophie; Sánchez-Poblet, Josep; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Giralt, Dolors; Fluri, Felix; Topakian, Raffi; Worthmann, Hans; Hug, Andreas; Molnar, Tihamer; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Katan, Mira; Smith, Craig J; Montaner, Joan

    2017-04-01

    We conducted a systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis to explore the role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in early detection or prediction of post-stroke infections. CRP, an acute-phase reactant binds to the phosphocholine expressed on the surface of dead or dying cells and some bacteria, thereby activating complement and promoting phagocytosis by macrophages. We searched PubMed up to May-2015 for studies measuring CRP in stroke and evaluating post-stroke infections. Individual participants' data were merged into a single database. CRP levels were standardized and divided into quartiles. Factors independently associated with post-stroke infections were determined by logistic regression analysis and the additional predictive value of CRP was assessed by comparing areas under receiver operating characteristic curves and integrated discrimination improvement index. Data from seven studies including 699 patients were obtained. Standardized CRP levels were higher in patients with post-stroke infections beyond 24 h. Standardized CRP levels in the fourth quartile were independently associated with infection in two different logistic regression models, model 1 [stroke severity and dysphagia, odds ratio = 9.70 (3.10-30.41)] and model 2 [age, sex, and stroke severity, odds ratio = 3.21 (1.93-5.32)]. Addition of CRP improved discrimination in both models [integrated discrimination improvement = 9.83% (0.89-18.77) and 5.31% (2.83-7.79), respectively], but accuracy was only improved for model 1 (area under the curve 0.806-0.874, p = 0.036). In this study, CRP was independently associated with development of post-stroke infections, with the optimal time-window for measurement at 24-48 h. However, its additional predictive value is moderate over clinical information. Combination with other biomarkers in a panel seems a promising strategy for future studies. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Screening of post-mortem tissue donors for Coxiella burnetii infection after large outbreaks of Q fever in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background After the largest outbreaks of Q fever ever recorded in history occurred in the Netherlands, concern arose that Coxiella may be transmitted via donated tissues of latent or chronically infected donors. The Dutch Health Council recently advised to screen tissue donors, donating high risk tissues, for Coxiella infection. Methods After validation of an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test for IgG antibodies against phase 2 of C. burnetii for use on post-mortem samples, serum samples of 1033 consecutive Dutch post-mortem tissue donors were tested for IgG antibodies against phase 2 of C. burnetii. Confirmation of reactive results was done by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). All available tissues (corneas, heart valves, skin and bone marrow) from donors with IgG reactivity were tested for presence of Coxiella DNA by PCR. Risk factors for IgG reactivity were investigated. Results After validation of the tests for use on post-mortem samples, 50/1033 donors (4.8%) screened positive for phase 2 anti-Coxiella IgG by EIA, and 31 were confirmed by IFA (3.0%). One donor showed a serological profile compatible with chronic infection. All tested tissues (25 corneas, 6 heart valves, 4 skin and 3 bone marrow) from donors with IgG reactivity tested negative for the presence of Coxiella DNA. Except for living in a postal code area with a high number of Q fever notifications, no risk factors for IgG reactivity were found. Conclusions The strong correlation between notifications and seroprevalence confirms that the used assays are sufficiently specific for use on post-mortem samples, although one has to be aware of differences between batches. Thus, this study provides a validated method for screening tissue donors for infection with Coxiella burnetii that can be used in future outbreaks. PMID:24393298

  7. The impact of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections on post-discharge healthcare costs and utilization.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Richard E; Jones, Makoto; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Samore, Matthew H; Evans, Martin E; Graves, Nicholas; Lee, Bruce; Rubin, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and cost among hospitalized patients. Little is known about their impact on post-discharge resource utilization. The purpose of this study was to estimate post-discharge healthcare costs and utilization attributable to positive MRSA cultures during a hospitalization. Our study cohort consisted of patients with an inpatient admission lasting longer than 48 hours within the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system between October 1, 2007, and November 30, 2010. Of these patients, we identified those with a positive MRSA culture from microbiology reports in the VA electronic medical record. We used propensity score matching and multivariable regression models to assess the impact of positive culture on post-discharge outpatient, inpatient, and pharmacy costs and utilization in the 365 days following discharge. Our full cohort included 369,743 inpatients, of whom, 3,599 (1.0%) had positive MRSA cultures. Our final analysis sample included 3,592 matched patients with and without positive cultures. We found that, in the 12 months following hospital discharge, having a positive culture resulted in increases in post-discharge pharmacy costs ($776, P<.0001) and inpatient costs ($12,167, P<.0001). Likewise, having a positive culture increased the risk of a readmission (odds ratio [OR]=1.396, P<.0001), the number of prescriptions (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.138; P<.0001) and the number of inpatient days (IRR, 1.204; P<.0001,) but decreased the number of subsequent outpatient encounters (IRR, 0.941; P<.008). The results of this study indicate that MRSA infections are associated with higher levels of post-discharge healthcare cost and utilization. These findings indicate that financial benefits resulting from infection prevention efforts may extend beyond the initial hospital stay.

  8. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin is effective in the treatment of recurrent hepatitis C virus infection post-liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Shoreibah, Mohamed; Orr, Jordan; Jones, DeAnn; Zhang, Jie; Venkata, Krishna; Massoud, Omar

    2017-01-12

    Recurrent hepatitis C virus infection is a challenging complication post-liver transplant. Current guidelines recommend the combination of ribavirin and ledipasvir/sofosbuvir for 12 weeks for the treatment of recurrent HCV genotype 1 post-liver transplant. Data are limited on the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin for the treatment of recurrent hepatitis C virus post-liver transplant. This is a retrospective study of liver transplant patients who received ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin for the treatment of recurrent hepatitis C virus in our liver center from 2014 to 2016. A total of 60 patients were enrolled of which 70% were male, 88% Caucasian, age 60 ± 7 years, 15% cirrhotic, and 45% treatment-experienced with recurrent hepatitis C virus infection genotype 1 post-liver transplant. Treatment duration varied from 8 to 24 weeks. There were no serious adverse events and no discontinuation of treatment. A total of 71% of patients had undetectable serum hepatitis C virus at 4 weeks. However, irrespective of treatment duration, 100% of patients had undetectable serum hepatitis C virus at the end of treatment and 100% of patients achieved sustained viral response at 12 weeks. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin is an effective treatment of recurrent hepatitis C virus infection post-liver transplant. The entire group achieved sustained viral response at 12 weeks irrespective of the length of treatment. The combination of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir was well tolerated without serious adverse effects or discontinuation.

  9. Sitobion avenae alatae infected by Pandora neoaphidis: their flight ability, post-flight colonization, and mycosis transmission to progeny colonies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2004-07-01

    Epizootics caused by the obligate Entomophthorales pathogen Pandora neoaphidis may result from more than one possible means of fungal dissemination among host aphids, but we hypothesize that wide dispersal of the fungus is most likely to be associated with the flight behavior of migratory alates. We tested this hypothesis in a simulation experiment by assessing the flight capability of Sitobion avenae alates infected with P. neoaphidis and the potential of their post-flight survival, colonization, and mycosis transmission to progeny. A total of 281 alates were inoculated with P. neoaphidis, individually flown for up to 5h and 9km in a computer-monitored flight mill system and then reared for 10 days on wheat seedlings. The infected alates were capable of surviving on average for 2.9 days (range 1-7 days) and leaving 4.6 nymphs prior to deaths. Transmission of fungal infection within progeny colonies occurred after the mother alates died from P. neoaphidis mycosis. The level of contagious infection among the nymphs reached up to 16.8% within 7 days but varied with the survival time of the infected mother alates after flight. Based on stepwise polynomial regression analysis, progeny colony size was highly correlated with the interactions of flight time with both post-flight survival time and the number of nymphs left per alate before death (r2 = 0.997). Progeny mortality on day 5 after colonization was inversely correlated with post-flight survival time (r2 = 0.949) whereas infection on day 7 was correlated with flight distance and an interaction of post-flight survival time with fecundity of the infected alates (r2 = 0.970). Progeny mortality observed on day 10 was merely correlated to mortality observed on day 5 (r2 = 0.946). These results indicate a successful transmission of alate-borne P. neoaphidis to progeny colonies and further support our hypothesis on the means of primary dispersal of aphid epizootics by migratory alates in a geographically wide range.

  10. Post Caesarean section infective morbidity in HIV-positive women at a tertiary training hospital in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Zvandasara, P; Saungweme, G; Mlambo, J T; Moyo, J

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the infective morbidity in HIV-positive and HIV-negative women whose babies were delivered by Caesarean section. A hospital based, prospective study: part of a larger operational research project. Harare Maternity Hospital, a tertiary referral teaching hospital in Harare, Zimbabwe. 164 HIV-positive and 382 HIV-negative women who were delivered of their babies by Caesarean sections. Minor and major infective complications. The results compare HIV-positive and HIV-negative women, 18/164 (10.9%) HIV-positive women developed anaemia requiring blood transfusion compared with 15/382 (3.9%) HIV-negative women. The difference was statistically significant (RR 3.05). HIV-positive women had a statistically significant increase in the incidence of post operative fever (RR 1.3) and wound sepsis/sinus (p = 0.002). Our study indicates that HIV-positive women who were given prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics were at an increased risk of minor infective complications and blood transfusion post Caesarean section. The risk of blood transfusion was higher in women who had a pre-operative haemoglobin of 10.5 grams/dl. Post operative fever, wound sepsis and wound sinus was commoner in HIV-positive when compared to HIV-negative women.

  11. [Effect of extracted ZG from gardenia on Hep-2 cell membrane post infected with parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV-1)].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shan-Shan; Huang, Yang; Zhao, Ye; Gao, Ying-Jie; Gong, Wen-Feng; Cui, Xiao-Lan

    2007-09-01

    In order to study the anti-viral mechanism of extracted ZG from Gardenia, the effect of extracted ZG on Hep-2 cell membrane potential, Na -K+-ATPase activity and membrane fluidity post infected with parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV-1) was observed. Acetylcholine which was fluorescent labeled with DiBAC4 (3) was taken as positive control to observe the changes of membrane potential and was measured by flow cytometer. The phosphorus determination method and spectrophotometer were used to measure the Na+-K+-ATPase activity of Hep-2 cell membrane post PIV-1 infection. Hep-2 cell membrane phospholipids was labeled with fluorescent NBD-C6-HPC and membrane fluidity was measured by confocal laser scanning microscope. The results demonstated that after PIV-1 infection the Hep-2 cell membrane potential decreased significantly and the membrane was in the state of hyperpolarization, Na+-K+-ATPase activity increased and membrane fluidity decreased significantly. There was no apparent interferring effect of extracted ZG on the changes of membrane potential and Na+-K+-ATPase activity post PIV-1 infection, while membrane fluidity was improved significantly. Acetylcholine improved the state of hyperpolarization. The changes of membrane potential, Na -K+-ATPase activity and membrane fluidity might be the biomechanism of PIV-1 infectoin. The extracted ZG improved membrane fluidity to prevent from PIV-1 infection by protecting the cell membrane, which was probably the mechanism of anti-PIV-1 activity of the extracted ZG, but ZG probably had nothing to do with membrane potential and Na+-K+-ATPase activity.

  12. Prevention of infection caused by immunosuppressive drugs in gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Orlicka, Katarzyna; Barnes, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy is frequently used to treat gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune hepatitis, IgG4-related disease (autoimmune pancreatitis and sclerosing cholangitis) and in the post-transplantation setting. These drugs interfere with the immune system. The main safety concern with their use is the risk of infections. Certain infections can be prevented or their impact minimized. Physicians must adopt preventative strategies and should have a high degree of suspicion to recognize infections early and treat appropriately. This article reviews the risk factors for infections, the mechanism of action of immunosuppressive therapy and proposes preventive strategies. PMID:23819020

  13. Can specific nutrients stimulate bowel wound healing?

    PubMed

    Ellinger, Sabine

    2016-06-24

    The purpose of review is to provide an overview on specific nutrients which play an important role in bowel wound healing, and to judge the efficacy of supplementation to derive recommendations for clinical practice. Glutamine, arginine, butyrate, ω-3 fatty acids, nucleotides, and several micronutrients are involved in bowel wound healing. However, with regard to clinical trials, the efficacy of supplementation of specific nutrients on bowel wound healing in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases has not been clarified yet. In patients undergoing colon surgery, sufficient evidence exists that the perioperative supply of an enteral immunomodulating formula enriched with arginine, nucleotides, and ω-3 fatty acids may improve intestinal wound healing, considering the lower risk of wound infections, wound dehiscence, and intra-abdominal abscess. Even if a range of nutrients are involved in bowel wound healing, only perioperative supply of an enteral immunomodulating formula to cancer patients undergoing colon surgery, can be recommended. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to elucidate the efficacy of individual nutrients on intestinal wound healing.

  14. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction.

  15. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel: etiologies and CT findings.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Rosenblat, Juliana; Duncan, Dameon R; Friedman, Barak; Katz, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate and discuss the various etiologies of perforation of the mesenteric small bowel and associated findings on abdominal CT. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel is an uncommon cause of an acute abdomen and can be due to various etiologies. In underdeveloped countries, infection is probably the most common cause, while in industrialized nations, perforation may be due to Crohn disease, diverticulitis, foreign body, trauma, tumor, mechanical obstruction, primary ischemic event, or iatrogenic causes. CT is usually the initial imaging examination in patients with an acute abdomen and is sensitive in diagnosing small bowel perforation. CT findings in the setting of small bowel perforation are often subtle, but when present, may help the radiologist determine a specific cause of perforation. The aims of this pictorial essay are to review the various causes of mesenteric small bowel perforation and to discuss and illustrate the CT findings that can help arrive at the diagnosis.

  16. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction. PMID:27403104

  17. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Zaanan, Aziz; Mary, Florence; Afchain, Pauline; Manfredi, Sylvain; Evans, Thomas Ronald Jeffry

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinomas (SBAs) are rare tumors, but their incidence is increasing. The most common primary location is the duodenum. Even though SBAs are more often sporadic, some diseases are risk factors. Early diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma remains difficult, despite significant radiologic and endoscopic progress. After R0 surgical resection, the main prognostic factor is lymph node invasion. An international randomized trial (BALLAD [Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy For Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma] study) will evaluate the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. For metastatic disease, retrospectives studies suggest that platinum-based chemotherapy is the most effective treatment. Phase II studies are ongoing to evaluate targeted therapy in metastatic SBA.

  18. Small bowel and colon perforation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R

    2014-04-01

    For patients with small bowel and colonic perforations, a definitive diagnosis of the cause of perforation is not necessary before operation. Bowel obstruction and inflammatory bowel disease are the most common causes of nontraumatic intestinal perforations in industrialized countries, whereas infectious causes of intestinal perforations are more common in developing countries. Treatment of small bowel and colonic perforations generally includes intravenous antibiotics and fluid resuscitation, but the specific management of the bowel depends on the underlying cause of the perforation.

  19. Post-exposure efficacy of oral T-705 (Favipiravir) against inhalational Ebola virus infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Smither, Sophie J; Eastaugh, Lin S; Steward, Jackie A; Nelson, Michelle; Lenk, Robert P; Lever, Mark S

    2014-04-01

    Filoviruses cause disease with high case fatality rates and are considered biological threat agents. Licensed post-exposure therapies that can be administered by the oral route are desired for safe and rapid distribution and uptake in the event of exposure or outbreaks. Favipiravir or T-705 has broad antiviral activity and has already undergone phase II and is undergoing phase III clinical trials for influenza. Here we report the first use of T-705 against Ebola virus. T-705 gave 100% protection against aerosol Ebola virus E718 infection; protection was shown in immune-deficient mice after 14 days of twice-daily dosing. T-705 was also shown to inhibit Ebola virus infection in cell culture. T-705 is likely to be licensed for use against influenza in the near future and could also be used with a new indication for filovirus infection.

  20. Salmonid alphavirus infection causes skin dysbiosis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) post-smolts

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kristin M.; Patel, Sonal; Robinson, Aaron J.; Bu, Lijing; Jarungsriapisit, Jiraporn; Moore, Lindsey J.; Salinas, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Interactions among host, microbiota and viral pathogens are complex and poorly understood. The goal of the present study is to assess the changes in the skin microbial community of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) in response to experimental infection with salmonid alphavirus (SAV). The salmon skin microbial community was determined using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing in five different experimental groups: control, 7 days after infection with low-dose SAV, 14 days after infection with low-dose SAV, 7 days after infection with high-dose SAV, and 14 days after infection with high-dose SAV. Both infection treatment and time after infection were strong predictors of the skin microbial community composition. Skin samples from SAV3 infected fish showed an unbalanced microbiota characterized by a decreased abundance of Proteobacteria such as Oleispira sp. and increased abundances of opportunistic taxa including Flavobacteriaceae, Streptococcaceae and Tenacibaculum sp. These results demonstrate that viral infections can result in skin dysbiosis likely rendering the host more susceptible to secondary bacterial infections. PMID:28264056

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100171.htm Inflammatory bowel disease - series—Normal anatomy To ... gastrointestinal tract starts at the mouth, which leads to the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, and finally, the rectum and ...

  2. Accidental Bowel Leakage

    MedlinePlus

    Member Login Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate ... underwear or pads Diarrhea Constipation How will my health care provider diagnose the cause of my accidental bowel ...

  3. Large bowel resection - discharge

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    ... 26. Read More Colon cancer Colostomy Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Large bowel resection Ulcerative colitis Patient Instructions Bland ... Diseases Colonic Polyps Colorectal Cancer Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis Intestinal Obstruction Ulcerative Colitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  4. Small bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Small bowel resection Patient Instructions Bland diet Crohn ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Cancer Intestinal Obstruction Small Intestine Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  5. Short bowel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine insufficiency; Short gut syndrome; Necrotizing enterocolitis - short bowel ... The small intestine absorbs much of the nutrients found in foods we eat. When one half or more of our small ...

  6. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  7. Daily bowel care program

    MedlinePlus

    ... a brain or spinal cord injury. People with multiple sclerosis also have problems with their bowels. Those with ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 18. Read More Multiple sclerosis Recovering after stroke Patient Instructions Constipation - self-care ...

  8. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause inflammation that can alter function of the gastrointestinal system. Stress can also play a part in IBS. ... Disease (GERD) Lactose Intolerance Inflammatory Bowel Disease Ulcers Digestive System Eating Well While Eating Out Constipation Celiac Disease ...

  9. Risk Factors for Post-operative Infection Following Single Piece Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, P U; Senthil Nathan, P; Madhulaxmi, M; Muthusekhar, M R; Loong, Soh Chen; Abhinav, Rajendra Prabhu

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to identify the significant risk factors that contribute towards postoperative infection in patients recovering from orthognathic surgery. Retrospective records of 522 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery over 9 year period were evaluated for postoperative infection within 3 months of surgery and after 3 months of surgery. The variables of interest included age, gender, habits like smoking and alcohol consumption and incidence of postoperative infection. The overall infection rate was 4.60%. Patients who underwent bilateral sagittal split osteotomy to advance the mandible had an infection rate of 10.4%. Statistically significant predictor variables (P < 0.05) included patients who had the smoking habit, and those that received bone grafts in both the time periods. In conclusion, the occurrence of infection after orthognathic surgery is influenced by multiple factors, among which are the type of osteotomy, smoking habit and bone grafting procedures.

  10. Post-operative infection by pathogenic micro-organisms in the oral cavity of patients with prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Senpuku, H; Tada, A; Uehara, S; Kariyama, R; Kumon, H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the change in the oral cavity microflora of 14 patients who had undergone a radical prostatectomy for prostatic carcinoma. The detection of micro-organisms in the oral cavity was compared before and after the surgical procedure. Post-operative infection, defined as those patients who had increased Candida species counts and/or pathogenic bacteria only at the post-operative examination, was observed in 10 patients. Six patients showed increased Candida species counts at the post-operative examination compared with the pre-operative examination. In five patients, pathogenic bacterial species were detected at the post-operative examination but not at the pre-operative examination. One patient had detectable pathogenic bacterial species only at the post-operative examination along with increased Candida species counts. Our findings suggest that pre-operative oral hygiene to remove bacterial and Candida species from patients who are scheduled for surgical procedures is important for satisfactory clinical outcomes.

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: interrelated diseases?

    PubMed

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2005-01-01

    In the past inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were regarded as completely separate disorders. Now, with the description of inflammation, albeit low-grade, in IBS, and of symptom overlap between IBS and celiac disease, this contention has come under question. Is there true overlap between these disorders? Despite the limitations of available data one cannot but be struck by some areas of apparent convergence: IBD and celiac disease in remission, lymphocytic colitis and microscopic inflammation in IBS, in general, and, especially, in the post-infectious IBS category. The convergence between latent celiac disease and sub-clinical IBD, on the one hand, and IBS, on the other, appears, based on available evidence, to be somewhat spurious and may largely relate to misdiagnosis, a phenomenon which may also explain the apparent evolution of IBS into IBD in some studies. Similarities between IBS and lymphocytic colitis are more striking and less readily dismissed; as for IBS, well documented instances of progression of lymphocytic colitis to full-blown IBD are infrequent, suggesting a true separation between this disorder and classical IBD. Do IBS and lymphocytic colitis represent different responses to similar triggers? Will some of the 'inflamed' IBS subgroup be reclassified as part of the spectrum of lymphocytic colitis in the future? Will inflammation emerge as a common underlying factor in the pathogenesis of IBS? The answer to these and many questions must await further study of this fascinating area.

  12. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B.; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs. PMID:26456301

  13. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B

    2015-10-12

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs.

  14. An outbreak of post-acupuncture cutaneous infection due to Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joon Young; Sohn, Jang Wook; Jeong, Hye Won; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo; Kim, Min Ja

    2006-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing popularity of acupuncture, the importance of infection control is not adequately emphasized in Oriental medicine. In December 2001, an Oriental medical doctor in Seoul, South Korea, encountered several patients with persistent, culture-negative skin lesions on the trunk and extremities at the sites of prior acupuncture treatment. We identified and investigated an outbreak of Mycobacterium abscessus cutaneous infection among the patients who attended this Oriental medicine clinic. Methods Patients were defined as clinic patients with persistent cutaneous infections at the acupuncture sites. Medical records for the previous 7 months were reviewed. Clinical specimens were obtained from the patients and an environmental investigation was performed. M. abscessus isolates, cultured from patients, were compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results Forty patients who attended the Oriental medicine clinic and experienced persistent cutaneous wound infections were identified. Cultures from five of these patients proved positive, and all other diagnoses were based on clinical and histopathologic examinations. All environmental objects tested were negative for M. abscessus, however, most were contaminated by various nosocomial pathogens. Molecular analysis using PFGE found all wound isolates to be identical. Conclusion We have identified a large outbreak of rapidly growing mycobacterial infection among patients who received acupuncture at a single Oriental medicine clinic. Physicians should suspect mycobacterial infections in patients with persistent cutaneous infections following acupuncture, and infection control education including hygienic practice, should be emphasized for Oriental medical doctors practicing acupuncture. PMID:16412228

  15. Successful treatment of post-neurosurgical intracranial Mycoplasma hominis infection using gatifloxacin.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, K L; Looke, D F M

    2008-10-01

    We describe two cases of intracerebral infection with Mycoplasma hominis following neurosurgery, the first after removal of a colloid cyst, the other after a craniotomy following a motor vehicle accident (MVA). Both infections were successfully treated with parenteral gatifloxacin, with ongoing clindamycin or moxifloxacin for associated osteomyelitis.

  16. Epidemiology of Toxascaris leonina infection post-weaning within a colony of dogs.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M A; Murphy, M G; Siedek, E M

    2002-03-01

    This communication reports incidental observations on Toxascaris leonina infections in a beagle breeding colony. Regular faecal monitoring demonstrated that T. leonina was endemic in the adult dam population within this colony. Small numbers of T. leonina eggs were also detected in the faeces of weaned pups from eight weeks of age possibly produced by a patent infection. This would mean a pre-patent period for T. leonina of 56 days or less. Worm counts on 10 pups showed that 60% of pups had acquired a T. leonina infection by 12 weeks of age. Since prenatal and lactogenic transmission do not occur and as the pups were kept in an environment which reduced chances of infection with T. leonina and there was no apparent source of paratenic hosts, the source of infection must have been embryonated T. leonina eggs from the whelping environment. These observations on T. leonina demonstrate that, if pups are exposed to an infected environment, patent infections may be seen in a younger age group than is normally associated with T. leonina infections.

  17. Infants' Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Composition Reflects Both Maternal and Post-Natal Infection with Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Ibitokou, Samad; Vianou, Bertin; Houngbegnon, Parfait; Ezinmegnon, Sem; Borgella, Sophie; Akplogan, Carine; Cottrell, Gilles; Varani, Stefania; Massougbodji, Achille; Moutairou, Kabirou; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Deloron, Philippe; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Fievet, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Maternal parasitoses modulate fetal immune development, manifesting as altered cellular immunological activity in cord blood that may be linked to enhanced susceptibility to infections in early life. Plasmodium falciparum typifies such infections, with distinct placental infection-related changes in cord blood exemplified by expanded populations of parasite antigen-specific regulatory T cells. Here we addressed whether such early-onset cellular immunological alterations persist through infancy. Specifically, in order to assess the potential impacts of P. falciparum infections either during pregnancy or during infancy, we quantified lymphocyte subsets in cord blood and in infants' peripheral blood during the first year of life. The principal age-related changes observed, independent of infection status, concerned decreases in the frequencies of CD4+, NKdim and NKT cells, whilst CD8+, Treg and Teff cells' frequencies increased from birth to 12 months of age. P. falciparum infections present at delivery, but not those earlier in gestation, were associated with increased frequencies of Treg and CD8+ T cells but fewer CD4+ and NKT cells during infancy, thus accentuating the observed age-related patterns. Overall, P. falciparum infections arising during infancy were associated with a reversal of the trends associated with maternal infection i.e. with more CD4+ cells, with fewer Treg and CD8+ cells. We conclude that maternal P. falciparum infection at delivery has significant and, in some cases, year-long effects on the composition of infants' peripheral blood lymphocyte populations. Those effects are superimposed on separate and independent age- as well as infant infection-related alterations that, respectively, either match or run counter to them. PMID:26580401

  18. TOPIC: "The level of nurses' knowledge on occupational post exposure to hepatitis B infection in the Tamale metropolis, Ghana".

    PubMed

    Konlan, Kennedy Diema; Aarah-Bapuah, Millicent; Kombat, Joseph M; Wuffele, Gifty Mary

    2017-04-05

    Health care workers especially nurses in developing countries are at serious risk for infection from blood-borne pathogens particularly hepatitis B virus (HBV) - because of the high prevalence of such pathogens in many poorer regions of the world. Employers are required to establish exposure-control plans that include post exposure follow-up for their employees and to comply with incident reporting requirements. This study assessed the level of knowledge and awareness of nurses in the Tamale Metropolis of Ghana on occupational post exposure measures to hepatitis B, and their risk of being infected. Hepatitis B vaccination status of nurses was also assessed. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 108 nurses of varied categories who were selected by simple random sampling from west and central hospitals in the Tamale Metropolis of Ghana. Data was collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. SPSS version 16 was used for the analysis of data. Ninety-four percent (94.4%) of the nurses considered themselves susceptible to occupational infection of HBV. About 23.4% were able to mention all the key elements of the post exposure management with 12.1% having adequate knowledge on post exposure prophylactic treatment against HBV. However, only 48 (44.4%) nurses have received hepatitis B vaccination. Thirty-six (75%) of those immunized had received three doses as required while the remaining had less than 3 doses. Some (38.9%) recap used needles before disposal and 30.2% do not decontaminate blood and body fluids before disposal. Nurses are aware of their risk of occupational exposure to hepatitis B but lack the requisite knowledge on post exposure management as well as measures that reduce the exposure. Nurses should familiarize with the principles of post exposure management as part of job orientation and on-going job training. Also, there is a need for a national policy on occupational safety and health which should include HB vaccination of health care workers

  19. Incidence of irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue following GI infection: a population-level study using routinely collected claims data.

