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  1. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  2. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  3. FGF22 signaling regulates synapse formation during post-injury remodeling of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Anne; Loy, Kristina; Schmalz, Anja M; Hellsten, Mikael; Umemori, Hisashi; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Bareyre, Florence M

    2015-01-01

    The remodeling of axonal circuits after injury requires the formation of new synaptic contacts to enable functional recovery. Which molecular signals initiate such axonal and synaptic reorganisation in the adult central nervous system is currently unknown. Here, we identify FGF22 as a key regulator of circuit remodeling in the injured spinal cord. We show that FGF22 is produced by spinal relay neurons, while its main receptors FGFR1 and FGFR2 are expressed by cortical projection neurons. FGF22 deficiency or the targeted deletion of FGFR1 and FGFR2 in the hindlimb motor cortex limits the formation of new synapses between corticospinal collaterals and relay neurons, delays their molecular maturation, and impedes functional recovery in a mouse model of spinal cord injury. These results establish FGF22 as a synaptogenic mediator in the adult nervous system and a crucial regulator of synapse formation and maturation during post-injury remodeling in the spinal cord. PMID:25766255

  4. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  6. Spinal cord contusion models.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2002-01-01

    Most human spinal cord injuries involve contusions of the spinal cord. Many investigators have long used weight-drop contusion animal models to study the pathophysiology and genetic responses of spinal cord injury. All spinal cord injury therapies tested to date in clinical trial were validated in such models. In recent years, the trend has been towards use of rats for spinal cord injury studies. The MASCIS Impactor is a well-standardized rat spinal cord contusion model that produces very consistent graded spinal cord damage that linearly predicts 24-h lesion volumes, 6-week white matter sparing, and locomotor recovery in rats. All aspects of the model, including anesthesia for male and female rats, age rather than body weight criteria, and arterial blood gases were empirically selected to enhance the consistency of injury. PMID:12440371

  7. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  8. Hindlimb Stretching Alters Locomotor Function Post-Spinal Cord Injury in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Caudle, Krista L.; Atkinson, Darryn A.; Brown, Edward H.; Donaldson, Katie; Seibt, Erik; Chea, Tim; Smith, Erin; Chung, Karianne; Shum-Siu, Alice; Cron, Courtney C.; Magnuson, David S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Stretching is a widely accepted standard-of-care therapy following spinal cord injury that has not been systematically studied in animal models. Objective To investigate the influence of a daily stretch-based physical therapy program on locomotor recovery in adult rats with moderate T9 contusive SCI. Methods A randomized treatment and control study of stretching in an animal model of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Moderate spinal cord injuries were delivered with the NYU Impactor. Daily stretching (30 min./day, 5 days/wk for 8 wks) was provided by a team of animal handlers. Hindlimb function was assessed using the BBB Open Field Locomotor Scale and kinematically. Passive range-of-motion for each joint was determined weekly using a goniometer. Results Declines in hindlimb function during overground stepping were observed for the first 4 weeks. BBB scores improved weeks 5–10 but remained below the control group. Stretched animals had significant deficits in knee passive ROM starting at week 4 and for the duration of the study. Kinematic assessment showed decreased joint excursion during stepping that partially recovered beginning at week 5. Conclusion Stretch-based therapy significantly impaired functional recovery in adult rats with a moderate contusive SCI at T10. The negative impact on function was greatest acutely, but persisted even after the stretching ceased at 8 weeks post-injury. PMID:25106555

  9. Spinal cord trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the bones or disks have been weakened Fragments of bone (such as from broken vertebrae, which are the ... presses on the spinal cord (decompression laminectomy ) Remove bone fragments, disk fragments, or foreign objects Fuse broken spinal ...

  10. POST-TETANIC POTENTIATION OF POLYSYNAPTIC REFLEXES OF THE SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1955-01-01

    The phenomenon of post-tetanic potentiation has been studied in the cat spinal cord with particular reference to polysynaptic responses. Following tetanization of dorsal roots, these reflexes show an increased response, as measured in terms of their voltage-time area, with a predominant change in the earlier reflex pathways. Both of these changes in the reflex discharge have a time course of 15 to 25 seconds. Post-tetanic potentiation is also observed in response to stimulation of a dorsal rootlet following tetanization of another rootlet in the same or in a neighboring segment. This effect can be explained by post-tetanic changes in the terminals of secondary, and possibly higher order, internuncial cells, essentially similar to those changes in the primary afferent terminals which give rise to potentiation of the monosynaptic reflex. PMID:13271720

  11. Minimally Invasive Drainage of a Post-Laminectomy Subfascial Seroma with Cervical Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    Kitshoff, Adriaan Mynhardt; Van Goethem, Bart; Cornelis, Ine; Combes, Anais; Dvm, Ingeborgh Polis; Gielen, Ingrid; Vandekerckhove, Peter; de Rooster, Hilde

    2016-01-01

    A 14 mo old female neutered Doberman pinscher was evaluated for difficulty in rising, a wide based stance, pelvic limb gait abnormalities, and cervical pain of 2 mo duration. Neurologic examination revealed pelvic limb ataxia and cervical spinal hyperesthesia. Spinal reflexes and cranial nerve examination were normal. The pathology was localized to the C1-C5 or C6-T2 spinal cord segments. Computed tomography (CT) findings indicated bony proliferation of the caudal articular processes of C6 and the cranial articular processes of C7, resulting in bilateral dorsolateral spinal cord compression that was more pronounced on the left side. A limited dorsal laminectomy was performed at C6-C7. Due to progressive neurological deterioration, follow-up CT examination was performed 4 days postoperatively. At the level of the laminectomy defect, a subfacial seroma had developed, entering the spinal canal and causing significant spinal cord compression. Under ultrasonographic guidance a closed-suction wound catheter was placed. Drainage of the seroma successfully relieved its compressive effects on the spinal cord and the patient's neurological status improved. CT was a valuable tool in assessing spinal cord compression as a result of a postoperative subfascial seroma. Minimally invasive application of a wound catheter can be successfully used to manage this condition.

  12. Minimally Invasive Drainage of a Post-Laminectomy Subfascial Seroma with Cervical Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    Kitshoff, Adriaan Mynhardt; Van Goethem, Bart; Cornelis, Ine; Combes, Anais; Dvm, Ingeborgh Polis; Gielen, Ingrid; Vandekerckhove, Peter; de Rooster, Hilde

    2016-01-01

    A 14 mo old female neutered Doberman pinscher was evaluated for difficulty in rising, a wide based stance, pelvic limb gait abnormalities, and cervical pain of 2 mo duration. Neurologic examination revealed pelvic limb ataxia and cervical spinal hyperesthesia. Spinal reflexes and cranial nerve examination were normal. The pathology was localized to the C1-C5 or C6-T2 spinal cord segments. Computed tomography (CT) findings indicated bony proliferation of the caudal articular processes of C6 and the cranial articular processes of C7, resulting in bilateral dorsolateral spinal cord compression that was more pronounced on the left side. A limited dorsal laminectomy was performed at C6-C7. Due to progressive neurological deterioration, follow-up CT examination was performed 4 days postoperatively. At the level of the laminectomy defect, a subfacial seroma had developed, entering the spinal canal and causing significant spinal cord compression. Under ultrasonographic guidance a closed-suction wound catheter was placed. Drainage of the seroma successfully relieved its compressive effects on the spinal cord and the patient's neurological status improved. CT was a valuable tool in assessing spinal cord compression as a result of a postoperative subfascial seroma. Minimally invasive application of a wound catheter can be successfully used to manage this condition. PMID:27008321

  13. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we expect ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dramatically Improves Function After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats May 2004 press release on an experimental treatment ... NINDS). Signaling Molecule Improves Nerve Cell Regeneration in Rats August 2002 news summary on a signaling molecule ...

  16. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... irritation (inflammation) and the collection of infected material (pus) in or around the spinal cord. ... occurs as a complication of an epidural abscess . Pus forms as a collection of: Destroyed tissue cells ...

  17. [Subcutaneous stimulation as additional therapy to spinal cord stimulation in a post-laminectomy syndrome patient].

    PubMed

    Akbaş, Mert; Yeğin, Mehmet Arif; Özdemir, İrem; Göksu, Ethem; Akyüz, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation as treatment of chronic low back pain via neuromodulation has been frequently performed in recent years. The dorsal column is stimulated by an electrode placed at the epidural region. In the case presently described, subcutaneous lead was implanted in a patient with failed back syndrome after spinal cord stimulation was inadequate to treat back and gluteal pain. A 65-year-old male had undergone surgery to treat lumbar disc herniation, after which he received physical therapy and multiple steroid injections due to unrelieved pain. He was admitted to the pain clinic with pain radiating to right gluteal muscle and leg. Spinal cord stimulation was performed and, as pain was not relieved, subcutaneous lead was applied to the right cluneal nerve distribution. Following treatment, the patient scored 1-2 on visual analog scale. Pain had been reduced by over 80%. Octad electrode was placed between T8 and T10 vertebrae after Tuohy needle was introduced to intervertebral area between L1 and L2. Paresthesia occurred in the right extremity. Boundaries were determined by area of right gluteal region in which paresthesia did not occur. Octad electrode was placed subcutaneously after vertical line was drawn from center point. Paresthesia occurred throughout the region. Pulse wave was 390-450 msec; frequency was 10-30 Hz. Subcutaneous electrode replacement is effective additional therapy when pain is not relieved by spinal cord stimulation. PMID:27225614

  18. [Spinal cord infarction].

    PubMed

    Naumann, N; Shariat, K; Ulmer, S; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2012-05-01

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone.Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord.

  19. Spinal cord stimulation for treatment of pain in a patient with post thoracotomy pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graybill, Jordan; Conermann, Till; Kabazie, Abraham J; Chandy, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Post Thoracotomy Pain Syndrome (PTPS) is defined as pain that occurs or persists in the area of the thoracotomy incision for at least 2 months following the initial procedure.  The true incidence of PTPS is hard to define as literature reports a wide range of occurrence from 5% to 90%.  Thoracotomy is associated with a high risk of severe chronic postoperative pain.  Presenting symptoms include both neuropathic pain in the area of the incision, as well as myofascial pain commonly in the ipsilateral scapula and shoulder.  Pain management can be challenging in these patients.  Multiple treatments have been described including conservative treatments with oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); topically applied, peripherally acting drugs; neuromodulating agents; physical therapy; transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as well as more invasive treatments including intercostal nerve blocks, trigger point steroid injections, epidural steroid injections, radiofrequency nerve ablation, cryoablation, and one case report of spinal cord stimulation.  Unfortunately, a portion of these patients will have persistent pain in spite of multiple treatment modalities, and in some cases will experience worsening of pain. This case report describes the novel utility and complete resolution of symptoms with spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in treatment of a patient with persistent PTPS. In the operating room, a percutaneous octet electrode lead was placed using sterile technique under fluoroscopic guidance and loss-of-resistance technique.  The octet electrode lead was subsequently advanced with the aid of fluoroscopy to the level of the T3 superior endplate just right of midline.  The patient's pain distribution was captured optimally with stimulation at this level.  With the assistance of a neurosurgeon, the lead was anchored, tunneled, and connected to a generator, which was implanted over the right iliac crest.  The patient tolerated the procedure well with

  20. Delayed Post-Injury Administration of Riluzole Is Neuroprotective in a Preclinical Rodent Model of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yongchao; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Teng, Yang; Chow, Diana S.-L.; Buttigieg, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Riluzole, a sodium/glutamate antagonist has shown promise as a neuroprotective agent. It is licensed for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and is in clinical trial development for spinal cord injury (SCI). This study investigated the therapeutic time-window and pharmacokinetics of riluzole in a rodent model of cervical SCI. Rats were treated with riluzole (8 mg/kg) at 1 hour (P1) and 3 hours (P3) after injury or with vehicle. Afterward, P1 and P3 groups received riluzole (6 (mg/kg) every 12 hours for 7 days. Both P1 and P3 animals had significant improvements in locomotor recovery as measured by open field locomotion (BBB score, BBB subscore). Von Frey stimuli did not reveal an increase in at level or below level mechanical allodynia. Sensory-evoked potential recordings and quantification of axonal cytoskeleton demonstrated a riluzole-mediated improvement in axonal integrity and function. Histopathological and retrograde tracing studies demonstrated that delayed administration leads to tissue preservation and reduces apoptosis and inflammation. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was undertaken to examine the pharmacokinetics of riluzole. Riluzole penetrates the spinal cord in 15 min, and SCI slowed elimination of riluzole from the spinal cord, resulting in a longer half-life and higher drug concentration in spinal cord and plasma. Initiation of riluzole treatment 1 and 3 hours post-SCI led to functional, histological, and molecular benefits. While extrapolation of post-injury time windows from rat to man is challenging, evidence from SCI-related biomarker studies would suggest that the post-injury time window is likely to be at least 12 hours in man. PMID:23517137

  1. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... How much do you know about taking good care of yourself? Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Illness & disability Types of ... Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric rehabilitation specialist at the Children’s National Medical Center. ...

  2. The reduction of radiation damage to the spinal cord by post-irradiation administration of vasoactive drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Hornsey, S.; Myers, R.; Jenkinson, T. )

    1990-06-01

    Radiation induced white matter necrosis in the rat spinal cord is preceded by changes in permeability of the blood brain-barrier, reduced blood flow, and infarction so that the necrosis is an ischemic necrosis. Attempts have been made to modify this developing pathology by the administration of drugs post-irradiation but just prior to the changes in vascular permeability. Verapamyl, a calcium channel blocker, had no effect on the development of ataxia. Dipyridamole, a drug which increases blood flow and reduces thrombosis, delayed and reduced the onset of ataxia. A low iron diet and desferrioxamine which reduces reperfusion injury also delayed and reduced ataxia. These results support the thesis that vascular changes are an important pathway in the development of radiation necrosis and that reperfusion injury is an important factor in the development and exacerbation of radiation damage to the spinal cord.

  3. Sensory Stimulation Prior to Spinal Cord Injury Induces Post-Injury Dysesthesia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoschouer, Emily L.; Finseth, Taylor; Flinn, Sharon; Basso, D. Michele

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain and dysesthesias are debilitating conditions that can arise following spinal cord injury (SCI). Research studies frequently employ rodent models of SCI to better understand the underlying mechanisms and develop better treatments for these phenomena. While evoked withdrawal tests can assess hypersensitivity in these SCI models, there is little consensus over how to evaluate spontaneous sensory abnormalities that are seen in clinical SCI subjects. Overgrooming (OG) and biting after peripheral nerve injury or spinal cord excitotoxic lesions are thought to be one behavioral demonstration of spontaneous neuropathic pain or dysesthesia. However, reports of OG after contusion SCI are largely anecdotal and conditions causing this response are poorly understood. The present study investigated whether repeated application of sensory stimuli to the trunk prior to mid-thoracic contusion SCI would induce OG after SCI in mice. One week prior to SCI or laminectomy, mice were subjected either to nociceptive and mechanical stimulation, mechanical stimulation only, the testing situation without stimulation, or no treatment. They were then examined for 14 days after surgery and the sizes and locations of OG sites were recorded on anatomical maps. Mice subjected to either stimulus paradigm showed increased OG compared with unstimulated or uninjured mice. Histological analysis showed no difference in spinal cord lesion size due to sensory stimulation, or between mice that overgroomed or did not overgroom. The relationship between prior stimulation and contusion injury in mice that display OG indicates a critical interaction that may underlie one facet of spontaneous neuropathic symptoms after SCI. PMID:20121420

  4. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting to ... a “complete” and “incomplete” spinal cord injury? What recovery is expected following spinal cord injury? Where is ...

  5. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... of injury are alive and easily get educational information on the Internet. Web happy. sites such as the National Spinal Cord Injury Association (www.spinalcord.org) and SPINAL CORD Injury ♦ “Because of my injury, it is now impossible for me Information Network (www.spinalcord.uab.edu) have to ever ...

  6. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  7. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  8. An unusual homicidal stab wound of the cervical spinal cord: A single case examined by post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA).

    PubMed

    Savall, Frederic; Dedouit, Fabrice; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Rougé, Daniel; Saint-Martin, Pauline; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of homicidal stab wound of the cervical spinal cord, which illustrates the value of post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA) in cases of vascular injury. First, we noted a posterior and horizontal trajectory to the neck with complete section of the cervical spinal cord between the first and second cervical vertebrae. This lesion was accompanied by section of the right vertebral and right deep cervical arteries. We also noted an anterior cervical trajectory with an injury to the right internal jugular vein and an anterior right chest wound with a lung trajectory and section of the internal mammary vessels. Cases of spinal cord injuries secondary to stab wounds are rare in the literature. Only one large series has been published from Cape Town. Complete section of the cervical spinal cord accounts for only 4.5% of all cases. Furthermore, lethal cases are rare and classically victims survive and present neurological sequelae. We found only one similar case but despite the transection of the cervical spinal cord the patient survived. Some studies suggest that PMCTA may be very helpful in visualizing vascular system injuries. Our observations are consistent with this proposal. The use of different-time acquisitions was essential for detection of the injured vessels.

  9. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... temperature from the body to the spinal cord. Did You Know... Doctors can often tell where the ... on symptoms and results of a physical examination. Did You Know... Nerves from the lowest parts of ...

  10. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest point on the spinal cord below which sensory feeling and motor movement diminish or disappear. The ... injury is so severe that almost all feeling (sensory function) and all ability to control movement (motor ...

  11. Employment Outcomes Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, S.; Murphy, G. S.; Athanasou, J. A.; Hickey, L.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 83 Australian adults with spinal cord injuries found that at least 56% had worked at some time post-injury and those who were working when surveyed had done so for an average of close to 10 years. Clerical, office, and administrative occupations proved to be the most suitable. (Author/CR)

  12. Malignancies of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Waters, J Dawn; Peran, Encarnacion Maria Navarro; Ciacci, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The management of intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCT) is primarily concerned with the preservation of existing neurologic function. To this end, clinical scientists are continually seeking tools and techniques to improve the safety and efficacy of tumor resection and control. Further advances in safety and efficacy can be proposed at each phase of management, from pre-operative screening to post-treatment monitoring. Innovations within the areas of molecular biology and genetics, intraoperative imaging and stereotactic radiosurgery offer exciting new options to explore in the management of IMSCT. This section will review the pathophysiology and epidemiology of IMSCT and the state-of-the-art management before delving into the promising new tools and techniques for each phase of management. PMID:23281516

  13. Post-traumatic syringomyelia (cystic myelopathy): a prospective study of 449 patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed Central

    Schurch, B; Wichmann, W; Rossier, A B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the incidence of post-traumatic syringomyelia (PTS), to correlate the presence of PTS with its most common signs and symptoms, and to compare results from the Swiss Paraplegic Centre with those reported in the medical literature. METHODS--A total of 449 recent traumatic paraplegic and tetraplegic patients admitted to the Swiss Paraplegic Centre in Zurich between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1993 were prospectively analysed. Yearly clinical tests with conventional radiographs and additional T1 and T2 weighted images were performed as soon as PTS was diagnosed. RESULTS--Of these 449 patients 20 patients displayed symptoms of PTS (4.45%). Ten non-operated patients remained clinically stable (average time: 37 months). Ten worsened--three refused operation, seven were operated on. Mean worsening time was 97 months. Deterioration was closely related to the enlargement of the cyst whereas in operated patients neurological improvement or stabilisation correlated with collapse of the cyst. CONCLUSIONS--Delay between appearance of the first symptoms of PTS and deterioration making surgery necessary may be long (mean five years in the seven operated patients) underlining the need for regular tests. "Slosh" and "suck" mechanisms could explain cyst enlargement as surgical realignment of the spine resulted in a complete cyst collapse in two of the operated patients (normalisation of CSF flow? ). Cord compression, tense syrinx at the fracture site, and kyphosis seemed to be closely linked to the enlargement of the cyst with subsequent further neurological deterioration. Images PMID:8558154

  14. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  15. Management of Chronic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Gary M.; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Both acute and chronic spinal cord disorders present multisystem management problems to the clinician. This article highlights key issues associated with chronic spinal cord dysfunction. Recent Findings: Advances in symptomatic management for chronic spinal cord dysfunction include use of botulinum toxin to manage detrusor hyperreflexia, pregabalin for management of neuropathic pain, and intensive locomotor training for improved walking ability in incomplete spinal cord injuries. Summary: The care of spinal cord dysfunction has advanced significantly over the past 2 decades. Management and treatment of neurologic and non-neurologic complications of chronic myelopathies ensure that each patient will be able to maximize their functional independence and quality of life. PMID:25651225

  16. Expression of microRNAs in human post-mortem amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cords provides insight into disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Romero, Claudia; Hur, Junguk; Lunn, J Simon; Paez-Colasante, Ximena; Bender, Diane E; Yung, Raymond; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a late-onset and terminal neurodegenerative disease. The majority of cases are sporadic with unknown causes and only a small number of cases are genetically linked. Recent evidence suggests that post-transcriptional regulation and epigenetic mechanisms, such as microRNAs, underlie the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders; therefore, altered microRNA expression may result in the dysregulation of key genes and biological pathways that contribute to the development of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Using systems biology analyses on postmortem human spinal cord tissue, we identified dysregulated mature microRNAs and their potential targets previously implicated in functional process and pathways associated with the pathogenesis of ALS. Furthermore, we report a global reduction of mature microRNAs, alterations in microRNA processing, and support for a role of the nucleotide binding protein, TAR DNA binding protein 43, in regulating sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated microRNAs, thereby offering a potential underlying mechanism for sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  17. Treadmill step training promotes spinal cord neural plasticity after incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tiansheng; Ye, Chaoqun; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Zhicheng; Cai, Yanhua; Yue, Feng

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence shows that spinal circuits are significantly affected by training, and that intrinsic circuits that drive locomotor tasks are located in lumbosacral spinal segments in rats with complete spinal cord transection. However, after incomplete lesions, the effect of treadmill training has been debated, which is likely because of the difficulty of separating spontaneous stepping from specific training-induced effects. In this study, rats with moderate spinal cord contusion were jected to either step training on a treadmill or used in the model (control) group. The treadmill training began at day 7 post-injury and lasted 20 ± 10 minutes per day, 5 days per week for 10 weeks. The speed of the treadmill was set to 3 m/min and was increased on a daily basis according to the tolerance of each rat. After 3 weeks of step training, the step training group exhibited a sig-nificantly greater improvement in the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score than the model group. The expression of growth-associated protein-43 in the spinal cord lesion site and the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive ventral neurons in the second lumbar spinal segment were greater in the step training group than in the model group at 11 weeks post-injury, while the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in the spinal cord lesion site showed no difference between the two groups. These results suggest that treadmill training significantly improves functional re-covery and neural plasticity after incomplete spinal cord injury. PMID:25206564

  18. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  19. Validation of a Score Predicting Post-Treatment Ambulatory Status After Radiotherapy for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Douglas, Sarah; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Basic, Hiba; Karstens, Johann H.; Hoskin, Peter J.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: A score predicting post-radiotherapy (RT) ambulatory status was developed based on 2,096 retrospectively evaluated metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) patients. This study aimed to validate the score in a prospective series. Methods and Materials: The score included five factors associated with post-RT ambulatory status: tumor type, interval tumor diagnosis to MSCC, visceral metastases, pre-RT motor function, time developing motor deficits. Patients were divided into five groups: 21-28, 29-31, 32-34, 35-37, 38-44 points. In this study, 653 prospectively followed patients were divided into the same groups. Furthermore, the number of prognostic groups was reduced from five to three (21-28, 29-37, 38-44 points). Post-RT ambulatory rates from this series were compared with the retrospective series. Additionally, this series was compared with 104 patients receiving decompressive surgery plus RT (41 laminectomy, 63 laminectomy plus stabilization of vertebrae). Results: In this study, post-RT ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 43.5% (29-31 points), 71.0% (32-34 points), 89.5% (35-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points). Ambulatory rates from the retrospective study were 6.2%, 43.5%, 70.0%, 86.1%, and 98.7%. After regrouping, ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 70.9% (29-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points) in this series, and 6.2%, 68.4%, and 98.7% in the retrospective series. Ambulatory rates were 0%, 62.5%, and 90.9% in the laminectomy plus RT group, and 14.3%, 83.9%, and 100% in the laminectomy + stabilization plus RT group. Conclusions: Ambulatory rates in the different groups in this study were similar to those in the retrospective study demonstrating the validity of the score. Using only three groups is simplier for clinical routine.

  20. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; da Rocha, Ivan Dias

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a “disease that should not be treated.” Over the last two decades, several studies have been performed to obtain more effective treatments for spinal cord injury. Most of these studies approach a patient with acute spinal cord injury in one of four manners: corrective surgery or a physical, biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  1. Ganglioglioma of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Daniel C; Johnson, Mahlon D; Judkins, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a rare tumor consisting of neoplastic glial and neuronal elements. It accounts for only 0.5% of all primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. We report an unusual case of extensive intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma in a 14-month-old girl who underwent subtotal resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The epidemiology, histopathologic features, imaging findings, treatment, and prognosis are subsequently reviewed. PMID:26605127

  2. Epidemiology of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kurtzke, J F

    1977-01-01

    Accidents are the cause of some 50 deaths per 100 000 population each year in the US; some 3% of these are from traumatic spinal cord injury alone. Traumatic spinal cord injury in socioeconomically advanced countries, has a probably annual incidence rate of 3 per 100 000 population. Males are affected five times as often as females, and in the US, Negroes have twice the rates of whites. Half the cases are due to motor vehicle accidents, 1/4 to falls, and 1/10 to sports injuries. Maximal ages at risk are 15 to 34; only for cord damage due to falls do this risk differ, and here elderly are the more prone. Associated injuries are common in traumatic cord injury, and head injury and pulmonary dysfunction are frequent causes of the acute deaths in traumatic SCI which is why complete quadriplegia has a high early case-fatality ratio. Late deaths in SCI are principally the direct or indirect result of the neurogenic bladder. With treatment in comprehensive spinal cord injury centers, more than 4 of 5 traumatic SCI patients will survive ten years with an average of almost 18 years. Median survival may be almost 14 years for complete quadriplegia, 17 for complete paraplegia, 19 for incomplete quadriplegia, 20 for incomplete paraplegia and 28 for cauda equina lesions. Prevalence is likely to be some 50 per 100 000 population with about 20 per 100 000 completely paralyzed (3 quadriplegic and 19 paraplegic). Some 4 out of 5 survivors of traumatic SCI should be able to live at home and perform gainful work after such treatment. PMID:616527

  3. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    were incorporated in the PEG-PCL-PEG gel and injected into a lesion transecting the main dorsomedial and minor ventral medial corticospinal tract (CST). The degree of collateralization of the transected CST was quantified as an indicator of the regenerative potential of these treatments. At one month post-injury, we observed the robust rostral collateralization of the CST tract in response to the bFGF plasmid-loaded gel. In conclusion, we hope that this platform technology can be applied to the sustained local delivery of other proteins for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  4. How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord tumors in children staged? How are brain and spinal cord tumors diagnosed in children? Brain ... resonance angiography (MRA) or computerized tomographic angiography (CTA). Brain or spinal cord tumor biopsy Imaging tests such ...

  5. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-07

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  6. Spinal cord compression due to ethmoid adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Johns, D R; Sweriduk, S T

    1987-10-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus is a rare tumor which has been epidemiologically linked to woodworking in the furniture industry. It has a low propensity to metastasize and has not been previously reported to cause spinal cord compression. A symptomatic epidural spinal cord compression was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in a former furniture worker with widely disseminated metastases. The clinical features of ethmoid sinus adenocarcinoma and neoplastic spinal cord compression, and the comparative value of MRI scanning in the neuroradiologic diagnosis of spinal cord compression are reviewed.

  7. Fas and FasL expression in the spinal cord following cord hemisection in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liu; Yu, Zou; Hui, Li; Yu-Guang, Guan; Xin-Fu, Zhou; Chao, You; Yanbin, Xiyang; Xi, Zhan; Jun, Wang; Xin-Hua, Heng; Xin-Hua, Hen; Ting-Hua, Wang

    2011-03-01

    The changes of endogenous Fas/FasL in injured spinal cord, mostly in primates, are not well known. In this study, we investigated the temporal changes in the expression of Fas and FasL and explored their possible roles in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and associated precentral gyrus following T(11) spinal cord hemisection in the adult rhesus monkey. A significant functional improvement was seen with the time going on in monkeys subjected to cord hemisection. Apoptotic cells were also seen in the ventral horn of injured spinal cord with TUNEL staining, and a marked increase presents at 7 days post operation (dpo). Simultaneously, the number of Fas and FasL immunoreactive neurons in the spinal cords caudal and rostral to injury site and their intracellular optical density (OD) in the ipsilateral side of injury site at 7 dpo increased significantly more than that of control group and contralateral sides. This was followed by a decrease and returned to normal level at 60 dpo. No positive neurons were observed in precentral gyrus. The present results may provide some insights to understand the role of Fas/FasL in the spinal cord but not motor cortex with neuronal apoptosis and neuroplasticity in monkeys subjected to hemisection spinal cord injury. PMID:21181266

  8. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  9. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  10. Ambulation and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Elizabeth C; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-05-01

    Walking is possible for many patients with a spinal cord injury. Avenues enabling walking include braces, robotics and FES. Among the benefits are improved musculoskeletal and mental health, however unrealistic expectations may lead to negative changes in quality of life. Use rigorous assessment standards to gauge the improvement of walking during the rehabilitation process, but also yearly. Continued walking after discharge may be limited by challenges, such as lack of accessibility in and outside the home, and complications, such as shoulder pain or injuries from falls. It is critical to determine the risks and benefits of walking for each patient.

  11. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  12. Regenerative treatment in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Mevci; Attar, Ayhan; Kuzu, Isinsu

    2012-09-01

    Spinal cord injury is a devastating, traumatic event, and experienced mainly among young people. Until the modern era, spinal cord injury was so rapidly fatal that no seriously injured persons would survive long enough for regeneration to occur. Treatment of spinal cord injury can be summarized as follows: prevent further cord injury, maintain blood flow, relieve spinal cord compression, and provide secure vertebral stabilization so as to allow mobilization and rehabilitation, none of which achieves functional recovery. Previous studies have focused on analyzing the pathogenesis of secondary injury that extends from the injury epicenter to the periphery, as well as the tissue damage and neural cell death associated with secondary injury. Now, there are hundreds of current experimental and clinical regenerative treatment studies. One of the most popular treatment method is cell transplantation in injured spinal cord. For this purpose bone marrow stromal cells, mononuclear stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, and olfactory ensheathing cells can be used. As a result, cell transplantation has become a promising therapeutic option for spinal cord injury patients. In this paper we discuss the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury.

  13. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa de; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Rocha, Ivan Dias da

    2012-10-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a "disease that should not be treated." Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  14. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; Şah, Volkan; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients’ family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  15. Segmentation of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Callot, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Segmenting the spinal cord contour is a necessary step for quantifying spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. Delineating gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) is also useful for quantifying GM atrophy or for extracting multiparametric MRI metrics into specific WM tracts. Spinal cord segmentation in clinical research is not as developed as brain segmentation, however with the substantial improvement of MR sequences adapted to spinal cord MR investigations, the field of spinal cord MR segmentation has advanced greatly within the last decade. Segmentation techniques with variable accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper, we review some of the existing methods for cord and WM/GM segmentation, including intensity-based, surface-based, and image-based methods. We also provide recommendations for validating spinal cord segmentation techniques, as it is important to understand the intrinsic characteristics of the methods and to evaluate their performance and limitations. Lastly, we illustrate some applications in the healthy and pathological spinal cord. One conclusion of this review is that robust and automatic segmentation is clinically relevant, as it would allow for longitudinal and group studies free from user bias as well as reproducible multicentric studies in large populations, thereby helping to further our understanding of the spinal cord pathophysiology and to develop new criteria for early detection of subclinical evolution for prognosis prediction and for patient management. Another conclusion is that at the present time, no single method adequately segments the cord and its substructure in all the cases encountered (abnormal intensities, loss of contrast, deformation of the cord, etc.). A combination of different approaches is thus advised for future developments, along with the introduction of probabilistic shape models. Maturation of standardized frameworks, multiplatform availability, inclusion

  16. Unusual aetiology of malignant spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Boland, Jason; Rennick, Adrienne

    2013-06-01

    Malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncological emergency requiring rapid diagnosis and treatment to prevent irreversible spinal cord injury and disability. A case is described in a 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma in which the presentation of the MSCC was atypical with principally proximal left leg weakness with no evidence of bone metastasis. This was due to an unusual aetiology of the MSCC as the renal carcinoma had metastasised to his left psoas muscle causing a lumbosacral plexopathy and infiltrated through the intervertebral disc spaces, initially causing left lateral cauda equina and upper lumbar cord compression, before complete spinal cord compression. This case illustrates the varied aetiology of MSCC and reinforces the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion of the possibility of spinal cord compression. PMID:24644568

  17. General Information about Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cord Tumors Treatment Overview (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Go ... types of brain and spinal cord tumors. The information from tests and procedures done to detect (find) ...

  18. Advance in spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury: Blood-spinal cord barrier and remote ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qijing; Huang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ji; Zhu, Hongfei

    2016-06-01

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is the physiological and metabolic substance diffusion barrier between blood circulation and spinal cord tissues. This barrier plays a vital role in maintaining the microenvironment stability of the spinal cord. When the spinal cord is subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, the structure and function of the BSCB is disrupted, further destroying the spinal cord homeostasis and ultimately leading to neurological deficit. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is an approach in which interspersed cycles of preconditioning ischemia is followed by reperfusion to tissues/organs to protect the distant target tissues/organs against subsequent lethal ischemic injuries. RIPC is an innovation of the treatment strategies that protect the organ from I/R injury. In this study, we review the morphological structure and function of the BSCB, the injury mechanism of BSCB resulting from spinal cord I/R, and the effect of RIPC on it.

