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Sample records for post menopausal women

  1. Why Do Only Some Women Develop Post-Menopausal Osteoporosis?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    turnover and net bone loss. Fortunately, only 25-30% of post-menopausal women will develop vertebral fractures – the hallmark of post-menopausal...sex steroids results in increased bone turnover and net bone loss. Fortunately, only 25-30% of post- menopausal women will develop vertebral ...achieve. Therefore greater expenditures on reagents, etc have been incurred. Significant changes in use or care of human subjects, vertebrate

  2. Treatment of hyperprolactinemia in post-menopausal women: pros.

    PubMed

    Iacovazzo, D; De Marinis, L

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of hyperprolactinemia in women peaks during the 3rd-4th decade and then greatly decreases after the menopause. Apart from the effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, prolactin can act directly on bone metabolism. Hyperprolactinemia is a recognized cause of secondary osteoporosis, and treatment with dopamine agonists can lead to improved BMD. Moreover, hyperprolactinemia has been linked to weight gain and insulin resistance, which can be ameliorated following medical treatment. Although relatively rare, prolactinomas can be observed in post-menopausal women and are frequently large and invasive; dopamine agonists appear to be as effective in these patients as in younger women to induce reduction of prolactin levels and tumour shrinkage. Here, we review data potentially favouring medical treatment with dopamine agonists in post-menopausal women diagnosed with hyperprolactinemia.

  3. Cortical porosity exhibits accelerated rate of change in peri- compared with post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Burt, L A; Bhatla, J L; Hanley, D A; Boyd, S K

    2017-01-10

    The rate of change in bone density was not different between peri- and post-menopausal women. Differences in rate of change were observed in bone microarchitecture, specifically cortical porosity (Ct.Po), where peri-menopausal women increased +9% per year compared with the +6% per year for post-menopausal women.

  4. Association between Estrogen Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Depression in Post-Menopausal Women: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Pae, Chi Un; Kim, Mi Ran; Min, Jung Ah; Kim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Chang Uk; Lee, Chul; Paik, In Ho

    2010-01-01

    Post-menopausal women experience variable biological and psychological changes. The effect of reduced levels of estrogen can effect on post-menopausal depression. Estrogen triggers physiological responses by binding to the estrogen receptor (ER). Two subtypes of ER, ERa and ERb are now known. We investigated the significance of ERa and ERb polymorphisms and post-menopasal depression in this study. Forty three women with post-menopausal depression and 63 post-menopausal women without depression as normal controls were recruited. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was used to investigate genotypes of ERa and ERb polymorphisms. Genotypes of PvuII and XbaI polymorphism of ERa receptor were significantly different in patients with post-menopausal depression comparing with controls. Genotypes of ERb did not show association with post-menopausal depression. Our study showed that ERa receptor polymorphism had an association with depression in post-menopausal women. It suggests that investigation of ER genes and their functions might be important for understanding pathophysilogical mechanism of post-menopausal depression. PMID:20927313

  5. The Effect of Support Group Method on Quality of Life in Post-menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Yazdkhasti, M; Keshavarz, M; Khoei, ES Merghaati; Hosseini, AF; ESmaeilzadeh, S; Pebdani, M Amiri; Jafarzadeh, H

    2012-01-01

    Background Quality of life in post-menopausal women and menopausal symptoms are closely related concepts. Influence health education policy in order to promote health and adopt a menopause lifestyle requires alternative strategies, including health training programs with community – based interventions. The current study aims to survey the effects of support groups on quality of life of post-menopausal women. Methods: A blind field trial (2010) was conducted at Saadatmandii Clinical Center (Robat Karim, Iran). 110 women were selected randomly divided into test and control groups (consisting of 55 ones). Menopause specific quality of life questionnaire (MENQOL) was used for evaluation of life quality before and three months after intervention; there was no intervention in the control group. Data were analyzed by using SPSS/16. Qualitative variables were analyzed using chi-square tests and quantitative variables were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon test, paired T-test and independent t-test. Results: There was significant difference between vasomotor, psychosocial, physical, sexual aspects and life quality of this group pf women (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the quality of life of women in control group. Conclusion: According to the results method of support group can lead to improved quality of life for post-menopausal ones and it can be appropriate healthcare policy to promote health and improve life quality of this group of women. PMID:23304680

  6. Predictors of weight variation and weight gain in peri- and post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Filipa; Maroco, João; Ramos, Catarina; Leal, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    This research encompasses a community sample of 497 women in peri- and post-menopause and uses structural equation modelling to investigate the structural models of weight variation and weight gain. Variables such as body shape concerns, depression, stress and life events are explored. Weight gain (from pre-menopause to current menopausal status) was observed in 69 per cent of participants. The predictors of weight gain were lower education level (β = -.146, p = .017), less or no physical exercise (β = -.111, p = .021), having a recent psychological problem (β = .191, p < .001), transition from peri- to post-menopause (β = .147, p = .013) and more frequent body shape concerns (β = .313, p < .001). Prevention of weight gain in pre-menopause is recommended; risk groups should be targeted considering the predictors of weight increase.

  7. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TUBERCULOSIS AND FEMALE HORMONE LEVELS IN POST-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN.

    PubMed

    Erbay, Gulru; Senol, Gunes; Anar, Ceyda; Meral, Ali Riza; Tuzel, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an intracellular infection controlled by T-lymphocyte. After menopause, T-lymphocyte cells counts increase suggesting a possible link between T-lymphocyte cell counts and estrogen and progesterone levels. In this study we compared post-menopausal women with and without TB to determine any differences in estrogen and progesterone levels between the two groups. The study group consisted of 38 post-menapausal women hospitalized for TB at Dr Suat Seren Chest Diseases and Surgery Training and Research Hospital for Tuberculosis, in Izmir, Turkey. The control group consisted of 30 post-menopausal women without TB. Both groups were selected from patients without immunosuppressive diseases or malignancies in whom PPD testing was not contraindicated. The mean progesterone level in the control group was 0.3896 ± 0.2014 ng/ml and in the study group was 0.3607 ± 0.3006 ng/ml (p = 0.638). The mean estrogen level in the control group was 18.9873 ± 6.5332 pg/ml and in the study group was 26.2768 ± 14.3418 pg/ml; the difference was significant (p = 0.007). The body mass index in the study group was significantly (p = 0.034) lower than in the study group. In post-menopausal women, the mean estrogen level was significantly higher in participants with TB than those without TB.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Salivary Alkaline Phosphatase in Post menopausal Women with and without Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sophia, Khumukcham; Sudhakar, Uma; Jayakumar, Parvathee; Mathew, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alkaline phosphatase is an intracellular destruction enzyme in the periodontium, and it takes part in the normal turnover of the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, and root cementum formation and maintenance. Aim The aim of this case control study was to evaluate the enzyme Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) level in saliva of post menopausal women with and without chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods In this study, 40 individuals, satisfying the study inclusion and exclusion criteria, were recruited. They were categorically divided, on the basis of gingival index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level, into two groups: Group I (post menopausal women with a clinically healthy periodontium, n=20); and Group II (post menopausal women with generalized chronic periodontitis, n=20). Clinical parameters assessed were Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) and Probing Pocket Depth (PPD). Unstimulated salivary samples were obtained in which the ALP concentration was measured using p-Nitrophenylphosphate, and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol reagents in Beckman and Coulter, AU 480 auto analyser. Mann-Whitney U test was used to find statistical difference with respect to all clinical parameters such as PI, GI, CAL, PPD and salivary ALP levels. Results The mean ALP in saliva was found to be higher in Group II compared to Group I and the difference was statistically significant with the p-value of 0.008. Conclusion A noteworthy increase in the ALP concentration was seen in saliva in our study (Group II) may be due to increased periodontal inflammation in post menopausal women. Thus salivary ALP can be taken as an additional biomarker to early diagnosis, development and progression of periodontitis especially among post menopausal women. PMID:28274061

  9. Post-Menopausal? Give Exercise a Try

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163625.html Post-Menopausal? Give Exercise a Try Study participants were fitter, felt better -- ... Feb. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- After menopause, moderate exercise can help women manage hot flashes, become more ...

  10. Serum concentrations of selected endogenous estrogen and estrogen metabolites in pre- and post-menopausal Chinese women with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gao, W; Zeng, C; Cai, D; Liu, B; Li, Y; Wen, X; Chen, Y

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether serum levels of selected endogenous estrogens and their metabolites are involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in pre- and post-menopausal women with osteoarthritis. Sixty-four patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, 48 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the knee, and 48 healthy women were included in this study. Serum concentrations of estradiol and estrogen metabolites, such as 2- hydroxyestrone, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and 16α-hydroxyestrone, were measured by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our results show that the serum concentrations of free estradiol and total 2-hydroxyestrone were significantly lower in pre-menopausal women with OA compared to the levels detected in the control groups (RA and healthy women). While serum concentrations of free and total estradiol in post-menopausal women with OA was significantly decreased compared to those of the control groups, the level of total 2-hydroxyestradiol significantly increased in postmenopausal women. Furthermore, the total 2-hydroxyestrone concentration positively correlated with the total estradiol level in pre-menopausal women with OA. In addition, the total 2- hydroxyestradiol level positively correlated with free and total estradiol levels in post-menopausal women with OA. In conclusion, estradiol and estrogen metabolites, including 2-hydroxyestrone and 2-hydroxyestradiol, were found in the sera of pre- and post-menopausal women with OA. Except for free and total estradiol deficiency, a decreased serum level of total 2- hydroxyestrone in pre-menopausal women and an increased total 2-hydroxyestradiol level in post-menopausal women with OA may also correlate with the pathogenesis of female OA.

  11. Identifying post-menopausal women at elevated risk for epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nicole; Hawley, Sarah; Janes, Holly; Karlan, Beth Y.; Berg, Christine D.; Drescher, Charles W.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Palomares, Melanie R.; Daly, Mary B.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; O’Sullivan, Mary J.; Thorpe, Jason; Robinson, Randal D.; Lane, Dorothy; Li, Christopher I.; Anderson, Garnet L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We developed and validated a hybrid risk classifier combining serum markers and epidemiologic risk factors to identify post-menopausal women at elevated risk for invasive fallopian tube, primary peritoneal, and ovarian epithelial carcinoma. METHODS To select epidemiologic risk factors for use in the classifier, Cox proportional hazards analyses were conducted using 74,786 Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study (OS) participants. To construct a combination classifier, 210 WHI OS cases and 536 matched controls with serum marker measurements were analyzed; validation employed 143 cases and 725 matched controls from the WHI Clinical Trial (CT) with similar data. RESULTS Analyses identified a combination risk classifier composed of two elevated-risk groups: 1) women with CA125 or HE4 exceeding a 98% specificity threshold; and 2) women with intact fallopian tubes, prior use of menopausal hormone therapy for at least two years, and either a first degree relative with breast or ovarian cancer or a personal history of breast cancer. In the WHI OS population, it classified 13% of women as elevated risk, identifying 30% of ovarian cancers diagnosed up to 7.8 years post-enrollment (Hazard Ratio [HR]=2.6, p<0.001). In the WHI CT validation population, it classified 8% of women as elevated risk, identifying 31% of cancers diagnosed within 7 years of enrollment (HR=4.6, p<0.001). CONCLUSION CA125 and HE4 contributed significantly to a risk prediction classifier combining serum markers with epidemiologic risk factors. The hybrid risk classifier may be useful to identify post-menopausal women who would benefit from timely surgical intervention to prevent epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:26343159

  12. Impact of Estrogen Therapy on Lymphocyte Homeostasis and the Response to Seasonal Influenza Vaccine in Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Flora; Rivera, Andrea; Park, Byung; Messerle-Forbes, Marci; Jensen, Jeffrey T.; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognized that changes in levels of ovarian steroids modulate severity of autoimmune disease and immune function in young adult women. These observations suggest that the loss of ovarian steroids associated with menopause could affect the age-related decline in immune function, known as immune senescence. Therefore, in this study, we determined the impact of menopause and estrogen therapy (ET) on lymphocyte subset frequency as well as the immune response to seasonal influenza vaccine in three different groups: 1) young adult women (regular menstrual cycles, not on hormonal contraception); 2) post-menopausal (at least 2 years) women who are not receiving any form of hormone therapy (HT) and 3) post-menopausal hysterectomized women receiving ET. Although the numbers of circulating CD4 and CD20 B cells were reduced in the post-menopausal group receiving ET, we also detected a better preservation of naïve B cells, decreased CD4 T cell inflammatory cytokine production, and slightly lower circulating levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Following vaccination, young adult women generated more robust antibody and T cell responses than both post-menopausal groups. Despite similar vaccine responses between the two post-menopausal groups, we observed a direct correlation between plasma 17β estradiol (E2) levels and fold increase in IgG titers within the ET group. These findings suggest that ET affects immune homeostasis and that higher plasma E2 levels may enhance humoral responses in post-menopausal women. PMID:26859566

  13. The effectiveness of conization treatment for post-menopausal women with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, XIAODONG; FENG, YAN; WANG, XINYU; WAN, XIAOYUN; XIE, XING; LU, WEIGUO

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of conization in the diagnosis and treatment of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in post-menopausal women. A total of 101 post-menopausal patients who were diagnosed with high-grade lesion CIN by biopsy and in whom conization was used as the primary treatment were examined and 202 pre-menopausal patients were studied as the controls. Clinical and pathological data including symptoms, cytological examination and HPV DNA test results before and after conization treatment were analyzed. Both the cytological abnormalities (57.9 vs. 58.5%, P=0.260) and the positive rate of the HPV DNA test (89.5 vs. 86.4%, P=0.812) did not show a significant difference between the post- and pre-menopausal group. The rate of satisfactory colposcopy was significantly lower in post-menopausal patients compared with pre-menosausal patients (23.2 vs. 68.9%, P<0.001). Post-menopausal patients presented a significantly lower diagnostic consistency between colpscopy-directed biopsy and conization (46.4 vs. 68.9%, P=0.004), and a significantly higher positive margin rate of conization (20.8 vs. 10.9%, P=0.020). A total of 10 of the 101 post-menopausal and 2 of the 202 pre-menopausal women were diagnosed with invasive cancer by conization and underwent further treatment. In conclusion, these data suggest that conization, as a conservative primary treatment, is not suitable for post-menopausal women with high-grade lesion CIN due to the lower rate of satisfactory colposcopy, lower consistency of diagnosis between colposcopy-directed biopsy and conization, and a higher positive margin of conization. PMID:23251264

  14. Anastrozole Use in Early Stage Breast Cancer of Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Monica; Jha, Gautam; Potter, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The majority of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor and depend on estradiol (E2) for their growth. Hormonal therapy aims at depriving estrogen signaling either by using selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM)—that interfere with the binding of E2 to its receptor (ER)—or aromatase inhibitors (AI)—that block the aromatase-dependent synthesis of E2. While SERMs are recommended for both pre- and post-menopausal patients, AIs are indicated only for post-menopausal patients. For the past 20 years, the SERM tamoxifen has been considered the “gold standard” for the treatment of hormone receptor positive breast cancers. However, tamoxifen’s role is now challenged by third generation AIs, such as anastrozole, which exhibit greater efficacy in the adjuvant setting in several recently reported trials. This review will focus on anastrozole’s mechanism of action, dosing, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical applications. It will briefly discuss the clinical trials that determined anastrozole’s efficacy in the treatment of advanced breast cancer (ABC) and in the neoadjuvant setting. Finally, it will present the clinical trials that established anastrozole as a frontline agent in the treatment of post-menopausal women with hormone receptor positive early breast cancer. PMID:19794821

  15. Prophylaxis approach to a-symptomatic post-menopausal women: breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aguas, Fernanda; Martins, Amália; Gomes, Tereza P; de Sousa, Mário; Silva, Daniel P

    2005-11-15

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women worldwide. Its frequency increases throughout the female lifespan. Epidemiological research has clearly identified important reproductive risk factors for breast cancer, including age at menarche, age at menopause, age at first-term pregnancy and nulliparity, which provide important clues to the hormonal origin of this disease. The widespread use of exogenous sex steroids as contraceptive agents and as hormonal replacement therapy has been a source of concern and generates discussion about their effects on breast health. Lifestyle changes, exercise or diet could play a role in primary prevention of breast cancer. Regular exercise, ingestion of adequate amounts of fruit and vegetables, limiting alcohol consumption, avoidance of obesity in post-menopausal women, and perhaps the use of olive oil, may all have a protective effect and should be considered by women. There is insufficient scientific evidence of the role played by phyto-oestrogens on breast cancer risk. Other preventive measures that include the use of drugs such as statins or aspirin should not be recommended until we have more information about their effects on the breast. Especially for high-risk women, all the aforementioned measures may be not enough, and chemo-prevention should be considered. The use of selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) to reduce breast cancer risk is still being evaluated. Tamoxifen was the first SERM approved for the reduction of breast cancer incidence in women at high risk. However its use has limitations, due to significant side effects. Raloxifene has been approved for the prevention and treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis and has provided excellent indications of breast cancer risk reduction, with a more favourable profile than tamoxifen.

  16. Aromatase inhibitors and their future role in post-menopausal women with early breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lønning, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    Anastrozole is the first aromatase inhibitor to show a significant survival advantage over megestrol acetate in post-menopausal women with advanced breast cancer. The rationale for extending the use of aromatase inhibitors to the treatment of early breast cancer is based on the efficacy observed in the advanced setting, combined with good tolerability and a convenient dosing regimen. Furthermore, oestrogen deprivation by ovarian ablation (similar to oestrogen antagonism with tamoxifen) is already established as an effective adjuvant treatment in premenopausal women with modality breast cancer. Anastrozole produces a profound suppression of plasma oestrogen levels which is greater than that obtained with earlier aromatase inhibitors (formestane, aminoglutethimide) or megestrol acetate. This could account for the differences in clinical efficacy seen between anastrozole and megestrol acetate. In terms of benefits over other endocrine agents, anastrozole causes significantly less weight gain than megestrol acetate; it does not have the partial agonist activity of tamoxifen, and is unlikely to lead to tumour stimulation in patients resistant to tamoxifen or to exert proliferative effects on the endometrium. The lack of oestrogen agonist activity, however, may possibly have detrimental effects on bone mineral density and blood lipid profile. Current clinical trials are investigating the efficacy and safety of anastrozole in the early breast cancer setting. The results of these trials will help to determine whether anastrozole has any benefits over tamoxifen, the current treatment of choice in post-menopausal women with early breast cancer. PMID:9741783

  17. Vitamin D receptor BsmI polymorphism and osteoporosis risk in post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bizeng; Zhang, Wei; Du, Shengchao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many studies have suggested that the vitamin D receptor polymorphism BsmI might be associated with the risk of osteoporosis development in post-menopausal women. However, the results have been inconsistent. The aim of this meta-analysis was to derive a more precise evaluation of the relationship. Material and methods Published literature from PubMed, EMBASE and the CNKI database was searched. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of any association. Results Ten case-control studies were included with a total of 1,403 osteoporosis cases and 2,144 healthy controls. In the overall analysis, no significant association was found between BsmI polymorphism and osteoporosis risk (BB vs. bb: OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.39–1.48; BB vs. Bb: OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.71–1.15; dominant model: OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.74–1.93; recessive model: OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.53–1.30). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the results showed similar result that BsmI polymorphism m had no association with osteoporosis. Conclusions Results from the current meta-analysis suggest that vitamin D receptor BsmI polymorphism may not be a risk factor for osteoporosis in post-menopausal women. PMID:26925115

  18. Putative relationship between hormonal status and serum pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase activity in pre- and post- menopausal women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carrera-González, María del Pilar; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; Dueñas, Basilio; Martínez-Ferrol, Julia; Mayas, María Dolores; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2012-12-01

    In breast cancer, hormonal changes are rather constant in post-menopausal women since they tend to vary only over long time spans. However, in pre-menopausal women, the development of breast cancer is associated with hormonal physiological variations. The aim of the present work was to analyse the changes in circulating levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in pre- and post-menopausal women that were healthy or with breast cancer, and their connection to serum pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase (Pcp) activity. We observed significant changes in the hormonal profile in post-menopausal women with breast cancer compared to the control group. In pre-menopausal women, we found significant changes in circulating GnRH levels with respect to the healthy group. Our present results support the existence of neuroendocrine misregulation that could be involved in tumour progression, with Pcp being a potentially new pharmacological target in breast cancer treatments.

  19. Hormone replacement therapy for preventing cardiovascular disease in post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Rafael Gabriel; Sanchez Gomez, Luis Maria; Carmona, Loreto; Figuls, Marta Roqué i; Cosp, Xavier Bonfill

    2014-01-01

    Background There is apparently compelling evidence, from observational studies, that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may have benefits in reducing cardiovascular events in post-menopausal women. However, these observational data are subject to biases and confounding and require support from formally designed randomised controlled trials of the effects of HRT on cardiovascular disease risk. Objectives To assess the effects of HRT for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in post-menopausal women. Search methods We searched MEDLINE (1998 to December 2002)), EMBASE (1998 to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CCTR) (Issue 4 2002), the National Research Register (1998 to present), ClinicalTrials.gov (1998 to present), and the database of Spanish Clinical Trials (1998 to present) and reference lists of articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing HRT with controls (placebo or no treatment) with a minimum follow up of 6 months for treating or preventing cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women with or without cardiovascular disease. Data collection and analysis Three independent reviewers extracted information from the articles, solving discrepancies by consensus. All outcomes studied were dichotomous. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for each study and plotted. Random effects meta-analysis was used in efficacy outcomes (cardiovascular events) and fixed-effects meta-analysis in variables regarding side effects (deep venous thrombosis). Main results No protective effect of HRT was seen for any of the cardiovascular outcomes assessed: all cause mortality, cardiovascular death, non-fatal MI, venous thromboemboli or stroke. Higher risks of venous thromboembolic events (Relative risk (RR) 2.15, 95% CI 1.61 to 2.86), pulmonary embolus (RR 2.15, 95% CI 1.41 to 3.28), and stroke (RR 1.44, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.89) was found in those randomised to HRT compared with placebo. No

  20. Anthropometrics, body shape over 12 years and risk of cancer events in pre- and post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Fagherazzi, Guy; Vilier, Alice; Balkau, Beverley; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Magliano, Dianna J

    2013-08-01

    Studies of anthropometry and cancer have focused on body mass index (BMI). Relations between weight, waist (WC) and hip circumferences (HC), birth length and adult height with cancer are less well studied. Women from the French E3N study, born between 1925 and 1950, were followed biennially from 1995 until 2008. Body shape was classed into four groups based on median WC and HC at baseline. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression models. Over the 12 years of follow-up, 7,247 of 63,798 women developed cancer. As WC increased, we found a trend for decreasing cancer risk in pre-menopausal women, which reversed to an increasing risk in post-menopausal women. This remained unchanged after further adjustment for HC /or height [HR: 0.72 (0.52-1.00) before menopause and 1.17 (1.04-1.31) in the 5th vs. 1st quintile of HC], and were similar after exclusion of breast cancer. We showed that large body shape decreased cancer risk before menopause and increased it after [HR: 0.87 (0.73-1.02) and 1.11 (1.04-1.17), respectively, in women with large waist and hips compared to small waist and hips]. Adult height was associated with an non-significant increase in cancer in pre-menopause and a significant cancer risk in menopause, independent of other anthropometric characteristics [5th vs. 1st quintile [HR: 1.24 (0.98-1.56) and 1.20 (1.10-1.30)], respectively as was long birth length in post-menopausal women [HR: 1.18 (1.07-1.30) compared to medium birth length]. These results suggest independent roles of height and WC on cancer risk, through different pathways.

  1. [Association between cardiovascular risk and lycopene consumption in pre- and post-menopausal women].

    PubMed

    Torresani, María Elena

    2009-06-01

    This work aimed at assessing association between cardiovascular risk (CVR) and lycopene intake in pre- and post-menopausal women, as well as its correlation with LDL-C and HDL-C values and waist circumference (WC). A transversal design of comparison and correlation was carried out for independent samples. A 316 women (40-65 y) sample attending nutritional consultation at a Research Foundation for Endocrino Metabollic Diseases in Buenos Aires city (2005-2007) was randomized according to biological stage (35.8% premenopausal and 64.2% postmenopausal women). CVR was obtained based on Framingham Score and lycopene intake (source food and all lycopene containing food) according to weekly consumption frequency (mg/d and weekly/servings). Association between variables was calculated with the Student Test, Fisher Test and Pearson Correlation Coefficient (alpha significance level: 0.05). At both biological stages and for each CVR category, an inverse relationship was observed with lycopene intake, but only in premenopausal women with low CVR (Category III), lycopene intake was significantly greater than in those women who had moderate CVR (Category II). There was a significant correlation in postmenopausal women between LDL-C values and lycopene intake supplied by source food. However, in both biological stages a significant correlation was found between LDL-C values and all lycopene containing food consumption. No significant correlation was found between lycopene intake, HDL-C values and WC. These findings point out the relevances of a preventive nutritional approach at woman's different biological stages.

  2. Circulating oxidative stress parameters in pre- and post-menopausal healthy women and in women suffering from breast cancer treated or not with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; Sánchez-López, Estefanía; Cueto-Ureña, Cristina; Dueñas, Basilio; Carrera-González, Pilar; Navarro-Cecilia, Joaquín; Mayas, María Dolores; Arias de Saavedra, José M; Sánchez-Agesta, Rafael; Martínez-Martos, José M

    2014-10-01

    We evaluate here the redox status in pre- and post-menopausal healthy women and in women with breast cancer in order to understand the consequences of the hormonal alterations of menopause for the oxidative stress status, its modifications with breast cancer and the influence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC). To that, serum oxidative stress parameters (total antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation), non-enzyme antioxidant defenses (total glutathione, uric acid and bilirubin) and enzyme antioxidant defenses (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities) were measured in healthy women and in women with breast cancer divided according to their menopausal status and that received or not NC. Circulating estradiol, progesterone, FSH and LH were also analyzed. We found that menopause itself modifies the redox status of healthy women, being most of these differences also reflected in women with breast cancer. However, several changes occur as a consequence of the disease. Furthermore, NC increases oxidative damage, decreases antioxidant defenses and eliminates the differences found in menopause. We conclude that the normal redox balance is disrupted by breast cancer but is also affected by the hormonal status promoted by menopause. In fact, NC nullifies the differences found between pre- and postmenopausal women in several antioxidant defense systems.

  3. Chronic vulvar pain in a cohort of post-menopausal women: Atrophy or Vulvodynia?

    PubMed Central

    Mitro, Susanna D.; Harlow, Siobán D.; Randolph, John F.; Reed, Barbara D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although postmenopausal vulvar pain is frequently attributed to vaginal atrophy, such symptoms may be due to vulvodynia, a chronic vulvar pain condition. Given the limited research on vulvodynia in postmenopausal women, the objective of this study was to provide preliminary population-based data on the associations of vaginal symptoms, serum hormone levels and hormone use with chronic vulvar pain in a multiethnic sample of post-menopausal women. Methods We used data from 371 participants at the Michigan site of the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) who participated in the 13th follow-up visit. Women completed a validated screening instrument for vulvodynia and provided information on additional vaginal symptoms as well as demographic characteristics, and hormone use by questionnaire. Blood samples were obtained to assess hormone levels. We compared women who screened positive for vulvodynia and women with past or short-duration vulvar pain to women without vulvar pain, using Chi-squared and Fisher’s Exact tests. Relative odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using multinomial logistic regression models adjusting for age, body mass index, and race/ethnicity. Results Current chronic vulvar pain consistent with vulvodynia was reported by 4.0 % of women, while 13.7 % reported past but not current chronic vulvar pain or short-duration vulvar pain symptoms. One quarter of women who reported current chronic vulvar pain did not report vaginal dryness. Women with current chronic and with past/short duration vulvar pain symptoms were more likely to have used hormones during the preceding year than women without vulvar pain symptoms (13.3 %, 17.6 %, 2.0 %, respectively; p < .01). Increased relative odds of current vulvar pain symptoms were associated with each log unit decrease in serum dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, estradiol and testosterone levels at the previous year’s visit. Conclusion Some women who experience chronic

  4. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, p<0.05). Logistic regression including all texture features yielded an ROC curve with an AUC of 0.76. Addition of age at menarche, ethnicity, contraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  5. RESIDENTIAL PROXIMITY TO MAJOR ROADWAYS AND INCIDENT HYPERTENSION IN POST-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Samantha L; Eliot, Melissa N; Whitsel, Eric A; Wang, Yi; Coull, Brent A; Hou, Lifang; Margolis, Helene G; Margolis, Karen L; Mu, Lina; Wu, Wen-Chih C; Johnson, Karen C; Allison, Matthew A; Manson, JoAnn E; Eaton, Charles B; Wellenius, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Living near major roadways has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, presumably from exposure to elevated levels of traffic-related air and/or noise pollution. This association may potentially be mediated through increased risk of incident hypertension, but results from prior studies are equivocal. Using Cox proportional hazards models we examined residential proximity to major roadways and incident hypertension among 38,360 participants of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Clinical Trial cohorts free of hypertension at enrollment and followed for a median of 7.9 years. Adjusting for participant demographics and lifestyle, trial participation, and markers of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status, the hazard ratios for incident hypertension were 1.13 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.28), 1.03 (0.95, 1.11), 1.05 (0.99, 1.11), and 1.05 (1.00, 1.10) for participants living ≤50, >50-200, >200-400, and >400-1000 m versus >1000 m from the nearest major roadway, respectively (ptrend=0.013). This association varied substantially by WHI study region with hazard ratios for women living ≤50m from a major roadway of 1.61 (1.18, 2.20) in the West, 1.51 (1.22, 1.87) in the Northeast, 0.89 (0.70, 1.14) in the South, and 0.94 (0.75, 1.19) in the Midwest. In this large, national cohort of post-menopausal women, residential proximity to major roadways was associated with incident hypertension in selected regions of the U.S. If causal, these results suggest residential proximity to major roadways, as a marker for air, noise and other traffic-related pollution, may be a risk factor for hypertension. PMID:26282224

  6. Serum pentosidine levels after 3 years of bisphosphonate treatment in post-menopausal osteoporotic women.

    PubMed

    Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Kamimura, Mikio; Ikegami, Shota; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Nakamura, Yukio; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The present study measured changes in plasma pentosidine and bone turnover markers in elderly patients with osteoporosis treated using bisphosphonate. The relationship between pentosidine and bone turnover markers and bone mineral density (BMD) was investigated. This study consisted of post-menopausal osteoporotic women who could be treated using bisphosphonate for 3 years were included in the present analysis. The study population consisted of 58 cases, all women, ranging in age from 53 to 86 years (mean, 67.1 years). Bisphosphonate treatment significantly increased BMD of the lumbar spine to 0.914 ± 0.141 g/cm(2) and BMD of the femoral neck to 0.708 ± 0.086 g/cm(2) after 3 years (p < 0.001 versus baseline). The mean BAP level was 27.3 ± 8.3 U/L in patients at baseline. After bisphosphonate treatment, BAP significantly decreased to 18.1 ± 7.2 U/L at 3 years (p < 0.001). Urinary NTX also decreased after bisphosphonate treatment. After 3 years of treatment, urinary NTX significantly decreased from 50.0 ± 19.0 nmol BCE/mmol Cr to 24.6 ± 10.2 nmol BCE/mmol Cr at 3 years (p < 0.001). Serum pentosidine levels were 0.0413 ± 0.0094 μg/mL at baseline and 0.0413 ± 0.0122 μg/mL after 3 years. They were not significantly changed by bisphosphonate treatment. Serum pentosidine levels were not changed by treatment with bisphosphonates. Thus, serum pentosidine may not be suitable as a marker of bone quality after 3 years of bisphosphonate treatment.

  7. Interaction between C-reactive protein and cognitive functions according to APOE gene polymorphism in post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Gujski, Mariusz; Pinkas, Jarosław; Raczkiewicz, Dorota; Owoc, Alfred; Humeniuk, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A potential factor increasing the risk of the development of cognitive impairment with age is apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 carrier status. A subsequent factor which may increase the risk of development of cognitive impairment at an older age is the concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP). The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between cognitive functions and the concentration of CRP in post-menopausal women who were carriers of particular apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) polymorphisms. Material and methods A group of 402 women was recruited to the study. The inclusion criteria were: minimum two years after the last menstruation, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentration 30 U/ml, no dementi signs on Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). The computerized battery of the Central Nervous System Vital Signs (CNS VS) test was used to diagnose cognitive functions. APOE genotyping was performed by multiplex PCR. The blood plasma CRP levels were determined. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica software. Results The level of neurocognitive index (NCI) and cognitive functions in post-menopausal women depends on apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism (p < 0.001) and the concentration of CRP (p < 0.05). A negative correlation was found between CRP and NCI (p = 0.018), and the reaction time (p = 0.008) of women with APOE ε2/ε3. A positive correlation was observed between CRP and visual memory (p = 0.025) in women with APOE ε3/ε3, and verbal memory (p = 0.023) in women with APOE ε3/ε4 or ε4/ε4. Conclusions Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism may modify the relationship between CRP concentration and cognitive functions in post-menopausal women. PMID:27904515

  8. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in pre- and post-menopausal women: A prospective study from apex institute of North India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sandeep; Aggarwal, Neelam; Joshi, Bharti; Suri, Vanita; Badada, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome (MS) (syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome) is a constellation of metabolic abnormalities and a complex predisease state that predicts future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Menopausal transition and postmenopausal state are considered as a vulnerable period for developing MS, and this increased risk has been attributed to decreasing estrogen levels with an increasing risk of insulin resistance following menopause. Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of MS and its components in pre- and post-menopausal women from North India. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study of 350 women in the age group of 45–55 years attending gynecology clinic in a tertiary center of North India. Details of sociodemographic data, menopausal history, reproductive, and medical profile were obtained. Then, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure were recorded. A venous blood sample was collected for fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. MS was defined according to the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The mean age was 49.09 ± 2.2 years in premenopausal and 49.54 ± 2.8 years in postmenopausal women. The prevalence of MS in the study group was 62.6%. Occurrence of MS was higher in older and obese women. Abnormal waist circumference was the most prevalent component (87%) of MS and in terms of odd ratio, correlation was highest for BMI followed by total cholesterol and waist-hip ratio. Conclusion: We should target obesity and deranged lipid profile by bringing out changes in lifestyle and dietary habits to decrease the higher prevalence of MS and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28096640

  9. Pyometra presenting in conjunction with bowel cancer in a post-menopausal women: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Soleymani majd, Hooman; Watermeyer, Sean; Ismail, Lamiese

    2008-01-01

    This case describes a 71 year old, post-menopausal woman who developed vaginal discharge. This complaint ultimately led to the discovery of bowel cancer in conjunction with a large sterile pyometra. The pyometra was not due to genital malignancy. The most likely conclusion is that the pyometra may have arisen as an inflammatory response to the adjacent bowel pathology. This case report highlights the need for clinicians to consider non-gynaecological cancer as a possible cause for otherwise unexplained pyometra. PMID:18606021

  10. Adult weight gain, fat distribution and mammographic density in Spanish pre- and post-menopausal women (DDM-Spain).

    PubMed

    Pollán, Marina; Lope, Virginia; Miranda-García, Josefa; García, Milagros; Casanova, Francisco; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Peris, Mercé; Moreno, María Pilar; Vázquez-Carrete, José Antonio; Collado, Francisca; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Ascunce, Nieves; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Ruiz-Perales, Francisco

    2012-07-01

    High mammographic density (MD) is a phenotype risk marker for breast cancer. Body mass index (BMI) is inversely associated with MD, with the breast being a fat storage site. We investigated the influence of abdominal fat distribution and adult weight gain on MD, taking age, BMI and other confounders into account. Because visceral adiposity and BMI are associated with breast cancer only after menopause, differences in pre- and post-menopausal women were also explored. We recruited 3,584 women aged 45-68 years within the Spanish breast cancer screening network. Demographic, reproductive, family and personal history data were collected by purpose-trained staff, who measured current weight, height, waist and hip circumferences under the same protocol and with the same tools. MD was assessed in the left craniocaudal view using Boyd's Semiquantitative Scale. Association between waist-to-hip ratio, adult weight gain (difference between current weight and self-reported weight at 18 years) and MD was quantified by ordinal logistic regression, with random center-specific intercepts. Models were adjusted for age, BMI, breast size, time since menopause, parity, family history of breast cancer and hormonal replacement therapy use. Natural splines were used to describe the shape of the relationship between these two variables and MD. Waist-to-hip ratio was inversely associated with MD, and the effect was more pronounced in pre-menopausal (OR = 0.53 per 0.1 units; 95 % CI = 0.42-0.66) than in post-menopausal women (OR = 0.73; 95 % CI = 0.65-0.82) (P of heterogeneity = 0.010). In contrast, adult weight gain displayed a positive association with MD, which was similar in both groups (OR = 1.17 per 6 kg; 95 % CI = 1.11-1.23). Women who had gained more than 24 kg displayed higher MD (OR = 2.05; 95 % CI = 1.53-2.73). MD was also evaluated using Wolfe's and Tabár's classifications, with similar results being obtained. Once BMI, fat distribution and other confounders were considered

  11. The theory of modulated hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Teresa S.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2012-03-01

    We present a theory that questions the standard of care for pre- and post-menopausal women with breast cancer. Through the use of modulated hormones to mimic the natural multiphasic fluctuations of estrogen and progesterone cycles of healthy young women, it can be expected that patients will not only exhibit increased quality of life such as better sleep, well-being, and libido, but also memory improvement and less joint pain. Additionally, this regimen may engage genetic pathways that protect women in youth from breast cancers. We present a mathematical basis for the coupling of the hormone cycles through the use of Gaussian curves that provides the foundation of a new format of hormone replacement in women.

  12. Menopause knowledge and attitude among Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Taherpour, M; Sefidi, F; Afsharinia, S; Hamissi, JH

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was done to assess the effects of training on knowledge and attitude level promotion of post menopause women about menopause. Methods & Material: The research communication included 100 menopausal women aged 45-60 years, who were selected in a stratified manner (according to the economic status: poor, average, and good). The tool used was an examiners-made questionnaire, which contained 3 parts: demographic characteristics, knowledge and attitude measurement. Results: Eleven percent of the studied women had a low knowledge regarding menopause and 1% was good. After training, 27% got a good knowledge and no one remained at the low level. The attitude of 59% of the studied women regarding menopause was positive and 80% got a positive attitude after training. A significant relation was found between knowledge and attitude, before and after training. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the majority of women judge menopause as a positive incident, it seems that paying attention to their training caused the bringing to their knowledge of the natural menopause and having a healthy and jolly life. PMID:28255401

  13. Treatments for post-menopausal osteoporotic women, what's new? How can we manage long-term treatment?

    PubMed

    Herrero, Soledad; Pico, Yolanda

    2016-05-15

    Since the mid-1980s, postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) has been considered a serious public health concern because of the associated fractures. Pharmacological therapies that effectively reduce the number of fractures by improving bone mass have been and are being developed continuously. Most current agents inhibit bone loss by reducing bone resorption, but emerging therapies may increase bone mass by stimulating bone formation. Furthermore, nowadays, the most representative pharmaceuticals have been prescribed long enough to include the reporting of some adverse effects. This review discusses osteoporotic drugs that are approved or are under investigation for the treatment of post-menopausal women (PMW), paying particular attention to long-term treatments.

  14. Increased intake of selected vegetables, herbs and fruit may reduce bone turnover in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Caroline Ann; Weber, Janet Louise; McGill, Anne-Thea; Kruger, Marlena Cathorina

    2015-04-08

    Increased consumption of vegetables/herbs/fruit may reduce bone turnover and urinary calcium loss in post-menopausal women because of increased intake of polyphenols and potassium, but comparative human studies are lacking. The main aim was to compare bone turnover markers and urinary calcium excretion in two randomised groups (n = 50) of healthy post-menopausal women consuming ≥ 9 servings of different vegetables/herbs/fruit combinations (three months). Group A emphasised a generic range of vegetables/herbs/fruit, whereas Group B emphasised specific vegetables/herbs/fruit with bone resorption-inhibiting properties (Scarborough Fair Diet), with both diets controlled for potential renal acid load (PRAL). Group C consumed their usual diet. Plasma bone markers, urinary electrolytes (24 h) and estimated dietary PRAL were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. Procollagen type I N propeptide (PINP) decreased (-3.2 μg/L, p < 0.01) in the B group only, as did C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) (-0.065 μg/L, p < 0.01) in women with osteopenia compared to those with normal bone mineral density (BMD) within this group. Intervention Groups A and B had decreased PRAL, increased urine pH and significantly decreased urinary calcium loss. Urinary potassium increased in all groups, reflecting a dietary change. In conclusion, Group B demonstrated positive changes in both turnover markers and calcium conservation.

  15. Osteocalcin carboxylation is not associated with body weight or percent fat changes during weight loss in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Centi, Amanda J; Booth, Sarah L; Gundberg, Caren M; Saltzman, Edward; Nicklas, Barbara; Shea, M Kyla

    2015-12-01

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a vitamin K-dependent bone protein used as a marker of bone formation. Mouse models have demonstrated a role for the uncarboxylated form of OC (ucOC) in energy metabolism, including energy expenditure and adiposity, but human data are equivocal. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between changes in measures of OC and changes in body weight and percent body fat in obese, but otherwise healthy post-menopausal women undergoing a 20-week weight loss program. All participants received supplemental vitamins K and D and calcium. Body weight and body fat percentage (%BF) were assessed before and after the intervention. Serum OC [(total (tOC), ucOC, percent uncarboxylated (%ucOC)], and procollagen type 1N-terminal propeptide (P1NP; a measure of bone formation) were measured. Women lost an average of 10.9 ± 3.9 kg and 4 %BF. Serum concentrations of tOC, ucOC, %ucOC, and P1NP did not significantly change over the twenty-week intervention, nor were these measures associated with changes in weight (all p > 0.27) or %BF (all p > 0.54). Our data do not support an association between any serum measure of OC and weight or %BF loss in post-menopausal women supplemented with nutrients implicated in bone health.

  16. Increased Intake of Selected Vegetables, Herbs and Fruit may Reduce Bone Turnover in Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Caroline Ann; Weber, Janet Louise; McGill, Anne-Thea; Kruger, Marlena Cathorina

    2015-01-01

    Increased consumption of vegetables/herbs/fruit may reduce bone turnover and urinary calcium loss in post-menopausal women because of increased intake of polyphenols and potassium, but comparative human studies are lacking. The main aim was to compare bone turnover markers and urinary calcium excretion in two randomised groups (n = 50) of healthy post-menopausal women consuming ≥9 servings of different vegetables/herbs/fruit combinations (three months). Group A emphasised a generic range of vegetables/herbs/fruit, whereas Group B emphasised specific vegetables/herbs/fruit with bone resorption-inhibiting properties (Scarborough Fair Diet), with both diets controlled for potential renal acid load (PRAL). Group C consumed their usual diet. Plasma bone markers, urinary electrolytes (24 h) and estimated dietary PRAL were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. Procollagen type I N propeptide (PINP) decreased (−3.2 μg/L, p < 0.01) in the B group only, as did C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) (−0.065 μg/L, p < 0.01) in women with osteopenia compared to those with normal bone mineral density (BMD) within this group. Intervention Groups A and B had decreased PRAL, increased urine pH and significantly decreased urinary calcium loss. Urinary potassium increased in all groups, reflecting a dietary change. In conclusion, Group B demonstrated positive changes in both turnover markers and calcium conservation. PMID:25856221

  17. Breast size, thoracic kyphosis & thoracic spine pain - association & relevance of bra fitting in post-menopausal women: a correlational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Menopause would seem to exist as a period of accelerated changes for women and their upper torso mechanics. Whether these anthropometric changes reflect changes in pain states remains unclear. Plausible mechanisms of pain exist for the independent and combined effect of increasing breast size and thoracic kyphosis. Bra fit has the potential to change when the anthropometric measures (chest circumference and bust circumference) used to determine bra size change, such as postmenopausally. Identifying an association between breast size, thoracic kyphosis and thoracic spine pain in postmenopausal women and identifying the relevance of bra fit to this association may be of importance to the future management and education of post-menopausal women presenting clinically with thoracic spine pain. Methods A cross-sectional study design. Fifty-one postmenopausal bra-wearing women were recruited. Measures included breast size (Triumph International), thoracic kyphosis (flexible curve), bra fitted (Y/N) and pain (Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire) and tenderness on palpation (posteroanterior pressure testing). These measures were collected in one session at a physiotherapy clinic. Results The majority of the women in this study were overweight or obese and wearing an incorrect sized bra. Pain was significantly related to breast size, body weight and BMI at mid thoracic levels (T7-8). In contrast self-reported thoracic pain was not correlated with age or index of kyphosis (thoracic kyphosis). Women with thoracic pain were no more likely to have their bra professionally fitted whereas women with a higher BMI and larger breasts were more likely to have their bra professionally fitted. Conclusion The findings of this study show that larger breasts and increased BMI are associated with thoracic pain in postmenopausal women. This is unrelated to thoracic kyphosis. Increasing breast size and how a bra is worn may have biomechanical implications for the loaded thoracic

  18. The ECOS-16 questionnaire for the evaluation of health related quality of life in post-menopausal women with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Badia, Xavier; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Lahoz, Raquel; Lizán, Luis; Nogués, Xavier; Iborra, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to validate the questionnaire ECOS-16 (Assessment of health related quality of life in osteoporosis) for the evaluation of health related quality of life (HRQoL) in post-menopausal women with osteoporosis. Methods An observational, prospective and multi-centre study was carried out among post-menopausal women with osteoporosis in primary care centres and hospital outpatient clinics. All patients attended 2 visits: at baseline and at 6 months. In addition, the subgroup of outpatients attended another visit a month after the baseline to assess the test-retest reliability. The psychometric properties of the questionnaire were evaluated in terms of feasibility, validity (content validity and construct validity) and internal consistency in baseline, and in terms of test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change in visit at month and visit at 6 months, respectively. In all visits, ECOS-16, EUROQoL-5D (EQ-5D) and four 7-point items about health status (general health status, back pain, limitation in daily activities and emotional status) were administered, whereas only outpatients were given MINI-OQLQ (Mini Osteoporosis Quality of Life Questionnaire), besides all clinical variables; and sociodemographic variables at baseline. Results 316 women were consecutively included, 212 from primary care centres and 104 from hospital outpatient clinics. Feasibility: 94.3% of patients answered all items of the questionnaire. The mean administration time was 12.3 minutes. Validity: factor analysis suggested that the questionnaire was unidimensional. In the multivariate analysis, patients with vertebral fractures, co-morbidity and a lower education level showed to have worse HRQoL. Moderate to high correlations were found between the ECOS-16 score and the other health status questionnaires (0.47–0.82). Reliability: internal consistency (Cronbach's α) was 0.92 and test-retest reliability (ICC) was 0.80. Responsiveness to change: ECOS-16

  19. Voices from the Hilo Women's Health Study: Talking Story About Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Lynn A.; Sievert, Lynnette L.; Brown, Daniel E.; Reza, Angela; Rahberg, Nichole; Mills, Phoebe; Goodloe, Amber

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose in conducting this qualitative study was to examine how a multi-ethnic sample of women living in Hilo, Hawaii describe menopause. Interviews were conducted with 185 pre-, peri-, and post-menopausal women aged 45 to 55. We found that pre-menopausal women felt anxious compared to peri- and post-menopausal women's more affirmative attitudes of increasing confidence and freedom in this new cycle of life. A dominant theme was the construction of a post-menstrual identity. Peri-and post-menopausal women's attitudes were not biomedically oriented. Local culture and the island lifestyle may provide a positive atmosphere for women going through menopause. PMID:24134306

  20. Comparison of sex hormonal and metabolic profiles between omnivores and vegetarians in pre- and post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Karelis, Antony D; Fex, Annie; Filion, Marie-Eve; Adlercreutz, Herman; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the sex hormonal and metabolic profiles in vegetarians and compare these with the profiles in omnivores. The design of the present study was cross-sectional. The study sample of pre- and post-menopausal women included forty-one omnivores and twenty-one vegetarians. Thereafter we determined: (1) plasma sex hormones, (2) fasting insulin, NEFA as well as apo-A and apo-B, (3) BMI, (4) a dietary profile (3 d dietary records), (5) physical activity and (6) total faecal excretion per 72 h and total urinary excretion per 72 h. Vegetarians showed higher levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), apo-A, total faecal excretion per 72 h and total fibre intake as well as lower levels of apo-B, free oestradiol, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s) and BMI. Interestingly, after controlling for BMI, significant differences between groups still persisted except for apo-B. Moreover, stepwise regression analysis showed that total fibre intake explained 15.2 % of the variation in SHBG in our cohort, which accounted for the greatest source of unique variance. Results of the present study indicate that pre- and post-menopausal vegetarians present higher concentrations of SHBG, which could be explained, in part, by higher levels of fibre intake. This may explain, at least in part, the lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

  1. Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Menopause Menopause is when a woman's menstrual period stops ... causes Ways to feel better Women's thoughts on menopause "Menopause for me was a welcomed friend. The ...

  2. Ferritin and Soluble Transferrin Receptors in Type 2 Diabetic and Non-diabetic Post-menopausal Women in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Md Ruhul, A; Sharmin, H; Luthfor, A; Farzana, S; Liaquat, A

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional comparative study was aimed at investigating the iron status of a group of post-menopausal women with and without diabetes. Thirty-five post-menopausal women in each group were selected purposively from among patients attending the out-patient department of Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), a specialist hospital, and two of its satellite clinics, all in Dhaka. Patients were enrolled based on their existing records. The subjects were matched on age, menstrual status and fasting status at blood draw. Ferritin, serum soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR) and fasting plasma glucose were measured by standard methods. Dietary information was collected by a specific food frequency questionnaire. No significant difference in plasma ferritin [62.02 ng/ml, (range: 4.68-288.89) vs 54.25 ng/ml (range: 4.58-137.17); p=0.28] was observed between the groups. But a higher level of plasma sTfR was found in diabetic women [(21.12 nmol/l (range: 7.91-39.79) vs 17.63 nmol/l (range: 10.30-110.00); p<0.01]. TFR-F index showed no difference between diabetic and control (p=0.25). Significantly a lower hemoglobin level [10.58±0.67 g/dl vs11.76±1.5 g/dl; p<0.01] was detected in diabetic women. Plasma sTfR (log) did not show any significant association with the dietary parameters and iron indices. No significant association between fasting glucose, ferritin and sTfR was seen except for haemoglobin (r=0.39, p=0.05). Total iron intake recorded was more than the requirement, and was significantly higher in control group [38.11mg/day (range: 19.83-105.63) vs 56.65 mg/day (range: 29.75-109.54); p<0.01)]. More than 97 % of total iron was of plant origin. No differences in heme iron [0.85 mg/day (range: 0.09-4.07) vs. 0.96 mg/day (range: 0.04-4.34), p= 0.17] and vitamin C intake was observed between the groups. Iron indices of non-diabetic women were within the normal range. A higher level of sTfR and a

  3. Correlating Estrogen Levels and Cognitive Functions in Regularly Menstruating Females of Reproductive Age Group and Post Menopausal Women of North India

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Deepti; Sodhi, Candy; Parmod, John; Dutta, Abhilasha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To correlate serum estrogen levels with cognitive functions calculated objectively as per Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) in the females in reproductive age group and those attaining menopause. Materials and methods: This study was conducted in Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. 150 subjects (100 postmenopausal females and 50 regularly menstruating females of the reproductive age group) were included. The cognitive functions of all the females and serum estrogen levels (i.e Estradiol E2) were assessed. Results: The E2 levels in normal menstruating females were found to be higher (mean = 188.062 pg/ml) as compared to the menopausal females and the difference in E2 levels was found to be significant (p < 0.001). However, the difference in serum estrogen levels of subjects in the two menopausal groups was insignificant. MMSE, showed that scores of normal menstruating females were higher (mean score = 29.92) as compared to post menopausal females for 1-5 years (mean score = 26.72) and post menopausal females for last 6-10 years (mean score = 26.30). Conclusion: We observed that the cognition functions declined in post menopausal women, whereas the scores were higher in the women of reproductive age group, meaning thereby, that it is the serum estrogen level that is bringing about this difference. Another finding was that the decline in cognition following menopause was not progressive. Therefore, this correlation would open up the gates for the use of estrogen therapy for various neuropsychological disorders pertaining to cognition in the postmenopausal females. PMID:26177471

  4. Effects of Resveratrol on Cognitive Performance, Mood and Cerebrovascular Function in Post-Menopausal Women; A 14-Week Randomised Placebo-Controlled Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Hamish M.; Howe, Peter R. C.; Wong, Rachel H. X.

    2017-01-01

    We tested whether chronic supplementation with resveratrol (a phytoestrogen) could improve cerebrovascular function, cognition and mood in post-menopausal women. Eighty post-menopausal women aged 45–85 years were randomised to take trans-resveratrol or placebo for 14 weeks and the effects on cognitive performance, cerebral blood flow velocity and pulsatility index (a measure of arterial stiffness) in the middle cerebral artery (using transcranial Doppler ultrasound), and cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) to both cognitive testing and hypercapnia were assessed. Mood questionnaires were also administered. Compared to placebo, resveratrol elicited 17% increases in CVR to both hypercapnic (p = 0.010) and cognitive stimuli (p = 0.002). Significant improvements were observed in the performance of cognitive tasks in the domain of verbal memory (p = 0.041) and in overall cognitive performance (p = 0.020), which correlated with the increase in CVR (r = 0.327; p = 0.048). Mood tended to improve in multiple measures, although not significantly. These results indicate that regular consumption of a modest dose of resveratrol can enhance both cerebrovascular function and cognition in post-menopausal women, potentially reducing their heightened risk of accelerated cognitive decline and offering a promising therapeutic treatment for menopause-related cognitive decline. PMID:28054939

  5. Correlation of physical aptitude; functional capacity, corporal balance and quality of life (QoL) among elderly women submitted to a post-menopausal physical activities program.

    PubMed

    de Souza Santos, César Augusto; Dantas, Estélio Enrique Martin; Moreira, Maria Helena Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of physical activity from the "Menopause in Form" program on physical aptitude, functional capacity, corporal balance and QoL among elderly women. In addition, correlations among these variables were examined. The present work was a longitudinal study that was quasi-experimental and correlational. A total of 323 elderly women (age: 69.0±5.53 years) participated in this study. Subjects were non-institutionalized, post-menopausal individuals residing at the Elderly Care Center in Belém Municipality (Pará, Brazil) and practiced one activity (i.e., dancing or walking) over a 10-month period. The assessment protocols used were the following: the Fullerton functional fitness test battery (physical aptitude); the activities of daily living (ADL) indices (functional capacity); the Tinetti-scale (corporal balance); and the WHOQOL-OLD questionnaire (QoL). The adopted significance level was p<0.05. Results from the Wilcoxon test demonstrated significant differences for the post-test assessment of functional capacity (Δ%=5.63%; p=0.0001) and general QoL (Δ%=9.19%; p=0.001). These results suggest that the physical activities employed during the "Menopause in Form" program resulted in significant improvements in the functional capacity and QoL of post-menopausal elderly women.

  6. Women's preferences for masculinity in male faces are highest during reproductive age range and lower around puberty and post-menopause.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony C; Saxton, Tamsin K; Roberts, S Craig; Jones, Benedict C; Debruine, Lisa M; Vukovic, Jovana; Perrett, David I; Feinberg, David R; Chenore, Todd

    2010-07-01

    Masculinity in male faces is thought to be a sign of mate quality and is associated with measures of long-term health. Previous studies have demonstrated that women's masculinity preferences change across the menstrual cycle with women preferring more masculine men during phases of the menstrual cycle where fertility is highest (i.e. the late follicular phase). Given the hormonal correlates of such preferences and that these hormones change across the life span, we tested for differences in female masculinity preferences at different ages. We compared the masculinity preferences of peri-pubescent girls and young adult women (Study 1), circum-menopausal women reporting to either be pre- or post-menopause (Study 2), and a large sample of women across a wide range of ages (Study 3). In all three studies, preferences for masculinity in male faces were highest in women who were at a reproductively active age. Preferences for masculinity were lower when females were peri-pubescent, post-menopausal, or at ages corresponding to these groups. These data support the notion that masculinity in male faces is an important trait for reproductively relevant mate choice decisions. These data also highlight a shift in female visual preferences for men that is associated with important stages of the lifespan. Visual preferences appear to track important hormonal changes associated with age; as women pass puberty their preferences shift towards facial traits associated with mate quality and as women undergo menopause their preferences for such facial traits decrease. Overall, these results demonstrate the important role of reproductive status and support the notion that preferences for male faces are tied to reproductively relevant hormones.

  7. Factors associated with estrogen receptors-alpha (ER-alpha) and -beta (ER-beta) and progesterone receptor abundance in obese and non obese pre- and post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Meza-Muñoz, Dalia Edith; Fajardo, Martha E; Pérez-Luque, Elva Leticia; Malacara, Juan Manuel

    2006-06-01

    There is scarce information about the factors associated with estrogen receptors (ER) at menopause. In 113 volunteers pre- and post-menopausal healthy women, grouped as with and without obesity, estrogen receptors-alpha and -beta, and progesterone receptor (PR) were measured by immunohistochemistry in skin punch biopsies obtained from the external gluteal area. In pre-menopausal women, biopsies and a blood sample were performed between days 7 and 14 of the cycle. Serum hormone levels were measured by immunoradiometric assay or radioimmunoassay. After menopause, ER and PR amounts decreased significantly. At pre-menopause, obese women had lower PR levels than non obese (P<.006). In the post-menopausal group, obese women showed higher ER-alpha (P<.03) and ER-beta (P<.02) levels than the non obese group. In the analysis of factors associated with the amount of steroid receptors for the total group, log[ER-alpha], log[ER-beta], and log[PR] were associated with age (P<.002, <.005, and <.004, respectively). The log[ER-alpha] was also associated with log[FSH] (P<.0008); meanwhile, the log[PR] showed a marginal correlation with log[FSH]. In pre-menopausal women no factor associated with any of the three receptors was found. In post-menopausal women log[ER-alpha] was associated with log[estrone] and log[DHEAS] (P<.003 and <.02, respectively). log[PR] was associated with BMI (P<.002), years since menopause (P<.05), and log[DHEAS] (P<.003). We concluded that ER and PR diminish sharply at post-menopause. At this stage the amount of receptors depends on several factors such as BMI, years since menopause, and androgen precursors.

  8. Plasma Metabolic Profiles in Women are Menopause Dependent.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chaofu; Hou, Yan; Zhang, Haiyu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Jingtao; Guo, Bing; Zhang, Fan; Li, Hailong; Zhou, Xiaohua; Li, Ying; Li, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is an endocrinological transition that greatly affects health and disease susceptibility in middle-aged and elderly women. To gain new insights into the metabolic process of menopause, plasma metabolic profiles in 115 pre- and post-menopausal women were systematically analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. Metabolic signatures revealed considerable differences between pre- and post-menopausal women, and clear separations were observed between the groups in partial least-squares discriminant analysis score plots. In total, 28 metabolites were identified as potential metabolite markers for menopause, including up-regulated acylcarnitines, fatty acids, lysophosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylethanolamines, and down-regulated pregnanediol-3-glucuronide, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydrolipoic acid. These differences highlight that significant alterations occur in fatty acid β-oxidation, phospholipid metabolism, hormone metabolism and amino acid metabolism in post-menopausal women. In conclusion, our plasma metabolomics study provides novel understanding of the metabolic profiles related to menopause, and will be useful for investigating menopause-related diseases and assessing metabolomic confounding factors.

  9. [Isoflavones in menopause women].

    PubMed

    Gris Martínez, José M

    2006-09-09

    Phytoestrogens are composed derivatives of vegetables. The 2 main classes of interest to human health are lignans and isoflavones. Isoflavones exist in at least 15 different chemical forms and their effect on human health has been investigated to some extent (particularly, genistein and daidzein as high levels of these compounds are present in soybean). Isoflavones have similar structure to oestrogen and have the capacity to exert both oestrogenic and anti oestrogenic effects. They may block the effects of oestrogen in some tissues (e. g., the breast and endometrium), but act like an oestrogen in providing possible protection against bone loss and heart disease. Lignans are much more widespread in plant foods but investigation has been limited due to the complexity of measurement. The increasing interest in the use of the soybean and the phytoestrogens derived from the soybean is due to the results published on experimental animal actions, and in human case-control studies. There are many observational and epidemiologists studies that suggest the potential benefit of isoflavones on the menopause symptoms, the cardiovascular system, the osteoporosis and the estrogen dependent cancers, but many open questions exist. We must be very strict with certain observational studies by the possible influences of collateral factors to the isoflavones (exercise, type of diet, etc.), and attribute the beneficial effects may be due to own treatment.

  10. Circulating concentrations of vitamin E isomers: Association with bone turnover and arterial stiffness in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hampson, G; Edwards, S; Sankaralingam, A; Harrington, D J; Voong, K; Fogelman, I; Frost, M L

    2015-12-01

    The effects of vitamin E on cardiovascular and bone health are conflicting with beneficial and detrimental findings reported. To investigate this further, we carried out a cross-sectional study to determine the relationship between circulating concentrations of the 2 vitamin E isomers, α- and γ-tocopherol (TP) with bone turnover and arterial stiffness. Two hundred and seventy eight post-menopausal women with mean age [SD] 60.9 [6.0] years were studied. Fasting serum α-TP and γ-TP, bone turnover markers; procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTX), parathyroid hormone (PTH), total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and central augmentation index (AI) as markers of arterial stiffness were also determined. A positive correlation was observed between α-TP and γ-TP (r=0.14, p=0.022). A significant negative association between α-TP and P1NP only was seen in multiple linear regression analysis following adjustment for serum TC and TG (p=0.016). In a full multi-linear regression model, following correction for age, years since menopause, smoking habits, alcohol intake, use of calcium supplements, BMI, PTH, serum calcium, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the association between α-TP and P1NP remained significant (p=0.011). We did not observe any significant association between γ-TP or α-TP/γ-TP ratio with P1NP or CTX. P1NP was significantly lower in subjects with α-TP concentrations of >30 μmol/L (α-TP >30 μmol/L; P1NP: 57.5 [20.7], α-TP<30 μmol/L; P1NP: 65.7 [24.9] μg/L, p=0.005). PWV was significantly associated with α-TP/γ-TP ratio (p=0.04) but not with serum α-TP or γ-TP in a full multi-linear regression model adjusting for serum lipids, age, and blood pressure. The data suggest that high serum concentrations of α-TP may have a negative effect on bone formation. The balance of α-TP and γ-TP may be important in maintaining

  11. Screening for osteoporosis among post-menopausal women in community pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Barris Blundell, Damià; Rodríguez Zarzuelo, Carmen; Sabio Sánchez, Belén; Gutiérrez álvarez, José Luis; Navarro Visa, Elena; Muñoz Valdés, Oscar; Garrido Jiménez, Belén; Gómez, Rocío Sánchez

    Objectives To identify postmenopausal women with risk of osteoporosis through quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUI) and to value the medical intervention after the determination of the bone mineral density (BMD). Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study developed in a community pharmacy. During the month of June of 2005 the community pharmacy enrolled postmenopausal women into the study. Women in treatment with calcium, vitamin D, hormone replacement therapy, estrogen receptor modulators, calcitonin or biphosphonates were considered criteria for exclusion. To all the women that consent to participate, the pharmacist measured BMD with the device Sahara Hologic Ultrasound Bone Densitometer at right calcaneus. Following the World Health Organization, women were classified as osteoporotic if their T-Score was less than -2.5 and as osteopenic if their T-Score ranged between -2.5 and -1.0. Results Of the 100 women screened, 11 (11%) presented risk of osteoporosis and 61 (61%) of osteopenia. The 18.5% postmenopausal women with body mass index lesser than 30 presented risk of osteoporosis and the 63.0% osteopenia. Conclusions The QUI constitutes a useful tool in community pharmacy for the screening of osteoporosis and it supposes a greater integration of the community pharmacy within the health care. PMID:25247006

  12. Menopausal Experiences of Women with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, D. S.; Wishart, J. G.; Muir, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the menopause in women with intellectual disabilities (ID) save that its onset is earlier than in the general population, and earlier still in women with Down's syndrome (DS). This study directly explored menopausal experiences in women with ID, both with and without DS, with the aim of identifying levels of…

  13. Dose-response effect of exercise frequency on bone mineral density in post-menopausal, osteopenic women.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, W; von Stengel, S

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term dose-response relationship of exercise frequency on areal bone mineral density (aBMD) in early post-menopausal women with osteopenia. Based on the 12-year results of the consequently supervised exercise group (EG) of the Erlangen Fitness and Osteoporosis Prevention Study, we retrospectively structured two exercise groups according to the overall exercise frequency. Changes in aBMD at lumbar spine and proximal femur as assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry technique were compared between a low-frequency exercise group (LEF-EG, n = 16) with 1.5-<2 sessions/week and a high-frequency exercise group (HEF-EG, n = 25) with ≥ 2-3.5 sessions/week. Changes in aBMD at the lumbar spine and proximal femur were significantly more favorable in the HEF-EG compared with the LEF-EG; lumbar spine: (mean value ± standard deviation) 1.1 ± 4.7% vs -4.1 ± 3.0%; P = 0.001, ES: d' = 1.26; total hip: -4.4 ± 3.9% vs -6.7 ± 3.5%, P = 0.045, ES: d' = 0.70). BMD results of the LEF-EG did not significantly differ from the data of the non-training control group (lumbar spine: -4.4 ± 5.2%, total hip: -6.9 ± 5.0%). Although this result might not be generalizable across all exercise types and cohorts, it indicates that to impact bone, an overall exercise frequency of at least 2 sessions/week may be crucial, even if exercise is applied with high intensity/impact.