    PubMed

    Donnachie, Ewan; Schneider, Antonius; Mehring, Michael; Enck, Paul

    2017-06-10

    To investigate the occurrence of postinfectious IBS in routine outpatient care, comparing different types of GI infection and its interaction with psychosomatic comorbidity. Retrospective cohort study using routinely collected claims data covering statutorily insured patients in Bavaria, Germany. Cases were defined as patients without prior record of functional intestinal disorder with a first-time diagnosis of GI infection between January 2005 and December 2013 and classed according to the type of infection. Each case was matched by age, sex and district of residence to a patient without history of GI infection. Prior psychological disorder (depression, anxiety or stress reaction disorder) was assessed in the 2 years prior to inclusion. Proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the HRs for GI infection and psychological disorder. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was assessed as a comparator outcome. A total of 508 278 patients with first diagnosis of GI infection were identified, resulting in a matched cohort of 1 016 556 patients. All infection types were associated with an increased risk of IBS (HR: 2.19-4.25) and CFS (HR 1.35-1.82). Prior psychological disorder was a distinct risk factor for IBS (HR: 1.73) and CFS (HR: 2.08). Female sex was a further risk factor for both conditions. Psychological disorder and GI infections are distinct risk factors for IBS. The high incidence of non-specific GI infection suggests that postinfectious IBS is a common clinical occurrence in primary care. Chronic fatigue is a further significant sequela of GI infection. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Lung Adenocarcinoma Originates from Retrovirus Infection of Proliferating Type 2 Pneumocytes during Pulmonary Post-Natal Development or Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Claudio; Caporale, Marco; Ceesay, Ousman; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Ferri, Nicola; Varasano, Vincenzo; de las Heras, Marcelo; Palmarini, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is a unique oncogenic virus with distinctive biological properties. JSRV is the only virus causing a naturally occurring lung cancer (ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma, OPA) and possessing a major structural protein that functions as a dominant oncoprotein. Lung cancer is the major cause of death among cancer patients. OPA can be an extremely useful animal model in order to identify the cells originating lung adenocarcinoma and to study the early events of pulmonary carcinogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that lung adenocarcinoma in sheep originates from infection and transformation of proliferating type 2 pneumocytes (termed here lung alveolar proliferating cells, LAPCs). We excluded that OPA originates from a bronchioalveolar stem cell, or from mature post-mitotic type 2 pneumocytes or from either proliferating or non-proliferating Clara cells. We show that young animals possess abundant LAPCs and are highly susceptible to JSRV infection and transformation. On the contrary, healthy adult sheep, which are normally resistant to experimental OPA induction, exhibit a relatively low number of LAPCs and are resistant to JSRV infection of the respiratory epithelium. Importantly, induction of lung injury increased dramatically the number of LAPCs in adult sheep and rendered these animals fully susceptible to JSRV infection and transformation. Furthermore, we show that JSRV preferentially infects actively dividing cell in vitro. Overall, our study provides unique insights into pulmonary biology and carcinogenesis and suggests that JSRV and its host have reached an evolutionary equilibrium in which productive infection (and transformation) can occur only in cells that are scarce for most of the lifespan of the sheep. Our data also indicate that, at least in this model, inflammation can predispose to retroviral infection and cancer. PMID:21483485

  1. Post-release substance abuse outcomes among HIV-infected jail detainees: results from a multisite study.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Archana; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Chitsaz, Ehsan; Springer, Sandra A; Jordan, Alison O; Zaller, Nick; Altice, Frederick L

    2013-10-01

    HIV-infected individuals with substance use disorders have a high prevalence of medical and psychiatric morbidities that complicate treatment. Incarceration further disrupts healthcare access and utilization. Without appropriate diagnosis and treatment, drug relapse upon release exceeds 85 %, which contributes to poor health outcomes. A prospective cohort of 1,032 HIV-infected jail detainees were surveyed in a ten-site demonstration project during incarceration and six-months post-release, in order to examine the effect of predisposing factors, enabling resources and need factors on their subsequent drug use. Homelessness, pre-incarceration cocaine and opioid use, and high drug and alcohol severity were significantly associated with cocaine and opioid relapse. Substance abuse treatment, though poorly defined, did not influence post-release cocaine and opioid use. An approach that integrates multiple services, simultaneously using evidence-based substance abuse, psychiatric care, and social services is needed to improve healthcare outcomes for HIV-infected persons transitioning from jails to the community.

  2. Post-infectious immune suppression: a new paradigm of severe infections.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, D; Llitjos, J F; Pène, F

    2014-10-01

    Infectious diseases remain a major public health issue in both developing and developed countries. For instance, there is still a high rate of morbidity and mortality due to seasonal influenza outbreaks and severe bacterial sepsis, despite major advances in their prevention and treatment. It is now clear that severe influenza and bacterial infections promote susceptibility for superinfections worsening the prognosis. Various immune defects acquired during severe infection may result in complex immunosuppression and may affect both innate and adaptive components. Some animal models of these common clinical situations have demonstrated the increased susceptibility of infected hosts to secondary infectious insult and allowed assessing the regulatory mechanisms. Such pathophysiological advances may help create new immunomodulatory therapeutics for infected patients exposed to severe secondary sepsis.

  3. Interaction between immunoglobulin allotypes and NK receptor genes in diabetes post-hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Granados-Montiel, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Azocar, Jose; Feris, Edmond J; Terreros, Daniel; Larsen, Charles E; Clavijo, Olga P; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Middleton, Derek; Alper, Chester A; Pandey, Janardan P; Yunis, Edmond J

    2011-06-01

    Genetic interactions between natural killer (NK) cells immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and immunoglobulin allotypes have been previously reported in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Puerto Rican Americans with a history of intravenous drug use who developed DM following HCV infection (n=32) were compared to individuals infected with HCV without diabetes (n=121) and to DM non-infected individuals (n=95). Subjects were genotyped for KIRs and immunoglobulin allotypes. We found interactions of immunoglobulin allotypes KM3/KM3 with NK inhibitory receptors 2DL3/2DL3, 2DL1 in the absence of 2DS4 associated with susceptibility to DM in HCV infected individuals. These data suggest the possibility that a subset of patients with HCV could have an immune-mediated component contributing to the development of DM.

  4. Endemic infection of the amphibian chytrid fungus in a frog community post-decline.

    PubMed

    Retallick, Richard W R; McCallum, Hamish; Speare, Rick

    2004-11-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has been implicated in the decline and extinction of numerous frog species worldwide. In Queensland, Australia, it has been proposed as the cause of the decline or apparent extinction of at least 14 high-elevation rainforest frog species. One of these, Taudactylus eungellensis, disappeared from rainforest streams in Eungella National Park in 1985-1986, but a few remnant populations were subsequently discovered. Here, we report the analysis of B. dendrobatidis infections in toe tips of T. eungellensis and sympatric species collected in a mark-recapture study between 1994 and 1998. This longitudinal study of the fungus in individually marked frogs sheds new light on the effect of this threatening infectious process in field, as distinct from laboratory, conditions. We found a seasonal peak of infection in the cooler months, with no evidence of interannual variation. The overall prevalence of infection was 18% in T. eungellensis and 28% in Litoria wilcoxii/jungguy, a sympatric frog that appeared not to decline in 1985-1986. No infection was found in any of the other sympatric species. Most importantly, we found no consistent evidence of lower survival in T. eungellensis that were infected at the time of first capture, compared with uninfected individuals. These results refute the hypothesis that remnant populations of T. eungellensis recovered after a B. dendrobatidis epidemic because the pathogen had disappeared. They show that populations of T. eungellensis now persist with stable, endemic infections of B. dendrobatidis.

  5. Acute post-infectious cerebellar ataxia due to co-infection of human herpesvirus-6 and adenovirus mimicking myositis.

    PubMed

    Naselli, Aldo; Pala, Giovanna; Cresta, Federico; Finetti, Martina; Biancheri, Roberta; Renna, Salvatore

    2014-11-26

    Acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) is a relatively common neurological disease in children. Most common types of ACA are acute post-infectious (APCA) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Less common but important causes include opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) and acute cerebellitis. Cerebellar neoplasms and acute hydrocephalus are additional causes of paediatric ataxia. APCA is the most common cause of ACA in children, comprising about 30-50% of total cases. This is a report about an immunocompetent 4-yrs-old male affected by APCA, due to co-infection by human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and adenovirus, with symptoms mimicking myositis.

  6. Spectrally selective UV bactericidal effect for curative treatment of post-surgical intra-abdominal abscesses and other infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudelzak, Alexander E.; Miller, Mark A.; Babichenko, Sergey M.

    2004-07-01

    Results of in-vitro studies of bactericidal effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on strains causing drug-resistant endo-cavital infections (Enterococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and others) are presented. An original technique to measure effects of UV-irradiation on bacterial growth at different wavelengths has been developed. Spectral dependences of the bactericidal effect have been observed, and spectral maxima of bactericidal efficiency have been found. Applications to curative treatments of wounds, post-surgical intra-abdominal abscesses and other diseases are discussed.

  7. Non-invasive fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in a patient presenting with hypertensive disorder post interventionem.

    PubMed

    Goeser, F; Schlabe, S; Ruiner, C E; Kramer, L; Strassburg, C P; Spengler, U

    2016-10-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation has gathered much attention due to its high efficacy in resolving recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Until today, it is recognized as a safe procedure without any severe side effects. Patients with impaired conscious states suffering from recurrent episodes of aspiration are at increased risk by endoscopic interventions needed during standard approaches for fecal microbiota transplantation application.Here, we illustrate the case of a tetraplegic patient undergoing fecal microbiota transplantation due to his fifth recurrent episode of Clostridium difficile infection using a self-advancing nasal jejunal feeding tube as effective minimal-invasive option of fecal microbiota transplantation application. Persistent aggravation of arterial hypertension, which developed post-intervention in this patient, could be interpreted as a hitherto unknown side effect of fecal microbiota transplantation in this setting. Moreover, this is a further hint for a link between the intestinal microbiome and arterial hypertension in general. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Post-natal anaemia and iron deficiency in HIV-infected women and the health and survival of their children.

    PubMed

    Isanaka, Sheila; Spiegelman, Donna; Aboud, Said; Manji, Karim P; Msamanga, Gernard I; Willet, Walter C; Duggan, Christopher; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2012-07-01

    Prenatal iron supplementation may improve pregnancy outcomes and decrease the risk of child mortality. However, little is known about the importance of post-natal maternal iron status for child health and survival, particularly in the context of HIV infection. We examined the association of maternal anaemia and hypochromic microcytosis, an erythrocyte morphology consistent with iron deficiency, with child health and survival in the first two to five years of life. Repeated measures of maternal anaemia and hypochromic microcytosis from 840 HIV-positive women enrolled in a clinical trial of vitamin supplementation were prospectively related to child mortality, HIV infection and CD4 T-cell count. Median duration of follow-up for the endpoints of child mortality, HIV infection and CD4 cell count was 58, 17 and 23 months, respectively. Maternal anaemia and hypochromic microcytosis were associated with greater risk of child mortality [hazard ratio (HR) for severe anaemia = 2.58, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.66-4.01, P trend < 0.0001; HR for severe hypochromic microcytosis = 2.36, 95% CI: 1.27-4.38, P trend = 0.001]. Maternal anaemia was not significantly associated with greater risk of child HIV infection (HR for severe anaemia = 1.46, 95% CI: 0.91, 2.33, P trend = 0.08) but predicted lower CD4 T-cell counts among HIV-uninfected children (difference in CD4 T-cell count/µL for severe anaemia: -93, 95% CI: -204-17, P trend = 0.02). The potential child health risks associated with maternal anaemia and iron deficiency may not be limited to the prenatal period. Efforts to reduce maternal anaemia and iron deficiency during pregnancy may need to be expanded to include the post-partum period.

  9. Porous orthopedic steel implant as an antibiotic eluting device: prevention of post-surgical infection on an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Marina; Pinczowski, Pedro; Vázquez, Francisco J; Pérez, Marta; Santamaría, Jesús; Arruebo, Manuel; Luján, Lluís

    2013-08-16

    Traumatology and orthopedic surgery can benefit from the use of efficient local antibiotic-eluting systems to avoid bacterial contamination of implanted materials. In this work a new percutaneous porous-wall hollow implant was successfully used as a local antibiotic-eluting device both in vitro and in vivo. The implant is a macroporous 316 L stainless steel filter tube with a nominal filtration cut-off size of 200 nm with one open end which was used to load the synthetic antibiotic linezolid and an opposite blind end. The antibiotic release kinetics from the device on a simulated biological fluid under in vitro conditions demonstrated an increased concentration during the first five days that subsequently was sustained for at least seven days, showing a kinetic close to a zero order release. Antibiotic-loaded implants were placed in the tibia of four sheep which were trans-surgically experimentally infected with a biofilm forming strain of Staphylococcus aureus. After 7 and 9 days post infection, sheep did not show any evidence of infection as demonstrated by clinical, pathological and microbiological findings. These results demonstrate the capability of such an antibiotic-loaded implant to prevent infection in orthopedic devices in vivo. Further research is needed to assess its possible use in traumatology and orthopedic surgery.

  10. Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000150.htm Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... your bowel (intestine). This condition is called an intestinal obstruction . The blockage may be partial or total (complete). ...

  11. Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel

    MedlinePlus

    ... complementary therapies such as guided imagery and other relaxation techniques. Short Bowel Syndrome Short bowel syndrome is ... some people. However, most people adjust and lead active and productive lives. A WOC nurse or an ...

  12. Gastrointestinal Complications (PDQ) - Bowel Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent more serious problems. With constipation, bowel movements are difficult or don’t happen as often ... impaction include being unable to have a bowel movement and pain in the abdomen or back. The ...

  13. Adverse events post smallpox-vaccination: insights from tail scarification infection in mice with Vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Mota, Bruno E F; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia; Trindade, Giliane; Keckler, M Shannon; Karem, Kevin; Carroll, Darin; Campos, Marco A; Vieira, Leda Q; da Fonseca, Flávio G; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Damon, Inger K; Kroon, Erna G

    2011-04-15

    Adverse events upon smallpox vaccination with fully-replicative strains of Vaccinia virus (VACV) comprise an array of clinical manifestations that occur primarily in immunocompromised patients leading to significant host morbidity/mortality. The expansion of immune-suppressed populations and the possible release of Variola virus as a bioterrorist act have given rise to concerns over vaccination complications should more widespread vaccination be reinitiated. Our goal was to evaluate the components of the host immune system that are sufficient to prevent morbidity/mortality in a murine model of tail scarification, which mimics immunological and clinical features of smallpox vaccination in humans. Infection of C57BL/6 wild-type mice led to a strictly localized infection, with complete viral clearance by day 28 p.i. On the other hand, infection of T and B-cell deficient mice (Rag1(-/-)) produced a severe disease, with uncontrolled viral replication at the inoculation site and dissemination to internal organs. Infection of B-cell deficient animals (µMT) produced no mortality. However, viral clearance in µMT animals was delayed compared to WT animals, with detectable viral titers in tail and internal organs late in infection. Treatment of Rag1(-/-) with rabbit hyperimmune anti-vaccinia serum had a subtle effect on the morbidity/mortality of this strain, but it was effective in reduce viral titers in ovaries. Finally, NUDE athymic mice showed a similar outcome of infection as Rag1(-/-), and passive transfer of WT T cells to Rag1(-/-) animals proved fully effective in preventing morbidity/mortality. These results strongly suggest that both T and B cells are important in the immune response to primary VACV infection in mice, and that T-cells are required to control the infection at the inoculation site and providing help for B-cells to produce antibodies, which help to prevent viral dissemination. These insights might prove helpful to better identify individuals with

  14. Adverse Events Post Smallpox-Vaccination: Insights from Tail Scarification Infection in Mice with Vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Bruno E. F.; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia; Trindade, Giliane; Keckler, M. Shannon; Karem, Kevin; Carroll, Darin; Campos, Marco A.; Vieira, Leda Q.; da Fonseca, Flávio G.; Ferreira, Paulo C. P.; Bonjardim, Cláudio A.; Damon, Inger K.; Kroon, Erna G.

    2011-01-01

    Adverse events upon smallpox vaccination with fully-replicative strains of Vaccinia virus (VACV) comprise an array of clinical manifestations that occur primarily in immunocompromised patients leading to significant host morbidity/mortality. The expansion of immune-suppressed populations and the possible release of Variola virus as a bioterrorist act have given rise to concerns over vaccination complications should more widespread vaccination be reinitiated. Our goal was to evaluate the components of the host immune system that are sufficient to prevent morbidity/mortality in a murine model of tail scarification, which mimics immunological and clinical features of smallpox vaccination in humans. Infection of C57BL/6 wild-type mice led to a strictly localized infection, with complete viral clearance by day 28 p.i. On the other hand, infection of T and B-cell deficient mice (Rag1−/−) produced a severe disease, with uncontrolled viral replication at the inoculation site and dissemination to internal organs. Infection of B-cell deficient animals (µMT) produced no mortality. However, viral clearance in µMT animals was delayed compared to WT animals, with detectable viral titers in tail and internal organs late in infection. Treatment of Rag1−/− with rabbit hyperimmune anti-vaccinia serum had a subtle effect on the morbidity/mortality of this strain, but it was effective in reduce viral titers in ovaries. Finally, NUDE athymic mice showed a similar outcome of infection as Rag1−/−, and passive transfer of WT T cells to Rag1−/− animals proved fully effective in preventing morbidity/mortality. These results strongly suggest that both T and B cells are important in the immune response to primary VACV infection in mice, and that T-cells are required to control the infection at the inoculation site and providing help for B-cells to produce antibodies, which help to prevent viral dissemination. These insights might prove helpful to better identify individuals

  15. Probiotics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Bai, A-P; Ouyang, Q

    2006-06-01

    Enteric microflora profiles vary considerably between active inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and healthy conditions. Intestinal microflora may partake in the pathogenesis of IBD by one or some ways: specific pathogenic infection induces abnormal intestinal mucosal inflammation; aberrant microflora components trigger the onset of IBD; abnormal host immune response loses normal immune tolerance to luminal components; luminal antigens permeate through the defective mucosal barrier into mucosal lamina propria and induce abnormal inflammatory response. Preliminary studies suggest that administration of probiotics may be benefit for experimental colitis and clinical trials for IBD. Researches have been studying the function of probiotics. Introduction of probiotics can balance the aberrant enteric microflora in IBD patients, and reinforce the various lines of intestinal defence by inhibiting microbial pathogens growth, increasing intestinal epithelial tight junction and permeability, modulating immune response of intestinal epithelia and mucosal immune cells, secreting antimicrobial products, decomposing luminal pathogenic antigens.

  16. Post transplant urinary tract infection in Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease a perpetual diagnostic dilema - 18-fluorodeoxyglucose - Positron emission computerized tomography - A valuable tool.

    PubMed

    Sainaresh, Vv; Jain, Sh; Patel, Hv; Shah, Pr; Vanikar, Av; Trivedi, Hl

    2011-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection contracted by renal allograft recipients. In patients of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst infection presents a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge especially in the post transplant period. Accurate diagnosis forms the cornerstone in salvaging the graft from potentially catastrophic outcome. We describe a case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XPN) in the native kidney in a patient of post transplant ADPKD which presented as frequently relapsing UTI with graft dysfunction where in accurate diagnosis was made possible with the aid of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - Positron emission computerized tomography (PET/CT).

  17. Lessons learnt from an atypical mycobacterium infection post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Stacy W L; Yee Han, Dave Lee

    2015-03-01

    Infections following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are rare, with no previous reports citing Mycobacterium abscessus as the culprit pathogen. A 22-year-old man presented twice over three years with a painful discharging sinus over his right tibia tunnel site necessitating repeated arthroscopy and washout, months of antibiotic therapy, and ultimately culminating in the removal of the implants. In both instances, M. abscessus was present in the wound cultures, along with a coinfection of Staphyloccocus aureus during the second presentation. Though rare, M. abscessus is an important pathogen to consider in postoperative wounds presenting with chronic discharging sinuses, even in healthy non-immunocompromised patients. This case illustrates how the organism can cause an indolent infection, and how the removal of implants can be necessary to prevent the persistence of infection. Coinfection with a second organism is not uncommon and necessitates a timely change in treatment regime as well.

  18. Should we add vancomycin antibiotic powder to prevent post operative infection in spine surgery?

    PubMed

    López, Mario; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-06-11

    Intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis is routinely administered to prevent surgical site infection in spinal surgery. Adding intrawound vancomycin powder before surgical closure might further decrease infection risk. However, its use is controversial. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews that considered 16 studies, including one randomized controlled trial. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded vancomycin probably does not decrease the risk of infection in low risk surgery, but there is uncertainty about its effects in populations or surgeries with a higher risk because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  19. Should we add vancomycin antibiotic powder to prevent post operative infection in spine surgery? - First update.

    PubMed

    López, Mario; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-08-05

    This Living FRISBEE (Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos) is an update of the summary published in June 2015, based on the detection of a new systematic review not identified in the previous version. Intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis is routinely administered to prevent surgical site infection in spinal surgery. Adding intrawound vancomycin powder before surgical closure might further decrease infection risk. However, its use is controversial. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified seven systematic reviews that considered 16 studies, including one randomized controlled trial. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded vancomycin probably does not decrease the risk of infection in low risk surgery, but there is uncertainty about its effects in populations or surgeries with a higher risk because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  20. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity (RH) on peanut infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. sclerotiorum, isolated from pumpkin. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DO...

  1. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity on peanut infection by Sclerotinia minor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. minor. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DOE), and five were closed for d...

  2. Long-term health effects after resolution of acute Cryptosporidium parvum infection: a 1-year follow-up of outbreak-associated cases.

    PubMed

    Stiff, Rhianwen E; Davies, Angharad P; Mason, Brendan W; Hutchings, Hayley A; Chalmers, Rachel M

    2017-10-06

    We describe a longitudinal study carried out in an adult outbreak-associated cohort to investigate health effects, including post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome, occurring after resolution of acute Cryptosporidium parvum infection. New symptoms self-reported up to 12 months included: weight loss (31 %), abdominal pain (38 %), diarrhoea (33 %), eye pain (9 %), joint pain (33 %), fatigue (22 %) and symptoms consistent with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (28 %). Two people were medically diagnosed with IBS. This study describes for the first time sequelae reported by patients up to 12 months after infection with C. parvum, which appear to be similar to those described with C. hominis.

  3. Combined use of rituximab and plasmapheresis pre-transplant increases post-transplant infections in renal transplant recipients with basiliximab induction therapy.

    PubMed

    Chung, B H; Yun, J T; Ha, S E; Kim, J I; Moon, I S; Choi, B S; Park, C W; Kim, Y S; Yang, C W

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of combined use of rituximab (RTX) and plasmapheresis (PP) pre-transplant on post-transplant infection. A total of 196 patients undergoing living-donor kidney transplantation at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, all of whom underwent basiliximab induction therapy, were included in the study. They were divided into 3 groups: RTX/PP/intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) (the RPI group; n = 53), RTX monotherapy (the RTX group; n = 14), and control (the CONT group; n = 129). We compared the post-transplant infections in the 3 groups. The overall prevalence of infection was significantly higher, and the infection-free survival rate was lower, in the RPI group compared with the RTX or CONT groups (P < 0.05). A trend toward more severe bacterial infections was seen in the RPI group compared with the other groups, and fungal infections developed only in the RPI group. After anti-rejection therapy, a significantly higher rate of infection developed in the RPI group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the RPI group was an independent risk factor for the development of infection. Our results show that in the setting of basiliximab induction, the use of combined RTX and PP therapy pre-transplant significantly increases the risk for post-transplant infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Post-epizootic chronic dolphin morbillivirus infection in Mediterranean striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba.

    PubMed

    Soto, Sara; Alba, Ana; Ganges, Llilianne; Vidal, Enric; Raga, Juan Antonio; Alegre, Ferrán; González, Beatriz; Medina, Pascual; Zorrilla, Irene; Martínez, Jorge; Marco, Alberto; Pérez, Mónica; Pérez, Blanca; Pérez de Vargas Mesas, Ana; Martínez Valverde, Rosa; Domingo, Mariano

    2011-10-06

    Dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) has caused 2 epizootics with high mortality rates on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, in 1990 and 2006-07, mainly affecting striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba. Following the first epizootic unusual DMV infections affecting only the central nervous system of striped dolphins were found, with histological features similar to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and old dog encephalitis, the chronic latent localised infections caused by defective forms of measles virus and canine distemper virus, respectively. Between 2008 and 2010, monitoring by microscopic and immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of 118 striped dolphins stranded along Catalonia, the Valencia Region and Andalusia showed similar localised DMV nervous system infections in 25.0, 28.6 and 27.4% of cases, respectively, with no significant differences among regions or sex. The body length of DMV-infected dolphins was statistically greater than that of non-infected dolphins (196.5 vs. 160.5 cm; p < 0.001). Molecular detection of DMV was performed by 2 different RT-PCR techniques amplifying a 429 bp fragment and a 78 bp fragment both within the phosphoprotein (P) gene. The 429 bp RT-PCR results contradicted the IHC-DMV results as only 3 of 6 dolphins with positive IHC-DMV had positive PCR results. All 6 cases were positive with the 78 bp RT-PCR. These findings contraindicate the use of the 429 bp RT-PCR protocol based on the P gene to detect this specific form of DMV. DMV localised nervous infection constitutes the most relevant single cause of stranding and death in Mediterranean striped dolphins in the years following a DMV epizootic, and it might even overwhelm the effects of the epizootic itself, at least in 2007.

  5. Antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates from post-surgical wound infections.

    PubMed

    Kasithevar, Muthupandi; Periakaruppan, Prakash; Muthupandian, Saravanan; Mohan, Mahalakshmi

    2017-06-01

    In order to investigate new effective and inexpensive nano-therapeutic approach for P. aeruginosa, staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS), the present study reports an eco-friendly process for rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using aqueous leaf extract of Corchorus Capsularis (CRCP). Formation of stable Ag-NPs at different time intervals gives mostly spherical particles with diameters ranging from 5 to 45 nm. The resulting Ag-NPs were characterized using Ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). XRD study shows that the particles are crystalline in nature with face centered cubic geometry. TEM studies show the formation of Ag-NPs with average size of 20.52 nm. The antimicrobial activity of the synthesized Ag-NPs was investigated against multi drug resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and CoNS isolates from post-surgical wound infections. The present study suggests that Ag-NPs synthesized from aqueous leaf extract of CRCP shows significant antibacterial potential against MDR isolates from post-surgical wound infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimating the impact post randomization changes in staff behavior in infection prevention trials: a mathematical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Lofgren, Eric T

    2017-08-03

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of behavior-based interventions are particularly vulnerable to post-randomization changes between study arms. We assess the impact of such a change in a large, multicenter study of universal contact precautions to prevent infection transmission in intensive care units. We construct a stochastic mathematical model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) acquisition in a simulated 18-bed intensive care unit (ICU). Using parameters from a recent study of contact precautions that reported a post-randomization change in contact rates, with fewer visits observed in the treatment arm, we explore the impact of several possible interpretations of this change on MRSA acquisition rates. Scenarios where contact precautions resulted in less patient visitation resulted in a mean decrease in MRSA acquisition rate of 37%, accounting for much of the effect reported in the trial. Behavior changes that impact the contact rate have the potential to drastically alter the results of RCTs in infection control settings. Careful monitoring for these changes, and an assessment of which changes will likely have the greatest impact on the study before the study begins are both recommended.

  7. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Eimeria infections in post-weaned and adult cattle on three Maryland farms.

    PubMed

    Fayer, R; Trout, J M; Graczyk, T K; Lewis, E J

    2000-11-10

    The prevalence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Eimeria, in healthy, asymptomatic, post-weaned and mature cattle was investigated on three Maryland farms. One farm, a dairy research facility, had 150 multiparous Holstein milking cows; 24 were examined and Cryptosporidium andersoni was detected in three (12.5%) but neither Giardia nor Eimeria was detected. The second farm, a commercial dairy, had 57 multiparous Holstein milking cows and an equal number of heifers. Of 19 cows examined, C. parvum, Giardia duodenalis, and Eimeria bovis and/or E. ellipsoidalis were detected in two (10.5%), two (10.5%) and one (5.26%) cow, respectively. Of 23 heifers examined, C. parvum, Giardia, and E. bovis and E. ellipsoidalis, was detected in two (8.7%), four (17.4%), and five (21.7%), heifers, respectively. The third farm, a beef cattle breeding and genetics research facility, had 180 7- to 9-month old purebred black Angus. Of 118 examined for C. parvum and Giardia, 34 (28.8%) and 44 (37.3%) were positive, respectively, of 97 examined for E. bovis and/or E. ellipsoidalis 32 (33.0%) were positive. These findings, based on a method with a minimum detection level of 100 oocysts of C. parvum/g of feces, which underestimates the number of infected cattle, clearly demonstrate the presence of low level, asymptomatic infections in post-weaned and adult cattle in the United States and indicate the potential role of such cattle as reservoirs of infectious parasites.