  19. Nanomedicine for Treating Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds. PMID:23945984

  20. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  1. Microsurgical resection of intramedullary spinal cord hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord hemangioblastomas account for about 10% of spinal cord tumors. They usually arise from the dorsolateral pia mater and are characterized by their significant vascularity. The principles and techniques of safe resection are different than those employed for the more commonly occurring intramedullary glial tumors (e.g. ependymoma, astrocytoma) and consist of circumferential detachment of the tumor margin from the surrounding normal pia. This video demonstrates the microsurgical techniques of resection of a thoracic spinal cord hemangioblastoma. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/yT5KLi4VyAo. PMID:25175571

  2. Spinal cord injury in youth.

    PubMed

    Apple, D F; Anson, C A; Hunter, J D; Bell, R B

    1995-02-01

    To identify special characteristics of the pediatric spinal cord-injured (SCI) population, we analyzed a database of 1,770 traumatic SCI patients; 88 (5%) fell into the two pediatric subgroups: 0-12 years (n = 26) and 13-15 years (n = 62) at time of injury. Differences between age groups were identified with regard to demographics, neurologic characteristics, associated injuries and complications, and management. Mode level of bony injury was C2 in preteens, C4 in teens, and C4-C5 in adults. Scoliosis developed far more frequently in children, particularly preteens (23%), than in adults (5%). Violent etiologies, predominantly gunshots, accounted for a disproportionate share of injuries to preteens (19%) and African-Americans (28%), as compared with adults (12%) and Caucasians (7%). This last finding underscores the urgent need to mount a response to the nationwide proliferation of gunshot-related SCI in children and minorities.

  3. Spinal cord injury in youth.

    PubMed

    Apple, D F; Anson, C A; Hunter, J D; Bell, R B

    1995-02-01

    To identify special characteristics of the pediatric spinal cord-injured (SCI) population, we analyzed a database of 1,770 traumatic SCI patients; 88 (5%) fell into the two pediatric subgroups: 0-12 years (n = 26) and 13-15 years (n = 62) at time of injury. Differences between age groups were identified with regard to demographics, neurologic characteristics, associated injuries and complications, and management. Mode level of bony injury was C2 in preteens, C4 in teens, and C4-C5 in adults. Scoliosis developed far more frequently in children, particularly preteens (23%), than in adults (5%). Violent etiologies, predominantly gunshots, accounted for a disproportionate share of injuries to preteens (19%) and African-Americans (28%), as compared with adults (12%) and Caucasians (7%). This last finding underscores the urgent need to mount a response to the nationwide proliferation of gunshot-related SCI in children and minorities. PMID:7729113

  4. Spinal cord lesions - The rehabilitation perspective.

    PubMed

    Faria, Filipa

    2006-02-01

    The present study provides an overview of the spinal cord injury focusing mainly on aspects related to rehabilitation. Spinal cord injury affects young people in an active phase of life, determining severe handicaps. Most of the lesions are traumatic, caused by car accidents. Until fifty years ago, the survival of individuals with spinal cord injury was very reduced and the leading cause of death was renal failure. Due to developments in medical knowledge and technical advances, the survival rates have significantly improved. The causes of death have also changed being respiratory complications, particularly pneumonia, the leading causes. Immediately after a spinal cord lesion there is a phase of spinal shock which is characterized by flaccid paralysis and bladder and bowel retention. Progressively there is a return of the spinal cord automatism with the beginning of some reflex activities. Based on neurological evaluation it is pos-sible to predict motor and functional recovery and establish the rehabilitation program. We can consider three phases on the rehabilitation program: the first while the patient is still in bed, directed to prevent or treat complications due to immobility and begin sphincters reeducation; the second phase is intended to achieve wheelchair autonomy; the last phase is training in ortostatism. The rehabilitation program also comprises sports and recreational activities, psychological and social support in order to achieve an integral of the individual with a spinal cord injury.

  5. Management of severe spinal cord injury following hyperbaric exposure.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bruce; Laden, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence that drainage of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) improves functional neurological outcome after reperfusion injury to the spinal cord that occasionally follows aortic reconstructive surgery. This beneficial effect is considered owing to lowering of the CSF pressure thereby normalising spinal cord blood flow and reducing the 'secondary' cord injury caused by vascular congestion and cord swelling in the relatively confined spinal canal. Whilst lacking definitive proof, there are convincing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort data and systematic reviews supporting this intervention. The therapeutic window for lumbar CSF drainage requires further elucidation; however, it appears to be days rather than hours post insult. We contend that the same benefit is likely to be achieved following other primary spinal cord injuries that cause cord swelling and elicit the 'secondary' injury. Traditionally the concept of CSF drainage has been considered more applicable to the brain as contained in a 'closed box' by lowering intracranial pressure (ICP) to improve cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The control of CPP is intended to limit 'secondary' brain injury and is a key concept of brain injury management. Using microdialysis in the spinal cords of trauma patients, it has been shown that intraspinal pressure (ISP) needs to be kept below 20 mmHg and spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP) above 70 mmHg to avoid biochemical evidence of secondary cord damage. Vasopressor have also been used in spinal cord injury to improve perfusion, however complications are common, typically cardiac in nature, and require very careful monitoring; the evidence supporting this approach is notably less convincing. Decompression illness (DCI) of the spinal cord is treated with recompression, hyperbaric oxygen, various medications designed to reduce the inflammatory response and fluid administration to normalise blood pressure and haematocrit. These

  6. Spinal cord protection in aortic endovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Scott, D A; Denton, M J

    2016-09-01

    A persistent neurological deficit, such as paraplegia or paraparesis, secondary to spinal cord injury remains one of the most feared complications of surgery on the descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. This is despite sophisticated advances in imaging and the use of less invasive endovascular procedures. Extensive fenestrated endovascular aortic graft prostheses still carry a risk of spinal cord injury of up to 10%; thus, this risk should be identified and strategies implemented to protect the spinal cord and maintain perfusion. The patients at highest risk are those undergoing extensive thoracic aortic stenting including thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic vessels. Although many techniques are available, lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage remains the most frequent intervention, along with maintenance of perfusion pressure and possibly staged procedures to allow collateral vessel stabilization. Many questions remain regarding other technical aspects, spinal cord monitoring and cooling, pharmacological protection, and the optimal duration of interventions into the postoperative period. PMID:27566805

  7. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronic pain in people with spinal cord injury. Robotic-assisted therapy Most recovery following SCI takes place ... the safety and efficacy of a type of robotic therapy device known as the AMES device. The ...

  8. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... the UAB-SCIMS More The UAB-SCIMS Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network as a resource to promote knowledge in the ...

  10. Staging Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  11. Mediastinal paraganglioma causing spinal cord compression.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, M G; Fresco, R; Bruetman, M E

    1977-01-01

    An invasive paraganglioma of the posterior mediastinum caused spinal cord compression in a 31 year old women. Electron microscopic examination of the paraganglioma invading the epidural space revealed numerous dense-cored granules in the cytoplasm of the tumour cells. We are reporting this case to present the ultrastructure of mediastinal paraganglioma, and to call attention to an unusual cause of spinal cord compression. Images PMID:886352

  12. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging.

  13. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging. PMID:27459933

  14. Polyvinyl alcohol-polyvinyl pyrrolidone thin films provide local short-term release of anti-inflammatory agents post spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Comolli, Noelle; Donaldson, Olivia; Grantier, Nathan; Zhukareva, Victoria; Tom, Veronica J

    2012-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers a large inflammatory response that results in exacerbated tissue damage. Locally delivering anti-inflammatory drugs could mitigate this secondary wave of degeneration. The mitogen-activated protein kinase family members p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) play important roles in the inflammatory response and cell death. We propose that the use of polymer thin films, made of polyvinyl alcohol and polyvinyl pyrrolidone blends (PVA-PVP), can be used to provide local release of inhibitors to p38 and JNK post-SCI. Release studies performed in vitro confirmed the inhibitors could be released from the film for up to 7 days. The thin film was also tested for its surgical feasibility using a cervical contusion model of SCI in adult female rats. Films with or without the inhibitors were placed subdurally over the injury site immediately following SCI. Animals were sacrificed 5 days post-SCI and spinal cord tissue above and below the injury site was harvested. Additionally, films were removed for analysis. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the anti-fouling properties of the PVA-PVP film. Tissue histology confirmed that the films themselves did not generate a large immune response, but they did compress the tissue slightly at its placement above the injury site. Finally, quantitative Western blot analysis determined the films loaded with p38 and JNK inhibitors delivered bioactive agents to the injury site and resulted in a significantly decreased amount of pro-cell death proteins. These data indicate that PVA-PVP films can be used to effectively deliver drugs to a SCI site.

  15. Self-Esteem Differences among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed 63 people with spinal cord injury (SCI) in either their first, second, or fifth year post-injury. Results indicated that perceived levels of self-esteem decreased following the SCI. Found that self-esteem was lowest in the second year of injury. Self-esteem may be connected to loss of employment. (RJM)

  16. Race-Ethnicity, Education, and Employment after Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Saunders, Lee; Staten, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article was to identify the relationship between race-ethnicity and employment after spinal cord injury (SCI), while evaluating interrelationships with gender, injury severity, and education. The authors used a cohort design using the most current status from a post-injury interview from the National SCI Statistical Center.…

  17. Microsurgical resection of intramedullary spinal cord ependymoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Ependymomas are the most commonly occurring intramedullary spinal cord tumor in adults. With few exceptions these tumors are histologically benign, although they exhibit some biologic variability with respect to growth rate. While unencapsulated, spinal ependymomas are non-infiltrative and present a clear margin of demarcation from the surrounding spinal cord that serves as an effective dissection plane. This video demonstrates the technique of microsurgical resection of an intramedullary ependymoma through a posterior midline myelotomy. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/lcHhymSvSqU. PMID:25175587

  18. A walking disaster: a case of incomplete spinal cord injury with symptomatic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Currie, Katharine D; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2015-10-01

    Eight months post-injury, an ambulatory 58-year-old male with an incomplete spinal cord injury experienced syncope and a 52-mmHg drop in his systolic blood pressure during a tilt-table assessment. This case study highlights the necessity to examine autonomic function in all cases of spinal cord injury, regardless of injury severity. PMID:26264838

  19. A walking disaster: a case of incomplete spinal cord injury with symptomatic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Currie, Katharine D; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2015-10-01

    Eight months post-injury, an ambulatory 58-year-old male with an incomplete spinal cord injury experienced syncope and a 52-mmHg drop in his systolic blood pressure during a tilt-table assessment. This case study highlights the necessity to examine autonomic function in all cases of spinal cord injury, regardless of injury severity.

  20. Spinal cord injury, immunodepression, and antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Held, Katherine S.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The inability to effectively control microbial infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals affected by spinal cord injury (SCI). Available evidence from clinical studies as well as animal models of SCI demonstrate that increased susceptibility to infection is derived from disruption of central nervous system (CNS) communication with the host immune system that ultimately leads to immunodepression. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing muted cellular and humoral responses that occur post-injury resulting in impaired host defense following infection is critical for improving the overall quality of life of individuals with SCI. This review focuses on studies performed using preclinical animal models of SCI to evaluate how injury impacts T and B lymphocyte responses following either viral infection or antigenic challenge. PMID:24747011

  1. Reducing synuclein accumulation improves neuronal survival after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Fogerson, Stephanie M; van Brummen, Alexandra J; Busch, David J; Allen, Scott R; Roychaudhuri, Robin; Banks, Susan M L; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Morgan, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury causes neuronal death, limiting subsequent regeneration and recovery. Thus, there is a need to develop strategies for improving neuronal survival after injury. Relative to our understanding of axon regeneration, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms that promote the survival of damaged neurons. To address this, we took advantage of lamprey giant reticulospinal neurons whose large size permits detailed examination of post-injury molecular responses at the level of individual, identified cells. We report here that spinal cord injury caused a select subset of giant reticulospinal neurons to accumulate synuclein, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein best known for its atypical aggregation and causal role in neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and other diseases. Post-injury synuclein accumulation took the form of punctate aggregates throughout the somata and occurred selectively in dying neurons, but not in those that survived. In contrast, another synaptic vesicle protein, synaptotagmin, did not accumulate in response to injury. We further show that the post-injury synuclein accumulation was greatly attenuated after single dose application of either the "molecular tweezer" inhibitor, CLR01, or a translation-blocking synuclein morpholino. Consequently, reduction of synuclein accumulation not only improved neuronal survival, but also increased the number of axons in the spinal cord proximal and distal to the lesion. This study is the first to reveal that reducing synuclein accumulation is a novel strategy for improving neuronal survival after spinal cord injury.

  2. Adiposity and spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Wells, Kathryn M; Austin, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    The drastic changes in body composition following spinal cord injury (SCI) have been shown to play a significant role in cardiovascular and metabolic health. The pattern of storage and distribution of different types of adipose tissue may impact metabolic health variables similar to carbohydrate, lipid and bone metabolism. The use of magnetic resonance imaging provides insights on the interplay among different regional adipose tissue compartments and their role in developing chronic diseases. Regional adipose tissue can be either distributed centrally or peripherally into subcutaneous and ectopic sites. The primary ectopic adipose tissue sites are visceral, intramuscular and bone marrow. Dysfunction in the central nervous system following SCI impacts the pattern of distribution of adiposity especially between tetraplegia and paraplegia. The current editorial is focused primarily on introducing different types of adipose tissue and establishing scientific basis to develop appropriate dietary, rehabilitation or pharmaceutical interventions to manage the negative consequences of increasing adiposity after SCI. We have also summarized the clinical implications and future recommendations relevant to study adiposity after SCI. PMID:26396933

  3. Mechanical characterization of the injured spinal cord after lateral spinal hemisection injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Tarun; Gilbert, Jeremy; Stelzner, Dennis; Hasenwinkel, Julie

    2012-06-10

    The glial scar formed at the site of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has been classically hypothesized to be a potent physical and biochemical barrier to nerve regeneration. One longstanding hypothesis is that the scar acts as a physical barrier due to its increased stiffness in comparison to uninjured spinal cord tissue. However, the information regarding the mechanical properties of the glial scar in the current literature is mostly anecdotal and not well quantified. We monitored the mechanical relaxation behavior of injured rat spinal cord tissue at the site of mid-thoracic spinal hemisection 2 weeks and 8 weeks post-injury using a microindentation test method. Elastic moduli were calculated and a modified standard linear model (mSLM) was fit to the data to estimate the relaxation time constant and viscosity. The SLM was modified to account for a spectrum of relaxation times, a phenomenon common to biological tissues, by incorporating a stretched exponential term. Injured tissue exhibited significantly lower stiffness and elastic modulus in comparison to uninjured control tissue, and the results from the model parameters indicated that the relaxation time constant and viscosity of injured tissue were significantly higher than controls. This study presents direct micromechanical measurements of injured spinal cord tissue post-injury. The results of this study show that the injured spinal tissue displays complex viscoelastic behavior, likely indicating changes in tissue permeability and diffusivity.

  4. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy.

  5. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. PMID:27616315

  6. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  7. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    McCunniff, A.J.; Liang, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    The incidence of permanent injury to the spinal cord as a complication of radiation therapy generally correlates positively with total radiation dosage. However, several reports in the literature have indicated that fraction size is also an important factor in the development or nondevelopment of late injuries in normal tissue. To determine the effect of fraction size on the incidence of radiation-induced spinal cord injuries, we reviewed 144 cases of head and neck cancer treated at our institution between 1971 and 1980 with radiation greater than 5600 cGy to a portion of the cervical spinal cord. Most of these patients received greater than or equal to 6000 cGy, with fraction sizes ranging from 133 cGy to 200 cGy. Fifty-three of the 144 patients have been followed up for 2 years or more. Nearly half of these (26 patients) received greater than 6000 cGy with fraction sizes of 133 cGy to 180 cGy. Only 1 of the 53 (1.9%) has sustained permanent spinal cord injury; 20 months after completion of radiation treatments he developed Brown-Sequard syndrome. Our experience suggests that radiation injuries to the spinal cord correlate not only with total radiation dosage, but also with fraction size; low fraction sizes appear to decrease the incidence of such injuries.

  8. What Are the Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI)? Skip sharing on social media links ... no known ways to reverse damage to the spinal cord. However, researchers are continually working on new treatments, ...

  9. Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poor, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews historical development of organized vocational rehabilitation programming for the spinal cord injured in the United States. Significant factors that affect vocational rehabilitation outcomes with spinal cord injured persons are listed and discussed. (Author)

  10. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion.

  11. Aquaporin 1 – a novel player in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Nesic, O.; Lee, J.; Unabia, G. C.; Johnson, K.; Ye, Z.; Vergara, L.; Hulsebosch, C. E.; Perez-Polo, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    The role of water channel aquaporin 1 (AQP-1) in uninjured or injured spinal cords is unknown. AQP-1 is weakly expressed in neurons and gray matter astrocytes, and more so in white matter astrocytes in uninjured spinal cords, a novel finding. As reported before, AQP-1 is also present in ependymal cells, but most abundantly in small diameter sensory fibers of the dorsal horn. Rat contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) induced persistent and significant four- to eightfold increases in AQP-1 levels at the site of injury (T10) persisting up to 11 months post-contusion, a novel finding. Delayed AQP-1 increases were also found in cervical and lumbar segments, suggesting the spreading of AQP-1 changes over time after SCI. Given that the antioxidant melatonin significantly decreased SCI-induced AQP-1 increases and that hypoxia inducible factor-1α was increased in acutely and chronically injured spinal cords, we propose that chronic hypoxia contributes to persistent AQP-1 increases after SCI. Interestingly; AQP-1 levels were not affected by long-lasting hypertonicity that significantly increased astrocytic AQP-4, suggesting that the primary role of AQP-1 is not regulating isotonicity in spinal cords. Based on our results we propose possible novel roles for AQP-1 in the injured spinal cords: (i) in neuronal and astrocytic swelling, as AQP-1 was increased in all surviving neurons and reactive astrocytes after SCI and (ii) in the development of the neuropathic pain after SCI. We have shown that decreased AQP-1 in melatonin-treated SCI rats correlated with decreased AQP-1 immunolabeling in the dorsal horns sensory afferents, and with significantly decreased mechanical allodynia, suggesting a possible link between AQP-1 and chronic neuropathic pain after SCI. PMID:18248364

  12. Surgical resection of subependymoma of the cervical spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Kasliwal, Manish K; Mhanna, Nakhle; Fontes, Ricardo B V; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2014-09-01

    Subependymomas can rarely occur in the spinal cord, and account for about 2% of symptomatic spinal cord tumors. It most often occurs in the cervical spinal cord, followed by cervicothoracic junction, thoracic cord and conus medullaris. It often has an eccentric location in the spinal cord and lacks gadolinium enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging. We present a rare case of symptomatic subependymoma of the cervical spinal cord, which underwent successful gross total resection. Surgical pearls and nuances are discussed to help surgeons to avoid potential complications. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/Rsm9KxZX7Yo. PMID:25175581

  13. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis. PMID:24966260

  14. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-06-25

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis.

  15. Causes of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the causes of spinal cord injury (SCI) and associated factors is critical in the development of successful prevention programs. Objective: This study analyzed data from the National SCI Database (NSCID) and National Shriners SCI Database (NSSCID) in the United States to examine specific etiologies of SCI by age, sex, race, ethnicity, day and month of injury, and neurologic outcomes. Methods: NSCID and NSSCID participants who had a traumatic SCI from 2005 to 2011 with known etiology were included in the analyses (N=7,834). Thirty-seven causes of injury documented in the databases were stratified by personal characteristics using descriptive analysis. Results: The most common causes of SCI were automobile crashes (31.5%) and falls (25.3%), followed by gunshot wounds (10.4%), motorcycle crashes (6.8%), diving incidents (4.7%), and medical/surgical complications (4.3%), which collectively accounted for 83.1% of total SCIs since 2005. Automobile crashes were the leading cause of SCI until age 45 years, whereas falls were the leading cause after age 45 years. Gunshot wounds, motorcycle crashes, and diving caused more SCIs in males than females. The major difference among race/ethnicity was in the proportion of gunshot wounds. More SCIs occurred during the weekends and warmer months, which seemed to parallel the increase of motorcycle- and diving-related SCIs. Level and completeness of injury are also associated with etiology of injury. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that prevention strategies should be tailored to the targeted population and major causes to have a meaningful impact on reducing the incidence of SCI. PMID:23678280

  16. Primary Multifocal Gliosarcoma of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh M.; Finn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Gliosarcoma (GS) is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuro-axis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord. PMID:27134708

  17. Intractable Pruritus After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    Background: This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Method: Case report. Findings: Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Conclusions: Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective. PMID:19777867

  18. Applier tool for intradural spinal cord implants.

    PubMed

    Oya, H; Reddy, C G; Dahdaleh, N S; Wilson, S; Howard, M A; Jeffery, N D; Utz, M; Gillies, G T

    2012-04-01

    We have designed, built and tested a novel device for placing intradural neurmodulator implants directly on the pial surface of the spinal cord. This applier tool is designed for ergonomic handling of delicate electro-mechanical devices such as the Iowa-Patch™ spinal cord stimulator implant, which is aimed at overcoming certain shortcomings in the performance of standard epidural stimulator devices. The applier is approximately 14 cm long, 6 mm in diameter, made of stainless steel components, and has simple and reliable mechanisms for the attachment and release of the implant from it. We describe the design of the device, details of its construction, and its performance during in vivo testing of somatosensory evoked potentials in an ovine model of intradural spinal cord stimulation. PMID:22339111

  19. Differences in Affect, Life Satisfaction, and Depression between Successfully and Unsuccessfully Rehabilitated Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Martha H.; Holbert, Donald

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether persons with spinal cord injuries who were successfully rehabilitated differed from those who were not with regard to positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and depression. An ex post facto research design compared persons with spinal cord injuries who were previously employed with persons with spinal cord…

  20. Texture-based characterization of pre- and post-operative T2-weighted magnetic resonance signals of the cervical spinal cord in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Klironomos, George; Gatzounis, George; Panayiotakis, George

    2009-10-01

    The utility of texture analysis regarding the provision of quantitative prognostic factors, potentially valuable to the prediction of the post-operative outcome of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients, is investigated. The clinical sample of the study comprised six subjects, who had undergone surgical therapeutic intervention for CSM. Following a specific imaging protocol, a pair of MR images of the cervical spine, corresponding to pre- and post-operative MR scans, was obtained for each of the patients. Accordingly, 12 sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were studied. Employing custom developed software, a Region Of Interest (ROI) within the spinal cord, corresponding to the region of the high-intensity CSM MR signal, was segmented on each image, according to the region growing method. Utilizing custom developed algorithms, the following sets of textural features were generated from the segmented ROIs: (i) gradient features, (ii) mean values of features from co-occurrence matrices (co-occurrence features) and (iii) range values of co-occurrence features. Utilizing each one of these sets of features, as well as the least-squares minimum distance and the quadratic classification algorithms, pattern recognition classification schemes were implemented for the discrimination between pre-operative and post-operative MR signals. Statistical analysis revealed the existence of statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between textural features generated from pre-operative and post-operative high-intensity MR signals. The classification accuracies accomplished ranged from 75% to 100%. Textural features, descriptive of relevant properties of the high-intensity MR signal in CSM, may be considered as quantitative information of potential value for the prediction of the post-operative outcome of CSM patients.

  1. Turkish Adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--Version III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-01-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the…

  2. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  3. Atorvastatin activates autophagy and promotes neurological function recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Zhong-Ming; Shen, Zhao-Liang; Gao, Kai; Chang, Liang; Guo, Yue; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ai-Mei

    2016-06-01

    Atorvastatin, a lipid-lowering medication, provides neuroprotective effects, although the precise mechanisms of action remain unclear. Our previous studies confirmed activated autophagy following spinal cord injury, which was conducive to recovery of neurological functions. We hypothesized that atorvastatin could also activate autophagy after spinal cord injury, and subsequently improve recovery of neurological functions. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established based on the Allen method. Atorvastatin (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected at 1 and 2 days after spinal cord injury. At 7 days post-injury, western blot assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining results showed increased Beclin-1 and light chain 3B gene and protein expressions in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group. Additionally, caspase-9 and caspase-3 expression was decreased, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells was reduced. Compared with the spinal cord injury + saline group, Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale scores significantly increased in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group at 14-42 days post-injury. These findings suggest that atorvastatin activated autophagy after spinal cord injury, inhibited apoptosis, and promoted recovery of neurological function. PMID:27482228

  4. Atorvastatin activates autophagy and promotes neurological function recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Zhong-ming; Shen, Zhao-liang; Gao, Kai; Chang, Liang; Guo, Yue; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ai-mei

    2016-01-01

    Atorvastatin, a lipid-lowering medication, provides neuroprotective effects, although the precise mechanisms of action remain unclear. Our previous studies confirmed activated autophagy following spinal cord injury, which was conducive to recovery of neurological functions. We hypothesized that atorvastatin could also activate autophagy after spinal cord injury, and subsequently improve recovery of neurological functions. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established based on the Allen method. Atorvastatin (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected at 1 and 2 days after spinal cord injury. At 7 days post-injury, western blot assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining results showed increased Beclin-1 and light chain 3B gene and protein expressions in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group. Additionally, caspase-9 and caspase-3 expression was decreased, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells was reduced. Compared with the spinal cord injury + saline group, Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale scores significantly increased in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group at 14–42 days post-injury. These findings suggest that atorvastatin activated autophagy after spinal cord injury, inhibited apoptosis, and promoted recovery of neurological function. PMID:27482228

  5. Atorvastatin activates autophagy and promotes neurological function recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Zhong-Ming; Shen, Zhao-Liang; Gao, Kai; Chang, Liang; Guo, Yue; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ai-Mei

    2016-06-01

    Atorvastatin, a lipid-lowering medication, provides neuroprotective effects, although the precise mechanisms of action remain unclear. Our previous studies confirmed activated autophagy following spinal cord injury, which was conducive to recovery of neurological functions. We hypothesized that atorvastatin could also activate autophagy after spinal cord injury, and subsequently improve recovery of neurological functions. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established based on the Allen method. Atorvastatin (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected at 1 and 2 days after spinal cord injury. At 7 days post-injury, western blot assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining results showed increased Beclin-1 and light chain 3B gene and protein expressions in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group. Additionally, caspase-9 and caspase-3 expression was decreased, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells was reduced. Compared with the spinal cord injury + saline group, Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale scores significantly increased in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group at 14-42 days post-injury. These findings suggest that atorvastatin activated autophagy after spinal cord injury, inhibited apoptosis, and promoted recovery of neurological function.

  6. Proprioceptive pathways of the spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, R J; Kulics, A T; Ducker, T B

    1977-01-01

    In the Macaque, surgical lesions were made in the dorsal funiculus, in the dorsolateral funiculus, and through half of the spinal cord. The somatosensory and motor capacity of the animal were examined neurologically and electrophysiologically. The exact lesion was then confirmed pathologically in detail. The results of these experiments indicate that limb position information from the distal limb and proximal limb are relayed to the brain in two different fashions. Distal limb position information, especially the cortical representation of the limbs' volar surface as it moves in space, is drastically impaired by dorsal funiculus or posterior white column lesions. Proximal limb position may or may not be impaired by similar lesions, for this information while initially in the dorsal or posterior white columns is sorted out (as it ascends in the spinal cord) to the dorsolateral funiculus or white columns. For example, in the lower thoracic spinal cord, both distal and proximal hind limb sensation are impaired by posterior white column damage; in the cervical cord, only distal sensation is impaired by the same lesion, and proximal information is spared. We refer to this neuroanatomic rearranging as "fibre sorting", and we believe that it is clinically significant in spinal cord disease. Images PMID:408463

  7. Intermittent catheterization in the management of post spinal cord injury (SCI) neurogenic bladder using new hydrophilic, with lubrication in close circuit devices – our own preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Spinu, A; Onose, G; Daia, C; Panţu, C; Anghelescu, A; Onose, L; Mihăescu, A

    2012-01-01

    / rigorous assessment methodology already used. Abbreviations IC – intermittent catheterism, SCI – spinal cord injury, CIC – clean intermittent catheterization, PVP – polyvinyl pyrolidone, UTI – urinary tract infections, WHO – World Health Organization, ICFDH – International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, PVC – polyvinyl chloride, RISCI - Initiation of a national informatics network for dynamic clustering of patients with spinal cord injury, QoL - Quality of life. PMID:22574083

  8. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2010-03-01

    Dose-volume data for myelopathy in humans treated with radiotherapy (RT) to the spine is reviewed, along with pertinent preclinical data. Using conventional fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy/fraction to the full-thickness cord, the estimated risk of myelopathy is <1% and <10% at 54 Gy and 61 Gy, respectively, with a calculated strong dependence on dose/fraction (alpha/beta = 0.87 Gy.) Reirradiation data in animals and humans suggest partial repair of RT-induced subclinical damage becoming evident about 6 months post-RT and increasing over the next 2 years. Reports of myelopathy from stereotactic radiosurgery to spinal lesions appear rare (<1%) when the maximum spinal cord dose is limited to the equivalent of 13 Gy in a single fraction or 20 Gy in three fractions. However, long-term data are insufficient to calculate a dose-volume relationship for myelopathy when the partial cord is treated with a hypofractionated regimen.

  9. Characterization of vascular disruption and blood-spinal cord barrier permeability following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Figley, Sarah A; Khosravi, Ramak; Legasto, Jean M; Tseng, Yun-Fan; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-03-15

    Significant vascular changes occur subsequent to spinal cord injury (SCI), which contribute to progressive pathophysiology. In the present study, we used female Wistar rats (300-350 g) and a 35-g clip-compression injury at T6 to T7 to characterize the spatial and temporal vascular changes that ensue post-SCI. Before sacrifice, animals were injected with vascular tracing dyes (2% Evans Blue (EB) or fluorescein isothiocyanate/Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin [FITC-LEA]) to assess blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) integrity or vascular architecture, respectively. Spectrophotometry of EB tissue showed maximal BSCB disruption at 24 h postinjury, with significant disruption observed until 5 days postinjury (p<0.01). FITC-LEA-identified functional vasculature was dramatically reduced by 24 h. Similarly, RECA-1 immunohistochemistry showed a significant decrease in the number of vessels at 24 h postinjury, compared to uninjured animals (p<0.01), with slight increases in endogenous revascularization by 10 days postinjury. White versus gray matter (GM) quantification showed that GM vessels are more susceptible to SCI. Finally, we observed an endogenous angiogenic response between 3 and 7 days postinjury: maximal endothelial cell proliferation was observed at day 5. These data indicate that BSCB disruption and endogenous revascularization occur at specific time points after injury, which may be important for developing effective therapeutic interventions for SCI. PMID:24237182

  10. Accommodating Workers with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Denetta; Batiste, Linda; Whidden, Eddie

    1998-01-01

    Examination of over 1,000 calls to the Job Accommodation Network involving workers with spinal cord injury identified the nature of the industry, job, career progression, and accessibility solutions. The number of calls increased dramatically after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. (SK)

  11. A simple post hoc transformation that improves the metric properties of the BBB scale for rats with moderate to severe spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Adam R; Hook, Michelle A; Garcia, Guadalupe; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Beattie, Michael S; Grau, James W

    2004-11-01

    The Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) open field locomotor scale is a popular measure of functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). To examine the metric properties of the scale, we performed detailed analyses of BBB scores from 643 rats with moderate and severe SCI (12.5, 25, or 50 mm MASCIS) from two different laboratories. The analyses revealed that the BBB scale is ordinal in the most frequently used portion of the scale. Higher scores (14 and greater) were not frequently assigned in the dataset as animals with mild injuries were not sampled, making the ordinal nature of the upper end of the scale difficult to assess. The rare scores assigned in this range disproportionately increased variance. Under these conditions collapsing scores above 14 into one category increased effect size. Analysis of the lower region of the scale revealed that some scores (2 and 3) were rarely assigned, implying a discontinuity in the scale. The discontinuous nature of the lower portion of the scale presents a problem for both parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses. Pooling scores 2/3/4 eliminated the gap, enhancing the metric properties of the scale. Under the injury conditions evaluated, the transformation helped assure that the data were continuous and ordered. Further, interval durations were comparable across the entire range of the transformed scale, allowing application of parametric statistical techniques. The transformation should be applied in a post hoc fashion to reduce variability and increase power in cases where few scores fall in upper portion of the scale. PMID:15684652

  12. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Y.; Oyama, D.; Somchai, N.; Kawabata, S.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  13. Phenylbutyrate prevents disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yulong; Ye, Libing; Zheng, Binbin; Zhu, Sipin; Shi, Hongxue; Zhang, Hongyu; Wang, Zhouguang; Wei, Xiaojie; Chen, Daqing; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of endocytoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by spinal cord injury (SCI) in blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption and the effect of phenylbutyrate (PBA) on BSCB disruption after SCI. After a moderate contusion injury at the T9 level of spinal cord with a vascular clip, PBA was immediately administered into injured rat via intraperitoneal injection (100 mg/kg) and then further treated once a day for 2 weeks for behavior test. Spinal cord was collected at 1 day post-injury for evaluation of the effects of ER stress and PBA on BSCB disruption after SCI. PBA significantly attenuated BSCB permeability and degradation of tight junction molecules such as P120, β-catenin, Occludin and Claudin5 at 1 day after injury and improved functional recovery in the rat model of trauma. The BSCB protective effect of PBA is related to the inhibition of ER stress induced by SCI. In addition, PBA significantly inhibited the increase of ER stress markers and prevents loss of tight junction and adherens junction proteins in TG-treated human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Taken together, our data demonstrate that therapeutic strategies targeting ER stress may be suitable for the therapy of preserving BSCB integrity after SCI. PBA may be a new candidate as a therapeutic agent for protecting SCI by a compromised BSCB. PMID:27186310

  14. Dopamine is produced in the rat spinal cord and regulates micturition reflex after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shaoping; Carson, David M.; Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Houlé, John D.; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are thought to be restricted to the brain. DA-mediated regulation of urinary activity is considered to occur through an interaction between midbrain DA neurons and the pontine micturition center. Here we show that DA is produced in the rat spinal cord and modulates the bladder reflex. We observed numerous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ neurons in the autonomic nuclei and superficial dorsal horn in L6–S3 spinal segments. These neurons are dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)− and some contain detectable dopamine decarboxylase (DDC), suggesting their capacity to produce DA. Interestingly, following a complete thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) to interrupt supraspinal projections, more TH+ neurons emerged in the lumbosacral spinal cord, coincident with a sustained, low level of DA expression there and a partially recovered micturition reflex. Non-selective blockade of spinal DA receptors reduced bladder activity whereas activation of spinal D2-like receptors increased bladder activity and facilitated voiding. Additionally, depletion of lumbosacral TH+ neurons with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) decreased bladder non-voiding contractions and voiding efficiency. Furthermore, injecting the transsynaptic neuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) into the bladder detrusor labeled TH+ cells in the lumbosacral cord, confirming their involvement in spinal micturition reflex circuits. These results illustrate that DA is synthesized in the rat spinal cord; plasticity of lumbosacral TH+ neurons following SCI may contribute to DA expression and modulate the spinal bladder reflex. Thus, spinally-derived DA and receptors could be a novel therapeutic target to improve micturition recovery after SCI. PMID:26655672

  15. Multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord: Magnetic resonance appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Thielen, K.R.; Miller, G.M.