  14. [Clinical evaluation of vertigo in menopausal women].

    PubMed

    Owada, Satoko; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Suzuki, Mitsuya; Yoshida, Tomoe; Nomura, Toshiyuki

    2012-05-01

    Vertigo is one of the usual menopausal symptoms. We have often examined some women under the complaint of vertigo related with the menopause. We diagnosed each disease based on neuro-otological examinations and investigated the characteristics of menopausal-associated vertigo. We studied 413 women aged 40-59 years old who complained of vertigo. There were 73 women with menopause symptoms (14 women introduced from the gynecologist in our medical center, 18 women had undergone treatment at another female clinic, and 41 women visited an otorhinolaryngologist first) compared with 340 women without menopause symptoms. In the menopause group, 41 (56.2%) cases were diagnosed as having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 13 (17.8%) cases had Meniere's disease, sudden deafness with vertigo accounted 2 cases, one was an acoustic tumor, and so on. The percentage of patients with BPPV was almost same ratio between the menopause group (56.2%) and the non-menopause group (52.9%). The percentage of patients with Meniere's disease was higher markedly in the menopausal group (17.8%). than the non-menopause group (9.7%). Menopausal symptoms are caused not only by hot flashes related to a lack of estrogen but also by psychological factors. The onset of Meniere's disease can also be influenced by psychological factors. As for the diagnosis of Meniere's disease, we supposed the reason for the higher percentage in the menopausal group was its relationship with psychological factors. We could diagnose and treat some menopausal women with vertigo. We believe that joint consultation with a gynecologist and otorhinolaryngologist would be necessary to ensure an optimum quality of life for such patients.

  15. Association between bone indices assessed by DXA, HR-pQCT and QCT scans in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Amstrup, Anne Kristine; Jakobsen, Niels Frederik Breum; Moser, Emil; Sikjaer, Tanja; Mosekilde, Leif; Rejnmark, Lars

    2016-11-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT), high-resolution peripheral QCT (HR-pQCT) and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans are commonly used when assessing bone mass and structure in patients with osteoporosis. Depending on the imaging technique and measuring site, different information on bone quality is obtained. How well these techniques correlate when assessing central as well as distal skeletal sites has not been carefully assessed to date. One hundred and twenty-five post-menopausal women aged 56-82 (mean 63) years were studied using DXA scans (spine, hip, whole body and forearm), including trabecular bone score (TBS), QCT scans (spine and hip) and HR-pQCT scans (distal radius and tibia). Central site measurements of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by DXA and volumetric BMD (vBMD) by QCT correlated significantly at the hip (r = 0.74, p < 0.01). Distal site measurements of density at the radius as assessed by DXA and HR-pQCT were also associated (r = 0.74, p < 0.01). Correlations between distal and central site measurements of the hip and of the tibia and radius showed weak to moderate correlation between vBMD by HR-pQCT and QCT (r = -0.27 to 0.54). TBS correlated with QCT at the lumbar spine (r = 0.35) and to trabecular indices of HR-pQCT at the radius and tibia (r = -0.16 to 0.31, p < 0.01). There was moderate to strong agreement between measuring techniques when assessing the same skeletal site. However, when assessing correlations between central and distal sites, the associations were only weak to moderate. Our data suggest that the various techniques measure different characteristics of the bone, and may therefore be used in addition to rather than as a replacment for imaging in clinical practice.

  16. Evidence for the Cost of Reproduction in Humans: High Lifetime Reproductive Effort Is Associated with Greater Oxidative Stress in Post-Menopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Ziomkiewicz, Anna; Sancilio, Amelia; Galbarczyk, Andrzej; Klimek, Magdalena; Jasienska, Grazyna; Bribiescas, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Life history theory predicts trade-offs between reproductive effort and maternal survivorship in energy-restricted environments. However, empirical evidence for the positive association between maternal mortality and reproductive effort from energetically challenged human populations are mixed and physiological mechanisms that may underlie this association are poorly understood. We hypothesized that increases in aerobic metabolism during repeated periods of pregnancy and lactation result in increased oxidative stress that may contribute to somatic deterioration, vulnerability to illness, and accelerated aging. We therefore predicted that lifetime gravidity and parity would be related to levels of biomarkers of oxidative stress, as well as antioxidative defence enzymes in post-menopausal women. Our hypothesis was supported by positive linear associations between levels of 8-OHdG, a biomarker of DNA oxidative damage (β = 0.21, p<0.05), levels of antioxidative defence enzyme Cu-Zn SOD (β = 0.25, p<0.05), and number of lifetime pregnancies. Furthermore, independent of age and health status, post-menopausal women with higher gravidity and parity (> = 4 pregnancies per lifetime) had 20% higher levels of 8-OHdG and 60% higher levels of Cu-Zn SOD compared to women with lower gravidity and parity (<4 pregnancies per lifetime). Our results present the first evidence for oxidative stress as a possible cost of reproductive effort in humans.

  17. Evidence for the Cost of Reproduction in Humans: High Lifetime Reproductive Effort Is Associated with Greater Oxidative Stress in Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Sancilio, Amelia; Galbarczyk, Andrzej; Klimek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Life history theory predicts trade-offs between reproductive effort and maternal survivorship in energy-restricted environments. However, empirical evidence for the positive association between maternal mortality and reproductive effort from energetically challenged human populations are mixed and physiological mechanisms that may underlie this association are poorly understood. We hypothesized that increases in aerobic metabolism during repeated periods of pregnancy and lactation result in increased oxidative stress that may contribute to somatic deterioration, vulnerability to illness, and accelerated aging. We therefore predicted that lifetime gravidity and parity would be related to levels of biomarkers of oxidative stress, as well as antioxidative defence enzymes in post-menopausal women. Our hypothesis was supported by positive linear associations between levels of 8-OHdG, a biomarker of DNA oxidative damage (β = 0.21, p<0.05), levels of antioxidative defence enzyme Cu-Zn SOD (β = 0.25, p<0.05), and number of lifetime pregnancies. Furthermore, independent of age and health status, post-menopausal women with higher gravidity and parity (> = 4 pregnancies per lifetime) had 20% higher levels of 8-OHdG and 60% higher levels of Cu-Zn SOD compared to women with lower gravidity and parity (<4 pregnancies per lifetime). Our results present the first evidence for oxidative stress as a possible cost of reproductive effort in humans. PMID:26761206

  18. Use of digital panoramic radiography as an auxiliary means of low bone mineral density detection in post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, C S; Trindade, A M; Mazzieiro, Ê T; Amaral, T P; Manzi, F R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To correlate the radiomorphometric indices obtained using digital panoramic radiography (DPR) with bone mineral densities, evaluated by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry test, in a population of post-menopausal females to identify patients with asymptomatic low bone mineral densities. Methods: The morphology of the mandibular cortex was evaluated using the mandibular cortical index (MCI) and the inferior mandibular cortex width was evaluated using the mental index (MI) in 64 female patients who had undergone dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry assessment. Of these patients, 21 were diagnosed with osteopaenia and 20 with osteoporosis, and 23 were normal. Three new indices for evaluating the inferior mandibular cortex width were designed: the mental posterior index 1 (MPI1), MPI2 and MPI3. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ2 and Kruskal–Wallis tests and the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: There were significant differences between the normal and lower bone mineral density groups (osteopaenia and osteoporosis) for MCI (p < 0.01). In the osteoporosis group, the MI, MPI1, MPI2 and MPI3 were significantly different from the normal and osteopaenia groups (p < 0.05). The MI, MPI1, MPI2 and MPI3 showed that there is an area in the mandibular cortex, located between the mental foramen and the antegonial region, which is valid for identifying females at high risk for osteoporosis. Conclusions: The MCI, MI, MPI1, MPI2, and MPI3 radiomorphometric indices evaluated using DPR can be used to identify post-menopausal females with low bone densities and to provide adequate medical treatment for them. PMID:24005062

  19. Effect of Citalopram in Combination with Omega-3 on Depression in Post-menopausal Women: A Triple Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra; Kazemi, Farideh; Rahimi, Alireza; Oshvandi, Khodayar; Soltanian, Alireza; Shobeiri, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Depressive disorder is a common and disabling disorder that causes high rates of morbidity and mortality. Citalopram is an antidepressant drug, of the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) class that has been used for geriatric depression since a long time ago. Prescription of omega-3 in geriatric depression has been increased recently; because of more favorable profile of their side effects. Some of the studies reported that omega-3 is effective in prevention or treatment of depressive disorders than Citalopram. However, there are contradictory studies too. Aim This study aimed to investigate the effect of a combination of omega-3 and citalopram in the treatment of women with post-menopausal depression. Materials and Methods This triple-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted on 60 women with post-menopausal depression who were referred to the Hamadan Fatemieh Hospital. After the participants completed the DSM-IV questionnaire and depression was confirmed by a psychiatrist, participants were assigned randomly into two-intervention and control groups. The patients in the control group received 20mg citalopram along with a placebo while patients in the intervention group received 20mg citalopram and 1g of omega-3. At baseline and at the end of the first, second, and fourth weeks, all of the participants answered the Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI). Descriptive statistics and t-test, repeated measures analysis of variance and Bonferroni post-hoc test was used to analyse the data. Results The depression score was 6.1±2.41 in intervention and 25.22±10.04 in control group, four weeks after intervention. A decreasing trend was observed in the mean depression scores of the intervention group during the study. Using repeated measures analysis of variance, a significant difference was observed between the mean depression scores of the two groups at the four measurement time-points (p<0.001). The mean depression scores of the intervention

  20. Post-menopausal vaginal angiomyofibroblastoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Laiyemo, Raphael; Disu, Stewart; Vijaya, Gopalar; Wise, B

    2005-12-01

    Angiomyofibroblastoma (AMF) is a recently described, rare, benign soft tissue vulvovaginal tumour that occurs mainly but not exclusively in the vulval region of pre-menopausal women (Fletcher et al. in Am J Surg Pathl 16:373; 1992). The first case was diagnosed in 1992. We report a case of a post-menopausal woman with a 2-month history of a rapidly growing painless vaginal tumour and thus drawing the attention of gynaecologist as well as general practitioners to the fact that this rare phenomenon can occur outside the vulva.

  1. Effect of 1-year dietary supplementation with vitaminized olive oil on markers of bone turnover and oxidative stress in healthy post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Laura; Battino, Maurizio; Nanetti, Laura; Raffaelli, Francesca; Alidori, Alessandro; Sforza, Giulia; Carle, Flavia; Quagliarini, Veronica; Cester, Nelvio; Vignini, Arianna

    2015-11-01

    Osteoporosis represents a serious health problem worldwide associated with an increased risk of fractures and mortality. Nutrition should form part of bone disease prevention strategies, especially in the light of the population ageing and the diet effect on bone health. Thus the study aimed at verifying whether 1 year of oral supplementation with either extra virgin olive oil (VOO) enriched with vitamins D3, K1 and B6 (VitVOO) or VOO used as placebo (PlaVOO) is able to modify some bone turnover and oxidative stress markers. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed in 60 healthy post-menopausal women together with the bone vitamin K status by measuring undercarboxylated osteocalcine (ucOC) plasma levels, the ratio between ucOC and carboxylated osteocalcine (UCR) and the relations with oxidative stress markers. After 1 year (T 1), subjects taking VitVOO showed lower ucOC levels than those taking PlaVOO; the same trend was found for UCR. As far as BMD is concerned, a significant increase in T-score at T 1 in VitVOO subjects compared to PlaVOO was found. All oxidative stress markers as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides and conjugated dienes showed a significant reduction after VitVOO supplementation, whilst plasma total antioxidant capacity values was significantly increased in VitVOO group compared to PlaVOO group at T 1. It might be suggested that the use of VitVOO in the diet of post-menopausal women could represent a proper tool for bone protection and a useful strategy against oxidative stress and related diseases, thus confirming the antioxidant role played by the added vitamins.

  2. Skin academy: hair, skin, hormones and menopause - current status/knowledge on the management of hair disorders in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Atkin, Stephen; Gieler, Uwe; Grimalt, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Menopause is defined by 12 months of amenorrhea after the final menstrual period. The reduction in ovarian hormones and increased androgen levels can manifest as hair and skin disorders. Although hirsutism, unwanted facial hair, alopecia, skin atrophy and slackness of facial skin are common issues encountered by post-menopausal women, these problems receive very little attention relative to other menopausal symptoms. The visibility of these disorders has been shown to cause significant anxiety and may impact on patients' self-esteem and quality of life, particularly given the strong association of hair and skin with a woman's femininity and beauty, which is demonstrated by extensive marketing by the cosmetic industry targeting this population and the large expenditure on these products by menopausal women. The proportion of the female population who are in the post-menopausal age group is rising. Therefore, the prevalence of these dermatological symptoms is likely to increase. Current therapies aim to rectify underlying hormonal imbalances and improve cosmetic appearance. However, there is little evidence to support treatment for these disorders specifically in post-menopausal women. This review discusses the assessment and treatment of both the physiological and psychological aspects of hair and skin disorders pertinent to the growing post-menopausal population.

  3. Correlation between Female Sex Hormones and Electrodiagnostic Parameters and Clinical Function in Post-menopausal Women with Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Azam; Naseri, Mahshid; Namazi, Hamid; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role of sex-hormonal changes in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among post-menopausal women through measuring estrogen receptor (ER) expression in their transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and serum estrogen level, as well as determine the correlation between these factors and electrodiagnostic parameters and Boston score. Methods Biopsy samples of TCL were collected from 12 postmenopausal women who had undergone surgery for severe idiopathic CTS; control specimens were collected from 10 postmenopausal women without CTS who had undergone surgery for the other hand pathologies. To determine the distributions of ER in TCL, histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed. Serum estrogen level was also measured. Electrodiagnosis and Boston questionnaire were used for CTS severity and determination of the patients' function. Results ER expression in TCL and serum estrogen level were not significantly different in the case group compared to the control group (P = 0.79 and P = 0.88, respectively). Also, there was no correlation between ER expression or serum estrogen level and electrodiagnostic parameters or Boston score. Conclusions Sex hormones cannot still be considered as the etiology of idiopathic CTS in postmenopausal women. The role of other factors such as wrist ratio and narrower outlet in females compared to the males should be considered along with hormonal changes. PMID:27617242

  4. Perspectives on menopause and women with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Andany, Nisha; Kennedy, V Logan; Aden, Muna; Loutfy, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Since the implementation of effective combination antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection has been transformed from a life-threatening condition into a chronic disease. As people with HIV are living longer, aging and its associated manifestations have become key priorities as part of HIV care. For women with HIV, menopause is an important part of aging to consider. Women currently represent more than one half of HIV-positive individuals worldwide. Given the vast proportion of women living with HIV who are, and will be, transitioning through age-related life events, the interaction between HIV infection and menopause must be addressed by clinicians and researchers. Menopause is a major clinical event that is universally experienced by women, but affects each individual woman uniquely. This transitional time in women’s lives has various clinical implications including physical and psychological symptoms, and accelerated development and progression of other age-related comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular disease, neurocognitive dysfunction, and bone mineral disease; all of which are potentially heightened by HIV or its treatment. Furthermore, within the context of HIV, there are the additional considerations of HIV acquisition and transmission risk, progression of infection, changes in antiretroviral pharmacokinetics, response, and toxicities. These menopausal manifestations and complications must be managed concurrently with HIV, while keeping in mind the potential influence of menopause on the prognosis of HIV infection itself. This results in additional complexity for clinicians caring for women living with HIV, and highlights the shifting paradigm in HIV care that must accompany this aging and evolving population. PMID:26834498

  5. Musculoskeletal pain among women of menopausal age in Puebla, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Goode-Null, Susan K

    2005-06-01

    Worldwide, complaints of musculoskeletal pain are more frequent than complaints of hot flashes amongst women of menopausal age. The purpose of this study was to examine musculoskeletal pain among women of menopausal age in the city of Puebla, Mexico. An opportunity sample was recruited from public parks and markets, with representation from all social classes (n=755). Mean age was 50.1 years, and the majority were employed as saleswomen in small businesses. Symptom frequencies were collected by open-ended interviews and with a structured symptom list that queried symptom experience during the two weeks prior to interview. In response to open-ended questions, "dolores de huesos" (bone pain) was volunteered by 47% of respondents as a symptom associated with menopause, second only to hot flashes (53%). From the structured symptom list, 55.8% and 55.6% reported back pain and joint stiffness during the two weeks prior to interview. Women with back pain and joint stiffness were less likely to report being active during their leisure time (p<.01). The results of backwards stepwise logistic regressions indicate that women with back pain were more likely to be older, with less education, a higher BMI, and ate less meat. Women with joint pain were more likely to be post-menopausal, with less education, more children, a higher BMI, and were likely to drink milk and coffee more than once/week but less than once/day. While menopause is not necessarily a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain, it is important to recognize the pervasiveness of this complaint among women of menopausal age.

  6. Prolactin receptor expression and breast cancer: relationships with tumor characteristics among pre- and post-menopausal women in a population-based case-control study from Poland.

    PubMed

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Duggan, Maire A; Sherman, Mark E; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Yang, Xiaohong R; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A; Peplonska, Beata; Vonderhaar, Barbara K; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have found an association between elevated circulating prolactin levels and increased risk of breast cancer. Prolactin stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and survival via binding to the cell-surface prolactin receptor. The association of prolactin receptor expression with breast tumorigenesis remains unclear as studies that have focused on this association have had limited sample size and/or information about tumor characteristics. Here, we examined the association of prolactin expression with tumor characteristics among 736 cases, from a large population-based case-control study of breast cancer conducted in Poland (2000-2003), with detailed risk factor and pathology data. Tumors were centrally reviewed and prepared as tissue microarrays for immunohistochemical analysis of prolactin receptor expression. Association of prolactin receptor expression across strata of tumor characteristics was evaluated using χ (2) analysis and logistic regression. Prolactin receptor expression did not vary by menopausal status; therefore, data from pre- and post-menopausal women were combined in the analyses. Approximately 83 % of breast cancers were categorized as strong prolactin receptor staining. Negative/low prolactin receptor expression was independently associated with poorly differentiated (p = 1.2 × 10(-08)) and larger tumors (p = 0.0005). These associations were independent of estrogen receptor expression. This is the largest study to date in which the association of prolactin receptor expression with tumor characteristics has been evaluated. These data provide new avenues from which to explore the associations of the prolactin/prolactin receptor signaling network with breast tumorigenesis.

  7. The effects of water-based exercise in combination with blood flow restriction on strength and functional capacity in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Joamira P; Neto, Gabriel R; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Bemben, Michael G; Laurentino, Gilberto C; Batista, Gilmário; Silva, Júlio C G; Freitas, Eduardo D S; Sousa, Maria S C

    2015-12-01

    Water-based exercise and low-intensity exercise in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR) are two methods that have independently been shown to improve muscle strength in those of advancing age. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of water-based exercise in combination with BFR on maximum dynamic strength and functional capacity in post-menopausal women. Twenty-eight women underwent an 8-week water-based exercise program. The participants were randomly allocated to one of the three groups: (a) water exercise only, (b) water exercise + BFR, or (c) a non-exercise control group. Functional capacity (chair stand test, timed up and go test, gait speed, and dynamic balance) and strength testing were tested before and after the 8-week aquatic exercise program. The main findings were as follows: (1) water-based exercise in combination with BFR significantly increased the lower limb maximum strength which was not observed with water-based exercise alone and (2) water-based exercise, regardless of the application of BFR, increased functional performance measured by the timed up and go test over a control group. Although we used a healthy population in the current study, these findings may have important implications for those who may be contraindicated to using traditional resistance exercise. Future research should explore this promising modality in these clinical populations.

  8. The effects of postmenopausal hormone therapy on serum estrogen, progesterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels in healthy post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Edlefsen, Kerstin L.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Prentice, Ross L.; Janssen, Imke; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Anderson, Garnet

    2010-01-01

    Objective Differences in disease outcomes between users and non-users of hormone therapy (HT) and between users of estrogen alone (ET) and users of estrogen plus progesterone therapy (EPT) may relate to differences in serum hormone concentrations between these populations. In this study, we examine the response of serum hormone levels in healthy post-menopausal women after one year of HT. Methods A representative sub-sample of 200 healthy adherent participants from the active and placebo groups of the Women's Health Initiative randomized, controlled clinical trials of ET (conjugated equine estrogen 0.625 mg daily) or EPT (ET plus medroxyprogesterone actetate 2.5 mg daily) were selected for determination of selected sex hormone levels at baseline and one year after randomization. Results In participants receiving active ET intervention compared to placebo, estrogenic hormone levels increased from baseline to year 1 by 3.6-fold for total estrone, 2.7-fold for total estradiol, and 1.8-fold for bioavailable and free estradiol concentrations. Serum SHBG concentrations also increased 2.5-fold. In contrast, progesterone levels decreased slightly in women taking exogenous EPT. The response of serum estrogens and SHBG did not differ substantially with the addition of progesterone. In subgroup analyses, hormone response varied by age, ethnicity, BMI, smoking, vasomotor symptoms, and baseline hormone levels. Conclusions These data provide a reference point for the serum hormone response to HT, and demonstrate that response of serum estrogens is similar for ET and EPT. The implications of the slight decrease in serum progesterone levels with EPT therapy are uncertain. Potential treatment interactions for estrogenic hormones were identified, which suggest a larger response to HT in women with low endogenous levels. PMID:20215977

  9. The menopause: women's psychology and health care.

    PubMed

    Defey, D; Storch, E; Cardozo, S; Díaz, O; Fernández, G

    1996-05-01

    Menopause has often been described as a time of loss and decay in the lay and medical literature. The present research aims at defining women's perception of themselves and their health care needs in this period of life. Through a community-based sample of women, participative assessments were performed and their conclusions contrasted with the opinions of male and female gynecologists. Though both groups coincided concerning the relevance of loneliness, partnership, beauty and the "empty nest" syndrome, several items showed a marked difference between both groups. Gynecologists tended to perceive women as much more striving for an active sex-life, depressed, lacking projects for the future and worried about their health care than they actually were. Women, instead, stressed the relevance of menopause as a life crisis laden with opportunities for self-accomplishment and positive changes in life-style towards greater autonomy.

  10. The relationship between inhibitors of the Wnt signalling pathway (Dickkopf-1(DKK1) and sclerostin), bone mineral density, vascular calcification and arterial stiffness in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Geeta; Edwards, Sylvie; Conroy, Soraya; Blake, Glen M; Fogelman, Ignac; Frost, Michelle L

    2013-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between bone loss/osteoporosis and vascular calcification (VC). Recent studies have implicated the Wnt signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of VC. We investigated the association between circulating concentrations of Wnt inhibitors; DKK1 and sclerostin with bone mineral density (BMD), abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) and arterial stiffness in post-menopausal women. One hundred and forty six post-menopausal women aged (mean [SD]) 61.5[6.5] years were studied. Sclerostin and DKK1 were measured in serum. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN), total hip (TH). AAC was detected by Vertebral Fracture Assessment (VFA) imaging and quantified using an 8- and 24- point scoring methods. Arterial stiffness was determined by aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV). A significant positive correlation was observed between sclerostin and BMD at the FN (r = 0.166, p = 0.043) and TH (r = 0.165, p = 0.044). The association remained significant at the FN (p = 0.045) and TH (p = 0.026) following adjustment for confounders. No significant correlation was observed between DKK1 and BMD. In contrast, there was a significant negative correlation between log DKK1 and AAC (24-point score: r = -0.25, p = 0.008 and 8-point score: r = -0.21, p = 0.024). Subjects with AAC score of 1 or less had significantly higher DKK1 (p = 0.01). The association between DKK1 and AAC remained significant following correction for age, blood pressure, cholesterol (24-point score: p = 0.017, 8-point score: p = 0.044). In adjusted linear regression analysis, sclerostin was positively associated with AAC (24-point score: p = 0.048, 8-point score: p = 0.031). Subjects with a PWV>9 m/s had significantly higher sclerostin than those with PWV <9 m/s: 23.8[12.3], vs 29.7 [14] pmol/l, p = 0.03). No association was observed between DKK1 and PWV. The opposite association between AAC and the 2 Wnt signaling inhibitors is of interest and merits further

  11. Insomnia in women approaching menopause: Beyond perception.

    PubMed

    Baker, Fiona C; Willoughby, Adrian R; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Colrain, Ian M; de Zambotti, Massimiliano

    2015-10-01

    The menopausal transition is marked by increased prevalence in disturbed sleep and insomnia, present in 40-60% of women, but evidence for a physiological basis for their sleep complaints is lacking. We aimed to quantify sleep disturbance and the underlying contribution of objective hot flashes in 72 women (age range: 43-57 years) who had (38 women), compared to those who had not (34 women), developed clinical insomnia in association with the menopausal transition. Sleep quality was assessed with two weeks of sleep diaries and one laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) recording. In multiple regression models controlling for menopausal transition stage, menstrual cycle phase, depression symptoms, and presence of objective hot flashes, a diagnosis of insomnia predicted PSG-measured total sleep time (p < 0.01), sleep efficiency (p = 0.01) and wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO) (p = 0.01). Women with insomnia had, on average, 43.5 min less PSG-measured sleep time (p < 0.001). There was little evidence of cortical EEG hyperarousal in insomniacs apart from elevated beta EEG power during REM sleep. Estradiol and follicle stimulating hormone levels were unrelated to beta EEG power but were associated with the frequency of hot flashes. Insomniacs were more likely to have physiological hot flashes, and the presence of hot flashes predicted the number of PSG-awakenings per hour of sleep (p = 0.03). From diaries, women with insomnia reported more WASO (p = 0.002), more night-to-night variability in WASO (p < 0.002) and more hot flashes (p = 0.012) compared with controls. Women who develop insomnia in the approach to menopause have a measurable sleep deficit, with almost 50% of the sample having less than 6h of sleep. Compromised sleep that develops in the context of the menopausal transition should be addressed, taking into account unique aspects of menopause like hot flashes, to avoid the known negative health consequences associated with insufficient sleep and insomnia in

  12. A Systems Biology Approach Investigating the Effect of Probiotics on the Vaginal Microbiome and Host Responses in a Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Bisanz, Jordan E.; Seney, Shannon; McMillan, Amy; Vongsa, Rebecca; Koenig, David; Wong, LungFai; Dvoracek, Barbara; Gloor, Gregory B.; Sumarah, Mark; Ford, Brenda; Herman, Dorli; Burton, Jeremy P.; Reid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    A lactobacilli dominated microbiota in most pre and post-menopausal women is an indicator of vaginal health. The objective of this double blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study was to evaluate in 14 post-menopausal women with an intermediate Nugent score, the effect of 3 days of vaginal administration of probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14 (2.5×109 CFU each) on the microbiota and host response. The probiotic treatment did not result in an improved Nugent score when compared to when placebo. Analysis using 16S rRNA sequencing and metabolomics profiling revealed that the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was increased following probiotic administration as compared to placebo, which was weakly associated with an increase in lactate levels. A decrease in Atopobium was also observed. Analysis of host responses by microarray showed the probiotics had an immune-modulatory response including effects on pattern recognition receptors such as TLR2 while also affecting epithelial barrier function. This is the first study to use an interactomic approach for the study of vaginal probiotic administration in post-menopausal women. It shows that in some cases multifaceted approaches are required to detect the subtle molecular changes induced by the host to instillation of probiotic strains. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02139839 PMID:25127240

  13. Women's perspectives toward menopause: A phenomenological study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Sevil; Simbar, Masoumeh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Zaiery, Farid; Khatami, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the attitude and feelings toward menopause among Azeri menopausal women using hermeneutic phenomenology based on Van Manen's approach. A total of 18 menopausal women who were attended in urban health centers of Tabriz, Iran, were recruited using a purposive sampling method. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. Each interview was transcribed verbatim and analyzed simultaneously. Data analysis led to the emergence of five main themes: positive attitude, neutral attitude, negative attitude, positive feelings, and negative feelings. Participants had different feelings and attitude. Acceptance of menopause as a natural process helps women to have a neutral attitude toward menopause.

  14. Is handgrip strength normalized to body weight a useful tool to identify dynapenia and functional incapacity in post-menopausal women?

    PubMed Central

    Dulac, Maude; Boutros, Guy El Hajj; Pion, Charlotte; Barbat-Artigas, Sébastien; Gouspillou, Gilles; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate whether handgrip strength normalized to body weight could be a useful clinical tool to identify dynapenia and assess functional capacity in post-menopausal women. Method A total of 136 postmenopausal women were recruited. Body composition (Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry [DEXA], Bio-electrical Impedence Analysis [BIA]), grip strength (dynamometer) and functional capacity (senior fitness tests) were evaluated. Dynapenia was established according to a handgrip strength index (handgrip strength divided by body weight (BW) in Kg/KgBW) obtained from a reference population of young women: Type I dynapenic (<0.44 kg/KgBW) and type II dynapenic (<0.35 kg/KgBW). Results The results show a positive correlation between handgrip strength index (in kg/KgBW) and alternate-step test (r=0.30, p<0.001), chair-stand test (r=0.25, p<0.005) and one-leg stance test (r=0.335, p<0.001). The results also showed a significant difference in non-dynapenic compared to type I dynapenic and type II dynapenic for the chair-stand test (Non-dynapenic: 12.0±3.0; Type I: 11.7±2.5; Type II: 10.3±3.0) (p=0.037 and p=0.005, respectively) and the one-leg stance test (Non-dynapenic: 54.2±14.2; Type I: 43.8±21.4; Type II: 35.0±21.8) (p=0.030 and p=0.004, respectively). Finally, a significant difference was observed between type II dynapenic and non-dynapenic for the chair-stand test (p=0.032), but not with type I dynapenic. Conclusion The results showed that handgrip strength was positively correlated with functional capacity. In addition, non-dynapenic women displayed a better functional status when compared to type I and type II dynapenic women. Thus, the determination of the handgrip strength thresholds could be an accessible and affordable clinical tool to identify people at risk of autonomy loss. PMID:27683834

  15. Menopause in Blackfeet women--a life span perspective.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Susan L

    2003-06-01

    A lifespan perspective, combining quantitative and qualitative approaches, is used to examine factors related to the timing of menopause in Blackfeet women of northern Montana (USA). Cross-sectional survey data demonstrate a median age at menopause using a status quo method of 51.6 years, and a mean age of 47.0 +/- 5.0 years among those women who had already experienced menopause. Age at menopause is inversely associated with age at menarche and having been breastfed, and positively associated with use of contraceptives, household income, and current or recent employment. Household income and age at menarche influence menopause age jointly in multivariate models. These and other patterns are examined in the lives of two women with very divergent ages at menopause. Although these data support an effect of early life influences on shaping reproductive trajectories that culminate in menopause, environmental factors and human agency during adult life may play a modifying role.

  16. Plasma levels of HDL subpopulations and remnant lipoproteins predict the extent of angiographically defined disease in post-menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The association of coronary heart disease (CHD) with subpopulations of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) is established in men, but has not been well characterized in women. Plasma HDL subpopulation concentrations, quantified by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis...

  17. Acute effects of calcium supplements on blood pressure and blood coagulation: secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Sarah M; Gamble, Greg D; Stewart, Angela; Horne, Anne M; Reid, Ian R

    2015-12-14

    Recent evidence suggests that Ca supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular events, but the mechanism(s) by which this occurs is uncertain. In a study primarily assessing the effects of various Ca supplements on blood Ca levels, we also investigated the effects of Ca supplements on blood pressure and their acute effects on blood coagulation. We randomised 100 post-menopausal women to 1 g/d of Ca or a placebo containing no Ca. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and every 2 h up to 8 h after their first dose and after 3 months of supplementation. Blood coagulation was measured by thromboelastography (TEG) in a subgroup of participants (n 40) up to 8 h only. Blood pressure declined over 8 h in both the groups, consistent with its normal diurnal rhythm. The reduction in systolic blood pressure was smaller in the Ca group compared with the control group by >5 mmHg between 2 and 6 h (P≤0·02), and the reduction in diastolic blood pressure was smaller at 2 h (between-groups difference 4·5 mmHg, P=0·004). Blood coagulability, assessed by TEG, increased from baseline over 8 h in the calcium citrate and control groups. At 4 h, the increase in the coagulation index was greater in the calcium citrate group compared with the control group (P=0·03), which appeared to be due to a greater reduction in the time to clot initiation. These data suggest that Ca supplements may acutely influence blood pressure and blood coagulation. Further investigation of this possibility is required.

  18. Effects of a Pilates exercise program on muscle strength, postural control and body composition: results from a pilot study in a group of post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bergamin, M; Gobbo, S; Bullo, V; Zanotto, T; Vendramin, B; Duregon, F; Cugusi, L; Camozzi, V; Zaccaria, M; Neunhaeuserer, D; Ermolao, A

    2015-12-01

    Participation in exercise programs is heartily recommended for older adults since the level of physical fitness directly influences functional independence. The aim of this present study was to investigate the effects of supervised Pilates exercise training on the physical function, hypothesizing that a period of Pilates exercise training (PET) can increase overall muscle strength, body composition, and balance, during single and dual-task conditions, in a group of post-menopausal women. Twenty-five subjects, aged 59 to 66 years old, were recruited. Eligible participants were assessed prior and after 3 months of PET performed twice per week. Muscular strength was evaluated with handgrip strength (HGS) test, 30-s chair sit-to-stand test (30CST), and abdominal strength (AST) test. Postural control and dual-task performance were measured through a stabilometric platform while dynamic balance with 8 ft up and go test. Finally, body composition was assessed by means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Statistically significant improvements were detected on HGS (+8.22%), 30CST (+23.41%), 8 ft up and go test (-5.95%), AST (+30.81%), medio-lateral oscillations in open eyes and dual-task condition (-22.03% and -10.37%). Pilates was effective in increasing upper body, lower body, and abdominal muscle strength. No changes on body composition were detected. Results on this investigation indicated also that 12-week of mat Pilates is not sufficient to determine a clinical meaningful improvement on static balance in single and dual-task conditions.

  19. Effects of antidepressants and soybean association in depressive menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Rose E Nina; Landa, Adriana I; Lafuente, José Vicente; Gargiulo, Pascual A

    2014-01-01

    Depression in menopausal women has been widely described for many years ago and is related to hormonal decrease, mainly estrogens. The use of soy has been proposed as a possible coadjutant alternative to treat menopausal depressive disorder. In the present pilot clinical trial the effect of soybean, antidepressants and the association of soybean with antidepressants was studied in 40 depressive menopausal women for three months. Patients were divided in four groups of 10 women: fluoxetine (10 mg), soybean (100 mg), sertraline (50 mg), and sertraline (50 mg) plus soybean (100 mg). The Hamilton and Zung Depression Scales were used to measure the treatment effects. Values at the beginning and at the end of the study were compared. In all cases a significant difference was observed when the treated groups were compared vs. their untreated situation in both scales (p < 0.001). When a comparison between pre- minus post-treatment Zung scale scores was done, the effect induced by the association of sertraline and soybean was significantly higher than the other groups (p < 0.05). These effects were also seen using the Hamilton scale scores, showing significant differences between the association vs. soybean (p < 0.05) and setraline (p < 0.05) groups, but not vs. fluoxetine group. We conclude that soybean has an antidepressant effect per se, and the association of soybean and antidepressants increases their effects.

  20. Effect of Anticholinergic Use for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder on Cognitive Function in Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Elizabeth J.; Crane, Andrea K.; Wells, Ellen C.; Robinson, Barbara L.; Jannelli, Mary L.; Khandelwal, Christine M.; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Parnell, Brent A.; Matthews, Catherine A.; Dumond, Julie B.; Busby-Whitehead, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common condition affecting the elderly. The mainstay of treatment for OAB is medical therapy with anticholinergics. However, adverse events have been reported with this class of drugs including cognitive changes. Objective To investigate the effect of an anticholinergic medication on cognitive function in postmenopausal women being treated for OAB. Study Design Prospective cohort study conducted from January to December 2010, with 12-week follow-up after medication initiation. Setting Urogynecology clinic at one academic medical center. Patients Women age 55 or older seeking treatment for OAB and opting for anticholinergic therapy were recruited. Intervention Baseline cognitive function was assessed via the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test – Revised Form (HVLT-R) (and its 5 subscales), the Orientation, Memory & Concentration (OMC) short form, and the Mini-Cog evaluation. After initiation of trospium chloride extended release, cognitive function was reassessed at Day 1, Week 1, Week 4 and Week 12. Bladder function was assessed via three condition-specific quality of life questionnaires. Secondary outcomes included change in bladder symptoms, correlation between cognitive and bladder symptoms, and overall medication compliance. Main Outcome Measure Change in HVLT-R score at Week 4 after medication initiation, compared to baseline (pre-medication) score. Results Of 50 women enrolled, 35 completed the assessment. Average age was 70.4 years and 77.1% had previously taken anticholinergic medication for OAB. At enrollment 65.7% had severe overactive bladder and 71.4% had severe urge incontinence. Cognitive function showed an initial decline on Day 1 in HVLT-R total score (p=0.037), HVLT-R Delayed Recognition subscale (p=0.011) and HVLT-R Recognition Bias subscale (p=0.01). At Week 1 the HVLT-R Learning subscale declined from baseline (p=0.029). All HVLT-R scores normalized by Week 4. OMC remained stable throughout. The Mini

  1. Systematic review of progesterone use by midlife and menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Spark, M Joy; Willis, Jon

    2012-07-01

    Progesterone treatment for menopausal symptoms is still controversial. Progesterone levels fall during menopause transition, therefore some menopausal women may benefit from progesterone therapy. A systematic review was conducted of studies published from 2001 reporting on progesterone use to treat symptoms associated with menopause or postmenopausal women. Fourteen data bases were searched using the search terms progesterone, menopause, aged, female and human; exclusions were breast cancer, animal and contraception. Thirteen studies were selected for inclusion (11 clinical trials, 1 cohort study and 1 qualitative study), evaluating progesterone effects on menopausal symptoms, bone, sleep, skin, cognition, plasma lipids and plaque progression. Most studies were of low methodological quality (GRADE low or very low). Progesterone improved vasomotor symptoms and sleep quality, with minimal risk. Large studies designed to identify confounders, such as hormone levels, menopausal status and metabolism are required to understand the place of progesterone in clinical practice.

  2. Management of menopause in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A J

    2015-10-01

    Increasing breast cancer incidence and decreasing mortality have highlighted the importance of survivorship issues related to breast cancer. A consideration of the issues related to menopause is therefore of great importance to both women and clinicians. Menopause/menopausal symptoms, with significant negative effects on quality of life and potential long-term health impacts, may in women with breast cancer be associated with: (1) natural menopause occurring concurrently with a breast cancer diagnosis; (2) recurrence of menopausal symptoms following cessation of hormone replacement therapy; (3) treatment-induced menopause (chemotherapy, ovarian ablation/suppression) and adjuvant endocrine therapy. A variety of non-hormonal pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies have been investigated as therapeutic options for menopausal symptoms with mixed results, and ongoing research is required. This review presents a summary of the causes, common problematic symptoms of menopause (vasomotor, genitourinary and sexual dysfunction), and longer-term consequences (cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis) related to menopause. It proposes an evidenced-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of menopause/menopausal symptoms in women with breast cancer.

  3. Empowerment and Coping Strategies in Menopause Women: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yazdkhasti, Mansoureh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Abdi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Context: Menopause is described as a period of psychological difficulties that changes the lifestyle of women in multiple ways. Menopausal women require more information about their physical and psychosocial needs. Empowerment during the menopause can contribute to improving the perception of this stage and the importance of self-care. It is essential to increase women’s awareness and adaptation to menopause, using empowerment programs. The aim of this study was to review the empowerment and coping strategies in menopause women. Evidence Acquisition: In this review, PubMed, EMBASE, ISI, and Iranian databases were scanned for relevant literature. A comprehensive search was performed, using the combinations of the keywords "empowerment, menopause, coping with" to review relevant literature and higher education journals. Results: Most interventions for menopause women have focused on educational intervention, physical activity/exercise, healthy diet, stress management, healthy behaviors, preventing certain diseases and osteoporosis. Health education intervention strategy is one of the alternative strategies for improving women's attitudes and coping with menopause symptoms, identified as severalof the subcategories of health promotion programs. Conclusions: Empowerment of menopausal women will guarantee their health during the last third of their life. It will also help them benefit from their final years of reproductive life. The results of the present study can pave the way for future research about women’s health promotion and empowerment. PMID:26019897

  4. Zinc transporter gene expression and glycemic control in post-menopausal women with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Meika; Chu, Anna; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2014-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated often with underlying zinc deficiency and nutritional supplements such as zinc may be of therapeutic benefit in the disease. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial in postmenopausal women (n=48) with Type 2 DM we investigated the effects of supplementation with zinc (40mg/d) and flaxseed oil (FSO; 2g/d) on the gene expression of zinc transporters (ZnT1, ZnT5, ZnT6, ZnT7, ZnT8, Zip1, Zip3, Zip7, and Zip10) and metallothionein (MT-1A, and MT-2A), and markers of glycemic control (glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c]). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. No significant effects of zinc or FSO supplementation were observed on glycemic marker concentrations, HOMA-IR or fold change over 12 weeks in zinc transporter and metallothionein gene expression. In multivariate analysis, the change over 12 weeks in serum glucose concentrations (P=0.001) and HOMA-IR (P=0.001) predicted the fold change in Zip10. In secondary analysis, marginal statistical significance was observed with the change in both serum glucose concentrations (P=0.003) and HOMA-IR (P=0.007) being predictive of the fold change in ZnT6. ZnT8 mRNA expression was variable; HbA1c levels were higher (P=0.006) in participants who exhibited ZnT8 expression compared to those who did not. The significant predictive relationships between Zip10, ZnT6, serum glucose and HOMA-IR are preliminary, as is the relationship between HbA1c and ZnT8; nevertheless the observations support an association between Type 2 DM and zinc homeostasis that requires further exploration.

  5. Discourses on menopause--Part II: How do women talk about menopause?

    PubMed

    Hvas, Lotte; Gannik, Dorte Effersøe

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this article is to describe which of the different available discourses women relate to as revealed in the way they talk about menopause. We use a discourse analytic approach, which implies that meaning is ascribed to things according to how we talk about them. Twenty-four menopausal women from Denmark were interviewed. They were selected to cover a broad spectrum of Danish women with different menopausal experiences and social background factors. Seven previously identified discourses could be found in the interviews, though to varying degrees from woman to woman. Nearly all women used terms from the biomedical sphere like 'a period of decline and decay', even if they did not necessarily agree with this view. Also the existential discourse permeated most of the interviews, especially when the conversation turned to the ageing process, femininity and self-development. The way the menopause was talked about almost became kaleidoscopic when images speedily changed from the decrepit osteoporotic woman or a woman with lack of vitality and sex-appeal to a healthy and strong woman with control over her body and self. Since many women contact doctors in relation to menopause, and since the way doctors talk about menopause is influential, doctors should carefully consider which words and images they use in the counselling. The medical way of perceiving menopause is just one of many, and doctors must be aware that there are other different and partially contradicting discourses at play in society and in the women's universes.

  6. Is menopausal status related to women's attitudes toward menopause and aging?

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Doyel; Ray, Subha

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between menopausal status and attitudes toward menopause and aging. We identified 1,400 Bengali Hindu women aged 40-55 years (early perimenopausal n = 445; late perimenopausal n = 240; early postmenopausal n = 285; late postmenopausal n = 430) from West Bengal, India. Information on attitudes toward menopause and aging was collected from March 2009 to July 2012 using ten agree/disagree statements, of which three were positive, four were negative, and the rest were neutral. We used only the positive and negative statements in the analyses. The participants were given three response options for each statement: (1) agreed, (2) disagreed, and (3) felt neutral. Agreement with positive statements and disagreement with negative statements were scored as 3. The converse responses were scored as 1. Neutral responses were not scored. Thus, the total attitude score for each participant ranged from 7 to 21. Additionally, data on sociodemographic and reproductive variables, menopausal symptoms, and perceptions toward menopause were also collected. Multivariable analyses (ANCOVA) showed that postmenopausal women had more positive attitudes toward menopause and aging than perimenopausal women. Providing balanced information about menopause and aging might help to foster positive attitudes toward menopause.

  7. The effect of Korean pine nut oil on in vitro CCK release, on appetite sensations and on gut hormones in post-menopausal overweight women.

    PubMed

    Pasman, Wilrike J; Heimerikx, Jos; Rubingh, Carina M; van den Berg, Robin; O'Shea, Marianne; Gambelli, Luisa; Hendriks, Henk F J; Einerhand, Alexandra W C; Scott, Corey; Keizer, Hiskias G; Mennen, Louise I

    2008-03-20

    Appetite suppressants may be one strategy in the fight against obesity. This study evaluated whether Korean pine nut free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides (TG) work as an appetite suppressant. Korean pine nut FFA were evaluated in STC-1 cell culture for their ability to increase cholecystokinin (CCK-8) secretion vs. several other dietary fatty acids from Italian stone pine nut fatty acids, oleic acid, linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and capric acid used as a control. At 50 muM concentration, Korean pine nut FFA produced the greatest amount of CCK-8 release (493 pg/ml) relative to the other fatty acids and control (46 pg/ml). A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over trial including 18 overweight post-menopausal women was performed. Subjects received capsules with 3 g Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) nut FFA, 3 g pine nut TG or 3 g placebo (olive oil) in combination with a light breakfast. At 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 minutes the gut hormones cholecystokinin (CCK-8), glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY) and ghrelin, and appetite sensations were measured. A wash-out period of one week separated each intervention day.CCK-8 was higher 30 min after pine nut FFA and 60 min after pine nut TG when compared to placebo (p < 0.01). GLP-1 was higher 60 min after pine nut FFA compared to placebo (p < 0.01). Over a period of 4 hours the total amount of plasma CCK-8 was 60% higher after pine nut FFA and 22% higher after pine nut TG than after placebo (p < 0.01). For GLP-1 this difference was 25% after pine nut FFA (P < 0.05). Ghrelin and PYY levels were not different between groups. The appetite sensation "prospective food intake" was 36% lower after pine nut FFA relative to placebo (P < 0.05). This study suggests that Korean pine nut may work as an appetite suppressant through an increasing effect on satiety hormones and a reduced prospective food intake.

  8. Guidelines for dietary management of menopausal women with simple obesity

    PubMed Central

    Piecha, Dariusz; Nowak, Justyna; Koszowska, Aneta; Kulik-Kupka, Karolina; Dittfeld, Anna; Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The problem of obesity affects all age groups. It is also observed among menopausal women. Menopause is the time in a woman's life when, as a consequence of hormonal changes occurring in the body, the risk of overweight and obesity increases significantly and, therefore, so does the risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Excess body weight in menopausal women may also be of social and psychological importance since the occurring symptoms may considerably decrease quality of life and sexual activity of these women. Reduction of body weight in obese menopausal women should play a vital role in treatment of this group of patients. Therefore, adequate management seems to be essential, and it should involve dietary, pharmacological and/or surgical treatment, depending on the patient's needs. Following a rational weight loss plan provided by a dietician under medical supervision may contribute to improvement of the health condition and quality of life. It is recommended to observe the guidelines on dietary management described in this article by adjusting a diet plan individually. The following work constitutes a review of articles from 2004-2014 which are available in the PubMed medical knowledge base and the Polish Medical Bibliography (Polska Bibliografia Lekarska). For this purpose, the following controlled vocabulary has been used: menopausal woman, menopausal diet, menopausal weight gain, menopausal weight loss, dietary management in menopause. PMID:26327888

  9. Guidelines for dietary management of menopausal women with simple obesity.

    PubMed

    Brończyk-Puzoń, Anna; Piecha, Dariusz; Nowak, Justyna; Koszowska, Aneta; Kulik-Kupka, Karolina; Dittfeld, Anna; Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    The problem of obesity affects all age groups. It is also observed among menopausal women. Menopause is the time in a woman's life when, as a consequence of hormonal changes occurring in the body, the risk of overweight and obesity increases significantly and, therefore, so does the risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Excess body weight in menopausal women may also be of social and psychological importance since the occurring symptoms may considerably decrease quality of life and sexual activity of these women. Reduction of body weight in obese menopausal women should play a vital role in treatment of this group of patients. Therefore, adequate management seems to be essential, and it should involve dietary, pharmacological and/or surgical treatment, depending on the patient's needs. Following a rational weight loss plan provided by a dietician under medical supervision may contribute to improvement of the health condition and quality of life. It is recommended to observe the guidelines on dietary management described in this article by adjusting a diet plan individually. The following work constitutes a review of articles from 2004-2014 which are available in the PubMed medical knowledge base and the Polish Medical Bibliography (Polska Bibliografia Lekarska). For this purpose, the following controlled vocabulary has been used: menopausal woman, menopausal diet, menopausal weight gain, menopausal weight loss, dietary management in menopause.

  10. Breast cancer and post-menopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenemans, P; Bosman, A

    2003-03-01

    From the introduction of post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) there has been great concern that HRT could possibly increase the risk of breast cancer. Prolonged exposure to endogenous oestrogens undeniably increases the risk of breast cancer. Questions that are important and until now only partly answered, are the following. Are oestrogens tumour promoters, as they induce mitosis, lead to proliferation and, therefore, accelerated growth of clinically occult pre-existing tumours? In addition to this, are they genotoxic mutagenic carcinogens, or could they initiate tumours by way of accumulation of incessant DNA-replication damage mechanism? Opinions vary as to the effect of the addition of a progestogen. There is a multitude of different progestogens which could bind with differing affinity to progesterone receptor PR-A or PR-B, and which have different physiological functions via differential gene regulation. The action of a progestogen on the oestrogen-induced cellular mitotic activity could be synergistic or antagonistic (by different pathways: oestrogen receptor downregulation, activating of metabolic pathways within the breast or stimulation of apoptosis)? Over 60 observational studies and two randomized trials provide evidence that the small but significant increase in risk appears with long-term current post-menopausal hormone use. The addition of a progestogen does not decrease the risk as seen with oestrogens alone and might increase the risk further. It is not clear whether there is a difference in risk with sequentially combined versus continuously combined HRT. Many questions nevertheless still remain. Is the risk increase limited to lean women only? What about risk-modifying factors such as alcohol use and a positive family history for breast cancer? Are tumours detected under HRT less aggressive, is there a better prognosis and is the mortality not increased while morbidity is? And is HRT contraindicated for women with a positive family

  11. Experience of menopause in aboriginal women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chadha, N; Chadha, V; Ross, S; Sydora, B C

    2016-01-01

    Every woman experiences the menopause transition period in a very individual way. Menopause symptoms and management are greatly influenced by socioeconomic status in addition to genetic background and medical history. Because of their very unique cultural heritage and often holistic view of health and well-being, menopause symptoms and management might differ greatly in aboriginals compared to non-aboriginals. Our aim was to investigate the extent and scope of the current literature in describing the menopause experience of aboriginal women. Our systematic literature review included nine health-related databases using the keywords 'menopause' and 'climacteric symptoms' in combination with various keywords describing aboriginal populations. Data were collected from selected articles and descriptive analysis was applied. Twenty-eight relevant articles were included in our analysis. These articles represent data from 12 countries and aboriginal groups from at least eight distinctive geographical regions. Knowledge of menopause and symptom experience vary greatly among study groups. The average age of menopause onset appears earlier in most aboriginal groups, often attributed to malnutrition and a harsher lifestyle. This literature review highlights a need for further research of the menopause transition period among aboriginal women to fully explore understanding and treatment of menopause symptoms and ultimately advance an important dialogue about women's health care.

  12. Effect of autogenic relaxation on depression among menopausal women in rural areas of Thiruvallur District (Tamil Nadu).

    PubMed

    Sujithra, S

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted among 60 menopausal women, 30 each in experimental and control group who met inclusion criteria. The menopausal women were identified in both the groups and level of depression was assessed using Cornell Dysthmia rating scale. Simple random sampling technique by lottery method was used for selecting the sample. Autogenic relaxation was practiced by the menopausal women for four weeks. The findings revealed that in experimental group, after intervention of autogenic relaxation on depression among menopausal women, 23 (76.7%) had mild depression. There was a statistically significant effectiveness in experimental group at the level of p < 0.05. There was a statistically significant association between the effectiveness of autogenic relaxation on depression among menopausal women in the post-experimental group with the type of family at the level of p < 0.05.

  13. Dosing time-dependent effect of raloxifene on plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentrations in post-menopausal women with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi; Otoda, Toshiki; Ookami, Hitoshi; Nagai, Yukihiro; Inano, Akihiro; Takamura, Toshinari; Ushijima, Kentarou; Hosohata, Keiko; Matsushita, Eiki; Saito, Tetsuo; Kaneko, Shuichi; Fujimura, Akio

    2013-03-01

    Raloxifene, a selective oestrogen receptor modulator commonly used for the treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis, affects the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems and consequently increases the risk of venous thromboembolism. Because both the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems exhibit circadian rhythms, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dosing time of raloxifene on markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis, as well as on markers of bone metabolism. Thirty-nine post-menopausal patients with osteoporosis were randomly allocated to two groups: one received 60 mg raloxifene once daily in the morning, whereas the other received 60 mg raloxifene once daily in the evening, for 12 months. In both groups, the activity of coagulation Factors IX and XII was increased significantly after 12 months treatment compared with baseline. The activity of coagulation Factors II and V and levels of markers of bone metabolism (i.e. bone alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b) decreased in both groups. The changes in these markers did not differ between the two groups. In contrast, the plasma concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 increased in the group receiving the morning dose (mean change 40.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.4, 72.5), but not in the groups receiving the evening dose (mean change -0.3%; 95% CI -31.5, 30.9); these percentage changes differed significantly (P < 0.05). Because an elevated concentration of PAI-1 is known to be associated with the risk of venous thromboembolism, the findings of the present study suggest that the dosing time of raloxifene influences its safety. Further larger-scale studies are needed to determine the clinical usefulness of chronotherapy with raloxifene.

  14. Contextual Influences on Women's Health Concerns and Attitudes toward Menopause

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Judy R.

    2011-01-01

    Social factors that affect women's attitudes toward menopause were examined in a sample of 1,037 baby boomer women who took part in two waves of the Midlife in the United States survey. Survey data were collected in 1996 and 2005 from a nationally representative sample of women born between 1946 and 1964 residing in the United States. Women's…

  15. Association Between Hypertension, Menopause, and Cognition in Women.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Judith M; Cerezo, Gustavo H; Del Sueldo, Mildren; Fernandez-Pérez, Cristina; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Vicario, Augusto

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cognitive state in women and its relation to menopause and hypertension (HTN). The authors included 1034 women aged 47.13±15.71 years. The prevalence of HTN was 47.1%, with 67.8% of patients treated and 48.6% controlled. Cognitive impairment was higher among hypertensive menopausal (mini-Boston Naming Test: 7.4±3.1 vs 8.5±2.4, P<.001; Clock-Drawing Test: 5.2±2 vs 5.6±1.6, P<.01). Using logistic regression adjusted by age and education level, statistical differences were found in the results from the mini-Boston Naming Test between menopausal hypertensive vs menopausal normotensive women (odds ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.07; P=.021), and no difference between nonmenopausal hypertensive vs menopausal normotensive women (odds ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-1.57; P=.697). The P interaction between both groups was significant (P=.038). The possibility of alteration in cortical functions in menopausal hypertensive woman showed a relative increment of 48% (P=.021). The association between HTN and menopause increases the possibility of compromising the semantic memory by 50%.

  16. Yale Study: African-American Women Report More Menopause Symptoms than White Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    A study of African-American women in menopause shows that while they experience many of the same symptoms as White women, they report more vasomotor symptoms such as dizziness and bloating, according to a study by a Yale School of Nursing researcher. The women reported symptoms common among White women in menopause--hot flashes, irregular…

  17. Association of PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms on estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene to changes into serum lipid profile of post-menopausal women: Effects of aging, body mass index and breast cancer incidence

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Rochette, Neuza Felix; Souza, Letícia Soncini; Tommasi, Bruno Otoni; Pedrosa, Diego França; Fin, Irani do Carmo Francischetto; Vieira, Fernando Luiz Herkenhoff; Graceli, Jones Bernardes; Rangel, Letícia Batista Azevedo; Silva, Ian Victor

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroidal hormone involved in several physiological functions in the female body including regulation of serum lipid metabolism and breast cancer (BC). Estrogen actions on serum lipids mostly occur through its binding to intracellular Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERalpha) isoform, expressed in most of tissues. This gene (ESR1) exhibit many polymorphic sites (SNPs) located either on translated and non-translated regions that regulate ERalpha protein expression and function. This paper aimed to investigate the association of two intronic SNPs of ESR1 gene, namely c454-397T>C (PvuII) and c454-351A>G (XbaI) to alterations in serum levels of total cholesterol (T-chol), total lipid (TL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides (TG) in a cohort of post-menopausal women. In addition, we aimed to associate presence of these SNPs to development of BC along 5 years period. To do so, a group of healthy 499, highly miscigenated, post-menopausal Brazilian women, were carried using PCR-FRLP technique and further confirmed by automatic sequence analysis as well followed through 5 years for BC incidence. Measurements of serum lipid profile by standard commercial methods were carried individually whereas Dual Energy X-ray Absorciometry (DXA) measured Body Mass Indexes (BMI), Fat Mass (FM), Lean Body Mass (LBM), and Body Water Content (BWC). No effects of PvuII SNP on ESR1 gene were observed on patient´s serum T-chol, TL, LDL, HDL, and TG. However, c454-397T>C PvuII SNP is associated to lower body fat and higher levels of lean mass and body water and lower incidence of BC. On the other hand, statistically significant effect of XbaI c454-351A>G SNP on serum TG and TL levels. Patients homozygous for X allele were followed up from 2010–2015. They showed higher incidence of breast cancer (BC) when compared to either heterozygous and any P allele combination. Moreover, the increasing of TG and TL serum concentrations

  18. Association of PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms on estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene to changes into serum lipid profile of post-menopausal women: Effects of aging, body mass index and breast cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Rochette, Neuza Felix; Souza, Letícia Soncini; Tommasi, Bruno Otoni; Pedrosa, Diego França; Eis, Sérgio Ragi; Fin, Irani do Carmo Francischetto; Vieira, Fernando Luiz Herkenhoff; Graceli, Jones Bernardes; Rangel, Letícia Batista Azevedo; Silva, Ian Victor

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroidal hormone involved in several physiological functions in the female body including regulation of serum lipid metabolism and breast cancer (BC). Estrogen actions on serum lipids mostly occur through its binding to intracellular Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERalpha) isoform, expressed in most of tissues. This gene (ESR1) exhibit many polymorphic sites (SNPs) located either on translated and non-translated regions that regulate ERalpha protein expression and function. This paper aimed to investigate the association of two intronic SNPs of ESR1 gene, namely c454-397T>C (PvuII) and c454-351A>G (XbaI) to alterations in serum levels of total cholesterol (T-chol), total lipid (TL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides (TG) in a cohort of post-menopausal women. In addition, we aimed to associate presence of these SNPs to development of BC along 5 years period. To do so, a group of healthy 499, highly miscigenated, post-menopausal Brazilian women, were carried using PCR-FRLP technique and further confirmed by automatic sequence analysis as well followed through 5 years for BC incidence. Measurements of serum lipid profile by standard commercial methods were carried individually whereas Dual Energy X-ray Absorciometry (DXA) measured Body Mass Indexes (BMI), Fat Mass (FM), Lean Body Mass (LBM), and Body Water Content (BWC). No effects of PvuII SNP on ESR1 gene were observed on patient´s serum T-chol, TL, LDL, HDL, and TG. However, c454-397T>C PvuII SNP is associated to lower body fat and higher levels of lean mass and body water and lower incidence of BC. On the other hand, statistically significant effect of XbaI c454-351A>G SNP on serum TG and TL levels. Patients homozygous for X allele were followed up from 2010-2015. They showed higher incidence of breast cancer (BC) when compared to either heterozygous and any P allele combination. Moreover, the increasing of TG and TL serum concentrations

  19. Teaching Taboo Topics: Menstruation, Menopause, and the Psychology of Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisler, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is (a) to consider reasons why women's reproductive processes receive so little attention in psychology courses and (b) to make an argument for why more attention is needed. Menstruation, menopause, and other reproductive events are important to the psychology of women. Reproductive processes make possible a social role…

  20. EMAS recommendations for conditions in the workplace for menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Amanda; Ceausu, Iuliana; Depypere, Herman; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Mueck, Alfred; Pérez-López, Faustino R; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Senturk, Levent M; Simoncini, Tommaso; Stevenson, John C; Stute, Petra; Rees, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    Women form a large part of many workforces throughout Europe. Many will be working throughout their menopausal years. Whilst the menopause may cause no significant problems for some, for others it is known to present considerable difficulties in both their personal and working lives. During the menopausal transition women report that fatigue and difficulties with memory and concentration can have a negative impact on their working lives. Furthermore, hot flushes can be a source of embarrassment and distress. Some consider that these symptoms can impact on their performance. Greater awareness among employers, together with sensitive and flexible management can be helpful for women at this time. Particular strategies might include: fostering a culture whereby employees feel comfortable disclosing health problems, allowing flexible working, reducing sources of work-related stress, providing easy access to cold drinking water and toilets, and reviewing workplace temperature and ventilation.

  1. Influences of Natural Menopause on Psychological Characteristics and Symptoms of Middle-Aged Healthy Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated psychological and symptom consequences of natural menopause in longitudinal study of 541 initially premenopausal healthy women. Findings 3 years later from 101 menopausal women and control group of 101 premenopausal women revealed that natural menopause led to few changes in psychological characteristics, with only decline in…

  2. Health issues for menopausal women: the top 11 conditions have common solutions.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Gabriella M; Kavousi, Maryam; Troup, Jenna; Franco, Oscar H

    2015-01-01

    Multiple health issues affect women throughout the life course differently from men, or do not affect men at all. Although attention to women's health is important in all stages in life, health among middle-aged and elderly women has not received sufficient attention by scientists and policy-makers. Related to the menopausal transition and the experiences accumulated until that age, many diseases occur or further develop in middle-aged and elderly women. To improve women's quality of life and guarantee a long-lasting and active role for middle-aged and elderly women in society, prevention of chronic diseases and disability is a key aspect. In this manuscript we give an overview of the major health issues for peri- and post-menopausal women, we summarize risk factors and interventions to improve menopausal health. Based on the available scientific literature and the global burden of disease endeavor, we have selected and herein describe the following top 11 key health issues, selected in terms of burden exerted in women's mortality, morbidity, disability and quality of life: cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, cancer, cognitive decline and dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, depression, vasomotor symptoms, sleep disturbances and migraine.

  3. Acute effects of marihuana on luteinizing hormone in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, J H; Cristofaro, P; Ellingboe, J; Benedikt, R; Mello, N K

    1985-11-01

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were determined under double blind crossover conditions in 10 healthy menopausal adult females prior to and following smoking of a 1-g marihuana cigarette containing 1.83% delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and a 1-g marihuana placebo cigarette. A significant increase in pulse rate and levels of intoxication occurred after marihuana smoking but not after smoking placebo cigarettes. LH levels determined before administration of marihuana and placebo cigarettes were not significantly different and were within the range of normal values for healthy menopausal women. No significant differences were found between LH levels following marihuana and placebo smoking.

  4. Why do women stop reproducing before menopause? A life-history approach to age at last birth.

    PubMed

    Towner, Mary C; Nenko, Ilona; Walton, Savannah E

    2016-04-19

    Evolutionary biologists have long considered menopause to be a fundamental puzzle in understanding human fertility behaviour, as post-menopausal women are no longer physiologically capable of direct reproduction. Menopause typically occurs between 45 and 55 years of age, but across cultures and history, women often stop reproducing many years before menopause. Unlike age at first reproduction or even birth spacing, a woman nearing the end of her reproductive cycle is able to reflect upon the offspring she already has--their numbers and phenotypic qualities, including sexes. This paper reviews demographic data on age at last birth both across and within societies, and also presents a case study of age at last birth in rural Bangladeshi women. In this Bangladeshi sample, age at last birth preceded age at menopause by an average of 11 years, with marked variation around that mean, even during a period of high fertility. Moreover, age at last birth was not strongly related to age at menopause. Our literature review and case study provide evidence that stopping behaviour needs to be more closely examined as an important part of human reproductive strategies and life-history theory. Menopause may be a final marker of permanent reproductive cessation, but it is only one piece of the evolutionary puzzle.