  8. Comparison of the risk of surgical site infection and feasibility of surgery between sennoside versus polyethylene glycol as a mechanical bowel preparation of elective colon cancer surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yusuke; Ishida, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Azusa; Chika, Noriyasu; Onozawa, Hisashi; Matsuzawa, Takeaki; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Mochiki, Erito

    2016-06-01

    To validate the usefulness of sennoside as a substitute for polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) for elective colon cancer surgery. We performed a prospective randomized non-inferiority trial comparing the use of sennoside and PEG in MBP for elective colon cancer surgery, in terms of the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) and the feasibility of surgery. The overall incidence of SSIs was 2.9 % in the sennoside group (n = 68) and 6.3 % in the PEG group (n = 63) with a difference of 3.4 % (95 % confidence interval 6.9-10.6 %). The intraoperative spillage of the stool materials in the sennoside and PEG groups was 4.4 and 3.1 %, respectively, and was not significantly different (p = 0.71), even the upstream stool consistency, was more frequently observed to be non-stool in the PEG group (65.1 vs. 30.9 %, p < 0.01). MBP with sennoside could be a substitution for PEG in elective colon cancer surgery.

  9. Distribution of intestinal parasitic infections amongst aborigine children at Post Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hartini, Y; Geishamimi, G; Mariam, A Z; Mohamed-Kamel, A G; Hidayatul, F O; Ismarul, Y I

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are important public health problems among underprivileged communities. This study was carried out to evaluate the infection rate of intestinal parasites among aborigine children at Pos Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia. A total of 111 faecal samples from aborigine children aged 4-12 years were screened for intestinal parasites by direct smear technique. Harada-Mori culture was also performed to identify hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. The results showed that 87.4% of the children examined were positive for one or more parasites. Intestinal parasites were significantly lower in boys (78.7%) as compared to girls (93.8%). The infection occurred in very young children aged 4-6 years (80.0%) and the percentage of parasite-positive cases appeared to be significantly higher (92.9%) among the children aged 7-9 years. Trichuris trichiura was the most common parasite found in aborigine children (65.8%). Low socioeconomic status, poor environmental sanitation and poor personal hygiene are possible contributing factors that increase the rate of intestinal parasitic infections among the children. Thus, the parasitic diseases will continue to threaten the people's health especially among communities from rural areas if no appropriate actions are taken to diminish the transmission of the parasites.

  10. Adherence to surgical care improvement project measures and post-operative surgical site infections.

    PubMed

    Awad, Samir S

    2012-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is unequivocally morbid and costly. The estimated 300,000 SSIs annually in the United States represent the second most common infection among surgical patients, prolong hospitalization by 7-10 days, and have an estimated annual incremental cost of $1 billion. The mortality rate associated with SSI is 3%, with about three quarters of deaths being attributable directly to the infection. Prevention is possible for the most part, and concerted effort has been made to limit these infections, arguably to little effect. Review of pertinent English-language literature. Numerous risk factors for SSI and tactics for prevention have been described, but efforts to bundle these tactics into an effective, comprehensive prevention program have been disappointing. Numerous studies now demonstrate that the Surgical Care Improvement Program (SCIP), which focused on process improvement rather than outcomes, has been ineffective despite governmental support, financial penalties for non-compliance, and consequent widespread implementation. Required reporting has increased awareness of the problem of SSI, but just as the complexity of SSI risk, pathogenesis, and preventions reflects the complexity of the disease, many other factors must be taken into account, including the skill and knowledge of the surgical team and promulgation of a culture of quality and safety in surgical patient care.

  11. Post-traumatic course complicated by cutaneous infection with Absidia corymbifera.

    PubMed

    Seguin, P; Musellec, H; Le Gall, F; Chevrier, S; Le Bouquin, V; Malledant, Y

    1999-10-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare but serious infection in trauma patients. Reported here is the case of a young patient with cutaneous mucormycosis due to Absidia corymbifera probably caused by a soil-contaminated wound. Despite daily surgical debridement and amphotericin B therapy, cure could be achieved only by amputation of the lower limb.

  12. A Mouse Model of Post-Arthroplasty Staphylococcus aureus Joint Infection to Evaluate In Vivo the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Implant Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Bernthal, Nicholas M.; Stavrakis, Alexandra I.; Billi, Fabrizio; Cho, John S.; Kremen, Thomas J.; Simon, Scott I.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Finerman, Gerald A.; Lieberman, Jay R.; Adams, John S.; Miller, Lloyd S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Post-arthroplasty infections represent a devastating complication of total joint replacement surgery, resulting in multiple reoperations, prolonged antibiotic use, extended disability and worse clinical outcomes. As the number of arthroplasties in the U.S. will exceed 3.8 million surgeries per year by 2030, the number of post-arthroplasty infections is projected to increase to over 266,000 infections annually. The treatment of these infections will exhaust healthcare resources and dramatically increase medical costs. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate novel preventative therapeutic strategies against post-arthroplasty infections, a mouse model was developed in which a bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus strain was inoculated into a knee joint containing an orthopaedic implant and advanced in vivo imaging was used to measure the bacterial burden in real-time. Mice inoculated with 5×103 and 5×104 CFUs developed increased bacterial counts with marked swelling of the affected leg, consistent with an acute joint infection. In contrast, mice inoculated with 5×102 CFUs developed a low-grade infection, resembling a more chronic infection. Ex vivo bacterial counts highly correlated with in vivo bioluminescence signals and EGFP-neutrophil fluorescence of LysEGFP mice was used to measure the infection-induced inflammation. Furthermore, biofilm formation on the implants was visualized at 7 and 14 postoperative days by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). Using this model, a minocycline/rifampin-impregnated bioresorbable polymer implant coating was effective in reducing the infection, decreasing inflammation and preventing biofilm formation. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, this mouse model may represent an alternative pre-clinical screening tool to evaluate novel in vivo therapeutic strategies before studies in larger animals and in human subjects. Furthermore, the antibiotic-polymer implant coating evaluated in this study was

  13. Post-transfusional human retrovirus infection in 41 Italian beta-thalassemic patients.

    PubMed

    Aglianò, A M; Vania, A; Gandini, O; Gradilone, A; Napolitano, M; Albonici, L; Falconieri, P; Digilio, G; Manzari, V; Frati, L

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that HTLV-I is present in Italy both in endemic form in Southern Apulia and in epidemic form among the population of intravenous drug addicts. In the present paper we intend to evaluate the risk for transfusional HTLV-I transmission in our country, as well as the already known risk for HIV1. A population of 41 polytransfused Italian beta-thalassemic patients was examined by serological methods and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for human retrovirus infection. Genomic DNA from PBMCs was analyzed by PCR with primer pairs specific for the HTLV-I gag, pol and env regions, and the HTLV-II env region. Two patients were found to be weakly seroreactive to p19 and p24 HTLV-I/HTLV-II proteins by Western blot. The analysis of genomic DNA from PBMCs by PCR revealed sequence homology to HTLV-I only in these two patients. On the contrary, PCR with primer pairs specific for HTLV-II showed no beta-thalassemic patient was infected by this retrovirus. Surprisingly, Western blot analysis for detecting anti-HIV1 antibodies in these polytransfused subjects showed a seropositivity in two patients (not the same found to be infected with HTLV-I) in spite of a screening for HIV1 antibodies in the blood bank. These findings suggest that in Italy polytransfused people should still be considered at risk for HIV1 as well as HTLV-I infection, even if the incidence cannot be evaluated from such a small sample. The authors stress the importance of a through medical history of potential blood donors to eliminate possibly infected subjects.

  14. Severe malaria - a case of fatal Plasmodium knowlesi infection with post-mortem findings: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zoonotic malaria caused by Plasmodium knowlesi is an important, but newly recognized, human pathogen. For the first time, post-mortem findings from a fatal case of knowlesi malaria are reported here. Case presentation A formerly healthy 40 year-old male became symptomatic 10 days after spending time in the jungle of North Borneo. Four days later, he presented to hospital in a state of collapse and died within two hours. He was hyponatraemic and had elevated blood urea, potassium, lactate dehydrogenase and amino transferase values; he was also thrombocytopenic and eosinophilic. Dengue haemorrhagic shock was suspected and a post-mortem examination performed. Investigations for dengue virus were negative. Blood for malaria parasites indicated hyperparasitaemia and single species P. knowlesi infection was confirmed by nested-PCR. Macroscopic pathology of the brain and endocardium showed multiple petechial haemorrhages, the liver and spleen were enlarged and lungs had features consistent with ARDS. Microscopic pathology showed sequestration of pigmented parasitized red blood cells in the vessels of the cerebrum, cerebellum, heart and kidney without evidence of chronic inflammatory reaction in the brain or any other organ examined. Brain sections were negative for intracellular adhesion molecule-1. The spleen and liver had abundant pigment containing macrophages and parasitized red blood cells. The kidney had evidence of acute tubular necrosis and endothelial cells in heart sections were prominent. Conclusions The overall picture in this case was one of systemic malaria infection that fit the WHO classification for severe malaria. Post-mortem findings in this case were unexpectedly similar to those that define fatal falciparum malaria, including cerebral pathology. There were important differences including the absence of coma despite petechial haemorrhages and parasite sequestration in the brain. These results suggest that further study of knowlesi malaria

  15. Pre-operative and early post-operative factors associated with surgical site infection after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Muñoz, Jose Luis; Calero, Alicia; Diez, María; Zubiaga, Lorea; Calpena, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Surgical procedures on obese patients are expected to have a high incidence of surgical site infection (SSI). The identification of pre-operative or early post-operative risk factors for SSI may help the surgeon to identify subjects in risk and adequately optimize their status. We conducted a study of the association of comorbidities and pre- and post-operative analytical variables with SSI following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of morbid obesity. We performed a prospective study of all morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure between 2007 and 2011. An association of clinical and analytical variables with SSI was investigated. The study included 40 patients with a mean pre-operative body mass index (BMI) of 51.2±7.9 kg/m(2). Surgical site infections appeared in three patients (7.5%), of whom two had an intra-abdominal abscess located in the left hypochondrium and the third had a superficial incisional SSI. Pre-operatively, a BMI >45 kg/m(2) (OR 8.7; p=0.008), restrictive disorders identified by pulmonary function tests (OR 10.0; p=0.012), a serum total protein concentration <5.3 g/dL (OR 13; p=0.003), a plasma cortisol >30 mcg/dL (OR 13.0; p=0.003), and a mean corpuscular volume (MCV) <82 fL (OR 1.6; p=0.04) were associated with post-operative SSI. Post-operatively, a serum glucose >128 mg/dL (OR 4.7; p=0.012) and hemoglobin <11g/dL (OR 7.5; p=0.002) were associated with SSI. The study supports the role of restrictive lung disorders and the values specified above for preoperative BMI, serum total protein and cortisol concentrations, and MCV, and of post-operative anemia and hyperglycemia as risk factors for SSI. In these situations, the surgeon must be aware of and seek to control these risk factors.

  16. Interest and possibilities of performing post-operative registration of wound infections in Danish orthopaedic departments. A study survey.

    PubMed

    Noer, H H; Jensen, L P; Gottlieb, J; Boel, J; Tørholm, C

    1990-01-01

    Surgical wound infections, like other nosocomial infections, represent a considerable burden on both the individual patient and society. As the direct result of the operation is less than optimal, and there is a considerable economic wastage. A questionnaire survey including all 69 surgical departments in Denmark was implemented. The present study indicates interest in continuous post-operative infection surveillance in 81% of the 52 answering Danish surgical departments, where orthopaedic surgery is carried out. Only about the half of the wards had financial possibilities to buy computer hardware and software for continuous registration. In Denmark only between one third and one half of the wards had prior experience with registration systems. None of the wards used the same system, and in a very few cases the registration was continuous, definitions were different and the amount of data registered varied considerably. The survey indicates the importance of establishment of uniform registration criteria and the Danish chief surgeons will accept criteria defined by a working group within the Danish Orthopedic Society. An expanded registration system developed by this working party was preferred over a 'simple' minimum data base system. Most departments wanted local registration only, and doctors and secretaries in unison should perform the daily registration.

  17. Antibody-dependent-cellular-cytotoxicity-inducing antibodies significantly affect the post-exposure treatment of Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Li, Qianqian; Zhou, Shuya; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Lan; Sun, Chunyun; Wang, Meng; Wu, Xi; Ma, Jian; Li, Baowen; Xie, Liangzhi; Wang, Youchun

    2017-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is an efficacious treatment for Ebola virus (EBOV) infections in animal models and humans. Understanding what constitutes a protective response is critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. We generated an EBOV-glycoprotein-pseudotyped Human immunodeficiency virus to develop sensitive neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays as well as a bioluminescent-imaging-based mouse infection model that does not require biosafety level 4 containment. The in vivo treatment efficiencies of three novel anti-EBOV mAbs at 12 h post-infection correlated with their in vitro anti-EBOV ADCC activities, without neutralizing activity. When they were treated with these mAbs, natural killer cell (NK)-deficient mice had lower viral clearance than WT mice, indicating that the anti-EBOV mechanism of the ADCC activity of these mAbs is predominantly mediated by NK cells. One potent anti-EBOV mAb (M318) displayed unprecedented neutralizing and ADCC activities (neutralization IC50, 0.018 μg/ml; ADCC EC50, 0.095 μg/ml). These results have important implications for the efficacy of antiviral drugs and vaccines as well as for pathogenicity studies of EBOV. PMID:28358050

  18. Small Bowel Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the small bowel, known as the jejunum. X-ray studies X-ray studies are sometimes used in people with bleeding ... that can be seen by standard or specialized x-ray studies, such as tumors. There are three x- ...

  19. [Irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kocián, J

    1994-04-01

    Irritable bowel is a functional gastrointestinal disorder with chronic or relapsing symptoms of abdominal pain and impaired frequency and consistency of the faeces caused by obscure structural or biochemical deviations. The frequency of the condition in civilized countries is estimated to amount to 15-20% of the population and it accounts for 25-50% of all patients in gastroenterological ambulatory departments. From the clinical aspect the type with dominant diarrhoea, typically in the morning and very compelling, and the type with pain and constipation are known but even combinations of the two types are encountered. A psychosomatic disorder of the motility of the large bowel and its tonus is involved associated with enhanced pain perception. Despite great efforts to find aetiopathogenetic factors, knowledge still is at the level of obscure theories. The diagnosis is still established per exclusion after all organic causes are ruled out, i.e. we always have to differentiate between an irritable bowel from an irritated one. In therapy the patient's confidence in his doctor is most important and it is essential to gain the patient's active cooperation. In case of diarrhoea a low-residue diet is used, calcium carbonate, codeine, loperamide, conversely in constipation adequate dietary fibre, intake metoclopramide or cisapride. Pain is relieved by spasmolytics or Ca channel blockers in the smooth musculature of the large bowel. The associated dysbiosis is transformed into eubiosis by Lactobacillus or other bacterial products.

  20. Frequent Bowel Movements

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sanjoaquin MA, et al. Nutrition and lifestyle in relation to bowel movement frequency: A cross-sectional study of 20,630 men and women in EPIC-Oxford. Public Health Nutrition. 2004;7:77. Evaluation of the GI patient. The Merck Manual Professional ...

  1. Mammalian MicroRNAs: Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation in RNA Virus Infection and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    RNA silencing mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) is a recently discovered gene regulatory mechanism involved in various aspects of biology, such as development, cell differentiation and proliferation, and innate immunity against viral infections. miRNAs, which are a class of small (21–25 nucleotides) RNAs, target messenger RNA (mRNA) through incomplete base-pairing with their target sequences resulting in mRNA degradation or translational repression. Although studies of miRNAs have led to numerous sensational discoveries in biology, many fundamental questions about their expression and function still remain. In this review, we discuss the dynamics of the mammalian miRNA machinery and the biological function of miRNAs, focusing on RNA viruses and the various therapeutic applications of miRNAs against viral infections. PMID:21607080

  2. EARLY DIAGNOSIS IN POST RENAL TRANSPLANT OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS: A FRESH LOOK.

    PubMed

    Chopra, G S; Narula, A S; Reddy, P S; Bhardwaj, J R

    1999-04-01

    A total of 86 renal transplant patients who were transplanted with live related donor (LRD) and live unrelated donor (LURD) kidneys were studied for opportunistic infections. Immune diagnosis of Toxoplasma, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Herpes-simplex virus type II (HSV-2), Aspergillosis and Tuberculosis was carried out in these patients along with sputum examination, CSF studies and biopsy of lymphnode and other tissues in few cases. A high degree of Toxoplasma, CMV & HSV-2 positivity was seen in transplanted patients. However sensitivity of serological diagnosis of tuberculos was found to be low with standard criteria, which increased significantly when modified criteria were used. It is concluded that regular immunological monitoring should be carried out in transplanted patients so as to reach an early diagnosis and management of opportunistic infections.

  3. Small bowel obstruction- a surprise.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jeffrey Daniel; Cp, Ganesh Babu; M, Balachandar; M, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Trans - omental hernia is very rare, accounting to 1-4% of all internal hernias which is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. Here we present a case report of a small bowel obstruction in a female due to trans - omental hernia presenting with central abdominal pain, distension and bilious vomiting. She had no previous history of trauma, surgery. Plain X-ray abdomen erect showed multiple air fluid levels with dilated small bowel loops. Emergency laparotomy revealed a segment of congested small bowel loop (ileum) through a defect in greater omentum. On table the herniated bowel loop was reduced and the defect in greater omentum was closed primarily. There was no necessity for bowel resection as it regained normal colour after reduction. Postoperative period was uneventful with complete resolution of symptoms. This case is presented for its rarity and its importance in clinical differential diagnosis of acute abdomen due to small bowel obstruction.

  4. Treatment of Early Post-Op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    having difficulty maintaining equipoise when prescribing antibiotics . Informational slides have been developed for the sites to use to present the study...to their Infectious Disease teams to assist with this problem. 15. SUBJECT TERMS PO, IV, Antibiotics , plate, fixation, infection 16. SECURITY...and either: (Group 1) operative debridement and PO antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks; or (Group 2) operative debridement and IV antibiotics for 6

  5. Acute post-infection glomerulonephritis caused by new 'thongs'. A case report.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, D; Markowitz, S

    1986-04-26

    Acute glomerulonephritis complicated secondary infection in a patient suffering from traumatic blisters caused by new footwear. This unlikely setting for acute glomerulonephritis was made more interesting by its occurrence in an adult in contrast with its more frequent recognition in a child. The age of the patient and the severity of the local symptoms masked the significance of the initial finding of haematuria until deteriorating renal function indicated the diagnosis of concomitant glomerular disease.

  6. Post-licensing safety of fosamprenavir in HIV-infected children in Europe†

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Ali; Duong, Trinh; Galli, Luisa; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Ene, Luminita; Julian, Antoni Noguera; Amador, Jose Tomas Ramos; Pimenta, Jeanne Marie; Thorne, Claire; Giaquinto, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Fosamprenavir, combined with low-dose ritonavir (FPV/r), is indicated for treatment of HIV-infected children aged ≥6 years in Europe. Our purpose was to assess the safety of licensed use of FPV/r in HIV-infected children reported to six cohorts in the European Pregnancy and Paediatric HIV Cohort Collaboration. Methods Retrospective analysis of individual patient data for all children aged 6–18 years taking the licensed dose of FPV up to 31/12/10. Adverse events (clinical events and absolute neutrophil counts, total cholesterol and triglycerides, and alanine transaminase) were summarised and DAIDS gradings characterised severity. Results Ninety-two HIV-infected children aged 6–18 years took the licensed dose, comprising 3% of the total number of children in follow-up in participating cohorts. Median age at antiretroviral therapy initiation was 6 years (interquartile range 1–11 years), and median age at start of FPV/r was 15 years (12–17 years). Estimated median time on an FPV-containing regimen was 52 months, with a total of 266.9 patient years of exposure overall. Half (54%) were on an FPV-containing regimen at last follow-up. Rates of grade 3/4 events were generally low for all biochemical toxicity markers, and no serious adverse events considered to be causally related to FPV/r were reported. Conclusions Results suggest that long-term licensed dose FPV-containing regimens appear to be generally well tolerated with few reported toxicities in HIV-infected children in Europe, although relatively infrequently prescribed. No serious events were reported. PMID:24741696

  7. Post-licensing safety of fosamprenavir in HIV-infected children in Europe.

    PubMed

    Judd, Ali; Duong, Trinh; Galli, Luisa; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Ene, Luminita; Noguera Julian, Antoni; Ramos Amador, Jose Tomas; Pimenta, Jeanne Marie; Thorne, Claire; Giaquinto, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Fosamprenavir, combined with low-dose ritonavir (FPV/r), is indicated for treatment of HIV-infected children aged ≥ 6 years in Europe. Our purpose was to assess the safety of licensed use of FPV/r in HIV-infected children reported to six cohorts in the European Pregnancy and Paediatric HIV Cohort Collaboration. Retrospective analysis of individual patient data for all children aged 6-18 years taking the licensed dose of FPV up to 31/12/10. Adverse events (clinical events and absolute neutrophil counts, total cholesterol and triglycerides, and alanine transaminase) were summarised and DAIDS gradings characterised severity. Ninety-two HIV-infected children aged 6-18 years took the licensed dose, comprising 3% of the total number of children in follow-up in participating cohorts. Median age at antiretroviral therapy initiation was 6 years (interquartile range 1-11 years), and median age at start of FPV/r was 15 years (12-17 years). Estimated median time on an FPV-containing regimen was 52 months, with a total of 266.9 patient years of exposure overall. Half (54%) were on an FPV-containing regimen at last follow-up. Rates of grade 3/4 events were generally low for all biochemical toxicity markers, and no serious adverse events considered to be causally related to FPV/r were reported. Results suggest that long-term licensed dose FPV-containing regimens appear to be generally well tolerated with few reported toxicities in HIV-infected children in Europe, although relatively infrequently prescribed. No serious events were reported

  8. Improved Therapeutic Regimens for Treatment of Post-Traumatic Ocular Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    uveitis .12-14 Our preliminary results demonstrate that anti-TNFα blocking, even in the early stages of infection, may not improve the outcome of...B753). 12. Ardoin SP, Kredich D, Rabinovich E, Schanberg LE, Jaffe GJ. Infliximab to treat chronic noninfectious uveitis in children: retrospective...Udaondo P, Bosch-Morell F, Quijada A, Romero FJ, Amselem L. High- dose infliximab prophylaxis in endotoxin-induced uveitis . J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2007

  9. Post-delivery mycobacterium tuberculosis infection misdiagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ting, Li Yu; Shrestha, Bikash; Lu, Yi Lu; Ping, Fu

    2016-12-30

    Tuberculosis is a common infectious mycobacterial disease having a wide range of clinical and serological manifestations that are similar to rheumatic disease. Differential diagnosis is a crucial aspect in any rheumatic disease as many other infectious diseases portray clinical similarities and autoantibody positivity. Our case report illustrates of a young woman just after the delivery of a child presented an unusual case of extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection initially misdiagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

  10. "Spiral intestinal lenghtening and tailoring (SILT)" for a child with severely short bowel.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Daniele; Boroni, Giovanni; Giannotti, Giulia; Parolini, Filippo; Armellini, Andrea; Morabito, Antonino; Bianchi, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    We report a child with post-surgical short bowel state who underwent bowel expansion followed by spiral intestinal lengthening and tailoring (SILT) at 10 months of age. Growth at 1-year follow-up is along the 15-25th centile on 82 % oral calories as normal diet and 18 % as parenteral nutrition, and he is passing 2-3 semisolid motions daily. SILT is a versatile technique for reconstructing dilated bowel towards improved propulsion and absorption, and has a role in the management of the short bowel state.

  11. Metalworking defects in surgery screws as a possible cause of post-surgical infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Mario; Peretti, Leandro E.; Romero, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    In the first phase of this work, surface defects (metalworking) in stainless steel implantable prostheses and their possible relation to infections that can be generated after surgery was studied. In a second phase, the results obtained in the aforementioned stage were applied to knee cruciate ligaments surgery screws, considering the fact that a substantial number of Mucormycetes infections have been reported after arthroscopic surgery in Argentina since the year 2005. Two types of screws, transverse and interference screws, were analyzed. The Allen heads presented defects such as burrs and metalworking bending as a result of the machining process. These defects allow the accumulation of machining oil, which could be contaminated with fungal spores. When this is the case, the gaseous sterilization by ethylene oxide may be jeopardized. Cortical screws were also analyzed and were found to present serious metalworking defects inside their heads. To reduce the risk of infection in surgery, the use of screws with metalworking defects on the outer surface, analyzed with stereomicroscope and considering the inside part of the Allen as an outer surface, should be avoided altogether.

  12. Bacterial infections post-living-donor liver transplantation in Egyptian hepatitis C virus-cirrhotic patients: A single-center study.

    PubMed

    Montasser, Mohamed F; Abdelkader, Nadia A; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Dabbous, Hany; Montasser, Iman F; Massoud, Yasmine M; Abdelmoaty, Waleed; Saleh, Shereen A; Bahaa, Mohamed; Said, Hany; El-Meteini, Mahmoud

    2017-07-18

    To determine risk factors, causative organisms and antimicrobial resistance of bacterial infections following living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in cirrhotic patients. This prospective study included 45 patients with hepatitis C virus-related end-stage liver disease who underwent LDLT at Ain Shams Center for Organ Transplant, Cairo, Egypt from January 2014 to November 2015. Patients were followed-up for the first 3 mo after LDLT for detection of bacterial infections. All patients were examined for the possible risk factors suggestive of acquiring infection pre-, intra- and post-operatively. Positive cultures based on clinical suspicion and patterns of antimicrobial resistance were identified. Thirty-three patients (73.3%) suffered from bacterial infections; 21 of them had a single infection episode, and 12 had repeated infection episodes. Bile was the most common site for both single and repeated episodes of infection (28.6% and 27.8%, respectively). The most common isolated organisms were gram-negative bacteria. Acinetobacter baumannii was the most common organism isolated from both single and repeated infection episodes (19% and 33.3%, respectively), followed by Escherichia coli for repeated infections (11.1%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa for single infections (19%). Levofloxacin showed high sensitivity against repeated infection episodes (P = 0.03). Klebsiella, Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas were multi-drug resistant (MDR). Pre-transplant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and duration of drain insertion (in days) were independent risk factors for the occurrence of repeated infection episodes (P = 0.024). MDR gram-negative bacterial infections are common post-LDLT. Pre-transplant HCC and duration of drain insertion were independent risk factors for the occurrence of repeated infection episodes.

  13. Feline Leukemia Virus Infection Requires a Post-Receptor Binding Envelope-Dependent Cellular Component▿

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R.; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S.

    2011-01-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (101 to 102 CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (104 to 106 CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells. PMID:21917946

  14. Feline leukemia virus infection requires a post-receptor binding envelope-dependent cellular component.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2011-12-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (10(1) to 10(2) CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (10(4) to 10(6) CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells.

  15. Does an Antibiotic-Loaded Hydrogel Coating Reduce Early Post-Surgical Infection After Joint Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Romanò, Carlo Luca; Malizos, Kostantinos; Capuano, Nicola; Mezzoprete, Riccardo; D'Arienzo, Michele; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; Scarponi, Sara; Drago, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infection remains among the main reasons for joint prosthesis failure. Preclinical reports have suggested that antibacterial coatings of implants may prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. This study presents the results of the first clinical trial on an antibiotic-loaded fast-resorbable hydrogel coating (Defensive Antibacterial Coating, DAC®) in patients undergoing hip or knee prosthesis. Methods: In this multicenter, randomized prospective study, a total of 380 patients, scheduled to undergo primary (n=270) or revision (n=110) total hip (N=298) or knee (N=82) joint replacement with a cementless or a hybrid implant, were randomly assigned, in six European orthopedic centers, to receive an implant either with the antibiotic-loaded DAC coating (treatment group) or without coating (control group). Pre- and postoperative assessment of clinical scores, wound healing, laboratory tests, and x-ray exams were performed at fixed time intervals. Results: Overall, 373 patients were available at a mean follow-up of 14.5 ± 5.5 months (range 6 to 24). On average, wound healing, laboratory and radiographic findings showed no significant difference between the two groups. Eleven early surgical site infections were observed in the control group and only one in the treatment group (6% vs. 0.6%; p=0.003). No local or systemic side effects related to the DAC hydrogel coating were observed, and no detectable interference with implant osteointegration was noted. Conclusions: The use of a fast-resorbable, antibiotic-loaded hydrogel implant coating can reduce the rate of early surgical site infections, without any detectable adverse events or side effects after hip or knee joint replacement with a cementless or hybrid implant. PMID:28529851

  16. [Post-appendectomy surgical site infection: overall rate and type according to open/laparoscopic approach].