    1996-05-01

    To determine the MR appearance of spinal cord multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in patients presenting with myclopathy by using a high-field (1.5 T) imager. We studied 119 patients who underwent high-field (1.5 T) MR studies of the spinal cord for evaluation of myelopathy. All 119 patients were thought to have possible findings of spinal cord MS at the time of the MRI interpretation. Sixty-four plaques were studied in 47 patients with clinically definite MS and adequate quality MRI. Of these patients 68% had a single spinal cord plaque, 19% had two plaques, and 13% had three or more plaques. Sixty-two percent of the plaques occurred in the cervical spinal cord and most frequently involved the posterior (41%) and lateral (25%) aspects of the spinal cord. None of the 64 lesions involved the entire thickness of the spinal cord. The lesion length varied from 2 to 60 mm, with 84% of the lesions <15 mm in length. The spinal cord diameter was unchanged in 84% of plaques, enlarged at the level of the lesion in 14%, and atrophic in 2%. Just over half (55%) of the plaques enhanced with intravenously administered gadolinium. Of the patients who received synchronous head and spinal cord examinations on the same day, 24% had normal findings on the MR study of the head. Follow-up spinal cord studies were available in nine patients. New lesions developed in two patients, while previously described lesions resolved. In three patients only new lesions developed. In four patients no change occurred in the existing number of cord plaques. Spinal cord demyelinating plaques present as well-circumscribed foci of increased T2 signal that asymmetrically involve the spinal cord parenchyma. Knowledge of their usual appearance may prevent unnecessary biopsy. An MR examination of the head may confirm the imaging suggestion of spinal cord demyelinating disease, because up to 76% of patients have abnormal intracranial findings. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma Lijun; Gibbs, Iris; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Soltys, Scott; Weinberg, Vivian; Wong Shun; Chang, Eric; Fowler, Jack; Larson, David A.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric data are reported for five cases of radiation-induced myelopathy after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to spinal tumors. Analysis per the biologically effective dose (BED) model was performed. Methods and Materials: Five patients with radiation myelopathy were compared to a subset of 19 patients with no radiation myelopathy post-SBRT. In all patients, the thecal sac was contoured to represent the spinal cord, and doses to the maximum point, 0.1-, 1-, 2-, and 5-cc volumes, were analyzed. The mean normalized 2-Gy-equivalent BEDs (nBEDs), calculated using an alpha/beta value of 2 for late toxicity with units Gy 2/2, were compared using the t test and analysis of variance test. Results: Radiation myelopathy was observed at the maximum point with doses of 25.6 Gy in two fractions, 30.9 Gy in three fractions, and 14.8, 13.1, and 10.6 Gy in one fraction. Overall, there was a significant interaction between patient subsets and volume based on the nBED (p = 0.0003). Given individual volumes, a significant difference was observed for the mean maximum point nBED (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The maximum point dose should be respected for spine SBRT. For single-fraction SBRT 10 Gy to a maximum point is safe, and up to five fractions an nBED of 30 to 35 Gy 2/2 to the thecal sac also poses a low risk of radiation myelopathy.

  17. Cardiovascular dysfunction following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Partida, Elizabeth; Mironets, Eugene; Hou, Shaoping; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    Both sensorimotor and autonomic dysfunctions often occur after spinal cord injury (SCI). Particularly, a high thoracic or cervical SCI interrupts supraspinal vasomotor pathways and results in disordered hemodynamics due to deregulated sympathetic outflow. As a result of the reduced sympathetic activity, patients with SCI may experience hypotension, cardiac dysrhythmias, and hypothermia post-injury. In the chronic phase, changes within the CNS and blood vessels lead to orthostatic hypotension and life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia (AD). AD is characterized by an episodic, massive sympathetic discharge that causes severe hypertension associated with bradycardia. The syndrome is often triggered by unpleasant visceral or sensory stimuli below the injury level. Currently the only treatments are palliative – once a stimulus elicits AD, pharmacological vasodilators are administered to help reduce the spike in arterial blood pressure. However, a more effective means would be to mitigate AD development by attenuating contributing mechanisms, such as the reorganization of intraspinal circuits below the level of injury. A better understanding of the neuropathophysiology underlying cardiovascular dysfunction after SCI is essential to better develop novel therapeutic approaches to restore hemodynamic performance. PMID:27073353

  18. Fluoro-jade B stains quiescent and reactive astrocytes in the rodent spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kevin J; Fugaccia, Isabella; Scheff, Stephen W

    2003-11-01

    In an attempt to label dying neurons in the injured spinal cord, we used the novel fluorescein derivative Fluoro-Jade B, which has been reported to specifically label dead or dying neurons in the brain. Rats and mice were subjected to a moderate level of spinal cord injury using an IH impact device and sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days post injury. Spinal cord tissue was processed for Fluoro-Jade B histochemistry and included sections throughout the injured region of the cord. No Fluoro-Jade positive neurons were observed in sections from any time point postinjury at any level of the spinal cord. Instead, Fluoro-Jade labeled astrocytes in uninjured control animals and injured animals. The specificity of astrocytic staining was confirmed by co-localizaton of Fluoro-Jade with glial fibrillary acidic protein. We also subjected a group of rats to a sequential cortical contusion injury and spinal cord injury. Sections from these animals showed numerous Fluoro-Jade positive neurons in the hippocampal formation and thalamus underlying the cortical contusion; however, the staining pattern in the spinal cord was identical to those animals that had received spinal cord injury alone.

  19. Spinal cord injury following an attempted thoracic epidural.

    PubMed

    Mayall, M F; Calder, I

    1999-10-01

    Unsuccessful attempts were made to insert a thoracic epidural in an anaesthetised patient. Signs of spinal cord damage were observed the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a haematoma anterior to the spinal cord. Surgical exploration revealed an intradural haematoma and a needle puncture of the cord. The patient suffered a permanent paraparesis.

  20. Neurocontrol of Movement in Humans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, Milan R; Danner, Simon M; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    In this review of neurocontrol of movement after spinal cord injury, we discuss neurophysiological evidences of conducting and processing mechanisms of the spinal cord. We illustrate that external afferent inputs to the spinal cord below the level of the lesion can modify, initiate, and maintain execution of movement in absence or partial presence of brain motor control after chronic spinal cord injury. We review significant differences between spinal reflex activity elicited by single and repetitive stimulation. The spinal cord can respond with sensitization, habituation, and dis-habituation to regular repetitive stimulation. Therefore, repetitive spinal cord reflex activity can contribute to the functional configuration of the spinal network. Moreover, testing spinal reflex activity in individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury provided evidences for subclinical residual brain influence, suggesting the existence of axons traversing the injury site and influencing the activities below the level of lesion. Thus, there are two motor control models of chronic spinal cord injury in humans: "discomplete" and "reduced and altered volitional motor control." We outline accomplishments in modification and initiation of altered neurocontrol in chronic spinal cord injury people with epidural and functional electrical stimulation. By nonpatterned electrical stimulation of lumbar posterior roots, it is possible to evoke bilateral extension as well as rhythmic motor outputs. Epidural stimulation during treadmill stepping shows increased and/or modified motor activity. Finally, volitional efforts can alter epidurally induced rhythmic activities in incomplete spinal cord injury. Overall, we highlight that upper motor neuron paralysis does not entail complete absence of connectivity between cortex, brain stem, and spinal motor cells, but there can be altered anatomy and corresponding neurophysiological characteristics. With specific input to the spinal cord below the level

  1. Acute central cervical spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morse, S D

    1982-08-01

    Two cases of the acute central cervical spinal cord syndrome are presented. A 63-year-old diabetic hypertensive man manifested the syndrome as a result of atraumatic ischemia of the cord. A 32-year-old health man developed it after sustaining a hyperextension injury in a baseball game. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this entity are reviewed. Knowledge of this entity is of major importance in the analysis and management of head and neck trauma, as well as in the recognition and management of atraumatic neurologic dysfunction due to ischemia, hemorrhage, or thrombosis.

  2. Chronic prostatitis in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Wyndaele, J J

    1985-06-01

    Six spinal cord injury patients with chronic prostatitis were reviewed, all of whom had been treated with an indwelling Foley catheter during the phase of spinal shock. The 3 glass urine specimen test, the bladder wash-out test, a study of antibody coated bacteria and urethrography had limited diagnostic value. A specific diagnostic 5 glass specimen test proved to be useful and reliable. Longterm antibiotic treatment was successful in only one patient. Injection of antibiotics into the prostate gland was ineffective in the five patients in whom it was carried out. During a follow up from 1 to 5 years urological complications were rare in all five patients who remained infected.

  3. [Effect of local hypothermia on H- and M-responses after spinal cord contusion in dogs].

    PubMed

    Iafarova, G G; Tumakaev, R F; Khazieva, A R; Baltina, T V

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated a motor-neuronal functional state based on H- and M-responses from m. quadratus plantae in dogs before and after experimental spinal cord contusion with and without following local intraoperative hypothermia. H- and M-responses from m. quadratus plantae were recorded during stimulation of the tibial nerve and results were compared between the groups. Our results demonstrate that local hypothermia applied after spinal cord contusion reduces amplitude of both M- and H-responses and also H(max)/M(max) ratio that may indicate depression of motorneurons excitability. After spinal cord contusion without following hypothermia the excitability of the spinal motorneurons during post-traumatic period, in opposite, was significantly increased. These results support a conclusion that intraoperative hypothermia after spinal cord contusion can delay development of functional excitability of the motoneurons and protect from further changes in H- and M-responses.

  4. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

    PubMed

    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus.

  5. Growing up with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K M; Berry, E T; Goldeen, R A; Wicker, E

    1991-04-01

    Much of what we need to know to be independent adults is learned in the first five years of life. In the toddler, instead of reteaching learned skills, as we do with older spinal cord injury persons, we are teaching skills for the first time. It is therefore imperative to have a creative therapeutic team who can teach skills which were never acquired and encourage the child's cognitive growth as well as growth towards independence. This paper will include a case report of a 2 year-old C3-4 quadriplegic child rehabilitated through an interdisciplinary family-centered model of care. We will share some of the issues our team has encountered when "rehabilitating" very young children with spinal cord injuries based on the observations of the team members as well as the scant literature available. This will also include a parent's reflections of modification needed in family structure and roles. PMID:2011723

  6. Reducing cardiometabolic disease in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kressler, Jochen; Cowan, Rachel E; Bigford, Gregory E; Nash, Mark S

    2014-08-01

    Accelerated cardiometabolic disease is a serious health hazard after spinal cord injuries (SCI). Lifestyle intervention with diet and exercise remains the cornerstone of effective cardiometabolic syndrome treatment. Behavioral approaches enhance compliance and benefits derived from both diet and exercise interventions and are necessary to assure that persons with SCI profit from intervention. Multitherapy strategies will likely be needed to control challenging component risks, such as gain in body mass, which has far reaching implications for maintenance of daily function as well as health.

  7. Anorgasmia in anterior spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Berić, A; Light, J K

    1993-01-01

    Three male and two female patients with anorgasmia and dissociated sensory loss due to an anterior spinal cord syndrome are described. Clinical, neurophysiological and quantitative sensory evaluation revealed preservation of the large fibre dorsal column functions from the lumbosacral segments with concomitant severe dysfunction or absence of the small fibre neospinothalamic mediated functions. These findings indicate a role for the spinothalamic system in orgasm. PMID:8505649

  8. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus. PMID:26553817

  9. Symptomatic spinal cord metastasis from cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Elefante, A; Peca, C; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Russo, C; Formicola, F; Mariniello, G; Brunetti, A; Maiuri, F

    2012-06-01

    Spinal subarachnoid spread is not uncommon in brain oligodendrogliomas; on the other hand, symptomatic involvement of the spinal cord and cauda is very rare, with only 16 reported cases. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent resection of a low-grade frontal oligodendroglioma 4 years previously. He was again observed because of bilateral sciatic pain followed by left leg paresis. A spine MRI showed an intramedullary T12-L1 tumor with root enhancement. At operation, an intramedullary anaplastic oligodendroglioma with left exophytic component was found and partially resected. Two weeks later, a large left frontoparietal anaplastic oligodendroglioma was diagnosed and completely resected. The patient was neurologically stable for 8 months and died 1 year after the spinal surgery because of diffuse brain and spinal leptomeningeal spread. The review of the reported cases shows that spinal symptomatic metastases can occur in both low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, even many years after surgery of the primary tumor; however, they exceptionally occur as first clinical manifestation or as anaplastic progression. The spinal seeding represents a negative event leading to a short survival.

  10. Three-dimensional imaging of microvasculature in the rat spinal cord following injury

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yong; Wu, Tianding; yuan, Zhou; Li, Dongzhe; Ni, Shuangfei; Hu, Jianzhong; Lu, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Research studies on the three-dimensional (3D) morphological alterations of the spinal cord microvasculature after injury provide insight into the pathology of spinal cord injury (SCI). Knowledge in this field has been hampered in the past by imaging technologies that provided only two-dimensional (2D) information on the vascular reactions to trauma. The aim of our study is to investigate the 3D microstructural changes of the rat spinal cord microvasculature on day 1 post-injury using synchrotron radiation micro-tomography (SRμCT). This technology provides high-resolution 3D images of microvasculature in both normal and injured spinal cords, and the smallest vessel detected is approximately 7.4 μm. Moreover, we optimized the 3D vascular visualization with color coding and accurately calculated quantitative changes in vascular architecture after SCI. Compared to the control spinal cord, the damaged spinal cord vessel numbers decreased significantly following injury. Furthermore, the area of injury did not remain concentrated at the epicenter; rather, the signs of damage expanded rostrally and caudally along the spinal cord in 3D. The observed pathological changes were also confirmed by histological tests. These results demonstrate that SRμCT is an effective technology platform for imaging pathological changes in small arteries in neurovascular disease and for evaluating therapeutic interventions. PMID:26220842

  11. Optical Monitoring and Detection of Spinal Cord Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; D’Souza, Angela; Bilfinger, Thomas V.; Galler, Robert M.; Emanuel, Asher; Schenkel, Steven S.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings. PMID:24358279

  12. Clinical radiology of the spine and spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Banna, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a source of information about aspects of radiology of the spine and spinal column. It presents coverage of both normal and abnormal conditions. Contents: Spinal fractures and dislocations. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Gross anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges. Intraspinal mass lesions. Spinal dysraphism. Congenital anomalies. Tumors of the vertebral column, and more.

  13. In-vivo spinal cord deformation in flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qing; Dougherty, Lawrence; Margulies, Susan S.

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic mechanical loading of the head-neck complex results cervical spinal cord injury when the distortion of the cord is sufficient to produce functional or structural failure of the cord's neural and/or vascular components. Characterizing cervical spinal cord deformation during physiological loading conditions is an important step to defining a comprehensive injury threshold associated with acute spinal cord injury. In this study, in vivo quasi- static deformation of the cervical spinal cord during flexion of the neck in human volunteers was measured using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of motion with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM). A custom-designed device was built to guide the motion of the neck and enhance more reproducibility. the SPAMM pulse sequence labeled the tissue with a series of parallel tagging lines. A single- shot gradient-recalled-echo sequence was used to acquire the mid-sagittal image of the cervical spine. A comparison of the tagged line pattern in each MR reference and deformed image pair revealed the distortion of the spinal cord. The results showed the cervical spinal cord elongates during head flexion. The elongation experienced by the spinal cord varies linearly with head flexion, with the posterior surface of the cord stretching more than the anterior surface. The maximal elongation of the cord is about 12 percent of its original length.

  14. Spinal cord mensuration--a comparative study on the spinal cord segments and spinal nerves in Zambian goats.

    PubMed

    Ramkrishna, V; Lovelace, C E; Sakala, L

    1991-06-01

    It has been known that the relative length of spinal cord and its segmental volume in domestic animals has established that the dynamics of spinal cord is directly related with the functions of the limbs and in particular to their feeding habits. Bilateral rostrocaudal measurements of spinal nerves involving their root attachment length, root emergence length, interroot length, segment length and cross sectional area were recorded on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of each segment of the spinal cords of five local healthy Zambian goats. We identified that the brachial and lumbar enlargements have involved identical number of spinal cord segments. Brachial and lumbar enlargements extended from C6 to T1 and L4 to L7. The average length of spinal cord was 59.9 cm and it extended up to caudal end of 5th sacral vertebrae. The root emergence length appeared to decrease gradually from C2 segment, which remained less variable in thoracic and lumbar segments and then receded sharply through sacral segments. The dorsal nerves entered spinal cord over a greater area than ventral because of more spinal rootlets. The greatest segment length lied in mid cervical region and then from lumbar segment it decreased sharply up to the end of sacral segments. It is concluded that these goats have a feeding habit similar to that of cattle rather than resting their forelimbs on the shrubs while nibbling the leaves as recorded in Asian goats. It also confirmed that the shrubs were more drooping along with grasses in the Gwembe Valley of Zambia.

  15. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiangbing; Xu, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration. PMID:26981071

  16. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangbing; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration.

  17. Mechanisms underlying spinal cord damage in decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, J M; Bove, A A; Elliott, D H

    1975-04-01

    Decompression sickness, which damaged the spinal cord, was produced in anesthetized dogs using a compression chamber. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure and several intravascular and intracardiac pressures were monitored during the course of the simulated dives. Manometric responses to forcible lung inflation and abdominal compression were measured both predive and postdive after signs of spinal cord damage were evident. Cinevenography of the epidural vertebral venous system was performed both predive and postdive. Histopathologic studies of the brains and cords of both predive and postdive. Histopathologic studies of the brains and cords of paretic animals were carried out. The results indicate that the epidural vertebral venous system becomes obstructed during spinal cord damaging decompression sickness and strongly suggests that spinal cord infarction in decompression sickness is caused by obstruction of cord venous drainage at the level of the epidural vertebral venous system. PMID:1168317

  18. Volume effects in Rhesus monkey spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E. ); Stephens, L.C.; Price, R.E.; Ang, K.K.; Peters, L.J. )

    1994-04-30

    An experiment was conducted to test for the existence of a volume effect in radiation myelopathy using Rhesus monkeys treated with clinically relevant field sizes and fractionation schedules. Five groups of Rhesus monkeys were irradiated using 2.2 Gy per fraction to their spinal cords. Three groups were irradiated with 8 cm fields to total doses of 70.4, 77, and 83.6 Gy. Two additional groups were irradiated to 70.4 Gy using 4 and 16 cm fields. The incidence of paresis expressed within 2 years following the completion of treatment was determined for each group. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to determine parameters of a logistic dose response function. The volume effect was modeled using the probability model in which the probability of producing a lesion in an irradiated volume is governed by the probability of the occurrence of independent events. This is a two parameter model requiring only the estimates of the parameters of the dose-response function for the reference volume, but not needing any additional parameters for describing the volume effect. The probability model using a logistic dose-response function fits the data well with the D[sub 50] = 75.8 Gy for the 8-cm field. No evidence was seen for a difference in sensitivities for different anatomical levels of the spinal cord. Most lesions were type 3, combined white matter parenchymal and vascular lesions. Latent periods did not differ significantly from those of type 3 lesions in humans. The spinal cord exhibits a volume effect that is well described by the probability model. Because the dose response function for radiation myelopathy is steep, the volume effect is modest. The Rhesus monkey remains the animal model most similar to humans in dose response, histopathology, and latency for radiation myelopathy. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Pediatric spinal cord injury: a review by organ system.

    PubMed

    Powell, Aaron; Davidson, Loren

    2015-02-01

    In this article, an overview is provided of pediatric spinal cord injury, organized by effects of this injury on various organ systems. Specific management differences between children and adults with spinal cord injury are highlighted. A detailed management approach is offered for particularly complex topics, such as spasticity and upper extremity reconstruction. PMID:25479784

  20. Cardiovascular health and fitness in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lavis, Timothy D; Scelza, William M; Bockenek, William L

    2007-05-01

    There are many issues after spinal cord injury that have an impact on cardiovascular health and fitness. This article discusses many of the secondary conditions and changes that occur and how they are affected by maintenance of an active lifestyle. It also discusses many of the benefits and difficulties individuals face in maintaining a regular exercise program after spinal cord injury.

  1. Personal Adjustment Training for the Spinal Cord Injured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This article describes experiences with Personal Achievement Skills (PAS), a group counseling process in a spinal cord injury project, emphasizing training in communication and goal setting in the context of group process. Issues in conducting such training and providing comprehensive service to the spinal cord injured are discussed in detail.…

  2. Shriners Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Self Care Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol

    This manual is intended for young people with spinal cord injuries who are receiving rehabilitation services within the Spinal Cord Injury Unit at Shriners Hospital (San Francisco, California). An introduction describes the rehabilitation program, which includes family conferences, an individualized program, an independent living program,…

  3. Spinal Cord Anatomy and Clinical Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Eric; Morales, Humberto

    2016-10-01

    We review the anatomy of the spinal cord, providing correlation with key functional and clinically relevant neural pathways, as well as magnetic resonance imaging. Peripherally, the main descending (corticospinal tract) and ascending (gracilis or cuneatus fasciculi and spinothalamic tracts) pathways compose the white matter. Centrally, the gray matter can be divided into multiple laminae. Laminae 1-5 carry sensitive neuron information in the posterior horn, and lamina 9 carries most lower motor neuron information in the anterior horn. Damage to the unilateral corticospinal tract (upper motor neuron information) or gracillis-cuneatus fasciculi (touch and vibration) correlates with ipsilateral clinical findings, whereas damage to unilateral spinothalamic tract (pain-temperature) correlates with contralateral clinical findings. Damage to commissural fibers correlates with a suspended bilateral "girdle" sensory level. Autonomic dysfunction is expected when there is bilateral cord involvement. PMID:27616310

  4. Effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jianbo; Gu, Zhengsong; Zhang, Qing; Zheng, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) after spinal cord injury (SCI) in a mouse model. Lycopene inhibited lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage as a highly efficient antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Lycopene (4 mg/kg/d) was administrated immediately following SCI. The permeability of the BSCB and water content in the spinal cord tissue were evaluated. Additionally, levels of expression of tight junction proteins and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were determined with Western blotting. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of spinal cord tissue homogenates was performed 48 h after SCI to evaluate the expression of inflammation-related cytokines. In addition, recovery of motor function was assessed 1 d, 2 d, 5 d, 10 d, and 15 d after SCI using the Basso Mouse Scale to score locomotion. Compared to the group with an untreated SCI, mice with an SCI treated with lycopene had significantly reduced spinal cord tissue water content and BSCB permeability. Furthermore, motor function of mice with an SCI was also greatly improved by lycopene administration. The expression of the proinflammatory factors TNF-α and NF-kB increased markedly 48 h after SCI, and their upregulation was significantly attenuated by lycopene treatment. The expression of molecules that protect tight junctions, zonula occluden-1 and claudin-5, was upregulated by lycopene treatment after SCI. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that lycopene attenuated SCI by promoting repair of the damaged BSCB, so lycopene is a novel and promising treatment for SCI in humans. PMID:27357536

  5. Early elective colostomy following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Michelle

    Elective colostomy is an accepted method of bowel management for patients who have had a spinal cord injury (SCI). Approximately 2.4% of patients with SCI have a colostomy, and traditionally it is performed as a last resort several years after injury, and only if bowel complications persist when all other methods have failed. This is despite evidence that patients find a colostomy easier to manage and frequently report wishing it had been performed earlier. It was noticed in the author's spinal unit that increasing numbers of patients were requesting colostomy formation during inpatient rehabilitation following SCI. No supporting literature was found for this; it appears to be an emerging and untested practice. This article explores colostomy formation as a method of bowel management in patients with SCI, considers the optimal time for colostomy formation after injury and examines issues for health professionals. PMID:26973012

  6. Natural Polyphenols and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have been shown to have some of the neuroprotective effects against neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are attributed to a variety of biological activities, including free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. In this regard, many efforts have been made to study the effects of various well-known dietary polyphenols on spinal cord injury (SCI) and to explore the mechanisms behind the neuroprotective effects. The aim of this paper is to present the mechanisms of neuroprotection of natural polyphenols used in animal models of SCI. PMID:24842137

  7. Functional electrical stimulation and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H; Triolo, Ronald J; Elias, Anastasia L; Kilgore, Kevin L; DiMarco, Anthony F; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H; Audu, Musa L; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R; Chan, K Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J; Brose, Steven W; Gustafson, Kenneth J; Kiss, Zelma H T; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2014-08-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, resulting in loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can use these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options to allow functional restoration and to manage medical complications following SCI. The use of FES for the restoration of muscular and organ functions may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many FES devices are commercially available and should be considered as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible persons with SCI.

  8. Immunotherapy strategies for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min; Chen, Kai-Ting; Shu, Ya-Hai; Qiu, Chun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammalian after traumatic injury is limited, which often causes permanent functional motor and sensory loss. After spinal cord injury (SCI), the lack of regeneration is mainly attributed to the presence of a hostile microenvironment, glial scarring, and cavitation. Besides, inflammation has also been proved to play a crucial role in secondary degeneration following SCI. The more prominent treatment strategies in experimental models focus mainly on drugs and cell therapies, however, only a few strategies applied in clinical studies and therapies still have only limited effects on the repair of SCI. Recently, the interests in immunotherapy strategies for CNS are increasing in number and breadth. Immunotherapy strategies have made good progresses in treating many CNS degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the strategies begin to be considered to the treatment of SCI and other neurological disorders in recent years. Besides anti-inflamatory therapy, immunization with protein vaccines and DNA vaccines has emerged as a novel therapy strategy because of the simplicity of preparation and application. An inflammatory response followed by spinal cord injury, and is controled by specific signaling molecules, such as some cytokines playing a crucial role. As a result, appropriate immunoregulation, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines may be an effective therapy strategy for earlier injury of spinal cord. In addition, myelinassociated inhibitors (MAIs) in the injured spinal cord, such as Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte- myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) are known to prevent axonal regeneration through their co-receptors, and to trigger demyelinating autoimmunity through T cell-mediated harmful autoimmune response. The antagonism of the MAIs through vaccinating with

  9. Functional electrical stimulation and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H; Triolo, Ronald J; Elias, Anastasia L; Kilgore, Kevin L; DiMarco, Anthony F; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H; Audu, Musa L; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R; Chan, K Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J; Brose, Steven W; Gustafson, Kenneth J; Kiss, Zelma H T; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2014-08-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, resulting in loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can use these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options to allow functional restoration and to manage medical complications following SCI. The use of FES for the restoration of muscular and organ functions may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many FES devices are commercially available and should be considered as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible persons with SCI. PMID:25064792

  10. Evaluation of optimal electrode configurations for epidural spinal cord stimulation in cervical spinal cord injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Monzurul; Garcia-Alias, Guillermo; Shah, Prithvi K.; Gerasimenko, Yury; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural spinal cord stimulation is a promising technique for modulating the level of excitability and reactivation of dormant spinal neuronal circuits after spinal cord injury (SCI). We examined the ability of chronically implanted epidural stimulation electrodes within the cervical spinal cord to (1) directly elicit spinal motor evoked potentials (sMEPs) in forelimb muscles and (2) determine whether these sMEPs can serve as a biomarker of forelimb motor function after SCI. New method We implanted EMG electrodes in forelimb muscles and epidural stimulation electrodes at C6 and C8 in adult rats. After recovering from a dorsal funiculi crush (C4), rats were tested with different stimulation configurations and current intensities to elicit sMEPs and determined forelimb grip strength. Results: sMEPs were evoked in all muscles tested and their characteristics were dependent on electrode configurations and current intensities. C6(−) stimulation elicited more robust sMEPs than stimulation at C8(−). Stimulating C6 and C8 simultaneously produced better muscle recruitment and higher grip strengths than stimulation at one site. Comparison with existing method(s) Classical method to select the most optimal stimulation configuration is to empirically test each combination individually for every subject and relate to functional improvements. This approach is impractical, requiring extensively long experimental time to determine the more effective stimulation parameters. Our proposed method is fast and physiologically sound. Conclusions Results suggest that sMEPs from forelimb muscles can be useful biomarkers for identifying optimal parameters for epidural stimulation of the cervical spinal cord after SCI. PMID:25791014

  11. Spinal cord injury following operative shoulder intervention: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Christine; Walker, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Context Cervical myelopathy is a spinal cord dysfunction that results from extrinsic compression of the spinal cord, its blood supply, or both. It is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in patients greater than 55 years of age. Findings: A 57-year-old male with right shoulder septic arthritis underwent surgical debridement of his right shoulder and sustained a spinal cord injury intraoperatively. The most likely etiology is damage to the cervical spinal cord during difficult intubation requiring multiple attempts in this patient with underlying asymptomatic severe cervical stenosis. Conclusion Although it is not feasible to perform imaging studies on all patients undergoing intubation for surgery, this patient's outcome would suggest consideration of inclusion of additional pre-surgical screening examination techniques, such as testing for a positive Hoffman's reflex, is appropriate to detect asymptomatic patients who may have underlying cervical stenosis. PMID:24679185

  12. Lizard tail spinal cord: a new experimental model of spinal cord injury without limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Szarek, Dariusz; Marycz, Krzysztof; Lis, Anna; Zawada, Zbigniew; Tabakow, Paweł; Laska, Jadwiga; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a well-known devastating lesion that sadly is very resistant to all treatment attempts. This fact has stimulated the exploration of multiple regenerative strategies that are examined at both the basic and clinical level. For laboratory research, differentin vivomodels are used, but each has many important limitations. The main limitation of these models is the high level of animal suffering related to the inflicted neurologic injury. It has caused a growing tendency to limit the injury, but this, in turn, produces incomplete SCI models and uncertainties in the neuroregeneration interpretation. To overcome such limitations, a new experimental SCI model is proposed. Geckos have been extensively examined as a potential animal model of SCI. Their spinal cord extends into the tail and can be transected without causing the typical neurologic consequences observed in rat models. In this study, we compared the gecko tail SCI model with the rat model of thoracic SCI. Anatomic and histologic analyses showed comparability between the gecko and rat in diameter of spinal canal and spinal cord, as well as applicability of multiple staining techniques (hematoxylin and eosin, immunostaining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy). We tested the suitability ofin vivostudy with 3 prototype implants for the reconstruction of SCI: a multichannel sponge, a multilaminar tube, and a gel cylinder. These were compared with a spinal cord excision (control). A 20-wk observation revealed no adverse effects of SCI on the animals' well-being. The animals were easily housed and observed. Histologic analysis showed growth of nervous tissue elements on implant surface and implant cellular colonization. The study showed that the gecko SCI model can be used as a primary model for the assessment of SCI treatment methods. It provides a platform for testing multiple solutions with limited animal suffering before performing tests on mammals. Detailed results of

  13. Lizard tail spinal cord: a new experimental model of spinal cord injury without limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Szarek, Dariusz; Marycz, Krzysztof; Lis, Anna; Zawada, Zbigniew; Tabakow, Paweł; Laska, Jadwiga; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a well-known devastating lesion that sadly is very resistant to all treatment attempts. This fact has stimulated the exploration of multiple regenerative strategies that are examined at both the basic and clinical level. For laboratory research, differentin vivomodels are used, but each has many important limitations. The main limitation of these models is the high level of animal suffering related to the inflicted neurologic injury. It has caused a growing tendency to limit the injury, but this, in turn, produces incomplete SCI models and uncertainties in the neuroregeneration interpretation. To overcome such limitations, a new experimental SCI model is proposed. Geckos have been extensively examined as a potential animal model of SCI. Their spinal cord extends into the tail and can be transected without causing the typical neurologic consequences observed in rat models. In this study, we compared the gecko tail SCI model with the rat model of thoracic SCI. Anatomic and histologic analyses showed comparability between the gecko and rat in diameter of spinal canal and spinal cord, as well as applicability of multiple staining techniques (hematoxylin and eosin, immunostaining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy). We tested the suitability ofin vivostudy with 3 prototype implants for the reconstruction of SCI: a multichannel sponge, a multilaminar tube, and a gel cylinder. These were compared with a spinal cord excision (control). A 20-wk observation revealed no adverse effects of SCI on the animals' well-being. The animals were easily housed and observed. Histologic analysis showed growth of nervous tissue elements on implant surface and implant cellular colonization. The study showed that the gecko SCI model can be used as a primary model for the assessment of SCI treatment methods. It provides a platform for testing multiple solutions with limited animal suffering before performing tests on mammals. Detailed results of

  14. Ischemic Preconditioning Protects against Spinal Cord Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits by Attenuating Blood Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Man; Sun, Xi-Jia; Bao, Na-Ren; Ren, Xiao-Yan; Lv, Huang-Wei; Ma, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning has been reported to protect against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To investigate this, Japanese white rabbits underwent I-R (30 min aortic occlusion followed by reperfusion), ischemic preconditioning (three cycles of 5 min aortic occlusion plus 5 min reperfusion) followed by I-R, or sham surgery. At 4 and 24 h following reperfusion, neurological function was assessed using Tarlov scores, blood spinal cord barrier permeability was measured by Evan’s Blue extravasation, spinal cord edema was evaluated using the wet-dry method, and spinal cord expression of zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured by Western blot and a real-time polymerase chain reaction. ZO-1 was also assessed using immunofluorescence. Spinal cord I-R injury reduced neurologic scores, and ischemic preconditioning treatment ameliorated this effect. Ischemic preconditioning inhibited I-R-induced increases in blood spinal cord barrier permeability and water content, increased ZO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and reduced MMP-9 and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression. These findings suggest that ischemic preconditioning attenuates the increase in blood spinal cord barrier permeability due to spinal cord I-R injury by preservation of tight junction protein ZO-1 and reducing MMP-9 and TNF-α expression. PMID:23685868

  15. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  16. Targeting the blood-spinal cord barrier: A therapeutic approach to spinal cord protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ji; Yu, Qijing; Xie, Lijie; Zhu, Hongfei

    2016-08-01

    One of the principal functions of physical barriers between the blood and central nervous system protects system (i.e., blood brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier) is the protection from toxic and pathogenic agents in the blood. Disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) plays a key role in spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury (SCIRI). Following SCIRI, the permeability of the BSCB increases. Maintaining the integrity of the BSCB alleviates the spinal cord injury after spinal cord ischemia. This review summarizes current knowledge of the structure and function of the BSCB and its changes following SCIRI, as well as the prevention and cure of SCIRI and the role of the BSCB.