  5. The impact of the menopause transition on the health and wellbeing of women living with HIV: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Shema; Delpech, Valerie; Anderson, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Improvements in survival due to advances in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have led to a shift in the age distribution of those receiving HIV care, with increasing numbers of women living with HIV (WLHIV) reaching menopausal age. We present a narrative literature review of 26 studies exploring the menopause transition in WLHIV, focusing on: (1) natural history (2) symptomatology and management, and (3) immunologic and virologic effects. Data are conflicting on the association between HIV and earlier age at menopause, and the role of HIV-specific factors such as HIV viral load and CD4 count. There are some data to suggest that WLHIV experience more vasomotor and psychological symptoms during the menopause than HIV-negative women, and that uptake of hormone replacement therapy by WLHIV is comparatively low. There is no evidence that menopause affects either CD4 count or response to ART, although there may be increased immune activation in older WLHIV. We conclude that menopause in WLHIV is a neglected area of study. Specific information gaps include qualitative studies on experiences of reproductive ageing; data on the impact of the menopause on women's quality of life and ability to adhere to health-sustaining behaviors; as well as studies investigating the safety and efficacy of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions. There is likely to be a burden of unmet health need among this growing population, and better data are required to inform optimal provision of care, supporting WLHIV to maintain their health and wellbeing into their post-reproductive years.

  6. Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help You Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions La menopausia y las hormonas: Preguntas más frecuentes Compounded Bio- ... Menopause and Hormones Card (PDF - 1.3MB) La menopausia y las hormonas tarjeta (PDF - 1.6MB) Order ...

  7. Validity and Reproducibility of a Self-Administered Semi-Quantitative Food-Frequency Questionnaire for Estimating Usual Daily Fat, Fibre, Alcohol, Caffeine and Theobromine Intakes among Belgian Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Bolca, Selin; Huybrechts, Inge; Verschraegen, Mia; De Henauw, Stefaan; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2009-01-01

    A novel food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed and validated to assess the usual daily fat, saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acid, fibre, alcohol, caffeine, and theobromine intakes among Belgian post-menopausal women participating in dietary intervention trials with phyto-oestrogens. The relative validity of the FFQ was estimated by comparison with 7 day (d) estimated diet records (EDR, n 64) and its reproducibility was evaluated by repeated administrations 6 weeks apart (n 79). Although the questionnaire underestimated significantly all intakes compared to the 7 d EDR, it had a good ranking ability (r 0.47–0.94; weighted κ 0.25–0.66) and it could reliably distinguish extreme intakes for all the estimated nutrients, except for saturated fatty acids. Furthermore, the correlation between repeated administrations was high (r 0.71–0.87) with a maximal misclassification of 7% (weighted κ 0.33–0.80). In conclusion, these results compare favourably with those reported by others and indicate that the FFQ is a satisfactorily reliable and valid instrument for ranking individuals within this study population. PMID:19440274

  8. Long-term topical oestrogen treatment of sun-exposed facial skin in post-menopausal women does not improve facial wrinkles or skin elasticity, but induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Lee, Se-Rah; Chung, Jin Ho

    2014-01-01

    It is controversial whether treatment with oestrogen stimulates collagen production or accumulation in sun-exposed skin. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of long-term treatment with topical oestrogen on photoaged facial skin, with regard to wrinkle severity, and expression of procollagen and matrix metalloproteinase-1 enzyme. Two groups of 40 post-menopausal women applied either 1 g of 1% oestrone or vehicle cream once daily to the face for 24 weeks. Visiometer R1-R5 values (skin wrinkles) and Cutometer values (skin elasticity) were not significantly improved in the oestrone group after 24 weeks of treatment. Type I procollagen immunostaining did not increase in the oestrone group compared with the control group. However, levels of matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNA increased robustly (10.3 times) in oestrone-treated skin compared with vehicle-treated skin. Thus, treatment with topical oestrogen may be deleterious in ultraviolet-induced skin ageing, at least in part, through induction of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression in human skin.

  9. Menopause Symptoms and Attitudes of African American Women: Closing the Knowledge Gap and Expanding Opportunities for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Shirley B.; Myers, Jane E.; Tingle, Lynne R.; Bond, Lloyd A.

    2005-01-01

    Menopause, a normal midlife transition for women, remains poorly understood, especially for minority women. A total of 226 African American midlife women completed the Menopause Symptoms List (J. M. Perz, 1997); Menopause Attitude Scale (C. Bowles, 1986); Attitudes Toward Menopause checklist (B. L. Neugarten, V. Wood, R. J. Kraines, & B. Loomes,…

  10. Low back pain in women before and after menopause

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzycki, Marian; Piotrowska, Sylwia

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is a massive problem in modern population, both in social and economic terms. It affects large numbers of women, especially those aged 45-60. Going through a perimenopausal period is associated with many symptoms, including low back pain. This paper is a review of published research on the association between the perimenopausal age and low back pain. PubMed databases were investigated. After the search was narrowed to “menopausal status, back pain”, 35 studies were found. Seven studies, which suited our area of research best, were thoroughly analyzed. All studies show increased pain when women enter this period of their life. There is no agreement among researchers regarding which stage of menopause is the most burdensome. Examples of possible treatments and physiotherapeutic methods targeting low back pain are also presented. Physiotherapeutic procedures used to treat low back pain include exercises in safe positions, balance exercises, manual therapy, massage and physical measures. PMID:26528111

  11. Low back pain in women before and after menopause.

    PubMed

    Kozinoga, Mateusz; Majchrzycki, Marian; Piotrowska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    Low back pain is a massive problem in modern population, both in social and economic terms. It affects large numbers of women, especially those aged 45-60. Going through a perimenopausal period is associated with many symptoms, including low back pain. This paper is a review of published research on the association between the perimenopausal age and low back pain. PubMed databases were investigated. After the search was narrowed to "menopausal status, back pain", 35 studies were found. Seven studies, which suited our area of research best, were thoroughly analyzed. All studies show increased pain when women enter this period of their life. There is no agreement among researchers regarding which stage of menopause is the most burdensome. Examples of possible treatments and physiotherapeutic methods targeting low back pain are also presented. Physiotherapeutic procedures used to treat low back pain include exercises in safe positions, balance exercises, manual therapy, massage and physical measures.

  12. Assessment of cardiovascular risk factors in menopausal Argentinian women.

    PubMed

    Etchegoyen, G S; Ortiz, D; Goya, R G; Sala, C; Panzica, E; Sevillano, A; Dron, N

    1995-01-01

    The cardiovascular risk factor profile was assessed in a population sample consisting of 60 nonmenopausal (control) and 100 menopausal women from different cities in Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Each subject was individually interviewed and asked to complete a specially designed questionnaire aimed at identifying cardiovascular risk factors. A clinical general and gynecological examination including blood pressure and anthropometric measurements as well as a Papanicolaou smear were performed. The most prevalent risk factor in the menopausal group was low physical activity (87% of the subjects), followed by nervous complaints (67%), obesity (64%), familial antecedents of cardiovascular disease (CVD; 38%) and hypertension (33%). Other risk factors assessed showed a level of prevalence below 10%. In the control group, a tobacco smoking habit was the CVD risk factor with the highest prevalence (47%). Nervous complaints also showed a high prevalence (48%). Most menopausal patients (77%) had a cardiovascular risk index (RI) level between 1.5 and 4.0, whereas 17% of these subjects had an RI greater than 4.0 (high-risk patients). The present study reveals that, in the studied community, the menopause is associated with increased levels of both estrogen-dependent and psychosocial risk factors for CVD.

  13. Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... first 1 to 2 years Night sweats Skin flushing Sleeping problems (insomnia) Other symptoms of menopause may ... Saunders; 2016:chap 135. Read More Adrenal glands Cardiovascular Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy Iontophoresis Osteoporosis - overview Review Date ...

  14. Longitudinal Trends in Sexual Behaviors with Advancing Age and Menopause Among Women With and Without HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Weedon, Jeremy; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Karpiak, Stephen E.; Gandhi, Monica; Cohen, Mardge H.; Levine, Alexandra M.; Minkoff, Howard L.; Adedimeji, Adebola A.; Goparaju, Lakshmi; Holman, Susan; Wilson, Tracey E.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed changes in self-reported sexual activity (SA) over 13 years among HIV-infected and uninfected women. The impact of aging and menopause on SA and unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse (UAVI) was examined among women in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), stratifying by HIV status and detectable viral load among HIV-infected women. Generalized mixed linear models were fitted for each outcome, adjusted for relevant covariates. HIV-uninfected women evidenced higher levels of SA and UAVI than HIV-infected. The odds of SA declined by 62–64 % per decade of age. The odds of SA in a 6-month interval for women aged 40–57 declined by 18–22 % post-menopause (controlling for age). Among HIV+/detectable women only, the odds of any UAVI decreased by 17 % per decade of age; the odds of UAVI were unchanged pre-menopause, and then decreased by 28 % post-menopause. Elucidating the factors accounting for ongoing unprotected sex among older women should inform interventions. PMID:25245474

  15. The Influence of Early Menopause on Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Emily C; Crowson, Cynthia S; Amin, Shreyasee; Gabriel, Sherine E; Matteson, Eric L

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Early menopause is associated with an increased risk for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women increases following menopause. Since RA is associated with an increased risk of CVD, this study was undertaken to determine if early menopause affects the risk of developing CVD in women with RA. Methods: A population-based inception cohort of 600 women with RA who fulfilled 1987 ACR criteria for RA between 1955 and 2007 and were age ≥ 45 years at diagnosis was assembled and followed. Age at menopause and duration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), along with occurrence of CVD was ascertained by review of medical records. Cox proportional hazard models compared women who underwent early menopause (natural or artificial menopause at age ≤ 45 years) to those within the cohort who did not undergo early menopause. Results: Of 600 women, 79 exprienced early menopause. Women who underwent early menopause were at significantly higher risk for developing CVD when compared to women who did not (hazard ratio (HR): 1.56; 95% CI: 1.08-2.26). Conclusion: The risk of CVD in women with RA was higher in those who experience early menopause, and like other known risk factors should increase clinician concern for development of CVD in these patients. PMID:24882842

  16. Talking "among us": how women from different racial-ethnic groups define and discuss menopause.

    PubMed

    Dillaway, Heather; Byrnes, Mary; Miller, Sara; Rehan, Sonica

    2008-08-01

    Against a backdrop of scant literature on commonalities and differences among diverse groups of menopausal women within the United States, and little attempt by scholars in any country to study the ways in which both privilege and oppression can shape women's ideas and experiences of menopause, in this study, 61 menopausal women of varied racial-ethnic and class locations in a Midwestern state were asked about the different meanings and experiences of menopause. African American women and Chicanas, particularly working-class women, viewed menopause as a positive experience, whereas many middle-class European American women discussed more negative feelings. Women of color were more likely than European Americans to report talking about menopause with same-race, same-sex friends only. While women of color discussed their knowledge of European American women's menopause, the latter lacked knowledge of other women's experiences. Women's lived experiences with privilege and oppression also surfaced in the interviews. The authors argue that when scholars listen to how women discuss menopause experiences, commonalities among women by gender, and differences among women by race, and class are exposed. The presence of racial-ethnic differences in these pilot data suggests the importance of more comparative studies on reproductive aging both in the United States and abroad.

  17. Oestradiol and sex hormone-binding globulin in premenopausal and post-menopausal meat-eaters, vegetarians and vegans.

    PubMed

    Thomas, H V; Davey, G K; Key, T J

    1999-07-01

    Endogenous oestradiol is strongly associated with breast cancer risk but its determinants are poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that vegetarians have lower plasma oestradiol and higher sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) than meat-eaters we assayed samples from 640 premenopausal women (153 meat-eaters, 382 vegetarians, 105 vegans) and 457 post-menopausal women (223 meat-eaters, 196 vegetarians, 38 vegans). Vegetarians and vegans had lower mean body mass indices (BMI) and lower plasma cholesterol concentrations than meat-eaters, but there were no statistically significant differences between meat-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in pre- or post-menopausal plasma concentrations of oestradiol or SHBG. Before adjusting for BMI there were small differences in the direction expected, with the vegetarians and vegans having higher SHBG and lower oestradiol (more noticeable amongst post-menopausal women) than the meat-eaters. These small differences were essentially eliminated by adjusting for BMI. Thus this study implies that the relatively low BMI of vegetarians and vegans does cause small changes in SHBG and in post-menopausal oestradiol, but that the composition of vegetarian diets may not have any additional effects on these hormones.

  18. Informing Women on Menopause and Hormone Therapy: Know the Menopause a Multidisciplinary Project Involving Local Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Serena; Satolli, Roberto; Colombo, Cinzia; Senatore, Sabrina; Cotichini, Rodolfo; Da Cas, Roberto; Spila Alegiani, Stefania; Mosconi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Background Hormone therapy (HT) in the menopause is still a tricky question among healthcare providers, women and mass media. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy was a Consensus Conference (CC) organized in 2008: the project Know the Menopause has been launched to shift out the results to women and healthcare providers and to assess the impact of the cc’s statement. Methods And Findings: The project, aimed at women aged 45-60 years, was developed in four Italian Regions: Lombardy, Tuscany, Lazio, Sicily, each with one Local Health Unit (LHU) as “intervention” and one as “control”. Activities performed were: survey on the press; training courses for health professionals; educational materials for target populations; survey aimed at women, general practitioners (GPs), and gynaecologists; data analysis on HT drugs’ prescription. Local activities were: training courses; public meetings; dissemination on mass media. About 3,700 health professionals were contacted and 1,800 participated in the project. About 146,500 printed leaflets on menopause were distributed to facilitate the dialogue among women and health care professionals. Training courses and educational cascade-process activities: participation ranged 25- 72% of GPs, 17-71% of gynaecologists, 14-78% of pharmacists, 34-85% of midwives. Survey: 1,281 women interviewed. More than 90% believed menopause was a normal phase in life. More than half did not receive information about menopause and therapies. HT prescription analysis: prevalence fell from 6% to 4% in five years. No differences in time trends before-after the intervention. Major limitations are: organizational difficulties met by LHU, too short time for some local activities. Conclusions A huge amount of information was spread through health professionals and women. The issue of menopause was also used to discuss women’s wellbeing. This project offered an opportunity to launch a multidisciplinary, multimodal approach to

  19. Carer Knowledge and Experiences with Menopause in Women with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Diane S.; Wishart, Jennifer G.; Muir, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    Overall life expectancy for women with intellectual disabilities (ID) is now significantly extended, and many will live long enough to experience menopause. Little is known about how carers support women with ID through this important stage in their lives. This study investigated carer knowledge of how menopause affects women with ID under their…

  20. Effects of Diabetes on Post-Menopausal Rat Submandibular Glands: A Histopathological and Stereological Examination

    PubMed Central

    Buyuk, Basak; Parlak, Secil Nazife; Keles, Osman Nuri; Can, Ismail; Yetim, Zeliha; Toktay, Erdem; Selli, Jale; Unal, Bunyami

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The menopause in elderly women is a physiological process where ovarian and uterine cycles end. Diabetes means higher blood glucose level that is a metabolic disease and has an increased incidence. The aim of the study was to examine the single or combined effects of menopause and diabetes that causes pathophysiological processes on submandibular gland on ovariectomy and diabetes induced rat models. Materials and Methods: Sprague Dawley twelve weeks old female (n=24) rats were divided randomly into four groups; Healthy control group (n=6), diabetic group (DM, n=6), ovariectomized group (OVX, n=6), post ovariectomy diabetes induced group (DM+OVX, n=6) individually. Histopathological, histochemical and stereological analyses were done in these groups. Results: Significant neutrophil cell infiltrations and myoepithelial cell proliferations, granular duct and seromucous acini damages and changes in the content of especially seromucous acini secretion in DM and/or OVX groups and distinctive interstitial and striated duct damages in post ovariectomy diabetes induced group were detected. Alterations ingranular ducts hypertrophic and in seromucous acini atrophic were determined in DM and/or OVX groups. Conclusion: The results revealed the pathophysiological processes that lead to morphological and functional alterations on the cellular level in submandibular glands. The molecular mechanisms related with pathogenesis of diabetes and menopause need further investigation. PMID:26644770

  1. Use of MR-based trabecular bone microstructure analysis at the distal radius for osteoporosis diagnostics: a study in post-menopausal women with breast cancer and treated with aromatase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Seifert-Klauss, Vanadin; Pencheva, Tsvetelina D.; Jungmann, Pia M.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Müller, Dirk; Bauer, Jan S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Purpose Treatment with aromatase inhibitor (AI) is recommended for post-menopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. However, AI therapy is known to induce bone loss leading to osteoporosis with an increased risk for fragility fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether changes of magnetic resonance (MR)-based trabecular bone microstructure parameters as advanced imaging biomarker can already be detected in subjects with AI intake but still without evidence for osteoporosis according to dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-based bone mineral density (BMD) measurements as current clinical gold standard. Methods Twenty-one postmenopausal women (62±6 years of age) with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer, ongoing treatment with aromatase inhibitor for 23±15 months, and no evidence for osteoporosis (current DXA T-score greater than −2.5) were recruited for this study. Eight young, healthy women (24±2 years of age) were included as controls. All subjects underwent 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the distal radius to assess the trabecular bone microstructure. Results Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were not significantly (p>0.05) different between subjects with AI intake and controls, including apparent bone fraction (0.42±0.03 vs. 0.42±0.05), trabecular number (1.95±0.10 mm−1 vs 1.89±0.15 mm−1), trabecular separation (0.30±0.03 mm vs 0.31±0.06 mm), trabecular thickness (0.21±0.01 mm vs 0.22±0.02 mm), and fractal dimension (1.70±0.02 vs. 1.70±0.03). Conclusion These findings suggest that the initial deterioration of trabecular bone microstructure as measured by MRI and BMD loss as measured by DXA occur not sequentially but rather simultaneously. Thus, the use of MR-based trabecular bone microstructure assessment is limited as early diagnostic biomarker in this clinical setting. PMID:27252740

  2. Pharmacologic Therapies in Women's Health: Contraception and Menopause Treatment.

    PubMed

    Allen, Caitlin; Evans, Ginger; Sutton, Eliza L

    2016-07-01

    Female hormones play a significant role in the etiology and treatment of many women's health conditions. This article focuses on the common uses of hormonal therapy. When prescribing estrogen-containing regimens throughout the span of a woman's life, the risks are similar (ie, cardiovascular risk and venous thromboembolism), but the degree of risk varies significantly depending on a woman's particular set of risk factors and the details of the hormone regimen. In addition to estrogens and progestogens, this article also touches on the use of selective steroid receptor modulators in emergency contraception and in treatment of menopause symptoms.

  3. Lycium chinense Improves Post-Menopausal Obesity Via Regulation of PPAR-γ and Estrogen Receptor-α/β Expressions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Hye; Kim, Eun-Jung; Choi, You Yeon; Hong, Jongki; Yang, Woong Mo

    2017-02-23

    The fruit of Lycium chinense Miller (Solanaceae) is used as a functional food and a medicinal herb for treating many specific health concerns. Weight gain induced by estrogen deficiency is a problem for post-menopausal women around the globe. The present study investigates the effects of aqueous extract of L. chinense (LC) on post-menopausal obesity. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and fed on high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks to induce post-menopausal obesity. LC extract (1[Formula: see text]mg/kg and 10[Formula: see text]mg/kg) was orally administrated for 6 weeks with continuous HFD feeding. Ovarian adipose tissues and uterus were weighed. Serum triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and fasting glucose levels were analyzed. The expressions of adipocyte-specific factors and estrogen receptors (ERs) were investigated. Additionally, lipid accumulation was confirmed in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Increased body weight due to post-menopausal obesity was ameliorated about 14.7% and 17.76% by treatment of 1[Formula: see text]mg/kg and 10[Formula: see text]mg/kg LC, respectively. LC treatment reduced both of serum lipid and fasting blood glucose levels. Adipocyte hypertrophy and fatty liver were ameliorated in LC-treated groups. In LC-treated adipocyte cells, lipid accumulation was significantly inhibited. The expression of perilipin in adipose tissues was decreased by LC. In addition, expression of PPAR-[Formula: see text] protein was down-regulated in adipose tissues and differentiated adipocytes, while GLUT4 expression was increased in adipose tissues by LC treatment. Moreover, LC treatment up-regulated the expressions of ER-[Formula: see text]/[Formula: see text] accompanied with increased uterine weight. These results showed the ameliorative effects of LC on overweight after menopause. Post-menopausal obesity may be improved by LC treatment.

  4. A comparative study of pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer: Risk factors, presentation, characteristics and management

    PubMed Central

    Surakasula, Aruna; Nagarjunapu, Govardhana Chary; Raghavaiah, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide and is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in Indian women. This study evaluates the differences between pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer women regarding risk factors, nature of disease presentation, tumor characteristics, and management. Methods: This is a prospective observational study, conducted in the Oncology Department of St. Ann's Cancer Hospital, for a period of 6 months from January to August 2012. Data on basic demography, clinical and pathological tumor profile, and treatment details were collected prospectively for each patient based on patient interviews and medical records. Findings: Among 100 female patients taken up for the study, 48 were premenopausal and 52 had reached menopause. The mean age of presentation for breast carcinoma was a decade earlier in these patients compared with western patients. The risk factors for both pre-and post-menopausal breast cancer were found similar other than late menopause in postmenopausal patients. Having dense breast tissue was a predominant risk factor among all women. Late presentation was the common phenomenon in almost all patients. The treatment given was not based on any standard guidelines due to inadequate public health policies. Conclusion: Late stage at presentation of breast cancer is the main problem and possesses a challenge to the health care community. In order to reduce the burden of breast cancer, a multi-sectorial approach and evidence-based strategies aiming at early detection and effective management of the disease are required. PMID:24991630

  5. Why is cardiovascular health important in menopausal women?

    PubMed

    Simon, T

    2006-09-01

    Since endogenous estrogen shows some preventative benefits against cardiovascular risk factors in premenopausal women, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is often considered a male disease. However, CVD is the biggest cause of death in women, especially after menopause when endogenous estrogen withdrawal has detrimental effects on cardiovascular physiology and whole-body metabolism. Despite this, awareness of the risk of CVD is low in both women and in doctors; this needs rectifying. Women are under-represented in most clinical studies of CVD. Following diagnosis of CVD, the prognosis for women is not systematically similar to that for men. Furthermore, from the few comparisons conducted, gender differences in response to pharmacological interventions are evident, so that results obtained in wholly or largely male-based studies cannot be systematically extrapolated to women. Women with CVD should be afforded equivalent investigations and treatment to men, and it is vital that women be included in clinical trials in sufficient numbers to allow sub-group analyses and subsequent development of appropriate therapies. Since CVD is usually advanced by the time symptoms appear, prevention is the key; health management advice might include smoking cessation, adoption of a healthy diet, and incorporation of physical activity into the lifestyle.

  6. A prospective study of body size throughout the life-course and the incidence of endometrial cancer among pre- and post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Dougan, Marcelle M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Glynn, Robert J.; Michels, Karin B.

    2016-01-01

    Although adult obesity is known to increase endometrial cancer risk, evidence for childhood obesity is limited. We prospectively examined the association between body fatness throughout life and endometrial cancer risk. 47,289 members of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and 105,386 of the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS II) recalled their body fatness at ages 5, 10, and 20 using a pictogram. Childhood and adolescent body fatness were derived as the average at ages 5 and 10, and ages 10 and 20, respectively. We obtained adult weight from concurrent questionnaires. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) of endometrial cancer using Cox proportional hazards models. During follow-up, 757 incident cases of endometrial cancer were diagnosed. Body fatness in childhood, at age 10, in adolescence, and at age 20 were positively associated with endometrial cancer risk (HR for ≥ Level 5 versus ≤ Level 2 in adolescence: 1.83 (95% CI 1.41-2.37). After adjusting for most recent BMI, none of the associations persisted. Weight change since age 18 was positively associated with endometrial cancer risk [HR for ≥ 25 kg gain versus stable: 2.54 (95% CI 1.80-3.59). Adult BMI was strongly associated with endometrial cancer risk [HR BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 versus BMI ≤ 25 kg/m2: 4.13 (95% CI 3.29-5.16)]. In postmenopausal women, the association with BMI was significantly stronger among non-users of hormone therapy. In conclusion, obesity throughout life is positively associated with endometrial cancer risk, with adult obesity one of the strongest risk factors. Maintaining a healthy weight throughout life remains important. PMID:25641700

  7. Activity of Wedelia calendulacea Less. in post-menopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Annie, Shirwaikar; Prabhu, R G; Malini, S

    2006-01-01

    Wedelia calendulacea Less., a perennial herb containing isoflavanoids, is used in liver disorders, uterine hemorrhage and menorrhagia. Osteoporosis in women occurs mainly due to estrogen deficiency following menopause. Studies indicate that isoflavones are estrogenic enough to promote bone formation. Our study was aimed to investigate the antiosteoporotic effect of the ethanol extract of W. calendulacea in the ovariectomized rat model of osteoporosis, at two different dose levels of 500 and 750 mg/kg/body wt. day. The findings, assessed on the basis of biomechanical and biochemical parameters, showed that the ethanol extract of the plant had a definite protective effect. This was further supported by the histopathological studies. Phytochemical investigation revealed the presence of isoflavones and wedelolactone, which are known to act as phytoestrogens and may be responsible for the antiosteoporotic activity.

  8. Midlife Women and Menopause: A Challenge for the Mental Health Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phyllis Kernoff; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed women (n=99) aged 35 to 55 about their medical histories, current menstrual events and symptomatology, and perceptions and experiences with menopause. Discovered menopausal women reported their needs were not being met because clinicians lacked sufficient understanding and because of shortage of information resources. Mental health…

  9. Zoledronic acid has differential anti-tumour activity in the pre-and post-menopausal bone microenvironment in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ottewell, Penelope D; Wang, Ning; Brown, Hannah K; Reeves, Kimberly J; Fowles, C Anne; Croucher, Peter I; Eaton, Colby L; Holen, Ingunn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials in early breast cancer have suggested that benefits of adjuvant bone targeted treatments are restricted to women with established menopause. We developed models that mimic pre- and post-menopausal status to investigate effects of altered bone turnover on growth of disseminated breast tumour cells. Here we report a differential anti-tumour effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in these two settings. Experimental design 12-week old female Balb/c-nude mice with disseminated MDA-MB-231 breast tumour cells in bone underwent sham operation or ovariectomy (OVX), mimicking the pre- and post-menopausal bone microenvironment, respectively. To determine the effects of bone-targeted therapy, sham/OVX animals received saline or 100ug/kg ZOL weekly. Tumour growth was assessed by in vivo imaging and effects on bone by RT-PCR, microCT, histomorphometry and measurements of bone markers. Disseminated tumour cells were detected by two-photon microscopy. Results OVX increased bone resorption and induced growth of disseminated tumour cells in bone. Tumours were detected in 83% of animals following OVX (post-menopausal model) compared to 17% following sham operation (pre-menopausal model). OVX had no effect on tumours outside of bone. OVX-induced tumour growth was completely prevented by ZOL, despite the presence of disseminated tumour cells. ZOL did not affect tumour growth in bone in the sham-operated animals. ZOL increased bone volume in both groups. Conclusions This is the first demonstration that tumour growth is driven by osteoclast-mediated mechanisms in models that mimic post-but not pre-menopausal bone, providing a biological rationale for the differential anti-tumour effects of ZOL reported in these settings. PMID:24687923

  10. Health in middle-aged and elderly women: A conceptual framework for healthy menopause.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Loes; Daan, Nadine M P; van Dijk, Gabriella M; Gazibara, Tatjana; Muka, Taulant; Wen, Ke-Xin; Meun, Cindy; Zillikens, M Carola; Roeters van Lennep, Jeanine E; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Laan, Ellen; Rees, Margaret; Laven, Joop S E; Franco, Oscar H; Kavousi, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Middle-aged and elderly women constitute a large and growing proportion of the population. The peri and postmenopausal period constitutes a challenging transition time for women's health, and menopausal health is a crucial aspect in healthy and successful aging. Currently, no framework for the concept of healthy menopause exists, despite its recognized importance. Therefore, we aimed to: (i) characterize healthy menopause; (ii) identify aspects that contribute to it; and (iii) explore potential approaches to measure it. We propose healthy menopause as a dynamic state, following the permanent loss of ovarian function, which is characterized by self-perceived satisfactory physical, psychological and social functioning, incorporating disease and disability, allowing the attainment of a woman's desired ability to adapt and capacity to self-manage. The concept of healthy menopause applies to all women from the moment they enter the menopausal transition, up until they reach early and late postmenopause and includes women with spontaneous, iatrogenic, and premature menopause. This conceptualization can be considered as a further step in the maintenance and improvement of health in menopausal women from different perspectives, foremost the woman's own perspective, followed by the clinical, public health, and societal perspectives, and can be seen as a further step in delineating lines for future research. Furthermore, it could facilitate the improvement of adequate preventive and treatment strategies, guide scientific efforts, and aid education and communication to health care practitioners and the general public, allowing women the achievement of their potential and the fulfillment of their fundamental role in society.

  11. Circulating Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Levels in Women with Bilateral Salpingo-Oophorectomy during the Menopausal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Lasley, Bill; Crawford, Sybil L.; Laughlin, Gail A.; Santoro, Nanette; McConnell, Daniel; Crandall, Carolyn; Greendale, Gail; Polotsky, Alex J.; Vuga, Marike

    2010-01-01

    Background A rise in circulating dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentration occurs during the menopausal transition (MT) that is ovarian-stage but not age-related. The objective of this study was to determine the source of the rise in circulating DHEAS. Methods Circulating DS concentrations in women that had undergone bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) were compared to the pattern of circulating DHEAS in women that progressed through the MT naturally. Annual serum samples from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) over a ten year study period were used. From1272 women in the SWAN cohort that were eligible for longitudinal evaluation of DHEAS annual samples, eighty one underwent BSO during the pre- or early-perimenopause stage of the menopausal transition and were potentially available for study. Of these eighty one BSO participants, twenty had sufficient annual samples for evaluation of the post-BSO trajectory of circulating DHEAS. SWAN women not having previous hormone replacement therapy those with intact ovaries were compared to women that underwent a BSO immediately after a pre- or early perimenopausal annual visit. There were no intervention and circulating concentrations of DHEAS was the main outcome. Results A detectable rise in DHEAS was observed in fourteen (70%) of the twenty BSO women which is similar to the proportion (85%) of women with intact ovaries that had a detectable DHEAS rise. The mean rise in DHEAS (5-8%) was similar in both BSO and non-BSO women. Conclusion The MT rise in DHEAS (5-8%) occurring in the absence of ovaries is largely of adrenal origin. PMID:21178790

  12. Menstrual Profile and Early Menopause in Women with Down Syndrome Aged 26-40 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ejskjaer, Kirsten; Uldbjerg, Niels; Goldstein, Henri

    2006-01-01

    Background: It is known that women with Down syndrome can be fertile, but it is not known whether all women with Down syndrome are fertile or sub-fertile. The age at menopause for women with Down syndrome is lower compared to women without Down syndrome. Method: A cross-sectional study of 11 women was undertaken, in which the participating women…

  13. Menopause and the influence of culture: another gap for Indigenous Australian women?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is great variation in experience of menopause in women around the world. The purpose of this study was to review current understanding of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) women’s experiences of menopause. The literature pertaining to the perception, significance and experience of menopause from a number of cultural groups around the world has been included to provide context for why Indigenous women’s experience might be important for their health and differ from that reported in other studies of Australian women and menopause. Methods A search of databases including Ovid Medline, Pubmed, Web of Science, AUSThealth, AMED, EMBASE, Global Health and PsychINFO was undertaken from January 2011 to April 2011 using the search terms menopause, Indigenous, Aboriginal, attitudes, and perceptions and repeated in September 2012. Results Considerable research shows significant variation across cultures in the menopausal experience. Biological, psychological, social and cultural factors are associated with either positive or negative attitudes, perceptions or experiences of menopause in various cultures. Comparative international literature shows that neither biological nor social factors alone are sufficient to explain the variation in experiences of the menopausal transition. However, a strong influence of culture on the menopause experience can be found. The variation in women’s experience of menopause indicates that different cultural groups of women may have different understandings and needs during the menopausal transition. While considerable literature exists for Australian women as a whole, there has been little investigation of Australian Indigenous women, with only two research studies related to Indigenous women’s experiences of menopause identified. Conclusions Differences in biocultural experience of menopause around the world suggest the importance of biocultural research. For the Indigenous women of Australia

  14. "Why can't you control this?" How women's interactions with intimate partners define menopause and family.

    PubMed

    Dillaway, Heather E

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explore women's discussions of the interactions that families have about menopause and, thus, attempt to broaden feminist knowledge of women's experiences of menopause within families. Data on which this article is based were collected in 61 in-depth interviews with menopausal women in a midwest state in 2001. Findings suggest that biomedical definitions of menopause are often reaffirmed within interactions between intimate partners. Thus, women reported negative familial interactions about menopause, as they were encouraged to define symptoms as problematic and seek medical treatment. Alternatively, some interviewees reported positive interactions about menopause, as a few partners helped them soothe symptoms and follow health regimens. Women interpreted these latter interactions as support or care, rather than surveillance or monitoring. The author concludes that familial interactions bolster dominant constructions of both menopause and family because, as menopause is discussed between intimate partners, definitions of gendered familial roles and responsibilities are cemented.

  15. Menopausal attitudes, objectified body consciousness, aging anxiety, and body esteem: European American women's body experiences in midlife.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Nita Mary; Lyon, Louise Ann

    2008-12-01

    Seventy-four European American women aged 50-68 years completed surveys of menopausal attitudes, appearance aging anxiety, body esteem, body surveillance, and body shame. Hypotheses based on the connections between cultural constructions of femininity and menopause were partially supported. Menopausal attitudes and appearance-related aging anxiety were related to body surveillance. Appearance-related menopausal attitudes were related to both body surveillance and body esteem. Body shame moderated the relationship between appearance-related menopausal attitudes and body esteem.

  16. Age at menopause, reproductive history and venous thromboembolism risk among postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Canonico, Marianne; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Cochrane, Barbara; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate VTE risk in relation to age at menopause, age at menarche, parity, bilateral oophorectomy and time since menopause, as well as any interaction with randomized HT assignment among postmenopausal women. Methods Using pooled data from the Women’s Health Initiative HT clinical trials including 27,035 postmenopausal women ages 50 to 79 years with no history of VTE, we assessed the risk of VTE in relation to age at menopause, age at menarche, parity, bilateral oophorectomy and time since menopause by Cox proportional hazard models. Linear trends, quadratic relationships and interactions of reproductive life characteristics with HT on VTE risk were systematically tested. Results During the follow-up, 426 women reported a first VTE, including 294 nonprocedure-related events. No apparent interaction of reproductive life characteristics with HT assignment on VTE risk was detected and there was any significant association of VTE with age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, oophorectomy or time since menopause. However, analyses restricted to nonprocedure-related VTE showed a U-shaped relationship between age at menopause and thrombotic risk that persisted after multivariable analysis (p<0.01). Compared to women aged 40 to 49 years at menopause, those with early menopause (age<40 years) or with late menopause (age>55 years) had a significant increased VTE risk (HR=1.8;95%CI:1.2–2.7 and HR=1.5;95%CI:1.0–2.4, respectively). Conclusion Reproductive life characteristics have little association with VTE and do not seem to influence the effect of HT on thrombotic risk among postmenopausal women. Nevertheless, early and late onset of menopause might be newly identified risk factors for nonprocedure-related VTE. PMID:23760439

  17. Predictors of Breast Discomfort among Women Initiating Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Carolyn J.; Markovic, Daniela; Huang, Mei-Hua; Greendale, Gail A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the determinants of breast discomfort among postmenopausal women initiating menopausal hormone therapy (HT). Methods We analyzed questionnaire, anthropometric, and serum estrone data from the Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions Trial (PEPI), a randomized trial comparing placebo, conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) alone, or CEE with a progestogen (continuous or cyclical medroxyprogesterone acetate or cyclical micronized progesterone) among postmenopausal women. HT users could join PEPI after stopping HT for 2 months. We modeled the relation between smoking, body weight, alcohol consumption, age, quitting HT to join PEPI, physical activity and alpha-tocopherol consumption and new-onset breast discomfort at 12-month follow-up among 662 participants without baseline breast discomfort. Results The associations of new-onset breast discomfort with weight and with strenuous exercise varied by treatment assignment. Among women assigned to CEE + progestogen, strenuous exercise was associated with a 49% lower odds of new-onset breast discomfort (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.29–0.89, P = 0.02), whereas among women assigned to placebo or CEE alone, strenuous exercise was not significantly associated with new-onset breast discomfort. Surprisingly, among women taking CEE alone, each kilogram higher weight was associated with 6% lower odds of new-onset breast discomfort (P=0.04), whereas among women taking placebo, the association was in the opposite direction (P=0.04). Adjustment for estrone level had neglible effects on odds ratios. Alpha-tocopherol intake, age, smoking, and alcohol intake were not significantly associated with new-onset breast discomfort in adjusted analyses. Conclusion Strenuous exercise and higher body weight may decrease the odds of new-onset breast discomfort among postmenopausal women initiating HT. PMID:20009961

  18. [Effects on health of soy in menopausic women].

    PubMed

    de Luis, D A; Aller, R; Sagrado, J

    2006-04-01

    Phystestrogens are organic compounds produced by a large variety of plants with protective function against the invasion of them by microorganisms. Phystestrogens, and among them isoflavones, have a great similarity with estradiol, principal endogenous estrogen. Those known most for their estrogenic activity are daidzeine and genisteine. Due to the existence of contradictory data on the effects of soy isoflavones on the most outstanding health disorders of menopause such as osteoporosis and hot flushes, and its ineffective role in the improvement of the lipid profile, it is recommendable to continue choosing hygienic-dietary and conventional drug treatments. However, we could introduce soy and soy derived products within a balanced, varied and adequate diet for these women.

  19. Spirituality and severity of menopausal symptoms in a sample of religious women.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Patrick R; Soto, Marilyn

    2011-09-01

    Menopause represents an important life change, particularly for religious women whose identity is significantly related to family. Two competing hypotheses are examined: one, because religious women have their identity focused on family and child rearing, spirituality will be related to increased menopausal symptoms because menopause represents a loss of identity and purpose; and two, because spirituality can provide strength and comfort during difficult times, it will, therefore, be related to decreased menopausal symptoms. To test these competing hypotheses, questionnaires were administered to 218 women (average age 55, 35% premenopausal, 26% peri-menopausal, 39% postmenopausal) who were members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Regression analyses indicated that higher levels of spiritual strength were related to decreased levels of reported menopausal symptoms. Spiritual strength was also related to increased benefit finding during menopause, decreased concern with body appearance, and increased use of adaptive coping strategies. We conclude that finding strength in spirituality may help religious women cope better with the life changes associated with menopause.

  20. Assessment of menopausal symptoms among women attending various outreach clinics in South Canara District of India

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nitin; Nagaraj, Kondagunta; Saralaya, Vittal; Nelliyanil, Maria; Rao, PP Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Menopausal symptoms experienced by women are known to affect their quality-of-life. The symptoms experienced at menopause are quite variable and their etiology is found to be multifactorial. This study was hence done to assess the pattern and severity of menopausal symptoms and to find out the factors associated with these symptoms. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in various outreach clinics of Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore. Women in the age group of 40-65 years were included in the study by convenient sampling method. Data regarding menopausal symptom was obtained by interviewing each participant using the menopause rating scale questionnaire. Results: Mean age of the participants were 54.2 ± 7.2 years and mean age of attainment of menopause was 48.4 ± 4.5 years. Mean duration of menopause was found to be 7.5 ± 5.3 years. Commonest symptom reported was joint and muscular discomfort and physical and mental exhaustion seen in 94 (85.4%) participants. The mean number of symptoms reported by participants was 7.6 ± 2.8. Educated women reported significantly more symptoms (F = 2.218, P = 0.047). Somatic and urogenital symptoms were more among perimenopausal women and somatic symptoms were more among postmenopausal women. Fifty-eight (52.7%) participants had one or more severe symptoms. Severe symptoms were most among premenopausal women. Conclusion: The high proportion and severity of menopausal symptoms observed in this study group proves that menopausal symptoms are common and cannot be ignored. More of menopausal clinics are needed for awareness generation, early recognition and treatment of related morbidities. PMID:24970987

  1. Menopausal symptom experience of Hispanic midlife women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lim, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Seung Hee; Dormire, Sharon; Chee, Wonshik; Kresta, Kimberly

    2009-10-01

    Using a feminist approach, we examined the menopausal symptom experience of Hispanic midlife women in the United States This was a qualitative online forum study among 27 Hispanic midlife women in the United States. Seven topics related to menopausal symptom experience were used to administer the 6-month online forum. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: (a) "Cambio de vida (change of life)," (b) "being silent about menopause," (c) "trying to be optimistic," and (d) "getting support." More in-depth studies with diverse groups of Hispanic women are needed while considering family as a contextual factor.

  2. Natural menopause among women below 50 years in India: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Pallikadavath, Saseendran; Ogollah, Reuben; Singh, Abhishek; Dean, Tara; Dewey, Ann; Stones, William

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The age at which menopause naturally occurs may reflect nutritional and environmental circumstances as well as genetic factors. In this study we examined natural menopause as a marker of women's health at the population level in India and in some major States. Methods: Data from the Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS) carried out during 2007-2008 covering 643,944 ever-married women aged 15-49 yr were used; women of older ages were not included in this survey. Since not all women in this age group had achieved natural menopause at the time of survey, Cox proportional hazard regression models were employed to obtain the median age of women reporting a natural menopause, excluding those who underwent hysterectomy. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated for key socio-economic and reproductive variables that could potentially affect the age at natural menopause <40 yr. Results: Overall, menopause prior to age 40 was reported by approximately 1.5 per cent of women. In the national data set, significant associations with age at natural menopause were identified with marriage breakdown or widowhood, poverty, Muslim religious affiliation, ‘scheduled caste’ status, not having received schooling, rural residence, having never used contraceptive pills, not been sterilized or had an abortion, low parity and residence in the western region. Within data from five selected States examined separately, the strength of these associations varied. Interpretation & conclusions: Associations of natural menopause with sociocultural, family planning and demographic variables were noted. Most importantly, there was an association with poverty that would require further investigation as to causality. The proportion of women experiencing early menopause may represent a useful overall indicator of women's health. The data are reassuring with regard to possible late effects of sterilization on ovarian function. PMID:28139535

  3. Self-Reported Menopausal Symptoms, Coronary Artery Calcification and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Recently Menopausal Women Screened for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS)

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Erin Foran; He, Yunxiao; Black, Dennis M.; Brinton, Eliot A.; Budoff, Mathew J.; Cedars, Marcelle I.; Hodis, Howard N.; Lobo, Rogerio A.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Merriam, George R.; Miller, Virginia M.; Naftolin, Fredrick; Pal, Lubna; Santoro, Nanette; Zhang, Heping; Harman, S. Mitchell; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether self-reported menopausal symptoms are associated with measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. Setting Multi-center, randomized controlled trial. Patients Recently menopausal women (n=868) screened for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Design Cross sectional analysis. Interventions None Main Outcome Measures Baseline menopausal symptoms (hot flashes, dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, night sweats, palpitations, mood swings, depression, insomnia, irritability), serum estradiol (E2) levels and measures of atherosclerosis were assessed. Atherosclerosis was quantified using Coronary Artery Calcium (CAC) Agatston scores (n=771) and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (CIMT). Logistic regression model of menopausal symptoms and E2 was used to predict CAC. Linear regression model of menopausal symptoms and E2 was used to predict CIMT. Correlation between length of time in menopause with menopausal symptoms, estradiol (E2), CAC, and CIMT were assessed. Results In early menopausal women screened for KEEPS, neither E2 nor climacteric symptoms predicted the extent of subclinical atherosclerosis. Palpitations (p=0.09) and depression (p=0.07) approached significance as predictors of CAC. Other symptoms of insomnia, irritability, dyspareunia, hot flashes, mood swings, night sweats, and vaginal dryness were not associated with CAC. Women with significantly elevated CAC scores were excluded from further participation in KEEPS; in women meeting inclusion criteria, neither baseline menopausal symptoms nor E2 predicted CIMT. Years since menopause onset correlated with CIMT, dyspareunia, vaginal dryness and E2. Conclusions Self-reported symptoms in recently menopausal women are not strong predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis. Continued follow-up of this population will be performed to determine if baseline or persistent symptoms in the early menopause are associated with progression of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23312232

  4. Assessment of Questionnaire Measuring Quality of Life in Menopausal Women: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jenabi, Ensiyeh; Shobeiri, Fatemeh; Hazavehei, Seyyed M.M.; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is a natural part of the aging process in women and is defined as occurring 12 months after the last menstrual period marking the end of menstrual cycles. Menopause has a negative impact on the quality of life (QoL). Various generic and specific questionnaires have been used for assessing different dimensions of QoL in menopausal women. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify those general and specific instruments, and to determine the factors that affect QoL in menopausal women. We assessed eight specific and three general tools and found that some general and specific instruments, such as the 36-item short form (SF-36) and the Menopause Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL), were mostly used for assessment. The specific tools available were diverse. Employment status and a high educational level in menopausal women were considered to be protective factors in improving QoL. Identification of predicting factors of QoL, such as body mass index, race, age, duration of menopause, and social and occupational variables can help to improve the QoL of these women allowing planning of psychological consultations and practical interventions. PMID:26171119

  5. Knowledge of the pelvic floor in menopausal women and in peripartum women.

    PubMed

    Neels, Hedwig; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques; De Wachter, Stefan; Wyndaele, Michel; Vermandel, Alexandra

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] Pelvic floor dysfunction is an important health-care issue, with pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause as the most important risk factors. Insufficient knowledge about pelvic floor dysfunction is the largest barrier to seeking care. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of knowledge and information on pelvic floor dysfunction in peripartum and menopausal women. [Subjects and Methods] The present study was a cross-sectional survey. A valid and reliable questionnaire of 48 items was distributed to 402 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth and to 165 postmenopausal women. All answers were analyzed and interpreted. The study was approved by an ethics committee (B300201318334). [Results] On a VAS scale of 0 to 10, the mean ratings of the peripartum and postmenopausal women concerning their knowledge were 4.38 (SD 2.71) and 4.92 (SD 2.72). Peripartum women held significantly more pessimistic perceptions about the occurrence of postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction. The results showed that 75% of the peripartum women and 68% of the postmenopausal women felt insufficiently informed or want to get better informed. [Conclusion] The results reveal sparse knowledge about the pelvic floor among women of all ages and that a major proportion of them would be interested in more information. Amelioration of common knowledge could improve help-seeking behavior in women.

  6. Knowledge of the pelvic floor in menopausal women and in peripartum women

    PubMed Central

    Neels, Hedwig; Tjalma, Wiebren A. A.; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques; De Wachter, Stefan; Wyndaele, Michel; Vermandel, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Pelvic floor dysfunction is an important health-care issue, with pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause as the most important risk factors. Insufficient knowledge about pelvic floor dysfunction is the largest barrier to seeking care. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of knowledge and information on pelvic floor dysfunction in peripartum and menopausal women. [Subjects and Methods] The present study was a cross-sectional survey. A valid and reliable questionnaire of 48 items was distributed to 402 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth and to 165 postmenopausal women. All answers were analyzed and interpreted. The study was approved by an ethics committee (B300201318334). [Results] On a VAS scale of 0 to 10, the mean ratings of the peripartum and postmenopausal women concerning their knowledge were 4.38 (SD 2.71) and 4.92 (SD 2.72). Peripartum women held significantly more pessimistic perceptions about the occurrence of postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction. The results showed that 75% of the peripartum women and 68% of the postmenopausal women felt insufficiently informed or want to get better informed. [Conclusion] The results reveal sparse knowledge about the pelvic floor among women of all ages and that a major proportion of them would be interested in more information. Amelioration of common knowledge could improve help-seeking behavior in women. PMID:27942113

  7. Association of SLC2A9 genotype with phenotypic variability of serum urate in pre-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Topless, Ruth K.; Flynn, Tanya J.; Cadzow, Murray; Stamp, Lisa K.; Dalbeth, Nicola; Black, Michael A.; Merriman, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    The SLC2A9 gene, that encodes a renal uric acid reuptake transporter, has genetic variants that explain ∼3% of variance in urate levels. There are previous reports of non-additive interaction between SLC2A9 genotype and environmental factors which influence urate control. Therefore, our aim was to further investigate the general phenomenon that such non-additive interactions contribute to genotype-specific association with variance at SLC2A9. Data from 14135 European individuals were used in this analysis. The measure of variance was derived from a ranked inverse normal transformation of residuals obtained by regressing known urate-influencing factors (sex, age, and body mass index) against urate. Variant rs6449173 showed the most significant effect on serum urate variance at SLC2A9 (P = 7.9 × 10-14), which was maintained after accounting for the effect on average serum urate levels (P = 0.022). Noting the stronger effect in a sub-cohort that consisted of pre-menopausal women and younger men, the participants were stratified into males and pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women. This revealed a strong effect on variance in pre-menopausal women (P = 3.7 × 10-5) with a weak effect in post-menopausal women (P = 0.032) and no effect in men (P = 0.22). The T-allele of rs6449173, which associates with increased urate levels, was associated with the greater variance in urate. There was a non-additive interaction between rs6449173 genotype and female gender in control of serum urate levels that was driven by a greater increase in urate levels associated with the T-allele in women. Female hormones, and/or other factors they influence or are associated with (such as iron levels, temperature, testosterone) interact with SLC2A9 genotype in women to determine urate levels. The association of SLC2A9 with greater variance in pre-menopausal women may reflect the cyclical changes resulting from menstruation. PMID:26528330

  8. The menopause transition in women living with HIV: current evidence and future avenues of research.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Shema; Anderson, Jane; Burns, Fiona; Delpech, Valerie; Gilson, Richard; Sabin, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    As the life expectancy of people living with HIV improves as a result of antiretroviral therapy, increasing numbers of women living with HIV (WLHIV) are now reaching menopausal age. The menopause transition in WLHIV remains a relatively overlooked area in clinical HIV research. Whilst there is some evidence to suggest that WLHIV experience menopause at an earlier age and that they have more menopausal symptoms, there is no clear consensus in the literature around an impact of HIV infection on either timing or symptomatology of the menopause. Data are also conflicting on whether HIV-related factors such as HIV viral load and CD4 cell count have an impact on the menopause. Furthermore, menopausal symptoms in WLHIV are known to go under-recognised by both healthcare providers and women themselves. There is likely to be a burden of unmet health needs among WLHIV transitioning through the menopause, with significant gaps in the evidence base for their care. With this in mind, we have developed the PRIME study (Positive Transitions Through the Menopause). This mixed-methods observational study will explore, for the first time in the UK, the impact of the menopause on the health and wellbeing of 1500 ethnically diverse WLHIV. In establishing a cohort of women in their midlife and following them up longitudinally, we hope to develop a nuanced understanding of the gendered aspects of ageing and HIV, informing the provision of appropriate services for WLHIV to ensure that they are supported in maintaining optimal health and wellbeing as they get older.

  9. Counseling Women in Midlife: An Integrative Approach to Menopause.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Shirley B.; Myers, Jane E.

    1999-01-01

    Proposes that counselors who use an integrative approach to menopause can not only provide accurate biomedical information but also conceptualize menopause as a normative midlife transition. Provides a foundation in biomedical issues and considers how these in interaction with cultural and psychosocial factors influence the experience of…

  10. Escitalopram Reduces Hot Flashes in Non-depressed Menopausal Women: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Roseanne DeFronzo; Menza, Matthew; Allen, Lesley A.; Marin, Humberto; Bienfait, Karina L.; Tiu, Jade; Howarth, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Background Hot flashes are one of the most troubling manifestations of menopause, affecting about 80% of women. Due to recent controversies about hormone replacement therapy (HRT), many women are seeking alternative treatments. The use of antidepressants to treat hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms has been an active area of investigation. However, the majority of past research in this area has included women with significant medical or psychiatric histories that may influence treatment response. This was the first study to examine the impact of escitalopram on hot flashes, mood, sleep, and quality of life in a healthy sample of non-depressed menopausal women. Methods Twenty-five menopausal women, with no significant psychiatric or medical history, were enrolled. All women were treated with escitalopram (10-20mg flexibly dosed) for 8 weeks. The active treatment phase was preceded by a single blind placebo lead-in period. Results Over the course of the study, women reported significant decreases in both hot flash frequency and severity and improvements in dysphoria, anxiety, quality of life, and sleep. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that escitalopram may be a feasible and effective option for treating hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms in healthy women who might not ordinarily consider antidepressant treatment. PMID:19439155

  11. The Relationship between Physical Activity and General Health among Menopausal Women in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Nasibeh; Jalili, Lida; Khazaeian, Somayeh; nia, Anvar-sadat Nayebi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Most women experience significant changes in their general health status during menopause, which negatively affects their quality of life. Physical activity has also been shown to enhance quality of life. However, little is known about the effect of physical activity on women’s health during the menopausal transition. This study aimed to determine the relationship between physical activity and general health among menopausal women in Ahvaz, Iran. Methods This cross sectional study was carried out on 600 menopausal women using cluster random sampling during 2013–2014. Data collection tools were three questionnaires; women’s demographic characteristics, the Goldenberg’s questionnaire, and International physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ). Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics through SPSS version 19. The statistical tests were performed at the 95% confidence interval. Results There was a significant relationship between the total score of physical activity and physical health, social functioning, anxiety and depression (p<0.05), but no significant relationship was found between subscales related to physical activity and general health (p>0.05). Conclusion Physical activity is effective in improving general health in menopausal women. Proper training and effective interventions for regular physical activity can be important steps to promote the general health of menopausal women. PMID:28243418

  12. Meta-analysis of loci associated with age at natural menopause in African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Christina T.L.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Chen, Gary K.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Arnold, Alice M.; Dreyfus, Jill; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Li, Guo; Lohman, Kurt K.; Musani, Solomon K.; Nalls, Michael A.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Smith, Jennifer; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Brzyski, Robert G.; Cappola, Anne; Carlson, Christopher S.; Couper, David; Deming, Sandra L.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Heiss, Gerardo; John, Esther M.; Lu, Xiaoning; Le Marchand, Loic; Marciante, Kristin; Mcknight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert; Nock, Nora L.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Press, Michael F.; Vaiyda, Dhananjay; Woods, Nancy F.; Taylor, Herman A.; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Evans, Michele K.; Harris, Tamara B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kooperberg, Charles; Liu, Yongmei; Mosley, Thomas H.; Psaty, Bruce; Wellons, Melissa; Windham, Beverly G.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Demerath, Ellen W.; Haiman, Christopher; Murabito, Joanne M.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Age at menopause marks the end of a woman's reproductive life and its timing associates with risks for cancer, cardiovascular and bone disorders. GWAS and candidate gene studies conducted in women of European ancestry have identified 27 loci associated with age at menopause. The relevance of these loci to women of African ancestry has not been previously studied. We therefore sought to uncover additional menopause loci and investigate the relevance of European menopause loci by performing a GWAS meta-analysis in 6510 women with African ancestry derived from 11 studies across the USA. We did not identify any additional loci significantly associated with age at menopause in African Americans. We replicated the associations between six loci and age at menopause (P-value < 0.05): AMHR2, RHBLD2, PRIM1, HK3/UMC1, BRSK1/TMEM150B and MCM8. In addition, associations of 14 loci are directionally consistent with previous reports. We provide evidence that genetic variants influencing reproductive traits identified in European populations are also important in women of African ancestry residing in USA. PMID:24493794

  13. Meta-analysis of loci associated with age at natural menopause in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christina T L; Liu, Ching-Ti; Chen, Gary K; Andrews, Jeanette S; Arnold, Alice M; Dreyfus, Jill; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa E; Kerr, Kathleen F; Li, Guo; Lohman, Kurt K; Musani, Solomon K; Nalls, Michael A; Raffel, Leslie J; Smith, Jennifer; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Brzyski, Robert G; Cappola, Anne; Carlson, Christopher S; Couper, David; Deming, Sandra L; Goodarzi, Mark O; Heiss, Gerardo; John, Esther M; Lu, Xiaoning; Le Marchand, Loic; Marciante, Kristin; Mcknight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert; Nock, Nora L; Olshan, Andrew F; Press, Michael F; Vaiyda, Dhananjay; Woods, Nancy F; Taylor, Herman A; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Evans, Michele K; Harris, Tamara B; Henderson, Brian E; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kooperberg, Charles; Liu, Yongmei; Mosley, Thomas H; Psaty, Bruce; Wellons, Melissa; Windham, Beverly G; Zonderman, Alan B; Cupples, L Adrienne; Demerath, Ellen W; Haiman, Christopher; Murabito, Joanne M; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-06-15

    Age at menopause marks the end of a woman's reproductive life and its timing associates with risks for cancer, cardiovascular and bone disorders. GWAS and candidate gene studies conducted in women of European ancestry have identified 27 loci associated with age at menopause. The relevance of these loci to women of African ancestry has not been previously studied. We therefore sought to uncover additional menopause loci and investigate the relevance of European menopause loci by performing a GWAS meta-analysis in 6510 women with African ancestry derived from 11 studies across the USA. We did not identify any additional loci significantly associated with age at menopause in African Americans. We replicated the associations between six loci and age at menopause (P-value < 0.05): AMHR2, RHBLD2, PRIM1, HK3/UMC1, BRSK1/TMEM150B and MCM8. In addition, associations of 14 loci are directionally consistent with previous reports. We provide evidence that genetic variants influencing reproductive traits identified in European populations are also important in women of African ancestry residing in USA.

  14. Menopausal Age and Chronic Diseases in Elderly Women: A Cross-Sectional Study in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingli; Yu, Yaqin; Wang, Shibin; Kanu, Joseph Sam; You, Yueyue; Liu, Yingyu; Zhang, Yangyu; Liu, Yawen; Li, Bo; Tao, Yuchun; Kou, Changgui

    2016-01-01

    Many factors affect menopausal age, and early or late onset of menopause may be associated with many chronic health problems. However, limited data are available regarding this phenomenon in the Northeast China population. For this study, 2011 elderly women were selected as a sample from participants in a cross-sectional survey performed using stratified, clustered multistage, and random sampling methods. Early menopause was more prevalent in subjects born from 1943 to 1947 (OR = 1.708, 95% CI = 1.205, 2.420) and 1933 to 1937 (OR = 2.445, 95% CI: 1.525, 3.921) and in physical laborers (OR = 1.413, 95% CI = 1.021, 1.957). Women with less than nine years of education (OR = 0.515, 95% CI: 0.327, 0.812) and who were current smokers (OR = 0.577, 95% CI: 0.347, 0.959) were less likely to have late menopause. BMIs between 25 and 30 (OR = 1.565, 95% CI: 1.152, 2.125) and greater than 30 (OR = 2.440, 95% CI: 1.482, 4.016) were associated with later menopausal age. Late menopause was positively associated with diabetes (OR = 1.611, 95% CI: 1.142, 2.274) but protective against chronic gastroenteritis/peptic ulcers (OR = 0.533, 95% CI: 0.333, 0.855). Results showed that (1) Being born in an earlier year, having a lower education, and engaging in physical labor were associated with an earlier menopausal age, while a higher BMI was associated with a later menopausal age; and that (2) menopausal age was associated with diabetes and gastroenteritis in elderly women living in Northeast China. PMID:27669270

  15. 2016 IMS Recommendations on women's midlife health and menopause hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Baber, R J; Panay, N; Fenton, A

    2016-04-01

    The International Menopause Society (IMS) has produced these new 2016 recommendations on women's midlife health and menopause hormone therapy (MHT) to help guide health-care professionals in optimizing their management of women in the menopause transition and beyond. The term MHT has been used to cover therapies including estrogens, progestogens and combined regimens. For the first time, the 2016 IMS recommendations now include grades of recommendations, levels of evidence and 'good practice points', in addition to section-specific references. Where possible, the recommendations are based on and linked to the evidence that supports them, unless good-quality evidence is absent. Particular attention has been paid to published evidence from 2013 onwards, the last time the IMS recommendations were updated. Databases have been extensively searched for relevant publications using key terms specific to each specialist area within menopause physiology and medicine. Information has also been drawn from international consensus statements published by bodies such as the IMS, the European Menopause and Andropause Society and the North American Menopause Society. The recommendations have been produced by experts derived mainly from the IMS, with the assistance of key collaborators where deemed advantageous. In preparing these international recommendations, experts have taken into account geographical variations in medical care, prevalence of diseases, and country-specific attitudes of the public, medical community and health authorities towards menopause management. The variation in availability and licensing of MHT and other products has also been considered.

  16. Conceptual models for women's health research: reclaiming menopause as an exemplar of nursing's contributions to feminist scholarship.

    PubMed

    Andrist, L C; MacPherson, K I

    2001-01-01

    An examination of women's transition through menopause provides a remarkable example of nursing's contributions to feminist scholarship. The predominant biomedical model perpetuates the idea that menopause is a deficiency disease, whereas feminist and nurse scholars have deconstructed this paradigm and have reclaimed menopause as a part of midlife women's developmental stage. We begin this chapter with a review of the birth of women's health scholarship as it is the foundation for theory that undergirds feminist nursing research. We then discuss the tenets of feminist scholarship. The historical context of menopause is reviewed briefly to highlight the ways in which menopause was transformed from a normal physiological event to a disease. Using this as a backdrop, we reviewed nursing studies in two emerging bodies of knowledge. We reviewed 10 studies in the area of "women reclaiming menopause" and found that over all women believe the menopausal transition is a normal developmental stage. The second area of new research looks at "menopause across cultures." The studies of Korean, Indian, and Thai women reviewed demonstrate that similar to other health issues, the experience of Western women cannot be universalized, and most important, researchers must take into consideration the social, political, economic, and cultural forces that impact women's experience of the menopause transition.

  17. Effect of menopausal status on carotid intima-media thickness and presence of carotid plaque in Chinese women generation population.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Dandan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Anxin; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Yuming; Wu, Shouling; Zhao, Xingquan

    2015-01-28

    Menopause is an important physiological stage in women's life. The potential association of menopause with carotid intima-media thickness as well as with occurrence and stability of carotid plaque in Chinese female population is unclear. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study by recruiting 2,131 participants aged above 40 years from northeast of China. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), presence of carotid plaque and its stability were evaluated by carotid duplex sonography. Among the participants, 1,133 (53.2%) were identified to be postmenopausal. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, presence of CIMT at 50(th-) 75(th) and ≥75(th) percentiles, carotid plaque and its unstable status were found to be significantly associated with the postmenopausal status (P < 0.001). When matched the participants by age, post-menopausal status was still associated with a higher risk of having unstable plaque. Moreover, our data show that postmenopausal status is a risk factor for intracranial arterial stenosis when compared with premenopausal status in the univariate analysis (OR = 1.314, P = 0.043), and such relationship is lost when the confounding factors are adjusted (OR = 0.828, P = 0.225). In conclusion, the vascular risk factors increase as the menopausal status changes. Compared with premenopausal status, postmenopausal status is associated with higher morbidity of CIMT, carotid plaque and its unstable status.

  18. [Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea and Menopause Symptoms in Women With Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Ying; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy is a common adjuvant therapy for breast cancer that improves survival rates by killing residual cancer cells. However, this intervention may damage the germ cells within the ovary and interrupt the menstrual cycle, ultimately leading to chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA). The incidence of CIA depends on how broadly this term is defined. Around 75% of premenopausal breast cancer women treated with chemotherapy will develop CIA. Age, having a relatively long chemotherapy cycle duration, being estrogen-receptor positive, and using Tamoxifen all increase the risk of CIA. Although CIA may be associated with better prognosis outcomes, breast cancer women must subsequently deal with the various menopausal symptoms that are associated with a CIA-induced drop in estrogen level (such as cognitive function decline, physical and psychological symptoms, vasomotor symptoms, reproductive and sexual function problems, and body weight change). The present article describes the female menstrual cycle, the mechanism and risk factors of CIA, and the range of menopausal symptoms. Furthermore, we summarized methods of assessing menopausal symptoms and compared five common rating scales of menopausal symptoms. By better understanding the potential menopausal symptoms, researchers and clinicians may then select the most appropriate scale based on the situational needs in order to evaluate the severity of menopausal symptoms that are experienced by breast cancer women.