    PubMed

    Aranda-Narváez, José Manuel; Prieto-Puga Arjona, Tatiana; García-Albiach, Beatriz; Montiel-Casado, María Custodia; González-Sánchez, Antonio Jesús; Sánchez-Pérez, Belinda; Titos-García, Alberto; Santoyo-Santoyo, Julio

    2014-02-01

    To compare the incidence and profile of surgical site infection (SSI) after laparoscopic (LA) or open (OA) appendicectomy. Observational and analytical study was conducted on patients older than 14years-old with suspected acute appendicitis operated on within a 4-year period (2007-2010) at a third level hospital (n=868). They were divided in two groups according to the type of appendicectomy (LA, study group, 135; OA, control group, 733). The primary endpoint was a surgical site infection (SSI), and to determine the overall rate and types (incisional/organ-space). The risk of SSI was stratified by: i)National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) index (low risk: 0E, 0 and 1; high risk: 2 and 3); ii)status on presentation (low risk: normal or phlegmonous; high risk: gangrenous or perforated). The statistical analysis was performed using the software SPSS. The main result and stratified analysis was determined with χ(2), and the risk parameters using OR and Mantel-Haenszel OR with 95%CI, accepting statistical significance with P<.05. Age, gender, ASA index and incidence of advanced cases were similar in both groups. The overall SSI rate was 13.4% (more than a half of them detected during follow-up after discharge). Type of SSI: OA, 13% (superficial 9%, deep 2%, organ-space 2%); AL, 14% (superficial 5%, deep 1%, organ-space 8%) (overall: not significant; distribution: P<.000). Stratified analysis showed that there is an association between incisional SSI/OA and organ-space SSI/LA, and is particularly stronger in those patients with high risk of postoperative SSI (high risk NNIS or gangrenous-perforated presentation). OA and LA are associated with a higher rate of incisional and organ-space SSI respectively. This is particularly evident in patients with high risk of SSI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Important cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Trost, L; McDonnell, J

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has many extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. Anyone presenting with IBD should be examined for cutaneous manifestations. Pyoderma gangrenosum is a severe painful ulcerating disease that requires moist wound management and, in the absence of secondary infection, systemic corticosteroids, cyclosporine, or both. Infliximab may also be used. Erythema nodosum is a common cause of tender red nodules of the shins. Management includes leg elevation, NSAIDs, and potassium iodide. Oral manifestations of IBD include aphthous stomatitis, mucosal nodularity (cobblestoning), and pyostomatitis vegetans. Treatment should be directed both at the cutaneous lesions and at the underlying systemic condition. PMID:16143688

  18. Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Infections Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis) Styes Fungal Infections (Ringworm, Yeast, etc.) Diaper Rash Infections That Pets Carry Oral ... Pneumonia Tinea (Ringworm, Jock Itch, Athlete's Foot) Vaginal Yeast Infections Immunizations Do My Kids Need Vaccines Before ...

  19. Low prevalence of Leishmania infection in post-epidemic areas of Libo Kemkem, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sordo, Luis; Gadisa, Endalamaw; Custodio, Estefanía; Cruz, Israel; Simón, Fernando; Abraham, Zelalem; Moreno, Javier; Aseffa, Abraham; Tsegaye, Hailu; Nieto, Javier; Chicharro, Carmen; Cañavate, Carmen

    2012-06-01

    In Libo Kemkem (a district of Amhara region, Ethiopia), no cases of kala-azar had ever been reported until 2005 when an outbreak occurred. Over one-third of those cases were children under 15 years of age. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Leishmania infection in children aged 4-15 years. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009. Children participating in the survey were selected using a three-stage cluster sampling method. A total of 386 children were included in the study. The overall prevalence of Leishmania infection (direct agglutination test- and/or rK39 immunochromatographic test- and/or leishmanin skin test-positive subjects) in this population was 1.02% (95% confidence interval = 0-4.54), and prevalence was higher in boys and children older than 12 years. Only one case of active disease was encountered. The results suggest that the conditions responsible for the outbreak no longer reign. However, active surveillance remains necessary.

  20. Low Prevalence of Leishmania Infection in Post-Epidemic Areas of Libo Kemkem, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Sordo, Luis; Gadisa, Endalamaw; Custodio, Estefanía; Cruz, Israel; Simón, Fernando; Abraham, Zelalem; Moreno, Javier; Aseffa, Abraham; Tsegaye, Hailu; Nieto, Javier; Chicharro, Carmen; Cañavate, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    In Libo Kemkem (a district of Amhara region, Ethiopia), no cases of kala-azar had ever been reported until 2005 when an outbreak occurred. Over one-third of those cases were children under 15 years of age. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Leishmania infection in children aged 4–15 years. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009. Children participating in the survey were selected using a three-stage cluster sampling method. A total of 386 children were included in the study. The overall prevalence of Leishmania infection (direct agglutination test- and/or rK39 immunochromatographic test- and/or leishmanin skin test-positive subjects) in this population was 1.02% (95% confidence interval = 0–4.54), and prevalence was higher in boys and children older than 12 years. Only one case of active disease was encountered. The results suggest that the conditions responsible for the outbreak no longer reign. However, active surveillance remains necessary. PMID:22665599

  1. Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva with Infective Endocarditis Complicated with Post-Infectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Rare Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Daga, Mradul Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva (RSOV) is a rarely seen disease condition. RSOV can have varied presentations from being asymptomatic with just a cardiac murmur to profound hypotension. There has been simultaneous occurrence of RSOV with Infective Endocarditis (IE) in literature. Glomerulonephritis has also been reported in approximately 20% patients with IE. Large amount of proteinuria or decline in kidney functions is rarely encountered and mostly this finding has been incidental on routine evaluation. The co-existence of all the three conditions in a single patient is rare. This case was diagnosed to have RSOV with IE and was also diagnosed with post-infectious glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy. Patient was advised corrective cardiac surgery, but due to financial constraints, patient could not be operated and he died. Here, we report for the first time an unusual presence of both RSOV and sub-aortic membrane with IE complicated by glomerulonephritis. PMID:27891383

  2. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection.

    PubMed

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Rommelaere, Heidi; Stortelers, Catelijne; Van Gucht, Steven

    2016-08-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days) and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate), when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP.

  3. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Rommelaere, Heidi; Stortelers, Catelijne; Van Gucht, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days) and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate), when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP. PMID:27483431

  4. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Role of Viral Infection, Genetic Lesions and Antigen Stimulation in the Pathogenesis of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Capello, Daniela; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation or, more rarely, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. PTLD generally display involvement of extranodal sites, aggressive histology and aggressive clinical behavior. The molecular pathogenesis of PTLD involves infection by oncogenic viruses, namely EBV, as well as genetic or epigenetic alterations of several cellular genes. At variance with lymphoma arising in immunocompetent hosts, whose genome is relatively stable, a fraction of PTLD are characterized by microsatellite instability as a consequence of defects in the DNA mismatch repair mechanism. Apart from microsatellite instability, molecular alterations of cellular genes recognized in PTLD include alterations of cMYC, BCL6, TP53, DNA hypermethylation, and aberrant somatic hypermutation of protooncogenes. The occurrence of IGV mutations in the overwhelming majority of PTLD documents that malignant transformation targets germinal centre (GC) B-cells and their descendants both in EBV–positive and EBV–negative cases. Analysis of phenotypic markers of B-cell histogenesis, namely BCL6, MUM1 and CD138, allows further distinction of PTLD histogenetic categories. PTLD expressing the BCL6+/MUM1+/-/CD138− profile reflect B-cells actively experiencing the GC reaction, and comprise diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) centroblastic and Burkitt lymphoma. PTLD expressing the BCL6−/MUM1+/CD138− phenotype putatively derive from B-cells that have concluded the GC reaction, and comprise the majority of polymorphic PTLD and a fraction of DLBCL immunoblastic. A third group of PTLD is reminiscent of post-GC and preterminally differentiated B-cells that show the BCL6−/MUM1+/CD138+ phenotype, and are morphologically represented by either polymorphic PTLD or DLBCL immunoblastic. PMID:21416004

  5. Post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection after sexual assault: when is it indicated?

    PubMed

    Fong, C

    2001-07-01

    To date there are no published studies on the effectiveness of HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) after sexual exposure. However, as emergency physicians we are faced with the dilemma of assessing the risk of HIV transmission and providing appropriate care for patients who present to us after sexual assault. Current practice in UK emergency departments and genitourinary clinics varies from trust to trust. There is no direct evidence that HIV PEP after rape prevents transmission or is cost effective. However, there may be certain rape cases where HIV PEP should be prescribed or at least considered. While we wait for more definitive clinical studies, HIV PEP after rape should be considered on a case to case basis. This article aims to provide emergency physicians with current scientific evidence on HIV PEP enabling them to make an informed decision on when HIV PEP is indicated after rape.

  6. Post-neurosurgical meningitis: Management of cerebrospinal fluid drainage catheters influences the evolution of infection

    PubMed Central

    Soavi, Laura; Rosina, Manuela; Stefini, Roberto; Fratianni, Alessia; Cadeo, Barbara; Magri, Silvia; Latronico, Nicola; Fontanella, Marco; Signorini, Liana

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to better define the pathogenic role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage catheters in postoperative patients, we comparatively analyze the clinical course of device and non-device-related meningitis. Methods: This is an observational, partially prospective, study on consecutive adult patients who developed meningitis after undergoing neurosurgical procedures at the Neurosurgery and Neurointensive care Departments, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy, between January 1999 and August 2007. Results: All 77 consecutive post-neurosurgical meningitis events in 65 patients were included in the analysis. Most were classified as external ventricular drainage (EVD)-related meningitis (23 cases, group A), external spinal drainage (ESD)-related meningitis (12 cases, group B), and non-device-related post-neurosurgical meningitis (30 cases, group C). Proven meningitis was identified in 78.3%, 91.7% and 56.7% of the events, respectively. ESD-related meningitis had a shorter onset time vs EVD and non-device-associated meningitis (3 days versus 6 and 7 days, respectively). Median antibiotic treatment duration was 20, 17, and 22.5 days in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Overall, 8 patients (34.8%) in group A, 3 (25.0%) in group B, and 3 (10.0%) in group C died. Median time to become afebrile was shorter in group C than in group A (10 days versus 12 days, P = 0.04). Removal of the device later than 48 hours after meningitis onset, as well as implantation of a second device were associated with a slower time of meningitis resolution. Conclusions: Early device removal and avoiding implantation of a second device were associated with short illness duration. Larger studies are warranted to confirm the conclusions of this study. PMID:28031985

  7. Small Bowel Hamartoma: A Huge Diverticulum of Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Eltweri, Amar M.; Salama, Yahya; Gorgees, Neshtman; Naidu, Leena; Bowrey, David J.

    2013-01-01

    A-20-year old male, with no significant medical history, presented with clinical features mimicking a perforated acute appendicitis. Because of features of peritonitis, a laparotomy was performed which showed a segment of small bowel with multiple large diverticula and mesenteric cysts. A segmental small bowel resection was performed. The patient made an uneventful recovery from surgery. Histology revealed features of a small bowel hamartoma. PMID:24454405

  8. Occupational risk of HIV infection among western health care professionals posted in AIDS endemic areas.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, R; Houweling, H; van Zessen, G

    1998-08-01

    In this study on occupational risks of HIV infection among 99 Dutch medics working in AIDS endemic areas, 61% reported percutaneous exposures during an average stay of 21 months. The mean number of injuries was lower among physicians (2.0 versus 3.9 per year) and higher among nurses (1.9 versus 1.2) than in previous research conducted in 1987-1990 among Dutch medics returning from Africa. But the reduction of exposures among physicians might be explained by the fact that the number of procedures they carried out was less in the later study. Also among nurses a shift of tasks was seen. On the basis of an estimated HIV prevalence in the patient population of 19%, a chance of transmission per accident of 0.3%, and 1.9 percutaneous exposures per year, the mean occupational risk of HIV infection per year can be estimated at 0.11% per person. Besides length of stay and number of activities, characteristics of the work setting were associated with the frequency of different kinds of injuries. From the analysis of 109 extensive descriptions of recent accidents, it appeared that the majority of the injuries occurred during routine activities and were self-inflicted. Injuries with hollow needles usually occurred after the actual medical act (e.g. during recapping). Carelessness (e.g. due to fatigue) or being in a hurry (e.g. because of an emergency) were also often the cause of percutaneous injuries, as were the poor quality of the equipment, lack of professional skills, or a combination of these factors. Prevention activities are still important to reduce the frequency of occupational exposures. But they will not eliminate them totally; from the descriptions of recent exposures it was clear that some of the injuries occurred in spite of precautions.

  9. Helminth co-infection in Helicobacter pylori infected INS-GAS mice attenuates gastric premalignant lesions of epithelial dysplasia and glandular atrophy and preserves colonization resistance of the stomach to lower bowel microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Whary, Mark T.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Lofgren, Jennifer; Shi, Hai Ning; Taylor, Nancy S.; Correa, Pelayo; Versalovic, James; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Higher prevalence of helminth infections in H. pylori infected children was suggested to potentially lower the life-time risk for gastric adenocarcinoma. In rodent models, helminth co-infection does not reduce Helicobacter-induced inflammation but delays progression of pre-malignant gastric lesions. Because gastric cancer in INS-GAS mice is promoted by intestinal microflora, the impact of Heligmosomoides polygyrus co-infection on H. pylori-associated gastric lesions and microflora were evaluated. Male INS-GAS mice co-infected with H. pylori and H. polygyrus for 5 months were assessed for gastrointestinal lesions, inflammation-related mRNA expression, FoxP3+ cells, epithelial proliferation, and gastric colonization with H. pylori and Altered Schaedler Flora. Despite similar gastric inflammation and high levels of proinflammatory mRNA, helminth co-infection increased FoxP3+ cells in the corpus and reduced H. pylori-associated gastric atrophy (p<0.04), dysplasia (p<0.02) and prevented H. pylori-induced changes in the gastric flora (p<0.05). This is the first evidence of helminth infection reducing H. pylori-induced gastric lesions while inhibiting changes in gastric flora, consistent with prior observations that gastric colonization with enteric microbiota accelerated gastric lesions in INS-GAS mice. Identifying how helminths reduce gastric premalignant lesions and impact bacterial colonization of the H. pylori infected stomach could lead to new treatment strategies to inhibit progression from chronic gastritis to cancer in humans. PMID:24513446

  10. [Irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Truninger, K

    2007-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequent functional gastrointestinal disorders. The main symptoms are abdominal pain associated with a change in bowel habit. Headache and psychiatric disorders such as mood or anxiety disorders are often associated with IBS. Genetic predisposition, sensomotoric dysfunction, altered enteric inflammation and immune activation and disturbance of the brain-gut interaction are the most important pathogenetic factors. The diagnosis requires the new symptom-based Rome-III-criteria. Diagnostic testing primarily depends on the patients complaints, clinical and laboratory features and is then guided by the patient's age, symptom's severity and duration, alarm symptoms, psychosocial factors, and the family history for tumors. Treatment of IBS is based on an individualized evaluation and depends on disease severity, predominant symptoms and associated disorders. Treatment options include lifestyle modifications, drug therapy aimed at predominant symptoms and various forms of psychological treatments.

  11. Intussusception as a Cause of Bowel Obstruction in Adults from a Resource Limited Area, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Aminde, L N; Bonko, N M; Takah, N F; Awungafac, G; Teno, D

    2015-04-01

    Intussusception refers to the telescoping of a proximal segment of bowel into a distal segment. It is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adulthood. We report two cases of adult intussusception in a post-operative period following Caesarean Section (with no lead point) and Appendicectomy (due to colonic adenocarcinoma) respectively. Though rare in adulthood, intussusception should be considered as a differential diagnosis to bowel obstruction in adults even in the post-operative period.

  12. Short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Claire L; Reynolds, John V

    2010-10-01

    The short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a state of malabsorption following intestinal resection where there is less than 200 cm of intestinal length. The management of short bowel syndrome can be challenging and is best managed by a specialised multidisciplinary team. A good understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of resection of different portions of the small intestine is necessary to anticipate and prevent, where possible, consequences of SBS. Nutrient absorption and fluid and electrolyte management in the initial stages are critical to stabilisation of the patient and to facilitate the process of adaptation. Pharmacological adjuncts to promote adaptation are in the early stages of development. Primary restoration of bowel continuity, if possible, is the principle mode of surgical treatment. Surgical procedures to increase the surface area of the small intestine or improve its function may be of benefit in experienced hands, particularly in the paediatric population. Intestinal transplant is indicated at present for patients who have failed to tolerate long-term parenteral nutrition but with increasing experience, there may be a potentially expanded role for its use in the future.

  13. Biobased silver nanocolloid coating on silk fibers for prevention of post-surgical wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dhas, Sindhu Priya; Anbarasan, Suruthi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibers are an important biomaterial and are used in surgical sutures due to their remarkable biocompatibility. The major drawback to the application of biomaterials is the risk of bacterial invasion, leading to clinical complications. We have developed an easy and cost-effective method for fabrication of antibacterial silk fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by an in situ and ex situ process using an aqueous extract of Rhizophora apiculata leaf. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that well dispersed nanoparticles impregnated the silk fibers both in situ and ex situ. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs in the silk fibers was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. The thermal and mechanical properties of the silk fibers were enhanced after they were impregnated with AgNPs. The silver-coated silk fibers fabricated by the in situ and ex situ method exhibited more than 90% inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Silk fibers doped with AgNPs were found to be biocompatible with 3T3 fibroblasts. The results obtained represent an important advance towards the clinical application of biocompatible AgNP-loaded silk fibers for prevention of surgical wound infections. PMID:26491317

  14. Osteoporosis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tauseef; Lam, David; Bronze, Michael S.; Humphrey, Mary Beth

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis commonly afflicts patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and many factors link the 2 states together. A literature review was conducted about the pathophysiology of osteoporosis in relation to inflammatory bowel disease. Screening guidelines for osteoporosis in general as well as those directed at patients with inflammatory bowel disease are reviewed, as are currently available treatment options. The purpose of this article is to increase physician awareness about osteopenia and osteoporosis occurring in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and to provide basic, clinically relevant information about the pathophysiology and guidelines to help them treat these patients in a cost-effective manner. PMID:19559158

  15. [Irritable bowel syndrome: a functional disorder?].

    PubMed

    Man, Fernando; Bustos Fernández, Luis María

    2013-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a highly prevalent condition responsible for almost one third of visits to the gastroenterologist and huge expenses for diagnosis, treatment and loss of working days. A unique pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated yet and several possibilities have been proposed such as senso-perception and motor disturbances, the effect of stress and anxiety, serotonin receptor failures, activation of abnormal brain areas and pain modulation differences, among others. The absence of a biological marker has led the investigators to consider this syndrome as an exclusion diagnostic condition, once the organic diseases have been discarded The changes in gut microbiota have recently raised great interest among gastroenterologists. The study of the small intestinal bowel overgrowth syndrome, the effect of antibiotics upon the flora, the recognition of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome and the action of probiotics, together with the effect of malabsortion of diet carbohydrates have brought some new light in our knowledge. The present update will focus on the published evidence about the subject, bearing in mind that the mechanisms elicited here are only suitable for a subgroup of patients.

  16. [Post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders: from the acute episode to chronicity].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Balboa, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) form a major part of gastroenterology practice. Several studies have reported the development of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) after acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Non-gastrointestinal (GI) infections may increase the risk of developing IBS. There are also data showing that a GI infection may trigger functional dyspepsia (PI-FD). The possible development of PI-IBS or PI-FD depends on factors related to both the infection and the host. Microinflammation has been found in patients with post-infectious FGID. Studies performed in animal models show that infection and acute inflammation permanently change gastrointestinal motility and sensitivity. The role of AGE in the development of FGID is important not only because this entity provides an excellent natural model for pathogenic study but also because it provides an opportunity for preventive action.

  17. Dynamic optimization of host defense, immune memory, and post-infection pathogen levels in mammals.

    PubMed

    Shudo, Emi; Iwasa, Yoh

    2004-05-07

    When attacked by pathogens, higher vertebrates produce specific immune cells that fight against them. We here studied the host's optimal schedule of specific immune cell production. The damage caused by the pathogen increases with the pathogen amount in the host integrated over time. On the other hand, there is also a cost incurred by the production of specific immune cells, not only in terms of the energy needed to produce and maintain the cells, but also with respect to damages sustained by the host's body as a result of immune activity. The optimal strategy of the host is the one that minimizes the total cost, defined as a weighted sum of the damage caused by pathogens and the costs caused by the specific immune cells. The problem is solved by using Pontryagin's maximum principle and dynamic programming. The optimal defense schedule is typically as follows: In the initial phase after infection, immune cells are produced at the fastest possible rate. The amount of pathogen increases temporarily but is eventually suppressed. When the pathogen amount is suppressed to a sufficiently low level, the immune cell number decreases and converges to a low steady level, which is maintained by alternately switching between fastest production and no production. We examine the effect of time delay required to have fully active immune cells by comparing cases with different number of rate limiting steps before producing immune cells. We examine the effect of the duration of time (time delay) required before full-scale production of active immune cells by comparing cases with different numbers of rate-limiting steps before immune-cell production. We also discuss the role of immune memory based on the results of the optimal immune reaction.

  18. Helminth co-infection in Helicobacter pylori infected INS-GAS mice attenuates gastric premalignant lesions of epithelial dysplasia and glandular atrophy and preserves colonization resistance of the stomach to lower bowel microbiota.

    PubMed

    Whary, Mark T; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Lofgren, Jennifer; Shi, Hai Ning; Taylor, Nancy S; Correa, Pelayo; Versalovic, James; Wang, Timothy C; Fox, James G

    2014-04-01

    Higher prevalence of helminth infections in Helicobacter pylori infected children was suggested to potentially lower the life-time risk for gastric adenocarcinoma. In rodent models, helminth co-infection does not reduce Helicobacter-induced inflammation but delays progression of pre-malignant gastric lesions. Because gastric cancer in INS-GAS mice is promoted by intestinal microflora, the impact of Heligmosomoides polygyrus co-infection on H. pylori-associated gastric lesions and microflora were evaluated. Male INS-GAS mice co-infected with H. pylori and H. polygyrus for 5 months were assessed for gastrointestinal lesions, inflammation-related mRNA expression, FoxP3(+) cells, epithelial proliferation, and gastric colonization with H. pylori and Altered Schaedler Flora. Despite similar gastric inflammation and high levels of proinflammatory mRNA, helminth co-infection increased FoxP3(+) cells in the corpus and reduced H. pylori-associated gastric atrophy (p < 0.04), dysplasia (p < 0.02) and prevented H. pylori-induced changes in the gastric flora (p < 0.05). This is the first evidence of helminth infection reducing H. pylori-induced gastric lesions while inhibiting changes in gastric flora, consistent with prior observations that gastric colonization with enteric microbiota accelerated gastric lesions in INS-GAS mice. Identifying how helminths reduce gastric premalignant lesions and impact bacterial colonization of the H. pylori infected stomach could lead to new treatment strategies to inhibit progression from chronic gastritis to cancer in humans. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Short Bowel Syndrome in the Nicu

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sachin C.; Pappas, Cleo; Iyengar, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is the most common cause of intestinal failure in infants. In neonates and young infants, necrotizing enterocolitis, gastroschisis, intestinal atresia and intestinal malrotation/volvulus are the leading causes of SBS. Following an acute post-surgical phase, the residual gastrointestinal tract adapts with reorganization of the crypt-villus histoarchitecture and functional changes in nutrient absorption and motility. A cohesive, multidisciplinary approach can allow most neonates with SBS to transition to full enteral feeds and achieve normal growth and development. In this article, we review the clinical features, management, complications, and prognostic factors in SBS. PMID:23415263

  20. Definition and Facts for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Reporters Calendar of Events Follow Us Home Health Information Digestive Diseases Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Definition & Facts Related Topics Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Definition & ...

  1. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn’s disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn’s disease. For those patients with Crohn’s disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn’s disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn’s disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn’s disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  2. [Transient stopping immunosuppressive agents during the post-transplant pulmonary infection does not affect the long-term outcome of renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Ding, Xiang; Xie, Jinliang; Zhou, Cheng; Zhu, Xiangrong

    2015-04-01

    To determine the effect of transient withdrawal of immunosuppressive agents during the treatment of pulmonary infection on long-term survival of patients and graft s. A total of 104 patients with post-transplant pulmonary infection were enrolled in this study. These patients received renal transplantation in Center for Organ Transplantation, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, during December 2005 and August 2014. Among them, 50 patients stopped immunosuppressive agents during the treatment of infection. These patients served as stopping drug (SD) group, whereas the remaining patients who served as a control group did not stop immunosuppressive drugs. The five-year cumulative patient survival, graft survival, and laboratory results were compared between the 2 groups. The five-year cumulative patient survival rates in the SD group were significantly lower than those in the control group [(69.8 ± 7.0)% vs (94.2 ± 3.2)%, P=0.001]. There was no significant difference in the allograft survival rates between the 2 groups [(81.7 ± 6.6)% vs (90.9 ± 4.3)%, P=0.113]. In patients who survived from pulmonary infection, there was no significant difference in long-term survival rates between the 2 groups (P=0.979). Pulmonary infection impacts allograft survival after patients underwent renal transplantation. Transient stopping immunosuppressive agents during the treatment of infection is a safe and necessary treatment strategy for patients with serious post-transplant pulmonary infection.

  3. Cutaneous varicella zoster virus infection following zoster vaccination: report of post-vaccination herpes zoster skin infection and literature review of zoster vaccination efficacy and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Stiff, Katherine M; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-06-15

    BackgroundHerpes zoster vaccine is currently recommended in the United States for immune competent individuals ≥60 years. The efficacy of the herpes zoster vaccine decreases with age and with time following vaccination.PurposeAn elderly man with herpes zoster following vaccination is described. The guidelines for vaccination and issues regarding re-vaccination are reviewed. PubMed was used to search the following terms: efficacy, elderly, herpes zoster, herpes zoster incidence, herpes zoster recurrence, and vaccination. The papers and relevant citations were reviewed. The clinical features of a patient with post-vaccination herpes zoster skin infection are presented; in addition, vaccine efficacy and guidelines are reviewed.ResultsA 91-year-old man, vaccinated for herpes zoster 10 years earlier, presented with crusted erosions on his face corresponding to the area innervated by the ophthalmic division of the left trigeminal nerve. Evaluation using polymerase chain reaction confirmed the diagnosis of herpes zoster.ConclusionsHerpes zoster vaccine decreases in efficacy with both age and number of years following vaccination. Therefore, booster shots or revaccination in the older population may be of benefit.

  4. Impact of Post-visit Contact on Emergency Department Utilization for Adolescent Women with a Sexually Transmitted Infection.

    PubMed

    Reed, Jennifer L; Zaidi, Mohsin A; Woods, Tiffany D; Bates, Justin R; Britto, Maria T; Huppert, Jill S

    2015-06-01

    To understand Emergency Department (ED) utilization patterns for women who received sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and explore the impact of post-visit telephone contact on future ED visits. We performed a secondary analysis on a prospectively collected dataset of ED patients ages 14-21 years at a children's hospital. The dataset documented initial and return visits, STI results, race, age and post-visit contact success (telephone contact ≤7 days of visit). Logistic regression was performed identifying variables that predicted a return visit to the ED, a return visit with STI testing, and subsequent positive STI results. Of 922 women with STI testing at their initial ED visit, 216 (23%) were STI positive. One-third (315/922) returned to the ED, 15% (141/922) returned and had STI testing, and 4% (38/922) had a subsequent STI. Of 216 STI-positive women, 59% were successfully contacted. Of those who returned to the ED, age ≥ 18 and Black race were associated with increased STI testing at a subsequent visit. Successful contact reduced the likelihood of STI testing at a subsequent ED visit (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.01-0.8), and ED empiric antibiotic treatment had no effect on subsequent STI testing. Contacting women with STI results and counseling them regarding safe sex behaviors may reduce the number of ED patients who return with symptoms or a new exposure necessitating STI testing. The high STI prevalence and frequent return rate suggest that ED interventions are needed. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. All rights reserved.