  17. Mineral metabolism in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Naftchi, N E; Viau, A T; Sell, G H; Lowman, E W

    1980-03-01

    In 10 paraplegic and 10 quadroplegic subjects, bone resorption was investigated by determining urinary excretion of hydroxyproline, calcium, and phosphorus. Measurements were performed weekly from the onset to 4 months after injury. During the first 7 weeks following injury, urinary excretion of calcium in paraplegic and quadriplegic subjects reached the highest level (380 +/- 180 mg/24hr). From 7 to 16 weeks after injury average urinary excretion of calcium (245 +/- 72 mg/24hr) remained significantly greater than that in controls (100 +/- 25 mg/24hr; p less than 0.05). Urinary hydroxyproline was elevated in paraplegic subjects (80 +/- 18 mg/24hr) for 8 weeks and in quadriplegic subjects (102 +/- 37 mg/24hr) for the entire 16 weeks following injury compared with that in controls (48 +/- 12 mg/24hr; p less than 0.05). Both paraplegic and quadriplegic subjects excreted more phosphorus (1.6 +/- 0.4 gm/24hr) than controls (0.85 +/- 0.2 gm/24hr; p less than 0.05) only during the first 2 weeks following spinal cord injury. During the acute phase of the injury (0-3 months), urinary excretion of calcium and magnesium was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in subjects with complete compared with incomplete spinal cord lesions. PMID:7369852

  18. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  19. Spinal cord effects of antipyretic analgesics.

    PubMed

    Brune, K

    1994-01-01

    Tissue damage results in the release of inflammatory mediators, including prostaglandins, which sensitive fine nerve endings in the periphery to mechanical and thermal changes. Sensitisation of these nerve endings, or nociceptors, contributes to the phenomenon of hyperalgesia, which routinely accompanies tissue damage. It has been shown that the acidic antipyretic analgesics reduce or down-regulate the enhanced nociceptor sensitivity in damaged tissue, an effect probably attributable to inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Recent studies suggest that these drugs may have an additional mechanism of action in the spinal cord or higher centres. When enantiomers of flurbiprofen were used in the rat, it was shown that S- and R-flurbiprofen exert differential antinociceptive effects. The R-enantiomer, which is practically devoid of peripheral cyclo-oxygenase inhibitory activity in vitro, showed comparable analgesic potency to the S-enantiomer, which does inhibit cyclo-oxygenase activity, in experimental models of nociception. It is possible that the antinociceptive action of the R-enantiomer is related to a reduction in prostaglandin synthesis in the CNS rather than at the site of tissue damage, although other mechanisms may also contribute to its antinociceptive action. In contrast to earlier indications, it would appear that a significant part of the antinociceptive action of the antipyretic analgesics is exerted in the spinal cord. The observed accumulation of acidic antipyretic analgesics in inflamed tissue may account for the superior anti-inflammatory activity of these latter compounds.

  20. Treadmill training in incomplete spinal cord injured rats.

    PubMed

    Fouad, K; Metz, G A; Merkler, D; Dietz, V; Schwab, M E

    2000-10-01

    Treadmill training has been shown to accelerate locomotor recovery and to improve weight bearing during treadmill walking in spinal cats. In human patients treadmill training is increasingly used in rehabilitation after incomplete spinal cord injury. In this study we examined training effects in spinal cord injured rats with an incomplete dorsal lesion. Recovery was examined with an open field locomotor score, kinematic analysis on the treadmill, and several functional tests (i.e. foot print evaluation, narrow beam crossing, grid walking, open field exploratory activity). During the course of 5 weeks after the injury, a substantial amount of recovery occurred in the treadmill trained as well as in the untrained rats. If compared to the control lesioned rats, which showed a high level of spontaneous hindlimb movements at 7-14 days post lesion, no additional beneficial effect of a 5-week daily treadmill training on the locomotor outcome could be detected in the trained group. The only change observed was a slightly larger exploratory activity of the trained rats. It is probable that the spared ventral and ventro-lateral fibers allowed spontaneous recovery and 'self-training' to occur to such an extend that systematic treadmill training did not provide additional improvement. PMID:10996413

  1. Cannabidiol-treated rats exhibited higher motor score after cryogenic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkoski, Marcelo; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira; Del-Bel, Elaine

    2012-04-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive constituent of cannabis, has been reported to induce neuroprotective effects in several experimental models of brain injury. We aimed at investigating whether this drug could also improve locomotor recovery of rats submitted to spinal cord cryoinjury. Rats were distributed into five experimental groups. Animals were submitted to laminectomy in vertebral segment T10 followed or not by application of liquid nitrogen for 5 s into the spinal cord at the same level to cause cryoinjury. The animals received injections of vehicle or CBD (20 mg/kg) immediately before, 3 h after and daily for 6 days after surgery. The Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan motor evaluation test was used to assess motor function post-lesion one day before surgery and on the first, third, and seventh postoperative days. The extent of injury was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin histology and FosB expression. Cryogenic lesion of the spinal cord resulted in a significant motor deficit. Cannabidiol-treated rats exhibited a higher Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor score at the end of the first week after spinal cord injury: lesion + vehicle, day 1: zero, day 7: four, and lesion + Cannabidiol 20 mg/kg, day 1: zero, day 7: seven. Moreover, at this moment there was a significant reduction in the extent of tissue injury and FosB expression in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. The present study confirmed that application of liquid nitrogen to the spinal cord induces reproducible and quantifiable spinal cord injury associated with locomotor function impairments. Cannabidiol improved locomotor functional recovery and reduced injury extent, suggesting that it could be useful in the treatment of spinal cord lesions.

  2. Expansion duroplasty improves intraspinal pressure, spinal cord perfusion pressure, and vascular pressure reactivity index in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury: injured spinal cord pressure evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Phang, Isaac; Werndle, Melissa C; Saadoun, Samira; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Marek; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2015-06-15

    We recently showed that, after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), laminectomy does not improve intraspinal pressure (ISP), spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP), or the vascular pressure reactivity index (sPRx) at the injury site sufficiently because of dural compression. This is an open label, prospective trial comparing combined bony and dural decompression versus laminectomy. Twenty-one patients with acute severe TSCI had re-alignment of the fracture and surgical fixation; 11 had laminectomy alone (laminectomy group) and 10 had laminectomy and duroplasty (laminectomy+duroplasty group). Primary outcomes were magnetic resonance imaging evidence of spinal cord decompression (increase in intradural space, cerebrospinal fluid around the injured cord) and spinal cord physiology (ISP, SCPP, sPRx). The laminectomy and laminectomy+duroplasty groups were well matched. Compared with the laminectomy group, the laminectomy+duroplasty group had greater increase in intradural space at the injury site and more effective decompression of the injured cord. In the laminectomy+duroplasty group, ISP was lower, SCPP higher, and sPRx lower, (i.e., improved vascular pressure reactivity), compared with the laminectomy group. Laminectomy+duroplasty caused cerebrospinal fluid leak that settled with lumbar drain in one patient and pseudomeningocele that resolved completely in five patients. We conclude that, after TSCI, laminectomy+duroplasty improves spinal cord radiological and physiological parameters more effectively than laminectomy alone.

  3. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  8. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  9. Spinal Activation of the cAMP-PKA Pathway Induces Respiratory Motor Recovery Following High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kajana, S.; Goshgarian, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the involvement of the adenosine 3’5’-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway in the activation of the crossed phrenic pathways after left C2 spinal cord hemisection. Experiments were conducted on left C2 spinal cord hemisected, anesthetized, vagotomized, pancuronium paralyzed, and artificially ventilated male Sprague-Dawley rats. One week post-injury, the ipsilateral phrenic nerve exhibited no respiratory-related activity indicating a functionally complete hemisection. Intrathecal spinal cord administration of the cAMP analog, 8-Br-cAMP at the level of the phrenic nucleus resulted in an enhancement of contralateral phrenic nerve output and a restoration of respiratory-related activity in the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to the hemisection. Furthermore, pretreatment with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, a PKA inhibitor, abolished the effects of 8-Br-cAMP. These results suggest that PKA activation is necessary for the cAMP-mediated respiratory recovery following high cervical spinal cord injury and that activation of intracellular signaling cascades may represent an important strategy for improving respiratory function after spinal cord injury. PMID:18656458

  10. Revisiting the segmental organization of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Leijnse, J N; D'Herde, K

    2016-09-01

    In classic anatomic atlases, the spinal cord is standardly represented in its anatomical form with symmetrically emerging anterior and posterior roots, which at the level of the intervertebral foramen combine into the spinal nerves. The parts of the cord delimited by the boundaries of the roots are called segments or myelomeres. Associated with their regular repetitive appearance is the notion that the cord is segmentally organized. This segmental view is reinforced by clinical practice. Spinal cord roots innervate specific body parts. The level of cord trauma is diagnosed by the de-innervation symptoms of these parts. However, systemically, the case for a segmentally organized cord is not so clear. To date, developmental and genetic research points to a regionally rather than a segmentally organized cord. In the present study, to what degree the fila radicularia are segmentally implanted along the cord was investigated. The research hypothesis was that if the fila radicularia were non-segmentally implanted at the cord surface, it would be unlikely that the internal neuron stratum would be segmented. The visual segmented aspect of the myelomeres would then be the consequence of the necessary bundling of axons towards the vertebral foramen as the only exits of the vertebral canal, rather than of an underlying segment organization of the cord itself. To investigate the research hypothesis, the fila radicularia in the cervical-upper thoracic part of five spinal cords were detached from their spinal nerves and dissected in detail. The principal research question was if the fila radicularia are separated from their spinal nerves and dissected from their connective tissues up to the cord, would it be possible to reconstruct the original spinal segments from the morphology and interspaces of the fila? The dissections revealed that the anterior fila radicularia emerge from the cord at regular regionally modulated interspaces without systematic segmental delineations. The

  11. Spinal Cord Stimulation and Augmentative Control Strategies for Leg Movement after Spinal Paralysis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Karen; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Severe spinal cord injury is a devastating condition, tearing apart long white matter tracts and causing paralysis and disability of body functions below the lesion. But caudal to most injuries, the majority of neurons forming the distributed propriospinal system, the localized gray matter spinal interneuronal circuitry, and spinal motoneuron populations are spared. Epidural spinal cord stimulation can gain access to this neural circuitry. This review focuses on the capability of the human lumbar spinal cord to generate stereotyped motor output underlying standing and stepping, as well as full weight-bearing standing and rhythmic muscle activation during assisted treadmill stepping in paralyzed individuals in response to spinal cord stimulation. By enhancing the excitability state of the spinal circuitry, the stimulation can have an enabling effect upon otherwise "silent" translesional volitional motor control. Strategies for achieving functional movement in patients with severe injuries based on minimal translesional intentional control, task-specific proprioceptive feedback, and next-generation spinal cord stimulation systems will be reviewed. The role of spinal cord stimulation can go well beyond the immediate generation of motor output. With recently developed training paradigms, it can become a major rehabilitation approach in spinal cord injury for augmenting and steering trans- and sublesional plasticity for lasting therapeutic benefits.

  12. Curcumin protects against ischemic spinal cord injury: The pathway effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhua; Wei, Hao; Lin, Meimei; Chen, Chunmei; Wang, Chunhua; Liu, Maobai

    2013-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors have been shown to participate in nerve cell injury during spinal cord ischemia. This study observed a protective effect of curcumin on ischemic spinal cord injury. Models of spinal cord ischemia were established by ligating the lumbar artery from the left renal artery to the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. At 24 hours after model establishment, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with curcumin. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after spinal cord ischemia, inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression significantly increased. However, curcumin significantly decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic spinal cord. Tarlov scale results showed that curcumin significantly improved motor function of the rat hind limb after spinal cord ischemia. The results demonstrate that curcumin exerts a neuroprotective fect against ischemic spinal cord injury by decreasing inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression. PMID:25206661

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves local microenvironment after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shuquan; Luo, Min; Li, Yajun

    2014-12-15

    Clinical studies have shown that hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves motor function in patients with spinal cord injury. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms associated with the recovery of neurological function after hyperbaric oxygen therapy in a rat model of spinal cord injury. We established an acute spinal cord injury model using a modification of the free-falling object method, and treated the animals with oxygen at 0.2 MPa for 45 minutes, 4 hours after injury. The treatment was administered four times per day, for 3 days. Compared with model rats that did not receive the treatment, rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen had fewer apoptotic cells in spinal cord tissue, lower expression levels of aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein, and more NF-200 positive nerve fibers. Furthermore, they had smaller spinal cord cavities, rapid recovery of somatosensory and motor evoked potentials, and notably better recovery of hindlimb motor function than model rats. Our findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces apoptosis, downregulates aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein expression in injured spinal cord tissue, improves the local microenvironment for nerve regeneration, and protects and repairs the spinal cord after injury.

  14. Lipid Peroxidation-Derived Reactive Aldehydes Directly and Differentially Impair Spinal Cord and Brain Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Singh, Indrapal N.; Miller, Darren M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction in traumatic spinal cord and brain injury is associated with post-traumatic free radical–mediated oxidative damage to proteins and lipids. Lipid peroxidation by-products, such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein, can form adducts with proteins and exacerbate the effects of direct free radical–induced protein oxidation. The aim of the present investigation was to determine and compare the direct contribution of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein to spinal cord and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Ficoll gradient–isolated mitochondria from normal rat spinal cords and brains were treated with carefully selected doses of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal or acrolein, followed by measurement of complex I– and complex II–driven respiratory rates. Both compounds were potent inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal significantly compromised spinal cord mitochondrial respiration at a 0.1-μM concentration, whereas 10-fold greater concentrations produced a similar effect in brain. Acrolein was more potent than 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, significantly decreasing spinal cord and brain mitochondrial respiration at 0.01 μM and 0.1 μM concentrations, respectively. The results of this study show that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein can directly and differentially impair spinal cord and brain mitochondrial function, and that the targets for the toxic effects of aldehydes appear to include pyruvate dehydrogenase and complex I–associated proteins. Furthermore, they suggest that protein modification by these lipid peroxidation products may directly contribute to post-traumatic mitochondrial damage, with spinal cord mitochondria showing a greater sensitivity than those in brain. PMID:20392143

  15. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  16. Biological Basis of Exercise-based Treatments: Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Basso, D. Michele; Hansen, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite intensive neurorehabilitation, extensive functional recovery after spinal cord injury is unattainable for most individuals. Optimal recovery will likely depend on activity-based, task-specific training that personalizes the timing of intervention with the severity of injury. Exercise paradigms elicit both beneficial and deleterious biophysical effects after spinal cord injury. Modulating the type, intensity, complexity, and timing of training may minimize risk and induce greater recovery. This review discusses the following: (a) the biological underpinning of training paradigms that promote motor relearning and recovery, and (b) how exercise interacts with cellular cascades after spinal cord injury. Clinical implications are discussed throughout. PMID:21703584

  17. Factors associated with early mortality after cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jiang; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Xiongsheng; Jia, Lianshun; Song, Dianwen; Zhou, Xuhui; Yan, Wangjun; Zhang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Background A relatively high early mortality rate (<30 days post-injury) for cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) has been observed. Objective To investigate this early mortality rate observed after cervical SCI and analyze the associated influential factors. Methods Medical records for 1163 patients with cervical SCI were reviewed, and the number of patients with early mortality was documented. Through logistic regression analysis, the effects of age, gender, occupation, cause of injury, severity of injury, highest involved spinal cord segment, nutritional condition during hospitalization, surgical treatment, tracheotomy, etc., on early mortality were assessed. Implementation of early treatment (i.e. surgery, tracheotomy, and nutritional support) and its effect on patient prognosis were also analyzed. Results Early mortality occurred in 109 of 1163 patients (9.4%). Four factors affected the early mortality rate, including level and severity of SCI, whether or not surgery was performed, the time interval between SCI and surgery, malnutrition, and tracheotomy. Patients with an American Spinal Injury Association grade of A, a high cervical SCI (C1–C3), and/or no surgical intervention were statistically more likely to have early mortality (P < 0.001). Conclusion Severe cervical SCI, upper-level cervical cord injury, malnutrition, and inappropriate tracheotomy are risk factors for early mortality in patients with cervical SCI. Surgery can reduce early mortality. Early tracheotomy should be performed in patients with complete upper-level cervical SCI, but patients with incomplete cervical SCI or complete low-level cervical SCI should initially be treated surgically to maintain smooth airway flow. PMID:22330110

  18. Biciliated ependymal cell proliferation contributes to spinal cord growth

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Two neurogenic regions have been described in the adult brain, the lateral ventricle subventricular zone and the dentate gyrus subgranular zone. It has been suggested that neural stem cells also line the central canal of the adult spinal cord. Using transmission and scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining, we describe here the organization and cell types of the central canal epithelium in adult mice. The identity of dividing cells was determined by three-dimensional ultrastructural reconstructions of [3H]thymidine-labeled cells and confocal analysis of bromodeoxyuridine labeling. The most common cell type lining the central canal had two long motile (9+2) cilia and was vimentin+, CD24+, FoxJ1+, Sox2+ and CD133+, but nestin- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-. These biciliated ependymal cells of the central canal (Ecc) resembled E2 cells of the lateral ventricles, but their basal bodies were different from that of E2 or E1 cells. Interestingly, we frequently found Ecc cells with two nuclei and four cilia, suggesting they are formed by incomplete cytokinesis or cell fusion. GFAP+ astrocytes with a single cilium and an orthogonally oriented centriole were also observed. The majority of dividing cells corresponded to biciliated Ecc cells. Central canal proliferation was most common during the active period of spinal cord growth. Pairs of labeled Ecc cells were observed within the central canal in adult mice 2.5 weeks post-labeling. Our work suggests that the vast majority of postnatal dividing cells in the central canal are Ecc cells and their proliferation is associated with the growth of the spinal cord. PMID:22434575

  19. Unique Spatiotemporal Neuromodulation of the Lumbosacral Circuitry Shapes Locomotor Success after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Prithvi K; Sureddi, Shakthi; Alam, Monzurul; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury

    2016-09-15

    Spinal cord epidural stimulation has resulted in the initiation of voluntary leg movements and improvement in postural, bladder, and sexual function. However, one of the limitations in reaching the full potential of epidural stimulation for therapeutic purposes in humans has been the identification of optimal stimulation configurations that can neuromodulate the spinal cord for stepping. In the present work, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the specificity of interaction between the rostral and caudal spinal cord circuitries in enabling locomotion in spinal rats (n = 10) by epidural spinal cord stimulation. By using unique spatiotemporal epidural stimulation parameters of the lumbar and sacral spinal cords, a robust stepping pattern in spinal rats was observed with only six training sessions and as early as 3 weeks post-injury. Electrophysiological evidence reveals that in addition to frequency of stimulation pulses at the stimulation sites, the relative timing between stimulation pulses applied at the lumbar (L2) and sacral (S1) segments of the spinal cord heavily impacted stepping performance. Best stepping was established at a higher stimulation frequency (40 Hz vs. 5, 10, 15, and 20Hz) and at specific relative time-intervals between the stimulation pulses (L2 pulse applied at 18-25 msec after the onset of the S1 pulse; S1 pulse applied 0-7 msec after the L2 pulse). Our data suggest that controlling pulse-to-pulse timing at multiple stimulation sources provides a novel strategy to optimize spinal stepping by fine-tuning the physiological state of the locomotor networks. These findings hold direct relevance to the clinician who will incorporate electrical stimulation strategies for optimizing control of locomotion after complete paralysis.

  20. Spinal cord injury and outdoor experiences.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Almut

    2004-03-01

    Anecdotal evidence from spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation clients suggests that nature experiences and outdoor pursuits are valued ingredients in a SCI rehabilitation program, in particular for those individuals who were outdoor enthusiasts pre-injury and/or who sustained their injury during outdoor pursuits. Model SCI centres in North America offer outdoor activities as components of SCI rehabilitation. A literature review on the effects and dynamics of nature experiences and outdoor pursuits in SCI rehabilitation and adjustment reveals a lacuna of empirical research in this area. Studies on leisure and recreation following SCI offer insights into how non-vocational rehabilitation activities assist functional independence, quality of life, and community re-integration. Systematic research is needed to ascertain the value and contribution of outdoor experiences in SCI rehabilitation; further, research is needed to document how contact with 'blue-green nature' may assist in the identity reconstruction process and in adjustment to life with a physical disability.

  1. Infertility in spinal-cord injured male.

    PubMed

    Ver Voort, S M

    1987-02-01

    Sterility in spinal-cord injured (SCI) men is believed to be caused by ejaculatory dysfunction, genital ductal blockage secondary to infection, and/or impaired spermatogenesis. Semen from SCI men demonstrates diminished numbers of motile, morphologically normal sperm. Testicular biopsies demonstrate impaired spermatogenesis. Leydig and Sertoli cells appear to be normal. Endocrine evaluations reveal normal testosterone levels with an adequate Leydig cell reserve. Luteinizing hormone (LD) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels are normal or high with normal or exaggerated stimulation responses. Acute depressions in testosterone, FSH, and LH levels can be seen following SCI, most markedly in quadriplegics. A normal hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis is implied by these findings, indicating a primary hypogonadism. Causes of impaired spermatogenesis may include local testicular temperature elevations, nondrainage of the reproductive tract, antisperm antibodies, and recurrent genitourinary infections. Treatment of infertility involves removal of these offending factors, and research is needed to correlate the impaired spermatogenesis with these factors.

  2. Functional Electrical Stimulation and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chester H.; Triolo, Ronald J.; Elias, Anastasia L.; Kilgore, Kevin L.; DiMarco, Anthony F.; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H.; Audu, Musa; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R.; Chan, K. Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J.; Brose, Steven W.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Kiss, Zelma; Mushahwar, Vivian K.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, leading to a loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. The use of electrical stimulation (ES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can take advantage of these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options, to allow functional restoration, and even to manage or prevent many medical complications following SCI. The use of ES for the restoration of upper extremity, lower extremity and truncal functions can make many activities of daily living a potential reality for individuals with SCI. Restoring bladder and respiratory functions and preventing pressure ulcers may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many of the ES devices are already commercially available and should be considered by all SCI clinicians routinely as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible individuals with SCI. PMID:25064792

  3. Pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) often have chronic pain, which may have a major impact on their quality of life. The purpose of this article is to present an update on the classification of SCI pain, recent advances in the understanding of underlying mechanisms, and current evidence-based treatment of SCI pain. The paper also discusses difficulties in assessing pain after SCI, both in the clinic and in preclinical research. While we continue to increase our understanding of underlying mechanisms, treatment is still unsatisfactory, and there is an unmet need to improve pain relief. We need to improve preclinical assessment of pain-like behavior in central pain models, and improve the clinical assessment of pain and our understanding of the interaction with cognitive, emotional, and social factors. In future studies on mechanisms and treatment, we need to acknowledge the different phenotypes of chronic SCI pain.

  4. Spinal Cord Schistosomiasis: Two Different Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Alsomaili, Mohammed; Abulaban, Ahmad A.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord schistosomiasis is difficult to diagnose in nonendemic areas. We report the clinical profile of 2 young Saudi males who presented with myelopathy. The first patient arrived at our hospital relatively late, i.e. 3 months following the presentation of initial symptoms, and had received both pulse steroid therapy and a plasma exchange. Praziquantel was administered late and the patient did not recover. The second case presented early, i.e. within around 8 weeks of initial symptoms. This patient received praziquantel without any kind of steroid and had a complete recovery. We concluded that prompt recognition and early treatment with praziquantel is crucial for a better outcome. The role of steroids in these cases still needs to be proven. PMID:27293404

  5. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chronic Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Naoum, Joseph J.; Arbid, Elias J.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of chronic limb ischemia involves the restoration of pulsatile blood flow to the distal extremity. Some patients cannot be treated with endovascular means or with open surgery; some may have medical comorbidities that render them unfit for surgery, while others may have persistent ischemia or pain even in the face of previous attempts at reperfusion. In spinal cord stimulation (SCS), a device with electrodes is implanted in the epidural space to stimulate sensory fibers. This activates cell-signaling molecules that in turn cause the release of vasodilatory molecules, a decrease in vascular resistance, and relaxation of smooth muscle cells. SCS also suppresses sympathetic vasoconstriction and pain transmission. When patient selection is based on microcirculatory parameters, SCS therapy can significantly improve pain relief, halt the progression of ulcers, and potentially achieve limb salvage. PMID:23805343

  6. 1H-MRS in spinal cord injury: acute and chronic metabolite alterations in rat brain and lumbar spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Erschbamer, Matthias; Öberg, Johanna; Westman, Eric; Sitnikov, Rouslan; Olson, Lars; Spenger, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A variety of tests of sensorimotor function are used to characterize outcome after experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). These tests typically do not provide information about chemical and metabolic processes in the injured CNS. Here, we used 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to monitor long-term and short-term chemical changes in the CNS in vivo following SCI. The investigated areas were cortex, thalamus/striatum and the spinal cord distal to injury. In cortex, glutamate (Glu) decreased 1 day after SCI and slowly returned towards normal levels. The combined glutamine (Gln) and Glu signal was similarly decreased in cortex, but increased in the distal spinal cord, suggesting opposite changes of the Glu/Gln metabolites in cortex and distal spinal cord. In lumbar spinal cord, a marked increase of myo-inositol was found 3 days, 14 days and 4 months after SCI. Changes in metabolite concentrations in the spinal cord were also found for choline and N-acetylaspartate. No significant changes in metabolite concentrations were found in thalamus/striatum. Multivariate data analysis allowed separation between rats with SCI and controls for spectra acquired in cortex and spinal cord, but not in thalamus/striatum. Our findings suggest MRS could become a helpful tool to monitor spatial and temporal alterations of metabolic conditions in vivo in the brain and spinal cord after SCI. We provide evidence for dynamic temporal changes at both ends of the neuraxis, cortex cerebri and distal spinal cord, while deep brain areas appear less affected. PMID:21251091

  7. Ischemic spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Jessica R.; Golomb, Meredith R.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord infarction in children is a rare condition which is becoming more widely recognized. There are few reports in the pediatric literature characterizing etiology, diagnosis, treament and prognosis. The risk factors for pediatric ischemic spinal cord infarction include obstruction of blood flow associated with cardiovascular compromise or malformation, iatrogenic or traumatic vascular inujury, cerebellar herniation, thrombotic or embolic disease, infection, and vasculitis. In many children the cause of spinal cord ischemia in the absence of vertebral fracture is unknown. Imaging diagnosis of spinal cord ischemia is often difficult due to the small transverse area of the cord, cerebrospinal fluid artifact and inadequate resolution of MRI. Physical therapy is the most important treatment option. The prognosis is dependent on the level of spinal cord damage, early identification and reversal of ischemia, and follow-up with intensive physical therapy and medical support. In addition to summarizing the literature regarding spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture, this review article adds two cases to the literature which highlight the difficulties and controversies in the management of this condition. PMID:17437902

  8. Injury alters intrinsic functional connectivity within the primate spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li Min; Mishra, Arabinda; Yang, Pai-Feng; Wang, Feng; Gore, John C

    2015-05-12

    Recent demonstrations of correlated low-frequency MRI signal variations between subregions of the spinal cord at rest in humans, similar to those found in the brain, suggest that such resting-state functional connectivity constitutes a common feature of the intrinsic organization of the entire central nervous system. We report our detection of functional connectivity within the spinal cords of anesthetized squirrel monkeys at rest and show that the strength of connectivity within these networks is altered by the effects of injuries. By quantifying the low-frequency MRI signal correlations between different horns within spinal cord gray matter, we found distinct functional connectivity relationships between the different sensory and motor horns, a pattern that was similar to activation patterns evoked by nociceptive heat or tactile stimulation of digits. All horns within a single spinal segment were functionally connected, with the strongest connectivity occurring between ipsilateral dorsal and ventral horns. Each horn was strongly connected to the same horn on neighboring segments, but this connectivity reduced drastically along the spinal cord. Unilateral injury to the spinal cord significantly weakened the strength of the intrasegment horn-to-horn connectivity only on the injury side and in slices below the lesion. These findings suggest resting-state functional connectivity may be a useful biomarker of functional integrity in injured and recovering spinal cords. PMID:25902510

  9. The beneficial effects of a thromboxane receptor antagonist on spinal cord perfusion following experimental cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tempel, G E; Martin, H F

    1992-06-01

    The eicosanoids thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin have opposing actions causing vasoconstriction and vasodilation respectively. The ratio of these two eicosanoids is thus an important determinant of circulatory homeostasis. An increase in this ratio occurs in certain inflammatory conditions with dramatic consequences in organ perfusion. In spinal cord trauma, in addition to direct physical perturbation of the spinal cord, it is likely that further structural and functional loss occurs as a result of decreased tissue perfusion precipitated by an increase in the thromboxane/prostacyclin ratio. This study evaluated hemodynamics and organ perfusion, 3 h following 24 g-cm spinal cord trauma in the rat. The role of thromboxane was investigated with an inhibitor of thromboxane synthesis (Dazoxiben) and with a receptor antagonist (13-APT). Cardiac output and blood pressure were unaffected by Dazoxiben, 13-APT, or spinal cord trauma. Injury effected approximately a 40% decrease in spinal cord perfusion from 0.41 to 0.25 ml/min/g which was not improved by the thromboxane synthase inhibitor, Dazoxiben. 13-ATP completely abrogated the decline in spinal cord blood flow flowing injury. Perfusion of other selected organs demonstrated little change as a result of the spinal trauma. Brain flow remained constant at 0.78 ml/min/g brain. Coronary blood flow, however, declined from 3.2 to 2.0 ml/min/g heart tissue. The data suggest consideration of the importance of thromboxane in therapeutic attempts to reduce secondary injury arising in spinal cord trauma. PMID:1386102

  10. Use of intraoperative ultrasonography in canine spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Nanai, Beatrix; Lyman, Ronald; Bichsel, Pierre S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the intraoperative appearance of various spinal cord conditions, and to investigate how intraoperative ultrasonography assisted in modification of surgical and postoperative treatment plans. Intraoperative ultrasonography (B-mode, and power Doppler mode) was used in 25 dogs undergoing spinal surgery. The neurologic conditions included cervical spondylomyelopathy, intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion, IVD extrusion, spinal tumors, nerve sheath mass, granulomatous myelitis, and discospondylitis. All of these diagnoses were supported by histopathologic and/or cytologic evaluation. It was possible to visualize the spinal cord and the abnormal spinal tissue in all of the patients. Power Doppler imaging allowed assessment of the spinal cord microcirculation, and assisted in judgment of the degree of decompression. Ultrasound imaging directly impacted the surgical and the medical treatment plans in four patients. Owing to the intraoperative imaging, two hemilaminectomies were extended cranially and caudally, and additional disc spaces were fenestrated, one hemilaminectomy site was extended dorsally to retrieve the disc material from the opposite side, and one intramedullary cervical spinal cord lesion was discovered, aspirated, and consequently diagnosed as granulomatous inflammation, which altered the long-term medication protocol in that dog. This study suggests that intraoperative sonographic spinal cord imaging is a useful and viable technique.

  11. An update on spinal cord injury research.

    PubMed

    Cao, He-Qi; Dong, Er-Dan

    2013-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can have a range of debilitating effects and permanently alter the capabilities and quality of life of survivors. The first specialized centers of care for SCI were established in 1944 and since then an increasing amount of research has been carried out in this area. Despite this, the present treatment and care levels for SCI are not comparable to those in other areas of medicine. In the clinic, the aim of SCI treatment is primarily to limit secondary damage by reducing compression in trauma spots and stabilizing the spinal column. Currently, no effective strategy for functional recovery is offered. In this review, we focus on research progress on the molecular mechanisms underlying SCI, and assess the treatment outcomes of SCI in animal models, i.e., neurotrophins and stem cells are discussed as pre-clinical therapies in animal models. We also assess the resources available and national research projects carried out on SCI in China in recent years, as well as making recommendations for the future allocation of funds in this area.