  19. Women With Early Menopause Have Higher Rates of Target Lesion Revascularization After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linlin; Wang, Zhijian; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Zhiming; Zhao, Yingxin; Shi, Dongmei; Liu, Yuyang; Liang, Jing; Yang, Lixia; Chai, Meng; Zhou, Yujie

    2016-04-01

    Early menopause has been found to be associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Our objective was to investigate the impact of early menopause on clinical outcomes for women undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We observed female patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing PCI and found that women with early menopause (≤46 years old) were more likely to have CAD risk factors and more severe coronary lesions. During the 18-month follow-up, early menopause was associated with similar risk of death and myocardial infarction but higher risk of target lesion revascularization (TLR; 7.8% vs 5.3%, P = .003) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs; 11.3% vs 9.0%, P = .007). After adjustment, early menopause was an independent risk factor for 18-month MACEs (hazard ratio [HR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-2.00) and TLR (HR 1.61; 95% CI 1.21-2.13). In conclusion, for women undergoing PCI, early menopause is associated with higher risk of MACE, which is mainly driven by risk of TLR.

  20. The Quality of Life During and After Menopause Among Rural Women

    PubMed Central

    G K, Poomalar; Arounassalame, Bupathy

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The overall health and well-being of middle-aged women has become a major public health concern around the world. More than 80% of the women experience physical or psychological symptoms in the years when they approach menopause, with various distresses and disturbances in their lives, leading to a decrease in the quality of life. The aim of our study was to assess the quality of life and the impact of hormonal changes in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and to correlate the prevalence of the symptoms with their duration since menopause. Material and Methods: A cross- sectional study was done at Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, Puducherry, from January 2012 to April 2012. Five hundred women who were in the age group of 40-65 years, who came from rural areas to our hospital, were included in the study. The women who were receiving hormonal treatment and those who refused to participate in the study were excluded. The data such as the socio-demographic information and the menstruation status, which were based on the reported length of time since the last menstrual period and the experience of the symptoms, as were tested in the Menopause Specific Quality of Life (MENQOL) questionnaire, were collected from each patient. The women who were included in the study were divided into three groups as the menopause transition, early postmenopausal and the late postmenopausal groups. All the data which were gathered were analyzed by using SAS 9.2. The Chi square test and the relative risk and the confidence interval calculations were applied to compare the frequencies of the symptoms among the women with different menopausal statuses. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Mean menopausal age in the study group was 45 years. The most common symptom within study subjects were low back ache (79%) and muscle-joint pain (77.2%). The least frequent symptoms were increase in facial hair (15%) and

  1. In Behalf of Women Over 40: Understanding the Importance of the Menopause.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkun, Cleo S.

    1986-01-01

    Interviews with 60 women aged 40-55 suggest no significant associations between a woman's menstrual status and her affective state. However, subjects strongly desired information about menopause and bodily changes. They protected themselves from exposure to the social rejection often experienced by older women but did not regret cessation of…

  2. Daydreaming in 40- to 60-Year-Old Women: Menopause, Health, Values, and Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giambra, Leonard M.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated midlife influences on daydreaming for 477 women from 40 to 60 years of age. Examined 42 variables including health status, symptom presence, menstruation difficulties, sexual activities, and effects of menopause. Results indicated daydreaming was more prevalent among women with various psychological symptoms. (PAS)

  3. Menopause Experiences and Attitudes in Women with Intellectual Disability and in Their Family Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lu, Zxy-Yann Jane; Pu, Cheng-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about how middle-aged and older women with intellectual disability (ID) cope with life transitions such as perimenopause and postmenopause. Method: A mixed methods approach was employed to explore the attitudes toward and experiences of menopause among women with ID and their family carers in one city in Taiwan.…

  4. Hemorheological aspects in hypertensive menopausal smoker women treated with female hormones.

    PubMed

    Cicco, G; Dolce, E; Vicenti, P; Stingi, G D; Tarallo, M S; Pirrelli, A

    1999-01-01

    In postmenopausal hypertensive women (PostMHW) the erythrocyte deformability (ED) is reduced if compared with premenopausal hypertensive women (PreMHW). This might partially explain the increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CD) in hypertensive women after menopause. Moreover a positive correlation exists between estradiol and rheological patterns in women. If PostMHW smoke cigarettes, there is an important decrease in hemorheological parameters. On the other hand if PostMHW are submitted to an hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) they can show controversial results with an impairment if hemorheological parameters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of smoking and HRT on PostMHW. We studied four groups of subjects: Group 1: PreMHW (10 F aged 35 +/- 3 years) non smokers; Group 2: PostMHW (8 F aged 45 +/- 2 years) non smokers; Group 3: PostMHW (14 F aged 48 +/- 4 years) smokers (20 cigarettes per day); Group 4: PostMHW (16 F aged 50 +/- 2 years) smokers (20 cigarettes per day) submitted to HRT. We evaluated Elongation Index of erythrocytes under torsion force of 30 pascals (EI--30 Pa) using a new computerized instrument Laser assisted Optical rotational Red Cell Analyzer (LORCA) (Mechatronics, Hoorn, NL) acc. to Hardeman (1994) and, also with the same LORCA, Aggregation Index (AI), t(1/2). We measured the transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure (TcpO2) in subclavicular standard area using a Transcutaneous Oximeter (Microgas 7650 Kontron Instruments with Combi Sensor) and total cholesterolaemia. In PostMHW our data showed a significant (p < 0.01) impairment of hemorheological patterns and tissue oxygenation if compared with PreMHW (Group 1). In Group 3 there is a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in EI, a significant (p < 0.01) increase in AI, a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in t(1/2) and TcpO2 if compared with Control Group 1 and Group 2. Finally a further significant (p < 0.01) impairment in hemorheology and tissue oxygenation showed Group 4

  5. Association of diet with the onset of menopause in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Nagata, C; Takatsuka, N; Kawakami, N; Shimizu, H

    2000-11-01

    A prospective study was conducted in Takayama, Gifu, Japan, to evaluate the association between diet and the onset of menopause. A total of 1,130 female residents aged 35-54 years who were premenopausal and completed a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire in 1992 were contacted by mail with a follow-up questionnaire in 1998 to update information on menopause. Onset of menopause was defined as a woman's age at the last menstrual period prior to stopping menstruation for 12 months. During the 6-year study period, 296 women experienced natural menopause. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios of the onset of menopause after controlling for age, total energy, body mass index, years of smoking, and age at which regular menstrual cycle began. The authors found that green and yellow vegetable intake was significantly inversely associated with the 6-year incidence of menopause (hazard ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval: 0.54, 0.95 for the highest vs. lowest tertile of intake, p for trend = 0.02). Association of carotene intake with the incidence of menopause was of borderline significance (hazard ratio = 0.78, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 1.04, p for trend = 0.07).

  6. Augmented vagal heart rate modulation in active hypoestrogenic pre-menopausal women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Emma; Goodman, Jack M; Morris, Beverly L; Floras, John S; Harvey, Paula J

    2015-11-01

    Compared with eumenorrhoeic women, exercise-trained women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (ExFHA) exhibit low heart rates (HRs) and absent reflex renin-angiotensin-system activation and augmentation of their muscle sympathetic nerve response to orthostatic stress. To test the hypothesis that their autonomic HR modulation is altered concurrently, three age-matched (pooled mean, 24 ± 1 years; mean ± S.E.M.) groups of women were studied: active with either FHA (ExFHA; n=11) or eumenorrhoeic cycles (ExOv; n=17) and sedentary with eumenorrhoeic cycles (SedOv; n=17). Blood pressure (BP), HR and HR variability (HRV) in the frequency domain were determined during both supine rest and graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -10, -20 and -40 mmHg). Very low (VLF), low (LF) and high (HF) frequency power spectra (ms(2)) were determined and, owing to skewness, log10-transformed. LF/HF ratio and total power (VLF + LF + HF) were calculated. At baseline, HR and systolic BP (SBP) were lower (P<0.05) and HF and total power were higher (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women. In all groups, LBNP decreased (P<0.05) SBP, HF and total power and increased (P<0.05) HR and LF/HF ratio. However, HF and total power remained higher (P<0.05) and HR, SBP and LF/HF ratio remained lower (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women, in whom measures did not differ (P>0.05). At each stage, HR correlated inversely (P<0.05) with HF. In conclusion, ExFHA women demonstrate augmented vagal yet unchanged sympathetic HR modulation, both at rest and during orthostatic stress. Although the role of oestrogen deficiency is unclear, these findings are in contrast with studies reporting decreased HRV in hypoestrogenic post-menopausal women.

  7. Long-term prediction of three-dimensional bone architecture in simulations of pre-, peri- and post-menopausal microstructural bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ralph

    2005-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of trabecular bone depends on the internal bone structure. It is generally accepted now that the trabecular bone structure is a result of a load adaptive bone remodeling. The mathematical laws that relate bone remodeling to the local state of stress and strain, however, are still under investigation. The aim of this project was to investigate if changes in the trabecular architecture as observed with age-related bone loss and osteoporosis can be predicted from a computer model that simulates bone resorption after hormone depletion based on realistic models of trabecular microstructure using micro-computed tomography (muCT). A compact desktop muCT providing a nominal isotropic resolution of 14 mum was used to measure two groups of seven trabecular bone specimens from pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women respectively. A novel algorithm was developed to simulate age-related bone loss for the specimens in the first group. The algorithm, also referred to as simulated bone atrophy (SIBA), describes a truly three-dimensional approach and is based directly on cellular bone remodeling with an underlying realistic time frame. Bone resorption is controlled by osteoclastic penetration depth and bone formation is governed by the efficiency level of the osteoblasts. The simulation itself describes an iterative process with a cellular remodeling cycle of 197 days. Activation frequency is controllable and can be adjusted for the different phases of pre-, peri- and post-menopause. For our simulations, osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities were in balance until the onset of menopause, set to be at the age of 50 years. In that period, the structure remained almost constant. After the onset of menopause an imbalance in the cell activities was modeled resulting in a net bone loss. The doubling of the activation frequency in the peri-menopausal phase caused a pronounced loss. Using advanced animation tools and quantitative bone morphometry, the changes in

  8. Racial Differences in Bone Loss and Relation to Menopause Among HIV-infected and Uninfected Women

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anjali; Flom, Peter L.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Schoenbaum, Ellie E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize changes in bone mineral density (BMD) according to race among HIV-infected and uninfected women, and to evaluate the relationship between race and menopause-related bone loss. Methods Dual x-ray absorptiometry measured BMD on study entry and a minimum of 18 months later in 246 HIV-infected and 219 HIV-uninfected women in the Menopause Study. Linear regression analyses determined percent annual BMD change at total hip (TH), femoral neck (FN), and lumbar spine (LS) after adjusting for potential confounders. Race-stratified and HIV-infected subgroup analyses were performed. Results At baseline, mean age was 45 years, 19% of women were postmenopausal. HIV-infected women were more likely to be black (58% vs. 38%), and had lower BMI and less cigarette exposure when compared to HIV-uninfected women. Women who were perimenopausal at baseline and postmenopausal at follow-up had the greatest TH bone loss (−1.68%/yr, p<.0001) followed by those postmenopausal throughout (−1.02%/yr, p=.007). We found a significant interaction between HIV status and race in multivariate analyses of BMD change at the FN and TH. In race-stratified analyses, HIV infection was associated with TH BMD loss in non-black women. Black women experienced greater menopause-associated decline in TH BMD compared with non-black women. Conclusions The association of HIV and BMD differs strikingly by race, as do the effects of the menopausal transition on bone. Determining the extent to which the effect of HIV on fracture risk varies by race will be crucial to identify HIV-infected women at greatest risk for osteoporotic fracture, particularly as they enter menopause. PMID:25896953

  9. El cambio de vida: conceptualizations of menopause and midlife among urban Latina women.

    PubMed

    Villarruel, Antonia M; Harlow, Sioban D; Lopez, Maria; Sowers, MaryFran

    2002-01-01

    The experience of menopause among Latina women has seldom been described. The purpose of this study was to conceptualize and contextualize the experience of menopause from the perspective of Latina women. A series of focus group sessions were conducted with postmenopausal Latina women living in a large midwestern city. Themes derived from content analysis included: (a) The primacy of health and the importance of harmony and balance; (b) El cambio de vida--something you have to go through; and (c) This time is for me: reorientation and restructuring. Rediscovery and redefinition as opposed to being defined by physical symptoms marked this life phase. Implications of study findings are discussed within the context of an emerging biopsychosocial perspective of midlife and menopause transition.

  10. Vulvovaginal symptoms prevalence in postmenopausal women and relationship to other menopausal symptoms and pelvic floor disorders

    PubMed Central

    EREKSON, Elisabeth A.; LI, Fang-Yong; MARTIN, Deanna K.; FRIED, Terri R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The primary objective of this study was to utilize the Vulvovaginal Symptom Questionnaire (VSQ) to estimate the prevalence and examine the emotional, life style and sexual impact of vulvovaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women. Methods We administered the VSQ questionnaire, a previous validated instrument to 358 postmenopausal women recruited from primary care physician offices and local senior centers. The first 7 questions of the VSQ comprise the symptom subscale (itching, burning, hurting, irritation, dryness, discharge and odor). Women who answered “Yes” to any of the first 7 symptom questions were considered to have vulvovaginal symptoms. Results Two hundred seventy nine women were recruited from primary care offices and 79 women were recruited from senior centers. One hundred eighty-three post-menopausal women (51.1%; 95% CI 45.9%, 56.3%) reported at least one vulvovaginal symptom. The most common symptom was being dry 35.8% (n/N = 128/358). Ten percent of women (n/N = 38/358) reported ≥ 5 symptoms and 6% of women reported all 7 symptoms in the last week. For women reporting ≥ 1vulvovaginal symptoms, 40.4% (n/N = 74/183) reported emotional impact (Yes to ≥ 1 out of 4 emotional impact subscale items) and 32.8% (n/N = 60/183) reported life style impact (Yes to ≥ 1 out of 5 life impact subscale items) from these symptoms. For sexually active women reporting vulvovaginal symptoms, 75.3% (n/N = 67/89) reported sexual impact (Yes to ≥ 1 out of 4 sexual impact subscale items). Vulvovaginal symptoms were associated with increased co-occurrence of specific pelvic floor disorders, including pelvic organ prolapse (p=0.001), anal incontinence to solid stool (p=0.001), urinary frequency (p=0.02), urgency urinary incontinence (p=0.001), and dysuria (p<0.001). Conclusion Vulvovaginal symptoms are common and present in over 50% of postmenopausal women. Sizeable proportions of women with vulvovaginal symptoms report emotional, life style and sexual

  11. The age and symptomatology of natural menopause among United Arab Emirates women.

    PubMed

    Rizk, D E; Bener, A; Ezimokhai, M; Hassan, M Y; Micallef, R

    1998-06-17

    A population-based survey of 742 United Arab Emirates women aged 40 years and over who had attained natural menopause (amenorrhea of at least 6 months' duration) investigated age at onset and the prevalence of climacteric symptoms. Women from both urban and rural areas of Al-Ain City and Abu Dhabi, Dubai, and Sharjah Emirates were recruited through use of the multi-stage stratified cluster sampling technique. The median age at menopause in this sample was 48 years (mean, 47.3 +or- 3.29 years; range, 40-59 years)--significantly lower than the 50.3 year mean recorded among Western women. Median age at menopause was significantly associated with that of the mother (p 0.001) and older sister (p 0.001), parity (p 0.0001), and a history of use of oral contraceptives for more than 1 year (p 0.001). 394 women (53%) reported at least one climacteric symptom. Most common were hot flushes, reported by 47% of women. 145 women (19.5%) were currently taking hormone replacement therapy. The relatively low age at menopause in this population could reflect additional social, economic, environmental, or genetic factors that were not explored in this study.

  12. The pQCT 'Bone Strength Indices' (BSIs, SSI). Relative mechanical impact and diagnostic value of the indicators of bone tissue and design quality employed in their calculation in healthy men and pre- and post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Cointry, G R; Ferretti, J L; Reina, P S; Nocciolino, L M; Rittweger, J; Capozza, R F

    2014-03-01

    The pQCT-assessed Bone Strength Indices (BSI's, SSI) depend on the product of a 'quality' indicator, the cortical vBMD (vCtD), and a 'design' indicator, one of the cross-sectional moments of inertia or related variables (MIs) in long bones. As the MIs vary naturally much more than the vCtD and represent different properties, it could be that the variation of the indices might not reflect the relative mechanical impact of the variation of their determinant factors in different individuals or circumstances. To understand this problem, we determined the vCtD and MI's in tibia scans of 232 healthy men and pre- and post-MP women, expressed in SD of the means calculated for each group, and analyzed the independent influence of 1 SD unit of variation of each factor on that of the indices by multiple correlations. Results showed: 1. that the independent influence of the MIs on the indices was generally larger than that of the vCtD, and 2. that in post-MP women the influence of the vCtD was larger than it was in the other groups. This confirms the view that inter-individual variation of vCtD is comparatively small, and that mechanical competence of human bone is mostly determined by 'design' factors.

  13. Knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices of African-American women toward menopausal health.

    PubMed

    Sharps, Phyllis W; Phillips, Janice; Oguntimalide, Lola; Saling, Jessica; Yun, Stephanie

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and health practices related to menopausal health among African-American women (N= 106) from diverse SES levels, between 40 to 65 years of age. The mean age was 49 years of age, 60.7% were college graduates, 45.8% were married, 85% employed full-time and 88% had medical insurance. Two-thirds rated their health as good, and half believed their health was better than other women. Most women (58%) use hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or would consider using HRT. In general women were knowledgeable about the process of menopause. Among this diverse group of women there were significant differences (p<.05) in use of HRT and health promotion behaviors. Most women (48.5%) sought information from printed materials. Women and their physicians should be encouraged to discuss menopausal health. Culturally appropriate materials should be provided in all women's health settings, through media and places where women gather including churches, beauty parlors, community centers.

  14. Exercising after Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... before beginning a new exercise program. Benefits of Exercise for Post-Menopausal Women Helps prevent osteoporosis by keeping bone and cartilage tissue strong and healthy. Reduces the risk of heart attack and other cardiovascular diseases by increasing heart and respiratory rates. Keeps your ...

  15. [Constitution identification and treatment with acupuncture-moxibustion for menopausal women].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Bin; Li, Xiao-Hong; Sun, Zhi-Fang; Mo, Jie; Wang, Jing; He, Long

    2011-12-01

    According to the theory of constitution and disease prevention of Chinese medicine, kidney deficiency, lack of nourishment of the Thoroughfare Vessel and the Conception Vessel as well as qi sufficiency and blood deficiency are taken as the main features of body constitutions of women during menopausal period. Acupuncture-moxibustion treatment before or in the early stage of menopausal period are discussed initially. Methods of tonifying the kidney and regulate qi and blood are held as the main treating principles. Acupuncture points such as Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Shenshu (BL 23), Guanyuan (CV 4) and Baihui (GV 20) are adopted as the main points. And proper stimulation of needling and moxibustion are applied. Thus, a new way of thinking is provided for disease prevention and health keeping of women during menopausal period in China.

  16. Cost of non-persistence with oral bisphosphonates in post-menopausal osteoporosis treatment in France

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the last decade, oral bisphosphonates (BP) became the most widely prescribed pharmacologic class for post-menopausal osteoporosis. However, many surveys revealed the important issue of poor persistence with those drugs resulting in a failure of treatment to reduce fracture risk sufficiently. Using a published Markov model, this study analyses the economic impact of non-persistence with bisphosphonates in the context of the introduction of generics in France. Methods Direct costs of vertebral, hip and wrist fracture were assessed and included in an existing 10-year Markov model developed to analyse consequences of non-persistence. Three alternatives of comparison were set: no treatment, real-world persistence, and ideal persistence. Simulated patients' characteristics matched those from a French observational study and the real-world adherence alternative employed persistence data from published database analysis. The risk of fracture of menopausal women and the risk reduction associated with the drugs were based on results reported in clinical trials. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated first between real-world adherence and no treatment alternatives, and second between ideal and real-world persistence alternatives. The cost of non-persistence was defined as the difference between total cost of ideal and real-world persistence alternatives. Results Within fractured women population, mean costs of 10-year management of fracture were significantly different between the three alternatives with €7,239 (± €4,783), €6,711 (± €4,410) and €6,134 (± €3,945) in the no-treatment, the real-world and ideal persistence alternatives, respectively (p < 0.0001). Cost-effectiveness ratio for real-world treatment persistence compared with no-treatment alternative was found dominant and as well, alternative of ideal persistence dominated the former. Each ten percentage point of persistence gain amounted to €58 per patient

  17. Symptomatic Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor not Otherwise Specified in a Post-Menopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Neha; Desai, Kaniksha; Chindris, Ana-Maria; Lewis, Jason; Dinh, Tri A.

    2016-01-01

    Steroid cell tumor not otherwise specified (NOS) is a rare subtype of sex cord stromal tumor of the ovary and contributes less than 0.1% of all ovarian neoplasms. The majority of tumors occur in pre-menopausal women (mean age: 43 years), in which 56-77% of patients present with virilization due to excess testosterone. An 80-year-old woman with worsening alopecia and excessive growth of coarse hair on abdomen and genital area was found to have elevated serum testosterone level (462 ng/mL). Radiologic studies were consistent with bilateral adrenal adenomas. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling ruled out the adrenal gland as origin of hormone secretion. A diagnostic and therapeutic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy confirmed steroid cell tumor NOS of the left ovary. Post-operatively, the patient had complete resolution of her symptoms and normalization of testosterone level. Our case emphasizes the importance of a clinical suspicion for an occult testosterone secreting ovarian tumor in a symptomatic patient without obvious ovarian mass on imaging. PMID:27441075

  18. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition attenuates cutaneous vasodilation during the post-menopausal hot flash

    PubMed Central

    Hubing, Kimberly A.; Wingo, Jonathan E.; Brothers, R. Matthew; Coso, Juan Del; Low, David A.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that local inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin synthesis attenuates cutaneous vasodilator responses during post-menopausal hot flashes. Methods Four microdialysis membranes were inserted into forearm skin (dorsal surface) of 8 post-menopausal women (mean ± SD, 51±7 y). Ringers solution (control), 10mM Ketorolac (Keto) to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, 10mM NG-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase, and a combination of 10mM Keto + 10mM L-NAME were each infused at the separate sites. Skin blood flow at each site was indexed using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial blood pressure and was expressed as a percentage of the maximal calculated CVC (CVCmax) obtained following infusion of 50mM sodium nitropruside at all sites at the end of the study. Data from 13 hot flashes were analyzed. Results At the control site, the mean ± SD peak increase in CVC was 15.5±6% CVCmax units. This value was not different relative to the peak increase in CVC at the Keto site (13.0±5 % CVCmax units, P = 0.09). However, the peak increase in CVC during the flash was attenuated at the L-NAME and L-NAME + Keto sites (7.4±4 % CVCmax units and 8.7±7 % CVCmax units, respectively) relative to both the control and the Keto sites (P<0.05 for both comparisons). There were no significant differences in the peak increases in sweat rate between any of the sites (P = 0.24). Conclusions These data demonstrate that cutaneous vasodilation during a hot flash has a nitric oxide component. Increases in CVC despite the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis suggest prostaglandins do not contribute to cutaneous vasodilation during a hot flash. PMID:20505548

  19. Roles of microRNA-221/222 in type 2 diabetic patients with post-menopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, M Y; Pan, S R; Qiu, A Y

    2016-07-14

    The aim of the research was to examine the expression level of microRNA221/222 (miR-221/222) in the serum of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are also diagnosed with post-menopausal breast cancer. We aimed to evaluate the differences in microRNA expression in patients with T2DM alone, patients with post-menopausal breast cancer alone, and patients with both T2DM and post-menopausal breast cancer. We selected 20 cases from a healthy control group, 30 cases from the group of patients with T2DM and obesity, 30 cases from the group of the patients with post-menopausal breast cancer, and 30 cases from the group of patients with both T2DM and post-menopausal breast cancer. The expression of miR-221/222 in the serum of the patients with post-menopausal breast cancer was higher than that of T2DM patients (P < 0.05), but lower than that of the T2DM patients who were also positive for post-menopausal breast cancer (P < 0.05); the expression of miR-221/222 in the serum of the T2DM patients was higher than that of the healthy controls (P < 0.05). BMI, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, and TG were positively correlated with the relative expression of miR-221/222 in the serum (P < 0.01). In conclusion, miR-221/222 participates in insulin resistance; the combination of miR- 221/222 and estrogen contributes to incidence of T2DM with post-menopausal breast cancer complications. MiR-221/222 may participate in the occurrence and progression of T2DM with post-menopausal breast cancer via down-regulation of CAVl.

  20. Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on nitric oxide metabolism and blood pressure in menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoflavones, having chemical structures similar to estrogens, are believed to stimulate nitric oxide production and thus lower blood pressure. The efficacy of soy isoflavone supplementation to stimulate nitric oxide production and lower blood pressure in menopausal women with high normal blood press...

  1. Hormonal changes in menopause: do they contribute to a 'midlife hair crisis' in women?

    PubMed

    Mirmirani, P

    2011-12-01

    Female pattern hair loss is a common problem affecting a large number of women worldwide but beset by a paucity of research. The study of androgens has hitherto dominated the field of hair biology but there is increasing scientific and clinical data to suggest that nonandrogen signals can also affect the folliculosebaceous unit, especially in women. The discovery of oestrogen receptor beta has renewed and redefined prior concepts of oestrogen activity and signalling in hair biology. It is postulated that oestrogens modulate hair growth by their influence on a number of other hormones, growth factors, transcription factors and cytokines. The menopause is a period in which significant changes in oestrogen levels are recorded, and this review discusses studies that help to clarify the link between menopause and the perception of thinning hair. In a study of pre- and postmenopausal women without alopecia, menopausal status significantly influenced hair parameters, specifically hair growth rate, percentage anagen and hair diameter distributions, most notably in the frontal scalp. Hair density decreased with age, but was not correlated with menopausal status. Analyses of hair amount using a model of hair density and hair diameters suggest that the impact of changing hair parameters is most notable in the mid-forties for women.

  2. Attitude to the Menopause and Sex amongst Middle-Aged Women in a Family Medicine Clinic in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Daramola, Olufunmilola Olutosin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Menopause is the expected end of reproductive life. Having a positive attitude towards it has been shown to result in a positive experience, while a negative attitude is associated with negative experiences and symptoms. Traditionally, women often abstain from sex after menopause. The study aimed to determine the level of awareness and perceptions about the menopause and sex in perimenopausal women attending a general outpatient clinic. Methods. Women over 40 years were recruited from the Family Medicine Department of University College Hospital, excluding those who were menopausal. Data analyses were done with chi-square test (p < 0.05). Results. Most (302; 86.4%) of the 352 surveyed participants were aware of the menopause. Only 36.1% anticipated associated symptoms. About half (55.7%) were indifferent to menopause onset, while 23% had a positive attitude and 21.4% had a negative attitude, respectively. Younger women were less likely to have a positive attitude to the menopause (p = 0.04). There were negative cultural beliefs towards sex. Sexual activity was low and declined with age (p < 0.001). Many women would like treatment to improve their sexual activity. Conclusion. Most participants had a favourable disposition towards the menopause, though sexual relationships suffer. Counselling and treatment should be offered. PMID:27895667

  3. Women's Experience at the Time of Menopause: Accounting for Biological, Cultural and Psychological Embodiment.

    PubMed

    Stephens, C

    2001-12-01

    In understanding health and illness, it has long been apparent that psychological and social aspects are as important as the biological explanations of the biomedical model. Recent studies of women's experience of menopause have demonstrated the psychological and social constructions of women's bodies, but have neglected to include individual embodiment and the notion of a social world that is inescapably embodied. This paper presents arguments for the consideration of an integrated approach to embodiment and, drawing upon recent theorizing, a conceptual framework that is able to take into account the integration of psyche, biology, and culture. The accounts of 80 New Zealand women, aged between 45 and 60, are analysed, using categories labelled, 'visceral', 'experiential', 'normative' and 'pragmatic', to provide a description of women's embodied and culturally embedded experience of menopause. The incorporation of these analytic categories, and the usefulness of the application of the model in contemporary applied work, is discussed.

  4. Effect of hormone metabolism genotypes on steroid hormone levels and menopausal symptoms in a prospective population-based cohort of women experiencing the menopausal transition

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Su, H. Irene; Sammel, Mary D.; Lin, Hui; Tran, Teo V.; Gracia, Clarisa R.; Freeman, Ellen W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated whether genes involved in the metabolism of steroid hormones are associated with hormone levels or menopausal symptoms. Methods We used a population-based prospective sample of 436 African American (AA) and European American (EA) women who were premenopausal at enrollment and were followed longitudinally through menopause. We evaluated the relationship between steroid hormone metabolism genotypes at COMT, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP3A4, CYP19, SULT1A1, and SULT1E1 with hormone levels and menopausal features. Results In EA women, SULT1E1 variant carriers had lower levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SULT1A1 variant carriers had lower levels of estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and testosterone compared with women who did not carry these variant alleles. In AA women, CYP1B1*3 genotypes were associated with hot flashes (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40–0.95). Interactions of CYP1A2 genotypes were associated with hot flashes across menopausal stage (P = 0.006). Interactions of CYP1B1*3 (P = 0.02) and CYP1B1*4 (P = 0.03) with menopausal stage were associated with depressive symptoms. In EA women, SULT1A1*3 was associated with depressive symptoms (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.41–0.68) and hot flashes (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.64–2.63). There were significant interactions between SULT1A1*3 and hot flashes (P < 0.001) and between SULT1A1*2 and depressive symptoms (P = 0.007) on menopausal stage, and there were race-specific effects of SULT1A1*2, SULT1A1*3, CYP1B1*3, and CYP3A4*1B on menopause. Conclusions Our results suggest that genotypes are associated with the occurrence of menopause-related symptoms or the timing of the menopausal transition. PMID:20505544

  5. Identifying predictive motor factors for falls in post-menopausal breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Zak, Marek; Biskup, Malgorzata; Macek, Pawel; Krol, Halina; Krupnik, Szymon; Opuchlik, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer treatment, including radical surgery, is also pursued as late as the 7th - 8th decade of women’s lives. Standard physical rehabilitation procedures offered to those women are predominantly focused on attenuating specific functional deficits of the upper limb and trunk. Seldom do they entail any regimens specifically aimed at recovering overall functionality, and reducing exposure to falls-risk. The study aimed to assess potential interrelationships between the self-reported falls, individual functional capabilities and appreciably reducing exposure to falls-risk in a group of post-menopausal, post-surgical breast cancer survivors. Methods The study recruited 102 women (aged 65–79; mean age 70.2), post-surgical breast cancer survivors. The subjects were stratified by age into three groups: Group 1 (65–69 years); Group 2 (70–74 years), and Group 3 (75–79 years). Individual functional capabilities were assessed with Eight-foot up & go test (8UG), chair stand test (CST), and 2-minute step test (2ST). Tinetti POMA test was applied to assess gait and balance disorders. Self-reported falls in the past year were ascertained through a questionnaire. Results Assessment of individual aerobic endurance (2ST) also demonstrated a clear deficit in the mean scores category in all respective age sub-groups, as compared against the reference values. The deficits ranged from 4.86 to 15.90 steps less than the normative values; the oldest subjects demonstrating the largest deficit. The aerobic endurance tests results significantly impacted the ultimate assessment of an individual falls-risk in the oldest group. The analysis of the number of falls sustained within the recent year indicated that 43.67% of the subjects fell victim of such incidents. Conclusion An individual exposure to falls-risk was found to be appreciably more dependent upon individual aerobic endurance rather than overall strength of the lower part of the body in the breast cancer

  6. Concomitant use of prescription medications and dietary supplements in menopausal women; an approach to provider preparedness

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Paula; Stargrove, Mitchell Bebel; Dog, Tieraona Low

    2010-01-01

    Dietary supplements are becoming increasingly popular as therapies for symptom relief among menopause-age women in the United States. However, a large gap exists between research in the concomitant use of prescription medications and dietary supplements and provider preparedness to guide patient decision making. Many menopausal women take prescription medications, over the counter medications, and herbs and dietary supplements for climactic symptoms or other health conditions. With any drug, there is the potential for interactions. Women taking medications with a narrow therapeutic index, such as anticoagulants, anticonvulsants, and drugs for the treatment of chronic diseases, are at particular risk. Patients should be queried regarding their use of dietary supplements when starting or stopping a prescription drug, or if unexpected reactions occur. When counseling patients, one must carefully consider the risks and benefits of each supplement and medication being taken by each individual. PMID:21168291

  7. Relationships between polymorphisms in NOS3 and MPO genes, cigarette smoking and risk of post-menopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hong, Chi-Chen; Ahn, Jiyoung; Rodriguez, Carmen; Thun, Michael J; Calle, Eugenia E

    2007-06-01

    NOS3 and MPO genes encode endothelial nitric oxide synthase and myeloperoxidase (MPO), respectively, which generate nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species. Because cigarette smoking generates reactive species, we hypothesized that NOS3 and MPO polymorphisms could influence susceptibility to breast cancer, particularly among smokers. We examined the associations between NOS3 Glu298Asp and MPO G-463A polymorphisms and breast cancer risk by cigarette smoking among post-menopausal women in the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. Included in this analysis were 502 women who provided blood samples and were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1992 and 2001 and 505 cancer-free controls who were matched to the cases by age, race/ethnicity and date of blood donation. Genotyping for NOS3 and MPO was performed using TaqMan, and unconditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). No statistically significant relationships were found between NOS3 and MPO genotypes and breast cancer risk. When considering smoking, variant NOS3 genotypes (GT and TT) were significantly associated with reduced breast cancer risk among never smokers (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.45-0.99), but were associated with higher risk among ever smokers (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.05-2.41) and 2-fold increase in risk for those who smoked >10 cigarettes per day (OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.21-3.97). NOS3 genotypes appeared to be associated with risk of post-menopausal breast cancer among smokers, supporting the hypothesis that subgroups of women based upon genetic profiles may be at higher risk of breast cancer when exposed to tobacco smoke.

  8. Body image and genital self-image in pre-menopausal women with dyspareunia.

    PubMed

    Pazmany, Els; Bergeron, Sophie; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Verhaeghe, Johan; Enzlin, Paul

    2013-08-01

    With a prevalence of 15-21%, dyspareunia is one of the most commonly reported sexual dysfunctions in pre-menopausal women under the age of 40. Studies to date have focused primarily on clinical samples, showing that women with dyspareunia report overall sexual impairment, anxiety, and feelings of sexual inadequacy. However, little is known about their body image and genital self-image and few studies have sampled women exclusively from the general population. The aim of the present, controlled study was to investigate body image and genital self-image in a community sample of pre-menopausal women with self-reported dyspareunia. In total, 330 women completed an online survey, of which 192 (58%) had dyspareunia and 138 (42%) were pain-free control women. In comparison to pain-free control women, women with dyspareunia reported significantly more distress about their body image and a more negative genital self-image. Moreover, findings from a logistic regression, in which trait anxiety was controlled for, showed that a more negative genital self-image was strongly and independently associated with an increased likelihood of reporting dyspareunia. These results suggest that, in women with dyspareunia, body image and genital self-image are significantly poorer and would benefit from more attention from both clinicians and researchers.

  9. Menopausal complaints in Slovak midlife women and the impact of CYP1B1 polymorphism on their incidence.

    PubMed

    Luptáková, Lenka; Sivtáková, Daniela; Cernanová, Veronika; Cvicelová, Marta

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of symptoms have been attributed to menopause, negatively influencing women's physical and psychological health. In addition to lifestyle parameters and personal history, genetic factors are considered to be the main source of this variation. This study aims to investigate the incidence of menopausal symptoms among midlife women according to their menopausal status, and to evaluate the contribution to their manifestation from CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism as a predisposing factor for menopausal symptoms. The studied cohort consisted of 299 women ranging from 39 to 59 years of age. Women were recruited from the western and middle parts of Slovakia, and all participants completed a menopause-specific questionnaire and provided blood or saliva samples for genotyping. Our results indicated that all women are at risk of typical menopausal symptoms, but there is a higher number of postmenopausal women affected than premenopausal ones. Regression analysis showed that the CYP1B1 Leu/Leu genotype can increase the experience of bloated stomach and facial hair increase in all the sampled women, while the Leu/Leu genotype may increase experience of palpitations and involuntary urination in the premenopausal women. The Leu/Leu genotype may increase the experience of nausea, bloated stomach, and vaginal dryness in peri- and postmenopausal women. We determined that women with the Leu/Leu, or Leu/Val genotypes were approximately five times more likely to suffer from vaginal dryness than the Val/Val women (OR = 4.948; 95% CI, 1.259-19.447). We therefore suggest that CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism could be involved in individual susceptibility to menopausal symptoms in Slovak midlife women.

  10. A decade post WHI, menopausal hormone therapy comes full circle--need for independent commission.

    PubMed

    Utian, W H

    2012-08-01

    The sudden decision by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to terminate the estrogen-progestogen therapy arm of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Study a decade ago now begs two questions:--has women's health after menopause been helped or harmed as a result of the findings and the way in which they were presented, and, if harmed, what needs to be done to put things right? Time and multiple reviews of specific publications from the WHI lead to the serious question whether a project designed to be of benefit to women's health has boomeranged, and instead may have resulted in significant impairment to both the quality of life and physical health of postmenopausal women. It is therefore urgent to confirm whether this is so and whether corrective action needs be taken to prevent even more harm. There are two obvious and immediate actions to be called for: (1) The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) needs to revisit the black-box warnings on postmenopausal hormones. Specifically, there needs to be a separation of the advisories for estrogen alone from estrogen and progestogen combined usage. (2) Justification is given to call for an independent commission to scrutinize every major WHI paper to determine whether the data justified the conclusions drawn. Women progressing through and beyond menopause in the next decade need to be spared the unnecessary harm that may have been inflicted on their sisters of the previous decade.

  11. Twelve-week exercise training and the quality of life in menopausal women – clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowska, Jolanta; Rutkowska, Magdalena; Michalski, Bogdan Adam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The menopause transition is associated with decreased health functioning. About 80-90% of women experience mild to severe physical or physiological menopause-related complaints per year when approaching menopause. Physical activity may reduce some climacteric symptoms and improve the quality of life. Aim of the study Aim of the study was to investigate the influence of a 12-week training programme on the quality of life (QoL) in menopausal-aged women living in a rural area. Material and methods Participants were 80 women aged 40-65 years and divided into two randomly selected groups in training sessions (exercising group, n = 40 and control group, n = 40). SF36 was used to assess the quality of life in both groups before and after 12 weeks. Exercising women participated in training session 3 times a week. Each 60-minute exercise session included warming-up exercises, walking, stretching, strengthening exercises with an elastic band and cooling down exercises. Results A non-significant positive difference in all SF36 domains in the exercising group was observed. The results of the study showed a statistically significant higher QoL in the exercising group compared to the control group after 12-week training in two domains: vitality and mental health. The improvement in the quality of life in the study group was 0.19 points (role limits – physical domain, least change) and 4.96 (vitality domain, most change). Conclusions Controlled and regular exercise for 12 weeks was significantly correlated with a positive change in vitality and mental health. Sedentary women should consider modification of their lifestyle to include physical activity as it leads to improvement of their quality of life. PMID:27095954

  12. Intake of Novel Red Clover Supplementation for 12 Weeks Improves Bone Status in Healthy Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Thorup, Anne Cathrine; Lambert, Max Norman; Kahr, Henriette Strøm; Bjerre, Mette; Jeppesen, Per Bendix

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect by which daily consumption of a novel red clover (RC) extract influences bone health, inflammatory status, and cardiovascular health in healthy menopausal women. Design. A 12-week randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial involving 60 menopausal women receiving a daily dose of 150 mL RC extract containing 37.1 mg isoflavones (33.8 mg as aglycones) or placebo. Methods. Bone parameters were changes in bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and T-score at the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Bone turnover (CTx) and inflammatory markers were measured in plasma and finally blood pressure (BP) was evaluated. Results. RC extract had positive effect on bone health, and only the women receiving the placebo experienced a decline in BMD (p < 0.01) at the lumbar spine. T-score at the lumbar spine only decreased in the placebo group (p < 0.01). CTx decreased in the RC group with −9.94 (±4.93)%, although not significant. Conclusion. Daily consumption of RC extract over a 12-week period was found to have a beneficial effect on bone health in menopausal women based on BMD and T-score at the lumbar spine and plasma CTx levels. No changes in BP or inflammation markers were found and no side effects were observed. PMID:26265926

  13. Treatment of Vaginal Atrophy with Vaginal Estrogen Cream in Menopausal Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maitri; Karena, Zalak; Patel, Sangita V.; Parmar, Niyati; Singh, Pawan K.; Sharma, Atul

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To measure the effect of vaginal estrogen cream in the treatment of vaginal atrophy in menopausal Indian women. Methods A total of 50 menopausal women aged between 40 and 80 years old with symptoms of vaginal atrophy were selected and treated with 0.5 g vaginal estrogen cream, twice weekly for 12 weeks. The women were followed-up monthly where symptom score, Genital Health Clinical Evaluation (GHCE) score, vaginal pH, and vaginal maturation index (VMI) were assessed and compared to baseline data. Any adverse events were recorded. Results There was a significant improvement (p < 0.010) in complaints such as vaginal dryness, itching, burning, and dyspareunia at the end of the study period. The clinical improvement of these patients was reflected in a decrease in GHCE score on every visit. Vaginal pH and VMI score also showed statistically significant improvements (p < 0.010). No side effects with the drugs used were recorded during the study period. Conclusions Vaginal estrogen cream causes symptomatic relief in women of menopausal age in India suffering from vaginal atrophy. PMID:28042397

  14. Ageing/Menopausal Status in Healthy Women and Ageing in Healthy Men Differently Affect Cardiometabolic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Campesi, Ilaria; Occhioni, Stefano; Tonolo, Giancarlo; Cherchi, Sara; Basili, Stefania; Carru, Ciriaco; Zinellu, Angelo; Franconi, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender medicine requires a global analysis of an individual's life. Menopause and ageing induce variations of some cardiometabolic parameters, but, it is unknown if this occurs in a sex-specific manner. Here, some markers of oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction are analysed in men younger and older than 45 years and in pre- and postmenopausal women. Methods: Serum and plasma sample were assayed for TNF-α and IL-6, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls and for methylated arginines using ELISA kits, colorimetric methods and capillary electrophoresis. Results: Before body weight correction, men overall had higher creatinine, red blood cells and haemoglobin and lower triglycerides than women. Men younger than 45 years had lower levels of TNF-α and malondialdehyde and higher levels of arginine than age-matched women, while postmenopausal women had higher IL-6 concentrations than men, and higher total cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine and IL-6 levels than younger women. Men younger than 45 years had lower total cholesterol and malondialdehyde than older men. After correction, some differences remained, others were amplified, others disappeared and some new differences emerged. Moreover, some parameters showed a correlation with age, and some of them correlated with each other as functions of ageing and ageing/menopausal status. Conclusions: Ageing/menopausal status increased many more cardiovascular risk factors in women than ageing in men, confirming that postmenopausal women had increased vascular vulnerability and indicating the need of early cardiovascular prevention in women. Sex-gender differences are also influenced by body weight, indicating as a matter of debate whether body weight should be seen as a true confounder or as part of the causal pathway. PMID:26941571

  15. Sex hormone therapy and progression of cardiovascular disease in menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Alhurani, Rabe E.; Chahal, C. Anwar A.; Ahmed, Ahmed T.; Mohamed, Essa A.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most controversial health decisions facing women is deciding upon the use of hormonal treatments for symptoms of menopause. This brief review focuses on the historical context of use of menopausal hormone treatments (MHT), summarizes results of major observational, primary and secondary prevention studies of MHT and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, provides evidence for how sex steroids modulate CV function and identifies challenges for future research. As medicine enters an era of personalization of treatment options, additional research into sex differences in the aetiology of CV diseases will lead to better risk identification for CV disease in women and identify whether a woman might receive CV benefit from specific formulations and doses of MHT. PMID:27215679

  16. Mechanisms underlying social inequality in post-menopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur

    2014-10-01

    This thesis is based on studies conducted in the period 2010-2014 at Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen and at Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York. The results are presented in three scientific papers and a synopsis. The main objective of the thesis was to determine mechanisms underlying social inequality (defined by educational level) in postmenopausal breast cancer (BC) by addressing mediating effects through hormone therapy (HT) use, BMI, lifestyle and reproductive factors. The results of previous studies suggest that the higher risk of postmenopausal BC among women of high socioeconomic position (SEP) may be explained by reproductive factors and health behaviors. Women of higher SEP generally have fewer children and give birth at older ages than women of low SEP, and these factors have been found to affect the risk of BC - probably through altered hormone levels. Adverse effects on BC risk have also been documented for modifiable health behaviors that may affect hormone levels, such as alcohol consumption, high BMI, physical inactivity, and HT use. Alcohol consumption and HT use are likewise more common among women of higher SEP. The analyses were based on the Social Inequality in Cancer (SIC) cohort and a subsample of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS). The SIC cohort was derived by pooling 6 individual studies from the Copenhagen area including 33,562 women (1,733 BC cases) aged 50-70 years at baseline. The subsample of WHI-OS consisted of two case-cohort studies with measurements of endogenous estradiol (N = 1,601) and insulin (N = 791). Assessment of mediation often relies on comparing multiplicative models with and without the potential mediator. Such approaches provide potentially biased results, because they do not account for mediator-outcome confounding, exposure-dependent mediator-outcome confounding, exposure-mediator interaction and interactions

  17. Subjective health, aging, and menopause among native and immigrant Jewish women in Israel.

    PubMed

    Remennick, Larissa

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the perceptions and practices of health between native Israeli women and recent immigrants from the former Soviet Union. A total of 315 respondents (aged 45-65 years, of Ashkenazi, that is, European, origin and middle-class background) were recruited through their workplaces and completed a structured questionnaire, followed by personal interviews (the latter not reported here). While "objective" health profiles of Russian and native Israeli women were rather similar, immigrant women typically perceived themselves as sicker and reported greater health-related damage to their lives than their native Israeli coworkers. More Russian women also reported mental disturbances and family problems, reflecting their vulnerable condition as immigrants. Israeli women were more aware of the "health promotion" discourse, but did not necessarily pursue healthier lifestyles (e.g., more of them smoked). Israeli-socialized women reported a higher number of perimenopausal symptoms and more often adopted the medicalized view of the menopause. The results imply that health interventions aimed at middle-aged women should be specifically tailored, accounting for different cultural constructions of aging and menopause.

  18. Female Sexual Function During the Menopausal Transition in a Group of Iranian Women

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Tahereh; Dashti, Mahboobeh; Shariat, Mamak; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Raisi, Firoozeh; Ghahghaei-Nezamabadi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women and association of sexual dysfunction with menopausal symptoms. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 151 married women with the age of 40-60 yearsold who were referred for treatmentto Department of Gynecology in Vali-e-Asr Hospital (Tehran, Iran) from April to July 2012, were recruited. They were evaluated concerning their sexual function in the domains of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain with the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire.Menopause rating scale (MRS) was developed for the diagnosis and quantification of climacteric symptoms. Results: Total frequency of sexual dysfunction was 53% with the domains of lubrication, arusal and desire being commonly affected 62%, 70% and 98.5% of cases respectively. There is a relationship between severity of somatic and urogenital symptoms with sexual dysfunction (p = 0.03, p = 0.00 respectively). Conclusion: A considerable percentage of women experienced sexual dysfunctions in this period. Somatic and urogenital symptoms during the menopausal period could be a factor to maintain or intensity of sexual dysfunctions. PMID:27648093

  19. [The Unified National Health System and public policies: psychological care for menopausal women in the Federal District, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mori, Maria Elizabeth; Coelho, Vera Lúcia Decnop; Estrella, Renata da Costa Netto

    2006-09-01

    This study focused on psychological care for middle-aged women in public health services in the Federal District (Brasilia), Brazil. The article discusses women's health and more specifically menopause and its place in Brazilian public health policies. The survey confirmed the lack of psychological support for menopausal women. In most cases only outpatient medical care was offered. No psychologist had been designated in any of the units surveyed to assist these women. The study concludes that this period of women's life has failed to receive psychological care in Brazil, thus neglecting the principles of the Unified National Health System. Menopausal women deserve comprehensive health care, including attention to conflicts related to biological, psychological, and socio-cultural dimensions of aging, thus contributing to the process of working through maturity.

  20. Recognizing menopause in women with amenorrhea induced by cytotoxic chemotherapy for endocrine-responsive early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Barnabei, Agnese; De Vecchis, Liana; Appetecchia, Marialuisa; Strigari, Lidia; Corsello, Salvatore M

    2012-04-01

    Cytotoxic anticancer treatment may induce amenorrhea or menopause to a variable extent. These side effects may not only impair or impede fertility but also cause sexual dysfunction, bone loss, and menopausal symptoms, with a strikingly negative effect on quality of life in many women. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are a recommended adjuvant endocrine treatment option in postmenopausal patients affected by early breast cancer (EBC) but are contraindicated in premenopausal women and in those with residual ovarian function. Women over 40 years of age with chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) and routine hormonal levels consistent with menopause may receive an AI as adjuvant endocrine treatment. For these women, the tools available to identify menopause do not appear to be completely reliable. This review focused on the pathophysiology of ovarian toxicity induced by cytotoxic agents and on potentially useful methods to diagnose chemotherapy-induced menopause in patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for endocrine-responsive EBC. Moreover, practical approaches are proposed to distinguish true menopausal women, who would benefit from AIs, from those with transient or persistent CIA.

  1. Estrogen and progestogen use in postmenopausal women: July 2008 position statement of The North American Menopause Society

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To update for both clinicians and the lay public the evidence-based position statement published by The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) in March 2007 regarding its recommendations for menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for postmenopausal women, with consideration for the therapeutic benefit-risk ratio at various times through menopause and beyond. Design An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women’s health was enlisted to review the March 2007 NAMS position statement, evaluate new evidence through an evidence-based analysis, and reach consensus on recommendations. The Panel’s recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees as an official NAMS position statement. The document was provided to other interested organizations to seek their endorsement. Results Current evidence supports a consensus regarding the role of HT in postmenopausal women, when potential therapeutic benefits and risks around the time of menopause are considered. This paper lists all these areas along with explanatory comments. Conclusions that vary from the 2007 position statement are highlighted. Addenda include a discussion of risk concepts, a new component not included in the 2007 paper, and a recommended list of areas for future HT research. A suggested reading list of key references is also provided. Conclusions Recent data support the initiation of HT around the time of menopause to treat menopause-related symptoms; to treat or reduce the risk of certain disorders, such as osteoporosis or fractures in select postmenopausal women; or both. The benefit-risk ratio for menopausal HT is favorable close to menopause but decreases with aging and with time since menopause in previously untreated women. PMID:18580541

  2. Hypertension in postmenopausal women: how to approach hypertension in menopause.

    PubMed

    Modena, Maria Grazia

    2014-09-01

    During fertile life women are usually normo or hypotensive. Hypertension may appear during pregnancy and this represents a peculiar phenomenon increasing nowadays for delay time of pregnancy. Gestational hypertension appears partially similar to hypertension in the context of metabolic syndrome for a similar condition of increased waste circumference. Parity, for the same pathogenesis, has been reported to be associated to peri and postmenopausal hypertension, not confirmed by our study of parous women with transitional non persistent perimenopausal hypertension. Estrogen's deficiency inducing endothelial dysfunction and increased body mass index are the main cause for hypertension in this phase of life. For these reasons lifestyle modification, diet and endothelial active drugs represent the ideal treatment. Antioxidant agents may have a role in prevention and treatment of hypertension. In conclusion, hypertension in women represents a peculiar constellation of different biological and pathogenic factors, which need a specific gender related approach, independent from the male model.

  3. Nutrition and bone health in women after the menopause.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, René; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike; Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Weaver, Connie

    2014-11-01

    Osteoporosis affects one out of three postmenopausal women. Their remaining lifetime risk of fragility fractures exceeds that of breast cancer. The risk of osteoporosis and/or fragility fractures can be reduced through healthy lifestyle changes. These include adequate dietary intakes of calcium, vitamin D and protein, regular weight-bearing exercise, reduction in alcohol intake and smoking cessation. European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women recommends a daily intake of at least 1000 mg/day for calcium, 800 IU/day for vitamin D and 1 g/kg body weight of protein for all women aged over 50 years. The development of programs that encourage lifestyle changes (in particular balanced nutrient intakes) are therefore essential for the reduction of osteoporosis risk.

  4. Relationship of Advanced Glycation End Products With Cardiovascular Disease in Menopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Pertynska-Marczewska, Magdalena; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the most significant cause of death in postmenopausal women. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed by nonenzymatic modification of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids by glucose. This review focuses on the contribution of AGEs and their receptors to the development of CVD in menopause. Advanced glycation end products circulate and activate the proinflammatory endothelial cell surface receptor called RAGE, bind to the extracellular matrix of the cardiovascular system, or bind to the circulating anti-inflammatory soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE). Data emerging from human and animal studies suggest that AGEs and both receptors (RAGE and sRAGE) are implicated in the pathophysiology of CVD. Particular emphasis has been given to the role of AGE-RAGE axis in oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial cell toxicity, and progression of atherosclerosis in menopause. Data accruing from human and animal studies suggest that RAGE expression level and circulating sRAGE level are associated with estradiol and are correlated with CVD risk factors, such as adiposity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. By recognizing the impact of AGEs on atherosclerosis, pharmacological strategies targeting the AGE-RAGE pathway hold therapeutic potential for CVD in menopausal women.

  5. Protective Effects of Nigella sativa on Metabolic Syndrome in Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ramlah Mohamad; Hamdan, Nurul Syima; Ismail, Maznah; Saini, Suraini Mohd; Abd Rashid, Saiful Nizam; Abd Latiff, Latiffah; Mahmud, Rozi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted in menopausal women to determine the metabolic impact of Nigella sativa. Methods: Thirty subjects who were menopausal women within the age limit of 45-60 were participated in this study and randomly allotted into two experimental groups. The treatment group was orally administered with N. sativa seeds powder in the form of capsules at a dose of 1g per day after breakfast for period of two months and compared to control group given placebo. Anthropometric and biochemical parameters were measured at baseline, 1st month, 2nd month and a month after treatment completed to determine their body weight, serum lipid profile and fasting blood glucose (FBG). Results: The treatment group showed slight reduction with no significant difference in body weight changes of the respondents. However, significant (p<0.05) improvement was observed in total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and blood glucose (p<0.05). Conclusion: These results suggested that treatment with N. sativa exert a protective effect by improving lipid profile and blood glucose which are in higher risk to be elevated during menopausal period. PMID:24409406

  6. Distinct cognitive effects of estrogen and progesterone in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Berent-Spillson, Alison; Briceno, Emily; Pinsky, Alana; Simmen, Angela; Persad, Carol C; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Smith, Yolanda R

    2015-09-01

    The effects of postmenopausal hormone treatment on cognitive outcomes are inconsistent in the literature. Emerging evidence suggests that cognitive effects are influenced by specific hormone formulations, and that progesterone is more likely to be associated with positive outcomes than synthetic progestin. There are very few studies of unopposed progesterone in postmenopausal women, and none that use functional neuroimaging, a sensitive measure of neurobiological function. In this study of 29 recently postmenopausal women, we used functional MRI and neuropsychological measures to separately assess the effects of estrogen or progesterone treatment on visual and verbal cognitive function. Women were randomized to receive 90 days of either estradiol or progesterone counterbalanced with placebo. After each treatment arm, women were given a battery of verbal and visual cognitive function and working memory tests, and underwent functional MRI including verbal processing and visual working memory tasks. We found that both estradiol and progesterone were associated with changes in activation patterns during verbal processing. Compared to placebo, women receiving estradiol treatment had greater activation in the left prefrontal cortex, a region associated with verbal processing and encoding. Progesterone was associated with changes in regional brain activation patterns during a visual memory task, with greater activation in the left prefrontal cortex and right hippocampus compared to placebo. Both treatments were associated with a statistically non-significant increase in number of words remembered following the verbal task performed during the fMRI scanning session, while only progesterone was associated with improved neuropsychological measures of verbal working memory compared to placebo. These results point to potential cognitive benefits of both estrogen and progesterone.

  7. [Sexuality of older women. The effect of menopause, other physical and social and partner related factors].

    PubMed

    von Sydow, K

    2000-04-01

    Research on female sexuality in middle and old age (50-90 years) is reviewed. The descriptive results of the studies published up to now are summarized according to the dimensions of sexual activity (e.g. intercourse, tenderness, masturbation) and interest. The influence of various factors on female sexuality in middle and old age is critically discussed, namely health/body (health; general changes in sexual reactions; menopause), society (population structure; "double standard of aging"; historical-biographical influences) and couple relationship. Altogether, female sexuality is highly variable. The most prevalent psychosexual problems of older women are not the classic medical complaints (e.g. dyspareunia, insufficient lubrication) but a lack of tenderness and of sexual contact. The effect of the hormonal changes of the menopause is smaller than the effect of psychological, society- and partner-related factors. The so-called "Hormone replacement therapy" does not have significant effects on most sexual dimensions.

  8. Effects of Escitalopram on Menopause-specific Quality of Life and Pain in Healthy Menopausal Women with Hot Flashes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Larson, Joseph; Carpenter, Janet S.; Joffe, Hadine; Reed, Susan D.; Newton, Katherine M.; Seguin, Rebecca A.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Cohen, Lee; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of escitalopram 10-20 mg/day on menopause-related quality of life and pain in healthy menopausal women with hot flashes. Study Design A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial of escitalopram 10-20 mg/day vs. identical placebo was conducted among 205 women ages 40-62 years with an average of > 4 daily hot flashes recruited at 4 clinical sites from July 2009 - June 2010. Main Outcome Measures The primary trial outcomes, reported previously, were the frequency and severity of vasomotor symptoms at 8 weeks. Here, we report on the pre-specified secondary endpoints of total and domain scores from the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL) and the Pain Intensity and Interference Scale (PEG). Results Outcome data were collected on 97% of randomized women and 87% of women took at least 70% of their study medication. Treatment with escitalopram resulted in significantly greater improvement in total MENQOL scores (mean difference at 8 weeks of −0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.71 to −0.11; p<0.001), as well as Vasomotor, Psychosocial, and Physical domain scores with the largest difference seen in the Vasomotor domain (mean difference −0.75; 95% CI −1.28 to −0.22; p=0.02). There was no significant treatment group difference for the Sexual Function domain. Escitalopram treatment resulted in statistically significant improvements in PEG scores compared to placebo (mean treatment group difference at 8 weeks of −0.33; 95% CI - 0.81 to 0.15; p=0.045). Conclusions Treatment with escitalopram 10-20 mg/day in healthy women with vasomotor symptoms significantly improved menopause-related quality of life and pain. PMID:23031421

  9. Effects of stretching on menopausal and depressive symptoms in middle-aged women: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Yuko; Nagamatsu, Toshiya; Kitabatake, Yoshinori; Sensui, Hiroomi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Exercise may help alleviate menopausal and depressive symptoms in middle-aged women, but sufficient evidence does not currently exist to fully support this theory. Whereas frequent moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise may be associated with the risk of menopausal hot flashes, light-intensity exercise, such as stretching, is not likely to increase the occurrence of hot flashes. Little is, however, known about the effects of light-intensity exercise on menopausal and depressive symptoms. We examined the effects of a 3-week stretching program on the menopausal and depressive symptoms in middle-aged, Japanese women. Methods: Forty Japanese women, aged 40 to 61 years, were recruited (mean age, 51.1 ± 7.3 y). The participants were randomly assigned to either a stretching or a control group. The stretching group (n = 20) participated in a 3-week intervention program that involved 10 minutes of daily stretching, just before bedtime. The control group (n = 20) was assigned to a waiting list. Menopausal symptoms were evaluated using the Simplified Menopausal Index, which measures vasomotor, psychological, and somatic symptoms. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Self-Rating Depression Scale. Results: The compliance rate was 75.8% during the 3-week intervention program. The total Simplified Menopausal Index scores, including the vasomotor, psychological, and somatic symptoms, and the Self-Rating Depression Scale scores significantly decreased in the stretching group compared with that in the control group. No adverse events, including increased hot flashes, were reported by the participants during the study period. Conclusions: These findings suggest that 10 minutes of stretching before bedtime decreases menopausal and depressive symptoms in middle-aged, Japanese women. PMID:27300113

  10. Changes in body fat distribution through menopause increase blood pressure independently of total body fat in middle-aged women: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Kyu; Lim, Young-Hyo; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soon Gil; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Lim, Heon Gil; Shin, Jinho

    2013-05-01

    Blood pressure in women increases sharply in middle age, especially after menopause. As the menopausal transition is known to induce changes in body fat distribution, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of body fat distribution as compared with the effect of total body fat on blood pressure through the menopausal transition. We analyzed 1422 subjects aged 45-55 years using the database from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010. The waist circumference (WC) of post-menopausal women was larger than that of pre-menopausal women (80.44 cm, 95% confidence interval (CI) 79.36-81.52 vs. 78.94 cm, 95% CI 78.27-79.61, P=0.013), but there was no statistically significant difference in body mass index (BMI). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) were significantly higher in post-menopausal women than in pre-menopausal women: SBP was 118.33 mm Hg, 95% CI 116.52-120.15 vs. 115.22 mm Hg, 95% CI 114.17-116.28 (P=0.003) and DBP was 76.94 mm Hg, 95% CI 75.88-77.99 vs. 75.25 mm Hg, 95% CI 74.57-75.93 (P=0.009). BMI and WC were positively correlated with BP. After adjustment for BMI, the correlation of WC with SBP remained significant (β=0.250, 95% CI 0.024-0.476, P=0.030). In a stratified analysis, WC correlated with SBP in women with BMI<25 kg m(-2) (β=0.358, 95% CI 0.138-0.579, P=0.001), but not in women with BMI25 kg m(-2). We conclude that the changes in body fat distribution through the menopausal transition are associated with SBP, independent of total body fat. This finding indicates that alterations in the localization of body fat are another cause of menopause-related changes in BP.

  11. Determinants of willingness to pay for a new therapy in a sample of menopausal-aged women.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Andrej; Hodek, Jan-Marc; Runge, Claus; Greiner, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Menopause is a natural physiological event that usually begins in women between the ages of 48 and 55 years. In many cases, this event is associated with unpleasant somatic-vegetative, urogenital or psychological symptoms. To test the health and social demographic factors (especially household income level) that influence willingness to pay (WTP) for a new hormone-free treatment in women of menopausal age. 1365 women between the ages of 45 and 73 years were surveyed about their health and WTP for the new treatment. WTP was evaluated with a closed-ended binary questionnaire (four groups with different levels of co-payment between euro15 and euro60), using the contingent valuation method. The average WTP was calculated according to the area under the demand function. Factors contributing to payment readiness were examined by means of binary logistic regression. WTP was significantly affected by women's opinion of the new medication, the level of co-payment required, net household income, whether currently in treatment for menopausal symptoms, and Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) values. Compared with other factors, the level of co-payment was predicted to have a negative impact on WTP. Income level is an important factor in WTP and correlates highly with several other health-related variables (WHO-5 index, MRS value, receipt of other menopause medicines and existing co-morbidity). The average co-payment that our group of women was willing to pay was between euro17 and euro35 per month, or euro24 to euro42 for women who were currently receiving treatment for symptoms of menopause. While interpreting the results, it should be considered that the hypothetical therapy was assumed to be a new non-reimbursable alternative to conventional therapy offered under the existing statutory framework for health insurance in Germany. Despite some methodological limitations, these results are useful for examining the factors affecting WTP and incremental utilities for future medicine

  12. Frequency of Symptoms and Health Seeking Behaviours of Menopausal Women in an Out-Patient Clinic in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Dienye, Paul Owajionyi; Judah, Funsho; Ndukwu, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the frequency and severity of menopausal symptoms and health seeking behaviour of women with menopausal symptoms attending the General Outpatient Department of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Method: This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study in which data was collected from menopausal women using a three-part, pre-tested questionnaire for a period of three months (July–September 2010). Part 1 consisted of information regarding socio-demographic and general medical information. Part 2 consisted of the modified version of the menopause rating scale (MRS). Part 3 sought for information on their health seeking behaviour. Data was analysed using EPI INFO version 6.04d software package. Results: A total of 385 women were recruited with ages ranging from 35 to 95 years, and a mean of 58.4 ± 10.39 years. The most prevalent menopausal symptoms were loss of libido (92.47%), muscle pain (87.53%), joint pain (85.45%) and tiredness (80.26%). Urinary symptoms had the least prevalence (7.79%). Results on the severity of menopausal symptoms showed that 28.25%, 49.84% and 21.9% were experiencing severe, moderate and mild menopausal symptoms, respectively. Loss of libido (79.21 %) was the most severe symptom followed by urinary symptoms (40%). The patent drug dealers were the most consulted (51.4%) followed by health workers (44.7%). The traditional healers were consulted by a small percentage (3.8%). Conclusion: The most common menopausal symptom among the patients in this study was loss of libido and the least common was urinary symptoms. The symptoms are similar to findings in other parts of the world but their prevalence and severity differ. In spite of the available health facilities in these communities, the utilization of the services of patent drug dealers is still very high but the traditional healers were poorly utilized. PMID:23777719

  13. Diabetes and Obesity as Independent Risk Factors for Osteoporosis: Updated Results from the ROIS/EMEROS Registry in a Population of Five Thousand Post-Menopausal Women Living in a Region Characterized by Heavy Environmental Pressure.