  5. Trichuris suis ova in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Schölmerich, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Some but not all epidemiological studies suggest that helminth infection in childhood protects against development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in later years. In animal models of IBD, helminths have shown protective effects and changed bacterial flora in the gut. Based on these concepts, small trials and series have been published showing some positive effects of Trichuris suis ova in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Currently, large randomized placebo-controlled trials are under way. Results remain to be awaited in order to clarify a possible role of T. suis ova in the treatment of IBD.

  6. Efficacy of 48-hour post-operative antibiotics prophylaxis for patients undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube in preventing site infection.

    PubMed

    Agha, Adnan; Alsaudi, Dib; Furnari, Manuele; Abdulhadi Ali, Mamdouh M; Al-Majadah, Saeed Salim Abdullah; Savarino, Vincenzo; Inferrera, Simona; Giannini, Edoardo G

    2011-06-01

    Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) is an endoscopic procedure for placing a feeding tube into the stomach through the skin, primarily to avoid malnutrition. Malnutrition can increase the risk of wound infection, whose incidence can be decreased by using antibiotic prophylaxis. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new antibiotic regimen in preventing acute post-PEG procedure complications. Ninety-seven consecutive patients were put on combined antibiotic therapy of clindamycin 600 mg and cefotaxime 1,000 mg every eight hours, starting with the insertion of the PEG tube and maintained for 48 hours. Pain/tenderness, leakage/drainage, bleeding fever, maximum white blood cells (WBC) count, pus/discharge, and PEG tube function were evaluated within 48 hours and 1 week from PEG insertion. Infection at the site of PEG insertion occurred in 3 cases (3.1%) within 48 hours and in 1 case (1.0%) within 7 days. Within 48 hours from the procedure, incidence of fever and increased WBC count was 10.3% and 9.3%, respectively, though at 7 days all were resolved. Pain, leak, and bleeding at the site of PEG placement were prevalently mild within 48 hours (74.2%, 12.4%,13.4% of patients, respectively) and subsided within 7 days (2.1%, 0%, 0%). One case (1.0%) of minor antibiotic side effect occurred. Two patients died due to complications not related to the procedure. The combined use of short-term cefotaxime and clindamycin seems to be effective in reducing incidence of acute complications due to PEG placement without increasing side-effects.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease unclassified

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Chen, Wei-xing; Chen, Shao-hua; Xu, Cheng-fu; Li, You-ming

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are idiopathic, chronic, and inflammatory intestinal disorders. The two main types, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), sometimes mimic each other and are not readily distinguishable. The purpose of this study was to present a series of hospitalized cases, which could not initially be classified as a subtype of IBD, and to try to note roles of the terms indeterminate colitis (IC) and inflammatory bowel disease unclassified (IBDU) when such a dilemma arises. Methods: Medical records of 477 patients hospitalized due to IBD, during the period of January 2002 to April 2009, were retrospectively studied in the present paper. All available previous biopsies from endoscopies of these patients were reanalyzed. Results: Twenty-seven of 477 IBD patients (5.7%) had been initially diagnosed as having IBDU. Of them, 23 received colonoscopy and histological examinations in our hospital. A total of 90% (9/10) and 66.7% (4/6) of patients, respectively, had a positive finding via wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). The barium-swallow or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was performed on 11 patients. Positive changes were observed under computer tomographic (CT) scanning in 89.5% (17/19) of patients. Reasonable treatment strategies were employed for all patients. Conclusions: Our data indicate that IBDU accounts for 5.7% of initial diagnoses of IBD. The definition of IBDU is valuable in clinical practice. For those who had no clear clinical, endoscopic, histological, or other features affording a diagnosis of either UC or CD, IBDU could be used parenthetically. PMID:21462383

  8. Bugs and irritable bowel syndrome: The good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Park, Hyojin; Gwee, Kok-Ann

    2010-02-01

    Recently, there has been strong interest in the therapeutic potential of probiotics for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). At the same time, there is a rapidly growing body of evidence to support an etiological role for gastrointestinal infection and the associated immune activation in the development of post-infectious IBS. In a more controversial area, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth has been associated with a subset of patients with IBS; the issue of whether it is appropriate to treat a subset of IBS patients with antibiotics and probiotics is currently a matter for debate. Thus, it appears that the gastrointestinal microbial flora may exert beneficial effects for symptoms of IBS under some circumstances, while in other situations gut microbes could give rise to symptoms of IBS. How do we make sense of the apparently diverse roles that 'bugs' may play in IBS? To address this question, we have conducted an in-depth review, attempting where possible to draw lessons from Asian studies.

  9. Small bowel intussusception in adults

    PubMed Central

    Potts, J; El-Hakeem, A

    2014-01-01

    Intussusception is the telescoping of a proximal segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent distal segment. This rare form of bowel obstruction occurs infrequently in adults. We report a case of small bowel intussusception in an adult male patient. We have also performed a literature review of this rare condition. PMID:24417823

  10. Optimal Bowel Preparation for Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2016-01-01

    During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), several factors, such as air bubbles, food material in the small bowel, and delayed gastric and small bowel transit time, influence diagnostic yield, small bowel visualization quality, and cecal completion rate. Therefore, bowel preparation before VCE is as essential as bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To date, there have been many comparative studies, consensus, and guidelines regarding different kinds of bowel cleansing agents in bowel preparation for small bowel VCE. Presently, polyethylene glycol- (PEG-) based regimens are given primary recommendation. Sodium picosulphate-based regimens are secondarily recommended, as their cleansing efficacy is less than that of PEG-based regimens. Sodium phosphate as well as complementary simethicone and prokinetics use are considered. In this paper, we reviewed previous studies regarding bowel preparation for small bowel VCE and suggested optimal bowel preparation of VCE. PMID:26880894

  11. Bowel Ischemia in Refractory Status Epilepticus: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Rizek, P; Ikeda, K M; Mele, T; Garcia, B; Gofton, T E

    2016-02-01

    Bowel ischemia is a rare life threatening complication seen in patients with refractory status epilepticus (RSE). The few reported cases of bowel ischemia in this setting have been associated with the use continuous barbiturate infusions. We report two patients with RSE in the absence of barbiturate infusion and without clear structural, infectious, anatomic, vascular, or autoimmune etiology. We review the clinical details of the cases and potential factors involved in the development of non-occlusive bowel ischemia in patients with RSE. The following is a retrospective review of two cases of non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia that occurred during the management of RSE. The clinical data and the details of pathological examination of the infarcted segments of bowel are presented in both cases. In both cases, the bowel ischemia occurred in the absence of barbiturate infusion or evidence of clear thrombosis, infection, or autoimmune etiology. Case 1 had extensive ischemic necrosis of the small bowel with secondary pseudomembrane formation, and case 2 had full thickness infarction of both the large and small bowel. The mechanism of bowel infarction in these cases is likely multifactorial and was not associated with barbiturate use. Likely contributors to ischemia include RSE itself, systemic hypotension, vasopressor use, general anesthesia, and abnormal cardiac function. During the management of RSE, every effort must be made to avoid the secondary complications such as bowel ischemia.

  12. Travel and Travelers’ Diarrhea in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    DuPont, Herbert L.; Galler, Greg; Garcia-Torres, Francisco; DuPont, Andrew W.; Greisinger, Anthony; Jiang, Zhi-Dong

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated occurrence of travel and travelers’ diarrhea in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A survey was mailed to 591 patients of a clinical practice who had IBS. Based on survey responses, patients were categorized as having IBS, post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS), unclassified functional bowel disorder (UFBD), or post-infectious UFBD (PI-UFBD). Of 201 persons who returned questionnaires meeting inclusion criteria, 57.7%, 11.4%, 24.9%, and 6.0% had IBS, UFBD, PI-IBS, and PI-UFBD, respectively. Travel during six months before illness onset was more common in patients with PI-IBS or PI-UFBD than in persons with idiopathic IBS or UFBD (P = 0.006). Survey results demonstrated that 16.1% of post-infectious bowel disorder cases and 7.5% of overall IBS cases in a general medical population developed chronic disease within six months of an international trip. Symptoms of established functional bowel disorder in each clinical category were shown to worsen after travel-related acute diarrhea. PMID:20134008

  13. Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    standing, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections. Key Words: musculoskeletal infection, biofilm , bacteria, biomaterial (J Orthop Trauma...form a biofilm , or slime layer.1 The recurrence of infections is often the result of microbial biofilm formation on the implant, enabling the persistence...Klebsiella pneumoniae). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm

  14. Application of four molecular typing methods for analysis of Mycobacterium fortuitum group strains causing post-mammaplasty infections.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, J L M; Chimara, E; Ferrazoli, L; da Silva Telles, M A; Del Guercio, V M F; Jericó, Z V N; Miyashiro, K; Fortaleza, C M C B; Padoveze, M C; Leão, S C

    2006-02-01

    A cluster of cases of post-augmentation mammaplasty surgical site infections occurred between 2002 and 2004 in Campinas, in the southern region of Brazil. Rapidly growing mycobacteria were isolated from samples from 12 patients. Eleven isolates were identified as Mycobacterium fortuitum and one as Mycobacterium porcinum by PCR-restriction digestion of the hsp65 gene. These 12 isolates, plus six additional M. fortuitum isolates from non-related patients, were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and three PCR-based techniques: 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genotyping; randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR; and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR. Four novel M. fortuitum allelic variants were identified by restriction analysis of the ITS fragment. One major cluster, comprising six M. fortuitum isolates, and a second cluster of two isolates, were identified by the four methods. RAPD-PCR and ITS genotyping were less discriminative than ERIC-PCR. ERIC-PCR was comparable to PFGE as a valuable complementary tool for investigation of this type of outbreak.

  15. Infection prevention and control in health facilities in post-Ebola Liberia: don't forget the private sector!

    PubMed Central

    Musa, E.; Cooper, C.; Van den Bergh, R.; Owiti, P.; Baller, A.; Siafa, T.; Woldeyohannes, D.; Shringarpure, K.; Gasasira, A.

    2017-01-01

    Setting: Recognising the importance of infection prevention and control (IPC), a minimum standards tool (MST) was developed in Liberia to guide the safe (re-) opening and provision of care in health facilities. Objectives: To analyse the implementation of specific IPC measures after the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak between June 2015 and May 2016, and to compare the relative improvements in IPC between the public and private sectors. Design: A retrospective comparative cohort study. Results: We evaluated 723 (94%) of the 769 health facilities in Liberia. Of these, 437 (60%) were public and 286 (40%) were private. There was an overall improvement in the MST scores from a median of 13 to 14 out of a maximum possible score of 16. While improvements were observed in all aspects of IPC in both public and private health facilities, IPC implementation was systematically higher in public facilities. Conclusions: We demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring IPC implementation using the MST checklist in post-Ebola Liberia. Our study shows that improvements were made in key aspects of IPC after 1 year of evaluations and tailored recommendations. We also highlight the need to increase the focus on the private sector to achieve further improvements in IPC. PMID:28744446

  16. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mosab; Karimi Torshizi, M. Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Dennehy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic) and route (oral gavage or vent lip) of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration. PMID:27555842

  17. Small Bowel Intussusception: A Dangerous Sequela of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Ali; Mahmood, Nadia; Robinson, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman who had successfully undergone bariatric surgery (gastric bypass with Roux-en-Y anastamosis) three years earlier presented with complaints of acute epigastric abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Computed tomography (CT) showed small bowel intussusception, and the patient was taken to the operating room. A mass the size and shape of a football was found; the mass consisted of the proximal limb of the Roux-en-Y intussuscepted in a retrograde manner. The bowel was gently reduced, deemed viable, and the Roux-en-Y anastamosis was revised with resection of the lead point. We urge the surgeon to be highly suspicious of acute bowel obstruction in the post-bariatric surgery population and believe that CT is essential in evaluating these patients. We further recommend resection of the lead point to avoid repeat bouts of intussusception from the same focal etiology.

  18. Insights Into Normal and Disordered Bowel Habits From Bowel Diaries

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Seide, Barbara M.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Melton, L. Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Background While symptom questionnaires provide a snapshot of bowel habits, they may not reflect day-to-day variations or the relationship between bowel symptoms and stool form. Aim To assess bowel habits by daily diaries in women with and without functional bowel disorders. Method From a community-based survey among Olmsted County, MN, women, 278 randomly selected subjects were interviewed by a gastroenterologist, who completed a bowel symptom questionnaire. Subjects also maintained bowel diaries for 2 wk. Results Among 278 subjects, questionnaires revealed diarrhea (26%), constipation (21%), or neither (53%). Asymptomatic subjects reported bowel symptoms (e.g., urgency) infrequently (i.e., <25% of the time) and generally for hard or loose stools. Urgency for soft, formed stools (i.e., Bristol form = 4) was more prevalent in subjects with diarrhea (31%) and constipation (27%) than in normals (16%). Stool form, straining to begin (odds ratio [OR] 4.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7–10.2) and end (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.6–15.2) defecation increased the odds for constipation. Straining to end defecation (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.2–12.0), increased stool frequency (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.02–3.7), incomplete evacuation (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.04–4.6), and rectal urgency (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.4–6.6) increased the odds for diarrhea. In contrast, variations in stool frequency and form were not useful for discriminating between health and disease. Conclusions Bowel symptoms occur in association with, but are only partly explained by, stool form disturbances. These observations support a role for other pathophysiological mechanisms in functional bowel disorders. PMID:18021288

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in patients with small bowel transplantation: single center experience.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Sait Murat; Kılınç, Selçuk; Kebapçı, Eyüp; Tuğmen, Cem; Gürkan, Alp; Baran, Maşallah; Kurtulmuş, Yusuf; Olmez, Mustafa; Karaca, Cezmi

    2014-07-07

    To study the effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy on the prevention of acute rejection and graft vs host disease following small bowel transplantation. In our transplantation center, 6 isolated intestinal transplants have been performed with MSC therapy since 2009. The primary reasons for transplants were short gut syndrome caused by surgical intestine resection for superior mesenteric artery thrombosis (n = 4), Crohn's disease (n = 1) and intestinal aganglionosis (n = 1). Two of the patients were children. At the time of reperfusion, the first dose of MSCs cultured from the patient's bone marrow was passed into the transplanted intestinal artery at a dose of 1000000 cells/kg. The second and third doses of MSCs were given directly into the mesenteric artery through the arterial anastomosis using an angiography catheter on day 15 and 30 post-transplant. The median follow-up for these patients was 10.6 mo (min: 2 mo-max: 30 mo). Three of the patients developed severe acute rejection. One of these patients did not respond to bolus steroid therapy. Although the other two patients did respond to anti-rejection treatment, they developed severe fungal and bacterial infections. All of these patients died in the 2(nd) and 3(rd) months post-transplant due to sepsis. The remaining patients who did not have acute rejection had good quality of life with no complications observed during the follow-up period. In addition, their intestinal grafts were functioning properly in the 13(th), 25(th) and 30(th) month post-transplant. The patients who survived did not encounter any problems related to MSC transplantation. Although this is a small case series and not a randomized study, it is our opinion that small bowel transplantation is an effective treatment for intestinal failure, and MSC therapy may help to prevent acute rejection and graft vs host disease following intestinal transplantation.

  20. Feasibility of dsRNA treatment for post-clearing SPF shrimp stocks of newly discovered viral infections using Laem Singh virus (LSNV) as a model.

    PubMed

    Saksmerprome, Vanvimon; Charoonnart, Patai; Flegel, Timothy W

    2017-05-02

    Using post-larvae derived from specific pathogen free (SPF) stocks in penaeid shrimp farming has led to a dramatic increase in production. At the same time, new pathogens of farmed shrimp are continually being discovered. Sometimes these pathogens are carried by shrimp and other crustaceans as persistent infections without gross signs of disease. Thus it is that a 5-generation stock of Penaeus monodon SPF for several pathogens was found, post-stock-development, to be persistently-infected with newly-discovered Laem Singh virus (LSNV). In this situation, the stock developers were faced with destroying their existing stock (developed over a long period at considerable cost) and starting the whole stock development process anew in order to add LSNV to its SPF list. As an alternative, it was hypothesized that injection of complementary dsRNA into viral-infected broodstock prior to mating might inhibit replication of the target virus sufficiently to reduce or eliminate its transmission to their offspring. Subsequent selection of uninfected offspring would allow for post-clearing of LSNV from the existing stock and for conversion of the stock to LSNV-free status. Testing this hypothesis using the LSNV-infected stock described above, we found that transmission was substantially reduced in several treated broodstock compared to much higher transmission in buffer-injected broodstock. Based on these results, the model is proposed for post-clearing of SPF stocks using dsRNA treatment. The model may also be applicable to post-clearing of exceptional, individual performers from grow-out ponds for return to a nucleus breeding center. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Case of Small Bowel Ulcer Associated with Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Woo, Saet Byul; Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Kon Hee; Shin, Su Rin

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of peptic ulcer disease in children may be primary, associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, or secondary, relied on underlying disease. Ulcerative lesions by H. pylori are mainly distributed in the duodenal bulb and they are rare below the ampulla of Vater because H. pylori growth is inhibited by bile juice. In this reason, there are only some restrictive reports presented small bowel ulcer associated H. pylori. We found multiple small bowel ulcerative lesions associated with H. pylori in an 11-year-old girl without any systemic disease while performing esophagogastroenteroscopy to the level of the proximal jejunum for differentiating bezoar. The abdominal pain improved after the patient was administered H. pylori eradication therapy. Because a small bowel ulcer associated with H. pylori has rarely been reported, we report it here with literature review. PMID:24010097

  2. Bacterial Intestinal Superinfections in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Beyond Clostridum difficile.

    PubMed

    Lobatón, Triana; Domènech, Eugeni

    2016-07-01

    Besides genetics and environmental factors, intestinal microbiota seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. For many decades, it has been said that some enteropathogens may even trigger both inflammatory bowel disease development and disease flares. For this reason, stool testing had been performed in inflammatory bowel disease flares but current guidelines only recommend to rule out Clostridium difficile infection and there is no clear advice for other enteropathogens given that the scarce available evidence points at a low prevalence of this sort of intestinal superinfections with no clear impact on disease course. The present article reviews the current knowledge about the role of bacterial enteropathogens on disease pathogenesis and flares beyond C. difficile.

  3. Vaccines and recommendations for their use in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tembleque, María Dolores; Corella, Carmen; Pérez-Calle, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    The patient with inflammatory bowel disease will be predisposed to numerous infections due their immune status. It is therefore important to understand the immune and serologic status at diagnosis and to put the patient into an adapted vaccination program. This program would be applied differently according to two patient groups: the immunocompromised and the non-immunocom-promised. In general, the first group would avoid the use of live-virus vaccines, and in all cases, inflammatory bowel disease treatment would take precedence over vaccine risk. It is important to individualize vaccination schedules according to the type of patient, the treatment used and the disease pattern.In addition, patient with inflammatory bowel disease should be considered for the following vaccines: varicella vaccine, human papilloma virus, influenza, pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine. PMID:23538680

  4. The impact of single versus mixed schistosome species infections on liver, spleen and bladder morbidity within Malian children pre- and post-praziquantel treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the developing world co-infections and polyparasitism within humans appear to be the rule rather than the exception, be it any combination of inter-specific and/or inter- and intra-Genera mixed infections. Mixed infections might generate synergistic or antagonistic interactions and thereby clinically affect individuals and/or impact parasite epidemiology. Methods The current study uniquely assesses both Schistosoma mansoni- and Schistosoma haematobium-related morbidity of the liver and the bladder as assessed by ultrasound as well as spleen and liver morbidity through clinical exams. The impact of praziquantel (PZQ) treatment on such potential inter-specific schistosome interactions and resulting morbidity using uniquely detailed longitudinal data (pre- and one year post-PZQ treatment) arising from the National Schistosomiasis Control Program in three areas of Mali: Ségou, Koulikoro and Bamako, is also evaluated. At baseline, data were collected from up to 2196 children (aged 7-14 years), 844 of which were infected with S. haematobium only, 124 with S. mansoni only and 477 with both. Follow-up data were collected from up to 1265 children. Results Results suggested lower liver morbidity in mixed compared to single S. mansoni infections and higher bladder morbidity in mixed compared to single S. haematobium infections. Single S. haematobium or S. mansoni infections were also associated with liver and spleen morbidity whilst only single S. haematobium infections were associated with bladder morbidity in these children (light S. haematobium infection OR: 4.3, p < 0.001 and heavy S. haematobium infection OR: 19, p < 0.001). PZQ treatment contributed to the regression of some of the forms of such morbidities. Conclusions Whilst the precise biological mechanisms for these observations remain to be ascertained, the results illustrate the importance of considering mixed species infections in any analyses of parasite-induced morbidity, including that for the

  5. Lost in transition: HIV prevalence and correlates of infection among young people living in post-emergency phase transit camps in Gulu District, Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheetal; Schechter, Martin T; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Atim, Stella; Kiwanuka, Noah; Spittal, Patricia M

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about HIV infection and the related vulnerabilities of young people living in resource-scarce, post-emergency transit camps that are now home to thousands of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) following two decades of war in northern Uganda. The objective of this analysis was to assess the prevalence and correlates of HIV infection among young people living in post-conflict transition in Gulu District, northern Uganda. In 2010, a cross-sectional demographic and behavioural survey was conducted in two of Gulu District's sub-counties with 384 purposively selected transit camp residents aged 15 to 29 years. Biological specimens were collected for rapid HIV testing in the field and confirmatory laboratory testing. Multivariable logistic regression identified independent determinants of HIV infection. HIV prevalence was alarmingly high at 12.8% (95% CI: 9.6%, 16.5%). The strongest determinant of HIV infection among young people was a non-consensual sexual debut (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 9.88; 95% CI: 1.70-18.06). Residing in Awach sub-county (AOR, 2.93; 95% CI: 1.28-6.68), experiencing STI symptoms in the previous 12 months (AOR, 2.36; 95% CI: 1.43-6.17), and practicing dry sex (AOR, 2.31; 95% CI: 1.04-5.13) were other key determinants of HIV infection. Study findings contribute to filling an important gap in epidemiological evidence and are useful for planning public health interventions in northern Uganda that effectively target young people in post-conflict transition and support them in the resettlement process. Findings serve to recommend reaching beyond traditional prevention programming in a way more effectively beneficial to young people in post-conflict settings by developing population-specific responses sensitive to local contexts and sufficient to address the underlying causes of the complex risk factors influencing the spread of HIV.

  6. Clinical presentations and outcomes of influenza infection among hematology/oncology patients from a single cancer center: pandemic and post-pandemic seasons.

    PubMed

    Saad, Mustafa; Hayajneh, Wail; Mubarak, Sawsan; Yousef, Ibraheem; Awad, Hazem; Elbjeirami, Wafa; Rihani, Rawad

    2014-11-01

    Influenza can cause severe infection in hematology/oncology patients. The occurrence of the 2009 pandemic represented an opportunity to study the impact of influenza on such patients in pandemic and post-pandemic seasons. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of hematology/oncology patients who had laboratory-confirmed influenza infection during the 2009 pandemic and the first post-pandemic seasons. We assessed influenza-related outcomes in both seasons with emphasis on the development of pneumonia and mortality. We also analyzed factors associated with poor outcomes. We included 350 patients; 207 were diagnosed in the pandemic and 143 in the post-pandemic seasons. Influenza severity was similar in both seasons with no significant differences in the development of pneumonia or death. Infection with the pH1N1 virus was associated with the development of pneumonia (24.7% vs 14.9%, p = 0.029) but did not affect mortality. A multivariate analysis showed that initiation of antiviral treatment after > 48 h, healthcare acquisition of influenza, and low albumin were independent risk factors for the development of pneumonia (p values 0.022, 0.003, and < 0.0001, respectively). A log-rank test showed increased mortality in patients who received therapy > 48 h after onset of symptoms (p = 0.001). In hematology/oncology patients, influenza was as severe in the post-pandemic as in the pandemic season. Pneumonia developed more commonly in patients infected with pH1N1 virus. Healthcare acquisition of infection and low albumin were associated with the development of pneumonia. Delayed initiation of antiviral treatment was associated with both pneumonia and mortality.

  7. Severe adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Catena, Fausto; Kelly, Michael D; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction is a frequent cause of hospital admission. Water soluble contrast studies may have diagnostic and therapeutic value and avoid challenging demanding surgical operations, but if bowel ischemia is suspected, prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. A 58-year-old patient was operated for extensive adhesive small bowel obstruction after having had two previous laparotomies for colorectal surgery, and had a complex clinical course with multiple operations and several complications. Different strategies of management have been adopted, including non-operative management with the use of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast medium, multiple surgical procedures, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, and finally use of antiadherences icodextrin solution. After 2 years follow-up the patient was doing well without presenting recurrent episodes of adhesive small bowel obstruction. For patients admitted several times for adhesive small bowel obstruction, the relative risk of recurring obstruction increases in relation to the number of prior episodes. Several strategies for non-operative conservative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction have already addressed diagnostic and therapeutic value of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast. According to the most recent evidence-based guidelines, open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating adhesive small bowel obstruction as well as after failed conservative management. Research interest and clinical evidence are increasing in adhesions prevention. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin may reduce incidence of adhesions.

  8. Surveillance for seasonal influenza virus prevalence in hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infection in Guangzhou, China during the post-pandemic era.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wen Da; Gong, Xiao Yan; Mok, Chris Ka Pun; Chen, Ting Ting; Wu, Shi Guan; Pan, Si Hua; Cowling, Benjamin John; Yang, Zi Feng; Chen, De Hui

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B viruses have co-circulated in the human population since the swine-origin human H1N1 pandemic in 2009. While infections of these subtypes generally cause mild illnesses, lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) occurs in a portion of children and required hospitalization. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of these three subtypes and compare the clinical manifestations in hospitalized children with LRTI in Guangzhou, China during the post-pandemic period. Children hospitalized with LRTI from January 2010 to December 2012 were tested for influenza A/B virus infection from their throat swab specimens using real-time PCR and the clinical features of the positive cases were analyzed. Of 3637 hospitalized children, 216 (5.9%) were identified as influenza A or B positive. Infection of influenza virus peaked around March in Guangzhou each year from 2010 to 2012, and there were distinct epidemics of each subtype. Influenza A(H3N2) infection was more frequently detected than A(H1N1)pdm09 and B, overall. The mean age of children with influenza A virus (H1N1/H3N2) infection was younger than those with influenza B (34.4 months/32.5 months versus 45 months old; p<0.005). Co-infections of influenza A/ B with mycoplasma pneumoniae were found in 44/216 (20.3%) children. This study contributes the understanding to the prevalence of seasonal influenza viruses in hospitalized children with LRTI in Guangzhou, China during the post pandemic period. High rate of mycoplasma pneumoniae co-infection with influenza viruses might contribute to severe disease in the hospitalized children.

  9. Etiology and pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease--environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Andus, T; Gross, V

    2000-01-01

    Environmental factors play an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease. There is a strong and consistent association between smoking and Crohn's disease, and between nonsmoking and ulcerative colitis. Despite extensive research, the exact pathophysiological mechanisms for these associations remain unclear. In spite of this, some clinical trials with nicotine-patches showed beneficial effects for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Associations of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis with other environmental factors are weaker like the association with use of oral contraceptives or those less well investigated such as the association with childhood hygiene. Most studies suggesting a potential pathogenetic role of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis or an effect of tuberculostatic therapy in Crohn's disease could not be reproduced by others. Perinatal or childhood infections by viruses like measles are heavily debated, but not proven to be causal for inflammatory bowel disease. Coagulation disorders have been described as protecting from inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting hypercoagulability to be a pathogenetic factor. Some studies described that appendectomy may prevent the onset of ulcerative colitis in man and mice. Other environmental factors such as hydrogen sulfide, tonsillectomy, diet, blood transfusions, and Listeria also require confirmation. There are, however, convincing data from genetic animal models and twin studies that environmental factors as the intestinal bacterial flora interact with susceptible hosts to cause inflammatory bowel disease. Inflammatory bowel diseases have multifactorial etiologies, which require a differentiated approach for treatment and prevention.