  12. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-fei; Zhang, Shu-quan; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-san

    2015-01-01

    The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1–4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells into the

  13. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Fei; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-Bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells into the

  14. Hypocretinergic control of spinal cord motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, Jack; Fung, Simon J; Xi, Mingchu; Chase, Michael H

    2004-06-01

    Hypocretinergic (orexinergic) neurons in the lateral hypothalamus project to motor columns in the lumbar spinal cord. Consequently, we sought to determine whether the hypocretinergic system modulates the electrical activity of motoneurons. Using in vivo intracellular recording techniques, we examined the response of spinal motoneurons in the cat to electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus. In addition, we examined the membrane potential response to orthodromic stimulation and intracellular current injection before and after both hypothalamic stimulation and the juxtacellular application of hypocretin-1. It was found that (1) hypothalamic stimulation produced a complex sequence of depolarizing- hyperpolarizing potentials in spinal motoneurons; (2) the depolarizing potentials decreased in amplitude after the application of SB-334867, a hypocretin type 1 receptor antagonist; (3) the EPSP induced by dorsal root stimulation was not affected by the application of SB-334867; (4) subthreshold stimulation of dorsal roots and intracellular depolarizing current steps produced spike potentials when applied in concert to stimulation of the hypothalamus or after the local application of hypocretin-1; (5) the juxtacellular application of hypocretin-1 induced motoneuron depolarization and, frequently, high-frequency discharge; (6) hypocretin-1 produced a significant decrease in rheobase (36%), membrane time constant (16.4%), and the equalizing time constant (23.3%); (7) in a small number of motoneurons, hypocretin-1 produced an increase in the synaptic noise; and (8) the input resistance was not affected after hypocretin-1. The juxtacellular application of vehicle (saline) and denatured hypocretin-1 did not produce changes in the preceding electrophysiological properties. We conclude that hypothalamic hypocretinergic neurons are capable of modulating the activity of lumbar motoneurons through presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. The lack of hypocretin

  15. Transforming care for patients with spinal cord injury in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Fiona

    Patients with spinal cord injury in Haiti previously had a poor prognosis. This article features a case study showing how care was transformed after the earthquake in 2010 by providing simple bladder care.

  16. Toxoplasmosis of the spinal cord in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Ernesto; Bolívar, Guillermo; Sánchez, Sandra; Carrascal, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    We, herein, describe an HIV-positive patient with toxoplasmosis of the spinal cord. We also carried out a comprehensive literature review of this topic, with emphasis on the diagnostic tools and therapeutic approach. PMID:24892240

  17. Dynamic loading characteristics of an intradural spinal cord stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliynyk, M. S.; Gillies, G. T.; Oya, H.; Wilson, S.; Reddy, C. G.; Howard, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the forces that act on the electrode-bearing surface of an intradural neuromodulator designed to be in direct contact with the pial surface of the spinal cord, as part of our effort to develop a new method for treating intractable pain. The goal was to investigate the pressures produced by this device on the spinal cord and compare them with normal intrathecal pressure. For this purpose, we employed a dual-sensor arrangement that allowed us to measure the response of a custom-designed silicone spinal cord surrogate to the forces applied by the device. We found that the device had a mean compliance of ≈63 μN μm-1, and that over a 3 mm range of compression, the mid-span pressure it exerted on the spinal cord was ≈1.88 × 103 Pa = 14.1 mm Hg, which lies within the range of normal intrathecal pressure in humans.

  18. Senegenin inhibits neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-quan; Wu, Min-fei; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-san; Jiang, Jin-lan

    2016-01-01

    Senegenin has been shown to inhibit neuronal apoptosis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect. In the present study, we established a rat model of spinal cord contusion injury using the modified Allen's method. Three hours after injury, senegenin (30 mg/g) was injected into the tail vein for 3 consecutive days. Senegenin reduced the size of syringomyelic cavities, and it substantially reduced the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. At the site of injury, Bax and Caspase-3 mRNA and protein levels were decreased by senegenin, while Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels were increased. Nerve fiber density was increased in the spinal cord proximal to the brain, and hindlimb motor function and electrophysiological properties of rat hindlimb were improved. Taken together, our results suggest that senegenin exerts a neuroprotective effect by suppressing neuronal apoptosis at the site of spinal cord injury. PMID:27212931

  19. Molecular and cellular development of spinal cord locomotor circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Daniel C.; Niu, Tianyi; Alaynick, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord of vertebrate animals is comprised of intrinsic circuits that are capable of sensing the environment and generating complex motor behaviors. There are two major perspectives for understanding the biology of this complicated structure. The first approaches the spinal cord from the point of view of function and is based on classic and ongoing research in electrophysiology, adult behavior, and spinal cord injury. The second view considers the spinal cord from a developmental perspective and is founded mostly on gene expression and gain-of-function and loss-of-function genetic experiments. Together these studies have uncovered functional classes of neurons and their lineage relationships. In this review, we summarize our knowledge of developmental classes, with an eye toward understanding the functional roles of each group. PMID:26136656

  20. Biomaterial Design Strategies for the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Straley, Karin S.; Po Foo, Cheryl Wong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The highly debilitating nature of spinal cord injuries has provided much inspiration for the design of novel biomaterials that can stimulate cellular regeneration and functional recovery. Many experts agree that the greatest hope for treatment of spinal cord injuries will involve a combinatorial approach that integrates biomaterial scaffolds, cell transplantation, and molecule delivery. This manuscript presents a comprehensive review of biomaterial-scaffold design strategies currently being applied to the development of nerve guidance channels and hydrogels that more effectively stimulate spinal cord tissue regeneration. To enhance the regenerative capacity of these two scaffold types, researchers are focusing on optimizing the mechanical properties, cell-adhesivity, biodegradability, electrical activity, and topography of synthetic and natural materials, and are developing mechanisms to use these scaffolds to deliver cells and biomolecules. Developing scaffolds that address several of these key design parameters will lead to more successful therapies for the regeneration of spinal cord tissue. PMID:19698073

  1. Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Treatment Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  2. Influence of Spinal Cord Integrity on Gait Control in Human Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Awai, Lea; Bolliger, Marc; Ferguson, Adam R; Courtine, Grégoire; Curt, Armin

    2016-07-01

    Background Clinical trials in spinal cord injury (SCI) primarily rely on simplified outcome metrics (ie, speed, distance) to obtain a global surrogate for the complex alterations of gait control. However, these assessments lack sufficient sensitivity to identify specific patterns of underlying impairment and to target more specific treatment interventions. Objective To disentangle the differential control of gait patterns following SCI beyond measures of time and distance. Methods The gait of 22 individuals with motor-incomplete SCI and 21 healthy controls was assessed using a high-resolution 3-dimensional motion tracking system and complemented by clinical and electrophysiological evaluations applying unbiased multivariate analysis. Results Motor-incomplete SCI patients showed varying degrees of spinal cord integrity (spinal conductivity) with severe limitations in walking speed and altered gait patterns. Principal component (PC) analysis applied on all the collected data uncovered robust coherence between parameters related to walking speed, distortion of intralimb coordination, and spinal cord integrity, explaining 45% of outcome variance (PC 1). Distinct from the first PC, the modulation of gait-cycle variables (step length, gait-cycle phases, cadence; PC 2) remained normal with respect to regained walking speed, whereas hip and knee ranges of motion were distinctly altered with respect to walking speed (PC 3). Conclusions In motor-incomplete SCI, distinct clusters of discretely controlled gait parameters can be discerned that refine the evaluation of gait impairment beyond outcomes of walking speed and distance. These findings are specifically different from that in other neurological disorders (stroke, Parkinson) and are more discrete at targeting and disentangling the complex effects of interventions to improve walking outcome following motor-incomplete SCI.

  3. Assessing small-volume spinal cord dose for repeat spinal stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Kirby, Neil; Korol, Renee; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-12-01

    Spinal cord biologically effective dose (BED) limits are critical to safe spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivery. In particular, when repeating SBRT to the same site, the problem of adding non-uniform BED distributions within small volumes of spinal cord has yet to be solved. We report a probability-based generalized BED (gBED) model to guide repeat spine SBRT treatment planning. The gBED was formulated by considering the sequential damaging probabilities of repeat spine SBRT treatments. Parameters from the standard linear-quadratic model, such as α/β = 2 Gy for the spinal cord, were applied. We tested the model based on SBRT specific spinal cord tolerance using a simulated and ten clinical repeat SBRT cases. The gBED provides a consistent solution for superimposing non-uniform dose distributions from different fractionation schemes, analogous to the BED for uniform dose distributions. Based on ten clinical cases, the gBED was observed to eliminate discrepancies in the cumulative BED of approximately 5% to 20% within small volumes (e.g. 0.1-2.0 cc) of spinal cord, as compared to a conventional calculation method. When assessing spinal cord tolerance for repeat spinal SBRT treatments, caution should be exercised when applying conventional BED calculations for small volumes of spinal cord irradiated, and the gBED potentially provides more conservative and consistently derived dose surrogates to guide safe treatment planning and treatment outcome modeling.

  4. Spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA): clinical applications of mechanical modeling of the spinal cord and brainstem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kenneth H.; Choi, Jae; Wilson, William; Berry, Joel; Henderson, Fraser C., Sr.

    2009-02-01

    Abnormal stretch and strain is a major cause of injury to the spinal cord and brainstem. Such forces can develop from age-related degeneration, congenital malformations, occupational exposure, or trauma such as sporting accidents, whiplash and blast injury. While current imaging technologies provide excellent morphology and anatomy of the spinal cord, there is no validated diagnostic tool to assess mechanical stresses exerted upon the spinal cord and brainstem. Furthermore, there is no current means to correlate these stress patterns with known spinal cord injuries and other clinical metrics such as neurological impairment. We have therefore developed the spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA) system, which uses imaging and finite element analysis to predict stretch injury. This system was tested on a small cohort of neurosurgery patients. Initial results show that the calculated stress values decreased following surgery, and that this decrease was accompanied by a significant decrease in neurological symptoms. Regression analysis identified modest correlations between stress values and clinical metrics. The strongest correlations were seen with the Brainstem Disability Index (BDI) and the Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), whereas the weakest correlations were seen with the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale. SCOSIA therefore shows encouraging initial results and may have wide applicability to trauma and degenerative disease involving the spinal cord and brainstem.

  5. Relating Histopathology and Mechanical Strain in Experimental Contusion Spinal Cord Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter; Kozlowski, Piotr; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), the spinal cord is subject to external displacements that result in damage of neural tissues. These displacements produce complex internal deformations, or strains, of the spinal cord parenchyma. The aim of this study is to determine a relationship between these internal strains during SCI and primary damage to spinal cord gray matter (GM) in an in vivo rat contusion model. Using magnetic resonance imaging and novel image registration methods, we measured three-dimensional (3D) mechanical strain in in vivo rat cervical spinal cord (n = 12) during an imposed contusion injury. We then assessed expression of the neuronal transcription factor, neuronal nuclei (NeuN), in ventral horns of GM (at the epicenter of injury as well as at intervals cranially and caudally), immediately post-injury. We found that minimum principal strain was most strongly correlated with loss of NeuN stain across all animals (R2 = 0.19), but varied in strength between individual animals (R2 = 0.06–0.52). Craniocaudal distribution of anatomical damage was similar to measured strain distribution. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to assess strain field error, and minimum principal strain (which ranged from 8% to 36% in GM ventral horns) exhibited a standard deviation of 2.6% attributed to the simulated error. This study is the first to measure 3D deformation of the spinal cord and relate it to patterns of ensuing tissue damage in an in vivo model. It provides a platform on which to build future studies addressing the tolerance of spinal cord tissue to mechanical deformation. PMID:26729511

  6. Relating Histopathology and Mechanical Strain in Experimental Contusion Spinal Cord Injury in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter; Kozlowski, Piotr; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-09-15

    During traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), the spinal cord is subject to external displacements that result in damage of neural tissues. These displacements produce complex internal deformations, or strains, of the spinal cord parenchyma. The aim of this study is to determine a relationship between these internal strains during SCI and primary damage to spinal cord gray matter (GM) in an in vivo rat contusion model. Using magnetic resonance imaging and novel image registration methods, we measured three-dimensional (3D) mechanical strain in in vivo rat cervical spinal cord (n = 12) during an imposed contusion injury. We then assessed expression of the neuronal transcription factor, neuronal nuclei (NeuN), in ventral horns of GM (at the epicenter of injury as well as at intervals cranially and caudally), immediately post-injury. We found that minimum principal strain was most strongly correlated with loss of NeuN stain across all animals (R(2) = 0.19), but varied in strength between individual animals (R(2) = 0.06-0.52). Craniocaudal distribution of anatomical damage was similar to measured strain distribution. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to assess strain field error, and minimum principal strain (which ranged from 8% to 36% in GM ventral horns) exhibited a standard deviation of 2.6% attributed to the simulated error. This study is the first to measure 3D deformation of the spinal cord and relate it to patterns of ensuing tissue damage in an in vivo model. It provides a platform on which to build future studies addressing the tolerance of spinal cord tissue to mechanical deformation.

  7. Spatio-Temporal Expression Pattern of Frizzled Receptors after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Ernest; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Wnt proteins are a large family of molecules that are critically involved in multiple central nervous system (CNS) developmental processes. Experimental evidences suggest a role for this family of proteins in many CNS disorders, including spinal cord injury (SCI), which is a major neuropathology owing to its high prevalence and chronic sensorimotor functional sequelae. Interestingly, most Wnt proteins and their inhibitors are expressed in the uninjured spinal cord, and their temporal expression patterns are dramatically altered after injury. However, little is known regarding the expression of their better-known receptors, the Frizzled family, after SCI. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of Frizzled receptors in the damaged spinal cord. Findings Based on the evidence that Wnts are expressed in the spinal cord and are transcriptionally regulated by SCI in adulthood, we analysed the spatio-temporal mRNA and protein expression patterns of Frizzled receptors after contusive SCI using quantitative RT-PCR and single and double immunohistochemistry, respectively. Our results show that almost all of the 10 known Frizzled receptors were expressed in specific spatial patterns in the uninjured spinal cords. Moreover, the Frizzled mRNAs and proteins were expressed after SCI, although their expression patterns were altered during the temporal progression of SCI. Finally, analysis of cellular Frizzled 5 expression pattern by double immunohistochemistry showed that, in the uninjured spinal cord, this receptor was expressed in neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglia and NG2+ glial precursors. After injury, Frizzled 5 was not only still expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and NG2+ glial precursors but also in axons at all evaluated time points. Moreover, Frizzled 5 was expressed in reactive microglia/macrophages from 3 to 14 days post-injury. Conclusions Our data suggest the involvement of Frizzled receptors in physiological

  8. Care of spinal cord injury in non-specialist settings.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Sian

    Patient with spinal cord injuries have individualised care routines to help prevent complications. Disruption to these routines following admission to non-specialist settings can have long-term consequences. This article focuses on the key long-term problems of pressure ulcers, bladder and bowel dysfunction, and autonomic dysreflexia. Nurses working on general wards need to consider how to manage these problems when caring for patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:27544957

  9. Myelin water fraction in human cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yijing; Alexander, Andrew L; Fleming, John O; Duncan, Ian D; Field, Aaron S

    2006-01-01

    The noninvasive discrimination of myelin disease from axonal loss and other pathologic confounds remains an unsolved problem in multiple sclerosis but may be possible through magnetic resonance quantitation of the intramyelinic water compartment. Technical challenges have limited the study of this approach in the spinal cord, a common site of involvement in multiple sclerosis. This technical note reports the test-retest reproducibility of a short T2-based estimate of myelin content in human spinal cord in vivo.

  10. Spontaneous resolution of idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniation: case report.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Nardin; Goldstein, Christina L; Santaguida, Carlo; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord herniation is a relatively rare but increasingly recognized clinical entity, with fewer than 200 cases reported in the literature to date. The etiology of this condition remains unknown, and surgery is used as the primary treatment to correct the herniation and consequent spinal cord compromise. Some patients without clinical progression have been treated with nonoperative measures, including careful follow-up and symptomatic physical therapy. To date, however, there has been no published report on the resolution of spinal cord herniation without surgical intervention. The patient in the featured case is a 58-year-old man who presented with mild thoracic myelopathy and imaging findings consistent with idiopathic spinal cord herniation. Surprisingly, updated MRI studies, obtained to better delineate the pathology, showed spontaneous resolution of the herniation. Subsequent MRI 6 months later revealed continued resolution of the previous spinal cord herniation. This is the first report of spontaneous resolution of a spinal cord herniation in the literature. At present, the treatment of this disorder is individualized, with microsurgical correction used in patients with progressive neurological impairment. The featured case highlights the potential variability in the natural history of this condition and supports considering an initial trial of nonoperative management for patients with mild, nonprogressive neurological deficits. PMID:26023901

  11. Arylsulfatase B Improves Locomotor Function after Mouse Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Myungsik; Khaled, Muntasir; Gibbs, Kurt M.; Kim, Jonghun; Kowalewski, Björn; Dierks, Thomas; Schachner, Melitta

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial chondroitinase ABC (ChaseABC) has been used to remove the inhibitory chondroitin sulfate chains from chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans to improve regeneration after rodent spinal cord injury. We hypothesized that the mammalian enzyme arylsulfatase B (ARSB) would also enhance recovery after mouse spinal cord injury. Application of the mammalian enzyme would be an attractive alternative to ChaseABC because of its more robust chemical stability and reduced immunogenicity. A one-time injection of human ARSB into injured mouse spinal cord eliminated immunoreactivity for chondroitin sulfates within five days, and up to 9 weeks after injury. After a moderate spinal cord injury, we observed improvements of locomotor recovery assessed by the Basso Mouse Scale (BMS) in ARSB treated mice, compared to the buffer-treated control group, at 6 weeks after injection. After a severe spinal cord injury, mice injected with equivalent units of ARSB or ChaseABC improved similarly and both groups achieved significantly more locomotor recovery than the buffer-treated control mice. Serotonin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive axons were more extensively present in mouse spinal cords treated with ARSB and ChaseABC, and the immunoreactive axons penetrated further beyond the injury site in ARSB or ChaseABC treated mice than in control mice. These results indicate that mammalian ARSB improves functional recovery after CNS injury. The structural/molecular mechanisms underlying the observed functional improvement remain to be elucidated. PMID:23520469

  12. Spontaneous resolution of idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniation: case report.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Nardin; Goldstein, Christina L; Santaguida, Carlo; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord herniation is a relatively rare but increasingly recognized clinical entity, with fewer than 200 cases reported in the literature to date. The etiology of this condition remains unknown, and surgery is used as the primary treatment to correct the herniation and consequent spinal cord compromise. Some patients without clinical progression have been treated with nonoperative measures, including careful follow-up and symptomatic physical therapy. To date, however, there has been no published report on the resolution of spinal cord herniation without surgical intervention. The patient in the featured case is a 58-year-old man who presented with mild thoracic myelopathy and imaging findings consistent with idiopathic spinal cord herniation. Surprisingly, updated MRI studies, obtained to better delineate the pathology, showed spontaneous resolution of the herniation. Subsequent MRI 6 months later revealed continued resolution of the previous spinal cord herniation. This is the first report of spontaneous resolution of a spinal cord herniation in the literature. At present, the treatment of this disorder is individualized, with microsurgical correction used in patients with progressive neurological impairment. The featured case highlights the potential variability in the natural history of this condition and supports considering an initial trial of nonoperative management for patients with mild, nonprogressive neurological deficits.

  13. Spinal Cord Injured College Students: Counseling and Guidance Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Anne Louise

    1979-01-01

    Physical, psychological, academic, and career problems of spinal cord injured college students plus counselor knowledge, attitudes, and skills that help in solving these problems are cited. Community and commercial resources are identified. Programs that enhance faculty and employer sensitivity and cord injured student development are described.…

  14. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  19. Relationship of Personality and Locus of Control With Employment Outcomes among Participants with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Broderick, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    We investigated relationships among personality, locus of control, and current post-injury employment status for 1,391 participants with spinal cord injury. Participants with higher internality locus-of-control scores and activity scores (personality) reported more favorable employment outcomes. Higher scores on chance and powerful others (locus…

  20. Extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia major causing spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Q L L; Lau, K K

    2007-04-01

    A 33-year-old, homozygous beta-thalassaemic, Jehovah witness man presented with subacute spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary haematopoiesis within the thoracic spinal canal. In this case, MRI showed characteristic features of extramedullary haematopoiesis, leading to an early diagnosis. PMID:17419864

  1. An Imaging-Based Approach to Spinal Cord Infection.

    PubMed

    Talbott, Jason F; Narvid, Jared; Chazen, J Levi; Chin, Cynthia T; Shah, Vinil

    2016-10-01

    Infections of the spinal cord, nerve roots, and surrounding meninges are uncommon, but highly significant given their potential for severe morbidity and even mortality. Prompt diagnosis can be lifesaving, as many spinal infections are treatable. Advances in imaging technology have now firmly established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard for spinal cord imaging evaluation, enabling the depiction of infectious myelopathies with exquisite detail and contrast. In this article, we aim to provide an overview of MRI findings for spinal cord infections with special focus on imaging patterns of infection that are primarily confined to the spinal cord, spinal meninges, and spinal nerve roots. In this context, we describe and organize this review around 5 distinct patterns of transverse spinal abnormality that may be detected with MRI as follows: (1) extramedullary, (2) centromedullary, (3) eccentric, (4) frontal horn, and (5) irregular. We seek to classify the most common presentations for a wide variety of infectious agents within this image-based framework while realizing that significant overlap and variation exists, including some infections that remain occult with conventional imaging techniques. PMID:27616314

  2. Chooramani technique: A novel method of omental transposition in traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chooramani, Gopal S.; Singh, Girish Kumar; Srivastava, Rajeshwar Nath; Jaiswal, Pramod Kumar; Srivastava, Chhitij

    2013-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord injury often results in significant catastrophic disability. Placement of the intact omentum upon a recently traumatized spinal cord was found to be effective. It represents a very suitable organ for revascularization of the ischemic nervous tissue, due to its abundance in blood and lymph vessels and its capability to adhere to the surface of the lesion, with capillary overgrowing in 4-6 h. The traditional method of omentum transposition is a hectic and time-consuming two-stage procedure in which position is changed twice. The major disadvantage of this two-staged procedure is that it takes longer operative time, and there is high risk of infection due to change of position with an open wound. So there is a need for modifications so that the procedure can be made easier and complications can be avoided. Objective: To avoid the complications and to make the procedure easier, a single-staged procedure called ‘chooramani technique’ for omental transposition in spinal cord injury is proposed. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 16 patients of post-traumatic thoraco-lumbar spinal cord injury with paraplegia. Results: Complications like wound infection, incisional hernia, and CSF leak were avoided. Operative time reduced to approximately half. Conclusion: This modification of technique is relatively easy and can be adopted for patients undergoing omental transposition for spinal cord injury. PMID:24551001

  3. Neurochemical profile of the human cervical spinal cord determined by MRS.

    PubMed

    Hock, Andreas; Wilm, Bertram; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Franckenberg, Sabine; Zoelch, Niklaus; Wyss, Patrik Oliver; De Zanche, Nicola; Nordmeyer-Maßner, Jurek; Kraemer, Thomas; Thali, Michael; Ernst, Matthias; Kollias, Spyros; Henning, Anke

    2016-10-01

    MRS enables insight into the chemical composition of central nervous system tissue. However, technical challenges degrade the data quality when applied to the human spinal cord. Therefore, to date detection of only the most prominent metabolite resonances has been reported in the healthy human spinal cord. The aim of this investigation is to provide an extended metabolic profile including neurotransmitters and antioxidants in addition to metabolites involved in the energy and membrane metabolism of the human cervical spinal cord in vivo. To achieve this, data quality was improved by using a custom-made, cervical detector array together with constructive averaging of a high number of echo signals, which is enabled by the metabolite cycling technique at 3T. In addition, the improved spinal cord spectra were extensively cross-validated, in vivo, post-mortem in situ and ex vivo. Reliable identification of up to nine metabolites was achieved in group analyses for the first time. Distinct features of the spinal cord neurochemical profile, in comparison with the brain neurotransmission system, include decreased concentrations of the sum of glutamate and glutamate and increased concentrations of aspartate, γ-amino-butyric acid, scyllo-inositol and the sum of myo-inositol and glycine. PMID:27580498

  4. Surgical Outcomes of High-Grade Spinal Cord Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to obtain useful information for establishing the guidelines for treating high-grade spinal cord gliomas. Overview of Literature The optimal management of high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains controversial. We report the outcomes of the surgical management of 14 high-grade spinal glioma. Methods We analyzed the outcomes of 14 patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas who were surgically treated between 1989 and 2012. Survival was charted with the Kaplan-Meier plots and comparisons were made with the log-rank test. Results None of the patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas underwent total resection. Subtotal resection was performed in two patients, partial resection was performed in nine patients, and open biopsy was performed in three patients. All patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy and six patients further underwent radiation cordotomy. The median survival time for patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas was 15 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 22.2%. The median survival time for patients with World Health Organization grade III tumors was 25.5 months, whereas the median survival time for patients with glioblastoma multiforme was 12.5 months. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant effect only in the group that did not include cervical cord lesion as a factor associated with survival (p=0.04 and 0.03). Conclusions The surgical outcome of patients diagnosed with high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains poor. Notably, only the model which excluded cervical cord lesions as a factor significantly predicted survival. PMID:26713128

  5. Progesterone Reduces Secondary Damage, Preserves White Matter, and Improves Locomotor Outcome after Spinal Cord Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; González, Susana; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Lima, Analía; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; De Nicola, Alejandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Progesterone is an anti-inflammatory and promyelinating agent after spinal cord injury, but its effectiveness on functional recovery is still controversial. In the current study, we tested the effects of chronic progesterone administration on tissue preservation and functional recovery in a clinically relevant model of spinal cord lesion (thoracic contusion). Using magnetic resonance imaging, we observed that progesterone reduced both volume and rostrocaudal extension of the lesion at 60 days post-injury. In addition, progesterone increased the number of total mature oligodendrocytes, myelin basic protein immunoreactivity, and the number of axonal profiles at the epicenter of the lesion. Further, progesterone treatment significantly improved motor outcome as assessed using the Basso-Bresnahan-Beattie scale for locomotion and CatWalk gait analysis. These data suggest that progesterone could be considered a promising therapeutical candidate for spinal cord injury. PMID:24460450

  6. Quantifying the internal deformation of the rodent spinal cord during acute spinal cord injury - the validation of a method.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter; Kozlowski, Piotr; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and analysis of the rodent spinal cord subject to experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) has almost completely been limited to naked-eye observations, and a single measure of gross spinal cord motion due to injury. This study introduces a novel method which utilizes MRI to quantify the deformation of the rodent spinal cord due to imposed, clinically-relevant injuries - specifically, cervical contusion and dislocation mechanisms. The image registration methods were developed using the Advanced Normalization Tools package, which incorporate rigid, affine and deformable registration steps. The proposed method is validated against a fiducial-based, 'gold-standard' measure of spinal cord tissue motion. The validation analysis yielded accuracy (and precision) values of 62 μm (49 μm), 73 μm (79 μm) and 112 μm (110 μm), for the medio-lateral, dorso-ventral and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. The internal morphological change of the spinal cord has never before been quantified, experimentally. This study demonstrates the capability of this method and its potential for future application to in vivo rodent models of SCI.

  7. In Vivo Measurement of Cervical Spinal Cord Deformation During Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter A; Kozlowski, Piotr; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The spinal cord undergoes physical deformation during traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), which results in biological damage. This study demonstrates a novel approach, using magnetic resonance imaging and image registration techniques, to quantify the three-dimensional deformation of the cervical spinal cord in an in vivo rat model. Twenty-four male rats were subjected to one of two clinically relevant mechanisms of TSCI (i.e. contusion and dislocation) inside of a MR scanner using a novel apparatus, enabling imaging of the deformed spinal cords. The displacement fields demonstrated qualitative differences between injury mechanisms. Three-dimensional Lagrangian strain fields were calculated, and the results from the contusion injury mechanism were deemed most reliable. Strain field error was assessed using a Monte Carlo approach, which showed that simulated normal strain error experienced a bias, whereas shear strain error did not. In contusion injury, a large region of dorso-ventral compressive strain was observed under the impactor which extended into the ventral region of the spinal cord. High tensile lateral strains under the impactor and compressive lateral strains in the lateral white matter were also observed in contusion. The ability to directly observe and quantify in vivo spinal cord deformation informs our knowledge of the mechanics of TSCI.

  8. Inflammogenesis of Secondary Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, M. Akhtar; Al Shehabi, Tuqa S.; Eid, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) and spinal infarction lead to neurological complications and eventually to paraplegia or quadriplegia. These extremely debilitating conditions are major contributors to morbidity. Our understanding of SCI has certainly increased during the last decade, but remains far from clear. SCI consists of two defined phases: the initial impact causes primary injury, which is followed by a prolonged secondary injury consisting of evolving sub-phases that may last for years. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms driving this condition are complex. Derangement of the vasculature is a notable feature of the pathology of SCI. In particular, an important component of SCI is the ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) that leads to endothelial dysfunction and changes in vascular permeability. Indeed, together with endothelial cell damage and failure in homeostasis, ischemia reperfusion injury triggers full-blown inflammatory cascades arising from activation of residential innate immune cells (microglia and astrocytes) and infiltrating leukocytes (neutrophils and macrophages). These inflammatory cells release neurotoxins (proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, free radicals, excitotoxic amino acids, nitric oxide (NO)), all of which partake in axonal and neuronal deficit. Therefore, our review considers the recent advances in SCI mechanisms, whereby it becomes clear that SCI is a heterogeneous condition. Hence, this leads towards evidence of a restorative approach based on monotherapy with multiple targets or combinatorial treatment. Moreover, from evaluation of the existing literature, it appears that there is an urgent requirement for multi-centered, randomized trials for a large patient population. These clinical studies would offer an opportunity in stratifying SCI patients at high risk and selecting appropriate, optimal therapeutic regimens for personalized medicine. PMID:27147970

  9. Non-painful sensory phenomena after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Siddall, P.; McClelland, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Non-painful sensory phenomena or "phantom" sensations are common after spinal cord injury. However, the physiological mechanisms responsible for these sensations are poorly understood. The aim of this study, therefore, was to document in a prospective fashion the time course, prevalence, and features of non-painful sensory phenomena after spinal cord injury, and to determine whether there was a relation between the presence of these sensations and completeness, level of injury, and type of spinal cord injury.
METHODS—Patients admitted to an acute spinal injuries unit were interviewed after admission and at several time points over a 2 year period to determine the presence and characteristics of non-painful sensations. Sensations were divided into simple and complex, with complex referring to sensations that incorporated a sensation of volume, length, posture, or movement.
RESULTS—The present study showed that the large majority (90%) of patients experience either type of sensation and most complex sensations (60%) are first experienced within 24 hours after the injury. Complex sensations were more common in those patients who had complete spinal cord injuries. The presence of either type of sensation did not seem to be related to the level of injury or the type of injury (cord syndrome). A relatively small proportion (22%) of patients reported that the postural sensations were related to their position at the time of injury and sensations were more commonly related to a familiar, comfortable, or often used position before the spinal cord injury.
CONCLUSION—Complex sensations such as postural illusions seem to be due to functional changes in the CNS that may occur almost immediately after spinal cord injury. These sensations may be related to a strong sensory memory "imprint" that has been established before injury.

 PMID:10209173

  10. Effect of nimodipine on rat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y-F; Gao, H-L; Ma, L-J; Li, J

    2015-02-13

    We evaluated the potentially protective effect of nimodipine on rat spinal cord injury. Sprague-Dawley rats received spinal cord injury, and were separated into nimodipine (N = 12) and saline groups (N = 12). Within 1 h of the injury, rats were treated intraperitoneally with nimodipine (1.0 mg/kg) or an equal amount of saline. Treatment was performed 3 times a day for 1 week. Operation BBB score and track experiment were used to measure the physical function of the hind legs 1 and 2 weeks after injury. Two weeks after the injury, malondialdehyde (MDA) content and spinal cord myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of the injured part were determined, and the glial scar and dead room were studied using the immune tissue chemical test. ED1 was used to observe active gitter cell and macrophages. The physical function of the nimodipine group improved significantly (P < 0.01). Two weeks after injury, spinal cord MDA content in the spinal cord in the nimodipine group (nmol/g, 25.6 ± 9.7 vs 68.5 ± 16.7) and MPO activity (U/g, 252.2 ± 63.9 vs 382.8 ± 108.2) decreased significantly (P < 0.01); nimodipine whole dead space (mm2, 4.45 ± 1.28 vs 6.16 ± 2.65) and ED1 antibody immunity colored positive room (mm2, 1.87 ± 0.42 vs 2.86 ± 1.01) reduced significantly (P < 0.01). Nimodipine treatment could reduce oxidative injury after spinal cord injury, reduce the whole dead space and inflammation, and repair spinal cord injury.

  11. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  12. Osteoporosis in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology, clinical considerations, and relevant experimental findings with regard to osteoporosis in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) will be discussed. The bone loss that occurs acutely after more neurologically motor complete SCI is unique for its sublesional skeletal distribution and rate, at certain skeletal sites approaching 1% of bone mineral density per week, and its resistance to currently available treatments. The areas of high bone loss include the distal femur, proximal tibia, and more distal boney sites. Evidence from a study performed in monozygotic twins discordant for SCI indicates that sublesional bone loss in the twin with SCI increases for several decades, strongly suggesting that the heightened net bone loss after SCI may persist for an extended period of time. The increased frequency of fragility fracture after paralysis will be discussed, and a few risk factors for such fractures after SCI will be examined. Because vitamin D deficiency, regardless of disability, is a relevant consideration for bone health, as well as an easily reversible condition, the increased prevalence of and treatment target values for vitamin D in this deficiency state in the SCI population will be reviewed. Pharmacological and mechanical approaches to preserving bone integrity in persons with acute and chronic SCI will be reviewed, with emphasis placed on efficacy and practicality. Emerging osteoanabolic agents that improve functioning of WNT/β-catenin signaling after paralysis will be introduced as therapeutic interventions that may hold promise.

  13. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  14. Spinal cord compression in two related Ursus arctos horribilis.