    PubMed

    Neglia, Cosimo; Argentiero, Alberto; Chitano, Giovanna; Agnello, Nadia; Ciccarese, Roberta; Vigilanza, Antonella; Pantile, Valerio; Argentiero, Domenico; Quarta, Raffaele; Rivezzi, Matteo; Di Tanna, Gian Luca; Di Somma, Carolina; Migliore, Alberto; Iolascon, Giovanni; Gimigliano, Francesca; Distante, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Prisco

    2016-11-01

    Objectives: We aimed to analyze bone mineralization and the effect of different risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Methods: We found 4909 postmenopausal subjects within ≥10,000 records from the ROIS/EMEROS (Ionian and Salento Osteoporosis Registry/Euro Mediterranean Registry of Osteoporosis) registry, a population study carried out in an area characterized by heavy environmental pressure between Brindisi and Taranto from 2009 to 2016. All subjects were assessed via phalangeal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) to evaluate their bone mineralization (assessed via amplitude dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS)) and the association between demineralization and the presence of other conditions or risk factors. Results: Mean age was 64 ± 9.5 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 28.7 ± 3.5 kg/m². Pearson correlation analyses revealed a negative association between bone mineralization (AD-SoS) and BMI (p < 0.001). By using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we observed significant values of odds ratios (ORs) of osteoporosis (adjusted for age, physical activity, and the use of drugs known to increase the risk of fractures) in subjects with diabetes and obesity: 1.39 (confidence interval (CI): 1.05-1.83) and 1.46 (CI: 1.20-1.78), respectively. A statistically significant linear trend of higher ORs of osteoporosis was found for increasing values of BMI. Conclusions: Our study confirmed the high impact of obesity and type 1 and type 2 diabetes on osteoporosis.

  14. The Availability of Beneficial Insects-originated Materials on Women's Health following Menopause.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sun Shin; Song, Ji Ae; Baek, Hyekyung; Hwang, Eunmi; Kim, Tae-Hee; Lee, Hye-Hyeog; Jun, Hyun Sik; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2015-12-01

    Human health problems due to long life are becoming major issues in society, and in particular greater interest collected on women's health after menopause. Many substances can be introduced to women's health, however, materials from the substances have not shown all of the safety and efficacy properties that are not easily found. Currently, it is known about the effects of the disease on the female insect-derived material that is capable of overcoming this problem significantly. When using the insect-derived material through the results of several studies suggest that it is possible to solve a hormonal imbalance and nutritional imbalance in the elderly. Here, we'd like to try to dissertate about the new trends for women's health improvement using novel materials-derived from insects.

  15. The Availability of Beneficial Insects-originated Materials on Women's Health following Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Sun Shin; Song, Ji Ae; Baek, Hyekyung; Hwang, Eunmi; Kim, Tae-Hee; Lee, Hye-Hyeog

    2015-01-01

    Human health problems due to long life are becoming major issues in society, and in particular greater interest collected on women's health after menopause. Many substances can be introduced to women's health, however, materials from the substances have not shown all of the safety and efficacy properties that are not easily found. Currently, it is known about the effects of the disease on the female insect-derived material that is capable of overcoming this problem significantly. When using the insect-derived material through the results of several studies suggest that it is possible to solve a hormonal imbalance and nutritional imbalance in the elderly. Here, we'd like to try to dissertate about the new trends for women's health improvement using novel materials-derived from insects. PMID:26793676

  16. Relationship between menopausal symptoms and sexual dysfunction among married Turkish women in 40-65 age group.

    PubMed

    Senturk Erenel, Ayten; Golbasi, Zehra; Kavlak, Tulay; Dilbaz, Serdar

    2015-10-01

    This was a cross-sectional study to analyse the relationship between menopausal symptoms and sexual dysfunction among 229 married Turkish women in the 40-65 age group. The study was carried out at a menopause clinic of a state hospital between 1 October and 31 December 2010. Data were collected with Personal Characteristics Form, Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) and the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX). The average age of the women was 52.33 (SD = 4.80) years. The average MRS total score was 20.13(SD = 9.20). The ASEX mean score was 19.97 (SD = 5.44). It was determined that there is a positive meaningful relationship between ASEX mean score, MRS total mean score and the sub-score of women. From the results obtained from this study, it can be said that women have differing levels of menopausal symptoms, and as the severity of menopausal symptoms increases, there is an increase in sexual dysfunction.

  17. Menopause, local biologies, and cultures of aging.

    PubMed

    Lock, M; Kaufert, P

    2001-01-01

    Menopause marks the end of menstruation, once generally accepted as the closure of women's reproductive lives. The current medical view of menopause, however, is as a pathological event with its own distinct set of symptoms and diseases. Researchers have described women as facing a dramatic increase in the risk of heart disease, osteoporosis, stroke, and Alzheimer's, all as the result of the impact of changing hormone levels, particularly the decline in estrogen. The clinical literature has interpreted these findings in terms of the absolute necessity of replacing these lost hormones for all women who are menopausal regardless of any other physiological, social, or cultural characteristic they might possess. Using research done in Japan, Canada, and the United States, this paper challenges the notion of a universal menopause by showing that both the symptoms reported at menopause and the post-menopause disease profiles vary from one study population to the next. For most of the symptoms commonly associated with menopause in the medical literature, rates are much lower for Japanese women than for women in the United States and Canada, although they are comparable to rates reported from studies in Thailand and China. Mortality and morbidity data from these same societies are used to show that post-menopausal women are also not equally at risk for heart disease, breast cancer, or osteoporosis. Rather than universality, the paper suggests that it is important to think in terms of "local biologies", which reflect the very different social and physical conditions of women's lives from one society to another.

  18. Diabetes and Obesity as Independent Risk Factors for Osteoporosis: Updated Results from the ROIS/EMEROS Registry in a Population of Five Thousand Post-Menopausal Women Living in a Region Characterized by Heavy Environmental Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Neglia, Cosimo; Argentiero, Alberto; Chitano, Giovanna; Agnello, Nadia; Ciccarese, Roberta; Vigilanza, Antonella; Pantile, Valerio; Argentiero, Domenico; Quarta, Raffaele; Rivezzi, Matteo; Di Tanna, Gian Luca; Di Somma, Carolina; Migliore, Alberto; Iolascon, Giovanni; Gimigliano, Francesca; Distante, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Prisco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to analyze bone mineralization and the effect of different risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Methods: We found 4909 postmenopausal subjects within ≥10,000 records from the ROIS/EMEROS (Ionian and Salento Osteoporosis Registry/Euro Mediterranean Registry of Osteoporosis) registry, a population study carried out in an area characterized by heavy environmental pressure between Brindisi and Taranto from 2009 to 2016. All subjects were assessed via phalangeal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) to evaluate their bone mineralization (assessed via amplitude dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS)) and the association between demineralization and the presence of other conditions or risk factors. Results: Mean age was 64 ± 9.5 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 28.7 ± 3.5 kg/m2. Pearson correlation analyses revealed a negative association between bone mineralization (AD-SoS) and BMI (p < 0.001). By using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we observed significant values of odds ratios (ORs) of osteoporosis (adjusted for age, physical activity, and the use of drugs known to increase the risk of fractures) in subjects with diabetes and obesity: 1.39 (confidence interval (CI): 1.05–1.83) and 1.46 (CI: 1.20–1.78), respectively. A statistically significant linear trend of higher ORs of osteoporosis was found for increasing values of BMI. Conclusions: Our study confirmed the high impact of obesity and type 1 and type 2 diabetes on osteoporosis. PMID:27809297

  19. Stress, menopausal status and nocturnal blood pressure dipping patterns among hypertensive women

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Faye S; McFetridge-Durdle, Judith A; Dean, CR

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A less than 10% decline in blood pressure during the night is known as a nondipping blood pressure (BP) pattern. Nondipping BP has been shown to be associated with target organ damage and poorer cardiovascular outcomes. Additionally, some evidence suggests that hypertensive nondipping women are at greater risk for target organ damage than hypertensive nondipping men. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether stress, demographics, menopausal status or sleep quality are associated with nondipping BP among hypertensive women. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was used to describe the relationship between stress and dipping status among a sample of hypertensive women and to describe the sample by age, ethnicity, marital status, menopausal status, current medications and sleep quality. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 47 women (mean [± SD] age 57±13.9 years) with essential or office hypertension who underwent 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring, and completed stress and sleep quality measurements. Thirty-one women (66%) were classified as dippers and 16 (34%) were classified as nondippers. Nondippers were older (P=0.04), postmenopausal (P=0.003) and had lower stress scores (P=0.02) than their dipper counterparts. Postmenopausal status significantly predicted nondipping (OR 16; 95% CI 1.9 to 136.4). CONCLUSION: These findings were of interest given that some women had a nondipping BP pattern and significantly lower stress scores. It is possible that there are fundamentally different physiological mechanisms that explain this nondipping phenomenon. In the future, the identification of specific hemodynamic mechanisms associated with nondipping could potentially influence the choice of antihypertensive treatment regimens for nondipper hypertensive patients. PMID:19536383

  20. Investigation of the relationship between personality characteristics and vasomotor symptoms in menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahboubeh; Azhari, Sedigheh; Esmaily, Habib Allah; GhanbariHashemabadi, Bahram Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research demonstrates that most of the menopausal symptoms and problems are the reflection of individual and social circumstances rather than the endocrine events of the menopause. As majority of women live 30 years or more through postmenopausal period, treatment and following up their problems during this period is among the main duties of a midwife. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between personality traits and vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women. Materials and Methods: This correlation study was conducted on 400 postmenopausal women referring to the training maternity centers of Mashhad, Iran. Subjects were selected through simple sampling method and filled NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI (questionnaire. Their daily records of hot flashes and night sweats were also collected. NEO-FFI questionnaire assesses the five personality aspects of neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, conscientiousness, and agreeableness. After the data were collected, they were analyzed by Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and linear regression statistical tests. P < 0.05 was considered as a statistically significant value. Results: Most of the women were in average level of personality traits. Among the aspects of personality traits, there was a significant correlation between intensity of hot flashes (P = 0.041) and night sweats (P = 0.028), and conscientiousness. Conclusions: According to the results of the study, during treatment of the vasomotor symptoms, a midwife should pay close attention to the personality of postmenopausal women to achieve an effective treatment. These women should also be referred to a psychologist, if needed. PMID:27563331

  1. Difference in Leukocyte Composition between Women before and after Menopausal Age, and Distinct Sexual Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang; Yang, Peixuan; Ye, Shu; Tan, Xuerui

    2016-01-01

    There are sex differences in many inflammatory and immune diseases, and the differences tend to diminish after menopause. The underlying reasons are unclear, but sex hormone levels are likely to be an important factor. Blood leukocyte count and composition provide an indicator of the inflammatory and immune status of an individual. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of blood leukocyte data from 46,879 individuals (26,212 men and 20,667 women, aged 18 to 93 years) who underwent a routine health checkup. In women aged around 50 years, neutrophil percentage (NE%) dropped whilst lymphocyte percentage (LY%) rose. Accordingly, women before age 50 had significantly higher NE%, lower LY%, and higher neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) than women of 51–70 years of age (p = 1.35×10−82, p = 5.32×10−100, and p = 1.25×10−26, respectively). In age groups of <50 years, women had higher NE%, lower LY% and higher NLR than men (p = 1.82×10−206, p = 1.46×10−69, and p = 2.30×10−118, respectively), whereas in age groups of >51 years, it was the reverse (p = 1.92×10−15, p = 1.43×10−84, and p = 1.51×10−48, respectively). These results show that blood leukocyte composition differs between women before and after menopausal age, with distinct sexual dimorphism. PMID:27657912

  2. An Evaluation of a Health Education Intervention for Mid-Aged Women: Five Year Follow-up of Effects upon Knowledge, Impact of Menopause and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Myra; O'Dea, Irene

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an evaluation of the long-term impact of a health education intervention for premenopausal women (N=86). Five years after the intervention questionnaire results showed that greater knowledge of menopause and fewer symptoms attributed to menopause. The evaluation was positive in terms of increasing knowledge and helping women to deal with…

  3. Telomere length and age-at-menopause in the US

    PubMed Central

    Shenassa, Edmond D.; Rossen, Lauren M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Age-at-menopause and leukocyte telomere length (LTL) are both associated with biologic aging. Therefore, it would be reasonable to hypothesize that LTL may also serve as a marker for reproductive aging as shorter LTL may be associated with earlier age-at-menopause. Methods We analyzed data from 799 post-menopausal (ages 41–85) participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2002), a nationally representative sample of U.S. women. Results Controlling for behavioral, socio-demographic, and health-related determinants of menopause, we found that among non-Hispanic white women, an increase of one standard deviation in LTL was associated with a 0.43 year higher reported age-at-menopause. Among Mexican–Americans, an increase of one standard deviation in LTL was associated with a 1.56 year earlier menopause. There was no significant association between LTL and age-at-menopause among non-Hispanic black women. Conclusions Our main finding is evidence of a strong interaction by race/ethnicity in the association between LTL and age-at-menopause. This evidence does not support the hypothesis that shorter LTL is a predictor of earlier age-at-menopause, as the magnitude and direction of the associations between LTL and age-at-menopause varied across racial/ethnic groups. PMID:26297686

  4. Perceived Control and Hot Flashes in Treatment-seeking Breast Cancer Survivors and Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Janet S.; Wu, Jingwei; Burns, Debra S.; Yu, Menggang

    2011-01-01

    Background Lower perceived control over hot flashes has been linked to fewer coping strategies, more catastrophizing, and greater hot flash severity and distress in midlife women; yet, this important concept has not yet been studied in breast cancer survivors. Objective To explore perceived control over hot flashes and hot flashes in breast cancer survivors compared to midlife women without cancer. Methods 99 survivors and 138 midlife women completed questionnaires and a prospective, electronic hot flash diary. All data were collected at a baseline assessment prior to randomization in a behavioral intervention study. Results Both groups had moderate perceived control over hot flashes. Control was not significantly related to hot flash frequency, but was significantly related to hot flash severity, bother, and interference in both groups. A significantly stronger association between control and hot flash interference was found for survivors than for mid-life women. Survivors using hot flash treatments perceived less control than survivors not using hot flash treatments, whereas the opposite was true in midlife women. Conclusions Findings extend our knowledge of perceived control over hot flashes in both survivors and midlife women. Implications for Practice Findings emphasize the importance of continued menopausal symptom assessment and management, support the importance of continuing nursing care even for survivors who are already using hot flash treatment, and suggest that nursing interventions aimed at improving perceived control over hot flashes may be more helpful for survivors than for midlife women. PMID:21946903

  5. Lisdexamfetamine Effects on Executive Activation and Neurochemistry in Menopausal Women with Executive Function Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Shanmugan, Sheila; Loughead, James; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Elliott, Mark; Hariharan, Hari; Appleby, Dina; Kim, Deborah; Ruparel, Kosha; Reddy, Ravinder; Brown, Thomas E; Epperson, C Neill

    2017-01-01

    Many women with no history of executive dysfunction report difficulties in this domain during the menopause transition. Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) has been suggested to be a safe and effective treatment option for these women. However, the mechanism by which LDX improves executive functioning in these women is not known. Here we investigated the effects of LDX on brain activation and neurochemistry, hypothesizing that LDX would be associated with increased activation and decreased glutamate in executive regions. Fourteen women underwent multimodal neuroimaging at 7T at three time points in this baseline-corrected, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Effects of LDX on symptom severity, blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) glutamate+glutamine (Glx) were measured using a clinician-administered questionnaire, fMRI during performance of a fractal n-back task, and (1)H-MRS, respectively. The effect of treatment (LDX minus baseline vs placebo minus baseline) on these behavioral and neural markers of executive function was examined using repeated measures mixed effects models. LDX treatment was associated with decreased symptom severity, increased activation in the insula and DLPFC, and decreased DLPFC Glx. In addition, the magnitude of LDX-induced improvement in symptom severity predicted both direction and magnitude of LDX-induced change in insular and DLPFC activation. Moreover, symptom severity was positively correlated with Glx concentration in the left DLPFC at baseline. These findings provide novel evidence that the neural mechanisms by which LDX acts to improve self-reported executive functioning in healthy menopausal women with midlife onset of executive difficulties include modulation of insular and DLPFC recruitment as well as decrease in DLPFC Glx concentration.

  6. Exercise through Menopause.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuhr, Robyn M.

    2002-01-01

    Menopause is associated with many different health effects and symptoms. This paper explains that regular exercise can play a critical role in protecting health and battling the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, pelvic floor atrophy, and joint stiffness associated with menopause. Exercise programs for menopausal women should…

  7. HDC gene polymorphisms are associated with age at natural menopause in Caucasian women

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Feng; Xiong Donghai; Wang Wei; Shen Hui; Xiao Peng; Yang Fang; Recker, Robert R.; Deng Hongwen . E-mail: dengh@umkc.edu

    2006-10-06

    Histidine decarboxylase gene (HDC) encodes histidine decarboxylase which is the crucial enzyme for the biosynthesis of histidine. Studies have shown that histamine is likely to be involved in the regulation of reproduction system. To find the possible correlation between HDC gene and AANM (age at natural menopause), we selected 265 postmenopausal women from 131 nuclear families and performed a transmission disequilibrium test. Significant within-family associations with AANM for SNP rs854163 and SNP rs854158 of HDC gene were observed (P values = 0.0018 and 0.0197, respectively). After 1000 permutations, SNP rs854163 still remained significant within-family association with AANM. Consistently, we also detected a significant within-family association between haplotype block 2 (defined by SNP rs854163 and rs860526) and AANM in the haplotype analyses (P value = 0.0397). Our results suggest that the HDC gene polymorphisms are significantly associated with AANM in Caucasian women.

  8. Depressive symptoms and bone mineral density in menopause and postmenopausal women: A still increasing and neglected problem

    PubMed Central

    Bener, Abdulbari; Saleh, Najah M.; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The association between depression and loss of bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported as controversial. Objective: The objectıve of the current study was to investigate whether an association exists between depression and low BMD during the menopausal and postmenopausal period. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was used to generate menopause symptoms experienced by Arabian women at the Primary Health Care Centers in Qatar. A multi-stage sampling design was used, and a representative sample of 1650 women aged 45–65 years were included during July 2012 and November 2013. This prospective study explored the association between bone density and major depressive disorder in women. Bone mineral densitometry measurements (BMD) (g/m2) were assessed at the BMD unit using a lunar prodigy DXA system (Lunar Corp., Madison, WI). Data on body mass index (BMI), clinical biochemistry variables including serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D were collected. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered for depression purposes. Results: Out of 1650 women 1182 women agreed to participate in the study (71.6%). The mean age and standard deviation (SD) of the menopausal age were 48.71 ± 2.96 with depressed and 50.20 ± 3.22 without depressed (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the mean and SD of postmenopausal age were 58.55 ± 3.27 with depression and 57.78 ± 3.20 without depression (P < 0.001). There were statistically significant differences between menopausal stages with regards to a number of parity, and place of living. There were statistically significant differences between menopausal stages with regards to BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, Vitamin D deficiency, calcium deficiency and shisha smoking habits. Overall, osteopenia and osteoporosis and bone loss were significantly lower in postmenopausal women than in menopausal women (P < 0.001). Similarly, T-score and Z-score were lower with depression menopause and postmenopausal women (P < 0

  9. Hormone therapy at early post-menopause increases cognitive control-related prefrontal activity

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Romuald; Météreau, Elise; Thomas, Julie; Pugeat, Michel; Qu, Chen; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Clinical data have been equivocal and controversial as to the benefits to the brain and cognition of hormone therapy (HT) in postmenopausal women. Recent reevaluation of the role of estrogens proposed that HT may effectively prevent the deleterious effects of aging on cognition, and reduces the risks of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, if initiated early at the beginning of menopause. Yet, little is known about the effects of HT on brain activation related to cognitive control, the ability to make flexible decisions in relation to internal goals. Here, we used fMRI to directly test for a modulation of sequential 17β estradiol (2 mg/day) plus oral progesterone (100 mg/day) on task switching-related brain activity in women at early postmenopause. The results showed that HT enhanced dorsolateral prefrontal cortex recruitment during task switching. Between-subjects correlation analyses revealed that women who engaged more the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex showed higher task switching performance after HT administration. These results suggest that HT, when taken early at the beginning of postmenopause, may have beneficial effect on cognitive control prefrontal mechanisms. Together, these findings demonstrate that HT can prevent the appearance of reduced prefrontal cortex activity, a neurophysiological measure observed both in healthy aging and early dementia. PMID:28322310

  10. Why Do Only Some Women Develop Post Menopausal Osteoporosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    RAGE-deficient mouse establishes an essential role for RAGE in diabetes related bone loss. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 340(4...explanation for bone fragility in aging, osteoporosis, and diabetes mellitus. Osteoporos Int, 21(2), 195-214. Turner, R.T., Vandersteenhoven, J.J

  11. Educational Approach to Menopausal Distress

    PubMed Central

    Stirtzinger, Ruth; Robinson, G. Erlick; Crawford, Belinda

    1992-01-01

    A brief menopause education workshop conducted by a psychiatrist and a gynecologist presented information on the physical, psychological, and sociocultural aspects of menopause. Before the course, 73% of participants were anxious about the menopause, and 54% felt a woman's body ceased functioning well at menopause. After the course, all the women felt less anxious, depressed, and irritable and more hopeful about themselves. PMID:21221255

  12. Influence of menopause on adipose tissue clock gene genotype and its relationship with metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Menopausal women exhibit a loss of circadian coordination, a process that runs parallel with a redistribution of adipose tissue. However, the specific genetic mechanisms underlying these alterations have not been studied. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine whether the development of...

  13. Acute stress alters autonomic modulation during sleep in women approaching menopause

    PubMed Central

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Sugarbaker, David; Trinder, John; Colrain, Ian M.; Baker, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Hot flashes, hormones, and psychosocial factors contribute to insomnia risk in the context of the menopausal transition. Stress is a well-recognized factor implicated in the pathophysiology of insomnia; however the impact of stress on sleep and sleep-related processes in perimenopausal women remains largely unknown. We investigated the effect of an acute experimental stress (impending Trier Social Stress Task in the morning) on presleep measures of cortisol and autonomic arousal in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia that developed in the context of the menopausal transition. In addition, we assessed the macro- and micro-structure of sleep and autonomic functioning during sleep. Following adaptation to the laboratory, twenty two women with (age: 50.4 ± 3.2 y) and eighteen women without (age: 48.5±2.3 y) insomnia had two randomized in-lab overnight recordings: baseline and stress nights. Anticipation of the task resulted in higher pre-sleep salivary cortisol levels and perceived tension, faster heart rate and lower vagal activity, based on heart rate variability measures, in both groups of women. The effect of the stress manipulation on the autonomic nervous system extended into the first four hours of the night in both groups. However, vagal tone recovered four-six hours into the stress night in controls but not in the insomnia group. Sleep macrostructure was largely unaltered by the stress, apart from a delayed latency to REM sleep in both groups. Quantitative analysis of non-rapid eye movement sleep microstructure revealed greater electroencephalographic (EEG) power in the beta1 range (15-≤23Hz), reflecting greater EEG arousal during sleep, on the stress night compared to baseline, in the insomnia group. Hot flash frequency remained similar on both nights for both groups. These results show that presleep stress impacts autonomic nervous system functioning before and during sleep in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia. Findings also

  14. Acute stress alters autonomic modulation during sleep in women approaching menopause.

    PubMed

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Sugarbaker, David; Trinder, John; Colrain, Ian M; Baker, Fiona C

    2016-04-01

    Hot flashes, hormones, and psychosocial factors contribute to insomnia risk in the context of the menopausal transition. Stress is a well-recognized factor implicated in the pathophysiology of insomnia; however the impact of stress on sleep and sleep-related processes in perimenopausal women remains largely unknown. We investigated the effect of an acute experimental stress (impending Trier Social Stress Task in the morning) on pre-sleep measures of cortisol and autonomic arousal in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia that developed in the context of the menopausal transition. In addition, we assessed the macro- and micro-structure of sleep and autonomic functioning during sleep. Following adaptation to the laboratory, twenty two women with (age: 50.4 ± 3.2 years) and eighteen women without (age: 48.5 ± 2.3 years) insomnia had two randomized in-lab overnight recordings: baseline and stress nights. Anticipation of the task resulted in higher pre-sleep salivary cortisol levels and perceived tension, faster heart rate and lower vagal activity, based on heart rate variability measures, in both groups of women. The effect of the stress manipulation on the autonomic nervous system extended into the first 4 h of the night in both groups. However, vagal tone recovered 4-6 h into the stress night in controls but not in the insomnia group. Sleep macrostructure was largely unaltered by the stress, apart from a delayed latency to REM sleep in both groups. Quantitative analysis of non-rapid eye movement sleep microstructure revealed greater electroencephalographic (EEG) power in the beta1 range (15-≤23 Hz), reflecting greater EEG arousal during sleep, on the stress night compared to baseline, in the insomnia group. Hot flash frequency remained similar on both nights for both groups. These results show that pre-sleep stress impacts autonomic nervous system functioning before and during sleep in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia. Findings also indicate

  15. Nutrition of women with hair loss problem during the period of menopause

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During the period of menopause as an effect of changes in hormone status, one of the most common ailments for women is hair loss. Taking into consideration fact that the ingredients of diet contained in various groups of consumed food products are both precursors in steroid hormones synthesis as well as have direct impact on structure, growth and keeping hair in skin integument, this is the reason why nourishing support for women during this period of life as well as during the hair loss therapy is reasonable. Standard value proteins containing Sulphur amino-acids: cysteine and methionine as precursor to keratin hair protein synthesis are basic element of diet conditioning of hair building. Irreplaceable having impact on keeping hair in skin integument is exogenous L-lysine, mainly present in the inner part of hair root is responsible for hair shape and volume. Fats present in the diet take part in steroid hormones synthesis (from cholesterol) thus have influence on keeping hair in skin integument. Women diet should contain products rich in complex carbohydrates, with low glycemic index and load containing fiber regulating carbohydrate-lipid metabolism of the body. Vitamins also have impact on the state of hair: C vitamin, group B and A vitamins. Minerals which influence hair growth are: Zn, Fe, Cu, Se, Si, Mg and Ca. It is worthwhile to pay closer attention to diet in women who besides hormone changes and undertaken pharmacotherapy are additionally exposed to chronic stress and improperly conducted cosmetic's and hairdresser's treatments. PMID:27095961

  16. Nutrition of women with hair loss problem during the period of menopause.

    PubMed

    Goluch-Koniuszy, Zuzanna Sabina

    2016-03-01

    During the period of menopause as an effect of changes in hormone status, one of the most common ailments for women is hair loss. Taking into consideration fact that the ingredients of diet contained in various groups of consumed food products are both precursors in steroid hormones synthesis as well as have direct impact on structure, growth and keeping hair in skin integument, this is the reason why nourishing support for women during this period of life as well as during the hair loss therapy is reasonable. Standard value proteins containing Sulphur amino-acids: cysteine and methionine as precursor to keratin hair protein synthesis are basic element of diet conditioning of hair building. Irreplaceable having impact on keeping hair in skin integument is exogenous L-lysine, mainly present in the inner part of hair root is responsible for hair shape and volume. Fats present in the diet take part in steroid hormones synthesis (from cholesterol) thus have influence on keeping hair in skin integument. Women diet should contain products rich in complex carbohydrates, with low glycemic index and load containing fiber regulating carbohydrate-lipid metabolism of the body. Vitamins also have impact on the state of hair: C vitamin, group B and A vitamins. Minerals which influence hair growth are: Zn, Fe, Cu, Se, Si, Mg and Ca. It is worthwhile to pay closer attention to diet in women who besides hormone changes and undertaken pharmacotherapy are additionally exposed to chronic stress and improperly conducted cosmetic's and hairdresser's treatments.

  17. Electrocardiograms of Menopausal Women With Coronary Heart Disease or at Increased Risk for Its Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Nanette K.; Mischke, Jennifer M.; Schroeder, Rolf; Schroeder, Klaus; Collins, Peter; Grady, Deborah; Kornitzer, Marcel; Mosca, Lori; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about electrocardiographic (ECG) characteristics of menopausal women with or at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Data from 10,101 participants in the Raloxifene Use for The Heart (RUTH) trial were used to correlate baseline ECG abnormalities with clinical characteristics. Baseline characteristics that were statistically significantly associated (p ≤ 0.05) with ECG findings in univariate analyses were used to derive multivariate model selection. Of 59% normal electrocardiograms, 50% were from women with CHD and 69% from women at increased risk of CHD. In the women with CHD, 59% reported a previous myocardial infarction (MI); 43% had a normal electrocardiogram, and 49% had a definite ECG Q-wave MI. Women in the increased-risk group had not reported a previous MI, yet 11% had a definite ECG Q-wave MI. Of women reporting hypertension, 35% had ECG evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy, but 58% did not have an abnormal electrocardiogram. Significantly more women with diabetes in the increased-risk and documented CHD cohorts had abnormal electrocardiograms (p < 0.01 for the 2 cohorts). Percent abnormal electrocardiograms increased with increasing age (55 to 64, 65 to 74, and ≥75 years, p < 0.01) in all cohorts. Angina and coronary artery bypass graft surgery, but not percutaneous coronary intervention, predicted an abnormal electrocardiogram. In conclusion, there were high percentages of normal electrocardiograms in the increased-risk and documented CHD groups of RUTH participants, with substantial discrepancy between MI history and ECG MI documentation, and increasing age was the predominant correlate with an abnormal electrocardiogram in all 3 cohorts. PMID:21094358

  18. Position of the Spanish Menopause Society regarding vaginal health care in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borrego, Rafael; Manubens, Montserrat; Navarro, Maria Concepción; Cancelo, Ma Jesús; Beltrán, Estanislao; Duran, Magda; Orte, Teresa; Baquedano, Laura; Palacios, Santiago; Mendoza, Nicolás

    2014-06-01

    Vaginal health, defined as the vaginal state in which the physiological condition remains stable, being protected from the onset of symptoms and facilitating a satisfying sex life, is one of the most common and less valued concerns in postmenopausal women. Many of the conditions that affect the vagina are related to its trophism and susceptibility to infection by unusual germs, which are phenomena strongly influenced by estrogen impregnation and the microbiota composition, ultimately affecting sexuality and the quality of life. An expert panel of the Spanish Menopause Society met to establish criteria for diagnosing and treating the processes that affect overall vaginal health and to decide the optimal timing and methods based on the best evidence available.

  19. Dermatosis associated with menopause

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A.

    2014-01-01

    Menopause is defined as permanent irreversible cessation of menses brought by decline in ovarian follicular activity. Hormonal alteration results in various physical, psychological, and sexual changes in menopausal women. Associated dermatological problems can be classified as physiological changes, age-related changes, changes due to estrogen deficiency and due to hormone replacement therapy. Dermatosis seen due to estrogen deficiency includes Atrophic Vulvovaginitis, Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus, Dyaesthetic Vulvodynia, Hirsutism, Alopecia, Menopausal Flushing, Keratoderma Climactericum, Vulvovaginal Candidiasis. Dermatologists and gynecologists need to be familiar with the problems of menopausal women, as with increase in life expectancy, women passing through this phase is rising. PMID:25540566

  20. Design and baseline characteristics of the soy phytoestrogens as replacement estrogen (SPARE) study--a clinical trial of the effects of soy isoflavones in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Levis, Silvina; Strickman-Stein, Nancy; Doerge, Daniel R; Krischer, Jeffrey

    2010-07-01

    Following the results of the Women's Health Initiative, many women now decline estrogen replacement at the time of menopause and seek natural remedies that would treat menopausal symptoms and prevent bone loss and other long-term consequences of estrogen deficiency, but without adverse effects on the breast, uterus, and cardiovascular system. The results of most soy studies in this population have had limitations because of poor design, small sample size, or short duration. This report describes the study rationale, design, and procedures of the Soy Phytoestrogens As Replacement Estrogen (SPARE) study, which was designed to determine the efficacy of soy isoflavones in preventing spinal bone loss and menopausal symptoms in the initial years of menopause. Women ages 45 to 60 without osteoporosis and within 5 years from menopause were randomized to receive soy isoflavones 200mg daily or placebo for 2 years. Participants have yearly measurements of spine and hip bone density, urinary phytoestrogens, and serum lipids, thyroid stimulating hormone, and estradiol. Menopausal symptoms, mood changes, depression, and quality of life are assessed annually. The SPARE study recruited 283 women, 66.1% were Hispanic white. With a large cohort, long duration, and large isoflavone dose, this trial will provide important, relevant, and currently unavailable information on the benefits of purified soy isoflavones in the prevention of bone loss and menopausal symptoms in the first 5 years of menopause. Given the high proportion of Hispanics participating in the study, the results of this trial will also be applicable to this minority group.

  1. Menopause as a long-term risk to health: implications of general practitioner accounts of prevention for women's choice and decision-making.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Madeleine J; Hepworth, Julie

    2003-03-01

    Over the past two decades medical researchers and modernist feminist researchers have contested the meaning of menopause. In this article we examine various meanings of menopause in major medical and feminist literature and the construction of menopause in a semi-structured interview study of general practitioners in rural South Australia. Three discursive themes are identified in these interviews; (i) .the hormonal menopause - symptoms, risk, prevention; (ii). the informed menopausal woman; and (iii). decision-making and hormone replacement therapy. By using the discourse of prevention, general practitioners construct menopause in relation to women's health care choices, empowerment and autonomy. We argue that the ways in which these concepts are deployed by general practitioners in this study produces and constrains the options available to women. The implications of these general practitioner accounts are discussed in relation to the proposition that medical and feminist descriptions of menopause posit alternative but equally-fixed truths about menopause and their relationship with the range of responses available to women at menopause. Social and cultural explanations of disease causality (c.f. Germov 1998, Hardey 1998) are absent from the new menopause despite their being an integral part of the framework of the women's health movement and health promotion drawn on by these general practitioners. Further, the shift of responsibility for health to the individual woman reinforces practice claims to empower women, but oversimplifies power relations and constructs menopause as a site of self-surveillance. The use of concepts from the women's health movement and health promotion have nevertheless created change in both the positioning of women as having 'choices' and the positioning of some general practitioners in terms of greater information provision to women and an attention to the woman's autonomy. In conclusion, we propose that a new menopause has evolved

  2. [History and poetry in women's biological twilight: menopause and old age].

    PubMed

    Cruz y Hermida, Julio

    2011-01-01

    This is a poetical and historical approach to the last biological stages of the evolutive development of women, namely menopause and old age. It starts with the passages found in Egyptian Papirii such as Ebers or Smith, dated 1500-2000 BC, which describe, among other symptoms, the sweating and hig body temperatures caused by the diminishing hormon secretion of the ovaries. Other important works on the subject, some of them written in the 20th century and some others composed before that date, are also quoted, such as the Edad Crítica (Critical Age) by Dr. Marañon. The final stage of a woman's life, old age, is presented through the famous sonet "Alfa y Omega" (Alpha and Omega) by poet Manuel Machado. Using poetical strokes, the author conveys an image of the many phisiopatological consequences of old age in women: osteoporosis, genital prolapse, urine incontinence and "wrinkles" ("old age is neither shown by white hair nor by wrinkles but by the heart"). The work finishes with the famous statement uttered by Napoleon Bona-parte: "God wanted to be a writer: Man is His prose; His poetry, Women". The same poetry that Dr. Cruz y Hermida has found through the complexities of the evolutive process of feminine biology.

  3. Comparison of SCORE-predicted risk of death due to cardiovascular events in women before and after menopause

    PubMed Central

    Brzostek, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 55% of women in Europe die from cardiovascular events, mostly as a result of coronary diseases and cerebral stroke. There is a 10-year shift in the cardiovascular risk between women and men. The risk in a 55-year-old female patient is similar to that of a 45-year-old man, thus the risk among women increases rapidly around the age of 50, when menopause prevails to occur. The purpose of the study was to assess and compare the SCORE-predicted risk of a fatal cardiovascular incident in pre- and postmenopausal women. Material and methods The cross-sectional study was conducted as part of community nursing practice. It covered 219 women – inhabitants of Krakow, aged from 30 to 65, without clinically validated cardiovascular diseases of arteriosclerotic and/or diabetic origin, who volunteered to take part in the study. The group was divided into three subgroups: K1 – menstruating women (n = 113), K2a – women after natural menopause (n = 88), and K2b – women after surgical menopause (n = 18). The study made use of a lifestyle questionnaire, which concerned the social and economic status, and lifestyle habits including tobacco smoking. Arterial blood pressure was measured, and total cholesterol concentration in blood (mmol/l) was recorded. Results A high (≥ 5%) level of the SCORE risk was discovered in 14.3% of postmenopausal women, as compared to 0.9% in the group of menstruating women. An average risk of a fatal cardiovascular incident during the following 10 years was significantly higher among women from groups K2a (2.61%) and K2b (2.32%) as compared to K1 – menstruating women (0.38%). No difference was, however, discovered between groups of naturally (K2a) and surgically menopausal women (K2b). Conclusions A significantly higher risk of SCORE-predicted death caused by a cardiovascular incident, as compared to the group of women in the premenopausal period, is characteristic of women in the postmenopausal period. PMID:26528104

  4. Effects of 8-week Pilates exercise program on menopausal symptoms and lumbar strength and flexibility in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haelim; Caguicla, Joy Matthew Cuasay; Park, Sangseo; Kwak, Dong Jick; Won, Deuk-Yeon; Park, Yunjin; Kim, Jeeyoun; Kim, Myungki

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week Pilates exercise program on menopausal symptoms and lumbar strength and flexibility in postmenopausal women. In total, 74 postmenopausal women were recruited and randomly allocated to a Pilates exercise group (n=45) and a control group (n=29). Menopausal symptoms were measured through a questionnaire, while lumbar strength was measured through a lumbar extension machine, and lumbar flexibility was measured through sit-and-reach and trunk lift tests performed before and after the Pilates exercise program, respectively. The Pilates exercises consisted of 7-10 min for warm-up, 35-40 min for the main program modified from Pilates Academy International, and 5-7 min for the cool-down, and were performed 3 times a week for 8 weeks. The results showed a significant decrease in menopausal symptoms except urogenital symptoms. Also, the results presented a significant increase in lumbar strength and flexibility after 8 weeks of the Pilates exercise program. We concluded that an 8-week Pilates exercise program is effective in decreasing menopausal symptoms and increasing lumbar strength and flexibility.

  5. Effects of 8-week Pilates exercise program on menopausal symptoms and lumbar strength and flexibility in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haelim; Caguicla, Joy Matthew Cuasay; Park, Sangseo; Kwak, Dong Jick; Won, Deuk-Yeon; Park, Yunjin; Kim, Jeeyoun; Kim, Myungki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week Pilates exercise program on menopausal symptoms and lumbar strength and flexibility in postmenopausal women. In total, 74 postmenopausal women were recruited and randomly allocated to a Pilates exercise group (n=45) and a control group (n=29). Menopausal symptoms were measured through a questionnaire, while lumbar strength was measured through a lumbar extension machine, and lumbar flexibility was measured through sit-and-reach and trunk lift tests performed before and after the Pilates exercise program, respectively. The Pilates exercises consisted of 7–10 min for warm-up, 35–40 min for the main program modified from Pilates Academy International, and 5–7 min for the cool-down, and were performed 3 times a week for 8 weeks. The results showed a significant decrease in menopausal symptoms except urogenital symptoms. Also, the results presented a significant increase in lumbar strength and flexibility after 8 weeks of the Pilates exercise program. We concluded that an 8-week Pilates exercise program is effective in decreasing menopausal symptoms and increasing lumbar strength and flexibility. PMID:27419122

  6. P17 - Early Menopause Influences Osteopenic or Osteoporotic Status in Postmenopausal Women: Preliminary Results from the Prof Project

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, P.; Rigliano, V.; Neglia, C.; Chitano, G.; Argentiero, A.; Paladini, D.; Mundi, S.; Paladini, L.; Greco, M.; Girasoli, C.; Gianicolo, M. E.; Pantile, V.; Argentiero, D.; De Padova, G.; Nibio, L.; Pansa, L.; Di Giuseppe, P.; Minosi, A.; Cirasino, L.; Laselva, G.; Scialpi, M.; D’Angela, D.; Benvenuto, M.; Brandi, M. L.; Distante, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: There is evidence that demographic trends in Southern Apulia are characterised by a huge proportion of elderly people relative to the general population, resulting in an ageing index which is higher than that recorded in other Southern Italian regions and/or sub-regions. Within the PROF (Prevention of Osteoporotic Fractures) project, which aims to foster synergistic efforts between researchers and clinicians, we investigated the correlation between early menopause and osteopenic or osteoporotic status in postmenopausal women by quantitative bone ultrasound evaluation (QUS). Methods: In a period of almost six years (2004–2010), 5665 postmenopausal women (mean age 55, ranging from 39 to 84) were screened by QUS at either the heel or the phalanx. Demographic and anamnestic data were recorded for all the patients, including BMI, nutrition, menopause, physical activity, previous fractures, familial fragility fractures. Three categories of demineralisation were identified: a) Demineralisation, when any T-score <−1.0 SD was observed; b) Severe demineralisation, whenever a T-score <−2.0 was observed, corresponding to a higher risk of fracture; c) Osteoporosis, whenever a T-score <−2.5±0.2 (for the heel) or T-score <−3.2±0.2 (for the phalanx) was observed. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed in order to assess the correlation between early menopause (<45 years of age) and the osteopenic or osteoporotic status of the patients. Results: Of the 5665 subjects examined overall, demineralisation was observed in 4487 subjects (79%), with severe osteopenia or osteoporotic status being documented in 2823 women (50%) and frank osteoporotic status in 846 (15%). In total, of 1169 women reporting an early menopause, 937 showed demineralisation corresponding to at least an osteopenic status (80%). In 605 of these patients (65%), there was a severe osteopenic or osteoporotic status, while 182 women experiencing an early menopause were found to be frankly

  7. Age- and menopause-related differences in physiological factors of health quality in women aged 35-60.

    PubMed

    Wiacek, Magdalena; Jegal, Bo Seul; Hagner, Wojciech; Hagner-Derengowska, Magdalena; Zubrzycki, Igor Z

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate using time series analysis age and menopause induced differences in selected health quality related physiological factors. The study was conducted, using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), and the NHANES 1999-2002 data, on women aged 35-60. Subjects who had not had surgical menopause, did not use contraceptives, did not smoke, and did not breastfeed during the examination, and did not use contraception and for whom follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone (LH) activity was assessed, were included in the study. Menopausal status was defined by months since the last period (<2, 2-12, and >12 months for pre-, peri-, and postmenopause, respectively). The results indicate that postmenopausal women, aged less than 45, are characterized by a decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP), an increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, and a decrease in triglyceride (TG) levels. It was also determined that aging is the main factor leading to physiological variability in systolic blood pressure and high density lipoprotein levels, in pre- and perimenopausal women, and in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activity in peri- and postmenopausal women.

  8. Effects of red clover on hot flash and circulating hormone concentrations in menopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfarpour, Masumeh; Sadeghi, Ramin; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Mirzaii Najmabadi, Khadijeh; mousavi bazaz, Mojtaba; abdolahian, Somayeh; Khadivzadeh, Talat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To critically evaluate the effect of red clover on hot flash, endometrial thickness, and hormones status in postmenopausal and peri- and post-menopausal women. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE (1966 to July 2014), Scopus (1990 to July 2014), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library issue 1, 2014) were searched for published randomized controlled Trials (RCTs). Results: Of 183 relevant publication trials, 11 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The mean hot flashes frequency in red clover was lower than the control groups (MD -1.99; p=0.067). There was larger decrease in FSH (SMD -0.812; CI: -1.93 to 0.312; p=0.157) and SHBG (SMD -0.128; CI-0.425 to 0.170; P=0.4) in red clover group, compared with placebo, which was not however statistically significant. LH (SMD 0.144; CI-0.097 to 0.384, p=0.242), estradiol (SMD 0.240; CI-0.001 to 0.482, p=0.051), testosterone (MD 0.083; CI: -0.560 to 0.726; p=0.901), and endometrial thickness (SDM 0.022; CI: -0.380 to 0.424, p=0.915) showed greater increase in red clover, compared with placebo, although the effect of estradiol was only significant. Conclusion: Red clover had a positive effect of alleviating hot flash in menopausal women. Our data, however, suggested very slight changes in FSH, LH, testosterone, and SHBG and significant effect in estrogen status by red clover consumption. However, the interpretation of results of the current study is limited due to methodological flaws of the included studies, menopause status, and large heterogeneity among them. Further trials are still needed to confirm the current finding. PMID:26693407

  9. A comparative study on the effects of Hypericum Perforatum and passion flower on the menopausal symptoms of women referring to Isfahan city health care centers

    PubMed Central

    Fahami, Fariba; Asali, Zahra; Aslani, Abolfazl; Fathizadeh, Nahid

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With regard to an increase in the life expectancy for women and the consistency of the menopause age, a significant portion of women's age is passed after the menopause. Menopause is considered as a critical and sensitive period due to the changes and the disorders that are involved in it. Vasomotor symptoms, sleep disorders and psycho-mental changes are among the most prevalent symptoms of this period. Hormone therapy is a common treatment and it involves some problems for most individuals. The purpose of this study was to comparatively examine the effects of two herbal medications, Hypericum Perforatum and Passion Flower, on menopause symptoms. METHODS: This study was of a clinical-experimental type which was done in 1388 in Isfahan. The sample included 59 menopausal women who had the conditions for entering into the study. The individuals were selected via simple sampling and were assigned randomly into two groups of Hypericum Perforatum treatment group (30 women) and Passion Flower group (29 women). The required data were filled out through interview, Personal Characteristics Questionnaire, and Cooperman's Index for menopause symptoms in three stages of pre-intervention, the third week of intervention, and the sixth week of intervention. The results were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistical methods and the statistical software of SPSS. RESULTS: The findings showed that the average score of menopause symptoms in two treatment groups of Hypericum Perforatum and Passion Flower had a significant decrease throughout the third and the sixth weeks of study (p < 0.05). In addition, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups and both herbs equally resulted in a decrease in the menopause symptoms scores (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: With regard to the effects of Hypericum Perforatum and Passion Flower on treating menopause precocious symptoms (vasomotor signs, insomnia, depression, anger, headache, etc.), these two

  10. Mind-body interventions for vasomotor symptoms in healthy menopausal women and breast cancer survivors. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stefanopoulou, Evgenia; Grunfeld, Elizabeth Alice

    2016-11-11

    Mind-body therapies are commonly recommended to treat vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweats (HFNS). The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the available evidence to date for the efficacy of different mind-body therapies to alleviate HFNS in healthy menopausal women and breast cancer survivors. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified using seven electronic search engines, direct searches of specific journals and backwards searches through reference lists of related publications. Outcome measures included HFNS frequency and/or severity or self-reported problem rating at post-treatment. The methodological quality of all studies was systematically assessed using predefined criteria. Twenty-six RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Interventions included yoga (n = 5), hypnosis (n = 3), mindfulness (n = 2), relaxation (n = 7), paced breathing (n = 4), reflexology (n = 1) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) (n = 4). Findings were consistent for the effectiveness of CBT and relaxation therapies for alleviating troublesome vasomotor symptoms. For the remaining interventions, although some trials indicated beneficial effects (within groups) at post-treatment and/or follow up, between group findings were mixed and overall, methodological differences across studies failed to provide convincing supporting evidence. Collectively, findings suggest that interventions that include breathing and relaxation techniques, as well as CBT, can be beneficial for alleviating vasomotor symptoms. Additional large, methodologically rigorous trials are needed to establish the efficacy of interventions on vasomotor symptoms, examine long-term outcomes and understand how they work.

  11. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    PubMed Central

    Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26327890

  12. Metabolic disorders in menopause.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, Grzegorz; Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance - IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus - T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  13. Impact of oral ibandronate 150 mg once monthly on bone structure and density in post-menopausal osteoporosis or osteopenia derived from in vivo μCT.

    PubMed

    Bock, Oliver; Börst, Hendrikje; Beller, Gisela; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Degner, Corina; Martus, Peter; Roth, Heinz-Jürgen; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ibandronate 150 mg/once monthly in the treatment of post-menopausal osteopenia and osteoporosis on bone micro-structure at the distal tibia and radius has not been considered to date. Seventy post-menopausal women with osteoporosis or osteopenia were recruited. All subjects received calcium and vitamin D supplementation and were randomized to either a group which took 150 mg ibandronate oral monthly or a placebo group over a 12-month period. μCT measures of the distal tibia and radius were conducted every three months, with DXA lumbar spine and hip measurements conducted only pre and post and serum markers of bone formation and resorption measured every 6 months. After 12-months no significant impact of ibandronate on the primary outcome measures bone-volume to tissue-volume and trabecular separation at the distal tibia (p≥0.15) was found. Further multiple regression analyses of the primary end-points indicated a significant effect favoring the ibandronate intervention (p=0.045). Analysis of secondary end-points showed greater increases in distal tibia cortical thickness, cortical density and total density (p≤0.043) with ibandronate and no significant effects at the distal radius, but greater increases of hip DXA-BMD and lumbar spine DXA-BMD (p≤0.017). Ibandronate use resulted in a marked reduction in bone turnover (p<0.001). While ibandronate resulted in greater mineralization of bone, this effect differed from one body region to another. There was some impact of ibandronate on bone structure (cortical thickness) at the distal tibia, but not on bone-volume to tissue-volume or trabecular separation.

  14. The Risk of Being Obese According to Short Sleep Duration Is Modulated after Menopause in Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    Doo, Miae; Kim, Yangha

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that women with short sleep duration consumed more dietary carbohydrate and showed an increased risk for obesity compared to those who slept adequately, but not for men. Using a cross-sectional study of 17,841 Korean women, we investigated the influence of sleep duration on obesity-related variables and consumption of dietary carbohydrate-rich foods in relation to menopausal status. Premenopausal women with short sleep duration had significantly greater body weight (p = 0.007), body mass index (p = 0.003), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p = 0.028 and p = 0.024, respectively), prevalence of obesity (p < 0.016), and consumption of more carbohydrate-rich foods such as staple foods (p = 0.026) and simple sugar-rich foods (p = 0.044) than those with adequate sleep duration after adjustment for covariates. Premenopausal women with short sleep duration were more obese by 1.171 times compared to subjects adequate sleep duration (95% confidence interval = 1.030–1.330). However, obesity-related variables, dietary consumption, and odds of being obese did not differ according to sleep duration for postmenopausal women. The findings suggest that the increased risk for obesity and consumption of dietary carbohydrate-rich foods with short sleep duration appeared to disappear after menopause in Korean women. PMID:28264442

  15. The Risk of Being Obese According to Short Sleep Duration Is Modulated after Menopause in Korean Women.

    PubMed

    Doo, Miae; Kim, Yangha

    2017-02-27

    We previously reported that women with short sleep duration consumed more dietary carbohydrate and showed an increased risk for obesity compared to those who slept adequately, but not for men. Using a cross-sectional study of 17,841 Korean women, we investigated the influence of sleep duration on obesity-related variables and consumption of dietary carbohydrate-rich foods in relation to menopausal status. Premenopausal women with short sleep duration had significantly greater body weight (p = 0.007), body mass index (p = 0.003), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p = 0.028 and p = 0.024, respectively), prevalence of obesity (p < 0.016), and consumption of more carbohydrate-rich foods such as staple foods (p = 0.026) and simple sugar-rich foods (p = 0.044) than those with adequate sleep duration after adjustment for covariates. Premenopausal women with short sleep duration were more obese by 1.171 times compared to subjects adequate sleep duration (95% confidence interval = 1.030-1.330). However, obesity-related variables, dietary consumption, and odds of being obese did not differ according to sleep duration for postmenopausal women. The findings suggest that the increased risk for obesity and consumption of dietary carbohydrate-rich foods with short sleep duration appeared to disappear after menopause in Korean women.

  16. Coconut oil predicts a beneficial lipid profile in pre-menopausal women in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Feranil, Alan B.; Duazo, Paulita L.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Adair, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Coconut oil is a common edible oil in many countries, and there is mixed evidence for its effects on lipid profiles and cardiovascular disease risk. Here we examine the association between coconut oil consumption and lipid profiles in a cohort of 1,839 Filipino women (age 35–69 years) participating in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey, a community based study in Metropolitan Cebu City. Coconut oil intake was measured as individual coconut oil intake calculated using two 24-hour dietary recalls (9.54 ± 8.92 grams). Cholesterol profiles were measured in plasma samples collected after an overnight fast. Mean lipid values in this sample were total cholesterol (TC) (186.52 ± 38.86 mg/dL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) (40.85 ± 10.30 mg/dL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) (119.42 ± 33.21 mg/dL), triglycerides (130.75 ± 85.29 mg/dL) and the TC/HDL ratio (4.80 ± 1.41). Linear regression models were used to estimate the association between coconut oil intake and each plasma lipid outcome after adjusting for total energy intake, age, body mass index (BMI), number of pregnancies, education, menopausal status, household assets and urban residency. Dietary coconut oil intake was positively associated with HDL-c levels. PMID:21669587

  17. Menopause and Methodological Doubt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Menopause and methodological doubt begins by making a tongue-in-cheek comparison between Descartes' methodological doubt and the self-doubt that can arise around menopause. A hermeneutic approach is taken in which Cartesian dualism and its implications for the way women are viewed in society are examined, both through the experiences of women…

  18. Relationships between menstrual and menopausal attitudes and associated demographic and health characteristics: The Hilo Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Lynnette L.; Brown, Daniel E.; Rahberg, Nichole; Reza, Angela

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relation of menstrual attitudes to menopausal attitudes and the demographic and health characteristics associated with each. This cross-sectional study consisted of a randomly selected sample of 1824 respondents aged 16 to 100 years in multi-ethnic Hilo, Hawai`i. Women completed questionnaires for demographic and health information, such as age, ethnicity, education, residency in Hawai`i, menopausal status, exercise, and attitudes toward menstruation and menopause. Women more often chose positive terms, such as “natural,” to describe menstruation (60.8%) and menopause (59.4%). In bivariate analyses, post-menopausal women were significantly more likely to have positive menstrual and menopausal attitudes than pre-menopausal women. Factor analyses were used to cluster attitudes followed by linear regression to identify demographic characteristics associated with factor scores. Asian-American ethnicity, higher education, reporting more exercise, and growing up outside of Hawai`i were associated with positive menstrual attitudes. Higher education, older age, post-menopausal status, growing up outside of Hawai`i and having hot flashes were associated with positive menopausal attitudes. Bivariate correlation analyses suggested significant associations between factor scores for menstrual and menopausal attitudes. Both negative and positive menstrual attitudes were positively correlated with the anticipation of menopause, although negative attitudes toward menstruation were negatively correlated with menopause as a positive, natural life event. Demographic variables, specifically education and where one grows up, influenced women’s attitudes toward menstruation and menopause and should be considered for inclusion in subsequent multi-ethnic studies. Further research is also warranted in assessing the relationship between menstrual and menopausal attitudes. PMID:20853216

  19. Early Menopause in Type 2 Diabetes – A Study from a South Indian Tertiary Care Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, T.V.D. Sasi; Rahman, Arifa; Adapa, Satya Sahi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Menopause marks the end of ovarian function and it is called ‘early’ or ‘premature’ if it occurs before 45 years. Very little is known about the menopause transition in Diabetic women. Metabolic disorders like diabetes will accelerate the reproductive ageing and determine premature ovarian failure by various mechanisms. Early menopause along with diabetes has a synergistic effect over the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and other illnesses. There is no data regarding menopausal age in Indian population. Hence, present study was aimed at understanding the age of menopause in diabetic Indian women. Materials and Methods This study was carried out at a tertiary care, teaching hospital in Southern India. Post-menopausal women who attended the Department of Medicine during August 2013 to August 2014, were included in the study. Six hundred patients were recruited by a systematic random sampling, 300 diabetic and 300 non-diabetic after obtaining their consents. They were all non-smokers, took mixed diet and other somatometric variables were similar in both the groups. Results Average age of menopause among diabetic women was 44.65 years which is much earlier than the menopause in non-diabetic women (48.2 years). Out of the 600 women, 212 women had an early menopause (<45 yrs.). Among them, 54 were non-diabetic and 158 were diabetic. Present study also revealed a higher BMI among the diabetics than the non-diabetic women. This may be due to the changes in body composition and increase in abdominal fat after menopause. This change is more in diabetics due to the disturbances in insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. Conclusion The present study confirms that Type 2 Diabetes increases the risk of early menopause. The study reinforces the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for a long term well being of a woman. PMID:26557555

  20. [Peculiarities of metabolic syndrome and nonalcogolic fatty liver disease in menopausal women].

    PubMed

    Antelava, N A; Antelava, A V; Gongadze, M V; Okudzhava, M V; Pachkoriia, K Z; Gogolauri, M I

    2012-07-01

    Correlation between menopause metabolic syndrome and nonalcogolic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is reviewed. NAFLD refers to a wide spectrum of liver disease ranging from simple fatty liver (steatosis), to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, to cirrhosis. The causes and pathogenetic factors of the disease are still under investigation. The risk of development of NAFLD during menopause is twice higher in comparison with fertile age and abdominal obesity and insulin resistances is more apparent. This feature is associated with deficit of estrogens during menopause, as risk of development of NAFLD is diminished with substitutive hormonotherapy. The obesity, particularly in the period of menopause, is discussed as additive, independent risk factor of metabolic syndrome and of diseases of hepatobiliare and cardiovascular systems.

  1. Effect of Bisphosphonates on the Levels of Rankl and Opg in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Patients With Periodontal Disease and Post-menopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Verde, María E; Bermejo, Daniela; Gruppi, Adriana; Grenón, Miriam

    2015-12-01

    The Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/RANK/Osteoprotegerine (OPG) system has been proposed as essential for osteoclast biology and identified as key part in regulating the physiology and pathology of the skeletal system. The study of the RANKL/RANK/OPG system has increased the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the bone remodeling process, especially in postmenopausal osteoporosis and periodontal disease. Bisphosphonates have become the mainstay of the treatment and prevention of post-menopausal osteoporosis. They inhibit the formation and dissolution of calcium phosphate crystals in bone and also osteoclasts, thus reducing bone turnover.Current investigations relate osteoporosis with the appearance and progression of periodontal disease. Although the etiology of both is different, the bone loss present in both shares several characteristics. Thus, therapy used for osteoporosis can be considered of value in the treatment of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of RANKL, OPG and their relationship in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients with periodontal disease and postmenopausal osteoporosis/ osteopenia in relation to consumption of bisphosphonates. We studied 66 periodontal active sites obtained from 17 post- menopausal women patients aged between 45-70 years old with osteoporosis/osteopenia and periodontal disease. GCF samples were collected using sterile filter paper strips. To determine the concentration of RANKL and OPG, a commercial ELISA assay was used. The values of RANKL, OPG and their ratio (RANKL/ OPG) were compared with Mann-Whitney U Test. The values of RANKL, OPG and their ratio obtained in patients with osteoporosis/osteopenia and periodontal disease with or without bisphosphonates treatment showed no differences. Bisphosphonates do not alter the concentration of RANKL and OPG and their ratio in the GCF of patients with osteoporosis/ osteopenia and periodontal disease

  2. Equol status and changes in fecal microbiota in menopausal women receiving long-term treatment for menopause symptoms with a soy-isoflavone concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Guadamuro, Lucía; Delgado, Susana; Redruello, Begoña; Flórez, Ana B.; Suárez, Adolfo; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Mayo, Baltasar

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge regarding the intestinal microbial types involved in isoflavone bioavailability and metabolism is still limited. The present work reports the influence of a treatment with isoflavones for 6 months on the fecal bacterial communities of 16 menopausal women, as determined by culturing and culture-independent microbial techniques. Changes in fecal communities were analyzed with respect to the women’s equol-producing phenotype. Compared to baseline, at 1 and 3 months the counts for all microbial populations in the feces of equol-producing women had increased strongly. In contrast, among the non-producers, the counts for all microbial populations at 1 month were similar to those at baseline, and decreased significantly by 3 and 6 months. Following isoflavone intake, major bands in the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles appeared and disappeared, suggesting important changes in majority populations. In some women, increases were seen in the intensity of specific DGGE bands corresponding to microorganisms known to be involved in the metabolism of dietary phytoestrogens (Lactonifactor longoviformis, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium sp., Ruminococcus sp.). Real-Time quantitative PCR revealed that the Clostridium leptum and C. coccoides populations increased in equol producers, while those of bifidobacteria and enterobacteria decreased, and vice versa in the non-producers. Finally, the Atopobium population increased in both groups, but especially in the non-producers at three months. As the main findings of this study, (i) variations in the microbial communities over the 6-month period of isoflavone supplementation were large; (ii) no changes in the fecal microbial populations that were convincingly treatment-specific were seen; and (iii) the production of equol did not appear to be associated with the presence of, or increase in the population of, any of the majority bacterial types analyzed. PMID:26300856

  3. Sex, women and the menopause: are specialist trainee doctors up for it? A survey of views and attitudes of specialist trainee doctors in Community Sexual & Reproductive Health and Obstetrics & Gynaecology around sexuality and sexual healthcare in the (peri)menopause.

    PubMed

    Gleser, Heike

    2015-03-01

    Sexual health, function and pleasure can contribute significantly towards the wellbeing of (peri-)menopausal women. Healthcare professionals specialising in women's health should therefore be able to provide 'sex-positive' menopause care, which proactively addresses any sexual issues and assesses the need for contraception and prevention of sexually transmitted infections. A survey was used to investigate the views and attitudes of specialist trainee doctors in Community Sexual & Reproductive Health (cSRH) and Obstetrics & Gynaecology towards sexual health in the (peri)menopause as they play a key role in promoting the sexual wellbeing of their patients. The results showed that both study groups had positive attitudes towards sexuality and sexual healthcare of mid-life and older women. However, cSRH trainees had significantly more confidence in dealing with psychosexual problems and perceived significantly less barriers to deliver comprehensive menopausal care within the mostly community-based Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare settings they are working in compared to their mainly hospital-based gynaecological colleagues. Profiting from seemingly better training in the topic cSRH trainees also noticed considerably less embarrassment from their patients when addressing sexual issues. Nonetheless, training needs were identified in both trainee groups.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Remifemin on Peri-Menopausal Symptoms Induced by Post-Operative GnRH-a Therapy for Endometriosis: A Randomized Study versus Tibolone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiming; Gao, Hongyan; Li, Qin; Cong, Jing; Wu, Jie; Pu, Dahua; Jiang, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate clinical efficacy and safety of Remifemin on peri-menopausal symptoms in endometriosis patients with a post-operative GnRH-a therapy. Material/Methods We treated 116 women who had endometriosis with either Remifemin (n=56) 20 mg bid po or Tibolone (n=60) 2.5 mg qd po for 12 weeks after GnRH-a injection. The efficacy was evaluated by Kupperman menopausal index (KMI), and hot flash/sweating scores. The safety parameters such as liver and renal functions, lipid profile, endometrial thickness, and serum sex hormone level, as well as the incidence of adverse events were recorded. Results (1) After GnRH-a therapy, KMI and hot flash/sweating scores in both groups increased significantly (P<0.05) but we found no significant difference for KMI (2.87±1.40 for Remifemin and 2.70±1.26 for Tibolone) and hot flash/sweating scores (0.94±1.72 for Remifemin and 1.06±1.78 for Tibolone) between the 2 groups (P>0.05). (2) No statistical change was observed in liver or renal functions and lipid profile in both groups before and after the treatment (P>0.05). The post-therapeutic serum FSH, LH, and E2 level and endometrial thickness decreased remarkably in both groups (P<0.05). E2 level in the Remifemin group was obviously lower than that in the Tibolone group (P<0.05), and FSH and LH levels were strongly higher (P<0.05). No significant difference in thickness were found in either group (P>0.05). The Remifemin group had far fewer adverse events than the Tibolone group (P<0. 05). Conclusions Compared with Tibolone, Remifemin had a similar clinical efficacy and was safer for the peri-menopausal symptoms induced by GnRH-a in endometriosis patients. PMID:25321621

  5. Sedentary Lifestyle and High-Carbohydrate Intake are Associated with Low-Grade Chronic Inflammation in Post-Menopause: A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Bruna Cherubini; Silva, Thaís Rasia da; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in post menopausal women, and inflammation is involved in the atherosclerosis process. Purpose to assess whether dietary pattern, metabolic profile, body composition and physical activity are associated with low-grade chronic inflammation according to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in postmenopausal women. Methods ninety-five postmenopausal participants, with no evidence of clinical disease, underwent anthropometric, metabolic and hormonal assessments. Usual dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire, habitual physical activity was measured with a digital pedometer, and body composition was estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Patients with hs-CRP ≥10 mg/L or using hormone therapy in the last three months before the study were excluded from the analysis. Participants were stratified according to hs-CRP lower or ≥3 mg/L. Sedentary lifestyle was defined as walking fewer than 6 thousand steps a day. Two-tailed Student's t-test, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U or Chi-square (χ(2)) test were used to compare differences between groups. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio of variables for high hs-CRP. Results participants with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L had higher body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, waist circumference (WC), triglycerides, glucose, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p = 0.01 for all variables) than women with hs-CRP <3 mg/L. Also, women with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L had a higher glycemic load diet and lower protein intake. Prevalence of sedentary lifestyle (p < 0.01) and metabolic syndrome (p < 0.01) was higher in women with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L. After adjustment for age and time since menopause, the odds ratio for hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L was higher for sedentary lifestyle (4.7, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.4-15.5) and carbohydrate intake (2.9, 95%CI

  6. Cyclical behavior of bone remodeling and bone loss in healthy women after menopause: results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mazzuoli, G; Marinucci, D; D'erasmo, E; Acca, M; Pisani, D; Rinaldi, M G; Bianchi, G; Diacinti, D; Minisola, S

    2002-12-01

    Annual changes in lumbar bone mineral density (LBMD) and bone remodeling markers were measured in 238 healthy pre- and postmenopausal women, aged 45-74 years. The subjects were divided into groups according to their menstrual status and years since menopause. The results obtained indicate that bone loss is not a constant process over time but rather exhibits cyclical damping oscillations. When the log-linear trend of LBMD decrement was transformed into a constant by considering annual percentage changes, the presence of a cyclical component of 7 years was evident. By employing a harmonic regression model, the cyclical component was also statistically significant on baseline data. The cyclical behavior of LBMD decrement corresponded to an analogous behavior of the bone remodeling markers. These results suggest that a lack of estrogen acts as a synchronizer on bone remodeling by triggering a latent cyclical rhythm of bone loss that persists throughout life after menopause. The existence of a chronobiological rhythm of bone loss starting after menopause, if confirmed, could have important clinical implications.