  10. Secondary changes in bowel function after successful treatment of voiding symptoms with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Killinger, Kim A; Kangas, Jeffrey R; Wolfert, Cheryl; Boura, Judith A; Peters, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    Expanded indications for neuromodulation are continually being explored. We evaluated secondary changes in bowel function after successful neuromodulation for voiding symptoms. Patients in our prospective neuromodulation database study with comorbid irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), constipation and/or diarrhea, or fecal incontinence (FI) at baseline were evaluated. Pre- and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operative measures included Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index and Problem Index (ICSI-PI), bowel diaries (assessing bowel movement frequency; constipation, diarrhea, and FI episodes), and scaled global response assessments (GRA) ("markedly worse" to "markedly improved" bowel function). Most patients reporting secondary bowel problems (128/199; 64.3%) were female (89%; mean age 56 ± 15.4 years). Primary voiding complaints were urgency/frequency (U/F) with or without urinary incontinence (n=74), interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS; n=43), and urinary retention (n=11). Secondary bowel complaints included constipation and/or diarrhea (49%), IBS (27%), and FI (23%). Urinary (ICSI-PI) scores improved after treatment (P<0.0001 for IBS and constipation/diarrhea; P=0.0021 for FI). Bowel diary data only indicated that mean FI episodes/day increased over time (P = 0.0100) in the FI group. Only the 12-month value (1.4 ± 2.2; n=8) was significantly different from baseline (0.3 ± 0.5; n = 18). On the GRA, only the IBS group consistently reported bowel function improvement versus worsening at each time point. Many reported no change. Studies have indicated that neuromodulation improves FI in carefully selected patients. The impact on other bowel conditions, including IBS, is unclear. Since voiding and bowel symptoms often coexist, it is crucial to fully evaluate all potential treatment benefits. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the term used for a group of diseases with yet unknown etiology, prevalence of which is increasing almost everywhere in the world. The disease was almost non-existent four decades ago in the east, including the middle-east, while now a days it is seen more and more. In addition to the increasing prevalence, our knowledge about its pathogenesis, clinical course, diagnosis, and treatment has changed dramatically over the past couple of decades. This has changed our concept of this group of diseases, their diagnosis, treatment, and treatment goals. Considering the vast literature on the subject, it is timely to review major topics in IBD with a look on the regional progress and knowledge as well. This essay is aimed to cover this task. PMID:24829639

  12. The prevalence and distribution of Mycobacterium bovis infection in European badgers (Meles meles) as determined by enhanced post mortem examination and bacteriological culture.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D; Gormley, E; Costello, E; O'Meara, D; Corner, L A L

    2010-02-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection in badgers is key to understanding the epidemiology of tuberculosis in this species and has significant implications for devising strategies to limit spread of the disease. In this study, badgers (n=215) in the Republic of Ireland were examined at post mortem and tissues were collected from a range of anatomical locations and pooled into groups for bacterial culture of M. bovis. By assessing confirmed gross visible lesions (VL) alone, infection was detected in 12.1% of badgers. However, by including the results of all culture positive pooled samples, the overall infection prevalence increased significantly to 36.3%. Two-thirds (66.7%) of infected animals had no visible lesions (NVL). While the thoracic cavity (lungs and pulmonary lymph nodes) was found to be the most common site of infection, in a proportion of animals infection was absent from the lungs and draining lymph nodes and was confined to the lymph nodes of the carcase or the head. This may indicate an early extrapulmonary dissemination of infection or alternatively, in the case of the head lymph nodes, a secondary pathogenic pathway involving the lymphoid tissues of the upper respiratory tract (URT).

  13. Virological Blips and Predictors of Post Treatment Viral Control After Stopping ART Started in Primary HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Ashley D.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fox, Julie; Thornhill, John; Morrison, Charles; Muga, Roberto; Phillips, Andrew; Frater, John; Porter, Kholoud

    2017-01-01

    Background: Few individuals commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in primary HIV infection (PHI) maintain undetectable viremia after treatment cessation. Associated factors remain unclear given the importance of the phenomenon to cure research. Methods: Using CASCADE data of seroconverters starting ART in PHI (≤6 months from seroconversion), we estimated proportions experiencing viral blips (>400 copies followed by <400 copies HIV-RNA/mL without alteration of regimen) while on ART. We used Cox models to examine the association between time from ART stop to loss of control (2 consecutive measurements >1000 copies per milliliter) and magnitude and frequency of blips while on ART, time from seroconversion to ART, time on ART, adjusting for mean number of HIV-RNA measurements/year while on ART, and other confounders. Results: Seven hundred seventy-eight seroconverters started ART in PHI with ≥3 HIV-RNA measurements. Median interquartile range (IQR) ART duration was 16.2 (8.0–35.9) months, within which we observed 13% with ≥1 blip. Of 228 who stopped ART, 119 rebounded; time to loss of control was associated with longer interval between seroconversion and ART initiation [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16 per month; 1.04, 1.28], and blips while on ART (HR = 1.71 per blip; 95% confidence interval = 0.94 to 3.10). Longer time on ART (HR = 0.84 per additional month; 0.76, 0.92) was associated with lower risk of losing control. Of 228 stopping ART, 22 (10%) maintained post treatment control (PTC), ie, HIV-RNA <50 copies per milliliter ≥24 months after ART cessation. Conclusion: HIV viral blips on therapy are associated with subsequent viral rebound on stopping ART among individuals treated in PHI. Longer duration on ART is associated with a greater chance of PTC. PMID:27846036

  14. Virological Blips and Predictors of Post Treatment Viral Control After Stopping ART Started in Primary HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Sarah; Olson, Ashley D; Bucher, Heiner C; Fox, Julie; Thornhill, John; Morrison, Charles; Muga, Roberto; Phillips, Andrew; Frater, John; Porter, Kholoud

    2017-02-01

    Few individuals commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in primary HIV infection (PHI) maintain undetectable viremia after treatment cessation. Associated factors remain unclear given the importance of the phenomenon to cure research. Using CASCADE data of seroconverters starting ART in PHI (≤6 months from seroconversion), we estimated proportions experiencing viral blips (>400 copies followed by <400 copies HIV-RNA/mL without alteration of regimen) while on ART. We used Cox models to examine the association between time from ART stop to loss of control (2 consecutive measurements >1000 copies per milliliter) and magnitude and frequency of blips while on ART, time from seroconversion to ART, time on ART, adjusting for mean number of HIV-RNA measurements/year while on ART, and other confounders. Seven hundred seventy-eight seroconverters started ART in PHI with ≥3 HIV-RNA measurements. Median interquartile range (IQR) ART duration was 16.2 (8.0-35.9) months, within which we observed 13% with ≥1 blip. Of 228 who stopped ART, 119 rebounded; time to loss of control was associated with longer interval between seroconversion and ART initiation [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16 per month; 1.04, 1.28], and blips while on ART (HR = 1.71 per blip; 95% confidence interval = 0.94 to 3.10). Longer time on ART (HR = 0.84 per additional month; 0.76, 0.92) was associated with lower risk of losing control. Of 228 stopping ART, 22 (10%) maintained post treatment control (PTC), ie, HIV-RNA <50 copies per milliliter ≥24 months after ART cessation. HIV viral blips on therapy are associated with subsequent viral rebound on stopping ART among individuals treated in PHI. Longer duration on ART is associated with a greater chance of PTC.

  15. Characteristics and Outcomes of HIV-Infected Patients With Severe Sepsis: Continued Risk in the Post-Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Era.

    PubMed

    Cribbs, Sushma K; Tse, Caroline; Andrews, Joel; Shenvi, Neeta; Martin, Greg S

    2015-08-01

    Although highly active antiretroviral therapy has led to improved survival in HIV-infected individuals, outcomes for HIV-infected patients with sepsis in the post-highly active antiretroviral therapy era are conflicting. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and healthcare disparities continue to affect outcomes. We hypothesized that HIV-infected patients with severe sepsis would have worse outcomes compared with their HIV-uninfected counterparts in a large safety-net hospital where access to healthcare is low and delivery of critical care is delayed. Secondary analysis of an ongoing prospective observational study between 2006 and 2010. Three adult ICUs (medical ICU, surgical ICU, and neurologic ICU) at Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, GA. Adult patients with severe sepsis in the ICU. Baseline patient characteristics and clinical outcomes were collected. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients with sepsis were compared using t tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression; p values less than 0.05 indicated significance. Of 1,095 patients with severe sepsis enrolled, 165 (15%) were positive for HIV, with a median CD4 count of 41 (8-167). Twenty-two percent of HIV-infected patients were on highly active antiretroviral therapy prior to admission, and 80% had a CD4 count less than 200. HIV-infected patients had a greater hospital mortality (50% vs 38%; p < 0.01). HIV infection (odds ratio = 1.78; p = 0.005) was an independent predictor of mortality by multivariate regression modeling after adjusting for age, history of pneumonia, history of hospital-acquired infection, and history of sepsis. HIV-infected patients with severe sepsis continue to suffer worse outcomes compared with HIV-uninfected patients in a large urban safety-net hospital caring for patients with limited access to medical care. Further studies need to be done to investigate the effect of socioeconomic status and mitigate healthcare disparities among critically ill HIV-infected patients.

  16. PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF CHANGES IN BOWEL HABITS AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    DEL GRANDE, Leonardo de Mello; LEME, Luis Fernando Paes; MARQUES, Francisco Pimenta; RAMOS, Andressa Teruya; RAMOS, Paula Teruya; de SOUZA, Felipe Araújo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The incidence of cholecystolithiasis is approximately 15% of the population. It is believed that between 30-40% of cholecystectomy patients have symptoms after surgery, being changes in bowel habits the most common among them. Aim: 1) Defining the prevalence, and 2) identifying predictors of changes in bowel habits after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study with an initial sample of 150 patients diagnosed with cholecystolithiasis operated between July and September 2014. Patients were submitted to a questionnaire about the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and changes in stools consistency before and after the surgical procedure. They were divided into two groups (with or without changes in bowel habits) being combined with the following variables: high blood pressure, body mass index, hypothyroidism, adherence to postoperative dietary orientations, previous abdominal and bariatric surgery. Results: The prevalence of changes in bowel habits in the study population was 35.1%. The association between it and gastrointestinal symptoms was demonstrated to be statistically significant (‰2=7.981; p=0.005), and people who did not have gastrointestinal symptoms had 2.34 times the odds of not presenting changes in bowel habits. None of the other investigated factors had shown to be a predictor of risk for post-cholecystectomy changes in bowel habits. Conclusion: 1) There was a high prevalence of changes in bowel habits, and 2) there was association between changes in bowel habits and the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:28489158

  17. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection.

  18. Bowel Preparation Is Associated with Reduced Morbidity in Elderly Patients Undergoing Elective Colectomy.

    PubMed

    Dolejs, Scott C; Guzman, Michael J; Fajardo, Alyssa D; Robb, Bruce W; Holcomb, Bryan K; Zarzaur, Ben L; Waters, Joshua A

    2017-02-01

    Bowel preparation in elderly patients is associated with physiologic derangements that may result in postoperative complications. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of bowel preparation on postoperative outcomes in elderly patients. Patients age 75 years and older who underwent elective colectomy were identified from the 2012-2014 American College of National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP database). Patients were grouped into no bowel preparation, mechanical bowel preparation (MBP), oral antibiotic preparation (OABP), or combined MBP + OABP. Logistic regression modeling was conducted to calculate risk-adjusted 30-day outcomes. There were 4829 patients included in the analysis. Morbidity was 34.3% in no bowel prep, 32.4% in MBP, 24.8% in OABP, and 24.6% in MBP + OABP groups (p < 0.001). The MBP + OABP group compared with no bowel prep was associated with reduced rates of anastomotic leak, ileus, superficial surgical site infection (SSI), organ space SSI, respiratory compromise, and reduced length of stay. There was no difference in the rate of acute kidney injury between the groups. MBP + OABP was associated with reduced morbidity compared with no bowel preparation in elderly patients undergoing elective colorectal resection. MBP alone was not associated with differences in outcomes compared with no bowel preparation. The use of MBP + OABP is safe and effective in elderly patients undergoing elective colectomy.

  19. Post-exposure treatment with whole inactivated H5N1 avian influenza virus protects against lethal homologous virus infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Mable; Ranadheera, Charlene; Audet, Jonathan; Morin, Jocelyn; Leung, Anders; Kobasa, Darwyn

    2016-01-01

    Concerns with H5N1 influenza viruses include their prevalence in wild and domestic poultry, high mortality rate (~60%) in humans with some strains, lack of pre-existing immunity in humans, and the possibility that these viruses acquire mutations that enable efficient transmission between humans. H5 subtype viruses of Eurasian origin have recently appeared in wild and domestic bird populations in North America, and have led to the generation of new virus strains that are highly pathogenic in poultry. These new H5 HA containing viruses with their ability to evolve rapidly represent an unknown threat to humans in contact with infected poultry, and vaccination with an off-the-shelf vaccine may be impractical to provide protection to at-risk individuals. Instead, we have evaluated the efficacy of a formalin-inactivated vaccine, which could be derived directly from a circulating virus, to provide post-exposure protection. This strategy was evaluated using a prototypic highly pathogenic avian H5N1 strain, A/Vietnam/1203/2004, and demonstrated rapid induction of adaptive immune responses providing protection in a mammalian model of lethal infection. Additionally, this post-exposure vaccine was highly efficacious when administered 24 hours after exposure. This study offers a platform for developing effective post-exposure vaccines for treatment of highly virulent influenza infections. PMID:27405487

  20. Diffuse small bowel thickening in aids patient - a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is common in HIV/AIDS patients, caused by both classic enteric pathogens and different opportunistic agents. Infection with these different pathogens may lead to similar radiological findings, thus causing diagnostic confusion. Case presentation A 30-yr-old female with AIDS presented with chronic diarrhea of 4 months duration. She had diffuse small bowel thickening present on CT scan of her abdomen, with stool examination showing no parasites. She was erroneously diagnosed as abdominal tuberculosis and given antituberculosis drugs with which she showed no improvement. Repeat stool examination later at a specialized laboratory revealed Cryptosporidium parvum infection. The patient was given an extended course of nitazoxanide treatment, as her stool examination was positive for Cryptosporidium parvum even after 2 weeks of drug consumption. Parasite clearance was documented after 10 weeks of treatment. Interestingly, the bowel thickening reversed with parasitological clearance. Conclusions Cryptosporidium parvum may lead to small bowel thickening in AIDS patients. This small bowel thickening may reverse following parasitological clearance. PMID:21029408

  1. Pre-Stroke Use of Beta-Blockers Does Not Lower Post-Stroke Infection Rate: An Exploratory Analysis of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study

    PubMed Central

    Westendorp, Willeke F.; Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Roos, Y.B.W.E.M.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke-associated infections occur frequently and are associated with unfavorable outcome. Previous cohort studies suggest a protective effect of beta-blockers (BBs) against infections. A sympathetic drive may increase immune suppression and infections. Aim This study is aimed at investigating the association between BB treatment at baseline and post-stroke infection in the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS), a prospective clinical trial. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis in PASS, 2,538 patients with acute phase of stroke (24 h after onset) were randomized to ceftriaxone (intravenous, 2 g per day for 4 days) in addition to stroke unit care, or standard stroke unit care without preventive antibiotic treatment. All clinical data, including use of BBs, was prospectively collected. Infection was diagnosed by the treating physician, and independently by an expert panel blinded for all other data. Multivariable analysis was performed to investigate the relation between BB treatment and infection rate. Results Infection, as defined by the physician, occurred in 348 of 2,538 patients (14%). Multivariable analysis showed that the use of BBs at baseline was associated with the development of infection during clinical course (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.61, 95% CI 1.19-2.18; p < 0.01). BB use at baseline was also associated with the development of pneumonia (aOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.05-2.30; p = 0.03). Baseline BB use was not associated with mortality (aOR 1.14, 95% CI 0.84-1.53; p = 0.41) or unfavorable outcome at 3 months (aOR 1.10, 95% CI 0.89-1.35; p = 0.39). Conclusions Patients treated with BBs prior to stroke have a higher rate of infection and pneumonia. PMID:27701170

  2. The LIPPSMAck POP (Lung Infection Prevention Post Surgery - Major Abdominal - with Pre-Operative Physiotherapy) trial: study protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boden, Ianthe; Browning, Laura; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Reeve, Julie; El-Ansary, Doa; Robertson, Iain K; Denehy, Linda

    2015-12-15

    Post-operative pulmonary complications are a significant problem following open upper abdominal surgery. Preliminary evidence suggests that a single pre-operative physiotherapy education and preparatory lung expansion training session alone may prevent respiratory complications more effectively than supervised post-operative breathing and coughing exercises. However, the evidence is inconclusive due to methodological limitations. No well-designed, adequately powered, randomised controlled trial has investigated the effect of pre-operative education and training on post-operative respiratory complications, hospital length of stay, and health-related quality of life following upper abdominal surgery. The Lung Infection Prevention Post Surgery - Major Abdominal- with Pre-Operative Physiotherapy (LIPPSMAck POP) trial is a pragmatic, investigator-initiated, bi-national, multi-centre, patient- and assessor-blinded, parallel group, randomised controlled trial, powered for superiority. Four hundred and forty-one patients scheduled for elective open upper abdominal surgery at two Australian and one New Zealand hospital will be randomised using concealed allocation to receive either i) an information booklet or ii) an information booklet, plus one additional pre-operative physiotherapy education and training session. The primary outcome is respiratory complication incidence using standardised diagnostic criteria. Secondary outcomes include hospital length of stay and costs, pneumonia diagnosis, intensive care unit readmission and length of stay, days/h to mobilise >1 min and >10 min, and, at 6 weeks post-surgery, patient reported complications, health-related quality of life, and physical capacity. The LIPPSMAck POP trial is a multi-centre randomised controlled trial powered and designed to investigate whether a single pre-operative physiotherapy session prevents post-operative respiratory complications. This trial standardises post-operative assisted ambulation and

  3. Etiology and outcome of fetal echogenic bowel. Ten years of experience.

    PubMed

    Kesrouani, Assaad K; Guibourdenche, Jean; Muller, Françoise; Denamur, Eric; Vuillard, Edith; Garel, Catherine; Delezoide, Anne Lise; Eydoux, Patrice; Tachdjian, Gerard; Lebon, Pierre; de Lagausie, Pascal; Sibony, Olivier; Bauman, Clarisse; Oury, Jean-François; Luton, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    To assess the frequency of certain etiologies in fetal echogenic bowel and the related pregnancy outcome. A retrospective study including 215 cases. Ultrasound findings included bowel abnormality, malformations, growth retardation and Doppler abnormalities. Amniocentesis was performed in 196 cases to screen for abnormalities in karyotype, cystic fibrosis gene and infection. The color of amniotic fluid and a history of first-trimester bleeding were also noted. Outcome according to different etiologies was reported. 112 cases (57%) had a known etiology, which included chromosomal abnormality (7%), infection (4%), cystic fibrosis (1.5%), bowel abnormality (3%), bleeding or stained amniotic fluid (11%), Doppler abnormality (14%), malformation (16%) and miscellaneous (0.5%). Pregnancy was terminated in 39 cases and fetal demise complicated one third of the cases (13) of severe growth retardation. Fetal echogenic bowel should be investigated and a careful follow-up is necessary if there is associated Doppler perturbation or growth retardation. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Adult small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark R; Lalani, Nadim

    2013-06-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a clinical condition that is often initially diagnosed and managed in the emergency department (ED). The high rates of potential complications that are associated with an SBO make it essential for the emergency physician (EP) to make a timely and accurate diagnosis. The primary objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the history, physical examination, and imaging modalities associated with the diagnosis of SBO. The secondary objectives were to identify the prevalence of SBO in prospective ED-based studies of adult abdominal pain and to apply Pauker and Kassirer's threshold approach to clinical decision-making to the diagnosis and management of SBO. MEDLINE, EMBASE, major emergency medicine (EM) textbooks, and the bibliographies of selected articles were scanned for studies that assessed one or more components of the history, physical examination, or diagnostic imaging modalities used for the diagnosis of SBO. The selected articles underwent a quality assessment by two of the authors using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 (QUADAS-2) tool. Data used to compile sensitivities and specificities were obtained from these studies and a meta-analysis was performed on those that examined the same historical component, physical examination technique, or diagnostic test. Separate information on the prevalence and management of SBO was used in conjunction with the meta-analysis findings of computed tomography (CT) to determine the test and treatment threshold. The prevalence of SBO in the ED was determined to be approximately 2% of all patients who present with abdominal pain. Having a previous history of abdominal surgery, constipation, abnormal bowel sounds, and/or abdominal distention on examination were the best history and physical examination predictors of SBO. X-ray was determined to be the least useful imaging modality for the diagnosis of SBO, with a pooled positive likelihood ratio (+LR

  5. Prevention of post-operative infection in spine surgery by wound irrigation with a solution of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, S; Toninelli, S; Petrini, C; Oliveri, G

    2011-06-01

    Starting from January 2008, we systematically irrigated the surgical wounds of patients undergoing spine surgery with a solution of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide. We prospectively recorded the clinical data of patients who underwent spine surgery during 2008 and we compared the results with retrospectively reviewed clinical records of patients operated during 2007. Patients were analyzed for preoperative risk factors, type of surgical procedure, onset of infection, presentation, treatment and outcome. We performed 490 spine surgeries during 2008 and 460 during 2007. We recorded four postoperative infections in 2007 compared to none in 2008. We consider this solution of povidone-iodine plus hydrogen peroxide effective to further reduce the rate of post-operative infection in spine surgery.

  6. Successful post-exposure prophylaxis of Ebola infected non-human primates using Ebola glycoprotein-specific equine IgG

    PubMed Central

    Pyankov, Oleg V.; Setoh, Yin Xiang; Bodnev, Sergey A.; Edmonds, Judith H.; Pyankova, Olga G.; Pyankov, Stepan A.; Pali, Gabor; Belford, Shane; Lu, Louis; La, Mylinh; Lovrecz, George; Volchkova, Valentina A.; Chappell, Keith J.; Watterson, Daniel; Marsh, Glenn; Young, Paul R.; Agafonov, Alexander A.; Farmer, Jillann F.; Volchkov, Victor E.; Suhrbier, Andreas; Khromykh, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    Herein we describe production of purified equine IgG obtained from horses immunized with plasmid DNA followed by boosting with Kunjin replicon virus-like particles both encoding a modified Ebola glycoprotein. Administration of the equine IgG over 5 days to cynomolgus macaques infected 24 hours previously with a lethal dose of Ebola virus suppressed viral loads by more than 5 logs and protected animals from mortality. Animals generated their own Ebola glycoprotein-specific IgG responses 9–15 days after infection, with circulating virus undetectable by day 15–17. Such equine IgG may find utility as a post-exposure prophylactic for Ebola infection and provides a low cost, scalable alternative to monoclonal antibodies, with extensive human safety data and WHO-standardized international manufacturing capability available in both high and low income countries. PMID:28155869

  7. Effects of Hypericum perforatum extract on rat irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffari, Shilan; Esmaily, Hadi; Rahimi, Roja; Baeeri, Maryam; Sanei, Yara; Asadi-Shahmirzadi, Azar; Salehi-Surmaghi, Mohammad-Hossein; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Context: In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), disturbance of bowel motility is associated with infiltration of inflammatory mediators and cytokines into the intestine, such as neutrophils, myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF-α), and lipid peroxide. Aims: Regarding promising anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of Hypericum perforatum (HP) extract, besides its anti-depressant effect, this study was designed to evaluate the effects of HP in an experimental model of IBS. Settings and Design: IBS was induced by a 5-day restraint stress in rats. The HP extract was administered by gavage in doses of 150, 300, and 450 mg/kg for 26 days. Fluoxetine and loperamide were used as positive controls. Gastric emptying and small bowel and colon transit, besides the levels of TNF-α, MPO, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant power, were determined in colon homogenates. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test for multiple comparisons. Results: A significant reduction in small bowel and colonic transit (450 mg/kg), TNF-α, MPO, and lipid peroxidation and an increase in antioxidant power in all HP-treated groups (150, 300, and 450 mg/kg) were seen as compared with the control group. Gastric emptying did not alter significantly when compared with the control group. Treatment with loperamide (10 mg/kg) significantly inhibited gastric emptying and small bowel and colonic transit, while flouxetine (10 mg/kg) decreased gastric emptying, TNF-α, MPO, and lipid peroxidation and increased the antioxidant power of the samples in comparison with the control group. Conclusions: HP diminished the recruitment of inflammatory cells and TNF-α following restraint stress not in a dose-dependent manner, possibly via inhibition of MPO activity and increasing colon antioxidant power, without any difference with fluoxetine. The HP extract inhibits small bowel and colonic transit acceleration like loperamide but has minimal

  8. Factors associated with post-operative conversion to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus positivity or infection in initially MRSA-negative patients.

    PubMed

    Abi-Haidar, Youmna; Gupta, Kalpana; Strymish, Judith; Williams, Sandra A; Itani, Kamal M F

    2011-12-01

    Hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with morbid, invasive infections and has been implicated in nearly every type of nosocomial infection. Our aim was to identify the risk factors for patient conversion from MRSA negativity pre-operatively to MRSA positivity post-operatively. We retrospectively reviewed all patients at the Veterans Affairs-Boston Health Care System who underwent clean or clean-contaminated surgical procedures during the years 2008 and 2009 and had documented pre-operative nasal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for MRSA. We abstracted post-operative MRSA microbiologic testing results, MRSA infections, surgical site infections (SSIs), surgical prophylaxis data, and SSI risk index, as calculated using the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Project (VASQIP) database variables. All patients who had a negative nasal MRSA PCR result in the 31-day pre-operative period and did not have any positive MRSA clinical swab or culture in the 1-year pre-operative period were defined as MRSA-negative. These patients were classified as converters to MRSA positivity if they had at least one documented positive nasal MRSA PCR swab, culture, nosocomial infection, or SSI within 31 days post-operatively. Among 4,238 eligible patients, 3,890 (92%) qualified as MRSA-negative pre-operatively. A total of 1,432 (37%) of these patients were assessed in the VASQIP database, of whom 34 (2%) converted to MRSA positivity post-operatively. On multivariable logistic regression analysis of the VASQIP sample, age (odds ratio [OR] 1.049; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.016, 1.083), SSI risk index (OR 2.863; 95% CI 1.251-6.554), and vancomycin prophylaxis alone or in combination (OR 3.223; 95% CI 1.174-8.845) were significantly associated with conversion to MRSA positivity. In pre-operatively MRSA-negative patients, age, SSI risk index, and vancomycin prophylaxis were significant factors for conversion to MRSA positivity

  9. Laparoscopic Surgery is Useful for Preventing Recurrence of Small Bowel Obstruction After Surgery for Postoperative Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Sato, Takeo; Naito, Masanori; Ogura, Naoto; Yamanashi, Takahiro; Miura, Hirohisa; Tsutsui, Atsuko; Yamashita, Keishi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    Risk factors for recurrence postoperative small bowel obstruction in patients who have postoperative abdominal surgery remain unclear. The study group comprised 123 patients who underwent surgery for ileus that developed after abdominal surgery from 1999 through 2013. There were 58 men (47%) and 65 women (53%), with a mean age of 63 years (range, 17 to 92 y). The following surgical procedures were performed: lower gastrointestinal surgery in 47 patients (39%), gynecologic surgery in 39 (32%), upper gastrointestinal surgery in 15 (12%), appendectomy in 9 (7%), cholecystectomy in 5 (4%), urologic surgery in 5 (4%), and repair of injuries caused by traffic accidents in 3 (2%). Laparoscopic surgery was performed in 75 patients (61%), and open surgery was done in 48 (39%). We examined the following 11 potential risk factors for recurrence of small bowel obstruction after surgery for ileus: sex, age, body mass index, the number of episodes of ileus, the number of previously performed operations, the presence or absence of radiotherapy, the previously used surgical technique, the current surgical technique (laparoscopic surgery, open surgery), operation time, bleeding volume, and the presence or absence of enterectomy. The median follow-up was 57 months (range, 7 to 185 mo). Laparoscopic surgery was switched to open surgery in 11 patients (18%). The reason for surgery for postoperative small bowel obstruction was adhesion to the midline incision in 36 patients (29%), band formation in 30 (24%), intrapelvic adhesion in 23 (19%), internal hernia in 13 (11%), small bowel adhesion in 20 (16%), and others in 1 (1%). Postoperative complications developed in 35 patients (28%): wound infection in 12 (10%), recurrence of postoperative small bowel obstruction in 12 (10%), paralytic ileus in 4 (3%), intra-abdominal abscess in 3 (2%), suture failure in 1 (1%), anastomotic bleeding in 1 (1%), enteritis in 1 (1%), and dysuria in 1 (1%). Enterectomy was performed in 42 patients (38

  10. Is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection after orthopaedic surgery in HIV patients? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kigera, James W M; Straetemans, Masja; Vuhaka, Simplice K; Nagel, Ingeborg M; Naddumba, Edward K; Boer, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of post-operative SSI and sought to determine if this risk is altered by antibiotic use beyond 24 hours. We searched electronic databases, manually searched citations from relevant articles, and reviewed conference proceedings. The risk of postoperative SSI was pooled using Mantel-Haenszel method. We identified 18 cohort studies with 16 mainly small studies, addressing the subject. The pooled risk ratio of infection in the HIV patients when compared to non-HIV patients was 1.8 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.3-2.4), in studies in Africa this was 2.3 (95% CI 1.5-3.5). In a sensitivity analysis the risk ratio was reduced to 1.4 (95% CI 0.5-3.8). The risk ratio of infection in patients receiving prolonged antibiotics compared to patients receiving antibiotics for up to 24 hours was 0.7 (95% CI 0.1-4.2). The results may indicate an increased risk in HIV infected patients but these results are not robust and inconclusive after conducting the sensitivity analysis removing poor quality studies. There is need for larger good quality studies to provide conclusive evidence. To better develop surgical protocols, further studies should determine the effect of reduced CD4 counts, viral load suppression and prolonged antibiotics on the risk for infection.