    PubMed

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Roberts, Greg R; Schmidt, Carrie E; Layton, Arthur W

    2012-09-01

    Two 15-yr-old grizzly bear littermates were evaluated within 9 mo of each other with the symptom of acute onset of progressive paraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia. The most significant clinical examination finding was pelvic limb paresis in both bears. Magnetic resonance examinations of both bears showed cranial thoracic spinal cord compression. The first bear had left-sided extradural, dorsolateral spinal cord compression at T3-T4. Vertebral canal stenosis was also observed at T2-T3. Images of the second bear showed lateral spinal cord compression from T2-T3 to T4-T5. Intervertebral disk disease and associated spinal cord compression was also observed at T2-T3 and T3-T4. One grizzly bear continued to deteriorate despite reduced exercise, steroid, and antibiotic therapy. The bear was euthanized, and a necropsy was performed. The postmortem showed a spinal ganglion cyst that caused spinal cord compression at the level of T3-T4. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C3-T6. The second bear was prescribed treatment that consisted of a combination of reduced exercise and steroid therapy. He continued to deteriorate with these medical therapies and was euthanized 4 mo after diagnosis. A necropsy showed hypertrophy and protrusion of the dorsal longitudinal ligament at T2-T3 and T3-T4, with resulting spinal cord compression in this region. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C2-L1. This is one of few case reports that describes paresis in bears. It is the only case report, to the authors' knowledge, that describes spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings in a grizzly bear and also the only report that describes a cranial thoracic myelopathy in two related grizzly bears with neurologic signs.

  15. Spinal cord compression in two related Ursus arctos horribilis.

    PubMed

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Roberts, Greg R; Schmidt, Carrie E; Layton, Arthur W

    2012-09-01

    Two 15-yr-old grizzly bear littermates were evaluated within 9 mo of each other with the symptom of acute onset of progressive paraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia. The most significant clinical examination finding was pelvic limb paresis in both bears. Magnetic resonance examinations of both bears showed cranial thoracic spinal cord compression. The first bear had left-sided extradural, dorsolateral spinal cord compression at T3-T4. Vertebral canal stenosis was also observed at T2-T3. Images of the second bear showed lateral spinal cord compression from T2-T3 to T4-T5. Intervertebral disk disease and associated spinal cord compression was also observed at T2-T3 and T3-T4. One grizzly bear continued to deteriorate despite reduced exercise, steroid, and antibiotic therapy. The bear was euthanized, and a necropsy was performed. The postmortem showed a spinal ganglion cyst that caused spinal cord compression at the level of T3-T4. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C3-T6. The second bear was prescribed treatment that consisted of a combination of reduced exercise and steroid therapy. He continued to deteriorate with these medical therapies and was euthanized 4 mo after diagnosis. A necropsy showed hypertrophy and protrusion of the dorsal longitudinal ligament at T2-T3 and T3-T4, with resulting spinal cord compression in this region. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C2-L1. This is one of few case reports that describes paresis in bears. It is the only case report, to the authors' knowledge, that describes spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings in a grizzly bear and also the only report that describes a cranial thoracic myelopathy in two related grizzly bears with neurologic signs. PMID:23082524

  16. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-04-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  17. Improved rat spinal cord injury model using spinal cord compression by percutaneous method

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wook-Hun; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Dai-Jung; Yang, Wo-Jong; Lee, A-Jin; Choi, Chi-Bong; Chang, Hwa-Seok; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chung, Hyo Jin; Suh, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Soo-Han; Han, Hoon; Do, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Here, percutaneous spinal cord injury (SCI) methods using a balloon catheter in adult rats are described. A balloon catheter was inserted into the epidural space through the lumbosacral junction and then inflated between T9-T10 for 10min under fluoroscopic guidance. Animals were divided into three groups with respect to inflation volume: 20 µL (n = 18), 50 µL (n = 18) and control (Fogarty catheter inserted but not inflated; n = 10). Neurological assessments were then made based on BBB score, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. Both inflation volumes produced complete paralysis. Gradual recovery of motor function occurred when 20 µL was used, but not after 50 µL was applied. In the 50 µL group, all gray and white matter was lost from the center of the lesion. In addition, supramaximal damage was noted, which likely prevented spontaneous recovery. This percutaneous spinal cord compression injury model is simple, rapid with high reproducibility and the potential to serve as a useful tool for investigation of pathophysiology and possible protective treatments of SCI in vivo. PMID:23820159

  18. Current Pregnancy Among Women with Spinal Cord Injury: Findings from the U.S. National Spinal Cord Injury Database

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Chen, Yuying; McLain, Aime B. Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Study design Cross-sectional study Objective To examine prevalence of pregnancy and associations with sociodemographic and clinical factors among women with spinal cord injury (SCI) Setting U.S. National Spinal Cord Injury Database, an SCI registry that interviews participants 1, 5, and then every 5 years post-injury. Data include SCI clinical details, functional impairments, participation measures, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction. Women ages 18-49 are asked about hospitalizations in the last year relating to pregnancy or its complications. Data represent 1,907 women, who completed 3,054 interviews. Methods We used generalized estimating equations to examine bivariable associations between pregnancy and clinical and psychosocial variables and to perform multivariable regressions predicting pregnancy. Results Across all women, 2.0% reported pregnancy during the prior 12 months. This annual prevalence differed significantly by years elapsed since injury; the highest rate occurred 15 years post-injury (3.7%). Bivariable analyses found that younger age at injury was significantly associated with current pregnancy (P < 0.0001). Compared with nonpregnant women, those reporting current pregancy were significantly more likely to be married or partnered, have sport-related SCI, have higher motor scores, and have more positive psychosocial status scores. Multivariable analyses found significant associations between current pregnancy and age, marital status, motor score, and mobility and occupation scale scores. Conclusions Current pregnancy rates among reproductive-aged women with SCI are similar to rates of other U.S. women with chronic mobility impairments. More information is needed about pregnancy experiences and outcomes to inform both women with SCI seeking childbearing and clinicians providing their care. PMID:25987000

  19. Frequency Mapping of Rat Spinal Cord at 7T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Evan; Rauscher, Alexander; Kozlowski, Piotr; Yung, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    The spinal cord is an integral part of the nervous system responsible for sensory, motor, and reflex control crucial to all bodily function. Due to its non-invasive nature, MRI is well matched for characterizing and imaging of spinal cord, and is used extensively for clinical applications. Recent developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high field (7T) using phase represents a new approach of characterizing spinal cord myelin. Theory suggests that microstructure differences in myelinated white matter (WM) and non-myelinated gray matter (GM) affect MR phase, measurable frequency shifts. Data from pilot experiments using a multi-gradient echo (MGE) sequence to image rat spinal cords placed parallel to main magnetic field B0 has shown frequency shifts between not only between WM and GM, but also between specific WM tracts of the dorsal column, including the fasciculus gracilis, fasciculus cuneatus, and corticospinal tract. Using MGE, frequency maps at multiple echo times (TE) between 4ms and 22ms show a non-linear relationship between WM frequency, contrary to what was previously expected. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of MGE in revealing new information about spinal cord tissue microstructure, and lays important groundwork for in-vivo and human studies.

  20. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, H S

    2012-05-01

    The list of experimental therapies that have been developed in animal models to improve functional outcomes after spinal cord injury is extensive. Though preclinical trials have shown a good potential for cellular therapies in spinal cord injury, there is no documentary proof as of now that any form of cellular therapy definitely improves outcome in management of human spinal cord injury. The adverse effects of many such therapies are well-documented. There is a need to conduct proper clinical trials. Some early-stage spinal cord injury clinical trials have recently been done and some have been started. However, some experimental therapies have been introduced into clinical practice without a clinical trial being completed. Undue hype by the media and claims by professionals have a profound psychological effect on the spinal cord injured and interferes in their rehabilitation. While we know that the future holds a good promise, this should not prevent patients from aggressively pursuing rehabilitation since we are not sure when a clinical breakthrough will be achieved. PMID:23155794

  1. Ubiquity of motor networks in the spinal cord of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cazalets, J R; Bertrand, S

    2000-11-15

    In a recent paper, we found that it is possible to record motor activity in sacral segments in the in vitro neonatal rat spinal cord preparation. This motor activity recorded in segments that are not innervating hindlimbs is driven by the lumbar locomotor network. Indeed, compartimentalizations of the cord with Vaseline walls or section experiments, reveals that the sacral segments possess their own rhythmogenic capabilities but that in an intact spinal cord they are driven by the lumbar locomotor network. In this review, these recent findings are placed in the context of spinal motor network interactions. As previously suspected, the motor networks do not operate in isolation but interact with each other according to behavioural needs. These interactions provide some insight into the discrepancies observed in several studies dealing with the localization of the lumbar locomotor network in the neonatal rat spinal cord. In conclusion, the spinal cord of quadrupeds appears as an heterogeneous structure where it is possible to identify neuronal networks that are crucial for the genesis of locomotor-related activities. PMID:11165798

  2. Coping and adaptation in adults living with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Barone, Stacey Hoffman; Waters, Katherine

    2012-10-01

    Biopsychosocial adaptation remains a multifaceted challenge for individuals with spinal cord injury, their families, and healthcare providers alike. The development of frequent medical complications necessitating healthcare interventions is an ongoing, debilitating, and costly problem for those living with spinal cord injuries. Although several demographic variables have been correlated with positive adaptation in individuals with spinal cord injury, the research outcome data present limitations in understanding and facilitating which coping techniques work best to augment biopsychosocial adaptation in this population. Coping facilitates adaptation and adjustment to stress and can help to increase quality of life in people living with spinal cord injury and reduce common complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which sociodemographic characteristics and hardiness explain coping in 243 adults living with a spinal cord injury. In addition, this study examined which predictors of coping explain biopsychosocial adaptation. A descriptive explanatory design was utilized. Standardized instruments were administered nationally to assess hardiness, coping, and physiological and psychosocial adaptation. Canonical correlation and multiple regression analyses indicated that less educated, less hardy, and recently injured participants were more likely to use escape-avoidance coping and less likely to use social support, problem solving, and positive reappraisal coping behaviors (p < .05). Individuals with paraplegia had a higher level of functional ability, spent less time in rehabilitation, had a greater sense of control, and experienced less frequent complications. The control dimension of hardiness was the only dimension that significantly related to biopsychosocial adaptation within this sample.

  3. Fully automated grey and white matter spinal cord segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Ferran; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Yiannakas, Marios C.; Hoy, Luke R.; Tebaldi, Elisa; Kearney, Hugh; Liechti, Martina D.; Miller, David H.; Ciccarelli, Olga; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M. Gandini; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Axonal loss in the spinal cord is one of the main contributing factors to irreversible clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). In vivo axonal loss can be assessed indirectly by estimating a reduction in the cervical cross-sectional area (CSA) of the spinal cord over time, which is indicative of spinal cord atrophy, and such a measure may be obtained by means of image segmentation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this work, we propose a new fully automated spinal cord segmentation technique that incorporates two different multi-atlas segmentation propagation and fusion techniques: The Optimized PatchMatch Label fusion (OPAL) algorithm for localising and approximately segmenting the spinal cord, and the Similarity and Truth Estimation for Propagated Segmentations (STEPS) algorithm for segmenting white and grey matter simultaneously. In a retrospective analysis of MRI data, the proposed method facilitated CSA measurements with accuracy equivalent to the inter-rater variability, with a Dice score (DSC) of 0.967 at C2/C3 level. The segmentation performance for grey matter at C2/C3 level was close to inter-rater variability, reaching an accuracy (DSC) of 0.826 for healthy subjects and 0.835 people with clinically isolated syndrome MS. PMID:27786306

  4. Simultaneous Brain–Cervical Cord fMRI Reveals Intrinsic Spinal Cord Plasticity during Motor Sequence Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Adad, Julien; Marchand-Pauvert, Veronique; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord participates in the execution of skilled movements by translating high-level cerebral motor representations into musculotopic commands. Yet, the extent to which motor skill acquisition relies on intrinsic spinal cord processes remains unknown. To date, attempts to address this question were limited by difficulties in separating spinal local effects from supraspinal influences through traditional electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence for local learning-induced plasticity in intact human spinal cord through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord during motor sequence learning. Specifically, we show learning-related modulation of activity in the C6–C8 spinal region, which is independent from that of related supraspinal sensorimotor structures. Moreover, a brain–spinal cord functional connectivity analysis demonstrates that the initial linear relationship between the spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex gradually fades away over the course of motor sequence learning, while the connectivity between spinal activity and cerebellum gains strength. These data suggest that the spinal cord not only constitutes an active functional component of the human motor learning network but also contributes distinctively from the brain to the learning process. The present findings open new avenues for rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, as they demonstrate that this part of the central nervous system is much more plastic than assumed before. Yet, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this intrinsic functional plasticity in the spinal cord warrant further investigations. PMID:26125597

  5. Simultaneous Brain-Cervical Cord fMRI Reveals Intrinsic Spinal Cord Plasticity during Motor Sequence Learning.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Shahabeddin; Lungu, Ovidiu; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Marchand-Pauvert, Veronique; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien

    2015-06-01

    The spinal cord participates in the execution of skilled movements by translating high-level cerebral motor representations into musculotopic commands. Yet, the extent to which motor skill acquisition relies on intrinsic spinal cord processes remains unknown. To date, attempts to address this question were limited by difficulties in separating spinal local effects from supraspinal influences through traditional electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence for local learning-induced plasticity in intact human spinal cord through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord during motor sequence learning. Specifically, we show learning-related modulation of activity in the C6-C8 spinal region, which is independent from that of related supraspinal sensorimotor structures. Moreover, a brain-spinal cord functional connectivity analysis demonstrates that the initial linear relationship between the spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex gradually fades away over the course of motor sequence learning, while the connectivity between spinal activity and cerebellum gains strength. These data suggest that the spinal cord not only constitutes an active functional component of the human motor learning network but also contributes distinctively from the brain to the learning process. The present findings open new avenues for rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, as they demonstrate that this part of the central nervous system is much more plastic than assumed before. Yet, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this intrinsic functional plasticity in the spinal cord warrant further investigations.

  6. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Giardini, Mario E; Zippo, Antonio G; Valente, Maurizio; Krstajic, Nikola; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1) accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord), and 2) identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3) check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma) for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention. PMID:27050096

  7. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Maurizio; Krstajic, Nikola; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1) accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord), and 2) identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3) check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma) for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention. PMID:27050096

  8. Automated identification of spinal cord and vertebras on sagittal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Dong, Qian; He, Bo; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Couriel, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We are developing an automated method for the identification of the spinal cord and the vertebras on spinal MR images, which is an essential step for computerized analysis of bone marrow diseases. The spinal cord segment was first enhanced by a newly developed hierarchical multiscale tubular (HMT) filter that utilizes the complementary hyper- and hypo- intensities in the T1-weighted (T1W) and STIR MRI sequences. An Expectation-Maximization (EM) analysis method was then applied to the enhanced tubular structures to extract candidates of the spinal cord. The spinal cord was finally identified by a maximum-likelihood registration method by analysis of the features extracted from the candidate objects in the two MRI sequences. Using the identified spinal cord as a reference, the vertebras were localized based on the intervertebral disc locations extracted by another HMT filter applied to the T1W images. In this study, 5 and 30 MRI scans from 35 patients who were diagnosed with multiple myeloma disease were collected retrospectively with IRB approval as training and test set, respectively. The vertebras manually outlined by a radiologist were used as reference standard. A total of 422 vertebras were marked in the 30 test cases. For the 30 test cases, 100% (30/30) of the spinal cords were correctly segmented with 4 false positives (FPs) mistakenly identified on the back muscles in 4 scans. A sensitivity of 95.0% (401/422) was achieved for the identification of vertebras, and 5 FPs were marked in 4 scans with an average FP rate of 0.17 FPs/scan.

  9. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Characterization of the Porcine Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Shetye, Snehal; Troyer, Kevin; Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H. T.; Kwon, Brian K.; Cripton, Peter; Puttlitz, Christian M.

    2014-01-01

    Although quasi-static and quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of the spinal cord have been reported previously, there are no published studies that have investigated the fully (strain-dependent) nonlinear viscoelastic properties of the spinal cord. In this study, stress relaxation experiments and dynamic cycling were performed on six fresh porcine lumbar cord specimens to examine their viscoelastic mechanical properties. The stress relaxation data were fitted to a modified superposition formulation and a novel finite ramp time correction technique was applied. The parameters obtained from this fitting methodology were used to predict the average dynamic cyclic viscoelastic behavior of the porcine cord. The data indicate that the porcine spinal cord exhibited fully nonlinear viscoelastic behavior. The average weighted RMSE for a Heaviside ramp fit was 2.8kPa, which was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than that of the nonlinear (comprehensive viscoelastic characterization (CVC) method) fit (0.365kPa). Further, the nonlinear mechanical parameters obtained were able to accurately predict the dynamic behavior, thus exemplifying the reliability of the obtained nonlinear parameters. These parameters will be important for future studies investigating various damage mechanisms of the spinal cord and studies developing high resolution finite elements models of the spine. PMID:24211612

  10. Anterior spinal cord infarction caused by fibrocartilaginous embolism.

    PubMed

    Piao, Yue-Shan; Lu, De-Hong; Su, Ying-Ying; Yang, Xiao-Ping

    2009-04-01

    Fibrocartilaginous embolism is a rare cause of anterior spinal cord infarction. We report a case of anterior spinal cord infarction caused by a fibrocartilaginous embolism of 3 months duration in a 23-year-old man. Ten days after a trivial strike to the neck and back, he had sudden back pain, weakness of the upper and lower extremities, developed dyspnea and became unconscious. Cervical MRI showed an enlargement of the lower medulla and cervical cord with abnormal signals in the ventral portion. The follow-up MRI performed 2 months later showed atrophy of the above lesion. On histopathological examination, there was a recent, extensive infarct in the cervical cord and lower medulla. The lesion was symmetrical, and predominantly involved the anterior part of the spinal cord. Moreover, many basophilic, alcian blue-positive emboli in the arteries and veins of the lesion were detected. This is the first autopsy case of anterior spinal cord infarction caused by a fibrocartilaginous embolism that has been confirmed in China. The clinicopathological features of this case are reviewed in this paper.

  11. THE EFFECT OF MONOSIALOGANGLYOSIDE (GM-1) ADMINISTRATION IN SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    BARROS, TARCÍSIO ELOY PESSOA; ARAUJO, FERNANDO FLORES DE; HIGINO, LUCAS DA PAZ; MARCON, RAPHAEL MARTUS; CRISTANTE, ALEXANDRE FOGAÇA

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of monosialoganglioside (GM-1) in spinal cord trauma patients seen in our service who have not been treated with methylprednisolone. Methods: Thirty patients with acute spinal cord trauma were randomly divided into two groups. In Group 1, patients received 200 mg GM-1 in the initial assessment and thereafter received 100 mg intravenous per day for 30 days and Group 2 (control) received saline. Patients were evaluated periodically (at 6 weeks, 6 months, one year and two years), using a standardized neurological assessment of the American Spinal Injury Association / International Spinal Cord Society. Results: The comparative statistical analysis of motor indices, sensitive indices for pain and touch according to the standardization of ASIA / ISCOS showed that the assessments at 6 weeks, 6 months and 2 years, GM-Group 1 patients had higher rates than the control group regarding sensitivity to pain and touch, with no statistically significant difference from the motor index. Conclusion: The functional assessment showed improvement in the sensitive indices of patients treated with GM1 after post-traumatic spinal cord injury compared to patients who received placebo. Level of Evidence IV, Prospective Case Studies Series. PMID:27217811

  12. [Non-invasive transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation facilitates locomotor activity in decerebrated and spinal cats].

    PubMed

    Musienko, P E; Bogacheva, I N; Savochin, A A; Kilimnik, V A; Gorskiĭ, O V; Nikitin, O A; Gerasimenko, Ia P

    2013-08-01

    It is known that spinal neuronal networks activated by epidural electrical stimulation (EES) can produce the stepping EMG pattern and control the locomotor behavior. At present study we showed that non-invasive transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation (tESCS) applied to the lumbar-sacral enlargement can facilitate the locomotor activity in decerebrated and spinal animals. The comparison of the motor responses evoked by EES vs tESCS showed that both methods produce the locomotor patterns with close properties and similar reflex mechanisms. The data obtained suggest that tESCS is an efficient approach for investigation of the locomotor control in acute and chronic experiments as well as facilitates of the locomotor abilities after spinal cord injury. Taking to account the non-invasivity and easement of tESCS, this approach could be further implemented in clinical practice for rehabilitation of the patient with spinal cord injury.

  13. 76 FR 56504 - Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request... spinal cord patients' satisfaction with VA rehabilitation and health care system. Affected Public... of automated collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title:...

  14. Evaluation of Avulsion-Induced Neuropathology in Rat Spinal Cords with 18F-FDG Micro-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ze-Min; Tang, Ying; Li, Ying-Qin; Luo, Hao-Xuan; Liu, Lin-Lin; Tu, Qing-Qiang; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Brachial plexus root avulsion (BPRA) leads to dramatic motoneuron death and glial reactions in the corresponding spinal segments at the late stage of injury. To protect spinal motoneurons, assessment of the affected spinal segments should be done at an earlier stage of the injury. In this study, we employed 18F-FDG small-animal PET/CT to assess the severity of BPRA-induced cervical spinal cord injuries. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly treated and divided into three groups: Av+NS (brachial plexus root avulsion (Av) treated with normal saline), Av+GM1 (treated with monosialoganglioside), and control. At time points of 3 day (d), 1 week (w), 2 w, 4 w and 8 w post-injury, 18F-FDG micro-PET/CT scans and neuropathology assessments of the injured spinal roots, as well as the spinal cord, were performed. The outcomes of the different treatments were compared. The results showed that BPRA induced local bleeding and typical Wallerian degeneration of the avulsed roots accompanied by 18F-FDG accumulations at the ipsilateral cervical intervertebral foramen. BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and overexpression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the motoneurons correlated with higher 18F-FDG uptake in the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord during the first 2 w post-injury. The GM1 treatment reduced BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and inhibited the de novo nNOS expressions in spinal motoneurons. The GM1 treatment also protected spinal motoneurons from avulsion within the first 4 w post-injury. The data from this study suggest that 18F-FDG PET/CT could be used to assess the severity of BPRA-induced primary and secondary injuries in the spinal cord. Furthermore, GM1 is an effective drug for reducing primary and secondary spinal cord injuries following BPRA. PMID:26010770

  15. Evaluation of Avulsion-Induced Neuropathology in Rat Spinal Cords with 18F-FDG Micro-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Qin; Luo, Hao-Xuan; Liu, Lin-Lin; Tu, Qing-Qiang; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Brachial plexus root avulsion (BPRA) leads to dramatic motoneuron death and glial reactions in the corresponding spinal segments at the late stage of injury. To protect spinal motoneurons, assessment of the affected spinal segments should be done at an earlier stage of the injury. In this study, we employed 18F-FDG small-animal PET/CT to assess the severity of BPRA-induced cervical spinal cord injuries. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly treated and divided into three groups: Av+NS (brachial plexus root avulsion (Av) treated with normal saline), Av+GM1 (treated with monosialoganglioside), and control. At time points of 3 day (d), 1 week (w), 2 w, 4 w and 8 w post-injury, 18F-FDG micro-PET/CT scans and neuropathology assessments of the injured spinal roots, as well as the spinal cord, were performed. The outcomes of the different treatments were compared. The results showed that BPRA induced local bleeding and typical Wallerian degeneration of the avulsed roots accompanied by 18F-FDG accumulations at the ipsilateral cervical intervertebral foramen. BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and overexpression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the motoneurons correlated with higher 18F-FDG uptake in the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord during the first 2 w post-injury. The GM1 treatment reduced BPRA-induced astrocyte reactions and inhibited the de novo nNOS expressions in spinal motoneurons. The GM1 treatment also protected spinal motoneurons from avulsion within the first 4 w post-injury. The data from this study suggest that 18F-FDG PET/CT could be used to assess the severity of BPRA-induced primary and secondary injuries in the spinal cord. Furthermore, GM1 is an effective drug for reducing primary and secondary spinal cord injuries following BPRA. PMID:26010770

  16. Nestin-Positive Ependymal Cells Are Increased in the Human Spinal Cord after Traumatic Central Nervous System Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cawsey, Thomas; Duflou, Johan; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endogenous neural progenitor cell niches have been identified in adult mammalian brain and spinal cord. Few studies have examined human spinal cord tissue for a neural progenitor cell response in disease or after injury. Here, we have compared cervical spinal cord sections from 14 individuals who died as a result of nontraumatic causes (controls) with 27 who died from injury with evidence of trauma to the central nervous system. Nestin immunoreactivity was used as a marker of neural progenitor cell response. There were significant increases in the percentage of ependymal cells that were nestin positive between controls and trauma cases. When sections from lumbar and thoracic spinal cord were available, nestin positivity was seen at all three spinal levels, suggesting that nestin reactivity is not simply a localized reaction to injury. There was a positive correlation between the percentage of ependymal cells that were nestin positive and post-injury survival time but not for age, postmortem delay, or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity. No double-labelled nestin and GFAP cells were identified in the ependymal, subependymal, or parenchymal regions of the spinal cord. We need to further characterize this subset of ependymal cells to determine their role after injury, whether they are a population of neural progenitor cells with the potential for proliferation, migration, and differentiation for spinal cord repair, or whether they have other roles more in line with hypothalamic tanycytes, which they closely resemble. PMID:25599268

  17. Spinal cord glioblastoma: 25years of experience from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Yanamadala, Vijay; Koffie, Robert M; Shankar, Ganesh M; Kumar, Jay I; Buchlak, Quinlan D; Puthenpura, Vidya; Frosch, Matthew P; Gudewicz, Thomas M; Borges, Lawrence F; Shin, John H

    2016-05-01

    Accounting for less than 0.2% of all glioblastomas, high grade gliomas of the spinal cord are very rare. Here, we discuss our approach to managing patients with high grade spinal cord glioma and review the literature on the subject. Six patients with high grade spinal cord gliomas who presented to our institution between 1990 and 2015 were reviewed. Each patient underwent subtotal surgical resection, with a subset receiving adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. Our primary outcomes of interest were pre-operative and post-operative functional status. One year survival rate was 100%. All patients had stable or improved American Spine Injury Association score immediately after surgery, which was maintained at 3months in 83.3% of patients. Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) was stable at 3month follow up in 50% of patients, but all had decreased KPS 1year after surgery. A subset of patients received post-operative radiation and chemotherapy with 0% tumor recurrence rate at 3months. We assessed the molecular profiles of tumors from two patients in our series and found that each had mutations in TP53, but had wildtype BRAF, IDH-1, and MGMT. Taken together, our data show that patients with high grade spinal cord gliomas have an excellent survival at 1year, but with some decline in functional status within this period. Further studies are needed to elucidate the natural history of the disease and to explore the role of adjuvant targeted molecular therapies. PMID:26755453

  18. Increase in oxidative stress biomarkers in dogs with ascending-descending myelomalacia following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Andrew; Packer, Rebecca A; Borgens, Richard B; Duerstock, Bradley S

    2015-01-01

    Multiple biochemical and immunohistochemical tests were performed to elucidate the role of oxidative stress during ascending-descending (A-D) myelomalacia by comparing dogs with this progressive terminal condition to dogs with chronic, focal spinal cord injuries (SCIs) and controls without SCI. Dogs with A-D myelomalacia exhibited increased biochemical markers for oxidative stress, including 8-isoprostane F2α and acrolein, as well as decreased endogenous glutathione with greatest changes occurring at the lesion center. Inflammation, as evident by the concentration of CD18+ phagocytes and hemorrhagic necrosis, was also exacerbated in the lesion of A-D myelomalacic spinal cord compared to focal SCI. The greatest differences in oxidative stress occurred at the lesion center and diminished distally in both spinal cords with A-D myelomalacia and focal SCIs. The spatial progression and time course of A-D myelomalacia are consistent with the development of secondary injury post-SCI. Ascending-descending myelomalacia is proposed as a clinical model that may further the understanding of the role of oxidative stress during secondary injury. Our results indicate that the pathology of A-D myelomalacia is also similar to subacute progressive ascending myelopathy in humans, which is characterized by recurrent neurodegeneration of spinal cord post-injury. PMID:25912174

  19. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to high energy p(66)Be(49) neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.; Ten Haken, R.K.; Mansell, J.; Yalavarthi, S.D.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Awschalom, M.

    1985-04-01

    The risk of post irradiation myelopathy was evaluated in 76 patients followed for 1-5 years after neutron irradiation of the cervical and thoracic regions. No overt myelopathy was observed. Forty-six patients received doses (central cord dose) in excess of 10 Gy, 9 received doses in excess of 12 Gy, and 5 received doses between 13 and 17 Gy, all without any evidence of spinal cord injury. A review of available literature revealed a total of 14 patients with myelopathy, 13 of whom received doses in excess of 13 Gy delivered with relatively low energy neutrons generated by the deuteron + beryllium reaction. It is concluded from these studies that the tolerance limit for the human spinal cord irradiated with high energy (p(66)Be(49)) neutrons is close to 15 Gy, above which the risk of cord injury becomes significant. Central cord doses of 13 Gy or less appear to be well tolerated with little, if any, risk of myelopathy. These conclusions are valid for a treatment time of 4 weeks or more with two or more fractions per week (9 or more fractions). The RBE for the human spinal cord irradiated under the above conditions compared with conventionally fractionated photon therapy does not exceed 4.0.

  20. Somatotopic arrangement of thermal sensory regions in the healthy human spinal cord determined by means of spinal cord functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Stroman, Patrick W; Bosma, Rachael L; Tsyben, Anastasia

    2012-09-01

    Previous functional MRI studies of normal sensory function in the human spinal cord, including right-to-left symmetry of activity, have been influenced by order effects between repeated studies. In this study, we apply thermal sensory stimulation to four dermatomes within each functional MRI time-series acquisition. Each of the four dermatomes receives a unique stimulation paradigm, such that the four paradigms form a linearly independent set, enabling detection of each individual stimulus response. Functional MRI data are shown spanning the cervical spinal cord and brainstem in 10 healthy volunteers. Results of general linear model analysis demonstrate consistent patterns of activity within the spinal cord segments corresponding to each dermatome, and a high degree of symmetry between right-side and left-side stimulation. Connectivity analyses also demonstrate consistent areas of activity and connectivity between spinal cord and brainstem regions corresponding to known anatomy. However, right-side and left-side responses are not at precisely the same rostral-caudal positions, but are offset by several millimeters, with left-side responses consistently more caudal than right-side responses. The results confirm that distinct responses to multiple interleaved sensory stimuli can be distinguished, enabling studies of sensory responses within the spinal cord without the confounding effects of comparing sequential studies.

  1. Respiration following Spinal Cord Injury: Evidence for Human Neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hoh, Daniel J.; Mercier, Lynne M.; Hussey, Shaunn P.; Lane, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory dysfunction is one of the most devastating consequences of cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) with impaired breathing being a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this population. However, there is mounting experimental and clinical evidence for moderate spontaneous respiratory recovery, or “plasticity”, after some spinal cord injuries. Pre-clinical models of respiratory dysfunction following SCI have demonstrated plasticity at neural and behavioral levels that result in progressive recovery of function. Temporal changes in respiration after human SCI have revealed some functional improvements suggesting plasticity paralleling that seen in experimental models – a concept that has been previously under-appreciated. While the extent of spontaneous recovery remains limited, it is possible that enhancing or facilitating neuroplastic mechanisms may have significant therapeutic potential. The next generation of treatment strategies for SCI and related respiratory dysfunction should aim to optimize these recovery processes of the injured spinal cord for lasting functional restoration. PMID:23891679

  2. Solitary fibrous tumor of the thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoyuki; Moriyama, Eiji; Beck, Hiroichi; Sonobe, Hiroshi

    2005-07-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with a rare case of primary solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) occurring in the extramedullary thoracic spinal cord. T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed the tumor as a mildly hypointense area with homogeneous enhancement by gadolinium. T2-weighted MR imaging showed a hypointense mass with peritumoral edema. The tumor arose from one of the posterior spinal roots, with no attachment to the dura. The tumor was clearly circumscribed from the surrounding cord tissue and easily removed. Histological examination showed the tumor predominantly consisted of spindle cells separated by abundant collagen matrix fibers. Tumor cells were strongly positive for vimentin and CD34, but negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein, S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, myelin basic protein, and keratin. SFT should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell central nervous system neoplasms, although SFT is extremely rare in the spinal cord.

  3. Stem cell-based therapies for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nandoe Tewarie, Rishi S; Hurtado, Andres; Bartels, Ronald H; Grotenhuis, Andre; Oudega, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of nervous tissue and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. There is no treatment available that restores the injury-induced loss of function to a degree that an independent life can be guaranteed. Transplantation of stem cells or progenitors may support spinal cord repair. Stem cells are characterized by self-renewal and their ability to become any cell in an organism. Promising results have been obtained in experimental models of SCI. Stem cells can be directed to differentiate into neurons or glia in vitro, which can be used for replacement of neural cells lost after SCI. Neuroprotective and axon regeneration-promoting effects have also been credited to transplanted stem cells. There are still issues related to stem cell transplantation that need to be resolved, including ethical concerns. This paper reviews the current status of stem cell application for spinal cord repair.