  7. The relationship between the calcaneal bone mineral density and the mental index in post-menopausal females

    PubMed Central

    Jagelaviciene, E; Krasauskiene, A; Zalinkevicius, R; Kubilius, R; Vaitkeviciene, I

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between the bone mineral density in the calcaneus and the mental index (MI) of the mandible in post-menopausal females, and to evaluate the diagnostic threshold of the index. Methods: The post-menopausal females aged 50 years and older were examined using panoramic radiography of the mandible for mandibular cortical width measurements at the mental foramen (mental index, MI) determination and DXL Calscan P/N 031000 (Demetech AB, Solna, Sweden) for the examination of calcaneal bone mineral density (BMD). The statistical analysis was performed to determine the tendencies between the data. Results: According to the T-score values of calcaneal BMD, the subjects were distributed into T1, T2 and T3 groups. BMD differences between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.001). The panoramic radiographic examination of the mandible was performed, MI (mm) was determined and the mean values in the groups were calculated. The differences of MI mean values between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.001). In the general group, a statistically significant relationship was found between calcaneal BMD, T-score and MI (p < 0.001). In the logistic analysis, the diagnostic threshold of MI was 3 mm (sensitivity 73.5%; specificity 72.6%). Conclusions: A diagnostic threshold for MI of 3 mm or less is suggested as the appropriate threshold for referral of calcaneal BMD reduction. PMID:23420860

  8. Acupuncture and Auricular Acupressure in Relieving Menopausal Hot Flashes of Bilaterally Ovariectomized Chinese Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jue; Qu, Fan; Sang, Xisheng; Wang, Xiaotong; Nan, Rui

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the effects of acupuncture and auricular acupressure in relieving menopausal hot flashes of bilaterally ovariectomized Chinese women. Between May 2006 and March 2008, 46 bilaterally ovariectomized Chinese women were randomized into an acupuncture and auricular acupressure group (n = 21) and a hormone replacement therapy (HRT) group (Tibolone, n = 25). Each patient was given a standard daily log and was required to record the frequency and severity of hot flashes and side effects of the treatment felt daily, from 1 week before the treatment started to the fourth week after the treatment ended. The serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), LH and E2 were detected before and after the treatment. After the treatment and the follow-up, both the severity and frequency of hot flashes in the two groups were relieved significantly when compared with pre-treatment (P <  .05). There was no significant difference in the severity of hot flashes between them after treatment (P >  .05), while after the follow-up, the severity of hot flashes in the HRT group was alleviated more. After the treatment and the follow-up, the frequency of menopausal hot flashes in the HRT group was reduced more (P <  .05). After treatment, the levels of FSH decreased significantly and the levels of E2 increased significantly in both groups (P <  .05), and they changed more in the HRT group (P <  .05). Acupuncture and auricular acupressure can be used as alternative treatments to relieve menopausal hot flashes for those bilaterally ovariectomized women who are unable or unwilling to receive HRT. PMID:19189989

  9. The relationship between vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphism and the occurrence of osteoporosis in menopausal Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Dabirnia, Raheleh; Mahmazi, Sanaz; Taromchi, Amirhossein; Nikzad, Masoum; Saburi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Osteoporosis, a multifactorial disease with reduced bone mineral density which increases the probability of bone fractures, is caused by calcium deficiency, and its incidence increases with age. It has been determined that mutations in functional regions of vitamin D receptor gene will affect the metabolism of minerals especially calcium and, therefore, bone density. The present study evaluates the relation between vitamin D receptor polymorphisms, TaqI (rs731236) and ApaI (rs7975232), and osteoporosis in menopausal Azari women in Zanjan province. Materials and methods This case-control study has been conducted on 50 menopausal women suffering from osteoporosis and 50 menopausal women who did not suffer from osteoporosis in Zanjan province. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was confirmed using DEXA instrument. Peripheral blood was collected from the subjects and controls to extract DNA and assess the ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms using PCR-RFLP method. The results were interpreted using independent T-test, chi-square, and Pearson correlation coefficient with a p-value less than 0.05. Results There was not a significant difference between the frequency of ApaI (AA/Aa/aa) and TaqI (TT/Tt/tt) genotypes in cases (mean age 68.72) and controls (mean age 64.7) (p=0.37 and p=0.64, respectively). In addition, ApaI/TaqI allele haplotype in osteoporotic population showed non-significant relation (p value=0.563) compared with the control group. Discussion and conclusion The relationship between the genotypes and osteoporosis, cancers, and mineral metabolism disorders has been studied for a long time. Although there has been a significant relation between the aforementioned genotypes and osteoporosis or reduced mineral density-related bone fractures in some studied, some other studies have opposing results. Therefore, it is only possible to reach an acceptable conclusion by studying the haplotype of the polymorphisms in subjects. PMID:28228780

  10. Promotional Tone in Reviews of Menopausal Hormone Therapy After the Women's Health Initiative: An Analysis of Published Articles

    PubMed Central

    Fugh-Berman, Adriane; McDonald, Christina Pike; Bell, Alicia M.; Bethards, Emily Catherine; Scialli, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Even after the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) found that the risks of menopausal hormone therapy (hormone therapy) outweighed benefit for asymptomatic women, about half of gynecologists in the United States continued to believe that hormones benefited women's health. The pharmaceutical industry has supported publication of articles in medical journals for marketing purposes. It is unknown whether author relationships with industry affect promotional tone in articles on hormone therapy. The goal of this study was to determine whether promotional tone could be identified in narrative review articles regarding menopausal hormone therapy and whether articles identified as promotional were more likely to have been authored by those with conflicts of interest with manufacturers of menopausal hormone therapy. Methods and Findings We analyzed tone in opinion pieces on hormone therapy published in the four years after the estrogen-progestin arm of the WHI was stopped. First, we identified the ten authors with four or more MEDLINE-indexed reviews, editorials, comments, or letters on hormone replacement therapy or menopausal hormone therapy published between July 2002 and June 2006. Next, we conducted an additional search using the names of these authors to identify other relevant articles. Finally, after author names and affiliations were removed, 50 articles were evaluated by three readers for scientific accuracy and for tone. Scientific accuracy was assessed based on whether or not the findings of the WHI were accurately reported using two criteria: (1) Acknowledgment or lack of denial of the risk of breast cancer diagnosis associated with hormone therapy, and (2) acknowledgment that hormone therapy did not benefit cardiovascular disease endpoints. Determination of promotional tone was based on the assessment by each reader of whether the article appeared to promote hormone therapy. Analysis of inter-rater consistency found moderate agreement for scientific

  11. Does menopausal status impact urinary continence outcomes following abdominal sacrocolpopexy without anti-incontinence procedures in continent women?

    PubMed Central

    Inan, Abdurrahman Hamdi; Toz, Emrah; Beyan, Emrah; Gurbuz, Tutku; Ozcan, Aykut; Oner, Oznur

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the impact of menopausal status on urinary continence following abdominal sacrocolpopexy (ASC) without an anti-incontinence procedure in continent women. Methods: We conducted a clinical follow-up study of 137 patients diagnosed with stage 3 or higher pelvic organ prolapse (POP) without urinary incontinence between January 2012 and December 2014. Patients were provided with detailed a priori information pertaining to the abdominal sacrocolpopexy procedure and were invited to attend follow-up visits at 1, 3, 12, and 24 months. Follow-up visits included a gynecological examination, cough test, and validated Urinary Distress Inventory-6 (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7 (IIQ-7) questionnaires. Results: The mean follow-up time for the cohort was 16.5±3.45 months. The study group was divided according to menopausal status: premenopausal (Group-1) and postmenopausal women (Group-II). Anatomical recurrence was not detected during the follow-up period in either group, but de novo stress urinary incontinence was seen in 15 of 53 (28.3%) Group-I patients and in 6 of 84 (7.1%; p < 0.01) Group-II patients. Conclusions: The risk of de novo stress urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women after ASC is low. However, premenopausal patients have a higher incidence of de novo stress incontinence which affect quality of life. PMID:27648027

  12. The Influence of Menopausal Status and Postmenopausal Use of Hormone Therapy on Presentation of Major Depression in Women

    PubMed Central

    Kornstein, Susan G.; Young, Elizabeth A.; Harvey, Annie T.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Barkin, Jennifer L.; Thase, Michael E.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Rush, A. John

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences in depression characteristics among premenopausal, perimenopausal, and postmenopausal women with major depressive disorder. This study also evaluated these differences between postmenopausal women with major depressive disorder who are taking and not taking hormone therapy. Methods: Analyses conducted with data from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression study focused on female outpatients with non-psychotic major depressive disorder seeking treatment in 41 primary or psychiatric care settings across the United States. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were compared among women not taking hormone therapy who were premenopausal (N=950), perimenopausal (N=380), or postmenopausal (N=562). These comparisons were also made between postmenopausal women (n=768) taking (N=171) or not taking (N=562) hormone therapy. Results: After adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical baseline differences, premenopausal women were more likely to present with irritability than either peri- or postmenopausal women, and were more likely to have decreased appetite and less likely to have early morning insomnia than perimenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were more likely to have suicidal ideation and poorer physical functioning than either of the other groups, and were more likely to have sympathetic arousal and gastrointestinal symptoms than premenopausal women. After adjusting for baseline differences, postmenopausal women taking hormone therapy had better physical functioning, fewer melancholic features, less sympathetic arousal, and more lack of involvement in activities than women not taking hormone therapy. Conclusions: Menopausal status and postmenopausal use of hormone therapy may influence the clinical presentation of major depressive episodes in women. PMID:20616669

  13. Integrative therapies for menopause.

    PubMed

    McKee, Julie; Warber, Sara L

    2005-03-01

    Menopause is a transitional time for women. This gives practitioners an opportunity to focus on recommending healthy life-style changes. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been the mainstay of therapy for menopausal symptoms. With recent research findings, women and their physicians are seeking alternatives that do not carry the risks associated with HRT. Exercise has been shown to help some women with symptoms of hot flashes, as have relaxation techniques and deep breathing. Dietary changes to incorporate whole foods and soy are thought by some to help with menopausal symptoms, and are recommended because of a positive impact on heart disease and obesity; soy isoflavones may also help with menopausal symptoms. Botanicals such as black cohosh and red clover have been shown in some studies to decrease severity and frequency of hot flashes. We recommend that HRT be prescribed when other measures have failed to adequately control symptoms. Bioidentical hormones are preferred in our practice.

  14. Coconut oil is associated with a beneficial lipid profile in pre-menopausal women in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Feranil, Alan B; Duazo, Paulita L; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Adair, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    Coconut oil is a common edible oil in many countries, and there is mixed evidence for its effects on lipid profiles and cardiovascular disease risk. Here we examine the association between coconut oil consumption and lipid profiles in a cohort of 1,839 Filipino women (age 35-69 years) participating in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey, a community based study in Metropolitan Cebu. Coconut oil intake was estimated using the mean of two 24-hour dietary recalls (9.5±8.9 grams). Lipid profiles were measured in morning plasma samples collected after an overnight fast. Linear regression models were used to estimate the association between coconut oil intake and each plasma lipid outcome after adjusting for total energy intake, age, body mass index (BMI), number of pregnancies, education, menopausal status, household assets and urban residency. Dietary coconut oil intake was positively associated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol especially among pre-menopausal women, suggesting that coconut oil intake is associated with beneficial lipid profiles. Coconut oil consumption was not significantly associated with low density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglyceride values. The relationship of coconut oil to cholesterol profiles needs further study in populations in which coconut oil consumption is common.

  15. Post Separation Adjustment and Women's Liberation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Elliot R.

    The interaction between post separation adjustment for reunited military families and the Women's Liberation Movement is a complex occurrence which is beginning to have a profound effect on some military families. Two forces are acting upon wives of servicemen that subject marriages to conflicts previously unheard of. One force is the critical…

  16. Menopause causes vertebral endplate degeneration and decrease in nutrient diffusion to the intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Griffith, James F

    2011-07-01

    The vasculature in the outer annulus supplies only the periphery of the disc so that nutrition to the bulk of the disc, including all the inner annulus and nucleus pulposus, is derived from the vertebral epiphyseal end arteries where nutrients diffuse across the cartilaginous endplate to reach the disc. In this regard the vertebral endplate plays an important role in disc nutrition. Compromise of diffusion of nutrients to the disc cells may play a large part in the progression or even initiation of disc degeneration. Increasing evidence suggests that estrogen deficiency also influence the severity of disc degeneration in post-menopausal females. Structural disorganization of the vertebral endplate occurs with disc degeneration, with the most common endplate changes observed clinically being Schmorl's node. Schmorl's node is more commonly seen in post-menopausal women than younger women. Osteosclerosis, osteonecrosis and fibrosis associated with Schmorl's nodes can impede nutrient diffusion into the disc as well as removal of metabolites from the disc. We hypothesize that menopause negatively affects vertebral endplate quality and induces endplate degeneration. This endplate degeneration decreases nutrients diffusion from vertebral body into discs, and also impedes removal of metabolites, leads to further disc degeneration. To confirm our hypothesis, a cross-sectional post-contrast MRI study can be performed in pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women. If the hypothesis is confirmed, then low dose hormone replacement treatment may retard disc degeneration in post menopausal women and thereby limit the consequences associated with disc degeneration such as low back pain.

  17. Menopause, a Self Care Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Maria Cristina; And Others

    Written for women from the three main cultural groups in New Mexico (Native American, Hispanic, and Anglo), this pamphlet discusses the causes and symptoms, some remedies for the symptoms of menopause, and presents ideas for organizing support groups to help middle-aged women and their families deal with menopausal problems. Explanations of the…

  18. Racial Differences in the Association between Carotid Plaque and Aortic and Coronary Artery Calcification Among Women Transitioning the Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, Genevieve A.; Narla, Vinod V.; Ye, Rong; Cauley, Jane A.; Thompson, Trina; Matthews, Karen A.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Background Carotid atherosclerosis is a marker for atherosclerotic disease in other vascular beds; however, racial differences in this association have not been fully examined. The purpose of this report is to evaluate racial differences in the relationship between carotid plaque and calcification in the aorta and coronary arteries among women transitioning the menopause. Methods 540 African American and White women with a median age of 50 years were evaluated from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation. Carotid plaque (none versus any) was assessed with B-mode ultrasound and aortic (AC; 0, >0–100, >100) and coronary artery calcification (CAC; 0, >0–10, >10) with computed tomography. Results For the total cohort, higher prevalence of plaque was significantly associated with higher levels of AC, but not CAC. The interaction of race and carotid plaque was significant in models with AC and CAC as dependent variables (p=0.03, 0.002, respectively). Among African Americans, there was an inverse relationship, although not significant, between carotid plaque and high AC (>100) (OR 0.75, 95%CI: 0.10–5.48), and between plaque and high CAC (>10) (OR 0.20, 95%CI: 0.03–1.52) in fully adjusted models. In contrast, for Whites, significant positive associations existed between carotid plaque and high AC (OR 4.12, 95%CI: 1.29–13.13) and borderline for high CAC (OR 1.83, 95%CI: 0.66–5.19). Conclusions This study demonstrated the presence of carotid plaque appeared to be a marker for AC and potentially CAC in White women during the menopause transition, but not African American middle-aged women. PMID:22037218

  19. The Effect of Melatonin on Climacteric Symptoms in Menopausal Women; A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    PARANDAVAR, Nehleh; ABDALI, Khadijeh; KESHTGAR, Sara; EMAMGHOREISHI, Maasoumeh; AMOOEE, Seddegheh

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Menopause is one of the most critical periods of woman’s life. With reducing of ovarian estrogen; women are more prone to psychological and physical symptoms. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of melatonin on the climacteric symptoms. Methods The present double blind, placebo randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 240 menopausal women (40 - 60 years old) referring to the gynecology clinics of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (January - November 2012). The participants were randomly divided into two groups through sortition. Demographic characteristics, Goldberg’s general health questionnaire (GHQ), Greene Climacteric Scale and level of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) were determined for both groups before the intervention. The intervention group received one 3mg melatonin tablet each night for 3 months and the control group received the placebo in the same period. Changes of climacteric symptoms and drug complications were measured 1, 2 and 3 months after the intervention Results We analyzed the data of 99 postmenopausal women in the intervention group and 101 postmenopausal women in the control group. In the melatonin group, the climacteric symptoms score decreased from 35.73+11.6 to 17.09+10.22 during the 3-month study period and regardless of time, a significant difference was observed between the two groups (P<0.001). In addition, a significant difference was found between the two groups regarding various dimensions of the climacteric symptoms over time (P<0.001). No significant difference was found regarding side effects between the two groups (P= 0.135). Conclusion The study findings showed that using melatonin improved the climacteric symptoms. PMID:26060703

  20. Bioidentical hormones, menopausal women, and the lure of the "natural" in U.S. anti-aging medicine.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Jennifer R; Flatt, Michael A; Settersten, Richard A

    2015-05-01

    In 2002, the Women's Health Initiative, a large-scale study of the safety of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for women conducted in the United States, released results suggesting that use of postmenopausal HRT increased women's risks of stroke and breast cancer. In the years that followed, as rates of HRT prescription fell, another hormonal therapy rose in its wake: bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT). Anti-aging clinicians, the primary prescribers of BHRT, tout it as a safe and effective alternative to treat menopausal symptoms and, moreover, as a preventative therapy for age-related diseases and ailments. Through in-depth interviews with 31 U.S.-based anti-aging clinicians and 25 female anti-aging patients, we analyze attitudes towards BHRT. We illustrate how these attitudes reveal broader contemporary values, discourses, and discomforts with menopause, aging, and biomedicine. The attraction to and promise of BHRT is rooted in the idea that it is a "natural" therapy. BHRT is given both biomedical and embodied legitimacy by clinicians and patients because of its purported ability to become part of the body's "natural" processes. The normative assumption that "natural" is inherently "good" not only places BHRT beyond reproach, but transforms its use into a health benefit. The clinical approach of anti-aging providers also plays a role by validating patients' embodied experiences and offering a "holistic" solution to their symptoms, which anti-aging patients see as a striking contrast to their experiences with conventional biomedical health care. The perceived virtues of BHRT shed light on the rhetoric of anti-aging medicine and a deeply complicated relationship between conventional biomedicine, hormonal technologies, and women's bodies.

  1. Menarche, menopause, and breast cancer risk: individual participant meta-analysis, including 118 964 women with breast cancer from 117 epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected women. Methods Individual data from 117 epidemiological studies, including 118 964 women with invasive breast cancer and 306 091 without the disease, none of whom had used menopausal hormone therapy, were included in the analyses. We calculated adjusted relative risks (RRs) associated with menarche and menopause for breast cancer overall, and by tumour histology and by oestrogen receptor expression. Findings Breast cancer risk increased by a factor of 1·050 (95% CI 1·044–1·057; p<0·0001) for every year younger at menarche, and independently by a smaller amount (1·029, 1·025–1·032; p<0·0001), for every year older at menopause. Premenopausal women had a greater risk of breast cancer than postmenopausal women of an identical age (RR at age 45–54 years 1·43, 1·33–1·52, p<0·001). All three of these associations were attenuated by increasing adiposity among postmenopausal women, but did not vary materially by women's year of birth, ethnic origin, childbearing history, smoking, alcohol consumption, or hormonal contraceptive use. All three associations were stronger for lobular than for ductal tumours (p<0·006 for each comparison). The effect of menopause in women of an identical age and trends by age at menopause were stronger for oestrogen receptor-positive disease than for oestrogen receptor-negative disease (p<0·01 for both comparisons). Interpretation The effects of menarche and menopause on breast cancer risk might not be acting merely by lengthening women's total number of reproductive years. Endogenous ovarian hormones are more relevant for oestrogen receptor-positive disease than for oestrogen receptor-negative disease and for lobular than

  2. Effect of glycemic treatment and microvascular complications on menopause in women with type 1 diabetes in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) cohort.

    PubMed

    Kim, Catherine; Cleary, Patricia A; Cowie, Catherine C; Braffett, Barbara H; Dunn, Rodney L; Larkin, Mary E; Gatcomb, Patricia M; Wessells, Hunter B; Nathan, David M; Sarma, Aruna V

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We examined the impact of intensive versus conventional diabetes treatment upon menopause among women with type 1 diabetes in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), a randomized controlled trial of intensive diabetes treatment, and its observational follow-up, the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a secondary analysis of women in the DCCT/EDIC (n = 657), outcomes were the cumulative incidences of natural menopause and surgical menopause. Cox regression analyses were used to examine associations with treatment group, time-varying estimates of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin dosage, BMI, and microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy). RESULTS By EDIC year 18, after an average of 28 years of follow-up, 240 (38%) women had experienced natural menopause and 115 (18%) women had experienced surgical menopause. Age at natural menopause was similar in the intensive versus conventional groups (49.9 vs. 49.0 years; P = 0.28), and age at surgical menopause was similar in the intensive versus conventional groups (40.8 vs. 42.0 years; P = 0.31). In multivariable models, treatment group, HbA1c, and microvascular complications were not associated with risk of natural or surgical menopause. Each 10 unit/day increase in insulin dosage decreased risk of natural menopause (hazard ratio [HR] 0.91, 95% CI 0.75-0.98) and each kg/m(2) increase in BMI increased risk of surgical menopause (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.00-1.16). CONCLUSIONS In the DCCT/EDIC, intensive versus conventional treatment group and HbA1c level were not associated with menopause risk. Greater insulin dose was associated with lower menopause risk.

  3. Lean Mass and Body Fat Percentage Are Contradictory Predictors of Bone Mineral Density in Pre-Menopausal Pacific Island Women

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Maria; von Hurst, Pamela R.; Beck, Kathryn L.; Shultz, Sarah; Kruger, Marlena C.; O’Brien, Wendy; Conlon, Cathryn A.; Kruger, Rozanne

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotally, it is suggested that Pacific Island women have good bone mineral density (BMD) compared to other ethnicities; however, little evidence for this or for associated factors exists. This study aimed to explore associations between predictors of bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm2), in pre-menopausal Pacific Island women. Healthy pre-menopausal Pacific Island women (age 16–45 years) were recruited as part of the larger EXPLORE Study. Total body BMD and body composition were assessed using Dual X-ray Absorptiometry and air-displacement plethysmography (n = 83). A food frequency questionnaire (n = 56) and current bone-specific physical activity questionnaire (n = 59) were completed. Variables expected to be associated with BMD were applied to a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Due to missing data, physical activity and dietary intake factors were considered only in simple correlations. Mean BMD was 1.1 ± 0.08 g/cm2. Bone-free, fat-free lean mass (LMO, 52.4 ± 6.9 kg) and age were positively associated with BMD, and percent body fat (38.4 ± 7.6) was inversely associated with BMD, explaining 37.7% of total variance. Lean mass was the strongest predictor of BMD, while many established contributors to bone health (calcium, physical activity, protein, and vitamin C) were not associated with BMD in this population, partly due to difficulty retrieving dietary data. This highlights the importance of physical activity and protein intake during any weight loss interventions to in order to minimise the loss of muscle mass, whilst maximizing loss of adipose tissue. PMID:27483314

  4. Lean Mass and Body Fat Percentage Are Contradictory Predictors of Bone Mineral Density in Pre-Menopausal Pacific Island Women.

    PubMed

    Casale, Maria; von Hurst, Pamela R; Beck, Kathryn L; Shultz, Sarah; Kruger, Marlena C; O'Brien, Wendy; Conlon, Cathryn A; Kruger, Rozanne

    2016-07-30

    Anecdotally, it is suggested that Pacific Island women have good bone mineral density (BMD) compared to other ethnicities; however, little evidence for this or for associated factors exists. This study aimed to explore associations between predictors of bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm²), in pre-menopausal Pacific Island women. Healthy pre-menopausal Pacific Island women (age 16-45 years) were recruited as part of the larger EXPLORE Study. Total body BMD and body composition were assessed using Dual X-ray Absorptiometry and air-displacement plethysmography (n = 83). A food frequency questionnaire (n = 56) and current bone-specific physical activity questionnaire (n = 59) were completed. Variables expected to be associated with BMD were applied to a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Due to missing data, physical activity and dietary intake factors were considered only in simple correlations. Mean BMD was 1.1 ± 0.08 g/cm². Bone-free, fat-free lean mass (LMO, 52.4 ± 6.9 kg) and age were positively associated with BMD, and percent body fat (38.4 ± 7.6) was inversely associated with BMD, explaining 37.7% of total variance. Lean mass was the strongest predictor of BMD, while many established contributors to bone health (calcium, physical activity, protein, and vitamin C) were not associated with BMD in this population, partly due to difficulty retrieving dietary data. This highlights the importance of physical activity and protein intake during any weight loss interventions to in order to minimise the loss of muscle mass, whilst maximizing loss of adipose tissue.

  5. Risks factors for low bone mineral density in pre-menopausal Mexican women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; García-Carrasco, Mario; Sandoval-Cruz, Hilda; Escárcega, Ricardo O; Jiménez-Hernández, Mario; Etchegaray-Morales, Ivet; Soto-Vega, Elena; Muñoz-Guarneros, Margarita; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Delezé-Hinojosa, Margarita; Cervera, Ricard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for low bone mineral density (BMD) in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 pre-menopausal patients with SLE. Patients were evaluated using a questionnaire about the following variables: age, disease duration, disease activity, chronic disease damage, cumulative corticosteroid dose, and history of fracture. Lumbar spine and hip measurements of BMD were performed by dual absorptiometry. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to assess the relationship between risk factors and BMD. The mean age was 32.8 +/- 8.7 years, and the median duration of SLE was 73.2 +/- 65 months. The mean cumulative corticosteroid dose was 20.0 +/- 21.3 g. The mean BMD was 1.09 +/- .18 g/cm(2) in the lumbar spine and 1.0 +/- .14 g/cm(2) in the hip. Osteopenia was present in 40% of patients and osteoporosis in 5%. In the multiple regression analysis, low BMD in the lumbar spine was associated with chronic disease damage and low body mass index (BMI). Low BMD in the hip was associated with cumulative corticosteroid dose and low BMI. Chronic disease damage, low BMI, and cumulative corticosteroid dose are risks factors for low BMD in pre-menopausal SLE patients. Osteopenia was found in 40% of patients, while osteoporosis was found in only 5%.

  6. Effects of Inhalation of Essential Oil of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara on Menopausal Symptoms, Stress, and Estrogen in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seo Yeon; Kang, Purum; Lee, Hui Su; Seol, Geun Hee

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhalation of the essential oil of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara (neroli oil) on menopausal symptoms, stress, and estrogen in postmenopausal women. Sixty-three healthy postmenopausal women were randomized to inhale 0.1% or 0.5% neroli oil or almond oil (control) for 5 minutes twice daily for 5 days. Menopause-related symptoms, as determined by the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL); sexual desire visual analog scale (VAS); serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations, blood pressure, pulse, and stress VAS, were measured before and after inhalation. Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significant improvements in the physical domain score of the MENQOL and in sexual desire. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the group inhaling 0.5% neroli oil than in the control group. Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significantly lower diastolic blood pressure and tended to improve pulse rate and serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations. These findings indicate that inhalation of neroli oil helps relieve menopausal symptoms, increase sexual desire, and reduce blood pressure in postmenopausal women. Neroli oil may have potential as an effective intervention to reduce stress and improve the endocrine system. PMID:25024731

  7. Increasing Iron and Zinc in Pre-Menopausal Women and Its Effects on Mood and Cognition: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lomagno, Karla A.; Hu, Feifei; Riddell, Lynn J.; Booth, Alison O.; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A.; Nowson, Caryl A.; Byrne, Linda K.

    2014-01-01

    Iron and zinc are essential minerals often present in similar food sources. In addition to the adverse effects of frank iron and zinc-deficient states, iron insufficiency has been associated with impairments in mood and cognition. This paper reviews current literature on iron or zinc supplementation and its impact on mood or cognition in pre-menopausal women. Searches included MEDLINE complete, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), psychINFO, psychARTICLES, pubMED, ProQuest Health and Medical Complete Academic Search complete, Scopus and ScienceDirect. Ten randomized controlled trials and one non-randomized controlled trial were found to meet the inclusion criteria. Seven studies found improvements in aspects of mood and cognition after iron supplementation. Iron supplementation appeared to improve memory and intellectual ability in participants aged between 12 and 55 years in seven studies, regardless of whether the participant was initially iron insufficient or iron-deficient with anaemia. The review also found three controlled studies providing evidence to suggest a role for zinc supplementation as a treatment for depressive symptoms, as both an adjunct to traditional antidepressant therapy for individuals with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder and as a therapy in its own right in pre-menopausal women with zinc deficiency. Overall, the current literature indicates a positive effect of improving zinc status on enhanced cognitive and emotional functioning. However, further study involving well-designed randomized controlled trials is needed to identify the impact of improving iron and zinc status on mood and cognition. PMID:25405366

  8. The advantage of letrozole over tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial is consistent in younger postmenopausal women and in those with chemotherapy-induced menopause.

    PubMed

    Chirgwin, Jacquie; Sun, Zhuoxin; Smith, Ian; Price, Karen N; Thürlimann, Beat; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Regan, Meredith M; Goldhirsch, Aron; Coates, Alan S

    2012-01-01

    Letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, is ineffective in the presence of ovarian estrogen production. Two subpopulations of apparently postmenopausal women might derive reduced benefit from letrozole due to residual or returning ovarian activity: younger women (who have the potential for residual subclinical ovarian estrogen production), and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause who may experience return of ovarian function. In these situations tamoxifen may be preferable to an aromatase inhibitor. Among 4,922 patients allocated to the monotherapy arms (5 years of letrozole or tamoxifen) in the BIG 1-98 trial we identified two relevant subpopulations: patients with potential residual ovarian function, defined as having natural menopause, treated without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and age ≤ 55 years (n = 641); and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause (n = 105). Neither of the subpopulations examined showed treatment effects differing from the trial population as a whole (interaction P values are 0.23 and 0.62, respectively). Indeed, both among the 641 patients aged ≤ 55 years with natural menopause and no chemotherapy (HR 0.77 [0.51, 1.16]) and among the 105 patients with chemotherapy-induced menopause (HR 0.51 [0.19, 1.39]), the disease-free survival (DFS) point estimate favoring letrozole was marginally more beneficial than in the trial as a whole (HR 0.84 [0.74, 0.95]). Contrary to our initial concern, DFS results for young postmenopausal patients who did not receive chemotherapy and patients with chemotherapy-induced menopause parallel the letrozole benefit seen in the BIG 1-98 population as a whole. These data support the use of letrozole even in such patients.

  9. The advantage of letrozole over tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial is consistent in younger postmenopausal women and in those with chemotherapy-induced menopause

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhuoxin; Smith, Ian; Price, Karen N.; Thürlimann, Beat; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Regan, Meredith M.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Coates, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, is ineffective in the presence of ovarian estrogen production. Two subpopulations of apparently postmenopausal women might derive reduced benefit from letrozole due to residual or returning ovarian activity: younger women (who have the potential for residual subclinical ovarian estrogen production), and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause who may experience return of ovarian function. In these situations tamoxifen may be preferable to an aromatase inhibitor. Among 4,922 patients allocated to the monotherapy arms (5 years of letrozole or tamoxifen) in the BIG 1-98 trial we identified two relevant subpopulations: patients with potential residual ovarian function, defined as having natural menopause, treated without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and age ≤55 years (n = 641); and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause (n = 105). Neither of the subpopulations examined showed treatment effects differing from the trial population as a whole (interaction P values are 0.23 and 0.62, respectively). Indeed, both among the 641 patients aged ≤55 years with natural menopause and no chemotherapy (HR 0.77 [0.51, 1.16]) and among the 105 patients with chemotherapy-induced menopause (HR 0.51 [0.19, 1.39]), the disease-free survival (DFS) point estimate favoring letrozole was marginally more beneficial than in the trial as a whole (HR 0.84 [0.74, 0.95]). Contrary to our initial concern, DFS results for young postmenopausal patients who did not receive chemotherapy and patients with chemotherapy-induced menopause parallel the letrozole benefit seen in the BIG 1-98 population as a whole. These data support the use of letrozole even in such patients. PMID:21892704

  10. A Multicenter, Prospective Study to Evaluate the Use of Contrast Stress Echocardiography in Early Menopausal Women at Risk for Coronary Artery Disease: Trial Design and Baseline Findings

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmoneim, Sahar S.; Bernier, Mathieu; Hagen, Mary E.; Eifert-Rain, Susan; Bott-Kitslaar, Dalene; Wilansky, Susan; Castello, Ramon; Bhat, Gajanan; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Best, Patricia J. M.; Hayes, Sharonne N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims This multisite prospective trial, Stress Echocardiography in Menopausal Women At Risk for Coronary Artery Disease (SMART), aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of contrast stress echocardiography (CSE), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and cardiac biomarkers for prediction of cardiovascular events after 2 and 5 years in early menopausal women experiencing chest pain symptoms or risk factors. This report describes the study design, population, and initial test results at study entry. Methods From January 2004 through September 2007, 366 early menopausal women (age 54±5 years, Framingham risk score 6.51%±4.4 %, range 1%–27%) referred for stress echocardiography were prospectively enrolled. Image quality was enhanced with an ultrasound contrast agent. Tests for cardiac biomarkers [high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), atrial natriuretic protein (ANP), brain natriuretic protein (BNP), endothelin (ET-1)] and cardiac computed tomography (CT) for CAC were performed. Results CSE (76% exercise, 24% dobutamine) was abnormal in 42 women (11.5%), and stress electrocardiogram (ECG) was positive in 22 women (6%). Rest BNP correlated weakly with stress wall motion score index (WMSI) (r=0.189, p<0.001). Neither hsCRP, ANP, endothelin, nor CAC correlated with stress WMSI. Predictors of abnormal CSE were body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus, family history of premature coronary artery disease (CAD), and positive stress ECG. Twenty-four women underwent clinically indicated coronary angiography (CA); 5 had obstructive (≥50%), 15 had nonobstructive (10%–49%), and 4 had no epicardial CAD. Conclusions The SMART trial is designed to assess the prognostic value of CSE in early menopausal women. Independent predictors of positive CSE were BMI, diabetes mellitus, family history of premature CAD, and positive stress ECG. CAC scores and biomarkers (with the exception of rest BNP) were not correlated with CSE results. We await the follow-up data. PMID

  11. A Study on Perception and Usage Status on Health Functional Foods in Women according to Menopause Status

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Heesook; Lee, Hae-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was performed to provide a reference base for suggesting proper guidelines for the health of the people by analyzing perception and intake pattern on health functional foods and by identifying needs in pre- and postmenopausal women. Methods We conducted a self-administered survey in women admitted to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at a university hospital between July and August, 2014. The survey questionnaire consisted of 8 items on general characteristics, 4 items on awareness on health functional foods, and 16 items on usage status. Results Of all 133 women with ages ranging between 19 to 67 years, postmenopausal women were 57 accounting for 42.9% of all subjects. Mean age was 55.4 ± 6.2 and menopausal age was 49.6 ± 4.3 in the postmenopause group. Mean age was 38.7 ± 9.0 in the postmenopause group. With respect to components of health functional foods, 76.3% of women answered "important" in the postmenopause group, significantly higher than 49.1% in the postmenopause group (P < 0.01). In regard to price, those who answered "important" accounted for the largest percentage in the premenopausal group at 56.6%, and those who answered "moderately important" accounted for 57.9% in the postmenopausal women. A significant difference was found between the two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion Development of products reflecting consumer needs can be considered. It is important to foster an environment allowing individuals to choose right health functional foods and further studies are warranted. PMID:27152310

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of high dose "ethinylestradiol" in post-menopausal advanced breast cancer patients heavily pre-treated with endocrine agents

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Amit; Robertson, John FR; Cheung, KL

    2006-01-01

    Background High dose estrogens (HDEs) were frequently used as endocrine agents prior to the introduction of tamoxifen which carries fewer side effects. Due to the development of resistance to available endocrine agents in almost all women with metastatic breast cancer, interest has renewed in the use of HDEs as yet another endocrine option that may have activity. We report our experience with one of the HDEs ("ethinylestradiol" 1 mg daily) in advanced breast cancer (locally advanced and metastatic) in post-menopausal women who had progressed on multiple endocrine agents. Patients and methods According to a database of advanced breast cancer patients seen in our Unit since 1998, those who had complete set of information and fulfilled the following criteria were studied: (1) patients in whom further endocrine therapy was deemed appropriate i.e., patients who have had clinical benefit with previous endocrine agents or were not fit or unwilling to receive chemotherapy in the presence of potentially life-threatening visceral metastases; (2) disease was assessable by UICC criteria; (3) were treated with "ethinylestradiol" until they were withdrawn from treatment due to adverse events or disease progression. Results Twelve patients with a median age of 75.1 years (49.1 – 85 years) were identified. Majority (N = 8) had bony disease. They had ethinylestradiol as 3rd to 7th line endocrine therapy. One patient (8%) came off treatment early due to hepato-renal syndrome. Clinical benefit (objective response or durable stable disease for ≥ 6 months) was seen in 4 patients (33.3%) with a median duration of response of 10+ (7–36) months. The time to treatment failure was 4 (0.5–36) months. Conclusion Yet unreported, high dose "ethinylestradiol" is another viable therapeutic strategy in heavily pre-treated patients when further endocrine therapy is deemed appropriate. Although it tends to carry more side effects, they may not be comparable to those of other HDEs (such as

  13. Hand osteoarthritis, menopause and menopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Watt, Fiona E

    2016-01-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the commonest musculoskeletal conditions, primarily affecting women over the age of 50, typically around the age of the menopause. Symptomatic disease can give rise to substantial pain, impairment of hand function and quality of life, leading to significant socioeconomic cost. There is currently no disease-modifying therapy, representing a huge unmet clinical need. The evidence for a relationship between hand OA and the menopause is summarised. Whether there is evidence for an effect of menopausal hormonal therapy on the incidence, prevalence or severity of symptomatic hand OA is critically reviewed, and gaps in our knowledge identified. Lastly, the potential mechanisms by which estrogen, or newer agents such as SERMs, might act to interfere with disease pathogenesis are overviewed. The need for specifically designed, controlled trials of agents in cohorts with symptomatic hand OA, refractory to standard symptomatic management is highlighted.

  14. The effect of 48 weeks of aerobic exercise training on cutaneous vasodilator function in post-menopausal females.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Gary J; Sharp, Lisa; Stephenson, Claire; Patwala, Ashish Y; George, Keith P; Goldspink, David F; Tim Cable, N

    2010-04-01

    Skin blood flow (SkBF) and endothelial-dependent vasodilatation decline with ageing and can be reversed with exercise training. We tested whether 48 weeks of training could improve SkBF and endothelial function in post-menopausal females; 20 post-menopausal subjects completed the study. SkBF was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF/blood pressure. Resting CVC was measured at 32 degrees C and peak CVC at 42 degrees C. Cutaneous endothelial-dependent and -independent vasodilatations were determined by the iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), respectively. All assessments described were performed at entry (week 0), and after 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks of training. Resting CVC measures did not change (P > 0.05) throughout the study. Peak CVC increased (P < 0.05) after 24 weeks (7.2 +/- 1.2 vs. 11.6 +/- 1.4 AU mmHg(-1)) and at the 36- and 48-week assessments (13.0 +/- 1.7 and 14.9 +/- 2.1 AU mmHg(-1), respectively). Responses to ACh also increased (P < 0.05) at the 24-week assessment (5.1 +/- 2.1 vs. 8.55 +/- 2.3 AU mmHg(-1)) and increased further at the 36 and 48-week assessments (11.6 +/- 3.7 and 13.2 +/- 3.9 AU mmHg(-1), respectively). Cutaneous responses to SNP increased (P < 0.05) after 36 weeks (8.7 +/- 2.1 vs. 13.02 +/- 2.23 AU mmHg(-1) at 36 weeks). VO(2max) increased after 12 weeks (23.5 +/- 0.7 vs. 25.4 +/- 0.9 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and improved (P < 0.05) further throughout the study (31.6 +/- 1.8 ml kg(-1) min(-1) at week 48). Aerobic exercise produces positive adaptations in the cutaneous vasodilator function to local heating as well as in cutaneous endothelial and endothelial-independent vasodilator mechanisms. Aerobic capacity was also significantly improved. These adaptations were further enhanced with progressive increases in exercise intensity.

  15. Novel use of the ovarian follicular pool to postpone menopause and delay osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Claus Yding; Kristensen, Stine Gry

    2015-08-01

    Life expectancy has increased by more than 30 years during the last century and continues to increase. Many women already live decades in menopause deprived of naturally produced oestradiol and progesterone, leading to an increasing incidence of menopause-related disorders such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases and lack of general well-being. Exogenous oestradiol has traditionally been used to alleviate menopause-related effects. This commentary discusses a radical new method to postpone menopause. Part of the enormous surplus of ovarian follicles can now be cryostored in youth for use after menopause. Excision of ovarian tissue will advance menopause marginally and will not reduce natural fertility. Grafted tissue restores ovarian function with circulating concentrations of sex steroids for years in post-menopausal cancer survivors. Future developments may further utilize the enormous store of ovarian follicles. Currently, the main goal of ovarian cryopreservation is fertility preservation, but grafting of ovarian tissue may also serve endocrine functions as a physiological solution to prevent the massive medical legacy of osteoporosis and menopause-related conditions in the ageing population. This intriguing solution is now technically available; the question is whether this method qualifies for postponing menopause, perhaps initially for those patients who already have cryostored tissue?

  16. Menopause. How Exercise Mitigates Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargarten, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    During menopause and the climacteric, women experience many changes that can affect nearly every organ system and cause psychological symptoms. This article reviews the specific changes and explains how exercise can address each symptom; outlines a practical approach physicians can use to help menopausal patients improve their quality of life. (SM)

  17. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Naturally Menopausal Women with Various Durations of Premenarche, Reproductive Periods, and Postmenopausal Stages

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuhang; Yu, Bin; Huang, Yu-qing; Zhou, Jing-nan

    2017-01-01

    Background. Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) exhibits a higher incidence in women. Due to various ages at menarche and menopause, estrogen levels vary, which may account for the differences in the occurrence, development, and prognosis of female patients with PTC. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between various durations in different estrogen levels and PTC and to provide important information to guide clinical management and treatment of this disease. Methods. First, we selected naturally menopausal female study subjects diagnosed with PTC at Zhejiang Cancer Hospital from 2007 to 2012 and then compared the differences in clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis among subjects with various lengths of premenarche, reproductive periods, and postmenopausal stages. Results. We found that all patients showed a significantly higher incidence of tumor multicentricity and intrathyroidal dissemination as the time after menopause increased. Additionally, women with shorter (<30) or longer (>38) reproductive lives had increased recurrence rates of PTC. Conclusions. In this study, we did not find any relationship of self-reported menarche and menopausal ages with the prognosis of PTC patients. More importantly, natural postmenopausal PTC patients with shorter or longer reproductive life, compared to the normal groups, had a higher rate of cancer recurrence and the patients with these characteristics could be recommended a more aggressive surgical treatment. PMID:28356910

  18. Bioidentical Hormones, Menopausal Women, and the Lure of the “Natural” in U.S. Anti-Aging Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Jennifer R.; Flatt, Michael A.; Settersten, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2002, the Women’s Health Initiative, a large-scale study of the safety of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for women conducted in the United States, released results suggesting that use of postmenopausal HRT increased women’s risks of stroke and breast cancer. In the years that followed, as rates of HRT prescription fell, another hormonal therapy rose in its wake: bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT). Anti-aging clinicians, the primary prescribers of BHRT, tout it as a safe and effective alternative to treat menopausal symptoms and, moreover, as a preventative therapy for age-related diseases and ailments. Through in-depth interviews with 31 U.S.-based anti-aging clinicians and 25 female anti-aging patients, we analyze attitudes towards BHRT. We illustrate how these attitudes reveal broader contemporary values, discourses, and discomforts with menopause, aging, and biomedicine. The attraction to and promise of BHRT is rooted in the idea that it is a “natural” therapy. BHRT is given both biomedical and embodied legitimacy by clinicians and patients because of its purported ability to become part of the body’s “natural” processes. The normative assumption that “natural” is inherently “good” not only places BHRT beyond reproach, but transforms its use into a health benefit. The clinical approach of anti-aging providers also plays a role by validating patients’ embodied experiences and offering a “holistic” solution to their symptoms, which anti-aging patients see as a striking contrast to their experiences with conventional biomedical health care. The perceived virtues of BHRT shed light on the rhetoric of anti-aging medicine and a deeply complicated relationship between conventional biomedicine, hormonal technologies, and women’s bodies. PMID:25795991

  19. Menopause accelerates biological aging

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Morgan E.; Lu, Ake T.; Chen, Brian H.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E.; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D. J.; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R.; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Horvath, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the “epigenetic clock”), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  20. Management of Menopausal Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms, with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen affected all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appears to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit: risk profile and safety of hormone therapy. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients’ risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely impacts the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit: risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26348174

  1. Large prospective study of ovarian cancer screening in high-risk women: CA125 cut-point defined by menopausal status.

    PubMed

    Skates, Steven J; Mai, Phuong; Horick, Nora K; Piedmonte, Marion; Drescher, Charles W; Isaacs, Claudine; Armstrong, Deborah K; Buys, Saundra S; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Horowitz, Ira R; Berchuck, Andrew; Daly, Mary B; Domchek, Susan; Cohn, David E; Van Le, Linda; Schorge, John O; Newland, William; Davidson, Susan A; Barnes, Mack; Brewster, Wendy; Azodi, Masoud; Nerenstone, Stacy; Kauff, Noah D; Fabian, Carol J; Sluss, Patrick M; Nayfield, Susan G; Kasten, Carol H; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Greene, Mark H; Lu, Karen

    2011-09-01

    Previous screening trials for early detection of ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women have used the standard CA125 cut-point of 35 U/mL, the 98th percentile in this population yielding a 2% false positive rate, whereas the same cut-point in trials of premenopausal women results in substantially higher false positive rates. We investigated demographic and clinical factors predicting CA125 distributions, including 98th percentiles, in a large population of high-risk women participating in two ovarian cancer screening studies with common eligibility criteria and screening protocols. Baseline CA125 values and clinical and demographic data from 3,692 women participating in screening studies conducted by the National Cancer Institute-sponsored Cancer Genetics Network and Gynecologic Oncology Group were combined for this preplanned analysis. Because of the large effect of menopausal status on CA125 levels, statistical analyses were conducted separately in pre- and postmenopausal subjects to determine the impact of other baseline factors on predicted CA125 cut-points on the basis of 98th percentile. The primary clinical factor affecting CA125 cut-points was menopausal status, with premenopausal women having a significantly higher cut-point of 50 U/mL, while in postmenopausal subjects the standard cut-point of 35 U/mL was recapitulated. In premenopausal women, current oral contraceptive (OC) users had a cut-point of 40 U/mL. To achieve a 2% false positive rate in ovarian cancer screening trials and in high-risk women choosing to be screened, the cut-point for initial CA125 testing should be personalized primarily for menopausal status (50 for premenopausal women, 40 for premenopausal on OC, and 35 for postmenopausal women).

  2. Perspective on post-menopausal osteoporosis: establishing an interdisciplinary understanding of the sequence of events from the molecular level to whole bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Current drug treatments for post-menopausal osteoporosis cannot eliminate bone fractures, possibly because the mechanisms responsible for bone loss are not fully understood. Although research within various disciplines has significantly advanced the state of knowledge, fundamental findings are not widely understood between different disciplines. For that reason, this paper presents noteworthy experimental findings from discrete disciplines focusing on post-menopausal osteoporosis. These studies have established that, in addition to bone loss, significant changes in bone micro-architecture, tissue composition and micro-damage occur. Cellular processes and molecular signalling pathways governing pathological bone resorption have been identified to a certain extent. Ongoing studies endeavour to determine how such changes are initiated at the onset of oestrogen deficiency. It emerges that, because of the discrete nature of previous research studies, the sequence of events that lead to bone fracture is not fully understood. In this paper, two sequences of multi-scale changes are proposed and the experimental challenges that need to be overcome to fully define this sequence are outlined. Future studies must comprehensively characterize the time sequence of molecular-, cellular- and tissue-level changes to attain a coherent understanding of the events that ultimately lead to bone fracture and inform the future development of treatments for post-menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:19846441

  3. Polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes and steady-state exemestane concentration in post-menopausal patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Daniel L.; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Seewald, Nicholas J.; Gersch, Christina L.; Desta, Zeruesenay; Flockhart, David A; Storniolo, Ana-Maria; Stearns, Vered; Skaar, Todd C; Hayes, Daniel F; Henry, N. Lynn; Rae, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of clinical and genetic predictors of exemestane pharmacokinetics was attempted in 246 post-menopausal patients with breast cancer enrolled on a prospective clinical study. A sample was collected two hours after exemestane dosing at a 1 or 3 month study visit to measure drug concentration. The primary hypothesis was that patients carrying the low-activity CYP3A4*22 (rs35599367) SNP would have greater exemestane concentration. Additional SNPs in genes relevant to exemestane metabolism (CYP1A1/2, CYP1B1, CYP3A4, CYP4A11, AKR1C3/4, AKR7A2) were screened in secondary analyses and adjusted for clinical covariates. CYP3A4*22 was associated with a 54% increase in exemestane concentration (p<0.01). Concentration was greater in patients who reported White race, had elevated aminotransferases, renal insufficiency, lower body mass index, and had not received chemotherapy (all p<0.05), and CYP3A4*22 maintained significance after adjustment for covariates (p<0.01). These genetic and clinical predictors of exemestane concentration may be useful for treatment individualization in patients with breast cancer. PMID:27549341

  4. A brief history of the International Menopause Society.

    PubMed

    Baber, R J; Wright, J

    2017-04-01

    Although some understanding of post-reproductive life dates back to Ancient Greece, the term 'menopause' was only introduced in the early 1800s by a French physician. Notwithstanding familiarity with the condition at that time, treatments were largely ineffective, often harmful and never evidence-based, and it was not until 100 years later with the identification and description of estrogen and progesterone that effective treatments became available. So efficacious were hormone therapies for menopausal symptoms that their prescription was often recommended for all postmenopausal women regardless of their needs, wishes or health status. For many there was benefit but for some there was harm. It was in this environment that a small group of clinicians determined to form an International Menopause Society (IMS) to conduct research into the appropriate use of hormone therapy in treating menopause symptoms, to hold regular congresses to educate colleagues and discuss research results and thus to improve the health and well-being of women in midlife and beyond. Formed in 1978, the IMS is now recognized as the global leader in its field, working towards these goals in collaboration with colleagues and other national and regional societies concerned with women's health. During that time, the IMS has been led by 13 Presidents and has conducted 15 World Congresses on the Menopause, all of which are reviewed in this paper.

  5. Metabolic implications of menopause.

    PubMed

    Polotsky, Hanah N; Polotsky, Alex J

    2010-09-01

    The incidence of metabolic syndrome increases substantially during perimenopause and early menopause. Postmenopausal women are at a higher risk of hypertension, proatherogenic lipid changes, diabetes, and severe cardiovascular disease as compared with their premenopausal counterparts. Whether or not menopause has a causative contribution to the deteriorating metabolic profile that is independent of chronological aging has been a subject of many studies. Menopausal transition is associated with significant weight gain (2 to 2.5 kg over 3 years on average), which is not dissimilar to that in premenopausal women of like age. Concomitantly, there is an increase in abdominal adiposity and a decrease in energy expenditure, phenomena that have been postulated to explain the higher risk of metabolic syndrome and increases in cholesterol and triglycerides. Hypertension and diabetes become more prevalent with age and should be timely diagnosed and treated. Lifestyle changes including moderately decreased caloric intake and aerobic exercise could prevent proatherogenic changes and weight gain observed with aging. Accurate prediction of cardiovascular risk in midlife women is essential to help identify the subset of women who are likely to benefit from intensive management of metabolic risk factors. This review focuses on metabolic changes associated with menopausal transition, specifically alterations in weight, waist circumference, body fat distribution, energy expenditure, and circulating biomarkers including adipokines.

  6. Use of compounded bioidentical hormone therapy in menopausal women: an opinion statement of the Women's Health Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    McBane, Sarah E; Borgelt, Laura M; Barnes, Kylie N; Westberg, Sarah M; Lodise, Nicole M; Stassinos, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Menopausal symptoms affect a significant portion of women. Traditional treatment with manufactured hormone therapy can alleviate these symptoms, but many women and their health care providers are concerned about the risks, such as venous thromboembolism and certain types of cancer, demonstrated with manufactured hormone therapy. Compounded bioidentical hormone therapy has been proposed and is often used as a solution for these concerns. Despite this use, no data are currently available to support the claims that compounded bioidentical hormone therapy is a safer or more efficacious option compared with manufactured hormone therapy. A common misperception is that all manufactured products consist of synthetic hormones and all compounded medications consist of natural hormones; however, in fact, significant overlap exists. Several key stakeholder organizations have issued statements expressing concern about the lack of evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of compounded bioidentical hormone therapy, in addition to concerns regarding prescribing patterns. The Women's Health Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy recommends against the consistent use of compounded bioidentical hormones as a safer option compared with manufactured therapy and supports the statements of other key organizations, acknowledging the need for more robust clinical studies to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of compounded bioidentical products compared with manufactured products.

  7. An innovative metal base denture design for a 55-year-old menopausal woman

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Vishwas; Bhatia, Garima; Jain, Nitul; Jadon, Ashwani Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a normal developmental stage in a woman's life, marking the permanent cessation of menstruation resulting from irreversible changes in the hormonal and reproductive functions of the ovaries and is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. Some of the common oral manifestations are oral burning sensation with associated mucosal infections, pain, altered taste perception, and alveolar bone loss. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to devise newer methods that would add along to the treatment modalities advised by gynecologists in relieving menopausal women from above symptoms. The present case report describes an innovative method of fabricating a metal base denture in an edentulous female that would help perimenopausal/menopausal/post-menopausal edentulous women feel hot/cold sensations of food/liquids, thereby giving them relief from pain, better taste perception, and relief from associated allergic and candidal infections that are common with conventional acrylic base dentures. PMID:24082754

  8. Associations Between the Periodontal Disease in Women Before Menopause and Menstrual Cycle Irregularity: The 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungdo; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-02-01

    The association between menstrual cycle irregularities and system disease has been evaluated in previous studies. However, the association between periodontal disease and menstrual cycle irregularity has not been fully investigated. The study aimed to evaluate the relationship between periodontal disease and tooth loss in women before menopause and menstrual cycle irregularity using nationally representative data.This study performed a cross-sectional analysis and used hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis models. Data from Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed. The analysis in this study was confined to a total of 1553 respondents over 19 years old who had not gone through menopause and had no missing values for the reproductive factors and outcome variables. A community periodontal index was greater than or equal to code 3 was used to define periodontal treatment needs.The risk of periodontal treatment needs tended to increase in the presence of menstrual cycle irregularity after adjustment for potential confounders (P for trend in the odds ratios = .0481 in model 1; 0.0613 in model 2; 0.0369 in model 3; 0.0456 in model 4). The number of natural teeth of 28 did not reach statistically significant differences (P for trend in the odds ratios = 0.2204 in model 1; 0.2373 in model 2; 0.2814 in model 3; 0.2609 in model 4).Menstrual cycle irregularity was positively associated with the risk of periodontal treatment needs in Korean women before menopause. However, there was no significant association between tooth loss and menstrual cycle irregularity. Menstrual cycle irregularity may be considered to be a potential risk indicator for periodontal treatment needs in Korean women before menopause.

  9. Manufacturing heterosexuality: hormone replacement therapy and menopause in urban Oaxaca.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    For several decades, hormone replacement therapies have been prescribed to women, not only to prevent disease but to improve the sexual functioning of menopausal women. The medical promotion of continued sexual activity in a woman's post-reproductive years is exported to locations outside of North America and Europe, which provides an opportunity to critically examine the cultural roots that have informed expert biomedical representations. This ethnographic study examined menopause and social class in Oaxaca de Juarez, Mexico using interviews, questionnaires, and textual analysis. The research found that biomedicine in conjunction with the pharmaceutical industry promoted culturally constructed gender hierarchies under the guise of optimal menopausal health. However, women's actual experience of gender and sexuality in mid-life diverged significantly from these expert representations. Themes that emerged in interviews and questionnaires included the importance of motherhood in old age, diminished sexual desire as not problematic, and greater sexual freedom at a post-reproductive age. Ultimately, biomedical discourse was not the sole arbiter of appropriate menopausal womanhood and femininity.

  10. Endocrinology of the Menopause.

    PubMed

    Hall, Janet E

    2015-09-01

    In women, age-related changes in ovarian function begin in the mid-30s with decreased fertility and compensatory hormonal changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis that maintain follicle development and estrogen secretion in the face of a waning pool of ovarian follicles. The menopause transition is characterized by marked variability in follicle development, ovulation, bleeding patterns, and symptoms of hyper- and hypoestrogenism. The menopause, which is clinically defined by the last menstrual period, is followed by the consistent absence of ovarian secretion of estradiol.

  11. Estrogen supplements in menopause.

    PubMed

    Booher, D L

    1990-01-01

    The number of women aged 65 and older is expected to double by the year 2000, increasing the need for effective management of symptoms related to menopause. Contemporary management of menopause addresses the continuum of events associated with the effects of estrogen deprivation on quality and duration of life, including neuroendocrine changes, urogenital atrophy, sexual dysfunction, skin and hair changes, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. The risks and benefits of management strategies, including hormone replacement therapy, must be weighted carefully by both physician and patient. The use of estrogens and progestins, alterative compounds, dosages, routes of administration, and their advantages and disadvantages must be analyzed.

  12. Fatty acid composition of the red blood cell membrane in relation to menopausal status.

    PubMed

    Tworek; Muti; Micheli; Krogh; Riboli; Berrino

    2000-10-01

    PURPOSE: Menopausal status effects female anatomical functioning at a variety of system-wide and cellular levels, including cellular membrane composition. This study analyzed a nested case-control ORDET data set of 433 pre and post-menopausal breast cancer controls to examine the effects of menopausal status on the fatty acid composition of the red blood cell membrane.METHODS: ORDET is a prospective cohort study conducted in Italy to investigate the etiologic role of hormones and diet in breast cancer development. The fatty acid composition was measured and analyzed by gas chromotography, comparing retention time with standard measurement. Twenty-two individual fatty acids were measured, recorded, and categorized into four fatty acid groups: saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated n-6 (PUFA n-6), and polyunsaturated (PUFA n-3) fatty acids.RESULTS: Post-menopausal women had consistently lower mean values for all four fatty acid categories and all individual fatty acids. Statistically significant mean differences, by menopausal status, were observed for three of the four fatty acid categories: saturated fatty acids (p = 0.006), PUFA n-6 acids (p = 0.001), and PUFA n-3 acids (p = 0.000). The biggest statistically significant differences in mean values among individual fatty acids for each category were observed for Palmitic acid (p = 0.009), Oleic acid (p = 0.040), Linoleic acid (p = 0.000), and Docosahexaenoic acid (p = 0.000). Individual fatty acids were also less highly correlated among post-menopausal women.CONCLUSIONS: There was an observed relationship between menopausal status and the fatty acid composition of the red blood cell membrane that warrants further study. This relationship may contribute to the physiological and psychological changes that occur during and after menopause, and may have far-reaching implications for women's health.

  13. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women (Post-MW) than premenopausal women (Pre-MW). Despite recent advances in preventive measures, the incidence of CVD in women has shown a rise that matched the increase in the Post-MW population. The increased incidence of CVD in Post-MW has been related to the decline in estrogen levels, and hence suggested vascular benefits of endogenous estrogen. Experimental studies have identified estrogen receptor ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30 (GPER) in blood vessels of humans and experimental animals. The interaction of estrogen with vascular ERs mediates both genomic and non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by increasing nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor. Estrogen also inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the vascular cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, lipid profile and the vascular inflammatory response have been reported. In addition to the experimental evidence in animal models and vascular cells, initial observational studies in women using menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) have suggested that estrogen may protect against CVD. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which examined the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in older women with established CVD (HERS) or without overt CVD (WHI), failed to demonstrate protective vascular effects of estrogen treatment. Despite the initial set-back from the results of MHT RCTs, growing evidence now supports the ‘timing hypothesis’, which suggests that MHT could increase the risk of CVD if started late after menopause, but may produce beneficial cardiovascular effects in younger women during the perimenopausal period. The choice of

  14. Liver disease in menopause.

    PubMed

    Brady, Carla W

    2015-07-07

    There are numerous physiologic and biochemical changes in menopause that can affect the function of the liver and mediate the development of liver disease. Menopause represents a state of growing estrogen deficiency, and this loss of estrogen in the setting of physiologic aging increases the likelihood of mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, declining immune responses to injury, and disarray in the balance between antioxidant formation and oxidative stress. The sum effect of these changes can contribute to increased susceptibility to development of significant liver pathology, particularly nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as accelerated progression of fibrosis in liver diseases, as has been particularly demonstrated in hepatitis C virus liver disease. Recognition of the unique nature of these mediating factors should raise suspicion for liver disease in perimenopausal and menopausal women and offer an opportunity for implementation of aggressive treatment measures so as to avoid progression of liver disease to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure.