  11. Pre-infection transcript levels of FAM26F in peripheral blood mononuclear cells inform about overall plasma viral load in acute and post-acute phase after simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Javed, Aneela; Leuchte, Nicole; Salinas, Gabriela; Opitz, Lennart; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sopper, Sieghart; Sauermann, Ulrike

    2016-12-01

    CD8+ cells from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected long-term non-progressors and some uninfected macaques can suppress viral replication in vitro without killing the infected cells. The aim of this study was to identify factors responsible for non-cytolytic viral suppression by transcriptional profiling and to investigate their potential impact on SIV replication. Results of microarray experiments and further validation with cells from infected and uninfected macaques revealed that FAM26F RNA levels distinguished CD8+ cells of controllers and non-controllers (P=0.001). However, FAM26F was also expressed in CD4+ T-cells and B-cells. FAM26F expression increased in lymphocytes after in vitro IFN-γ treatment on average 40-fold, and ex vivo FAM26F RNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlated with plasma IFN-γ but not with IFN-α. Baseline FAM26F expression appeared to be stable for months, albeit the individual expression levels varied up to tenfold. Investigating its role in SIV-infection revealed that FAM26F was upregulated after infection (P<0.0008), but did not directly correlate with viral load in contrast to MX1 and CXCL10. However, pre-infection levels of FAM26F correlated inversely with overall plasma viral load (AUC) during the acute and post-acute phases of infection (e.g. AUC weeks post infection 0-8; no AIDS vaccine: P<0.0001, Spearman rank correlation coefficient (rs)=-0.89, n=16; immunized with an AIDS vaccine: P=0.033, rs=-0.43; n=25). FAM26F transcript levels prior to infection can provide information about the pace and strength of the antiviral immune response during the early stage of infection. FAM26F expression represented, in our experiments, one of the earliest prognostic markers, and could supplement major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-typing to predict disease progression before SIV-infection.

  12. Irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  13. Modulation of α-Enolase Post-Translational Modifications by Dengue Virus: Increased Secretion of the Basic Isoforms in Infected Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Luiza M.; Curi, Bruno M.; Aguiar, Renato S.; Cardoso, Cynthia C.; De Lorenzi, André G.; Sena, Silvia L. F.; Zingali, Russolina B.; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic cells are major sites of dengue virus (DENV) replication and liver injury constitutes a characteristic of severe forms of dengue. The role of hepatic cells in dengue pathogenesis is not well established, but since hepatocytes are the major source of plasma proteins, changes in protein secretion by these cells during infection might contribute to disease progression. Previously, we showed that DENV infection alters the secretion pattern of hepatic HepG2 cells, with α-enolase appearing as one of the major proteins secreted in higher levels by infected cells. ELISA analysis demonstrated that DENV infection modulates α-enolase secretion in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, but has no effect on its gene expression and on the intracellular content of the protein as assessed by PCR and western blot analyses, respectively. Two-dimensional western blots showed that both intracellular and secreted forms of α-enolase appear as five spots, revealing α-enolase isoforms with similar molecular weights but distinct isoeletric points. Remarkably, quantification of each spot content revealed that DENV infection shifts the isoform distribution pattern of secreted α-enolase towards the basic isoforms, whereas the intracellular protein remains unaltered, suggesting that post-translational modifications might be involved in α-enolase secretion by infected cells. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying α-enolase secretion by hepatic cells and its relationship with the role of liver in dengue pathogenesis. In addition, preliminary results obtained with plasma samples from DENV-infected patients suggest an association between plasma levels of α-enolase and disease severity. Since α-enolase binds plasminogen and modulates its activation, it is plausible to speculate the association of the increase in α-enolase secretion by infected hepatic cells with the haemostatic dysfunction observed in dengue patients including the promotion of

  14. Home hyperalimentation for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, J H

    1992-04-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) has become a useful tool in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the past, it was felt that TPN would have a therapeutic role in IBD, but experience has shown that it functions more as an adjunct to other therapeutic interventions. The specific roles of TPN in IBD include: (1) nutritional maintenance in the short bowel syndrome, (2) TPN as adjunctive therapy in jejunoileitis of Crohn's disease, (3) home TPN (HTPN) in Crohn's colitis, and (4) preoperative repletion of significantly depleted patients going to surgery. The adaptation of hospital techniques to the home situation has allowed patients to carry out long-term TPN therapy at home. Patients with IBD on HTPN are subject to the same mechanical and metabolic problems as are other patients on HTPN and, in addition, have a higher infection rate. When carried out appropriately, however, HTPN is a valuable technique in the management of patients with IBD and may provide an improved quality of life.

  15. Small Bowel and Liver/Small Bowel Transplantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Jorge; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Nour, Bakr; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    A clinical trial of intestinal transplantation was initiated at the University of Pittsburgh in May 1990. Eleven children received either a combined liver/small bowel graft (n = 8) or an isolated small bowel graft (n = 3). Induction as well as maintenance immunosuppression was with FK-506 and steroids. Four patients were male, and seven were female; the age range was 6 months to 10.2 years. There were 3 deaths (all in recipients of the combined liver/small bowel graft), which were attributed to graft-versus-host disease (n = 1), posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (n = 1), and biliary leak (n = 1). Transplantation of the intestine has evolved into a feasible operation, with an overall patient and graft survival rate of 73%. These survivors are free of total parenteral nutrition, and the majority are home. These encouraging results justify further clinical trials. PMID:8062049

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of micronutrient deficiencies pre- and post-antiretroviral therapy (ART) among a diverse multicountry cohort of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Christian, Parul; Yang, Wei-Teng; Gupte, Nikhil; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Santos, Breno; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Tripathy, Srikanth; Riviere, Cynthia; Berendes, Sima; Lama, Javier R; Cardoso, Sandra W; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Tang, Alice M; Semba, Richard D; Campbell, Thomas B; Gupta, Amita

    2016-02-01

    HIV-infected adults have increased risk of several individual micronutrient deficiencies. However, the prevalence and risk factors of concurrent and multiple micronutrient deficiencies and whether micronutrient concentrations change after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation have not been well described. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of individual, concurrent and multiple micronutrient deficiencies among ART-naïve HIV-infected adults from nine countries and assess change in micronutrient status 48 weeks post-ART initiation. A random sub-cohort (n = 270) stratified by country was selected from the multinational PEARLS clinical trial (n = 1571 ART-naïve, HIV-infected adults). We measured serum concentrations of vitamins A, D (25-hydroxyvitamin), E, carotenoids and selenium pre-ART and 48 weeks post-ART initiation, and measured vitamins B6, B12, ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor at baseline only. Prevalence of single micronutrient deficiencies, concurrent (2 coexisting) or conditional (a deficiency in one micronutrient given a deficiency in another) and multiple (≥3) were determined using defined serum concentration cutoffs. We assessed mean changes in micronutrient concentrations from pre-ART to week 48 post-ART initiation using multivariable random effects models. Of 270 participants, 13.9%, 29.2%, 24.5% and 32.4% had 0, 1, 2 and multiple deficiencies, respectively. Pre-ART prevalence was the highest for single deficiencies of selenium (53.2%), vitamin D (42.4%), and B6 (37.3%) with 12.1% having concurrent deficiencies of all three micronutrients. Deficiency prevalence varied widely by country. 48 weeks post-ART initiation, mean vitamin A concentration increased (p < 0.001) corresponding to a 9% decrease in deficiency. Mean concentrations also increased for other micronutrients assessed 48 weeks post-ART (p < 0.001) but with minimal change in deficiency status. Single and multiple micronutrient

  17. Endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Carter, D; Lang, A; Eliakim, R

    2013-09-01

    Small bowel imaging and endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) underwent a lot of change and advancement in the recent years. Modalities have shifted from gastroscopy, colonoscopy and small bowel follow through, to ileo-colonoscopy, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR), enteroscopy, wireless video capsule endoscopy and balloon assisted enteroscopy. Nowadays endoscopy has a major role in the diagnosis of IBD, assessing its extent, treating some of its complications (stricture, bleeding), assessing the success of various treatments (mucosal healing), and as a predictor of disease course. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a relatively new "toy" allowing direct, patient friendly, visualization of the entire small bowel mucosa. It has gained a substantial role in the evaluation of patients with suspected Chron's Disease (CD) and indeterminate colitis. WCE has a high positive predictive value in patients with suspected CD, when one uses more than two of the International Conference on Capsule Endoscopy (ICCE) criteria, and not less important, a very high negative predictive value in patients with suspected CD. Its role in patients with known CD, assessing their disease activity and extent, its role in assessing postsurgical small bowel recurrence and its role in the evaluation of mucosal healing are still unclear. Balloon assisted enteroscopy has established its role as a complementary tool in cases where there is need of biopsies or treatment (dilatation of strictures). The present review will summarize the role of endoscopy in the diagnosis of IBD, in assessing its activity, its management, interventional endoscopy and cancer surveillance.

  18. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Susan K; Gaarder, Stephen M

    2005-12-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome affects 10 to 15 percent of the U.S. population to some degree. This condition is defined as abdominal pain and discomfort with altered bowel habits in the absence of any other mechanical, inflammatory, or biochemical explanation for these symptoms. Irritable bowel syndrome is more likely to affect women than men and is most common in patients 30 to 50 years of age. Symptoms are improved equally by diets supplemented with fiber or hydrolyzed guar gum, but more patients prefer hydrolyzed guar gum. Antispasmodic agents may be used as needed, but anticholinergic and other side effects limit their use in some patients. Loperamide is an option for treatment of moderately severe diarrhea. Antidepressants have been shown to relieve pain and may be effective in low doses. Trials using alosetron showed a clinically significant, although modest, gain over placebo, but it is indicated only for women with severe diarrhea-predominant symptoms or for those in whom conventional treatment has failed. Tegaserod has an advantage over placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome; it is indicated for up to 12 weeks of treatment in women. However, postmarketing reports of severe diarrhea and ischemic colitis further limit its use. Herbal therapies such as peppermint oil also may be effective in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Therapies should focus on specific gastrointestinal dysfunctions (e.g., constipation, diarrhea, pain), and medications only should be used when nonprescription remedies do not work or when symptoms are severe.

  19. Lost in Transition: HIV Prevalence and Correlates of Infection among Young People Living in Post-Emergency Phase Transit Camps in Gulu District, Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheetal; Schechter, Martin T.; Sewankambo, Nelson K.; Atim, Stella; Kiwanuka, Noah; Spittal, Patricia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about HIV infection and the related vulnerabilities of young people living in resource-scarce, post-emergency transit camps that are now home to thousands of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) following two decades of war in northern Uganda. The objective of this analysis was to assess the prevalence and correlates of HIV infection among young people living in post-conflict transition in Gulu District, northern Uganda. Methods In 2010, a cross-sectional demographic and behavioural survey was conducted in two of Gulu District’s sub-counties with 384 purposively selected transit camp residents aged 15 to 29 years. Biological specimens were collected for rapid HIV testing in the field and confirmatory laboratory testing. Multivariable logistic regression identified independent determinants of HIV infection. Results HIV prevalence was alarmingly high at 12.8% (95% CI: 9.6%, 16.5%). The strongest determinant of HIV infection among young people was a non-consensual sexual debut (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 9.88; 95% CI: 1.70–18.06). Residing in Awach sub-county (AOR, 2.93; 95% CI: 1.28–6.68), experiencing STI symptoms in the previous 12 months (AOR, 2.36; 95% CI: 1.43–6.17), and practicing dry sex (AOR, 2.31; 95% CI: 1.04–5.13) were other key determinants of HIV infection. Conclusions Study findings contribute to filling an important gap in epidemiological evidence and are useful for planning public health interventions in northern Uganda that effectively target young people in post-conflict transition and support them in the resettlement process. Findings serve to recommend reaching beyond traditional prevention programming in a way more effectively beneficial to young people in post-conflict settings by developing population-specific responses sensitive to local contexts and sufficient to address the underlying causes of the complex risk factors influencing the spread of HIV. PMID:24587034

  20. Risk Factors for Transfusion Transmissible Infections Elicited on Post Donation Counselling in Blood Donors: Need to Strengthen Pre-donation Counselling.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Suchet; Mittal, Kshitija; Patidar, Gopal; Marwaha, Neelam; Sharma, Ratti Ram; Duseja, Ajay Kumar; Chawla, Yogesh Kumar; Arora, Sunil Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Donor notification and counselling transforms the legal and ethical requirement of disclosure of transfusion transmissible infection (TTI) in a blood donor into practice. The present study was done to assess the response to the disclosure of TTI reactivity results in blood donors, assess the risk factors in blood donors and follow the compliance of the disclosure and clinical referral in a population of blood donors who are difficult to convince that they may be harbouring infections apparently in a healthy state today but with possible clinical disease consequences in the future. A retrospective study was conducted from April 2011 to November 2012. Screening was done using third generation ELISA kits used according to the manufacturer's directions; these kits were approved for use in blood banks by the Drug Controller General of India. Those testing repeat reactive were referred for further confirmation and management. The total number of TTI reactive donors was 787 (0.93 %, N = 83,865). The observed response rate in the present study is 21.6 % (167, N = 787). The risk factors for acquiring infections in TTI reactive donors were statistically significant history of high risk behaviour (20.3 %) for human immunodeficiency virus infection and history of jaundice in themselves, family or close contacts (16.1 %) for hepatitis B virus infection. One hundred and ten (65.8 %) of the referred donors were on outpatient clinical care when post-referral follow up was conducted. The study emphasises on continuing sensitization of blood donation camp organisers to the need of privacy during blood donor selection. The study also stresses the need to strengthen the pre-donation counselling at outdoor blood donation at the same time raise awareness amongst blood donors about the importance of post-donation counselling and follow up.

  1. Characterization and experimental infection of Flexibacter maritimus (Wakabayashi et al. 1986) in hatcheries of post-larvae of Litopenaeus vannamei Boone, 1931.

    PubMed

    Mouriño, J L P; Vinatea, L; Buglione-Neto, C; Ramirez, C T; Vieira, F N; Pedrotti, F; Martins, M L; Derner, R B; Aguilar, M A; Beltrame, E

    2008-02-01

    A preliminary study to characterize filamentous bacteria, whose presence is related to high mortality of Litopenaeus vannamei larvae cultured in Santa Catarina State, Brazil, is reported. The extract of infected larvae was diluted in different concentrations, cultured in marine agar (Difco, Marine Agar 2216) and incubated at 30 degrees C for 48 hours. The biochemical characterization included hydrolytic reactions of starch, gelatin and tyrosine, growth in TCBS agar, growth in 0 and 37 per thousand salinity, pigment production in tyrosine agar, production of H2S, nitrate reduction, congo red reaction, oxidase and catalase. The isolated bacteria belong to the species Flexibacter maritimus, Gram-negative bacilli of 0.4-0.5 microm width and 15 microm length. Experiments were carried out on pathogenicity of F. maritimus in post-larvae of L. vannamei. Survival and symptoms in L. vannamei post-larvae 24 hours after inoculation with F. maritimus and its growth in marine agar were evaluated. Mortality was detected around 92,5% as well as symptoms like melanized lesions in several parts of body, discolouration of gills, bad formation of appendages and of the last abdominal segment, low motility and feeding reduction. The experimental infection results suggested that isolated bacteria of the genus Flexibacter are pathogenic to the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei post-larvae.

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Symptoms include abdominal ... become pregnant? Women with ulcerative colitis and inactive Crohn’s disease are as likely to become pregnant as women ...

  3. Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or articles contaminated by them is an important component of infection control and isolation precautions. To help protect exposure to infectious materials, wash your hands: Wear gloves: In addition to ...

  4. Relation between hysterectomy and the irritable bowel: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Prior, A; Stanley, K M; Smith, A R; Read, N W

    1992-01-01

    Some women with irritable bowel syndrome date the onset of symptoms to previous hysterectomy. To assess prospectively the incidence of gastrointestinal symptomatology arising de novo after hysterectomy, and to study the effect of surgery on pre-existing symptoms, 205 women completed a symptom questionnaire before and six weeks and six months after surgery. Beforehand, symptoms suggestive of irritable bowel syndrome occurred in 22% of patients. At six months after operation, 60% of these had improved or were symptom free while 20% had increased symptomatology. New gastrointestinal symptoms were present more than once per week in 10% of previously asymptomatic women. Constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome was the commonest symptom complex seen de novo, occurring more than once per week in 5% of the group. No relation was found between new symptomatology and the type of hysterectomy, oophorectomy, or the administration of perioperative antibiotics. This study suggests that many women with pre-existing gastrointestinal symptomatology improve after hysterectomy. However, symptoms suggestive of irritable bowel syndrome do arise de novo in 10%. As hysterectomy is common, gastroenterologists can expect to see women presenting with post-hysterectomy problems. PMID:1624165

  5. Identification of Effective Subdominant Anti-HIV-1 CD8+ T Cells Within Entire Post-infection and Post-vaccination Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Gemma; Yang, Hongbing; Yorke, Elisabeth; Wainwright, Emma; Bourne, Victoria; Frisbee, Alyse; Payne, Tamika L.; Berrong, Mark; Ferrari, Guido; Chopera, Denis; Hanke, Tomas; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; McElrath, M. Juliana; McMichael, Andrew; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Frahm, Nicole; Dorrell, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Defining the components of an HIV immunogen that could induce effective CD8+ T cell responses is critical to vaccine development. We addressed this question by investigating the viral targets of CD8+ T cells that potently inhibit HIV replication in vitro, as this is highly predictive of virus control in vivo. We observed broad and potent ex vivo CD8+ T cell-mediated viral inhibitory activity against a panel of HIV isolates among viremic controllers (VC, viral loads <5000 copies/ml), in contrast to unselected HIV-infected HIV Vaccine trials Network (HVTN) participants. Viral inhibition of clade-matched HIV isolates was strongly correlated with the frequency of CD8+ T cells targeting vulnerable regions within Gag, Pol, Nef and Vif that had been identified in an independent study of nearly 1000 chronically infected individuals. These vulnerable and so-called “beneficial” regions were of low entropy overall, yet several were not predicted by stringent conservation algorithms. Consistent with this, stronger inhibition of clade-matched than mismatched viruses was observed in the majority of subjects, indicating better targeting of clade-specific than conserved epitopes. The magnitude of CD8+ T cell responses to beneficial regions, together with viral entropy and HLA class I genotype, explained up to 59% of the variation in viral inhibitory activity, with magnitude of the T cell response making the strongest unique contribution. However, beneficial regions were infrequently targeted by CD8+ T cells elicited by vaccines encoding full-length HIV proteins, when the latter were administered to healthy volunteers and HIV-positive ART-treated subjects, suggesting that immunodominance hierarchies undermine effective anti-HIV CD8+ T cell responses. Taken together, our data support HIV immunogen design that is based on systematic selection of empirically defined vulnerable regions within the viral proteome, with exclusion of immunodominant decoy epitopes that are irrelevant

  6. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  7. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molodecky, Natalie A.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  8. Gastric bezoar with small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Urgancı, Ayvaz Ulaş; Akıncılar, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    In the operation performed on a patient with a history of abdominal surgery, a gastric bezoar and a small bowel bezoar were detected. Adhesive bowel obstruction was suspected; however, the patient was diagnosed with mechanical intestinal obstruction. Small bowel bezoar has resulted in intestinal obstruction. This case was discussed in accordance with the literature. PMID:28149129

  9. Biomarkers of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengming, Yi; Jianbing, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease mostly involved with intestine with unknown etiology. Diagnosis, evaluation of severity, and prognosis are still present as challenges for physicians. An ideal biomarker with the characters such as simple, easy to perform, noninvasive or microinvasive, cheap, rapid, and reproducible is helpful for patients and clinicians. Currently biomarkers applied in clinic include CRP, ESR, pANCA, ASCA, and fecal calprotectin. However, they are far from ideal. Lots of studies are focused on seeking for ideal biomarker for IBD. Herein, the paper reviewed recent researches on biomarkers of IBD to get advances of biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24963213

  10. Baker's yeast β-glucan supplementation increases monocytes and cytokines post-exercise: implications for infection risk?

    PubMed

    Carpenter, K C; Breslin, W L; Davidson, T; Adams, A; McFarlin, B K

    2013-02-14

    Strenuous aerobic exercise is known to weaken the immune system, and while many nutritional supplements have been proposed to boost post-exercise immunity, few are known to be effective. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether 10 d of supplementation with a defined source of baker's yeast β-glucan (BG, Wellmune WGP®) could minimise post-exercise immunosuppression. Recreationally active men and women (n 60) completed two 10 d trial conditions using a cross-over design with a 7 d washout period: placebo (rice flour) and baker's yeast BG (250 mg/d of β-1,3/1,6-glucans derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae) before a bout of cycling (49 ± 6 min) in a hot (38 ± 2°C), humid (45 ± 2 % relative humidity) environment. Blood was collected at baseline (before supplement), pre- (PRE), post- (POST) and 2 h (2H) post-exercise. Total and subset monocyte concentration was measured by four-colour flow cytometry. Plasma cytokine levels and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cytokine production were measured using separate multiplex assays. Total (CD14⁺) and pro-inflammatory monocyte concentrations (CD14⁺/CD16⁺) were significantly greater at POST and 2H (P<0·05) with BG supplementation. BG supplementation boosted LPS-stimulated production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) at PRE and POST (P<0·05). Plasma IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ concentrations were greater at 2H following BG supplementation. It appears that 10 d of supplementation with BG increased the potential of blood leucocytes for the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ. The key findings of the present study demonstrate that BG may have potential to alter immunity following a strenuous exercise session.

  11. Cytomegalovirus in inflammatory bowel disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Römkens, Tessa EH; Bulte, Geert J; Nissen, Loes HC; Drenth, Joost PH

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify definitions of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and intestinal disease, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to determine the prevalence associated with these definitions. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and interrogated PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane for literature on prevalence and diagnostics of CMV infection and intestinal disease in IBD patients. As medical headings we used “cytomegalovirus” OR “CMV” OR “cytomegalo virus” AND “inflammatory bowel disease” OR “IBD” OR “ulcerative colitis” OR “colitis ulcerosa” OR “Crohn’s disease”. Both MeSH-terms and free searches were performed. We included all types of English-language (clinical) trials concerning diagnostics and prevalence of CMV in IBD. RESULTS: The search strategy identified 924 citations, and 52 articles were eligible for inclusion. We identified 21 different definitions for CMV infection, 8 definitions for CMV intestinal disease and 3 definitions for CMV reactivation. Prevalence numbers depend on used definition, studied population and region. The highest prevalence for CMV infection was found when using positive serum PCR as a definition, whereas for CMV intestinal disease this applies to the use of tissue PCR > 10 copies/mg tissue. Most patients with CMV infection and intestinal disease had steroid refractory disease and came from East Asia. CONCLUSION: We detected multiple different definitions used for CMV infection and intestinal disease in IBD patients, which has an effect on prevalence numbers and eventually on outcome in different trials. PMID:26811669

  12. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial on the management of post-infective cough by inhaled ipratropium and salbutamol administered in combination.

    PubMed

    Zanasi, Alessandro; Lecchi, Marzia; Del Forno, Manuela; Fabbri, Elisa; Mastroroberto, Marianna; Mazzolini, Massimiliano; Pisani, Lara; Pandolfi, Paolo; Nava, Stefano; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria

    2014-12-01

    Post-viral cough is a type of cough originating from upper respiratory tract infections that persists after the infection is resolved. Although it was hypothesized that bronchodilators might have a role in the management of post-viral cough, a clear demonstration of their efficacy is missing. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of a combination of a β-agonist and an anticholinergic agent in reducing post-viral cough with a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial. Patients were treated for 10 days with either a nebulized combination of salbutamol 1.875 mg/0.5 mL and ipratropium bromide 0.375 mg/0.5 mL, or a placebo, and followed up for another 10 days. Daytime and nighttime cough severity and spirometry testing were assessed before starting treatment, after 10 and 20 days. Ninety-two patients were randomized to receive placebo (n = 46) or the active treatment (n = 46); nine of them (4 in the placebo group, 5 in the active treatment group) dropped out from the study. Daytime and nighttime cough severity were significantly reduced in both groups during the study period, but the reduction was more prominent in the active treatment group vs. placebo after 10 days of treatment (P = 0.003 for day cough; P = 0.061 for night cough), whereas at the end of follow-up period cough severity was comparable between the two groups. Small but significant increases in spirometric parameters were observed in the active treatment vs. placebo group, although at the end of follow-up these values returned to be comparable to placebo. The frequency of adverse events was not significantly different between the two groups of patients. We concluded that a combination of a β-agonist and an anticholinergic agent can effectively reduce post-viral cough, and can thus represent a valid option for this type of cough.

  13. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Major, Giles; Spiller, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to update the reader on current developments in our understanding of how the gut microbiota impact on inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome. It will also consider current efforts to modulate the microbiota for therapeutic effect. Recent findings Gene polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease increasingly suggest that interaction with the microbiota drives pathogenesis. This may be through modulation of the immune response, mucosal permeability or the products of microbial metabolism. Similar findings in irritable bowel syndrome have reinforced the role of gut-specific factors in this ‘functional’ disorder. Metagenomic analysis has identified alterations in pathways and interactions with the ecosystem of the microbiome that may not be recognized by taxonomic description alone, particularly in carbohydrate metabolism. Treatments targeted at the microbial stimulus with antibiotics, probiotics or prebiotics have all progressed in the past year. Studies on the long-term effects of treatment on the microbiome suggest that dietary intervention may be needed for prolonged efficacy. Summary The microbiome represents ‘the other genome’, and to appreciate its role in health and disease will be as challenging as with our own genome. Intestinal diseases occur at the front line of our interaction with the microbiome and their future treatment will be shaped as we unravel our relationship with it. PMID:24296462

  14. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Major, Giles; Spiller, Robin

    2014-02-01

    The review aims to update the reader on current developments in our understanding of how the gut microbiota impact on inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome. It will also consider current efforts to modulate the microbiota for therapeutic effect. Gene polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease increasingly suggest that interaction with the microbiota drives pathogenesis. This may be through modulation of the immune response, mucosal permeability or the products of microbial metabolism. Similar findings in irritable bowel syndrome have reinforced the role of gut-specific factors in this 'functional' disorder. Metagenomic analysis has identified alterations in pathways and interactions with the ecosystem of the microbiome that may not be recognized by taxonomic description alone, particularly in carbohydrate metabolism. Treatments targeted at the microbial stimulus with antibiotics, probiotics or prebiotics have all progressed in the past year. Studies on the long-term effects of treatment on the microbiome suggest that dietary intervention may be needed for prolonged efficacy. The microbiome represents 'the other genome', and to appreciate its role in health and disease will be as challenging as with our own genome. Intestinal diseases occur at the front line of our interaction with the microbiome and their future treatment will be shaped as we unravel our relationship with it.