  4. Effects of gabapentin on thermal sensitivity following spinal nerve ligation or spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Yezierski, Robert P; Green, Megan; Murphy, Karen; Vierck, Charles J

    2013-10-01

    Neuropathic pain challenges healthcare professionals and researchers to develop new strategies of treatment and experimental models to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition. In the present study, the efficacy of gabapentin on thermal sensitivity following spinal nerve ligation and spinal cord compression was evaluated. The method of behavioral assessment was a well-validated cortically dependent operant escape task. Spinal nerve ligation produced peripheral neuropathic pain whereas spinal cord compression, achieved with an expanding polymer placed extradurally, produced a condition of central neuropathic pain. Changes in thermal sensitivity were also observed in animals undergoing nerve ligation surgery without nerve injury. Gabapentin (50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly reduced thermal sensitivity to 10 and 44.5 °C in surgically naive animals as well as those undergoing spinal nerve ligation and spinal cord compression. In conclusion, an operant method of behavioral assessment was used to show that spinal nerve ligation and spinal cord compression produced increases in sensitivity to noxious cold and heat stimuli. A decrease in thermal sensitivity was observed following administration of gabapentin. The results achieved with these methods are consistent with the clinical profile of gabapentin in treating conditions of neuropathic pain.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of human spinal cord-derived neural precursor cells after transplantation to the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Emgård, Mia; Piao, Jinghua; Aineskog, Helena; Liu, Jia; Calzarossa, Cinzia; Odeberg, Jenny; Holmberg, Lena; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt; Bezubik, Bartosz; Vincent, Per Henrik; Falci, Scott P; Seiger, Åke; Åkesson, Elisabet; Sundström, Erik

    2014-03-01

    To validate human neural precursor cells (NPCs) as potential donor cells for transplantation therapy after spinal cord injury (SCI), we investigated the effect of NPCs, transplanted as neurospheres, in two different rat SCI models. Human spinal cord-derived NPCs (SC-NPCs) transplanted 9 days after spinal contusion injury enhanced hindlimb recovery, assessed by the BBB locomotor test. In spinal compression injuries, SC-NPCs transplanted immediately or after 1 week, but not 7 weeks after injury, significantly improved hindlimb recovery compared to controls. We could not detect signs of mechanical allodynia in transplanted rats. Four months after transplantation, we found more human cells in the host spinal cord than were transplanted, irrespective of the time of transplantation. There was no focal tumor growth. In all groups the vast majority of NPCs differentiated into astrocytes. Importantly, the number of surviving rat spinal cord neurons was highest in groups transplanted acutely and subacutely, which also showed the best hindlimb function. This suggests that transplanted SC-NPCs improve the functional outcome by a neuroprotective effect. We conclude that SC-NPCs reliably enhance the functional outcome after SCI if transplanted acutely or subacutely, without causing allodynia. This therapeutic effect is mainly the consequence of a neuroprotective effect of the SC-NPCs.

  6. Intramedullary spinal cord and leptomeningeal metastases from intracranial low-grade oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nipun; Nolan, Craig; Hirano, Miki; Young, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a patient with an intracranial low-grade oligodendroglioma who developed recurrence with an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis and multiple spinal leptomeningeal metastases. The intramedullary spinal cord metastasis showed mild enhancement similar to the original intracranial primary, while the multiple spinal leptomeningeal metastases revealed no enhancement. This is the seventh reported case of symptomatic intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a low-grade oligodendroglioma.

  7. 76 FR 71623 - Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review AGENCY.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0515).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey... Collection. Abstract: Information collected on VA Form 10-0515 will be used to determine spinal cord...

  8. Potential associations between chronic whiplash and incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew C.; Parrish, Todd B.; Hoggarth, Mark A.; McPherson, Jacob G.; Tysseling, Vicki M.; Wasielewski, Marie; Kim, Hyosub E.; Hornby, T. George; Elliott, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This research utilized a cross-sectional design with control group inclusion. Objectives Preliminary evidence suggests that a portion of the patient population with chronic whiplash may have sustained spinal cord damage. Our hypothesis is that in some cases of chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD), observed muscle weakness in the legs will be associated with local signs of a partial spinal cord injury of the cervical spine. Setting University based laboratory in Chicago, IL, USA. Methods Five participants with chronic WAD were compared with five gender/age/height/weight/body mass index (BMI) control participants. For a secondary investigation, the chronic WAD group was compared with five unmatched participants with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Spinal cord motor tract integrity was assessed using magnetization transfer imaging. Muscle fat infiltration (MFI) was quantified using fat/water separation magnetic resonance imaging. Central volitional muscle activation of the plantarflexors was assessed using a burst superimposition technique. Results We found reduced spinal cord motor tract integrity, increased MFI of the neck and lower extremity muscles and significantly impaired voluntary plantarflexor muscle activation in five participants with chronic WAD. The lower extremity structural changes and volitional weakness in chronic WAD were comparable to participants with iSCI. Conclusion The results support the position that a subset of the chronic whiplash population may have sustained partial damage to the spinal cord. Sponsorship NIH R01HD079076-01A1, NIH T32 HD057845 and the Foundation for Physical Therapy Promotion of Doctoral Studies program.

  9. Potential associations between chronic whiplash and incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew C.; Parrish, Todd B.; Hoggarth, Mark A.; McPherson, Jacob G.; Tysseling, Vicki M.; Wasielewski, Marie; Kim, Hyosub E.; Hornby, T. George; Elliott, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This research utilized a cross-sectional design with control group inclusion. Objectives Preliminary evidence suggests that a portion of the patient population with chronic whiplash may have sustained spinal cord damage. Our hypothesis is that in some cases of chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD), observed muscle weakness in the legs will be associated with local signs of a partial spinal cord injury of the cervical spine. Setting University based laboratory in Chicago, IL, USA. Methods Five participants with chronic WAD were compared with five gender/age/height/weight/body mass index (BMI) control participants. For a secondary investigation, the chronic WAD group was compared with five unmatched participants with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Spinal cord motor tract integrity was assessed using magnetization transfer imaging. Muscle fat infiltration (MFI) was quantified using fat/water separation magnetic resonance imaging. Central volitional muscle activation of the plantarflexors was assessed using a burst superimposition technique. Results We found reduced spinal cord motor tract integrity, increased MFI of the neck and lower extremity muscles and significantly impaired voluntary plantarflexor muscle activation in five participants with chronic WAD. The lower extremity structural changes and volitional weakness in chronic WAD were comparable to participants with iSCI. Conclusion The results support the position that a subset of the chronic whiplash population may have sustained partial damage to the spinal cord. Sponsorship NIH R01HD079076-01A1, NIH T32 HD057845 and the Foundation for Physical Therapy Promotion of Doctoral Studies program. PMID:27630770

  10. Cell therapy for spinal cord injury informed by electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Jack; Ye, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury devastates the CNS, besetting patients with symptoms including but not limited to: paralysis, autonomic nervous dysfunction, pain disorders and depression. Despite the identification of several molecular and genetic factors, a reliable regenerative therapy has yet to be produced for this terminal disease. Perhaps the missing piece of this puzzle will be discovered within endogenous electrotactic cellular behaviors. Neurons and stem cells both show mediated responses (growth rate, migration, differentiation) to electromagnetic waves, including direct current electric fields. This review analyzes the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury, the rationale for regenerative cell therapy and the evidence for directing cell therapy via electromagnetic waves shown by in vitro experiments.

  11. Rodent Models and Behavioral Outcomes of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Sydney A.; Schmidt, Christine E.; Schallert, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Rodent spinal cord injury (SCI) models have been developed to examine functional and physiological deficits after spinal cord injury with the hope that these models will elucidate information about human SCI. Models are needed to examine possible treatments and to understand histopathology after SCI; however, they should be considered carefully and chosen based on the goals of the study being performed. Contusion, compression, transection, and other models exist and have the potential to reveal important information about SCI that may be related to human SCI and the outcomes of treatment and timing of intervention. PMID:25309824

  12. Spinal cord response to laser treatment of injured peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Rochkind, S.; Vogler, I.; Barr-Nea, L. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors describe the changes occurring in the spinal cord of rats subjected to crush injury of the sciatic nerve followed by low-power laser irradiation of the injured nerve. Such laser treatment of the crushed peripheral nerve has been found to mitigate the degenerative changes in the corresponding neurons of the spinal cord and induce proliferation of neuroglia both in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. This suggests a higher metabolism in neurons and a better ability for myelin production under the influence of laser treatment.

  13. Exercise and sport for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Jörgensen, Sophie; Stapleton, Jessica

    2012-11-01

    This review article provides an overview of the evidence that links exercise and sports participation to physical and psychological well-being among people with spinal cord injury. Two aspects of physical well-being are examined, including the prevention of chronic disease and the promotion of physical fitness. Multiple aspects of psychosocial well-being are discussed, including mental health, social participation, and life satisfaction. The review concludes with future research recommendations and a discussion of challenges and opportunities for using exercise and sports to promote health and well-being among people living with spinal cord injury.

  14. [Spinal cord stimulation for the management of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Perruchoud, Christophe; Mariotti, Nicolas

    2016-06-22

    Neuromodulation techniques modify the activity of the central or peripheral nervous system. Spinal cord stimulation is a reversible and minimally invasive treatment whose efficacy and cost effectiveness are recognized for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain or ischemic pain. Spinal cord stimulation is not the option of last resort and should be considered among other options before prescribing long-term opioids or considering reoperation. The selection and regular follow-up of patients are crucial to the success of the therapy. PMID:27506068

  15. Cell therapy for spinal cord injury informed by electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Jack; Ye, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury devastates the CNS, besetting patients with symptoms including but not limited to: paralysis, autonomic nervous dysfunction, pain disorders and depression. Despite the identification of several molecular and genetic factors, a reliable regenerative therapy has yet to be produced for this terminal disease. Perhaps the missing piece of this puzzle will be discovered within endogenous electrotactic cellular behaviors. Neurons and stem cells both show mediated responses (growth rate, migration, differentiation) to electromagnetic waves, including direct current electric fields. This review analyzes the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury, the rationale for regenerative cell therapy and the evidence for directing cell therapy via electromagnetic waves shown by in vitro experiments. PMID:27599240

  16. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  17. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  18. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, remains underused. In the last 10 to 15 years, it has undergone constant technical advancement. This review gives an overview of the present practice of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain and current developments such as high-frequency stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation. PMID:25429237

  19. Comparative Analysis Between Thoracic Spinal Cord and Sacral Neuromodulation in a Rat Spinal Cord Injury Model: A Preliminary Report of a Rat Spinal Cord Stimulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kwon, Ji Woong; Yoon, Cheol-Yong; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to compare a neuroprotective effect of thoracic cord neuromodulation to that of sacral nerve neuromodulation in rat thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) model. Methods Twenty female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: the normal control group (n=5), SCI with sham stimulation group (SCI, n=5), SCI with electrical stimulation at thoracic spinal cord (SCI + TES, n=5), and SCI with electrical stimulation at sacral nerve (SCI + SES, n=5). Spinal cord was injured by an impactor which dropped from 25mm height. Electrical stimulation was performed by the following protocol: pulse duration, 0.1ms; frequency, 20 Hz; stimulation time, 30 minutes; and stimulation duration at thoracic epidural space and S2 or 3 neural foramina for 4 weeks. Locomotor function, urodynamic study, muscle weights, and fiber cross sectional area (CSA) were investigated. Results All rats of the SCI + TES group expired within 3 days after the injury. The locomotor function of all survived rats improved over time but there was no significant difference between the SCI and the SCI + SES group. All rats experienced urinary retention after the injury and recovered self-voiding after 3-9 days. Voiding contraction interval was 25.5±7.5 minutes in the SCI group, 16.5±5.3 minutes in the SCI+SES group, and 12.5±4.2 minutes in the control group. The recovery of voiding contraction interval was significant in the SCI + SES group comparing to the SCI group (p<0.05). Muscle weight and CSA were slightly greater in the SCI + SES than in the SCI group, but the difference was not significant. Conclusion We failed to establish a rat spinal cord stimulation model. However, sacral neuromodulation have a therapeutic potential to improve neurogenic bladder and muscle atrophy. PMID:24757451

  20. Complete rat spinal cord transection as a faithful model of spinal cord injury for translational cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lukovic, Dunja; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Lopez-Mocholi, Eric; Rodriguez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva; Oria, Marc; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Erceg, Slaven

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in neural loss and consequently motor and sensory impairment below the injury. There are currently no effective therapies for the treatment of traumatic SCI in humans. Various animal models have been developed to mimic human SCI. Widely used animal models of SCI are complete or partial transection or experimental contusion and compression, with both bearing controversy as to which one more appropriately reproduces the human SCI functional consequences. Here we present in details the widely used procedure of complete spinal cord transection as a faithful animal model to investigate neural and functional repair of the damaged tissue by exogenous human transplanted cells. This injury model offers the advantage of complete damage to a spinal cord at a defined place and time, is relatively simple to standardize and is highly reproducible. PMID:25860664

  1. Complete rat spinal cord transection as a faithful model of spinal cord injury for translational cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lukovic, Dunja; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Lopez-Mocholi, Eric; Rodriguez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva; Oria, Marc; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Erceg, Slaven

    2015-04-10

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in neural loss and consequently motor and sensory impairment below the injury. There are currently no effective therapies for the treatment of traumatic SCI in humans. Various animal models have been developed to mimic human SCI. Widely used animal models of SCI are complete or partial transection or experimental contusion and compression, with both bearing controversy as to which one more appropriately reproduces the human SCI functional consequences. Here we present in details the widely used procedure of complete spinal cord transection as a faithful animal model to investigate neural and functional repair of the damaged tissue by exogenous human transplanted cells. This injury model offers the advantage of complete damage to a spinal cord at a defined place and time, is relatively simple to standardize and is highly reproducible.

  2. Diffuse and persistent blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after contusive spinal cord injury rapidly recovers following intravenous infusion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Takashi; Lankford, Karen L; Arroyo, Edgardo J; Sasaki, Masanori; Neyazi, Milad; Radtke, Christine; Kocsis, Jeffery D

    2015-05-01

    Intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to reduce the severity of experimental spinal cord injury (SCI), but mechanisms are not fully understood. One important consequence of SCI is damage to the microvasculature and disruption of the blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB). In the present study we induced a contusive SCI at T9 in the rat and studied the effects of intravenous MSC infusion on BSCB permeability, microvascular architecture and locomotor recovery over a 10week period. Intravenously delivered MSCs could not be identified in the spinal cord, but distributed primarily to the lungs where they survived for a couple of days. Spatial and temporal changes in BSCB integrity were assessed by intravenous infusions of Evans blue (EvB) with in vivo and ex vivo optical imaging and spectrophotometric quantitation of EvB leakage into the parenchyma. SCI resulted in prolonged BSCB leakage that was most severe at the impact site but disseminated extensively rostral and caudal to the lesion over 6weeks. Contused spinal cords also showed an increase in vessel size, reduced vessel number, dissociation of pericytes from microvessels and decreases in von Willebrand factor (vWF) and endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) expression. In MSC-treated rats, BSCB leakage was reduced, vWF expression was increased and locomotor function improved beginning 1 week post-MSC infusion, i.e., 2weeks post-SCI. These results suggest that intravenously delivered MSCs have important effects on reducing BSCB leakage which could contribute to their therapeutic efficacy.

  3. Behavioral and histological characterization of unilateral cervical spinal cord contusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gensel, John C; Tovar, C Amy; Hamers, Frank P T; Deibert, Rochelle J; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2006-01-01

    Most experimental studies of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats damage the thoracic cord, with the consequent functional loss being due to interruption of long tracts connecting the caudal spinal cord to the rostral nervous system. Less work has been done evaluating injury to the cervical cord, even though it is the most common level of human SCI. In addition to the long tracts, the cervical spinal cord contains the sensory and motor neurons responsible for upper extremity function. The purpose of this study was to further develop a rat model of cervical spinal cord contusion injury using a modified NYU/MASCIS weight drop device. Mild (6.25 mm) and moderate (12.5 mm) C5 unilateral injuries were produced. Behavioral recovery was examined using a grooming test, a paw preference test, a walkway test (The Catwalk), and a horizontal ladder test. Histological outcome measures included sparing at the lesion epicenter, sparing throughout the extent of the lesion, quantification of myelin loss rostral and caudal to the lesion, and motor neuron counts. Compared to controls, animals receiving SCI exhibited injury severity-specific deficits in forelimb, locomotor, and hindlimb function persisting for 6-weeks post-SCI. Histological analysis revealed ipsilateral containment of the injury, and differentiation between groups on all measures except motor neuron counts. This model has many advantages: (1) minimal animal care requirements post-SCI, (2) within subject controls, (3) functional loss involves primarily the ipsilateral forelimb, and (4) it is a behavioral and histological model for both gray and white matter damage caused by contusive SCI. PMID:16430371

  4. Spinal cord pathways involved in initiation of swimming in the stingray, Dasyatis sabina: spinal cord stimulation and lesions.

    PubMed

    Williams, B J; Livingston, C A; Leonard, R B

    1984-03-01

    In spinally transected stingrays, electrical stimulation of a site just ventral to the dorsal root entry zone or a site in the intermediate portions of the lateral funiculus produced rhythmic swimming like movements of the contralateral pectoral fin. Electromyographic (EMG) records collected during cord-stimulated rhythms had the same pattern of activity and sometimes the same intersegmental coordination as those collected during spontaneous swimming of the same animal. In paralyzed, high-spinal stingrays, the only stimulation sites that produced rhythmic activity (fictive swimming) in the pectoral fin motor nerves were in the intermediate portion of the lateral funiculus. The evoked rhythm occurred in the motor nerves that were contralateral to the stimulated side of the spinal cord. The effects of subtotal lesions of the rostral spinal cord on spontaneous swimming behavior were assessed by analysis of EMG records taken before and after the lesions were made. Severe deficits in swimming occurred after bilateral ablation of intermediate portions of the lateral funiculi. In agreement with previous results, the stimulation experiments indicate that the stingray spinal cord contains an inherent capacity to generate properly coordinated rhythmic swimming. The current experiments also suggest that the descending pathways(s) that normally functions to initiate swimming projects through the intermediate aspects of the lateral funiculi. PMID:6699678

  5. Augmentation of Voluntary Locomotor Activity by Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation in Motor-Incomplete Spinal Cord-Injured Individuals.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Krenn, Matthias; Danner, Simon M; Hofer, Christian; Kern, Helmut; McKay, William B; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The level of sustainable excitability within lumbar spinal cord circuitries is one of the factors determining the functional outcome of locomotor therapy after motor-incomplete spinal cord injury. Here, we present initial data using noninvasive transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) to modulate this central state of excitability during voluntary treadmill stepping in three motor-incomplete spinal cord-injured individuals. Stimulation was applied at 30 Hz with an intensity that generated tingling sensations in the lower limb dermatomes, yet without producing muscle reflex activity. This stimulation changed muscle activation, gait kinematics, and the amount of manual assistance required from the therapists to maintain stepping with some interindividual differences. The effect on motor outputs during treadmill-stepping was essentially augmentative and step-phase dependent despite the invariant tonic stimulation. The most consistent modification was found in the gait kinematics, with the hip flexion during swing increased by 11.3° ± 5.6° across all subjects. This preliminary work suggests that tSCS provides for a background increase in activation of the lumbar spinal locomotor circuitry that has partially lost its descending drive. Voluntary inputs and step-related feedback build upon the stimulation-induced increased state of excitability in the generation of locomotor activity. Thus, tSCS essentially works as an electrical neuroprosthesis augmenting remaining motor control.

  6. From classical to current: analyzing peripheral nervous system and spinal cord lineage and fate

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Samantha J.; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2015-01-01

    During vertebrate development, the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS) arise from the neural plate. Cells at the margin of the neural plate give rise to neural crest cells, which migrate extensively throughout the embryo, contributing to the majority of neurons and all of the glia of the PNS. The rest of the neural plate invaginates to form the neural tube, which expands to form the brain and spinal cord. The emergence of molecular cloning techniques and identification of fluorophores like Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), together with transgenic and electroporation technologies, have made it possible to easily visualize the cellular and molecular events in play during nervous system formation. These lineage-tracing techniques have precisely demonstrated the migratory pathways followed by neural crest cells and increased knowledge about their differentiation into PNS derivatives. Similarly, in the spinal cord, lineage-tracing techniques have led to a greater understanding of the regional organization of multiple classes of neural progenitor and post-mitotic neurons along the different axes of the spinal cord and how these distinct classes of neurons assemble into the specific neural circuits required to realize their various functions. Here, we review how both classical and modern lineage and marker analyses have expanded our knowledge of early peripheral nervous system and spinal cord development. PMID:25446276

  7. Panax notoginseng saponins improve recovery after spinal cord transection by upregulating neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Yu; Li, Xuan-Peng; Li, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng are neuroprotective, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In the present study, we established a rat model of thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection, and injected Panax notoginseng saponins (100 mg/kg) or saline 30 minutes after injury. Locomotor functions were assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale from 1 to 30 days after injury, and immunohistochemistry was carried out in the ventral horn of the spinal cord at 1 and 7 days to determine expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our results show that at 7-30 days post injury, the BBB score was higher in rats treated with Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. Furthermore, at 7 days, more NGF- and BDNF-immunoreactive neurons were observed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord of rats that had received Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. These results indicate that Panax notoginseng saponins caused an upregulation of NGF and BDNF in rats with spinal cord transection, and improved hindlimb motor function. PMID:26487862

  8. Double labeling serial sections to enhance three-dimensional imaging of injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Duerstock, Bradley S

    2004-03-15

    A method of double labeling a set of serial histological sections was performed to produce multiple three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from the same segment of injured spinal cord. Alternate groups of consecutive histological sections were stained with Luxol fast blue with cresyl violet and Mallory's trichrome in order to reconstruct two different 3D images that reveal different pathological features of the same 1-month-old compression spinal cord injury. Three-dimensional visualization of the two reconstructions was accomplished using an isocontouring algorithm that automatically extracts surfaces of features of interest based on pixel intensity. The two 3D reconstructions demonstrated the sparing of myelinated nerve fibers and the composition of neuroglia through the chronic lesion of an adult guinea pig. The 3D images provided a comprehensive and explicit view of a chronically injured spinal cord that is not possible by the inspection of two-dimensional (2D) histological sections or from magnetic resonance imaging. Using every histological section, we believe this double labeling 3D reconstruction technique provides a more enhanced and accurate visualization of the entire spinal cord lesion than has been possible before. Furthermore, we contend that this double labeling technique can further elucidate the histopathological events of secondary injury at different time points post-injury by using different combinations of complementary histological makers.

  9. Enhanced Functional Recovery in MRL/MpJ Mice after Spinal Cord Dorsal Hemisection

    PubMed Central

    Thuret, Sandrine; Thallmair, Michaela; Horky, Laura L.; Gage, Fred H.

    2012-01-01

    Adult MRL/MpJ mice have been shown to possess unique regeneration capabilities. They are able to heal an ear-punched hole or an injured heart with normal tissue architecture and without scar formation. Here we present functional and histological evidence for enhanced recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) in MRL/MpJ mice. A control group (C57BL/6 mice) and MRL/MpJ mice underwent a dorsal hemisection at T9 (thoracic vertebra 9). Our data show that MRL/MpJ mice recovered motor function significantly faster and more completely. We observed enhanced regeneration of the corticospinal tract (CST). Furthermore, we observed a reduced astrocytic response and fewer micro-cavities at the injury site, which appear to create a more growth-permissive environment for the injured axons. Our data suggest that the reduced astrocytic response is in part due to a lower lesion-induced increase of cell proliferation post-SCI, and a reduced astrocytic differentiation of the proliferating cells. Interestingly, we also found an increased number of proliferating microglia, which could be involved in the MRL/MpJ spinal cord repair mechanisms. Finally, to evaluate the molecular basis of faster spinal cord repair, we examined the difference in gene expression changes in MRL/MpJ and C57BL/6 mice after SCI. Our microarray data support our histological findings and reveal a transcriptional profile associated with a more efficient spinal cord repair in MRL/MpJ mice. PMID:22348029

  10. Panax notoginseng saponins improve recovery after spinal cord transection by upregulating neurotrophic factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Li, Yu; Li, Xuan-peng; Li, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng are neuroprotective, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In the present study, we established a rat model of thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection, and injected Panax notoginseng saponins (100 mg/kg) or saline 30 minutes after injury. Locomotor functions were assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale from 1 to 30 days after injury, and immunohistochemistry was carried out in the ventral horn of the spinal cord at 1 and 7 days to determine expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our results show that at 7–30 days post injury, the BBB score was higher in rats treated with Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. Furthermore, at 7 days, more NGF- and BDNF-immunoreactive neurons were observed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord of rats that had received Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. These results indicate that Panax notoginseng saponins caused an upregulation of NGF and BDNF in rats with spinal cord transection, and improved hindlimb motor function. PMID:26487862

  11. Neuroprotective role of hydralazine in rat spinal cord injury-attenuation of acrolein-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonghyuck; Zheng, Lingxing; Marquis, Andrew; Walls, Michael; Duerstock, Brad; Pond, Amber; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Wang, He; Ouyang, Zheng; Shi, Riyi

    2014-04-01

    Acrolein, an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde and a reactive product of lipid peroxidation, has been suggested as a key factor in neural post-traumatic secondary injury in spinal cord injury (SCI), mainly based on in vitro and ex vivo evidence. Here, we demonstrate an increase of acrolein up to 300%; the elevation lasted at least 2 weeks in a rat SCI model. More importantly, hydralazine, a known acrolein scavenger can provide neuroprotection when applied systemically. Besides effectively reducing acrolein, hydralazine treatment also resulted in significant amelioration of tissue damage, motor deficits, and neuropathic pain. This effect was further supported by demonstrating the ability of hydralazine to reach spinal cord tissue at a therapeutic level following intraperitoneal application. This suggests that hydralazine is an effective neuroprotective agent not only in vitro, but in a live animal model of SCI as well. Finally, the role of acrolein in SCI was further validated by the fact that acrolein injection into the spinal cord caused significant SCI-like tissue damage and motor deficits. Taken together, available evidence strongly suggests a critical causal role of acrolein in the pathogenesis of spinal cord trauma. Since acrolein has been linked to a variety of illness and conditions, we believe that acrolein-scavenging measures have the potential to be expanded significantly ensuring a broad impact on human health.

  12. Spatial Elucidation of Spinal Cord Lipid- and Metabolite- Regulations in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2014-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, rapidly progressing disease of the central nervous system that is characterized by motor neuron degeneration in the brain stem and the spinal cord. We employed time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to profile spatial lipid- and metabolite- regulations in post mortem human spinal cord tissue from ALS patients to investigate chemical markers of ALS pathogenesis. ToF-SIMS scans and multivariate analysis of image and spectral data were performed on thoracic human spinal cord sections. Multivariate statistics of the image data allowed delineation of anatomical regions of interest based on their chemical identity. Spectral data extracted from these regions were compared using two different approaches for multivariate statistics, for investigating ALS related lipid and metabolite changes. The results show a significant decrease for cholesterol, triglycerides, and vitamin E in the ventral horn of ALS samples, which is presumably a consequence of motor neuron degeneration. Conversely, the biogenic mediator lipid lysophosphatidylcholine and its fragments were increased in ALS ventral spinal cord, pointing towards neuroinflammatory mechanisms associated with neuronal cell death. ToF-SIMS imaging is a promising approach for chemical histology and pathology for investigating the subcellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  13. Absence of gliosis in a teleost model of spinal cord regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vitalo, Antonia G; Sîrbulescu, Ruxandra F; Ilieş, Iulian; Zupanc, Günther K H

    2016-06-01

    Among the cellular processes that follow injury to the central nervous system, glial scar formation is thought to be one of the major factors that prevent regeneration. In regeneration-competent organisms, glial scar formation has been a matter of controversy. We addressed this issue by examining the glial population after spinal cord injury in a model of regeneration competency, the knifefish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Analysis of spinal cord sections immunostained against the glial markers glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan failed to produce any evidence for the formation of a glial scar in the area of the lesion at post-injury survival times ranging from 5 to 185 days. This result was independent of the lesion paradigm applied-amputation of the caudal part of the spinal cord or hemisection lesioning-and similar after examination of transverse and longitudinal sections. We hypothesize that the well-developed network of radial glia in both the intact and the injured spinal cord provides a support system for regeneration of tissue lost to injury. This glial network is likely also involved in the generation of new cells, as indicated by the large subset of glial fibrillary acidic protein-labeled glia that express the stem cell marker Sox2. PMID:27225982

  14. [Spinal cord ischemia following subrenal aortic clamping].

    PubMed

    Battisti, G; Marigliani, M; Stio, F; Iavarone, C

    1990-01-01

    The paraplegia caused by an aortic clamping just below the Renal artery is a rare but very complication in aortic surgery. Such a complication is even rarer if we consider the few cases reported in literature following a reconstructive surgery for occlusive chronic diseases of aortiliac axes. The authors have studied the case of a patient bearing the syndrome of Leriche; this one had an aortic clamping below the kidney and soon after developed an acute ischaemic syndrome below the spinal medulla with flaccid paraparesis, anal and vesical sphincteric diseases and persistence of deep tactile sensibility. After a reconstruction of vascular anatomy of the medulla they emphasize the importance, in such a disease, of the "arteria radicularis magna" of Adamkievicz and its place of origin. After they discuss the severe physioopathologic moments that are connected: with the direct ischaemia following aortic clamping in the cases where the arteria radicularis magna rises at a level lower than the clamping itself; with the embolism or thrombosis caused by surgical manipulation peroperatively (it might be the cause of paraplegia more frequent in aneurysmectomia surgery); with the severe hypotension per- and post operatively for the existence of arteriosclerotic disease of the lumbar arteries. Finally they analyses preoperatively diagnostic possibilities and per operatively methods used in preventing this sort of complication.

  15. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life(1), this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques(1). Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections(1). PMID:27078037

  16. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C.; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life1, this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques1. Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections1. PMID:27078037

  17. Transcutaneous electrical spinal-cord stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gerasimenko, Yury; Gorodnichev, Ruslan; Moshonkina, Tatiana; Sayenko, Dimitry; Gad, Parag; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2016-01-01

    Locomotor behavior is controlled by specific neural circuits called central pattern generators primarily located at the lumbosacral spinal cord. These locomotor-related neuronal circuits have a high level of automaticity; that is, they can produce a “stepping” movement pattern also seen on electromyography (EMG) in the absence of supraspinal and/or peripheral afferent inputs. These circuits can be modulated by epidural spinal-cord stimulation and/or pharmacological intervention. Such interventions have been used to neuromodulate the neuronal circuits in patients with motor-complete spinal-cord injury (SCI) to facilitate postural and locomotor adjustments and to regain voluntary motor control. Here, we describe a novel non-invasive stimulation strategy of painless transcutaneous electrical enabling motor control (pcEmc) to neuromodulate the physiological state of the spinal cord. The technique can facilitate a stepping performance in non-injured subjects with legs placed in a gravity-neutral position. The stepping movements were induced more effectively with multi-site than single-site spinal-cord stimulation. From these results, a multielectrode surface array technology was developed. Our preliminary data indicate that use of the multielectrode surface array can fine-tune the control of the locomotor behavior. As well, the pcEmc strategy combined with exoskeleton technology is effective for improving motor function in paralyzed patients with SCI. The potential impact of using pcEmc to neuromodulate the spinal circuitry has significant implications for furthering our understanding of the mechanisms controlling locomotion and for rehabilitating sensorimotor function even after severe SCI. PMID:26205686

  18. Autoregulation of spinal cord blood flow: is the cord a microcosm of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, R.; Albin, M.S.; Bunegin, L.; Gelineau, J.

    1986-11-01

    The autoregulatory capability of regional areas of the brain and spinal cord was demonstrated in 18 rats anesthetized with a continuous infusion of intravenous pentothal. Blood flow was measured by the injection of radioactive microspheres (Co57, Sn113, Ru103, Sc46). Blood flow measurements were made at varying levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP) which was altered by neosynephrine to raise MAP or trimethaphan to lower MAP. Autoregulation of the spinal cord mirrored that of the brain, with an autoregulatory range of 60 to 120 mm Hg for both tissues. Within this range, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was 59.2 +/- 3.2 ml/100 g/min (SEM) and spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) was 61.1 +/- 3.6. There was no significant difference in CBF and SCBF in the autoregulatory range. Autoregulation was also demonstrated regionally in the left cortex, right cortex, brainstem, thalamus, cerebellum, hippocampus and cervical, thoracic and lumbar cord. This data provides a coherent reference point in establishing autoregulatory curves under barbiturate anesthesia. Further investigation of the effects of other anesthetic agents on autoregulation of the spinal cord is needed. It is possible that intraspinal cord compliance, like intracranial compliance, might be adversely affected by the effects of anesthetics on autoregulation.

  19. Incidence of Secondary Complications in Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, C. A.; Shepherd, C.

    1996-01-01

    Data from 348 patients (mean age 37) with postacute spinal cord injury revealed that 95% reported at least 1 secondary problem, and 58% reported 3 or more. The number and severity of complications varied with time since the injury. Obesity, pain, spasticity, urinary tract infections, pressure sores, and lack of social integration were common…

  20. Employment after Spinal Cord Injury: Transition and Life Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, J. Stuart

    1996-01-01

    Tested two competing hypotheses regarding employment, adjustment, and spinal cord injury (SCI). Longitudinal data collected on 142 participants with SCI on two occasions separated by an 11-year interval showed a correlation between enhanced adjustment and a positive transition from unemployment to employment. Results support hypothesis that…

  1. The Relationship between Productivity and Adjustment Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Examined adjustment and productivity of persons (N=344) with spinal cord injuries. Found 45 percent of subjects gainfully employed, 14 percent engaged in unpaid productive activities, 41 percent not engaged in any productive activities. Employed subjects had best overall adjustment. Injury level was not related to level of productive activity,…

  2. Drinking Patterns, Drinking Expectancies, and Coping after Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Drinking patterns, alcohol expectancies, and coping strategies were assessed for 121 persons with recent spinal cord injuries during hospitalization, 3 months after surgery, and 12 months after surgery. Although the rate of heavy drinking decreased, preinjury problem drinkers still had the lowest rate of positive reappraisal, problem solving, and…

  3. Vocational Interests of Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohe, Daniel E.; Athelstan, Gary T.

    1982-01-01

    Studied vocational interests of persons with spinal cord injury. Using the Strong Campbell Interest Inventory, participants' scores were compared to norms for men and women in general on the inventory. Showed their interests were often incongruent with their physical limitations and suggested that counselors must assist in identifying vocational…

  4. Perceptions of Positive Attitudes toward People with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lys, K.; Pernice, R.