  15. Influence of SULT1A1 genetic variation on age at menopause, estrogen levels, and response to hormone therapy in recently postmenopausal white women

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Ann M.; de Andrade, Mariza; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Onset and symptoms of menopause, and response to hormone therapy (HT) show large interindividual variability. SULT1A1 encodes for a highly expressed enzyme that metabolizes estrogens. We evaluated the relationship between genetic variation in SULT1A1, menopause age, symptoms, and response to HT. Methods: Women enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study at Mayo Clinic were randomized to 48 months of treatment with oral conjugated equine estrogen (n = 34), transdermal 17β-estradiol (E2) (n = 33), or placebo (n = 35). Linear regression models and ANOVA were used to test for association of SULT1A1 copy number, rs3760091, rs750155, and rs9282861 (SULT1A1∗2), with age at menopause and symptoms, levels of estrogens (estrone [E1], estrone sulfate [E1S], E2, and estradiol sulfate [E2S]), before and after HT. Results: SULT1A1 gene copy number affected the minor allele frequency for each single nucleotide polymorphisms tested. Before administration of exogenous hormones, increasing number of G alleles at rs9282861 was associated with earlier age at menopause (P = 0.014), lower frequency of night sweats (P = 0.009), and less severe insomnia (P = 0.046). After 48 months of treatment, SULT1A1 genotype was not associated with the presence of menopausal symptoms. In women randomized to oral conjugated equine estrogen, increasing number of the A allele at rs750155 was associated with lower E1S and E2S (P = 0.004 and 0.017), whereas increasing number of the C allele at rs3760091 was associated with lower E2S/E2 (P = 0.044). Conclusions: Interindividual variability in onset of menopause and symptoms before initiation of HT is explained in part by genetic variation in SULT1A1 and may represent a step toward individualizing HT treatment decisions. PMID:27300114

  16. Cognitive changes across the menopause transition: A longitudinal evaluation of the impact of age and ovarian status on spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Koebele, Stephanie V; Mennenga, Sarah E; Hiroi, Ryoko; Quihuis, Alicia M; Hewitt, Lauren T; Poisson, Mallori L; George, Christina; Mayer, Loretta P; Dyer, Cheryl A; Aiken, Leona S; Demers, Laurence M; Carson, Catherine; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive changes that occur during mid-life and beyond are linked to both aging and the menopause transition. Studies in women suggest that the age at menopause onset can impact cognitive status later in life; yet, little is known about memory changes that occur during the transitional period to the postmenopausal state. The 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) model simulates transitional menopause in rodents by depleting the immature ovarian follicle reserve and allowing animals to retain their follicle-deplete ovarian tissue, resulting in a profile similar to the majority of perimenopausal women. Here, Vehicle or VCD treatment was administered to ovary-intact adult and middle-aged Fischer-344 rats to assess the trajectory of cognitive change across time with normal aging and aging with transitional menopause via VCD-induced follicular depletion, as well as to evaluate whether age at the onset of follicular depletion plays a role in cognitive outcomes. Animals experiencing the onset of menopause at a younger age exhibited impaired spatial memory early in the transition to a follicle-deplete state. Additionally, at the mid- and post- follicular depletion time points, VCD-induced follicular depletion amplified an age effect on memory. Overall, these findings suggest that age at the onset of menopause is a critical parameter to consider when evaluating learning and memory across the transition to reproductive senescence. From a translational perspective, this study illustrates how age at menopause onset might impact cognition in menopausal women, and provides insight into time points to explore for the window of opportunity for hormone therapy during the menopause transition period. Hormone therapy during this critical juncture might be especially efficacious at attenuating age- and menopause- related cognitive decline, producing healthy brain aging profiles in women who retain their ovaries throughout their lifespan.

  17. Cooking with biomass increases the risk of depression in pre-menopausal women in India.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Madhuchhanda; Siddique, Shabana; Dutta, Anindita; Mukherjee, Bidisha; Ranjan Ray, Manas

    2012-08-01

    Cooking with biomass fuel, a common practice in rural India, is associated with a high level of indoor air pollution (IAP). The aim of this study was to investigate whether IAP from biomass burning increases the risk of depression. For this cross-sectional study, we enrolled a group of 952 women (median age 37 years) who cooked regularly with biomass and a control group of 804 age-matched women who cooked with cleaner fuel (liquefied petroleum gas). Depression was assessed using the second edition of Beck's depression inventory (BDI-II). Platelet P-selectin expression was assessed by flow cytometry and platelet serotonin was measured by ELISA. Particulate matter having diameter of less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM(10) and PM(2.5), respectively) in indoor air was measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Carbon monoxide (CO) in exhaled breath was measured by CO monitor. Compared with the control group, women who cooked with biomass had a higher prevalence of depression and depleted platelet serotonin, suggesting altered serotonergic activity in the brain. In addition, P-selectin expression on platelet surface was up-regulated implying platelet hyperactivity and consequent risk of cardiovascular disease. Biomass-using households had increased levels of PM(10) and PM(2.5), and biomass users had elevated levels of CO in expired air. Controlling potential confounders, cooking with biomass was found to be an independent and strong risk factor for depression. IAP from cooking with biomass is a risk for depression among rural women in their child-bearing age.

  18. Quality of Life in Infertile Menopausal Women; Development and Psychometric of an Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Montazeri, Ali; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction So far few studies have been designed to evaluate the quality of life instrument in infertile women. Aim The present study was decided to design a valid and reliable instrument to assess quality of life in Iranian infertile women in postmenopausal period. Materials and Methods Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were applied. The process was divided into three main stages including: instrument development, instrument validity and instrument reliability. Instrument development used three main steps, including determining content domain, item generation and instrument construction. Instrument was validated using face validity, content validity and factor analysis. Both internal consistency and test–retest reliability methods were used to confirm the reliability of the questionnaire. Results During content development, domain step obtained 83 items in all demission of life in infertile women. In the qualitative and quantitative face validity, 25 items had item impact less than 1.5 and were excluded from the questionnaire. In the content validity section, 17 items failure to obtain necessary score based on Lawshe formula, so were excluded from the questionnaire. Overall, 8 factors were extracted by factor analysis test. However, 67.38% of the total variance was explained by 4 factors, other 4 next factors explained the remaining 32.62% of the total variance. Totally, 34.01% of rotation variance was explained by first factor and 24.37% by second factor. In questionnaire internal consistency, 8 items had Cronbach’s alpha 0.942. Conclusion Therefore, we recommend the use of present questionnaire as a valid tool to evaluate the quality of life in infertile women during postmenopausal period. PMID:27504311

  19. A test of the intergenerational conflict model in Indonesia shows no evidence of earlier menopause in female-dispersing groups

    PubMed Central

    Snopkowski, Kristin; Moya, Cristina; Sear, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Menopause remains an evolutionary puzzle, as humans are unique among primates in having a long post-fertile lifespan. One model proposes that intergenerational conflict in patrilocal populations favours female reproductive cessation. This model predicts that women should experience menopause earlier in groups with an evolutionary history of patrilocality compared with matrilocal groups. Using data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey, we test this model at multiple timescales: deep historical time, comparing age at menopause in ancestrally patrilocal Chinese Indonesians with ancestrally matrilocal Austronesian Indonesians; more recent historical time, comparing age at menopause in ethnic groups with differing postmarital residence within Indonesia and finally, analysing age at menopause at an individual-level, assuming a woman facultatively adjusts her age at menopause based on her postmarital residence. We find a significant effect only at the intermediate timescale where, contrary to predictions, ethnic groups with a history of multilocal postnuptial residence (where couples choose where to live) have the slowest progression to menopause, whereas matrilocal and patrilocal ethnic groups have similar progression rates. Multilocal residence may reduce intergenerational conflicts between women, thus influencing reproductive behaviour, but our results provide no support for the female-dispersal model of intergenerational conflict as an explanation of menopause. PMID:24966311

  20. A test of the intergenerational conflict model in Indonesia shows no evidence of earlier menopause in female-dispersing groups.

    PubMed

    Snopkowski, Kristin; Moya, Cristina; Sear, Rebecca

    2014-08-07

    Menopause remains an evolutionary puzzle, as humans are unique among primates in having a long post-fertile lifespan. One model proposes that intergenerational conflict in patrilocal populations favours female reproductive cessation. This model predicts that women should experience menopause earlier in groups with an evolutionary history of patrilocality compared with matrilocal groups. Using data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey, we test this model at multiple timescales: deep historical time, comparing age at menopause in ancestrally patrilocal Chinese Indonesians with ancestrally matrilocal Austronesian Indonesians; more recent historical time, comparing age at menopause in ethnic groups with differing postmarital residence within Indonesia and finally, analysing age at menopause at an individual-level, assuming a woman facultatively adjusts her age at menopause based on her postmarital residence. We find a significant effect only at the intermediate timescale where, contrary to predictions, ethnic groups with a history of multilocal postnuptial residence (where couples choose where to live) have the slowest progression to menopause, whereas matrilocal and patrilocal ethnic groups have similar progression rates. Multilocal residence may reduce intergenerational conflicts between women, thus influencing reproductive behaviour, but our results provide no support for the female-dispersal model of intergenerational conflict as an explanation of menopause.

  1. A systematic SNP selection approach to identify mechanisms underlying disease aetiology: linking height to post-menopausal breast and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Elands, Rachel J. J.; Simons, Colinda C. J. M.; Riemenschneider, Mona; Isaacs, Aaron; Schouten, Leo J.; Verhage, Bas A.; Van Steen, Kristel; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Stoll, Monika; Weijenberg, Matty P.

    2017-01-01

    Data from GWAS suggest that SNPs associated with complex diseases or traits tend to co-segregate in regions of low recombination, harbouring functionally linked gene clusters. This phenomenon allows for selecting a limited number of SNPs from GWAS repositories for large-scale studies investigating shared mechanisms between diseases. For example, we were interested in shared mechanisms between adult-attained height and post-menopausal breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, because height is a risk factor for these cancers, though likely not a causal factor. Using SNPs from public GWAS repositories at p-values < 1 × 10−5 and a genomic sliding window of 1 mega base pair, we identified SNP clusters including at least one SNP associated with height and one SNP associated with either post-menopausal BC or CRC risk (or both). SNPs were annotated to genes using HapMap and GRAIL and analysed for significantly overrepresented pathways using ConsensuspathDB. Twelve clusters including 56 SNPs annotated to 26 genes were prioritised because these included at least one height- and one BC risk- or CRC risk-associated SNP annotated to the same gene. Annotated genes were involved in Indian hedgehog signalling (p-value = 7.78 × 10−7) and several cancer site-specific pathways. This systematic approach identified a limited number of clustered SNPs, which pinpoint potential shared mechanisms linking together the complex phenotypes height, post-menopausal BC and CRC. PMID:28117334

  2. Prevention of diseases after menopause.

    PubMed

    Lobo, R A; Davis, S R; De Villiers, T J; Gompel, A; Henderson, V W; Hodis, H N; Lumsden, M A; Mack, W J; Shapiro, S; Baber, R J

    2014-10-01

    Women may expect to spend more than a third of their lives after menopause. Beginning in the sixth decade, many chronic diseases will begin to emerge, which will affect both the quality and quantity of a woman's life. Thus, the onset of menopause heralds an opportunity for prevention strategies to improve the quality of life and enhance longevity. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, cognitive decline, dementia and depression, and cancer are the major diseases of concern. Prevention strategies at menopause have to begin with screening and careful assessment for risk factors, which should also include molecular and genetic diagnostics, as these become available. Identification of certain risks will then allow directed therapy. Evidence-based prevention for the diseases noted above include lifestyle management, cessation of smoking, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, a healthy diet and moderate exercise, as well as mentally stimulating activities. Although the most recent publications from the follow-up studies of the Women's Health Initiative do not recommend menopause hormonal therapy as a prevention strategy, these conclusions may not be fully valid for midlife women, on the basis of the existing data. For healthy women aged 50-59 years, estrogen therapy decreases coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality; this interpretation is entirely consistent with results from other randomized, controlled trials and observational studies. Thus. as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic disease after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered as part of the armamentarium.

  3. Low-Grade Inflammation, Oxidative Stress and Risk of Invasive Post-Menopausal Breast Cancer - A Nested Case-Control Study from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Joana A.; Fredrikson, Gunilla N.; Ericson, Ulrika; Gullberg, Bo; Hedblad, Bo; Engström, Gunnar; Borgquist, Signe; Nilsson, Jan; Wirfält, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although cancer promotes inflammation, the role of inflammation in tumor-genesis is less well established. The aim was to examine if low-grade inflammation is related to post-menopausal breast cancer risk, and if obesity modifies this association. Methods In the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort, a nested case-control study was defined among 8,513 women free of cancer and aged 55–73 years at baseline (1991–96); 459 were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer during follow-up (until December 31st, 2010). In laboratory analyses of blood from 446 cases, and 885 controls (matched on age and date of blood sampling) we examined systemic inflammation markers: oxidized (ox)-LDL, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, white blood cells, lymphocytes and neutrophils. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for breast cancer risk was calculated using multivariable conditional logistic regression. Results Inverse associations with breast cancer were seen in fully-adjusted models, for 2nd and 3rd tertiles of ox-LDL, OR (95% CI): 0.65 (0.47–0.90), 0.63 (0.45–0.89) respectively, p-trend = 0.01; and for the 3rd tertile of TNF-α, 0.65 (0.43–0.99), p-trend = 0.04. In contrast, those in the highest IL-1β category had higher risk, 1.71 (1.05–2.79), p-trend = 0.01. Obesity did not modify associations between inflammation biomarkers and breast cancer. Conclusion Our study does not suggest that low-grade inflammation increase the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer. PMID:27391324

  4. Changes in 5-hydroxytryptamine and cortisol plasma levels in menopausal women after inhalation of clary sage oil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Bok; Cho, Eun; Kang, Young-Sook

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the antidepressant-like effects of clary sage oil on human beings by comparing the neurotransmitter level change in plasma. The voluntary participants were 22 menopausal women in 50's. Subjects were classified into normal and depression tendency groups using each of Korean version of Beck Depression Inventory-I (KBDI-I), KBDI-II, and Korean version of Self-rating Depression Scale. Then, the changes in neurotransmitter concentrations were compared between two groups. After inhalation of clary sage oil, cortisol levels were significantly decreased while 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration was significantly increased. Thyroid stimulating hormone was also reduced in all groups but not statistically significantly. The different change rate of 5-HT concentration between normal and depression tendency groups was variable according to the depression measurement inventory. When using KBDI-I and KBDI-II, 5-HT increased by 341% and 828% for the normal group and 484% and 257% for the depression tendency group, respectively. The change rate of cortisol was greater in depression tendency groups compared with normal groups, and this difference was statistically significant when using KBDI-II (31% vs. 16% reduction) and Self-rating Depression Scale inventory (36% vs. 8.3% reduction). Among three inventories, only KBDI-II differentiated normal and depression tendency groups with significantly different cortisol level. Finally, clary sage oil has antidepressant-like effect, and KBDI-II inventory may be the most sensitive and valid tool in screening for depression status or severity.

  5. Menopause and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... that could cause feelings of depression and/or anxiety during menopause include: Having depression before menopause Feeling negative about menopause and getting older Increased stress Having severe menopausal symptoms Smoking Not being physically active Not being happy in ...

  6. Associations of Self-Reported Sleep Quality with Circulating Interferon Gamma-Inducible Protein 10, Interleukin 6, and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Healthy Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chen, Ting-Yu; Wu, Hung-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sleep disturbance is very common in menopausal women and poor sleep quality has been linked to systemic inflammation. However, the impact of poor sleep quality on health outcomes of menopausal women remains unclear. This study evaluated the relationships between sleep quality and inflammation in menopausal women. Participants and design This cross-sectional study enrolled 281 healthy women aged 45 to 60 years. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure quality of sleep. Multiplex assays were used to measure the levels of 9 cytokines in morning fasting plasma samples. Other variables measured in this study included clinical characteristics and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Setting The study was performed at a medical center. Results The 281 participants comprised 79 (28%) perimenopausal women and 202 (72%) postmenopausal women. Global PSQI scores were positively correlated with plasma hs-CRP levels (P = 0.012) and were marginally associated with interferon gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP10), interleukin 6 (IL6), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (MIP-1β) levels. After adjusting for age, body mass index, menopause duration, and follicle stimulating hormone, multiple linear regression analysis revealed that high PSQI scores and sleep efficiency < 65% were associated with elevated plasma levels of hs-CRP, IP10, and IL6. In addition, sleep duration < 5 hours was associated with high hs-CRP levels. Conclusion Our data show that poor sleep quality and low sleep efficiency are associated with elevated levels of circulating inflammatory factors IP10, IL6 and hs-CRP and that short sleep duration is associated with high levels of hs-CRP in menopausal women. These findings provide novel evidence that poor sleep quality is linked to low-grade systemic inflammation in menopausal women. PMID:28060925

  7. Menopause Symptoms | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... STDs), such as gonorrhea or even HIV/AIDS. Hot flashes. Many women have hot flashes around the time of menopause. They may be related to changing estrogen levels. Hot flashes may last a few years after menopause. ...

  8. Plasma prolactin changes during the administration of human menopausal gonadotropins in nonovulatory women.

    PubMed

    Kemmann, E; GEMZELL, C A; Beinert, W C; Beling, C B; Jones, J R

    1977-09-15

    Plasma prolactin concentrations were determined in 16 nonovulatory women during treatment with human meonpausal gonadotropins (hMG). In eight patients with initially normal prolactin levels of less than 20 ng. per milliliter, a significant rise was noted at the end of hMG administration, this is thought to be a response to increased endogenous estrogen concentrations. A similar rise in plasma prolactin levels was seen in some but not all of the eight patients with initially elevated "basal" prolactin concentrations. Three of these hyperprolactinemic patients had radiographic evidence of a pituitary lesion--either a pituitary adenoma or a "microadenoma"--but the variance in prolactin response could not be explained on this basis. The two groups of normo- and hyper-prolactinemic patients showed no significant difference in the required dosage and duration or hMG treatment, plasma estradiol-17 beta response, and ovulatory and pregnancy outcome.

  9. Influence of hormone supplementation therapy on the incidence of denture stomatitis and on chemiluminescent activity of polymorphonuclear granulocytes in blood of menopausal-aged women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Menopause is a health and social problem that affects a large number of women. Inadequate quantity of steroid hormones also impacts quality of the mucous membrane of the oral cavity. During menopausal age, many women wear removable prosthetic restorations in order to replace missing teeth. Such restorations may facilitate the development of inflammations in the surface of the oral cavity, referred to as denture stomatitis. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of hormone supplementation therapy on the incidence of Candida-associated denture stomatitis and on the metabolic activity of polymorphonuclear granulocytes in peripheral blood of female patients. Materials and methods The study was conducted on a group of women in menopausal age, users of hormone replacement therapy and of removable prosthetic restorations. Female patients were subjected to a clinical study that included interviews and physical examinations. Laboratory microbiological examinations were completed on the basis of direct swabs collected from the mucous membrane of the oral cavity and from the surface of dentures. Metabolic activity of polymorphonuclear granulocytes in peripheral blood of female patients was evaluated by means of a chemiluminescence test. Results Candida-associated denture stomatitis observed was characterized by a strong growth of fungi and a lower chemiluminescent activity of neutrophils in blood of female patients undergoing hormone supplementation therapy. Conclusions Patients using hormone supplementation therapy and removable prosthetic restorations constitute a high-risk group for Candida infections and inflammations of the mucous membrane of the oral cavity; thus they should remain under constant dental control. PMID:21147619

  10. Effects of Estrogen or Venlafaxine on Menopause Related Quality of Life in Healthy Postmenopausal Women with Hot Flashes: A Placebo-Controlled Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Caan, Bette; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Joffe, Hadine; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Larson, Joseph C.; Carpenter, Janet S.; Cohen, Lee S.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Newton, Katherine; Reed, Susan; Rexrode, Kathy; Shifren, Jan; Sternfeld, Barbara; Ensrud, Kris

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of low-dose estradiol (ET) or venlafaxine on menopause-related quality of life and associated symptoms in healthy peri- and postmenopausal women with hot flashes. METHODS A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial of low-dose oral 17-beta-estradiol 0.5-mg/day, venlafaxine XR 75-mg/day, vs. identical placebo was conducted among 339 women ages 40–62 years with ≥2 (mean 8.07, SD 5.29) daily VMS recruited at 3 clinical sites from November 2011 to October 2012. The primary trial outcome, reported previously, was the frequency of VMS at 8 weeks. Here, we report on secondary endpoints of total and domain scores from the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL) and measures of pain (PEG), depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7) and perceived stress (PSS). RESULTS Treatment with both estradiol and venlafaxine resulted in significantly greater improvement in quality of life, as measured by total MENQOL scores compared to placebo (mean difference for ET at 8 weeks of −0.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.7 to −0.2; p<0.001 and for venlafaxine of −0.2; 95% CI −0.5 to 0.0; p 0.04). Quality of life (QOL) domain analyses revealed that ET had beneficial treatment effects in all domains of the MENQOL except psychosocial, while venlafaxine benefits were observed only in the psychosocial domain. Neither ET nor venlafaxine improved pain, anxiety or depressive symptoms, although baseline symptom levels were low. Modest benefits were observed for perceived stress with venlafaxine. CONCLUSIONS Both low-dose estradiol and venlafaxine are effective pharmacologic agents for improving menopause-related quality of life in healthy women with vasomotor symptoms. PMID:25405571

  11. Symptoms of menopause: hot flushes.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Nanette

    2008-09-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMSs) are highly prevalent during the peri- and early postmenopause. They constitute a major driver for patient self-referral for medical care. Although most women will experience an abatement of their VMS by 5 years after their final menses, women with early or surgical menopause may have worse or more persistent symptoms, and up to 16% of naturally menopausal women continue to experience VMS well after their menopause is past. Although estrogen is the most effective known therapy, it is neither appropriate nor desirable for every symptomatic woman, and nonhormonal treatments such as gabapentin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors/selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors drugs, and the antihypertensives clonidine and alphamethyldopa may be helpful for some women. There is mounting evidence to support the ineffectiveness of many proposed complementary and alternative modalities. This review will highlight the natural history of VMS and the current medical evidence supporting various treatments.

  12. Menopause: Medicines to Help You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications English Publications Spanish Publications Publications in Other Languages Take Time to Care Program College Women's Health Pink Ribbon ... for You Menopause Office of Women's Health Take Time to Care Program ... Assistance Available: Español | 繁體中文 | Tiếng Việt | 한국어 | Tagalog | ...

  13. The Women of Agabagaya: Education and Post-Development Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Melanie D.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a snapshot ethnography conducted in Uganda with the Agabagaya Women's Group. The purpose of the study was to explore how women share knowledge among themselves to support their communities. Using post-development theory and Freire's critical theory as a lens, I argue that although international development is often focused…

  14. Menopause and sexuality: key issues in premature menopause and beyond.

    PubMed

    Graziottin, Alessandra

    2010-09-01

    Woman's sexuality encompasses sexual identity, sexual function, and sexual relationships. It is modulated throughout life by life and reproduction-related events, health, relationships, and sociocultural variables. The aging process and menopause are two potent contributors to female sexual dysfunction. The earlier the menopause, the more severe and complex the impact on sexuality is. The younger the woman, the less she realizes the different key goals of her life cycle (falling in love, having a satisfying sexual life, forming a stable couple, getting married, having a family) and the more pervasive the consequences on her sexual identity, sexual function, and sexual relationship can be. Premature menopause is an amplified paradigm of the complex impact menopause can have on women's and couple's sexuality. This paper will focus on biologically based sexual issues, namely desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain disorders, as well as key questions encountered in infertility. The concepts of "symptom inducer" and "symptom carrier" will also be addressed.

  15. Ambiguities of aging: Japanese experience and perceptions of menopause.

    PubMed

    Lock, M

    1986-03-01

    The initial findings of this study indicate that menopause is regarded as a natural life-cycle transition in Japan in which the biological marker of cessation of menstruation is not considered to be of great importance. Symptom reporting among all respondents is generally low regardless of menopausal status, and symptoms such as shoulder stiffness and headaches, which are reported frequently, are not linked specifically to menopausal status (even though individual informants may perceive them to be so). Symptoms of hot flashes and sudden perspiration are higher among peri- and post-menopausal women, but their prevalence appears to be much lower than research findings from other areas to date. Reports by Japanese gynecologists emphasize that menopausal women are liable to present with numerous non-specific somatic complaints. This may well be an accurate representation of a clinical population, but the findings of this present study indicate that such a picture is by no means representative of the average middle-aged female population in Japan. While occupational differences do not contribute to variation in reported symptomatology (with the exception of lumbago and shoulder stiffness), there are nevertheless considerable differences in the subjective meaning of menopause, many of which can be accounted for by class and occupational differences. Presentation of these differences awaits a future publication, but there is one topic which is of concern to the majority of the respondents from each of the sub-samples. The present generation of women entering their 50's are the first where the majority must face later middle age in a nuclear family, along with their husbands, although both they and their husbands have been socialized for the more distant male/female relationships of an extended family. Japanese women cannot look forward, as they did in the past, to the power and comforts derived from running an extended family; on the contrary many can expect a late

  16. Use of menopausal hormone therapy and risk of ductal and lobular breast cancer among women 55-74 years of age.

    PubMed

    Li, Christopher I; Daling, Janet R; Haugen, Kara L; Tang, Mei Tzu Chen; Porter, Peggy L; Malone, Kathleen E

    2014-06-01

    The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized trials found that use of combined estrogen and progestin menopausal hormone therapy (CHT) increases breast cancer risk, but use of unopposed estrogen hormone therapy (EHT) does not. However, several questions regarding the impact of hormone use on risk of different types of breast cancer and what thresholds of use confer elevations in risk remain. We conducted a population-based case-control study among women 55-74 years of age to assess the association between menopausal hormone use and risk of invasive ductal and invasive lobular breast carcinomas. Associations were evaluated using polytomous logistic regression and analyses included 880 ductal cases, 1,027 lobular cases, and 856 controls. Current EHT and CHT use were associated with 1.6-fold [95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.1-2.2] and 2.3-fold (95 % CI: 1.7-3.2) increased risks of lobular breast cancer, respectively, but neither was associated with risk of ductal cancer. Lobular cancer risk was increased after 9 years of EHT use, but after only 3 years of CHT use. Evidence across more than a dozen studies indicates that lobular carcinoma is the type of breast cancer most strongly influenced by menopausal hormones. Here, we characterize what thresholds of duration of use of both EHT and CHT that confer elevations in risk. Despite the rapid decline in hormone therapy use the WHI results were published, study of the hazards associated with these medications remains relevant given the estimated 38 million hormone therapy prescriptions that are still filled in the United States annually.

  17. Relationship between lower limb position and pelvic floor muscle surface electromyography activity in menopausal women: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Dymarek, Robert; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In physiotherapeutic practice, special attention is being given to the reciprocal anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical relationship of the pelvis and the structures connected to it. However, the scientific literature shows mainly the theoretical information about their mutual connections. The lack of information about these relations from a practical aspect coupled with the paucity of scientific papers on the impact of posture changes on the pelvic floor led the authors to conduct this study. The primary aim of this study was to compare the resting and functional bioelectrical activities of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) depending on three different positions of the lower limbs (positions A, B, and C) in the supine position. Materials and methods This was a prospective observational study evaluating resting and functional activities of the PFM depending on the position of the lower limbs. The study was carried out at the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland and the target group were women in the menopausal period. Bioelectrical activity of PFM was recorded using a surface electromyographic instrument in the supine position. Results of the values obtained in A, B, and C positions were compared using a one-way analysis of variance. Results In position A, the average resting surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of PFM was 6.9±2.6 µV; in position B, the result was 6.9±2.5 µV and in position C, the resting sEMG activity was 5.7±1.8 µV (P=0.0102). The results of the functional bioelectrical activity of PFM were as follows: position A – 20.3±11.8 µV, position B – 19.9±10.6 µV, and position C – 25.3±10.9 µV (P=0.0104). Conclusion The results showed that in the supine position, the PFM achieved the lowest resting activity and the highest functional activity. Therefore, the supine position can be recommended for the diagnosis and therapy of weakened PFM. PMID:28115836

  18. HR+/Her2- breast cancer in pre-menopausal women: The impact of younger age on clinical characteristics at diagnosis, disease management and survival.

    PubMed

    De Camargo Cancela, Marianna; Comber, Harry; Sharp, Linda

    2016-12-01

    Young women (20-39 years-old) with breast cancer are diagnosed with more aggressive tumours and consequently have poorer survival. However, there is an evidence gap as to whether age has an independent effect on survival of pre-menopausal women diagnosed with HR+/Her2- tumours. The aim of this population-based study was to compare characteristics at diagnosis, determinants of treatment and survival in women aged 20-39 and 40-49 years diagnosed with HR+/Her2- tumours. From the National Cancer Registry Ireland, we identified women aged 20-49 diagnosed with a first invasive HR+/Her2- breast cancer during 2002-2008. Women aged 20-39 were compared to those aged 40-49 years. Poisson regression with robust error variance was used to explore the impact of age on treatment receipt. Associations between age and survival from all causes was investigated using Cox models. In multivariate models, women aged 20-39 significantly more often having no cancer-directed surgery (IRR=1.49, 95%CI 1.07, 2.08). In those having surgery, younger age was associated with significantly higher likelihood of receiving chemotherapy; age was not associated with receipt of adjuvant radiotherapy or endocrine therapy. Women aged 20-39 undergoing surgery were significantly more likely to die than women aged 40-49 (HR=1.84, 95%CI: 1.31, 2.59). Age is an independent prognostic factor in younger women diagnosed with HR+/Her2- breast cancer, supporting the hypothesis that breast cancer in women under 40 has more aggressive behaviour, even within HR+/Her2- tumours. Future research should explore the reasons for poorer survival in order to inform strategies to improve outcomes in this age group.

  19. Comparison of Buckling Ratio and Finite Element Analysis of Femoral Necks in Post-menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, D; Kim, Kwang Joon; Lim, Sung-Kil

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Osteoporosis is a prevalent problem amongst the elderly. Bone mineral density (BMD) obtained from dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the gold standard in diagnosing osteopenia (-1.0 < t < -2.5) and osteoporosis (t > -2.5). However, following osteoporosis therapy, increases in BMD may be unreliable. Although hip fracture risk can be reduced with the aid of drugs, treated patients still face considerable risk as most people who sustain hip fracture do not have generalized osteoporosis. A study of the local distribution of bone mass was necessary as they contribute to the geometry and consequently the bone strength. Methods By identifying the respective regions in the femoral neck, the geometric changes were localized and differed between each patient, proving that drug treatment elicits local changes in mean outer radius and mean cortical thickness. Numerical analysis also validated the above findings, where critical strain regions were predicted at similar zones and this is coherent with the fact that reduced thickness of the cortical bone has been related to increased risk of fracture initiation. Results Hence, from individual radar plots, we can determine if the effect of drugs had outweighed the effect of aging. We can then propose a course of treatment drug better suited for the patient in the clinical scenario. Conclusion Clinically, little conclusion can be drawn from just the BMD in osteopenic / osteoporotic patients. This emphasizes the necessity of using geometry and structure to predict fracture risk. Focusing on a patient specific analysis at a local level will improve diagnosis of osteoporosis and ultimately fracture prediction. PMID:25371894

  20. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  1. Menstruation and the menopausal transition.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Siobán D; Paramsothy, Pangaja

    2011-09-01

    This paper characterizes changes in menstrual bleeding during perimenopause,including bleeding changes that represent markers of the menopausal transition. Recent results from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation and other cohort studies are reviewed. Emerging data describing subpopulation differences in the transition experience are highlighted. When treating women in the midlife, clinicians should pay careful attention to medical factors, including both conditions and treatments, that may increase menstrual blood loss or alter menstrual cycle characteristics sufficiently to obscure the onset of the menopausal transition or the final menstrual period.

  2. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Circadian rhythm and menopause.

    PubMed

    Pines, A

    2016-12-01

    Circadian rhythm is an internal biological clock which initiates and monitors various physiological processes with a fixed time-related schedule. The master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. The circadian clock undergoes significant changes throughout the life span, at both the physiological and molecular levels. This cyclical physiological process, which is very complex and multifactorial, may be associated with metabolic alterations, atherosclerosis, impaired cognition, mood disturbances and even development of cancer. Sex differences do exist, and the well-known sleep disturbances associated with menopause are a good example. Circadian rhythm was detected in the daily pattern of hot flushes, with a peak in the afternoons. Endogenous secretion of melatonin decreases with aging across genders, and, among women, menopause is associated with a significant reduction of melatonin levels, affecting sleep. Although it might seem that hot flushes and melatonin secretion are likely related, there are not enough data to support such a hypothesis.

  4. Mapping the primrose patch--a practical approach to herbal therapies in the menopause.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Women suffering post-menopausal symptoms will often seek alternative therapies. No alternative therapies have been shown to be more effective for hot flashes than estrogen replacement; nonetheless, there are more than 40 products on the alternative medicine shelf, which claim to bring relief to women in the climacteric. Patients will benefit from physician knowledge of the herbal remedies that are now heavily marketed, and apparently widely used, without FDA oversight.

  5. The Academic Experiences of Women Post 9/11 Veterans Attending Post-Secondary Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunden, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the perspectives of women Post 9/11 veterans on their experiences in the military and subsequently in higher education. Using feminist research methodology, I interviewed three women veterans about their decisions to join the military, their gendered experiences in the military, their decisions to enroll in college, and their…

  6. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  7. Safety and efficacy of low-dose esterified estrogens and methyltestosterone, alone or combined, for the treatment of hot flashes in menopausal women: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Liu, James; Allgood, Adam; Derogatis, Leonard R; Swanson, Stephen; O'Mahony, Michael; Nedoss, Bertrand; Soper, Herbert; Zbella, Edward; Prokofieva, Svetlana Vladimirovna; Zipfel, Lisa; Guo, Chun-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated safety and efficacy of esterified estrogens and methyltestosterone administered alone or in combination for the treatment of hot flashes in menopausal women. The 0.30-mg esterified estrogens and 0.30-mg methyltestosterone combination was the lowest effective dose, and our results are consistent with the known safety profile of estrogen and androgen combination products.

  8. Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity In Postmenopausal Women with Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Singh, Paras Nath; Hossain, Mohd Mobarak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The post-menopausal phase is characterized by a decline in the serum oestrogen and progesterone levels. This phase is also associated with higher incidence of peripheral neuropathy. Aim To explore the relationship between the peripheral motor nerve status and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels through assessment of Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity (MNCV) in post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College during 2011-2013. The study included 30 post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy (age: 51.4±7.9) and 30 post-menopausal women without peripheral neuropathy (control) (age: 52.5±4.9). They were compared for MNCV in median, ulnar and common peroneal nerves and serum levels of oestrogen and progesterone estimated through enzyme immunoassays. To study the relationship between hormone levels and MNCV, a stepwise linear regression analysis was done. Results The post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy had significantly lower MNCV and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels as compared to control subjects. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed oestrogen with main effect on MNCV. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that while the post-menopausal age group is at a greater risk of peripheral neuropathy, it is the decline in the serum estrogen levels which is critical in the development of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:28208850

  9. Menopause prediction and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Daan, Nadine M P; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2015-11-01

    Reproductive ageing in women is characterized by a decline in both the quantity and quality of oocytes. Menopause is reached upon exhaustion of the resting primordial follicle pool, occurring on average at 51 years of age (range 40-60 years). The mean global age at natural menopause (ANM) appears robust, suggesting a distinct genetic control. Accordingly, a strong correlation in ANM is observed between mothers and daughters. Few specific genetic determinants of ANM have been identified. Substantial efforts have been made to predict ANM by using anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels. AMH serum concentrations at reproductive age predict ANM, but precision is currently limited. Early ANM is associated with early preceding fertility loss, whereas late menopause is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality later in life. Menopause affects various women's health aspects, including bone density, breast, the cardiovascular system, mood/cognitive function and sexual well-being. If the current trend of increasing human life expectancy persists, women will soon spend half their life postmenopause. Unfortunately, increased longevity does not coincide with an equal increase in years spend in good health. Future research should focus on determinants of long term health effects of ANM, and efforts to improve women's postmenopausal health and quality of life.

  10. Comparison of the Hyaluronic Acid Vaginal Cream and Conjugated Estrogen Used in Treatment of Vaginal Atrophy of Menopause Women: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jokar, Azam; Davari, Tayebe; Asadi, Nasrin; Ahmadi, Fateme; Foruhari, Sedighe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vaginal atrophy is a common complication in menopause which does not improve with time and, if untreated, can affect the quality of life for women. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the vaginal cream of hyaluronic acid and conjugated estrogen (Premarin) in treatment of vaginal atrophy. Methods: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial on 56 menopausal women with symptoms of vaginal atrophy; they were randomly allocated to two groups (recipient conjugated estrogen and hyaluronic acid). The severity of each sign of atrophy was evaluated by visual analog signals (VAS) and on the basis of a four point scale. Also to recognize the cellular maturation with pap smear and the maturation degree were calculated according to the formula and scores 0-100. As to the vaginal PH, we used PH marker band, the rate of which was divided into 4 degrees. Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 20, and P≤0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The results of this study showed that the symptoms of vaginal atrophy compared with the baseline level were relieved significantly in both groups. Dryness, itching, maturation index, PH and composite score of the vaginal symptoms were relieved significantly in both groups (P<0.001). Dyspareunia in Premarin (P<0.05) and hyaluronic acid (P<0.001) decreased compared with pre-treatment. Urinary incontinence only showed improvement in the hyaluronic acid group (P<0.05). Improvement in urinary incontinence, dryness, maturation index (P<0.05) and composite score of vaginal symptoms (P<0.001) in the hyaluronic acid group was better than those in the Premarin group. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, hyaluronic acid and conjugated estrogen improved the symptoms of vaginal atrophy. But hyaluronic acid was more effective and this drug is suggested for those who do not want to or cannot take local hormone treatment. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2013022712644N1 PMID:26793732

  11. Effects of beer, wine and liquor intakes on bone mineral density in older adult men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moderate intake of alcohol has been reported to have beneficial effects on bone. However, different classes of alcoholic beverages have not been investigated. We examined alcohol intake (total and individual types) and BMD in 1251 men, 1317 post-menopausal and 264 pre-menopausal women in the populat...

  12. Dieting Behaviors of Young Women Post-College Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soliah, LuAnn; Walter, Janelle; Antosh, Deeanna

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health epidemic in the United States. During the past decade, obesity has increased across all education levels, including college graduates. The purpose of this research was to study the health decisions that young women, post-college graduation make regarding their food intake. The subjects in this study completed a…

  13. Physical Activity Patterns of Young Women Post-College Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soliah, LuAnn; Walter, Janelle; Antosh, Deeanna

    2008-01-01

    Americans need more physical activity in their daily routines. There are numerous physical as well as psychological benefits that can be credited to regular physical activity. The purpose of this research was to examine the physical activity patterns of young women, post-college graduation. The average woman in this study exercised 22 minutes per…

  14. Age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Hautaniemi, Susan I

    2003-04-01

    Comparisons of age at menopause are made difficult by the different methodologies applied across populations. This study extended an opportunity to apply different methodologies to the same data to draw some preliminary conclusions about age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico. Among 755 women aged 28 to 70 interviewed in the capital city of Puebla, Mexico, 447 (59.6%) were naturally or surgically postmenopausal. Mean recalled age at natural menopause in Puebla (46.7 years) appears to be similar to mean recalled age at menopause in Mexico City (46.5 years), suggesting that age at menopause is similar in urban Mexican populations. However, median age at menopause computed by probit analysis was later in the city of Puebla (49.6 years) compared to the median age computed by the same method in the capital city of León, Guanajuato, Mexico (48.2 years). Median age at menopause computed by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis suggests that age at menopause in Puebla (50.0 years) is older still, and close to that of the United States (51.1 years). The differences in median ages at menopause in Puebla are solely due to methodological choices and highlight the difficulty inherent in making inferences across studies of age at menopause between biological and/or cultural groups. Factors associated with age at menopause offer another avenue for comparing and understanding variation in this basic biological process. In Puebla, smoking, low levels of education, and nulliparity are associated with an earlier age at menopause.

  15. What is the influence of menopausal status on metabolic profile, eating behaviors, and perceived health of obese women after weight reduction?

    PubMed

    Riesco, Eléonor; Roussel, Michel; Lemoine, Sophie; Garnier, Sophie; Sanguignol, Frédéric; Mauriège, Pascale

    2008-10-01

    The duration of the numerous weight-loss studies that combine physical activity and diet varies from 3 to 14 months, and these studies have often considered pre- and postmenopausal women separately. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a 3-week weight-reducing program that combines caloric restriction and exercise on the metabolic profile, eating behaviors, and perceived health of sedentary obese pre- and postmenopausal women, after adjustment for age. In 10 pre- and 22 postmenopausal women, before and after weight loss, body composition, fasting lipid-lipoprotein profile, glucose and insulin levels, eating behaviors, and perceived health state were assessed. Body mass index, fat mass, and waist girth decreased after weight reduction in both groups (p < 0.0001). Reductions in fasting serum cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were greater in pre- than in postmenopausal women (p < 0.0001), whereas triacylglycerol, glucose, and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels decreased similarly in both groups (p < 0.05). Neither fasting insulin nor free fatty-acid concentrations were modified after weight loss in either group. Disinhibition (p < 0.005) and hunger scores on the three-factor eating questionnaire (TFEQ) (p < 0.05) and the state-anxiety score on the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) questionnaire (p < 0.0005) decreased in both groups, but restriction (TFEQ) increased (p < 0.01) and trait anxiety (STAI) decreased (p < 0.001) after weight reduction only in premenopausal women. Improvements in selected lipid-lipoprotein indices, eating behaviors, and perceived health-state components were better in pre- than in postmenopausal women, suggesting that menopausal status has an influence on some metabolic and behavioral responses to weight loss.

  16. Effect of Escitalopram on Insomnia Symptoms and Subjective Sleep Quality in Healthy Menopausal Women with Hot Flashes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ensrud, Kristine E.; Joffe, Hadine; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Larson, Joseph C.; Reed, Susan D.; Newton, Katherine M.; Sternfeld, Barbara; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Landis, Carol A.; Woods, Nancy F.; Freeman, Ellen W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Determine effect of escitalopram on insomnia symptoms and subjective sleep quality in healthy menopausal women with hot flashes. Methods Randomized, blinded, multi-center, placebo-controlled, parallel group 8-week trial in 205 women (95 African American; 102 white; 8 other) conducted between July 2009 and June 2010. Participants received escitalopram (10–20 mg/day) or placebo. Insomnia symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]) and subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]) at week 4 and 8 were prespecified secondary outcomes. A total of 199 women (97%) provided ISI data and 194 (95%) provided PSQI data at follow-up. Results At baseline, mean hot flash frequency was 9.78/day (SD 5.60), mean ISI was 11.4 (SD 6.3), and mean PSQI was 8.0 (SD 3.7). Treatment with escitalopram reduced ISI at week 8 (mean difference −2.00, 95% CI: −3.43 to −0.57, p<0.001 overall treatment effect), with mean reductions of −4.73 (95% CI −5.72 to −3.75) in the escitalopram group and −2.73 (95% CI −3.78 to −1.69) in the placebo group. Reduction in PSQI was greater in the escitalopram versus placebo group at week 8 (mean difference −1.31, 95% CI −2.14 to −0.49, p<0.001 overall treatment effect). Clinical improvement in insomnia symptoms and subjective sleep quality (≥50% decreases in ISI and PSQI from baseline) was observed more frequently in the escitalopram group versus placebo group (ISI: 50.0% versus 35.4%, p=0.04; PSQI 29.6% versus 19.2%, p=0.09). Conclusions Among healthy menopausal women with hot flashes, escitalopram at 10–20 mg/day compared with placebo reduced insomnia symptoms and improved subjective sleep quality at 8 weeks of follow-up. PMID:22433978

  17. Hormonal management of migraine at menopause.

    PubMed

    Nappi, Rossella E; Sances, Grazia; Detaddei, Silvia; Ornati, Alessandra; Chiovato, Luca; Polatti, Franco

    2009-06-01

    In this review, we underline the importance of linking migraine to reproductive stages for optimal management of such a common disease across the lifespan of women. Menopause has a variable effect on migraine depending on individual vulnerability to neuroendocrine changes induced by estrogen fluctuations and on the length of menopausal transition. Indeed, an association between estrogen 'milieu' and attacks of migraine is strongly supported by several lines of evidence. During the perimenopause, it is likely to observe a worsening of migraine, and a tailored hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) to minimize estrogen/progesterone imbalance may be effective. In the natural menopause, women experience a more favourable course of migraine in comparison with those who have surgical menopause. When severe climacteric symptoms are present, postmenopausal women may be treated with continuous HRT. Even tibolone may be useful when analgesic overuse is documented. However, the transdermal route of oestradiol administration in the lowest effective dose should be preferred to avoid potential vascular risk.

  18. Menopausal Sexual Interest Questionnaire (MSIQ): a unidimensional scale for the assessment of sexual interest in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Raymond C; Lobo, Rogerio A; Block, Barbara A; Yang, Hwa-Ming; Zipfel, Lisa M

    2004-01-01

    A panel of experts formulated relevant domains of sexual function with a focus on sexual interest and desire. The resulting 10-item scale, the Menopausal Sexual Interest Questionnaire (MSIQ), was examined for reliability (internal consistency and test-retest repeatability), construct validity (concurrent, convergent, and discriminant), sensitivity, and specificity in a clinical trial. A principal components analysis identified three factors (desire, responsiveness, and satisfaction) with eigenvalues > 1. A high degree of internal consistency was observed for each of the three domains. Test-retest repeatability correlation coefficients for domain scores were all highly significant. The MSIQ demonstrated adequate construct validity, with all three domains showing a high degree of sensitivity and with two of the three exhibiting specificity to the effects of treatment.

  19. Fitness benefits of prolonged post-reproductive lifespan in women.

    PubMed

    Lahdenperä, Mirkka; Lummaa, Virpi; Helle, Samuli; Tremblay, Marc; Russell, Andrew F

    2004-03-11

    Most animals reproduce until they die, but in humans, females can survive long after ceasing reproduction. In theory, a prolonged post-reproductive lifespan will evolve when females can gain greater fitness by increasing the success of their offspring than by continuing to breed themselves. Although reproductive success is known to decline in old age, it is unknown whether women gain fitness by prolonging lifespan post-reproduction. Using complete multi-generational demographic records, we show that women with a prolonged post-reproductive lifespan have more grandchildren, and hence greater fitness, in pre-modern populations of both Finns and Canadians. This fitness benefit arises because post-reproductive mothers enhance the lifetime reproductive success of their offspring by allowing them to breed earlier, more frequently and more successfully. Finally, the fitness benefits of prolonged lifespan diminish as the reproductive output of offspring declines. This suggests that in female humans, selection for deferred ageing should wane when one's own offspring become post-reproductive and, correspondingly, we show that rates of female mortality accelerate as their offspring terminate reproduction.

  20. Endocrine disrupters and menopausal health.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip; Rumsby, Paul; Harrison, Paul T C

    2004-06-01

    Chemicals known to disrupt the endocrine system of animal models are assessed for their potential impact on the health of menopausal and postmenopausal women. These "endocrine disrupters" consist of two groups of compounds - man-made and naturally occurring. There is some evidence to suggest that the naturally occurring phytoestrogens, derived from plant material, may have some beneficial effects on menopausal symptoms and the risk of breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Further studies are required to confirm these possibilities. Some man-made environmental pollutants appear to increase the risk of breast cancer, although again the evidence is inconclusive. Mechanistic experiments indicate that these chemicals interact with oestrogen receptors and alter metabolism in a number of different ways, some of which may be important in postmenopausal women. Further investigation of the differences in mode of action between the man-made and the natural endocrine disrupters may lead to important insights into their effects on women's health.

  1. Contribution of prostanoids to endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in the digital circulation of women with primary Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Easter, Melanie J; Marshall, Janice M

    2005-07-01

    In 15 women with PR (primary Raynaud's) disease and in 15 matched control women, ACh (acetylcholine) was delivered by iontophoresis to the dorsum of the finger (seven 20 s pulses of 0.1 mA, followed by one 20 s pulse of 0.2 mA, applied at 60 s intervals). Cutaneous RCF (red cell flux) was recorded from the same site by the laser Doppler technique. ACh evoked progressive increases in RCF that were comparable in pre- and post-menopausal women with PR [maxima of 294+/-113 and 259+/-59 pu (perfusion units) respectively, n = 7 and 8 respectively], and in pre-menopausal controls (225+/-92 pu, n = 7), but smaller in post-menopausal controls (140+/-63 pu, n = 8; P < 0.05). Aspirin (600 mg, orally), a COX (cyclo-oxygenase) inhibitor, potentiated the ACh-evoked dilator responses in pre- and post-menopausal women with PR (343+/-129 and 311+/-48 pu respectively) and post-menopausal controls (277+/-124 pu; P < 0.05), but had no effect in pre-menopausal controls (225+/-92 pu). These results suggest that vasoconstrictor COX products limit ACh-evoked endothelium-dependent cutaneous dilatation in the digits in pre- and post-menopausal women with PR and in post-menopausal, but not pre-menopausal, control women. We propose that PR disease is associated with abnormality in the ability of oestrogen to modulate the synthesis of endothelium-dependent vasodilator and/or vasoconstrictor COX products.

  2. Starting Hormone Therapy at Menopause Increases Breast Cancer Risk

    Cancer.gov

    According to a January 28, 2011 article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who start taking menopausal hormone therapy around the time of menopause have a higher risk of breast cancer than women who begin taking hormones a few years later.

  3. Herbs, menopause, and dialysis.

    PubMed

    Roemheld-Hamm, Beatrix; Dahl, Naomi V

    2002-01-01

    Women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for menstrual disorders, early menopause, and osteoporosis, and rarely discuss gynecologic and reproductive issues with their nephrologist. Various complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) products are of interest to women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who have these disorders. However, very little is known about the specifics of using herbal medicines in patients on chronic dialysis, resulting in numerous problems when patients and providers try to ascertain the safety and efficacy of these products. This article reviews evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of black cohosh, ginseng, chastetree, dong quai, evening primrose oil, soy products, and the so-called natural hormones. Pharmacologic parameters important to evaluating the quality of botanical products are discussed, along with recommendations and information resources.

  4. Life Course Exposure to Smoke and Early Menopause and Menopausal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Heba; Kline, Jennie; Jacobson, Judith; Tehranifar, Parisa; Protacio, Angeline; Flom, Julie D.; Cirillo, Piera; Cohn, Barbara A.; Terry, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Objective Early age at menopause is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, osteoporosis and all-cause mortality. Cigarette smoke exposure in adulthood is an established risk factor for earlier age at natural menopause and may be related to age at menopausal transition. Using data from two U.S. birth cohorts, we examined the association between smoke exposure at various stages of the life course (prenatal, childhood exposure to parental smoking and adult smoke exposure) with menopause status in 1,001 women aged 39 – 49 years at follow-up. Methods We used logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age at follow-up, to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) relating smoke exposure to natural menopause and menopausal transition. Results The magnitudes of the associations for natural menopause were similar, but not statistically significant after adjustment for confounders for i) women with prenatal smoke exposure who did not smoke at adult follow-up (OR= 2.7 [95% CI 0.8, 9.4]) and ii) current adult smokers who were not exposed prenatally (OR= 2.8 [95% CI 0.9, 9.0]). Women who had been exposed to prenatal smoke and were current smokers had three times the risk of experiencing natural menopause (adjusted OR=3.4 [95% CI 1.1, 10.3]) compared to women without smoke exposure in either time period. Only current smoking of long duration (>26 years) was associated with the timing of the menopausal transition. Conclusion Our data suggest that exposure to smoke both prenatally and around the time of menopause accelerates ovarian aging. PMID:25803667

  5. Dangers of the menopause. 1910.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Anne E

    2012-06-01

    Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over the last century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives will be a frequent column, containing articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the September 1910 issue, is "Dangers of the Menopause." The author, Anne E. Perkins, MD, states that its purpose is to correct "popular fallacies," so nurses can "disseminate knowledge of the real dangers" of menopause. It's interesting how much information in the article is still valid 100 years later, such as the need to investigate any postmenopausal bleeding. It's also noteworthy that the three symptoms causing women the most distress-hot flashes, insomnia, and mood problems-haven't changed, although a comparison of Dr. Perkins's article with "Managing Menopausal Symptoms" in this issue reveals that menopause management certainly has: from a "trip abroad" and avoiding "fancy work" in 1910 to physical exercise and acupuncture in 2012. To read the complete article from our archives, go to http://bit.ly/IZkCiD.

  6. [Intermediate-density lipoproteins and liver lipase in postmenopausal women].

    PubMed

    Halperin, H; Berg, G; Aisemberg, L; Brites, F; Siseles, N; Wikinski, R

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate atherogenic lipoproteins in post-menopause, we studied 73 healthy women, 49 to 65 years old (Post-menopausal Group), with 1 to 10 years of amenorrhea and body mass index below 27 Kg/m2, and 20 young women (Control Group). We have determined plasma cholesterol concentration in the lipoproteins of intermediate density in addition to the classical lipoprotein parameters: total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and fractionation of lipoproteins by electrophoresis. In 63 women from the Post-menopausal Group and 16 from the Control Group we studied the activity of hepatic lipase. Among these patients we selected at random 25 post-menopausal women and 13 controls to add measurements of triglycerides in the lipoproteins of intermediate density. Table 1 shows that the average plasma concentration of total cholesterol in the Post-menopausal Group was higher than that of the Controls (p < 0.001). The same was found for LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.001) and for triglycerides (p < 0.001) whereas the average concentration of HDL-cholesterol did not show significant differences. The Post-menopausal Group had high values of plasma lipoproteins of intermediate density, even with normal phenotypes (Table 2). Cholesterol but also triglycerides (Fig. 1) were responsible for this increase. A triglyceride rich lipoprotein subspecies of intermediate density was predominant in 73% of Post-menopausal women vs 23% of the Controls (p < 0.01, Table 3). No differences in hepatic lipase activity were seen between the two groups (Table 4), and non statistic correlation between the enzyme activity and IDL-triglycerides or HDL-cholesterol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Sex-specific risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline: pregnancy and menopause

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biology of sex differences is integral to personalized medicine. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline are two related conditions, with distinct sex differences in morbidity and clinical manifestations, response to treatments, and mortality. Although mortality from all-cause cardiovascular diseases has declined in women over the past five years, due in part to increased educational campaigns regarding the recognition of symptoms and application of treatment guidelines, the mortality in women still exceeds that of men. The physiological basis for these differences requires further research, with particular attention to two physiological conditions which are unique to women and associated with hormonal changes: pregnancy and menopause. Both conditions have the potential to impact life-long cardiovascular risk, including cerebrovascular function and cognition in women. This review draws on epidemiological, translational, clinical, and basic science studies to assess the impact of hypertensive pregnancy disorders on cardiovascular disease and cognitive function later in life, and examines the effects of post-menopausal hormone treatments on cardiovascular risk and cognition in midlife women. We suggest that hypertensive pregnancy disorders and menopause activate vascular components, i.e., vascular endothelium and blood elements, including platelets and leukocytes, to release cell-membrane derived microvesicles that are potential mediators of changes in cerebral blood flow, and may ultimately affect cognition in women as they age. Research into specific sex differences for these disease processes with attention to an individual’s sex chromosomal complement and hormonal status is important and timely. PMID:23537114

  8. Cellulite in menopause.

    PubMed

    Leszko, Marta

    2014-10-01

    Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly affected by female sex hormones, estrogens and progesterone. However, this review also emphasizes the influences of other hormones on the skin and subcutaneous tissue. During menopause, a low estrogen concentration is responsible for increased vascular permeability and decreased vascular tone, which lead to microcirculation impairment and are important factors predisposing to the development of cellulite. The effects of estrogen deficiency on the skin connective tissue include a decreased production and topical content of both type I and III collagen and elastin fibers, which also contributes to cellulite. This paper presents diagnostic methods and clinical types of cellulite, as well as principal instrumental and manual treatments used for the reduction of the condition. Preparations containing ingredients which help to improve the metabolism of subcutaneous fat and enhance blood and lymphatic circulation, applied in cosmetology and esthetic medicine practice, have been reviewed. Furthermore, we provide an array of opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment modalities presented here.

  9. Cellulite in menopause

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly affected by female sex hormones, estrogens and progesterone. However, this review also emphasizes the influences of other hormones on the skin and subcutaneous tissue. During menopause, a low estrogen concentration is responsible for increased vascular permeability and decreased vascular tone, which lead to microcirculation impairment and are important factors predisposing to the development of cellulite. The effects of estrogen deficiency on the skin connective tissue include a decreased production and topical content of both type I and III collagen and elastin fibers, which also contributes to cellulite. This paper presents diagnostic methods and clinical types of cellulite, as well as principal instrumental and manual treatments used for the reduction of the condition. Preparations containing ingredients which help to improve the metabolism of subcutaneous fat and enhance blood and lymphatic circulation, applied in cosmetology and esthetic medicine practice, have been reviewed. Furthermore, we provide an array of opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment modalities presented here. PMID:26327870

  10. Sexuality and the menopause.

    PubMed

    Pitkin, Joan

    2009-02-01

    Sexuality is innate within all women to a greater or lesser extent, and is affected by a number of extrinsic factors that occur in the menopausal transition. Assessing hormone status is difficult as evidence exists that sex hormones may differ between ethnic groups, and that bio-assays may be insensitive at lower testosterone levels. Data are available on the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction, but results from cross-sectional studies differ from those of longitudinal studies. The original traditional models of human sexual response have been challenged, and new models have been defined which show more complex interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Definitions of sexual dysfunction have been redefined. There are a limited number of randomized, placebo-controlled trials of drugs to improve sexual function. These include sildenafil citrate, tibolone and hormone replacement therapy. Randomized controlled trials on testosterone replacement in naturally and/or surgically menopausal patients with female sexual dysfunction have been criticized for a high placebo response rate and short duration. This chapter seeks to put sexuality into perspective and to define both function and dysfunction.

  11. Contemporary Alternatives to Plant Estrogens for Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Stacie E.; Studee, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Every year, millions of women begin the peri-menopause and may experience a number of symptoms related to this transition. Many women are reluctant to use exogenous hormone therapy for treatment of menopausal symptoms and are turning to botanical and dietary supplements (BDS) for relief. This paper reviews the literature on alternatives to plant estrogens for relief of menopausal symptoms. Methods The MEDLINE database was searched for clinical trials of non-estrogenic plant extracts for menopausal symptoms. To be included, studies had to include peri- or postmenopausal women as subjects. All clinical trials (randomized-controlled trials, open trials, and comparison group studies) were included for this review. Results Black Cohosh appears to be one of the most effective botanicals for relief of vasomotor symptoms, while St. John’s wort can improve mood disorders related to the menopausal transition. Many other botanicals have limited evidence to demonstrate safety and efficacy for relief of symptoms related to menopause. Conclusions A growing body of evidence suggests that some botanicals and dietary supplements could result in improved clinical outcomes. Health care providers should discuss these issues with their patients so they can assist them in managing these alternative therapies through an evidence-based approach. PMID:16884867

  12. Exercise to reduce vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms: a review.

    PubMed

    Daley, A J; Stokes-Lampard, H J; Macarthur, C

    2009-07-20

    Many women are reluctant to consider HRT as a therapeutic option for menopausal symptoms and are keen to use non-pharmacological treatments. Evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) concerning the effects of aerobic exercise on vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms is limited but what evidence we do have suggests that aerobic exercise can improve psychological health and quality of life in vasomotor symptomatic women. In addition, several RCTs of middle-aged/menopausal-aged women have found that aerobic exercise can invoke significant improvements in several common menopause-related symptoms (e.g. mood, health-related QoL and insomnia), relative to non-exercise comparison groups. There is some evidence that alternative forms of low intensity exercise such as yoga are beneficial in reducing vasomotor symptoms and improving psychological well-being in menopausal women. Collectively, these RCTs highlight the broader potential that exercise could have for women during the menopause transition. Whilst both the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in the UK and the North American Menopause Society have recommended that women be advised to consider aerobic exercise as a treatment for vasomotor menopausal symptoms, to make any evidence-based conclusions regarding the effectiveness of exercise in managing these symptoms, more high quality research is needed.

  13. Exercise at menopause: a critical difference.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, M

    1999-01-01

    Even at menopause, fitness can reduce the risk of heart disease, osteoporosis, and diabetes, yet only 38% of women over age 19 exercise regularly. A sports medicine expert recommends that exercise be encouraged and prescribed, even for women with a variety of comorbidities.

  14. The effect of 8-week different-intensity walking exercises on serum hepcidin, IL-6, and iron metabolism in pre-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Buyukyazi, G; Ulman, C; Çelik, A; Çetinkaya, C; Şişman, A R; Çimrin, D; Doğru, Y; Kaya, D

    2017-03-01

    Objective Hepcidin may be an important mediator in exercise-induced iron deficiency. Despite the studies investigating acute exercise effects on hepcidin and markers of iron metabolism, we found no studies examining the chronic effects of walking exercises (WE) on hepcidin and markers of iron metabolism in premenopausal women. The chronic effects of two 8-week different-intensity WE on hepcidin, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and markers of iron metabolism in pre-menopausal women were examined. Methods Exercise groups (EG) [moderate tempo walking group (MTWG), n = 11; brisk walking group (BWG), n = 11] walked 3 days/week, starting from 30 to 51 min. Control group (CG; n = 8) did not perform any exercises. BWG walked at ∼70%-75%; MTWG at ∼50%-55% of HRRmax. VO2max, hepcidin, IL-6, and iron metabolism markers were determined before and after the intervention. Results VO2max increased in both EGs, favoring the BWG. Hepcidin increased in the BWG (p < 0.01) and CG (p < 0.05). IL-6 decreased in the BWG and the MTWG (p < 0.05; p < 0.01). While iron, ferritin, transferrin, and transferrin saturation levels did not change in any group, total iron binding capacity (p < 0.05), red blood cells (p < 0.05), and hematocrit (p < 0.01) increased only in the BWG. Conclusion Both WE types may be useful to prevent inflammation. However, brisk walking is advisable due to the positive changes in VO2max and some iron metabolism parameters, which may contribute to prevent iron deficiency. The increase in hepcidin levels remains unclear and necessitates further studies.

  15. Managing the menopause: British Menopause Society Council consensus statement on hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Pitkin, Joan; Rees, Margaret C P; Gray, Sarah; Lumsden, Mary Ann; Marsden, Jo; Stevenson, John; Williamson, Jennifer

    2005-12-01

    The British Menopause Society Council aims to help health professionals inform and advise women about the menopause. This guidance regarding estrogen-based hormone replacement therapy (HRT), including tibolone, which is classified in the British National Formulary as HRT, responds to the results and analysis of the randomized Women's Health Initiative studies and the observational Million Women Study. Treatment choice should be based on up-to-date information and targeted to individual women's needs. HRT still offers the potential for benefit to outweigh harm, providing the appropriate regimen has been instigated in terms of dose, route and combination.

  16. Ventilatory responses to exercise and CO2 after menopause in healthy women: effects of age and fitness.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Margie H; Beaudin, Andrew E; Brown, Allison D; Leigh, Richard; Poulin, Marc J

    2012-10-15

    The extent to which aging affects respiratory control in postmenopausal women remains relatively unknown. In a cross-sectional study of 39 postmenopausal women (50-79 years), we examined the influence of age and fitness on the ventilatory responses to hypercapnia (HCVR; +8 mmHg) and exercise (ΔV˙(E)/ΔV˙CO2) above and below the anaerobic threshold (AT). Data were analyzed using the full cohort, by age (younger postmenopausal: YPM, 50-64 years; and older postmenopausal: OPM, 65-79 years) and fitness as per our previous work (Active: V˙O2max ≥90% age-predicted values; and Sedentary: V˙O2max <90% age-predicted values). Although age did not affect the sensitivity of HCVR, Active women had significantly lower HCVR gain compared to sedentary women (Sedentary: 2.12±0.80; Active: 1.57±0.73, p=0.02). In contrast, age, but not fitness, was inversely related to ΔV˙(E)/ΔV˙CO2 above AT (YPM: 46.8±11.5; OPM: 34.8±6.9, p<0.01) which may be explained, at least in part, by age-related declines in lung function. HCVR and ΔV˙(E)/ΔV˙CO2 were not correlated.

  17. Use of Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Bioidentical Hormone Therapy in Australian Women 50 to 69 Years of Age: Results from a National, Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Velentzis, Louiza S; Banks, Emily; Sitas, Freddy; Salagame, Usha; Tan, Eng Hooi; Canfell, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Menopausal Hormone Therapy (MHT) use in Australia fell by 55% from 2001 to 2005, following the release of large-scale findings on its risks and benefits. Comprehensive national data, including information on overall prevalence of MHT use as well as information on duration of use in Australia have not been reported since the 2004-5 National Health Survey, when 11% of women aged 45+ years were estimated to be current MHT users. No national data are available on prevalence of use of "bioidentical" hormone therapy (BHT). The objective of this study was to determine recent prevalence of MHT and BHT use. A cross-sectional, national, age-stratified, population survey was conducted in 2013. Eligible women, aged 50-69 years, resident in Australia were randomly sampled in 5-year age groups from the Medicare enrolment database (Australia's universal health scheme). The response rate was 22% based on return of completed questionnaires, and analyses were restricted to 4,389 women within the specified age range. The estimated population-weighted prevalence of current use of MHT was 13% (95%CI 12-14), which was broadly similar to the previously reported national figures in 2004-5, suggesting that the use of MHT in Australia has largely stabilised over the past decade. A total of 39% and 20% of current-users with an intact uterus reported use of oestrogen-progestagen MHT and oestrogen-only MHT, respectively, whereas 77% of hysterectomised current-users used oestrogen-only MHT. Almost three-quarters of current-users [population-weighted prevalence 9% (95%CI 8-10)] had used MHT for ≥5 years. In regard to BHT, estimated population-weighted prevalence of ever use was 6% (95%CI 6-7) and 2% (95%CI 2-3) for current use. The population-weighted prevalence of MHT and BHT combined, in current users in their fifties and sixties was 15% (95%CI 14-16). These data provide a recent national "snapshot" of Australian women's use of both conventional MHT and of BHT.