  15. The post-transcriptional regulator CsrA plays a central role in the adaptation of bacterial pathogens to different stages of infection in animal hosts.

    PubMed

    Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Burrowes, Elizabeth; Baysse, Christine; Ermel, Gwennola

    2008-01-01

    The importance of Csr post-transcriptional systems is gradually emerging; these systems control a variety of virulence-linked physiological traits in many pathogenic bacteria. This review focuses on the central role that Csr systems play in the pathogenesis of certain bacteria and in the establishment of successful infections in animal hosts. Csr systems appear to control the 'switch' between different physiological states in the infection process; for example switching pathogens from a colonization state to a persistence state. Csr systems are controlled by two-component sensor/regulator systems and by non-coding RNAs. In addition, recent findings suggest that the RNA chaperone Hfq may play an integral role in Csr-mediated bacterial adaptation to the host environment.

  16. Cold atmospheric plasma for local infection control and subsequent pain reduction in a patient with chronic post-operative ear infection

    PubMed Central

    Isbary, G; Shimizu, T; Zimmermann, J L; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E; Stolz, W

    2013-01-01

    Following surgery of cholesteatoma, a patient developed a chronic infection of the external auditory canal, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, which caused severe pain. The application of cold atmospheric plasma resulted in a significant reduction in pain and clearance of bacterial carriage, allowing antibiotics and analgesics to be ceased. PMID:25356328

  17. Neutralizing Antibodies Induced by Recombinant Virus-Like Particles of Enterovirus 71 Genotype C4 Inhibit Infection at Pre- and Post-attachment Steps

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Zhiqiang; Ye, Xiaohua; Huang, Xulin; Cai, Yicun; Liu, Qingwei; Li, Yan; Su, Zhiguo; Huang, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease, which has been prevalent in Asia–Pacific regions, causing significant morbidity and mortality in young children. Antibodies elicited by experimental EV71 vaccines could neutralize infection in vitro and passively protect animal models from lethal challenge, indicating that neutralizing antibodies play an essential role in protection. However, how neutralizing antibodies inhibit infection in vitro remains unclear. Methods/Findings In the present study, we explored the mechanisms of neutralization by antibodies against EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs). Recombinant VLPs of EV71 genotype C4 were produced in insect cells using baculovirus vectors. Immunization with the VLPs elicited a high-titer, EV71-specific antibody response in mice. Anti-VLP mouse sera potently neutralized EV71 infection in vitro. The neutralizing antibodies in the anti-VLP mouse sera were found to target mainly an extremely conserved epitope (FGEHKQEKDLEYGAC) located at the GH loop of the VP1 protein. The neutralizing anti-VLP antisera were able to inhibit virus binding to target cells efficiently. In addition, post-attachment treatment of virus-bound cells with the anti-VLP antisera also neutralized virus infection, although the antibody concentration required was higher than that of the pre-attachment treatment. Conclusions Collectively, our findings represent a valuable addition to the understanding of mechanisms of EV71 neutralization and have strong implications for EV71 vaccine development. PMID:23451250

  18. Safety and efficacy of micafungin for prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in Japanese patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Results of a post-marketing surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Chie; Hanadate, Tomoko; Niwa, Toshiro; Hirano, Yasuno; Yoshiyasu, Takashi; So, Masahiro; Matsui, Keita

    2015-06-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A prospective multicenter post-marketing observational surveillance study was conducted from July 2007 to June 2010 to assess the safety and efficacy of micafungin, an echinocandin antifungal, for prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in Japanese patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Among 241 patients evaluated for safety, 143 adverse drug reactions were reported in 86 patients (35.7%), with hepatobiliary disorders the most frequently reported adverse drug reactions. The success rate for prophylaxis at the end of observation was 72.8% (131/180 patients), and the incidence of breakthrough infections was only 4.4% (8/180 patients). In conclusion, micafungin had sufficient safety and efficacy for prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in Japanese patients with various backgrounds undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Small bowel magnetic resonance imaging for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Schunk, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    The presented concept of hydro-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 2.5% mannitol solution as an orally applicable intraluminal contrast agent is a meaningful, reproducible, and reliable imaging method for the depiction of the small bowel. Especially in patients with Crohn's disease, hydro-MRI is the imaging method of first choice because hydro-MRI offers the advantage of a superior depiction of the inflamed bowel wall and the extramural complications of this disease without radiation exposure. In addition, hydro-MRI allows for a reliable assessment of the inflammatory activity, especially for the differentiation between an active and an inactive (scarred) stenosis. In particular, the mural enhancement, the length as well as the wall thickness of inflamed bowel segments, are considered to be significant MR parameters for the determination of the activity of Crohn's disease. Hydro-MRI of the colon is suitable for the depiction of pathologic changes in ulcerative colitis, but in contrast to Crohn's disease, the assessment of disease activity by hydro-MRI is unreliable in ulcerative colitis, probably because of the low spatial resolution (mucositis in ulcerative colitis vs. transmural inflammation in Crohn's disease). Hydro-MRI does not allow a reliable classification of inflammatory bowel diseases, but in ambiguous cases, hydro-MRI may provide helpful information for the differentiation of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. There are no data of larger patient groups published regarding MR findings in inflammatory bowel diseases besides Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, but hydro-MRI is a promising imaging tool for these entities, which should be assessed in additional studies.

  20. Natural infection with peste des petits ruminants virus: a pre and post vaccinal assessment following an outbreak scenario.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, Muhammad; Arshed, Muhammad Javed; Zahur, Aamir Bin; Ali, Qurban; Banyard, Ashley C

    2012-07-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) infection was confirmed in a herd of goats (n = 55) at an organised farm in Islamabad, Pakistan. PPRV infection was confirmed using both antigen- and antibody-based detection methods, haemagglutination (HA) tests and molecular methods. Animals that survived natural infection developed a typical serological response and virus antigen was detected in fecal matter. Following determination of serological response to infection animals were grouped and either vaccinated or left unvaccinated: group 1 animals succumbed to infection (n = 5) and samples were analysed for PPRV antigen; group 2 animals developed clinical disease (n = 10) and were divided into 2 groups, half being vaccinated (group 2a) whilst the remainder were unvaccinated (group 2b); group 3 (n = 15) animals included those that developed only very mild clinical disease or no clinical disease; group 4 animals (n = 5) were negative for clinical disease and were housed as a negative control group. A variable antibody response was detected following resolution of the initial outbreak. Excretion of virus antigen was assessed at different time points following vaccination. Importantly, animals that were vaccinated (group 2a) excreted antigen in fecal matter for 1 month following vaccination whilst unvaccinated animals (group 2b) continued to shed virus antigen for 2 months. The potential for virus excretion in fecal matter and effects of vaccination upon virus infection are discussed. We postulate that excretion in fecal material may represent a mechanism of virus transmission following natural infection and that this mechanism may demonstrate a potential method by which PPRV outbreaks occur spontaneously in areas not previously known to have circulating virus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A multidisciplinary approach to short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Denegri, Andrea; Paparo, Francesco; Denegri, Roberto; Revelli, Matteo; Frascio, Marco; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Fornaro, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a complex clinical picture, characterized by signs and symptoms of malabsorption and subsequent malnutrition, which often occurs after extensive bowel resections. Short bowel syndrome's treatment must begin together with the planning of the first surgery, especially for disease that may need multiple interventions. Patients with short bowel should be individually managed because they all are different in diagnosis, length of the remaining bowel and in psychosocial characteristics. For all these reasons, a multidisciplinary approach between the various specialists is therefore needed.

  2. Effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating intestinal hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Long, Yanqin; Liu, Ying; Tong, Jingjing; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiaohua

    2010-06-25

    Trimebutine maleate, which modulates the calcium and potassium channels, relieves abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, its effect on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome is not clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating colonic hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Mice infected up to 8 weeks with T. spiralis underwent abdominal withdrawal reflex to colorectal distention to evaluate the visceral sensitivity at different time points. Tissues were examined for histopathology scores. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared in the organ bath under basal condition or to be stimulated by acetylcholine and potassium chloride, and consecutive concentrations of trimebutine maleate were added to the bath to record the strip responses. Significant inflammation was observed in the intestines of the mice infected 2 weeks, and it resolved in 8 weeks after infection. Visceral hyperalgesia and colonic muscle hypercontractility emerged after infection, and trimebutine maleate could effectively reduce the colonic hyperreactivity. Hypercontractility of the colonic muscle stimulated by acetylcholine and high K(+) could be inhibited by trimebutine maleate in solution with Ca(2+), but not in Ca(2+) free solution. Compared with 8-week postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome group, 2-week acute infected strips were much more sensitive to the stimulators and the drug trimebutine maleate. Trimebutine maleate was effective in reducing the colonic muscle hypercontractility of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome mice. The findings may provide evidence for trimebutine maleate to treat postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome patients effectively.

  3. Transanal presentation of a distal ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter: Management of bowel perforation without laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bales, James; Morton, Ryan P.; Airhart, Nathan; Flum, David; Avellino, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bowel perforation is a serious but rare complication after a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) procedure. Prior studies have reported spontaneous bowel perforation after VPS placement in adults of up to 0.07%. Transanal catheter protrusion is a potential presentation of VPS bowel perforation and places a patient at risk for both peritonitis and ventriculitis/meningitis via retrograde migration of bacteria. This delayed complication can be fatal if unrecognized, with a 15% risk of mortality secondary to ventriculitis, peritonitis, or sepsis. Case Description: We describe a unique case of a patient with distal VPS catheter protrusion from the anus whose bowel perforation did not cause clinical sequelae of infection. We were able to manage the patient without laparotomy. Conclusions: A subset of patients can be managed without laparotomy and only with externalization of the ventricular shunt with antibiotics until the cerebrospinal fluid cultures finalize without growth. PMID:28194303

  4. Occurrence and infection of Cladosporium, Fusarium, Epicoccum and Aureobasidium in withered rotten grapes during post-harvest dehydration.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Marilinda; Zapparoli, Giacomo

    2015-11-01

    Fungi like Cladosporium, Fusarium, Epicoccum and Aureobasidium can occur on withered grapes causing spoilage of passito wine. There is little or no information on the pathogenic role of these fungi. This study describes the isolation, incidence and identification of several isolates from different withered rotten grapes. Representative isolates grouped in several phenotypes were identified by phylogenetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer, actin or elongation factor gene sequences. Isolates of Cladosporium and Fusarium were ascribed to different species, of these C. ramotenellum, C. halotolerans and F. graminearum were isolated from Vitis vinifera for the first time. All Epicoccum and Aureobasidium isolates belonged to E. nigrum and A. pullulans, respectively. Random amplified DNA polymorphism analysis showed high level of heterogenicity among Epicoccum and Fusarium isolates. Infection assays were carried out to evaluate infectivity in some strains under different withering conditions. Fusarium spp. strains had similar infectivity, while significant variability was observed among Cladosporium spp. and E. nigrum strains. A. pullulans resulted particularly infective. This study provided insights into the occurrence and infection of these fungi in fruit-drying rooms with important implications towards control management during the withering.

  5. Decreasing salinity of seawater moderates immune response and increases survival rate of giant groupers post betanodavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tz-Shiang; Wu, Yu-Chi; Chi, Shau-Chi

    2016-10-01

    Giant groupers (Epinephelus lanceolatus), an important aquaculture fish in Asia, are attacked by nervous necrosis virus (NNV), belonging to betanodavirus. Environmental salinity can affect fish immunity and physiology. We examined whether decreasing salinity from 30 to 15 ppt during acclimation of groupers could affect survival with NNV infection and the associated factors. Although NNV infection decreased muscle moisture, up-regulated the gene expression of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter isoform 2, and elevated plasma cortisol level in groupers, these factors were not related to the higher mortality of groupers reared at 30-ppt salinity (S30-groupers), compared to 15-ppt reared groupers (S15-groupers). Infected S30-groupers exhibited high leukocyte count and innate immune gene expression level. Moreover, NNV-infected dead S30-groupers showed high IL-1β gene expression level but low NNV load in the brain. The high or excess IL-1β gene expression levels in the brain of NNV-infected S30-groupers may be the factor in high mortality.

  6. Neoplasms of the Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Howard; Crichlow, Robert W.; Caplan, Howard S.

    1974-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are unusual lesions exhibiting nonspecific clinical features often diagnosed at an advanced stage. In the cases studied at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania nearly all the 32 patients with malignancies were symptomatic whereas in the 34 patients with benign lesions the condition was discovered as an incidental finding in about half of the patients. Weight loss, palpable mass or anemia usually indicated malignancy. Small bowel radiography was the most useful diagnostic aid in the present series. While the etiology of these lesions is unknown, villous adenomas probably bear a relationship to carcinoma. The association between chronic regional enteritis and small bowel tumors is unestablished but suggestive. An analysis of reported series reveals a disproportionate incidence of additional primary tumors in patients with small bowel neoplasms. Surgical extirpation is indicated for curative treatment. In the present series, resection in hope of cure was carried out in 25 of 32 malignant tumors resulting in eight five-year survivals. One of these latter lived nine years with disseminated malignant carcinoid reflecting the occasional indolent course of this tumor. PMID:4842978

  7. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Children)

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a defect in the body's immune system . continue What Are the Symptoms of IBD? Inflammatory bowel disease can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe. Symptoms can include: diarrhea that happens again and again, with or without ...

  8. Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... bedtime. Daytime activities also affect sleep, so regular exercise and avoidance of napping can greatly improve nighttime sleep. Unfortunately, it is safe to say that the average doctor does not necessarily ask about sleep disturbance in patients with functional bowel disorders, and patients ...

  9. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dhatt, Harpreet S.; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, CT findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In this chapter we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and non-occlusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. In the setting of an acute abdomen, rapid evaluation is necessary to identify intraabdominal processes that require emergent surgical intervention (1). While a wide-range of intraabdominal diseases may be present from trauma to inflammation, one of the most feared disorders is mesenteric ischemia, also known as intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel (2). Initial imaging evaluation for intestinal ischemia is typically obtained with CT. Close attention to technique and search for key radiologic features with relation to the CT technique is required. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the vascular anatomy, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of various forms of mesenteric ischemia and their corresponding radiological findings on MDCT. At imaging, not only is inspection of the bowel itself important, but evaluation of the mesenteric fat, vasculature, and surrounding peritoneal cavity also helps improves accuracy in the diagnosis of bowel ischemia. PMID:26526436

  10. Lymphoproliferative disorders in inflammatory bowel disease patients on immunosuppression: Lessons from other inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Grace Y; Halloran, Brendan P; Peters, Anthea C; Fedorak, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents, such as thiopurines, methotrexate, and biologics, have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, a number of case reports, case control studies and retrospective studies over the last decade have identified a concerning link between immunosuppression and lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), the oncological phenomenon whereby lymphocytes divide uncontrollably. These LPDs have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the virus provides the impetus for malignant transformation while immunosuppression hampers the immune system’s ability to detect and clear these malignant cells. As such, the use of immunosuppressive agents may come at the cost of increased risk of developing LPD. While little is known about the LPD risk in IBD, more is known about immunosuppression in the post-transplantation setting and the development of EBV associated post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). In review of the PTLD literature, evidence is available to demonstrate that certain immune suppressants such as cyclosporine and T-lymphocyte modulators in particular are associated with an increased risk of PTLD development. As well, high doses of immunosuppressive agents and multiple immunosuppressive agent use are also linked to increased PTLD development. Here, we discuss these findings in context of IBD and what future studies can be taken to understand and reduce the risk of EBV-associated LPD development from immunosuppression use in IBD. PMID:26600976

  11. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  12. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged.

  13. Modeling aging in HIV infection in nonhuman primates to address an emerging challenge of the post-ART era.

    PubMed

    He, Tianyu; Falwell, Elizabeth; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Pandrea, Ivona

    2017-08-01

    The advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically improved both quality and length of life for subjects infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), delaying or preventing progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, the virus induces aging-related changes to the immune system which confound treatment. Additionally, the normal physiologic events that occur during aging lead to deficiencies in immunity which not only exacerbate HIV pathogenesis but also trigger a variety of comorbidities. Here, the synergistic linkage between aging and HIV infection is examined in regard to the immunological and pathological mechanisms that drive both senescence and disease progression. The use of NHPs to investigate potential therapeutic strategies to control the deleterious consequences of aging with HIV infection is also reviewed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for treatment of post- renal transplant hepatitis C infection: A case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jha, R; Fatima, R; Lakhtakia, S; Jha, A; Srikant, P; Narayan, G

    2016-01-01

    Liver disease due to hepatitis C infection in renal transplant recipients is difficult to treat and often associated with reduced patient survival. A 43-year-old male, a renal allograft recipient, presented at 6 years follow-up with significant weight loss over 3 months. He was detected to have new onset diabetes mellitus together with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (genotype 1). His HCV load remained high despite the change of immuno-suppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine. A decision to treat with a new anti-viral combination of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for 12 weeks was taken. Within 3 weeks, his raised serum transaminases levels normalized and viral load became undetectable. At the end of 16 weeks, he continues to do well with normal renal function, has sustained remission from hepatitis C infection and resolution of diabetes.

  15. Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for treatment of post- renal transplant hepatitis C infection: A case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jha, R.; Fatima, R.; Lakhtakia, S.; Jha, A.; Srikant, P.; Narayan, G.

    2016-01-01

    Liver disease due to hepatitis C infection in renal transplant recipients is difficult to treat and often associated with reduced patient survival. A 43-year-old male, a renal allograft recipient, presented at 6 years follow-up with significant weight loss over 3 months. He was detected to have new onset diabetes mellitus together with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (genotype 1). His HCV load remained high despite the change of immuno-suppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine. A decision to treat with a new anti-viral combination of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for 12 weeks was taken. Within 3 weeks, his raised serum transaminases levels normalized and viral load became undetectable. At the end of 16 weeks, he continues to do well with normal renal function, has sustained remission from hepatitis C infection and resolution of diabetes. PMID:27194839

  16. Post-operative endophthalmitis: the application of hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) to an infection control problem.

    PubMed

    Baird, D R; Henry, M; Liddell, K G; Mitchell, C M; Sneddon, J G

    2001-09-01

    Hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) is a quality assurance system widely used in the food industry to ensure safety. We adopted the HACCP approach when conventional infection control measures had failed to solve an ongoing problem with an increased incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis, and our ophthalmology unit was threatened with permanent cessation of intraocular surgery. Although time-consuming, the result was an entirely new set of protocols for the care of patients undergoing intraocular surgery, the development of an integrated care pathway, and a comprehensive and robust audit programme, which enabled intraocular surgery to continue in a new spirit of confidence. HACCP methodology has so far been little used in healthcare, but it might be usefully applied to a variety of apparently intractable infection control problems. Copyright 2001 The Hospital Infection Society.

  17. Compliance with American Urological Association Guidelines for Post-Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Antibiotics Does Not Appear to Increase Rates of Infection.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sameer; Sternberg, Kevan; Hernandez, Natalia; Eisner, Brian H

    2015-10-01

    We compared infection rates after percutaneous nephrolithotomy in a group of patients without a history of infection or struvite calculi who received 24 hours or less of antibiotics postoperatively (ie compliance with AUA guidelines) vs a group that received 5 to 7 days of antibiotics postoperatively. We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomy procedures in patients without a history of urinary tract infection. Group 1 received 24 hours or less of antibiotics postoperatively and group 2 received a mean of 6 days of antibiotics postoperatively. A total of 52 patients in group 1 (24 hours or less of antibiotics) and 30 in group 2 (mean 6 days of antibiotics) met study inclusion criteria. In 5 group 1 patients (9.6%) fever developed within 72 hours of percutaneous nephrolithotomy but none demonstrated bacteriuria or bacteremia on cultures. No patient in group 1 was treated for urinary tract infection on postoperative days 3 to 14. In 4 group 2 patients (13.3%) fever developed within 72 hours of percutaneous nephrolithotomy. A single patient showed bacteriuria (less than 10,000 cfu mixed gram-positive bacteria) on culture while no patient demonstrated bacteremia. No patient in group 2 was treated for urinary tract infection on postoperative days 3 to 14. There was no difference in stone-free rates or the need for additional procedures between the 2 groups. In this pilot series compliance with AUA guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis did not result in higher rates of infection than in a comparable group of 30 patients who received approximately 6 days of antibiotics postoperatively. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cryptococcus neoformans and Streptococcus pneumoniae co-infection in post-traumatic meningitis in a patient with unknown HIV status.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Faryal; Fasih, Naima; Zafar, Afia

    2015-10-01

    Meningitis is a serious disease associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Mixed meningeal infections due to bacteria and fungi are exceptionally rare. Here we report a case of meningeal co-infection with cryptococcus neoformans and streptococcus pneumoniae in a patient with unknown human immunodeficiency virus status. Because of the rarity of such cases, stringent screening of every cerebrospinal fluid specimen to exclude the presence of multiple pathogens is imperative. Assessment of patients for immunodeficiencies in case of isolation of an opportunistic organism like cryptococcus is also needed.

  19. A review of the irritable bowel syndrome investigation on epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathophysiology in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinsong; Hou, Xiaohua

    2011-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional disorder with poor understanding on its pathogenesis and pathology. China has huge amount of population and have a lot of literatures on IBS in Chinese publications. The aim of this article was to review the reported investigations on IBS in China and discuss the difference between China and other country. Literatures pertaining IBS epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathophysiology, which published in the high level journals in china and SCI journals after 1998 were reviewed. In the general health population, 5-6% meets the Rome II IBS criteria. Intestinal infection, food intolerance, genetic factor and psychological disturbance were responsible for the pathogenesis of IBS. In IBS patients, the impaired reaction to rectal distension, abnormal gastrointestinal motility, impaired autonomic nerve function, weakened colon epithelium connection, altered cerebral nuclei activation were the main pathophysiological findings. Comparing to the findings from other area, literatures from China provided more evidences on epidemiological data of IBS in China, post-infection IBS, visceral hypertension and gastrointestinal motility abnormalities in IBS. This detailed literature review may help the understanding and promoting the future studies on IBS. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Efficacy of CMX001 as a Post Exposure Antiviral in New Zealand White Rabbits Infected with Rabbitpox Virus, a Model for Orthopoxvirus Infections of Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Amanda D.; Adams, Mathew M.; Wallace, Greg; Burrage, Andrew M.; Lindsey, Scott F.; Smith, Andrew J.; Swetnam, Daniele; Manning, Brandi R.; Gray, Stacey A.; Lampert, Bernhard; Foster, Scott; Lanier, Randall; Robertson, Alice; Painter, George; Moyer, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    CMX001, a lipophilic nucleotide analog formed by covalently linking 3-(hexdecyloxy)propan-1-ol to cidofovir (CDV), is being developed as a treatment for smallpox. In the absence of human cases of smallpox, new treatments must be tested for efficacy in animal models. Previously, we demonstrated the efficacy of CMX001 in protecting New Zealand White rabbits from mortality following intradermal infection with rabbitpox virus as a model for smallpox, monkeypox and for treatment of adverse reactions to smallpox vaccination. Here we extend these studies by exploring different dosing regimens and performing randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled studies. In addition, because rabbitpox virus can be transmitted via naturally generated aerosols (animal to animal transmission), we report on studies to test the efficacy of CMX001 in protecting rabbits from lethal rabbitpox virus disease when infection occurs by animal to animal transmission. In all cases, CMX001 treatment was initiated at the onset of observable lesions in the ears to model the use of CMX001 as a treatment for symptomatic smallpox. The results demonstrate that CMX001 is an effective treatment for symptomatic rabbitpox virus infection. The rabbitpox model has key similarities to human smallpox including an incubation period, generalized systemic disease, the occurrence of lesions which may be used as a trigger for initiating therapy, and natural animal to animal spread, making it an appropriate model. PMID:21373379

  1. A Single HIV-1 Cluster and a Skewed Immune Homeostasis Drive the Early Spread of HIV among Resting CD4+ Cell Subsets within One Month Post-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Nembot, Georges; Mélard, Adeline; Blanc, Catherine; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Slama, Laurence; Allegre, Thierry; Allavena, Clotilde; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Duvivier, Claudine; Katlama, Christine; Goujard, Cécile; Seksik, Bao Chau Phung; Leplatois, Anne; Molina, Jean-Michel; Meyer, Laurence; Autran, Brigitte; Rouzioux, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing therapeutic strategies for an HIV cure requires better understanding the characteristics of early HIV-1 spread among resting CD4+ cells within the first month of primary HIV-1 infection (PHI). We studied the immune distribution, diversity, and inducibility of total HIV-DNA among the following cell subsets: monocytes, peripheral blood activated and resting CD4 T cells, long-lived (naive [TN] and central-memory [TCM]) and short-lived (transitional-memory [TTM] and effector-memory cells [TEM]) resting CD4+T cells from 12 acutely-infected individuals recruited at a median 36 days from infection. Cells were sorted for total HIV-DNA quantification, phylogenetic analysis and inducibility, all studied in relation to activation status and cell signaling. One month post-infection, a single CCR5-restricted viral cluster was massively distributed in all resting CD4+ subsets from 88% subjects, while one subject showed a slight diversity. High levels of total HIV-DNA were measured among TN (median 3.4 log copies/million cells), although 10-fold less (p = 0.0005) than in equally infected TCM (4.5), TTM (4.7) and TEM (4.6) cells. CD3−CD4+ monocytes harbored a low viral burden (median 2.3 log copies/million cells), unlike equally infected resting and activated CD4+ T cells (4.5 log copies/million cells). The skewed repartition of resting CD4 subsets influenced their contribution to the pool of resting infected CD4+T cells, two thirds of which consisted of short-lived TTM and TEM subsets, whereas long-lived TN and TCM subsets contributed the balance. Each resting CD4 subset produced HIV in vitro after stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28+IL-2 with kinetics and magnitude varying according to subset differentiation, while IL-7 preferentially induced virus production from long-lived resting TN cells. In conclusion, within a month of infection, a clonal HIV-1 cluster is massively distributed among resting CD4 T-cell subsets with a flexible inducibility, suggesting that

  2. The Association Between Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Markers of Inflammation and Immune Activation in HIV-Infected Individuals With Controlled Viremia.

    PubMed

    Siyahhan Julnes, Peter; Auh, Sungyoung; Krakora, Rebecca; Withers, Keenan; Nora, Diana; Matthews, Lindsay; Steinbach, Sally; Snow, Joseph; Smith, Bryan; Nath, Avindra; Morse, Caryn; Kapetanovic, Suad

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be associated with chronic immune dysregulation and a proinflammatory state. Among HIV-infected individuals, PTSD is associated with greater morbidity and mortality, but the association with immune dysfunction has not been evaluated. This study explores the association between PTSD and selected markers of inflammation and immune activation in a cohort of HIV-infected, virally-suppressed individuals. HIV-infected adults who were virologically controlled on antiretroviral medications were recruited through a screening protocol for studies of HIV-related neurocognitive disorders. Each participant underwent blood draws, urine toxicology screen, and completed the Client Diagnostic Questionnaire, a semistructured psychiatric interview. Of 114 eligible volunteers, 72 (63%) were male, 77 (68%) African American, and 34 (30%) participants met criteria for PTSD. Participants with PTSD were more likely to be current smokers (79%) than those without (60%) (p = 0.05). The PTSD cohort had significantly higher total white blood cell counts (5318 and 6404 cells/uL, p = 0.03), absolute neutrophil count (2767 and 3577 cells/uL, p = 0.02), CD8% (43 and 48, p = 0.05), and memory CD8% (70 and 78%, p = 0.04); lower naïve CD8% (30 and 22%, p = 0.04) and higher rate of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >3mg/L (29 and 20, p = 0.03). A high prevalence of PTSD was identified in this cohort of HIV-infected adults who were virally suppressed. These results suggest that PTSD may be associated with immune dysregulation even among antiretroviral therapy-adherent HIV-infected individuals. Published by Elsevier Inc.