  18. The concentration of forming and resorption markers in menopausal period women with osteoartrosis changes at spinal vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Stanosz, Małgorzata; Myśliwiec, Leszek; Stanosz, Stanisław

    2006-12-29

    Introduction Osteoartrosis is a genetically determined disease, which develops on multisystem diseases, spreads on joint cartilage, overcartilage bone and soft structure of the joint. The aim of the work is to evaluate the relationship between mineral density of spinal vertebrae and the concentration of basic progesterone and progesterone after a test with metoklopramid.. Material and methods. The research was based on 50 women, aged 50,7+/-4,4 , in an early physiological postmenopausal period, divided into two groups, the control and the exam group, depending on mineral density of spinal vertebrae. The concentration of estradiol, estron, prolaktyn, prolaxtic/MCP, osteocalcyn, prokolagen, alkali bone fhosphatase, total calcium and ionic calcium in serum and pirydynolin, dezoksypirydynolin and total calcium in urine were tested. Statistic analysis was made by means of statistic packet Statistica Pl version 5 of StatSoft company. Results. In women with osteoartrosis, the concentration of estradiol, alkali bone fhosphatase, pirydynolin and dezoksypirydynolin significantly decreased, the concentration of basic prolaktyn and prolactin after a test with metoklopramid significantly increased, and the concentration of estron, prokolagen, osteocalcyn, total calcium and ionic calcium in urine and serum insignificantly decreased. Conclusion 1.The decrease of bone metabolism markers in women with osteoartrosis may contribute to handicap of osteoblasts and osteoklasts function. 2. Dopaminergic treatment should be used in women with osteoatrisis syndrome who have frequent hyperprolactynic problems 3. Lack of correlation between the mineral density of spinal vertebrae and the concentration of pirydynolin and dezoksypirydynolin in women with osteoartrosis suggest that resorption disease is not the main pathogenic factor of osteoartrosis diseases.

  19. Lifestyle Interventions Targeting Body Weight Changes during the Menopause Transition: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jull, Janet; Stacey, Dawn; Beach, Sarah; Dumas, Alex; Strychar, Irene; Ufholz, Lee-Anne; Prince, Stephanie; Abdulnour, Joseph; Prud'homme, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effectiveness of exercise and/or nutrition interventions and to address body weight changes during the menopause transition. Methods. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using electronic databases, grey literature, and hand searching. Two independent researchers screened for studies using experimental designs to evaluate the impact of exercise and/or nutrition interventions on body weight and/or central weight gain performed during the menopausal transition. Studies were quality appraised using Cochrane risk of bias. Included studies were analyzed descriptively. Results. Of 3,564 unique citations screened, 3 studies were eligible (2 randomized controlled trials, and 1 pre/post study). Study quality ranged from low to high risk of bias. One randomized controlled trial with lower risk of bias concluded that participation in an exercise program combined with dietary interventions might mitigate body adiposity increases, which is normally observed during the menopause transition. The other two studies with higher risk of bias suggested that exercise might attenuate weight loss or weight gain and change abdominal adiposity patterns. Conclusions. High quality studies evaluating the effectiveness of interventions targeting body weight changes in women during their menopause transition are needed. Evidence from one higher quality study indicates an effective multifaceted intervention for women to minimize changes in body adiposity. PMID:24971172

  20. Hot flushes in healthy aging men differ from those in men with prostate cancer and in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anna-Clara Spetz; Thorell, Lars-Håkan; Theodorsson, Elvar; Hammar, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) seems to be involved in hot flushes in women and in castrated men. Therefore, we studied whether the plasma concentrations of CGRP changed during flushes in a group of healthy aging men. Twelve men (49-71 years) with no history of current or former prostate cancer or hormonal treatment reporting ≥ 20 flushes/week were investigated. Blood samples were drawn during and between flushes for analysis of CGRP and also androgen concentrations, that is, testosterone and bioavailable testosterone were analysed. Skin temperature and skin conductance were monitored. Thirty-five flushes were reported by 10 men. The plasma concentrations of CGRP did not increase during flushes. No significant change in skin temperature or conductance was found. CGRP is probably not involved in the mechanisms of flushes in healthy aging men. Therefore, flushes in aging healthy men seem to be different from flushes in men and women deprived of sex steroids where CGRP increases during flushes.

  1. Assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms in different stages of menopause

    PubMed Central

    Varella, Larissa Ramalho Dantas; Bezerra da Silva, Rossânia; Eugênia de Oliveira, Maria Clara; Melo, Priscylla Hellouyse Angelo; Maranhão, Técia Maria de Oliveira; Micussi, Maria Thereza Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To assess lower urinary tract symptoms in different stages of menopause and the quality of life of females with incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] The sample consisted of 302 females, aged between 40 and 56 years, divided into three groups: PRE (n= 81), PERI (n= 108) and POST (n= 113). This was a cross-sectional, analytical, observational study. Data were collected by assessment chart and conducting the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. [Results] Most of the women had less than 10 years of schooling and were married. In PERI and POST menopause, the most frequent lower urinary tract symptoms were urinary urgency and stress incontinence. The PRE group did not exhibit nocturia, urge incontinence or urinary urgency, and had the lowest symptoms frequency. In the three stages, stress incontinence was the most prevalent symptom. Of the three menopause stages, PERI had a greater impact on urinary incontinence according to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. [Conclusion] The presence of lower urinary tract symptoms can vary across the different stages of menopause and the urinary incontinence was the most frequent complaint. Moreover, it was observed that quality of life was more affected in the perimenopause stage. PMID:27942131

  2. Assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms in different stages of menopause.

    PubMed

    Varella, Larissa Ramalho Dantas; Bezerra da Silva, Rossânia; Eugênia de Oliveira, Maria Clara; Melo, Priscylla Hellouyse Angelo; Maranhão, Técia Maria de Oliveira; Micussi, Maria Thereza Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] To assess lower urinary tract symptoms in different stages of menopause and the quality of life of females with incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] The sample consisted of 302 females, aged between 40 and 56 years, divided into three groups: PRE (n= 81), PERI (n= 108) and POST (n= 113). This was a cross-sectional, analytical, observational study. Data were collected by assessment chart and conducting the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. [Results] Most of the women had less than 10 years of schooling and were married. In PERI and POST menopause, the most frequent lower urinary tract symptoms were urinary urgency and stress incontinence. The PRE group did not exhibit nocturia, urge incontinence or urinary urgency, and had the lowest symptoms frequency. In the three stages, stress incontinence was the most prevalent symptom. Of the three menopause stages, PERI had a greater impact on urinary incontinence according to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. [Conclusion] The presence of lower urinary tract symptoms can vary across the different stages of menopause and the urinary incontinence was the most frequent complaint. Moreover, it was observed that quality of life was more affected in the perimenopause stage.

  3. Treating schizophrenia at the time of menopause.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to optimize treatment for women with schizophrenia during the menopause. Recommendations are based on a relatively sparse literature derived from searching PubMed, PsychINFO, SOCINDEX with appropriate search terms for all years subsequent to 2000. Attention needs to be paid to menopausal symptoms in women with schizophrenia and to the possibility that psychotic symptoms may worsen at this time and that general health may deteriorate. Antipsychotic treatment may need to be modified and cardiac and metabolic health indices closely monitored.

  4. The timing of the age at which natural menopause occurs.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ellen B

    2011-09-01

    The timing of natural menopause is a clinically important indicator of longevity and risk of morbidity and mortality. Demographic, menstrual, reproductive, familial, genetic, and lifestyle factors seem to be important in this timing. Smoking, lower parity and poor socioeconomic status are associated with earlier menopause. However, a number of relationships have been inconsistent; others remain largely unexplored. Much remains to be learned about factors that affect follicular atresia and the onset and duration of perimenopause and the timing of the natural menopause. Knowledge about these relationships offers women and their health care providers enhanced understanding and choices to deal with menopause.

  5. The Menopause Time of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet examines menopause and the changes associated with it. Menopause is briefly described, surgical menopause is explained, and the relationship between menopause and the reproductive cycle is discussed. Signs of menopause are described, including hot flashes and vaginal and urinary tract changes. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is explained…

  6. [The organization of medical stomatological care of women in post-natal period].

    PubMed

    Kulikova, N G; Omeltchuk, N N; Zalenskiy, V A; Tkachenko, A S

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the following new data. The medical social aspects of women with stomatological pathology during post-natal period are characterized by age gender, professional, educational and organizational aspects. The issues of impact of characteristics of medical stomatological care of women in post-natal period are considered. The results of survey of women in post-natal period using questionnaire targeted to detection of stomatological diseases are presented.

  7. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Woroń, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens. PMID:26327902

  8. Reproducibility of 24-h post-exercise changes in energy intake in overweight and obese women using current methodology.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gemma L; Lean, Michael E; Hankey, Catherine R

    2012-07-01

    Direct observation(s) of energy intake (EI) via buffet meals served in the laboratory are often carried out within short-term exercise intervention studies. The reproducibility of values obtained has not been assessed either under resting control conditions or post-exercise, in overweight and obese females. A total of fourteen sedentary, pre-menopausal females (BMI 30.0 (SD 5.1) kg/m²) completed four trials; two exercise and two control. Each trial lasted 24 h spanning over 2 d; conducted from afternoon on day 1 and morning on day 2. An exercise session to expend 1.65 MJ was completed on day 1 of exercise trials, and three buffet meals were served during each trial. Reproducibility of post-exercise changes in energy and macronutrient intakes was assessed at each individual buffet meal by intraclass correlation coefficient (r(i)). Only the r(i) values for post-exercise changes in energy (r(i) 0.44 (95 % CI - 0.03, 0.77), P = 0.03) and fat intake (r(i) 0.51 (95 % CI 0.04, 0.81), P = 0.02) at the lunch buffet meal achieved statistical significance; however, these r i values were weak and had large associated 95 % CI, which indicates a large degree of variability associated with these measurements. Energy and macronutrient intakes at the breakfast and evening buffet meals were not reproducible. This study concludes that the frequently used laboratory-based buffet meal method of assessing EI does not produce reliable, reproducible post-exercise changes in EI in overweight and obese women.

  9. Effect of Isopropanolic Cimicifuga racemosa Extract on Uterine Fibroids in Comparison with Tibolone among Patients of a Recent Randomized, Double Blind, Parallel-Controlled Study in Chinese Women with Menopausal Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Xi, Sisi; Liske, Eckehard; Wang, Shuyu; Liu, Jianli; Zhang, Zhonglan; Geng, Li; Hu, Lina; Jiao, Chunfeng; Zheng, Shurong; Zepelin, Hans-Heinrich Henneicke-von; Bai, Wenpei

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Effect of isopropanolic Cimicifuga racemosa extract (iCR) on uterine fibroid size compared with tibolone. Method. The randomized, double-blind, controlled study in China enrolled 244 patients aged 40-60 years with menopausal symptoms (Kupperman Menopause Index ≥ 15). The participants were treated with either iCR of 40 mg crude drug/day (N = 122) or tibolone 2.5 mg/day (N = 122) orally for 3 months in 2004. Now, we investigated the subset of all women (N = 62) with at least one uterine fibroid at onset of treatment for the effect of iCR (N = 34) on fibroid size compared with tibolone (N = 28) by transvaginal ultrasonography. Results. The median myoma volume decreased upon iCR by as much as -30% (P = 0.016) but increased upon tibolone by +4.7%. The percentage of volume change, mean diameter change and geometric mean diameter change of the iCR group compared to tibolone were statistically significant (P = 0.016, 0.021, 0.016 respectively). Conclusion. Our results suggest that iCR (Remifemin) is a valid herbal medicinal product in patients with uterine myomas as it provides adequate relief from menopausal symptoms and inhibits growth of the myomas in contrast to tibolone.

  10. Effect of Isopropanolic Cimicifuga racemosa Extract on Uterine Fibroids in Comparison with Tibolone among Patients of a Recent Randomized, Double Blind, Parallel-Controlled Study in Chinese Women with Menopausal Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Liske, Eckehard; Wang, Shuyu; Liu, Jianli; Zhang, Zhonglan; Geng, Li; Hu, Lina; Zheng, Shurong; Zepelin, Hans-Heinrich Henneicke-von; Bai, Wenpei

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Effect of isopropanolic Cimicifuga racemosa extract (iCR) on uterine fibroid size compared with tibolone. Method. The randomized, double-blind, controlled study in China enrolled 244 patients aged 40–60 years with menopausal symptoms (Kupperman Menopause Index ≥ 15). The participants were treated with either iCR of 40 mg crude drug/day (N = 122) or tibolone 2.5 mg/day (N = 122) orally for 3 months in 2004. Now, we investigated the subset of all women (N = 62) with at least one uterine fibroid at onset of treatment for the effect of iCR (N = 34) on fibroid size compared with tibolone (N = 28) by transvaginal ultrasonography. Results. The median myoma volume decreased upon iCR by as much as −30% (P = 0.016) but increased upon tibolone by +4.7%. The percentage of volume change, mean diameter change and geometric mean diameter change of the iCR group compared to tibolone were statistically significant (P = 0.016, 0.021, 0.016 respectively). Conclusion. Our results suggest that iCR (Remifemin) is a valid herbal medicinal product in patients with uterine myomas as it provides adequate relief from menopausal symptoms and inhibits growth of the myomas in contrast to tibolone. PMID:24719645

  11. Life history evolution: what does a menopausal killer whale do?

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Hal

    2015-03-16

    Menopause evolved in humans and whales, presumably because older females can help their kin. But how do they help? New research shows that post-menopausal female killer whales lead foraging groups. This leadership is most significant when food is scarce.

  12. [Hormonal treatment for menopause and arterial risk].

    PubMed

    Gueyffier, François; Cornu, Catherine

    2005-02-28

    Is hormonal atmosphere before menopause the cause of the lower risk of coronary heart disease in women? Big clinical trials do not validate this hypothesis, however simple and attractive: in 5 primary or secondary prevention trials, estrogens alone or in association with progestatives to near 32000 women after menopause, do not leave hope for a significant reduction of coronary risk, and show in contrast an 30% increase of stroke risk. These results highlight the crucial importance of clinical trials to validate therapeutic models. The remaining hypotheses on the nature of hormonal treatments and the administration route must follow the same validation process. The prescription of hormonal treatment for menopause illustrates the importance of informed decision including individualised estimate of the risk to benefit ratio.

  13. Menopause and Cancers.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Levine, Nanci F; Nevadunsky, Nicole S

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is a disease of aging, and therefore is more prevalent after menopause. Menopausal symptoms resulting from cancer treatments are an important survivorship issue in cancer care. This article reviews the preventive strategies, utilization of health resources, and management of menopausal symptoms after cancer treatment. Preventive screening as informed by genetic and lifestyle risk, and lifestyle modification, may mitigate the risk of cancer and cancer mortality. Despite potential benefits to quality of life, hormone replacement is rarely prescribed to survivors of gynecologic malignancies. Special considerations are needed for the treatment and supportive care of menopausal symptoms in cancer survivors.

  14. Using Community Radio in a Rural Women's Post-Literacy Programme in Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Chizuko; Karki, Manohar

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the literacy and post-literacy needs of rural women in Nepal, describes a pilot study in using community radio to supplement a classroom-based post-literacy programme for these women, analyses the findings of this intervention and considers the implications for similar programmes in other settings.

  15. The Exercise Plus Program for Older Women Post Hip Fracture: Participant Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; Wehren, Lois; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Simpson, Marjorie; Magaziner, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of older women post hip fracture who were exposed to a motivational intervention, the Exercise Plus Program, intended to increase adherence to exercise. Design and Methods: This study used a naturalistic inquiry. We interviewed a total of 70 older women, 12 months post hip fracture,…

  16. The Effect of Menopause on the Innate Anti-Viral Activity of Cervicovaginal Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Catherine A.; Isaacs, Charles E.; XU, Weimin; Meyn, Leslie A.; Uranker, Kevin; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Moncla, Bernard J.; Hillier, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reproductive hormones are known to impact innate mucosal immune function of the lower genital tract. Our objectives were to determine the effect of hormonal status on intrinsic anti-viral (HSV-1, HSV-2 and HIV-1) activity of cervicovaginal lavage (CVL). Methods CVL was collected from165 asymptomatic women which included post-menopausal women (n=29), women not on contraception in the days 1-14 (n=26) or days 15-28 (n=27) of the menstrual cycle, and women using the levonogerestrol intrauterine device (n=28), depomedroxyprogesterone acetate (n=28) or combined oral contraceptives (n=27). The anti-HSV-1/-2 and the anti-HIV-1 activity of the CVL were measured using plaque assays and the Jurkat-Tat-CCR5 assay, respectively. Results CVL from all of the groups had modest anti-viral activity. Anti-HIV-1 activity was decreased in CVL from postmenopausal women when compared to premenopausal women (11% vs. 34%, p=0.002). However there was no difference in anti-HIV-1 activity among premenopausal women regardless of phase of menstrual cycle or contraceptive use. Anti-HIV-1 activity was associated with the protein content of the CVL (r=0.44, p<0.001). There was no difference in anti-HSV-1 or -2 activity by hormonal group. Conclusions Menopause is associated with decreased innate HIV-1 activity in the lower genital tract, suggesting that factors in the vaginal fluid could play a role in increased susceptibility of HIV-1 infection in postmenopausal women. Hormonal contraceptive use, menopause and phase of menstrual cycle did not have a measurable impact on the intrinsic anti-HSV-1 or -2 activity. PMID:25818668

  17. Role of exercise and nutrition in menopause.

    PubMed

    Hagey, Allison R; Warren, Michelle P

    2008-09-01

    Menopause and the aging process itself cause many physiologic changes, which explain the increased prevalence of chronic diseases observed in postmenopausal women. Exercise and nutrition play important roles in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, and depression.

  18. Peace, justice and disabled women's advocacy: Tamil women with disabilities in rural post-conflict Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Niro; Soldatic, Karen; Samararatne, Dinesha

    2016-10-13

    This article draws on grounded qualitative research with rural Tamil women who acquired a disability during the civil war in Sri Lanka and conceptualizes an intersectionality-peace framework. Three main themes were developed from the interviews: narratives of conflict, survival outcomes of social assistance and mobilization of cross-ethnic relationships. With the support of a local women's disability advocacy organization, Tamil women with disabilities were enabled to overcome social stigma and claim a positive identity as women with disabilities. The organization's focus on realizing disability rights created new opportunities for these highly marginalized rural women. The women were also supported to form cross-ethnic relationships with women who similarly faced multiple oppressions. These relationships transformed the women into 'agents of peace', using their newfound disability identity to foster cross-ethnic dialogue and create safe spaces in the post-conflict context.

  19. Managing menopause.

    PubMed

    Reid, Robert; Abramson, Beth L; Blake, Jennifer; Desindes, Sophie; Dodin, Sylvie; Johnston, Shawna; Rowe, Timothy; Sodhi, Namrita; Wilks, Penny; Wolfman, Wendy; Fortier, Michel; Reid, Robert; Abramson, Beth L; Blake, Jennifer; Desindes, Sophie; Dodin, Sylvie; Graves, Lisa; Guthrie, Bing; Khan, Aliya; Johnston, Shawna; Rowe, Timothy; Sodhi, Namrita; Wilks, Penny; Wolfman, Wendy

    2014-09-01

    Objectif : Offrir, aux fournisseurs de soins de santé, une mise à jour de la directive clinique quant à la prise en charge de la ménopause chez les femmes asymptomatiques en santé, ainsi que chez les femmes qui présentent des symptômes vasomoteurs ou urogénitaux; cette mise à jour se penche également sur les facteurs associés à la maladie cardiovasculaire, au cancer du sein, à l’urogynécologie et à la sexualité. Issues : Les interventions quant au mode de vie, les médicaments d’ordonnance et les traitements de médecine complémentaire et parallèle sont présentés en fonction de leur efficacité dans la prise en charge des symptômes ménopausiques. Des stratégies de counseling et thérapeutiques en ce qui concerne les préoccupations en matière de sexualité au cours de la périménopause et de la postménopause sont passées en revue. Des approches quant à l’identification et à l’évaluation des femmes exposées à un risque élevé d’ostéoporose (ainsi que des options en matière de prévention et de traitement) sont présentées dans la directive clinique sur l’ostéoporose qui accompagne les présentes. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed et The Cochrane Library, en août et en septembre 2012, au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. « hormone replacement therapy », « menopause », « cardiovascular diseases » et « sexual function ») et de mots clés (p. ex. « HRT », « perimenopause », « heart disease » et « sexuality »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux directives cliniques, aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Les résultats ont également été restreints aux documents publiés, en anglais ou en français, à partir de 2009. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la

  20. Premature menopause linked to CVD and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Claire; Overton, Caroline

    2010-03-01

    Premature menopause affects 1% of women under the age of 40, the usual age of the menopause is 51. Most women will present with irregular periods or no periods at all with or without climacteric symptoms. Around 10% of women present with primary amenorrhoea. A careful history and examination are required. It is important to ask specifically about previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy and to look for signs of androgen excess e.g. polycystic ovarian syndrome, adrenal problems e.g. galactorrhoea and thyroid goitres. Once pregnancy has been excluded, a progestagen challenge test can be performed in primary care. Norethisterone 5 mg tds po for ten days or alternatively medroxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg daily for ten days is prescribed. A withdrawal bleed within a few days of stopping the norethisterone indicates the presence of oestrogen and bleeding more than a few drops is considered a positive withdrawal bleed. The absence of a bleed indicates low levels of oestrogen, putting the woman at risk of CVD and osteoporosis. FSH levels above 30 IU/l are an indicator that the ovaries are failing and the menopause is approaching or has occurred. It should be remembered that FSH levels fluctuate during the month and from one month to the next, so a minimum of two measurements should be made at least four to six weeks apart. The presence of a bleed should not exclude premature menopause as part of the differential diagnosis as there can be varying and unpredictable ovarian function remaining. The progestagen challenge test should not be used alone, but in conjunction with FSH, LH and oestradiol. There is no treatment for premature menopause. Women desiring pregnancy should be referred to a fertility clinic and discussion of egg donation. Women not wishing to become pregnant should be prescribed HRT until the age of 50 to control symptoms of oestrogen deficiency and reduce the risks of osteoporosis and CVD.

  1. Breast-feeding initiation among post-Caesarean women of the Negev, Israel.

    PubMed

    Chertok, Ilana R

    The objectives of the study were to increase post-Caesarean breastfeeding rates and decrease timing of post-Caesarean breastfeeding initiation in multicultural populations following a post-Caesarean breastfeeding intervention. The study was a prospective population-based evaluation of a breastfeeding intervention for post-Caesarean women of different cultures at a southern Israeli hospital. The study population consisted of 570 Jewish and Muslim post-Caesarean women who had delivered healthy, term infants. The control group (n=264) received standard hospital care and the intervention group (n=306) received early, culturally sensitive, post-Caesarean breast-feeding guidance and education by trained professionals. Timing of post-Caesarean maternal-infant contact and breastfeeding initiation outcomes for the Jewish and Muslim women significantly improved following the intervention.

  2. Vascular function and cardiovascular risk factors in women with severe flushing.

    PubMed

    Sassarini, Jenifer; Lumsden, Mary Ann

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women of postmenopausal age worldwide. It is a relatively rare occurrence before the menopause and the increase in incidence coincides with the most common symptom associated with menopausal transition, hot flushing. Interest in cardiovascular disease post-menopause has largely focused on the effect of hormone therapy on risk of coronary events and stroke, with vasomotor symptoms considered merely a nuisance symptom, but recent work suggests that the presence of flushing may be a marker of underlying cardiovascular disease.

  3. Marital status and age at natural menopause: considering pheromonal influence.

    PubMed

    Sievert, L L; Waddle, D; Canali, K

    2001-01-01

    Married women generally report a later mean age at menopause. The results reported here, from a study carried out in Greene County, New York, are no exception. Married and widowed women report a later mean age at natural menopause compared to single and divorced women (P < 0.05). To better understand the relationship between marital status and age at menopause, possible mechanistic and confounding variables are examined, in particular parity, sexual activity, smoking habits, level of education, and income. Parity and income 10 years prior to interview are significant factors, along with marital status, that explain part of the variation in age at natural menopause. An alternative explanation is the pheromonal influence of a male in the household. This would explain the consistency of results across populations. This pilot study supports further biochemical investigation.

  4. Osteocalcin carboxylation is not associated with body weight or percent fat changes during weight loss in post menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a vitamin K-dependent bone protein used as a marker of bone formation. Mouse models have demonstrated a role for the uncarboxylated form of OC (ucOC) in energy metabolism, including energy expenditure and adiposity, but human data are equivocal. To determine the associations betw...

  5. Osteocalcin carboxylation is not associated with body weight or percent fat changes during weight loss in post menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a vitamin K dependent bone protein used as a marker of bone formation. Mouse models have demonstrated a role for the uncarboxylated form of OC (ucOC) in energy metabolism, including energy expenditure and adiposity, but human data are equivocal. To determine the associations betw...

  6. Menopause in the workplace: What employers should be doing.

    PubMed

    Jack, Gavin; Riach, Kathleen; Bariola, Emily; Pitts, Marian; Schapper, Jan; Sarrel, Philip

    2016-03-01

    Large numbers of women transition through menopause whilst in paid employment. Symptoms associated with menopause may cause difficulties for working women, especially if untreated, yet employers are practically silent on this potentially costly issue. This review summarises existing research on the underexplored topic of menopause in the workplace, and synthesises recommendations for employers. Longstanding scholarly interest in the relationship between employment status and symptom reporting typically (but not consistently) shows that women in paid employment (and in specific occupations) report fewer and less severe symptoms than those who are unemployed. Recent studies more systematically focused on the effects of menopausal symptoms on work are typically cross-sectional self-report surveys, with a small number of qualitative studies. Though several papers established that vasomotor (and associated) symptoms have a negative impact on women's productivity, capacity to work and work experience, this is not a uniform finding. Psychological and other somatic symptoms associated with menopause can have a relatively greater negative influence. Physical (e.g., workplace temperature and design) and psychosocial (e.g., work stress, perceptions of control/autonomy) workplace factors have been found to influence the relationship between symptoms and work. Principal recommendations for employers to best support menopausal women as part of a holistic approach to employee health and well-being include risk assessments to make suitable adjustments to the physical and psychosocial work environment, provision of information and support, and training for line managers. Limitations of prior studies, and directions for future research are presented.

  7. First Nations women’s knowledge of menopause

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Sharen; St Pierre-Hansen, Natalie; Kelly, Len; Cromarty, Helen; Linkewich, Barbara; Payne, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To understand and describe the menopause experiences and perspectives of First Nations women residing in northwestern Ontario. DESIGN Phenomenologic approach using in-depth qualitative interviews. SETTING Sioux Lookout, Ont, and 4 surrounding First Nations communities. PARTICIPANTS Eighteen perimenopausal and postmenopausal First Nations women, recruited by convenience and snowball sampling techniques. METHODS Semistructured interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Themes emerged through a crystallization and immersion analytical approach. Triangulation of methods was used to ensure reliability of findings. MAIN FINDINGS This study confirms the hypothesis that menopause is generally not discussed by First Nations women, particularly with their health care providers. The generational knowledge gained by the women in this study suggests that a variety of experiences and symptoms typical of menopause from a medical perspective might not be conceptually linked to menopause by First Nations women. The interview process and initial consultation with translators revealed that there is no uniform word in Ojibway or Oji-Cree for menopause. A common phrase is “that time when periods stop,” which can be used by caregivers as a starting point for discussion. Participants’ interest in the topic and their desire for more information might imply that they would welcome the topic being raised by health care providers. CONCLUSION This study speaks to the importance of understanding the different influences on a woman’s menopause experience. Patient communication regarding menopause might be enhanced by providing women with an opportunity or option to discuss the topic with their health care providers. Caregivers should also be cautious of attaching preconceived ideas to the meaning and importance of the menopause experience. PMID:20841572

  8. Culture and symptom reporting at menopause.

    PubMed

    Melby, Melissa K; Lock, Margaret; Kaufert, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to review recent research on the relationship of culture and menopausal symptoms and propose a biocultural framework that makes use of both biological and cultural parameters in future research. Medline was searched for English-language articles published from 2000 to 2004 using the keyword 'menopause' in the journals--Menopause, Maturitas, Climacteric, Social Science and Medicine, Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Journal of Women's Health, Journal of the American Medical Association, American Journal of Epidemiology, Lancet and British Medical Journal, excluding articles concerning small clinical samples, surgical menopause or HRT. Additionally, references of retrieved articles and reviews were hand-searched. Although a large number of studies and publications exist, methodological differences limit attempts at comparison or systematic review. We outline a theoretical framework in which relevant biological and cultural variables can be operationalized and measured, making it possible for rigorous comparisons in the future. Several studies carried out in Japan, North America and Australia, using similar methodology but different culture/ethnic groups, indicate that differences in symptom reporting are real and highlight the importance of biocultural research. We suggest that both biological variation and cultural differences contribute to the menopausal transition, and that more rigorous data collection is required to elucidate how biology and culture interact in female ageing.

  9. Menopause: highlighting the effects of resistance training.

    PubMed

    Leite, R D; Prestes, J; Pereira, G B; Shiguemoto, G E; Perez, S E A

    2010-11-01

    The increase in lifespan and in the proportion of elderly women has increased the focus on menopause induced physiological alterations. These modifications are associated with the elevated risk of several pathologies such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, non-alcoholic fat liver disease, among others. Because of estrogen levels decline, many tissue and organs (muscular, bone, adipose tissue and liver) are affected. Additionally, body composition suffers important modifications. In this sense, there is a growing body of concern in understanding the physiological mechanisms involved and establishing strategies to prevent and reverse the effects of menopause. The hormone reposition therapy, diet and physical exercise have been recommended. Among the diverse exercise modalities, resistance training is not commonly used as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of menopause. Thus, the aim of this review was to analyze the physiological alterations on several organs and systems induced by menopause and ovariectomy (experimental model to reproduce menopause), as well as, to study the effects of resistance training in preventing and reverting these modifications. In conclusion, resistance training promotes beneficial effects on several organs and systems, mainly, on muscular, bone and adipose tissue, allowing for a better quality of life in this population.

  10. Alternative Medicine for Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be part of mainstream medicine. CAM includes herbs and other plant-based treatments (botanicals), non-botanical ... warfarin, a blood thinner May include other untested herbs Evening primrose No effect on menopausal symptoms May ...

  11. Menopause and Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the participating organizations that have assisted in its reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  12. Managing menopause at home

    MedlinePlus

    Perimenopause - self-care; Hormone replacement therapy - self-care; HRT- self-care ... Your health care provider may have prescribed hormone therapy to relieve symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, sleep problems, and ...

  13. The endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause induces aberrant cell cycle signaling that triggers re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle, neurodysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive disease.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Sex hormones are physiological factors that promote neurogenesis during embryonic and fetal development. During childhood and adulthood these hormones support the maintenance of brain structure and function via neurogenesis and the formation of dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture, processing and retrieval of information (memories). Not surprisingly, changes in these reproductive hormones that occur with menopause and during andropause are strongly correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of adult neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories while decreasing neurogenesis after memory formation during infancy mitigated forgetting. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in sex hormone signaling associated with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle that leads to neurite retraction, neuron dysfunction and neuron death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the LH:sex steroid ratio as driving aberrant mitotic events. These include the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor; amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ; and

  14. Evaluation of Symptoms and Prevention of Cancer in Menopause: The Value of Vulvar Exam

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, AR; Fasolino, C; Santoro, G; Gargano, V; Rinaldi, M; Arduino, B; Belli, M; Guida, M

    2016-01-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA), is a chronic medical condition experienced by postmenopausal women, with prevalence estimated ranging from 10% to 50% [1]. VVA is characterized by a constellation of symptoms, that may affect daily activities, sexuality, relationships, and quality of life [3]. Early recognition and effective treatment of VVA may enhance sexual health and the quality of life of women and their partners. Some vulvar conditions such as lichen sclerosus are more prevalent in the postmenopausal years. Lichen sclerosus has been suggested as a precursor of Vulvar squamous cell carcinoma. The vulvar exam in post-menopausal women plays an essential role in prevention of cancer because it allows to identify women who should undergo vulvar skin biopsy in order to early detect pre-neoplastic lesions for early diagnosis of cancer of the vulva. PMID:27896230

  15. The dependence [correction of dependance] between the mineral content in skeletal bones and the state of periodontium in women in case of hypoestrogenemia.

    PubMed

    Volozhin, A I; Khokhlova EYu; Novikov, V E

    1996-09-01

    Women with hypoestrogenemia either through secondary amenorrhea of unknown etiology, post-menopausal period or removed ovaries due to benign tumor were studied to determine if there is a relationship between the hormone state of women and their skeletal and periodontal tissues. Results indicated that women with hypoestrogenemia showed more pronounced changes in periodontium tissue as compared to normal women. These women also showed evidence of periodontium injury. These results are discussed along with implications for treatment and preventive measures.

  16. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Post Partum: The Impact of Birth on the Prevalence of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Multiparous Women.

    PubMed

    Schwab, W; Marth, C; Bergant, A M

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic birth experiences may lead to serious psychological impairment. Recent studies show that a considerable number of women can develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in some cases in a subsyndromal form. Until now, the possibility that postpartum psychological symptoms might be a continuum of a pre-existing disorder in pregnancy has rarely been considered. This study therefore aimed to evaluate the proportion of women who develop post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of childbirth. Materials and Methods: 56 multiparous women were recruited for the study. The diagnosis of PTSD was made according to the criteria for psychological disorders in the DSM-IV (Diagnostics and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). The data were collected in structured interviews in the 30th to 38th week of gestation and in the 6th week post partum. Results: Of the 56 women participating, 52 (93 %) completed the survey. Uncontrolled results showed that 21.15 % of the multiparous women met the full diagnostic PTSD criteria in the 6th week post partum. After the exclusion of all cases already characterised by all criteria or a subsyndromal form of PTSD caused by previous traumatisation, the PTSD rate was below 8 % at 6 weeks postpartum (= incidence rate of PTSD post partum). Conclusions: The present study is the first prospective longitudinal study to demonstrate the occurrence of full criteria PTSD in multiparous women as a result of childbirth after having excluded pre-existing PTSD. The results of our study show a high prevalence rate of PTSD during pregnancy. A number of women report all aspects of post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of childbirth.

  17. Probiotic L. reuteri treatment prevents bone loss in a menopausal ovariectomized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Robert A.; Irwin, Regina; Quach, Darin; Schaefer, Laura; Zhang, Jing; Lee, Taehyung; Parameswaran, Narayanan; McCabe, Laura R.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency is a major risk factor for osteoporosis that is associated with bone inflammation and resorption. Half of women over the age of 50 will experience an osteoporosis related fracture in their lifetime, thus novel therapies are needed to combat post-menopausal bone loss. Recent studies suggest an important role for gut-bone signaling pathways and the microbiota in regulating bone health. Given that the bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 (L. reuteri) secretes beneficial immunomodulatory factors, we examined if this candidate probiotic could reduce bone loss associated with estrogen deficiency in an ovariectomized (Ovx) mouse menopausal model. Strikingly, L. reuteri treatment significantly protected Ovx mice from bone loss. Osteoclast bone resorption markers and activators (Trap5 and RANKL) as well as osteoclastogenesis are significantly decreased in L. reuteri treated mice. Consistent with this, L. reuteri suppressed Ovx-induced increases in bone marrow CD4+ T-lymphocytes (which promote osteoclastogenesis) and directly suppressed osteoclastogenesis in vitro. We also identif ied that L. reuteri treatment modifies microbial communities in the Ovx mouse gut. Together, our studies demonstrate that L. reuteri treatment suppresses bone resorption and loss associated with estrogen deficiency. Thus, L. reuteri treatment may be a straightforward and cost-effective approach to reduce post-menopausal bone loss. PMID:24677054

  18. Young Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Post HPV Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L; Mosavel, Maghboeba; Murithi, Lydia Karuta

    2014-01-01

    In the present study the authors sought to explore, in greater depth, the impact that HPV vaccination has on college-aged women's reproductive and sexual health. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 HPV-vaccinated, college women and analyzed for reoccurring themes. Although findings revealed that women's HPV-related knowledge was suboptimal, most women correctly believed that they were still at risk for HPV after having received the vaccination. Women indicated that having the HPV vaccine made them more aware of sexually transmitted infections and prompted them to continue to take care of their sexual health. Women reported that having the HPV vaccine did not influence their condom use or birth control choices, and they believed that obtaining Pap smears was still important. These results help us to understand the impact of HPV vaccination on women's reproductive and sexual health. These findings are promising and reinforce the importance of educating women about behaviors that will help them maintain reproductive and sexually healthy lives.

  19. From Hot Flashes to Cool Insights: Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Menopause From Hot Flashes to Cool Insights: Menopause Winter 2017 Table ... experienced the menopausal transition. Researching "the menopause transition" Hot flashes, weight gain, night sweats, insomnia, and moodiness— ...

  20. Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women's Rhetoric Revisited: A Case for an "Enlightened" Feminist Rhetorical Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Identifying the specific complexities and historical context of post-Mao Chinese literary women's rhetoric, along with ways they have been misread, the author argues in general that Western feminist critics need to be cautious about applying their concepts to non-Western women's literature. (Contains 7 notes.)

  1. Post-Secondary Education and Rural Women Enrolled in Liberal Arts Undergraduate Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, Monique; Kirby, Dale

    2012-01-01

    The significance of post-secondary education is investigated for rural Newfoundland women enrolled in undergraduate liberal arts degree programs. Data collection for this research involved comprehensive, detailed semi-structured biographical interviews with rural women studying liberal arts disciplines during the 2006-2007 academic year at…

  2. Women Teachers of Post-Revolutionary Mexico: Feminisation and Everyday Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Oresta

    2013-01-01

    The reflections presented in this article include the process of incorporating women teachers into schools during the post-revolutionary period in Mexico. From one standpoint, women teachers lived in a state of ambiguity throughout this period because they were seen as symbols of national reconstruction following a war that left more than one…

  3. A Maternal Identity? The Family Lives of British Women Graduates Pre- and Post-1945

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiston, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to the first generations of university-educated women, this article will suggest that later cohorts no longer transgressed conventional expectations by rejecting marriage and motherhood on the same scale as their predecessors. Post-1945 society was a period within which "theoretically" women could "have it all" and arguably graduate…

  4. [Quality of life in menopause. Experimental research].

    PubMed

    Di Corrado, D; Di Nuovo, S; Catalano, D; Squatrito, R; Sciacchitano, G; Trovato, G M

    2001-01-01

    Psychophysiological relationship in menopausal women was explored by the comparison of stress level and resistance to stress and related symptoms: socio-economic and cultural variables and willingness to participate into a specific therapeutic program were taken into account. One hundred women, aged 44-59 years (54.2 +/- 5.64), that consecutively were referred to an out-patient menopausal Clinic, were studied by a questionnaire that evaluates quality of life (qol) derived and adapted from the Sickness Impact Profile and the Functional Living Test; moreover the test MSP (psychological stress measurement), translated from the original and adapted to Italy, was used. Psychological complaints of women examined are minimal: adaptation tests are substantially normal, and stress index measurements are even lower in comparison with a gender and age matched population group. Our results suggest that after a short period of psychological tension at the onset of climaterium, women acquire a positive, stable status, well different from stereotypes and prejudices around psychological disturbance associated with menopause. Minimal relevance of perceived disturbance seems the reason that limits the women's need and request for a specific therapy. Menopausal depression seems more related to life changes than to hormonal alterations. Reduced physical fitness, increased risk of parental death, difficulty to cope with new roles, apart the care of adult sons or daughters. A critical point is socio-economic level and the possibility to maintain a satisfying work. Contextual conditions, and specially degree of instruction, type of role change inside the family and number of sons, appears the most evident and relevant variables that mediate psychophysical conditions and perceived quality of life.

  5. Managing the menopause - British Menopause Society Council consensus statement on hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Pitkin, Joan; Rees, Margaret C P; Gray, Sarah; Lumsden, Mary Ann; Stevenson, John; Williamson, Jennifer

    2003-09-01

    The British Menopause Society Council aims to aid health professionals to inform and advise women about the menopause. The oestrogen plus progestogen arm of the Women's Health Initiative was stopped in July 2002. This guidance regarding hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use responds to the results and analysis that have been published since then. Because there are few effective alternatives to HRT for vasomotor and urogenital symptoms, oestrogen-based treatments still have a major role. HRT is also most effective for prevention of osteoporosis. Unopposed oestrogens are contraindicated in women with an intact uterus, and hence a range of oestrogen and progestogen combinations, with differing routes of delivery, now exists under the title of "HRT". Treatment choice should be based on up to date information and targeted to individual women's needs. Hormone replacement still offers the potential for benefit to outweigh harm, providing the appropriate regimen has been instigated in terms of dose, route and combination.

  6. Efficacy of Exercise for Menopausal Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sternfeld, Barbara; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Larson, Joseph C.; Dunn, Andrea L.; Anderson, Garnet L.; Seguin, Rebecca A.; Carpenter, Janet S.; Newton, Katherine M.; Reed, Susan D.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Cohen, Lee S.; Joffe, Hadine; Roberts, Melanie; Caan, Bette J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine efficacy of exercise training for alleviating vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms. METHODS Late-peri and post-menopausal, sedentary women with frequent vasomotor symptoms (VMS) participated in a randomized controlled trial conducted at three sites: 106 to exercise and 142 to usual activity. The exercise intervention consisted of individual, facility-based aerobic exercise training 3 times/week for 12 weeks. VMS frequency and bother were recorded on daily diaries at baseline and weeks 6 and 12. Intent to treat analyses compared between group differences in changes in VMS frequency and bother, sleep symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and mood (Patient Health Questionnaire-8 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire). RESULTS At the end of week 12, changes in VMS frequency in the exercise group (mean change of −2.4/day, 95% CI −3.0, −1.7) and VMS bother (mean change of −0.5 on a 4 point scale, 95% CI −0.6, −0.4) were not significantly different from those in the control group (−2.6 VMS/day, 95% CI −3.2, −2.0, p=0.43; −0.5 points, 95% CI −0.6, −0.4, p=0.75). The exercise group reported greater improvement in insomnia symptoms (p=0.03), subjective sleep quality (p=0.01), and depressive symptoms (p=0.04), but differences were small and not statistically significant when p values were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Results were similar when considering treatment-adherent women only. CONCLUSION These findings provide strong evidence that 12-weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise does not alleviate VMS but may result in small improvements in sleep quality, insomnia and depression in midlife, sedentary women. PMID:23899828

  7. Accelerated postmenopausal cognitive decline is restricted to women with normal BMI: longitudinal evidence from the Betula project.

    PubMed

    Thilers, Petra P; Macdonald, Stuart W S; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Herlitz, Agneta

    2010-05-01

    In order to determine whether cognitive performance is influenced by the menopausal transition, we tested cognitive performance at three time points, sampled women in earlier as well as later stages of the menopausal transition (40-65 years of age), and assessed the moderating influence of body mass index (BMI) on rate of change. Multilevel analyses were used to model change in cognitive performance as a function of number of years post menopause over and above chronological age. We investigated change in the menopausal transition for 10 cognitive outcomes in 193 women who were postmenopausal during the last test wave. The model, controlling for age and education, showed that postmenopausal women within the normal range of BMI (BMI 18.5-25) displayed more rapid decline than women with BMI above 25 for measures of visuospatial ability and episodic memory. In addition, there was an accelerated rate of change post menopause for all women on verbal fluency. The results support the notion that the diminished postmenopausal production of endogenous estrogen may have a slight negative influence on cognitive abilities, but mainly for women within a normal BMI range.

  8. Toward a Biology of Menopause.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Madeleine

    1980-01-01

    Discusses research dealing with the study of menopause. Underscores the problems with the case study method. Discusses two population-based studies and the problems of age adjustment and measurement in menopause research. Highlights alternate research strategies. (MK)

  9. Lipid and lipoprotein profile in menopausal transition. Effects of hormones, age and fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Mesch, V; Boero, L; Sayegh, F; Prada, M; Royer, M; Muzzio, M L; Schreier, L; Siseles, N; Benencia, H

    2004-04-01

    The behavior of lipoproteins during the menopausal transition and their relationship with sex hormones and body fat distribution is still unclear. Our aim was to evaluate atherogenic IDL, LDL, Lp(a) and antiatherogenic HDL lipoproteins in four groups of women: premenopausal (n = 20), menopausal transition women with menstrual bleeding (n = 31), menopausal transition women with 3 to 6 months amenorrhea (n = 36), and postmenopausal women (n = 30). We also measured their FSH, LH and estradiol levels along with BMI and waist circumference. Menopausal transition and postmenopausal women showed higher values of waist circumference (p < 0.0032), LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.002), IDL-cholesterol (p < 0.002) and apoprotein B (p < 0.0001) than premenopausal women. Total-cholesterol (p < 0.0001), triglycerides (p < 0.004), IDL-cholesterol and Lp(a) were higher in menopausal transition women with amenorrhea and in postmenopausal women in comparison with premenopausal women. After adjustment according to age and waist circumference, multiple regression analysis showed the increase in total-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol to be linearly associated to menopausal status and estradiol concentration, whereas Lp(a) was only related to menopausal status. Age was found to be an independent variable in relation to apoprotein B concentration changes. The effect of menopausal status on TG levels did not remain in the model when age, waist and BMI were included (beta = 0.05, p = 0.356). HDL-cholesterol levels were the same in all the groups. Menopause, age and the increase in abdominal fat distribution were three independent and significant factors impairing lipoprotein profiles from the beginning of the menopausal transition.

  10. Prevalence and correlates of explosive anger among pregnant and post-partum women in post-conflict Timor-Leste

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Susan; Tam, Natalino; Mohsin, Mohammed; Tay, Alvin Kuowei; Tol, Wietse

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about explosive anger as a response pattern among pregnant and post-partum women in conflict-affected societies. Aims To investigate the prevalence and correlates of explosive anger among this population in Timor-Leste. Method We assessed traumatic events, intimate partner violence, an index of adversity, explosive anger, psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder among 427 women (257 in the second trimester of pregnancy, 170 who were 3–6 months post-partum) residing in two districts of Timor-Leste (response >99%). Results Two-fifths (43.6%) had explosive anger. Levels of functional impairment were related to frequency of explosive anger episodes. Explosive anger was associated with age (>35 years), being married, low levels of education, being employed, traumatic event count, ongoing adversity and intimate partner violence. Conclusions A combination of social programmes and novel psychological therapies may assist in reducing severe anger among pregnant and post-partum women in conflict-affected countries such as Timor-Leste. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703721

  11. The menopausal hot flush: a review.

    PubMed

    Sturdee, D W; Hunter, M S; Maki, P M; Gupta, P; Sassarini, J; Stevenson, J C; Lumsden, M A

    2017-04-05

    The hot flush is the most characteristic and often the most distressing symptom of the menopause. It is a unique feature and yet the mechanism and health implications are still not fully understood. This review summarizes some of the current thoughts on factors contributing to flushing, the physiological, vascular and neuroendocrine changes associated with flushing and the possible cardiovascular and other health implications for women experiencing hot flushes. Therapy is not discussed.

  12. Ginseng for managing menopausal woman's health

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Choi, Jiae; Lee, YoungJoo; Kil, Ki-Jung; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this systematic review was to update, complete, and critically evaluate the evidence from placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of ginseng for managing menopausal women's health. Methods: We searched the literature using 13 databases (MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, 6 Korean Medical, and 3 Chinese Databases) from their inception to July 2016 and included all double-blind RCTs that compared any type of ginseng with a placebo control in postmenopausal women. The methodological quality of all studies was assessed using a Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results: Ten RCTs met our inclusion criteria. Most RCTs had unclear risk of bias. One RCT did not show a significant difference in hot flash frequency between Korean red ginseng (KRG) and placebo. The second RCT reported positive effects of KRG on menopausal symptoms. The third RCT found beneficial effects of ginseng (Ginsena) on depression, well-being, and general health. Four RCTs failed to show significant differences in various hormones between KRG and placebo controls except dehydroepiandrosterone. Two other RCTs failed to show effects of KRG on endometrial thickness in menopausal women. The other RCT also failed to show the effects of American ginseng on oxidative stress markers and other antioxidant enzymes. Conclusion: Our systematic review provided positive evidence of ginseng for sexual function and KRG for sexual arousal and total hot flashes score in menopausal women. However, the results of KRG or ginseng failed to show specific effects on hot flash frequency, hormones, biomarkers, or endometrial thickness. The level of evidence for these findings was low because of unclear risk of bias. PMID:27661038

  13. Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on menopausal quality of life

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent clinical trials have found an increased risk of health problems in women using menopausal hormone therapy. As a result, women are in search of alternative strategies to improve their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on quali...

  14. Reassuring the Woman Facing Menopause: Strategies and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Janine O'Leary

    1998-01-01

    Women in menopause require reassurance and reliable information. Based on concerns expressed in letters (N=7,000), women in premenopause want to know what to expect, in perimenopause they want to know whether their experiences are normal, and in postmenopause they need help in making sensible decisions about the use of hormone therapy. (Author/EMK)

  15. Exploring Australian Aboriginal Women’s experiences of menopause: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite extensive literature demonstrating differing experiences in menopause around the world, documentation of the experience of menopause in Australian Aboriginal women is scarce, and thus their menopausal experience is relatively unknown. This study aimed to understand Australian Aboriginal women’s understanding and experience of menopause and its impact on their lives. Methods The study was an exploratory qualitative study. Twenty-five Aboriginal women were recruited from a regional centre in the Mid-West region of Western Australia using opportunistic and snowballing sampling. Interviews and focus group discussions were undertaken from February 2011 to February 2012 using open-ended questioning with a yarning technique. Thematic analysis was undertaken of the transcribed interviews. Results A number of themes were revealed. These related to the language used, meanings and attitudes to menopause, symptoms experienced, the role of men, a lack of understanding, coping mechanisms and the attribution of menopausal changes to something else. The term “change of life” was more widely recognised and signified the process of ageing, and an associated gain of respect in the local community. A fear of menopausal symptoms or uncertainty about their origin was also common. Overall, many women reported insufficient understanding and a lack of available information to assist them and their family to understand the transition. Conclusion There are similarities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal experiences of menopause, including similar symptom profiles. The current language used within mainstream health settings may not be appropriate to this population if it fails to recognise the importance of language and reflect the attributed meaning of menopause. The fear of symptoms and uncertainty of their relationship to menopause demonstrated a need for more information which has not adequately been supplied to Australian Aboriginal women through current

  16. The medicalisation of male menopause in America.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Elizabeth Siegel

    2007-08-01

    The topic of male menopause occupied space on the medical radar screen from the late 1930s through the mid-1950s, then virtually disappeared for the next four decades, until the late 1990s. By contrast, articles on this subject appeared in American popular magazines and newspapers at a consistent, if low-level, rate throughout the same period. This essay describes how the male menopause became medicalised, not by the driving forces of academic researchers and influential clinicians, but instead by a model perpetuated by lay people and medical popularisers. A medicalised conceptualisation of the body and the life-cycle had become widespread by the second half of the twentieth century, as Americans grew accustomed to regarding their lives through the lens of medicine. People came to expect medicine to provide a cure for any ailment; in the wake of the development of the so-called wonder drugs, no affliction seemed beyond medical and pharmaceutical intervention. A medicalised model had also been effectively produced for understanding and treating the menopause in women; a parallel, if not identical, stage in the life-course of men seemed reasonable. This framework, rather than persuasive evidence from the research laboratory or clinic, helped to medicalise male menopause and provided the basis for its eventual pharmaceuticalisation at the end of the twentieth century.

  17. A Qualitative Study: The Post-Incarceration Experience of Women with Post-Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Barbara K.

    2009-01-01

    The total number of individuals in correctional institutions in 2000 was 1,976,020 (http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/phc-t26.html). Moreover, the population of women offenders has risen at a particularly fast rate, doubling since 1990. The purpose of this study was to add to the information about the experience of women related to…

  18. Involvement of Family Members and Professionals in Older Women's Post-Fall Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Caroline D; Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K; Friedman, Daniela B; Spencer, S Melinda; Miller, Susan C

    2016-12-29

    This exploratory, descriptive study examined involvement of family members and professionals in older women's post-fall decision making. We conducted semistructured interviews with 17 older women who had recently fallen and 11 individuals these women identified as being engaged in their post-fall decision-making processes. Qualitative data analysis involved open and axial coding and development of themes. After experiencing a fall, these older women's openness to others' opinions and advice; their assessments of types and credibility of potential information sources; and the communication practices they established with these sources influenced how they accessed, accepted, or rejected information from family members and professionals. Increased awareness of the involvement of others in post-fall decision making could enhance communication with older women who fall. Developing and implementing practical strategies to help family members and professionals initiate and engage in conversations about falls and their consequences could lead to more open decision making and improved post-fall quality of life among older women.

  19. A large-scale, hospital-based case-control study of risk factors of breast cancer according to menopausal status.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Tajima, K; Hamajima, N; Inoue, M; Takezaki, T; Kuroishi, T; Yoshida, M; Tokudome, S

    1995-02-01

    We conducted a large-scale, hospital-based case-control study to evaluate differences and similarities in the risk factors of female breast cancer according to menopausal status. This study is based on a questionnaire survey on life style routinely obtained from outpatients who first visited the Aichi Cancer Center Hospital between January 1, 1988 and December 31, 1992. Among 36,944 outpatients, 1,186 women with breast cancer detected by histological examination were taken as the case group (607 premenopausal women and 445 postmenopausal women) and 23,163 women confirmed to be free of cancer were selected as the control group. New findings and reconfirmed factors of breast cancer were as follows. 1) The risk of at least one breast cancer history among subjects' first-degree relatives was relatively high among pre- as well as post-menopausal women. 2) A protective effect of physical activity against breast cancer was observed among both pre- and post-menopausal women. 3) Dietary control decreased the risk of premenopausal breast cancer. 4) Current smoking and drinking elevated the risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women. 5) Decreasing trends of breast cancer risk were associated with intake of bean curd, green-yellow vegetables, potato or sweet potato, chicken and ham or sausage in premenopausal women, while in postmenopausal women a risk reduction was associated with a more frequent intake of boiled, broiled and/or raw fish (sashimi). Further study will be needed to clarify the age group- and/or birth cohort-specific risk factors for breast cancer among the young generation in Japan.

  20. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Fernando; Guzmán, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones strongly influence body fat distribution and adipocyte differentiation. Estrogens and testosterone differentially affect adipocyte physiology, but the importance of estrogens in the development of metabolic diseases during menopause is disputed. Estrogens and estrogen receptors regulate various aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism. Disturbances of this metabolic signal lead to the development of metabolic syndrome and a higher cardiovascular risk in women. The absence of estrogens is a clue factor in the onset of cardiovascular disease during the menopausal period, which is characterized by lipid profile variations and predominant abdominal fat accumulation. However, influence of the absence of these hormones and its relationship to higher obesity in women during menopause are not clear. This systematic review discusses of the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in adipocyte differentiation, and its control by the central nervous systemn and the possible role of estrogen-like compounds and endocrine disruptors chemicals are discussed. Finally, the interaction between the decrease in estrogen secretion and the prevalence of obesity in menopausal women is examined. We will consider if the absence of estrogens have a significant effect of obesity in menopausal women. PMID:24734243

  1. Effect of two oral doses of 17beta-estradiol associated with dydrogesterone on thrombin generation in healthy menopausal women: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Alexandra; Robert, Annie; Gerotziafas, Grigoris; Torchin, Dahlia; Zannad, Faiez; Lacut, Karine; Libersa, Christian; Dasque, Eric; Démolis, Jean-Louis; Elalamy, Ismail; Simon, Tabassome

    2010-04-01

    Oral hormone therapy is associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Drug agencies recommend the use of the lowest efficient dose to treat menopausal symptoms for a better risk/ratio profile, although this profile has not been totally investigated yet. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of the standard dose of 17beta-estradiol to a lower one on thrombin generation (TG). In a 2-month study, healthy menopausal women were randomized to receive daily 1mg or 2 mg of 17beta-estradiol (E1, n = 24 and E2, n = 26; respectively) with 10 mg dydrogesterone or placebo (PL, n = 22). Plasma levels factors VII, X, VIII and II were assessed before and after treatment as well as Tissue factor triggered TG, which allows the investigation of the different phases of coagulation process. The peak of thrombin was higher in hormone therapy groups (E1: 42.39 +/- 50.23 nm, E2: 31.08 +/- 85.86 nm vs. 10.52 +/- 40.63 nm in PL, P = 0.002 and P = 0.01). Time to reach the peak was also shortened (PL: 0.26 +/- 0.69 min vs. E1: -0.26 +/- 0.80 min, E2: -0.55 +/- 0.79 min, P <10(-3) for both comparisons) and mean rate index of the propagation phase of TG was significantly increased. Among the studied clotting factors, only the levels of FVII were significantly increased after treatment administration. The two doses of 17beta-estradiol induced in a similar degree an acceleration of the initiation and propagation phase of tissue factor triggered thrombin generation and a significant increase of FVII coagulant activity.

  2. Premature menopause and low back pain. A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Adera, T; Deyo, R A; Donatelle, R J

    1994-09-01

    The association between premature menopause and low back pain was examined among 5325 women surveyed in the second National Health and Nutrition Examination survey. Nearly 49% of the women were postmenopausal. In a multiple logistic regression model that included age, postmenopausal women were approximately twice as likely to report low back pain compared to premenopausal women (odds ratio = 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-3.0). Among postmenopausal women, significant positive trends in low back pain were observed with decreasing age at menopause (P = 0.005) and increasing years since menopause (P = 0.004). The prevalence odds ratio for women who had their menopause before the age of 30 was 3.2 (1.8-5.4); and for women who had their menopause for 15 or more years the odds ratio was 3.0 (1.7-5.3). These findings suggest that premature menopause is associated with low back pain. Further studies appear warranted to confirm these findings, assess possible explanations, and examine the circumstances in which premature menopause occurs.

  3. Dyspareunia in postmenopausal women: A critical review

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Alina; Binik, Yitzchak M; Kapuscinski, Anita; Khalifé, Samir

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyspareunia, or pain during sexual intercourse, is among the problems most frequently reported by postmenopausal women. Past literature has almost unanimously attributed dyspareunic pain occurring during or after the menopausal transition to declining estrogen levels and vaginal atrophy. OBJECTIVES: To critically review the literature on the prevalence, risk factors, etiology, clinical presentation and treatment of post-menopausal dyspareunia. The present review also examines the traditional and widely held conceptualization of postmenopausal dyspareunia as a direct symptom of hormonal decline. METHODS: Searches of medical and psychological databases were performed for relevant articles and empirical studies. The methodological quality and outcomes of the studies were systematically reviewed. RESULTS: Available empirical evidence suggests that dyspareunia is common in postmenopausal women, and that it is not highly correlated with menopausal status, estrogen levels or vaginal atrophy. Decreasing levels of endogenous estrogen contribute to the development of dyspareunia in postmenopausal women suffering from vaginal atrophy. Hormonal supplementation is beneficial in alleviating their pain. However, a substantial proportion of treated women do not report relief. CONCLUSIONS: Postmenopausal dyspareunia occurring concurrently with vaginal atrophy is strongly associated with a lack of estrogen in the genital tract. However, a significant percentage of postmenopausal women experience dyspareunic pain that is not caused by hypoestrogenism. It is likely that other types of dyspareunia that occur premenopausally are also occurring in postmenopausal women. Research is needed to adequately address this issue. A change in perspective toward a multiaxial pain-focused approach is proposed for future research concerning dyspareunia in postmenopausal women. PMID:18592062

  4. [Pregnancy in adolescence, associated factors, and perinatal results among low-income post-partum women].

    PubMed

    Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira da; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; Leal Md, Maria do Carmo

    2002-01-01

    This paper compares socioeconomic characteristics, prenatal care, and life styles of three groups of post-partum women, one consisting of adolescents (< 20 years) and the other two of women 20-34 years old, classified according to their history of pregnancy during adolescence. A sample of 3,508 post-partum women was selected from public hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and interviewed just after childbirth. To verify the hypothesis of homogeneity of proportions, chi-square tests (chi2) were used. Comparing the three groups, the most adverse conditions were found among the 20-34-year-old mothers with a history of pregnancy during adolescence. These women have the least schooling, the highest rates of smoking and use of illegal drugs during pregnancy, and the fewest prenatal appointments. According to this study, prenatal care proved to be an effective compensatory policy for the prevention of prematurity and low birth weight, especially among adolescent mothers.

  5. Sociodemographic factors and age at natural menopause in Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, S M T; Ghaem, H; Ayatollahi, S A R

    2005-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, menopause is an increasingly important aspect of women's health. We recorded the age at natural menopause among women in a population-based cross-sectional study in Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran, in summer 2000. Interviews with 948 randomly selected menopausal women showed the mean (standard deviation) age at menopause was 48.3 (5.3) years (95% CI: 48.0-48.6), median 49 years. The sociodemographic and health behaviour factors that were significantly related to early mean age of menopause were: never married (44.7 years), low income level (47.4 years), low social class (45.8 years), tobacco use (47.9 years) and non-consanguineous husband (48.1 years).

  6. Treatment of Insomnia, Insomnia Symptoms, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea During and After Menopause: Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Joshua Z.; Suh, Sooyeon A.; Dowdle, Claire L.; Nowakowski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Understanding sleep complaints among menopausal women is an emerging area of clinical and research interest. Several recent reviews have focused on mechanisms of menopausal insomnia and symptoms. In this review, we present a discussion on the most relevant and recent publications on the treatment of sleep disorders for menopausal women, with a focus on menopause-related insomnia, insomnia symptoms, and obstructive sleep apnea. We discuss both nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments, including cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), complementary and alternative medicine, hormone replacement therapy, sedative hypnotics, antidepressants, and continuous positive airway pressure. In addition, we briefly discuss methods and considerations of assessment of sleep disorders in menopausal women. PMID:26478725

  7. Influencing factors on the cord-blood donation of post-partum women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miok; Han, Seungchul; Shin, Minho

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to identify the factors on the cord-blood donation of Korean post-partum women, who may store, donate, or discard their infant's cord blood. This descriptive research assesses the level of knowledge and attitude of post-partum women in Korea, regarding cord blood and its usage. The participants in this study were 320 post-partum women of which 109 stored, 34 donated, and 177 discarded their cord blood. The knowledge level of women who donated or stored their cord blood was higher than that of those who discarded. The attitude level of the women who donated was higher than that of those who stored or discarded. Knowledge, attitude, income, and source of information were the factors on the cord-blood donation; high knowledge, high attitude, low income, and information source from mass media contributes to cord-blood donation. In order to promote the cord-blood donation, it is necessary to develop guidelines for cord-blood education to improve the knowledge and attitudes of child-bearing women and healthcare professionals.

  8. Energy homeostasis genes and breast cancer risk: The influence of ancestry, body size, and menopausal status, the breast cancer health disparities study

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Hines, Lisa; Wolff, Roger K.; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; Baumgartner, Kathy N.; John, Esther M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity and breast cancer risk is multifaceted and genes associated with energy homeostasis may modify this relationship. Methods We evaluated 10 genes that have been associated with obesity and energy homeostasis to determine their association with breast cancer risk in Hispanic/Native American (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (1481 cases, 1585 controls) women. Results Cholecystokinin (CCK) rs747455 and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) rs6713532 and rs7565877 (for low Indigenous American (IA) ancestry); CCK rs8192472 and neuropeptide Y (NYP) rs16141 and rs14129 (intermediate IA ancestry); and leptin receptor (LEPR) rs11585329 (high IA ancestry) were strongly associated with multiple indicators of body size. There were no significant associations with breast cancer risk between genes and SNPs overall. However, LEPR was significantly associated with breast cancer risk among women with low IA ancestry (PARTP = 0.024); POMC was significantly associated with breast cancer risk among women with intermediate (PARTP = 0.015) and high (PARTP = 0.012) IA ancestry. The overall pathway was statistically significant for pre-menopausal women with low IA ancestry (PARTP = 0.05), as was cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript protein (CARTPT) (PARTP = 0.014) and ghrelin (GHRL) (PARTP = 0.007). POMC was significantly associated with breast cancer risk among post-menopausal women with higher IA ancestry (PARTP = 0.005). Three SNPs in LEPR (rs6704167, rs17412175, and rs7626141), and adiponectin (ADIPOQ); rs822391) showed significant 4-way interactions (GxExMenopausexAncestry) for multiple indicators of body size among pre-menopausal women. Conclusions Energy homeostasis genes were associated with breast cancer risk; menopausal status, body size, and genetic ancestry influenced this relationship. PMID:26395295

  9. Perceptions of misoprostol among providers and women seeking