    1995-01-01

    This New Zealand study examined attitudes toward persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) via a survey of 35 people with SCI, 27 SCI rehabilitation workers, 16 outpatient hospital rehabilitation workers, and 37 people from the general population. Results were analyzed in terms of age, ethnic identity, gender, professional training, and amount of…

  5. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  6. Social Support, Stress, and Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds, James B; And Others

    Social support has been considered an important coping resource moderating the stress associated with physical illness and disability. The role of social support as a buffering agent for stressful life events inherent in physical illness and disability was examined in 78 individuals with spinal cord injury, residing in community settings in…

  7. Sexual Counseling with Spinal Cord-Injured Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Donald K.

    1975-01-01

    Spinal cord-injured clients have many fears and misapprehensions about their sexual functioning. Such misapprehensions can be helped by the counselor's willingness to discuss sexual issues openly. Clients need a clear and accurate picture of the facts, as well as encouragement and support to help them rediscover their sexuality. (Author)

  8. Sexuality in Spinal-Cord-Injured High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Anne Louise

    1982-01-01

    Presents facts, literature, and organization sources on the sexual functioning of spinal-cord-injured persons. Suggests using this information in counseling situations. Urges counselors to help their clients reach sexual maturity by speaking frankly about sexuality and expressing affection, and by accepting their sexual behavior as normal. (JAC)

  9. The Rehabilitation of the Spinal Cord-Injured Street Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coven, Arnold B.; Glazeroff, Herbert

    1978-01-01

    The spinal cord-injured street person is especially resistant to rehabilitation. His life style is characterized by the use of physical power and mobility to survive and gain respect. He loses this main form of control and attempts to manipulate the treatment environment to care for him while he avoids confronting his disability. (Author)

  10. [Devic disease associated with isolated spinal cord atrophy].

    PubMed

    Landragin, N; Jeanjean, L; Bouly, S; Honnorat, J; de Sèze, J; Castelnovo, G; Labauge, P

    2007-12-01

    Devic disease is a rare entity characterized by bilateral optic neuritis and transverse myelitis. Recently, recognition of antibody activity (Anti NMO) led to broaden the clinical and MR phenotype spectrum of this disease. This report is about a patient with spinal cord atrophy and bilateral optic neuritis, occurring more than 8 years after symptom onset. PMID:18355472

  11. Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes regeneration after adult zebrafish spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Strand, Nicholas S; Hoi, Kimberly K; Phan, Tien M T; Ray, Catherine A; Berndt, Jason D; Moon, Randall T

    2016-09-01

    Unlike mammals, zebrafish can regenerate their injured spinal cord and regain control of caudal tissues. It was recently shown that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for spinal cord regeneration in the larval zebrafish. However, the molecular mechanisms of regeneration may or may not be conserved between larval and adult zebrafish. To test this, we assessed the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. We show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is increased after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. Moreover, overexpression of Dkk1b inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the regenerating spinal cord of adult zebrafish. Dkk1b overexpression also inhibited locomotor recovery, axon regeneration, and glial bridge formation in the injured spinal cord. Thus, our data illustrate a conserved role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adult and larval zebrafish spinal cord regeneration.

  12. Cell Therapy Augments Functional Recovery Subsequent to Spinal Cord Injury under Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Tharion, George; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord injury leads to enervation of normal tissue homeostasis ultimately leading to paralysis. Until now there is no proper cure for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, cell therapy in animal spinal cord injury models has shown some progress of recovery. At present, clinical trials are under progress to evaluate the efficacy of cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Different types of cells such as pluripotent stem cells derived neural cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, neural stem cells, glial cells are being tested in various spinal cord injury models. In this review we highlight both the advances and lacuna in the field of spinal cord injury by discussing epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular mechanism, and various cell therapy strategies employed in preclinical and clinical injury models and finally we discuss the limitations and ethical issues involved in cell therapy approach for treating spinal cord injury. PMID:26240569

  13. Safety and Efficacy of At-Home Robotic Locomotion Therapy in Individuals with Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective, Pre-Post Intervention, Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Rüdiger; Schließmann, Daniel; Plewa, Harry; Schuld, Christian; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Weidner, Norbert; Hofer, Eberhard P.; Knestel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background The compact Motorized orthosis for home rehabilitation of Gait (MoreGait) was developed for continuation of locomotion training at home. MoreGait generates afferent stimuli of walking with the user in a semi-supine position and provides feedback about deviations from the reference walking pattern. Objective Prospective, pre-post intervention, proof-of-concept study to test the feasibility of an unsupervised home-based application of five MoreGait prototypes in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Methods Twenty-five (5 tetraplegia, 20 paraplegia) participants with chronic (mean time since injury: 5.8 ± 5.4 (standard deviation, SD) years) sensorimotor iSCI (7 ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) C, 18 AIS D; Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI II): Interquartile range 9 to 16) completed the training (45 minutes / day, at least 4 days / week, 8 weeks). Baseline status was documented 4 and 2 weeks before and at training onset. Training effects were assessed after 4 and 8 weeks of therapy. Results After therapy, 9 of 25 study participants improved with respect to the dependency on walking aids assessed by the WISCI II. For all individuals, the short-distance walking velocity measured by the 10-Meter Walk Test showed significant improvements compared to baseline (100%) for both self-selected (Mean 139.4% ± 35.5% (SD)) and maximum (Mean 143.1% ± 40.6% (SD)) speed conditions as well as the endurance estimated with the six-minute walk test (Mean 166.6% ± 72.1% (SD)). One device-related adverse event (pressure sore on the big toe) occurred in over 800 training sessions. Conclusions Home-based robotic locomotion training with MoreGait is feasible and safe. The magnitude of functional improvements achieved by MoreGait in individuals with iSCI is well within the range of complex locomotion robots used in hospitals. Thus, unsupervised MoreGait training potentially represents an option to prolong effective training aiming at recovery of locomotor

  14. Spinal epidural angiolipoma: A rare cause of spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Rajesh K; Koti, Kalyan; Dandamudi, Srinivas

    2012-09-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare, benign tumors composed of mature lipocytes admixed with abnormal blood vessels. Only 128 cases of spinal epidural angiolipomas have been reported in literature till now. Spinal angiolipomas are predominantly located in the mid-thoracic region. We report a case of dorsal epidural angiolipoma in a 56-year-old male who presented with paraparesis and was diagnosed to have D4-5 epidural angiolipoma. Total surgical excision of the epidural angiolipoma was done and his paraparesis gradually improved.

  15. Biomechanical responses to open experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hung, T K; Albin, M S; Brown, T D; Bunegin, L; Albin, R; Jannetta, P J

    1975-08-01

    This study evaluates the dynamic biomechanical responses of the cat spinal cord during experimental impact injury. Temporal deformations of the laminectomized spinal cord were recorded by a high speed camera (1500-3000 frames/sec). The cinematograph revealed large deformations, the cord being compressed to half its posterior-anterior diameter 7 msec after the onset of the impact. Peak impact force produced by a 20 gm mass falling from 15 cm height (300 GCF) averaged about 1.2 pounds, and the corresponding stress acting on the dural surface reached 42 pounds per square inch (or 2200 mm Hg). Both positive and negative pressure waves were found to be propagated in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  16. Radionuclide assessment of heterotopic ossification in spinal cord injury patients

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, V.

    1983-01-01

    Whole body /sup 99m/T-pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained and correlated with skeletal radiographs for detection of heterotopic ossification in 135 spinal injury patients. There were 40 patients with recent injury (less than 6 months) and 95 with injury of over 6 months duration. Heterotopic new bone was detected on the bone scan in 33.7% of 95 patients with spinal cord injuries of more than 6 months duration and 30% of 40 patients with injuries of less than 6 months. The radionuclide scan was found to be useful in detection of heterotopic ossification at its early stage and in its differentiation from other complications in spinal cord injury patients.

  17. Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerve Root Involvement (Myeloradiculopathy) in Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rahul; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most of the information about spinal cord and nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is available in the form of isolated case reports or case series. In this article, we evaluated the incidence, predictors, and prognostic impact of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis. In this prospective study, 71 consecutive patients of newly diagnosed tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. In addition to clinical evaluation, patients were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain and spine. Patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Out of 71 patients, 33 (46.4%) had symptoms/signs of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement, 22 (30.9%) of whom had symptoms/signs at enrolment. Eleven (15.4%) patients had paradoxical involvement. Paraparesis was present in 22 (31%) patients, which was of upper motor neuron type in 6 (8.4%) patients, lower motor neuron type in 10 (14%) patients, and mixed type in 6 (8.4%) patients. Quadriparesis was present in 3 (4.2%) patients. The most common finding on spinal MRI was meningeal enhancement, seen in 40 (56.3%) patients; in 22 (30.9%), enhancement was present in the lumbosacral region. Other MRI abnormalities included myelitis in 16 (22.5%), tuberculoma in 4 (5.6%), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) loculations in 4 (5.6%), cord atrophy in 3 (4.2%), and syrinx in 2 (2.8%) patients. The significant predictor associated with myeloradiculopathy was raised CSF protein (>250 mg/dL). Myeloradiculopathy was significantly associated with poor outcome. In conclusion, spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is common. Markedly raised CSF protein is an important predictor. Patients with myeloradiculopathy have poor outcome. PMID:25621686

  18. [Role of MRI in spinal and spinal cord emergencies].

    PubMed

    Tourrette, J H; Le Vot, J; Solacroup, J C; Léonetti, P; Muyard, B; Gueguen, E; Clavel, G; Colineau, X; Abony, E

    1995-08-01

    Out of 137 cases concerning the spine and spine cord, the authors demonstrate that MRI is nowadays fully integrated in urgency investigations. In all cord compression suspicions and in spine trauma investigations, it's place is found. Coil and software improvements allow to put CT and MR scanning delays on a line. This study underlines the necessity of being equipped with non magnetic life support systems allowing management of very fragile patients. In traumas, MR provides the lesion's authentification, it's type, it's unique localisation or not, and therefore an early functional prognosis. The discovery of spine cord involving lesions in neoplastic conditions allows to follow a therapeutic strateging for maintaining the motor function. In the end, the authors discuss about practical utility of MR in scuba diving decompression accidents. No lesion of the spine cord has been demonstrated in 25 patients, probably because of technical insufficiency.

  19. Intramedullary solitary fibrous tumor of dorsal spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ciappetta, Pasqualino; D'Urso, Pietro Ivo; Cimmino, Antonia; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Rossi, Roberta; Colamaria, Antonio; D'Urso, Oscar Fernando

    2010-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are rare neoplasms of mesenchymal origin involving soft tissues, mainly serosal sites; the spinal cord location is uncommon. We report a case of SFT occurring in the thoracic spinal cord, discussing histological, ultrastructural and molecular aspects. A 75-year-old woman with an MRI suggesting a dorsal intracanalar lesion was admitted to our institution. T5-T7 laminectomies were performed and an intramedullary tumor was discovered. The tumor arose within the spinal cord and was completely removed. Tumor samples were processed for histological, ultrastructural and molecular analysis (comparative genomic hybridization [CGH], methylation status of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase [MGMT], p16, deleted in colorectal cancer [DCC] and death-associated protein kinase 1 [DAPK1]). The histological examination demonstrated a proliferation of spindle-shaped cells with a collagen-matrix background. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for vimentin and CD34 and negative for S-100 and epithelial membrane antigen. A histological diagnosis of SFT was made. The ultrastructural examination showed undifferentiated cells within a collagenous matrix and sparse extravascular basement membrane. CGH analysis revealed deletion of 9p21 and losses on 2q, 3p, 16q and 19q and gains on 7q; furthermore, no aberrant methylation pattern was found in the promoter region of MGMT, p16, DCC and DAPK1 genes. On the second-year follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact. The occurrence of SFT within the spinal cord parenchyma and its histological characteristics demonstrate that SFTs are not restricted to serosal surfaces. The course of spinal cord SFT is unknown and long-term follow-up is necessary. The histological, ultrastructural and molecular findings are important for the diagnosis and the authors provide a literature review of these aspects.

  20. The Dual Cyclooxygenase/5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor Licofelone Attenuates P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Drug Resistance in the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Dulin, Jennifer N.; Moore, Meredith L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract There are currently no proven effective treatments that can improve recovery of function in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Many therapeutic compounds have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but clinical trials have been largely unsuccessful. P-glycoprotein (Pgp, Abcb1b) is a drug efflux transporter of the blood–spinal cord barrier that limits spinal cord penetration of blood-borne xenobiotics. Pathological Pgp upregulation in diseases such as cancer causes heightened resistance to a broad variety of therapeutic drugs. Importantly, several drugs that have been evaluated for the treatment of SCI, such as riluzole, are known substrates of Pgp. We therefore examined whether Pgp-mediated pharmacoresistance diminishes delivery of riluzole to the injured spinal cord. Following moderate contusion injury at T10 in male Sprague–Dawley rats, we observed a progressive, spatial spread of increased Pgp expression from 3 days to 10 months post-SCI. Spinal cord uptake of i.p.-delivered riluzole was significantly reduced following SCI in wild type but not Abcb1a-knockout rats, highlighting a critical role for Pgp in mediating drug resistance following SCI. Because inflammation can drive Pgp upregulation, we evaluated the ability of the new generation dual anti-inflammatory drug licofelone to promote spinal cord delivery of riluzole following SCI. We found that licofelone both reduced Pgp expression and enhanced riluzole bioavailability within the lesion site at 72 h post-SCI. This work highlights Pgp-mediated drug resistance as an important obstacle to therapeutic drug delivery for SCI, and suggests licofelone as a novel combinatorial treatment strategy to enhance therapeutic drug delivery to the injured spinal cord. PMID:22947335

  1. Recovery from Chronic Spinal Cord Contusion after Nogo Receptor Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Duffy, Philip; McGee, Aaron W.; Hasan, Omar; Gould, Grahame; Tu, Nathan; Harel, Noam Y.; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; Weinzimmer, David; Ropchan, Jim; Benowitz, Larry I.; Cafferty, William B. J.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Several interventions promote axonal growth and functional recovery when initiated shortly after CNS injury, including blockade of myelin-derived inhibitors with soluble Nogo Receptor (NgR1, RTN4R) ‘decoy’ protein. We examined the efficacy of this intervention in the much more prevalent and refractory condition of chronic spinal cord injury. Methods We eliminated the NgR1 pathway genetically in mice by conditional gene targeting starting 8 weeks after spinal hemisection injury and monitored locomotion in the open field and by video kinematics over the ensuing 4 months. In a separate pharmacological experiment, intrathecal NgR1 decoy protein administration was initiated 3 months after spinal cord contusion injury. Locomotion and raphespinal axon growth were assessed during 3 months of treatment between 4 and 6 months after contusion injury. Results Conditional deletion of NgR1 in the chronic state results in gradual improvement of motor function accompanied by increased density of raphespinal axons in the caudal spinal cord. In chronic rat spinal contusion, NgR1 decoy treatment from 4–6 months after injury results in 29% (10 of 35) of rats recovering weight-bearing status compared to 0% (0 of 29) of control rats (P<0.05). Open field BBB locomotor scores showed a significant improvement in the NgR-treated group relative to the control group (P<0.005, repeated measures ANOVA). An increase in raphespinal axon density caudal to the injury is detected in NgR1-decoy-treated animals by immunohistology and by positron emission tomography using a serotonin reuptake ligand. Interpretation Antagonizing myelin-derived inhibitors signaling with NgR1 decoy augments recovery from chronic spinal cord injury. PMID:22162062

  2. Cervical spinal cord injection of epidural corticosteroids; comprehensive longitudinal study including multiparametric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Adad, Julien; Buchbinder, Bradley; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2012-01-01

    Despite widespread use, the efficacy of epidural corticosteroid injections (ESI) for osteoarthritis-associated neck or radicular pain remains uncertain, so even rare serious complications enter into discussions about use. However various factors impede investigation and publication of serious adverse events. To that end, we developed new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for spinal cord white-matter quantification and employed best-available physiological tests to characterize a cervical spinal cord lesion caused by inadvertent intramedullary injection of Depo-Medrol. A 29-year-old woman with mild cervical osteoarthritis had 2 years of headache and neck pain (concussion and whiplash) after two minor motor-vehicle accidents. During C5–6 ESI, she developed new left-sided motor and sensory symptoms and MRI demonstrated a new left dorsal spinal cord cavity. Mild left-sided motor and sensory symptoms have persisted for more than 2 years, during which time we performed serial neurological examinations, standard electrodiagnostics, somatosensory evoked potentials, and transcranial measurement of corticospinal central motor conduction time (CMCT). We used 3 tesla MRI with a 32-channel coil developed for high-resolution cervical spinal cord structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetization transfer (MT). T2*-weighted signal, DTI and MT metrics showed delayed spread of the lesion across four vertebral levels rostrally, consistent with Wallerian degeneration within the ascending left dorsal columns. However only CMCT metrics detected objective correlates of her left hemiparesis and bilateral hyperreflexia. DTI and MT metrics may better distinguish between post-traumatic demyelination and axonal degeneration than conventional MRI. These tests should be considered to better characterize similar spinal cord injuries. PMID:22964435

  3. One day of motor training with amphetamine impairs motor recovery following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jamie K; Steward, Oswald

    2012-02-01

    It has previously been reported that a single dose of amphetamine paired with training on a beam walking task can enhance locomotor recovery following brain injury (Feeney et al., 1982). Here, we investigated whether this same drug/training regimen could enhance functional recovery following either thoracic (T9) or cervical (C5) spinal cord injury. Different groups of female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on a beam walking task, and in a straight alley for assessment of hindlimb locomotor recovery using the BBB locomotor scale. For rats that received C5 hemisections, forelimb grip strength was assessed using a grip strength meter. Three separate experiments assessed the consequences of training rats on the beam walking task 24 h following a thoracic lateral hemisection with administration of either amphetamine or saline. Beginning 1 h following drug administration, rats either received additional testing/retraining on the beam hourly for 6 h, or they were returned to their home cages without further testing/retraining. Rats with thoracic spinal cord injuries that received amphetamine in conjunction with testing/retraining on the beam at 1 day post injury (DPI) exhibited significantly impaired recovery on the beam walking task and BBB. Rats with cervical spinal cord injuries that received training with amphetamine also exhibited significant impairments in beam walking and locomotion, as well as impairments in gripping and reaching abilities. Even when administered at 14 DPI, the drug/training regimen significantly impaired reaching ability in cervical spinal cord injured rats. Impairments were not seen in rats that received amphetamine without training. Histological analyses revealed that rats that received training with amphetamine had significantly larger lesions than saline controls. These data indicate that an amphetamine/training regimen that improves recovery after cortical injury has the opposite effect of impairing recovery following spinal cord injury

  4. Idiopathic Transverse Myelitis Mimicking an Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Andrew A.; Olszewski, Nathan P.; Lipinski, Lindsay J.; Qiu, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnoses for spinal cord lesions include spinal tumors and inflammatory processes. The distinction between these pathologies can be difficult if solely based on imaging. We report for the first time to our knowledge a case of idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM) mimicking a discrete cervical spinal lesion in a 66-year-old man who presented with gait instability and neck pain. The patient's symptoms failed to resolve after an initial course of steroid therapy. Surgical biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ITM. Subsequent treatment with dexamethasone resulted in complete resolution of the symptoms as well as the intramedullary enhancement. ITM is most common in the cervical and thoracic spine, spanning 3-4 spinal segments. It usually occupies more than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord and tends to be central, uniform, and symmetric. It exhibits patchy and peripheral contrast enhancement. These criteria are useful guidelines that help distinguish ITM from neoplastic spinal lesions. A decision to perform biopsy must take into consideration the patient's clinical symptoms, the rate of progression of neurological deficits, and the imaging characteristics of the lesion. Surgical biopsy for questionable lesions should be reserved for patients with progressive neurological deficits refractory to empirical medical therapy. PMID:27672469

  5. Idiopathic Transverse Myelitis Mimicking an Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumor.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Andrew A; Olszewski, Nathan P; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Qiu, Jingxin; Fabiano, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnoses for spinal cord lesions include spinal tumors and inflammatory processes. The distinction between these pathologies can be difficult if solely based on imaging. We report for the first time to our knowledge a case of idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM) mimicking a discrete cervical spinal lesion in a 66-year-old man who presented with gait instability and neck pain. The patient's symptoms failed to resolve after an initial course of steroid therapy. Surgical biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ITM. Subsequent treatment with dexamethasone resulted in complete resolution of the symptoms as well as the intramedullary enhancement. ITM is most common in the cervical and thoracic spine, spanning 3-4 spinal segments. It usually occupies more than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord and tends to be central, uniform, and symmetric. It exhibits patchy and peripheral contrast enhancement. These criteria are useful guidelines that help distinguish ITM from neoplastic spinal lesions. A decision to perform biopsy must take into consideration the patient's clinical symptoms, the rate of progression of neurological deficits, and the imaging characteristics of the lesion. Surgical biopsy for questionable lesions should be reserved for patients with progressive neurological deficits refractory to empirical medical therapy. PMID:27672469

  6. An Intermediate Animal Model of Spinal Cord Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Guiho, Thomas; Coste, Christine Azevedo; Delleci, Claire; Chenu, Jean-Patrick; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Bauchet, Luc; Guiraud, David

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) result in the loss of movement and sensory feedback as well as organs dysfunctions. For example, nearly all SCI subjects loose their bladder control and are prone to kidney failure if they do not proceed to intermittent (self-) catheterization. Electrical stimulation of the sacral spinal roots with an implantable neuroprosthesis is a promising approach, with commercialized products, to restore continence and control micturition. However, many persons do not ask for this intervention since a surgical deafferentation is needed and the loss of sensory functions and reflexes become serious side effects of this procedure. Recent results renewed interest in spinal cord stimulation. Stimulation of existing pre-cabled neural networks involved in physiological processes regulation is suspected to enable synergic recruitment of spinal fibers. The development of direct spinal stimulation strategies aiming at bladder and bowel functions restoration would therefore appear as a credible alternative to existent solutions. However, a lack of suitable large animal model complicates these kinds of studies. In this article, we propose a new animal model of spinal stimulation -pig- and will briefly introduce results from one first acute experimental validation session. PMID:27478570

  7. Idiopathic Transverse Myelitis Mimicking an Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Andrew A.; Olszewski, Nathan P.; Lipinski, Lindsay J.; Qiu, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnoses for spinal cord lesions include spinal tumors and inflammatory processes. The distinction between these pathologies can be difficult if solely based on imaging. We report for the first time to our knowledge a case of idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM) mimicking a discrete cervical spinal lesion in a 66-year-old man who presented with gait instability and neck pain. The patient's symptoms failed to resolve after an initial course of steroid therapy. Surgical biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ITM. Subsequent treatment with dexamethasone resulted in complete resolution of the symptoms as well as the intramedullary enhancement. ITM is most common in the cervical and thoracic spine, spanning 3-4 spinal segments. It usually occupies more than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord and tends to be central, uniform, and symmetric. It exhibits patchy and peripheral contrast enhancement. These criteria are useful guidelines that help distinguish ITM from neoplastic spinal lesions. A decision to perform biopsy must take into consideration the patient's clinical symptoms, the rate of progression of neurological deficits, and the imaging characteristics of the lesion. Surgical biopsy for questionable lesions should be reserved for patients with progressive neurological deficits refractory to empirical medical therapy.

  8. Efficacy of a metalloproteinase inhibitor in spinal cord injured dogs.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jonathan M; Cohen, Noah D; Heller, Michael; Fajt, Virginia R; Levine, Gwendolyn J; Kerwin, Sharon C; Trivedi, Alpa A; Fandel, Thomas M; Werb, Zena; Modestino, Augusta; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is elevated within the acutely injured murine spinal cord and blockade of this early proteolytic activity with GM6001, a broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, results in improved recovery after spinal cord injury. As matrix metalloproteinase-9 is likewise acutely elevated in dogs with naturally occurring spinal cord injuries, we evaluated efficacy of GM6001 solubilized in dimethyl sulfoxide in this second species. Safety and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in naïve dogs. After confirming safety, subsequent pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated that a 100 mg/kg subcutaneous dose of GM6001 resulted in plasma concentrations that peaked shortly after administration and were sustained for at least 4 days at levels that produced robust in vitro inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9. A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled study was then conducted to assess efficacy of GM6001 given within 48 hours of spinal cord injury. Dogs were enrolled in 3 groups: GM6001 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 35), dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 37), or saline (n = 41). Matrix metalloproteinase activity was increased in the serum of injured dogs and GM6001 reduced this serum protease activity compared to the other two groups. To assess recovery, dogs were a priori stratified into a severely injured group and a mild-to-moderate injured group, using a Modified Frankel Scale. The Texas Spinal Cord Injury Score was then used to assess long-term motor/sensory function. In dogs with severe spinal cord injuries, those treated with saline had a mean motor score of 2 (95% CI 0-4.0) that was significantly (P<0.05; generalized linear model) less than the estimated mean motor score for dogs receiving dimethyl sulfoxide (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0-8.0) or GM6001 (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0-8.0). As there was no independent effect of GM6001, we attribute improved neurological outcomes to dimethyl sulfoxide, a pleotropic agent that may target diverse secondary pathogenic

  9. Efficacy of a Metalloproteinase Inhibitor in Spinal Cord Injured Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Jonathan M.; Cohen, Noah D.; Heller, Michael; Fajt, Virginia R.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Kerwin, Sharon C.; Trivedi, Alpa A.; Fandel, Thomas M.; Werb, Zena; Modestino, Augusta; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is elevated within the acutely injured murine spinal cord and blockade of this early proteolytic activity with GM6001, a broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, results in improved recovery after spinal cord injury. As matrix metalloproteinase-9 is likewise acutely elevated in dogs with naturally occurring spinal cord injuries, we evaluated efficacy of GM6001 solubilized in dimethyl sulfoxide in this second species. Safety and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in naïve dogs. After confirming safety, subsequent pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated that a 100 mg/kg subcutaneous dose of GM6001 resulted in plasma concentrations that peaked shortly after administration and were sustained for at least 4 days at levels that produced robust in vitro inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9. A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled study was then conducted to assess efficacy of GM6001 given within 48 hours of spinal cord injury. Dogs were enrolled in 3 groups: GM6001 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 35), dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 37), or saline (n = 41). Matrix metalloproteinase activity was increased in the serum of injured dogs and GM6001 reduced this serum protease activity compared to the other two groups. To assess recovery, dogs were a priori stratified into a severely injured group and a mild-to-moderate injured group, using a Modified Frankel Scale. The Texas Spinal Cord Injury Score was then used to assess long-term motor/sensory function. In dogs with severe spinal cord injuries, those treated with saline had a mean motor score of 2 (95% CI 0–4.0) that was significantly (P<0.05; generalized linear model) less than the estimated mean motor score for dogs receiving dimethyl sulfoxide (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0–8.0) or GM6001 (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0–8.0). As there was no independent effect of GM6001, we attribute improved neurological outcomes to dimethyl sulfoxide, a pleotropic agent that may target diverse

  10. Efficacy of a metalloproteinase inhibitor in spinal cord injured dogs.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jonathan M; Cohen, Noah D; Heller, Michael; Fajt, Virginia R; Levine, Gwendolyn J; Kerwin, Sharon C; Trivedi, Alpa A; Fandel, Thomas M; Werb, Zena; Modestino, Augusta; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is elevated within the acutely injured murine spinal cord and blockade of this early proteolytic activity with GM6001, a broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, results in improved recovery after spinal cord injury. As matrix metalloproteinase-9 is likewise acutely elevated in dogs with naturally occurring spinal cord injuries, we evaluated efficacy of GM6001 solubilized in dimethyl sulfoxide in this second species. Safety and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in naïve dogs. After confirming safety, subsequent pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated that a 100 mg/kg subcutaneous dose of GM6001 resulted in plasma concentrations that peaked shortly after administration and were sustained for at least 4 days at levels that produced robust in vitro inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9. A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled study was then conducted to assess efficacy of GM6001 given within 48 hours of spinal cord injury. Dogs were enrolled in 3 groups: GM6001 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 35), dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 37), or saline (n = 41). Matrix metalloproteinase activity was increased in the serum of injured dogs and GM6001 reduced this serum protease activity compared to the other two groups. To assess recovery, dogs were a priori stratified into a severely injured group and a mild-to-moderate injured group, using a Modified Frankel Scale. The Texas Spinal Cord Injury Score was then used to assess long-term motor/sensory function. In dogs with severe spinal cord injuries, those treated with saline had a mean motor score of 2 (95% CI 0-4.0) that was significantly (P<0.05; generalized linear model) less than the estimated mean motor score for dogs receiving dimethyl sulfoxide (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0-8.0) or GM6001 (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0-8.0). As there was no independent effect of GM6001, we attribute improved neurological outcomes to dimethyl sulfoxide, a pleotropic agent that may target diverse secondary pathogenic

  11. Regulatory effects of intermittent noxious stimulation on spinal cord injury-sensitive microRNAs and their presumptive targets following spinal cord contusion

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Eric R.; Woller, Sarah A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Grau, James W.; Miranda, Rajesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrollable nociceptive stimulation adversely affects recovery in spinally contused rats. Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in altered microRNA (miRNA) expression both at, and distal to the lesion site. We hypothesized that uncontrollable nociception further influences SCI-sensitive miRNAs and associated gene targets, potentially explaining the progression of maladaptive plasticity. Our data validated previously described sensitivity of miRNAs to SCI alone. Moreover, following SCI, intermittent noxious stimulation decreased expression of miR124 in dorsal spinal cord 24 h after stimulation and increased expression of miR129-2 in dorsal, and miR1 in ventral spinal cord at 7 days. We also found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression was significantly down-regulated 1 day after SCI alone, and significantly more so, after SCI followed by tailshock. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) mRNA expression was significantly increased at both 1 and 7 days post-SCI, and significantly more so, 7 days post-SCI with shock. MiR1 expression was positively and significantly correlated with IGF-1, but not BDNF mRNA expression. Further, stepwise linear regression analysis indicated that a significant proportion of the changes in BDNF and IGF-1 mRNA expression were explained by variance in two groups of miRNAs, implying co-regulation. Collectively, these data show that uncontrollable nociception which activates sensorimotor circuits distal to the injury site, influences SCI-miRNAs and target mRNAs within the lesion site. SCI-sensitive miRNAs may well mediate adverse consequences of uncontrolled sensorimotor activation on functional recovery. However, their sensitivity to distal sensory input also implicates these miRNAs as candidate targets for the management of SCI and neuropathic pain. PMID:25278846

  12. Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Alterations in Subacute and Chronic Stages of a Rat Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Haller, Edward; Tajiri, Naoki; Thomson, Avery; Barretta, Jennifer; Williams, Stephanie N; Haim, Eithan D; Qin, Hua; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Abraham, Jerry V; Sanberg, Paul R; Van Loveren, Harry; Borlongan, Cesario V

    2016-07-01

    We previously demonstrated blood-brain barrier impairment in remote contralateral brain areas in rats at 7 and 30 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), indicating ischemic diaschisis. Here, we focused on effects of subacute and chronic focal cerebral ischemia on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We observed BSCB damage on both sides of the cervical spinal cord in rats at 7 and 30 days post-tMCAO. Major BSCB ultrastructural changes in spinal cord gray and white matter included vacuolated endothelial cells containing autophagosomes, pericyte degeneration with enlarged mitochondria, astrocyte end-feet degeneration and perivascular edema; damaged motor neurons, swollen axons with unraveled myelin in ascending and descending tracts and astrogliosis were also observed. Evans Blue dye extravasation was maximal at 7 days. There was immunofluorescence evidence of reduction of microvascular expression of tight junction occludin, upregulation of Beclin-1 and LC3B immunoreactivities at 7 days and a reduction of the latter at 30 days post-ischemia. These novel pathological alterations on the cervical spinal cord microvasculature in rats after tMCAO suggest pervasive and long-lasting BSCB damage after focal cerebral ischemia, and that spinal cord ischemic diaschisis should be considered in the pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches in patients with ischemic cerebral infarction. PMID:27283328

  13. Cerebral activation is correlated to regional atrophy of the spinal cord and functional motor disability in spinal cord injured individuals.

    PubMed

    Lundell, H; Christensen, M S; Barthélemy, D; Willerslev-Olsen, M; Biering-Sørensen, F; Nielsen, J B

    2011-01-15

    Recovery of function following lesions in the nervous system requires adaptive changes in surviving circuitries. Here we investigate whether changes in cerebral activation are correlated to spinal cord atrophy and recovery of functionality in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). 19 chronic SCI individuals and 7 age-comparable controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing rhythmic dorsiflexion of the ankle. A significant negative correlation was found between the activation in the ipsilateral motor (M1) and bilateral premotor cortex (PMC) on one hand and the functional ability of the SCI participants measured by the clinical motor score on the other. There was no significant correlation between activation in any other cerebral area and the motor score. Activation in ipsilateral somatosensory cortex (S1), M1 and PMC was negatively correlated to the width of the spinal cord in the left-right direction, where the corticospinal tract is located, but not in the antero-posterior direction. There was a tendency for a negative correlation between cerebral activation in ipsilateral S1, M1 and PMC and the amplitude of motor evoked potentials in the tibialis anterior muscle elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, but this did not reach statistical significance. There was no correlation between motor score or spinal cord dimensions and the volume of the cortical motor areas. The observations show that lesion of descending tracts in the lateral part of the spinal cord results in increased activation in ipsilateral motor and sensory areas, which may help to compensate for the functional deficit following SCI. PMID:20851198

  14. Vulnerability of the spinal cord to injury from extracorporeal shock waves in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tao-Chen; Huang, Hsiu-Yu; Yang, Yu-Lin; Hung, Kuo-Sheng; Cheng, Ching-Hsiao; Chang, Nyuk-Kong; Chung, Yueh-Hua; Hu, Min-Shou; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2007-09-01

    We studied the vulnerability of the spinal cord to extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT). In this experiment, 12 rabbits were divided into three groups (4 in each group). All animals underwent a preceding lumbar laminectomy at L4 1 week before ESWT. In group 1, 2000 impulses of high dose (0.62 mJ/mm2 energy flux density) shockwave energy were applied to the spinal cord at the laminectomy site. In group 2, 2000 impulses of low dose (0.18 mJ/mm2 energy flux density) shockwave energy were applied to the same site as group 1. Group 3 did not receive ESWT and served as a control. None of the rabbits in the study groups (groups 1 and 2) showed weakness or paralysis of the hind limbs throughout the entire post-ESWT period. The spinal cord at the L4 level of all animals was harvested on day 13 after laminectomy. On gross morphology, the cord from the study groups and the control group showed normal surface appearance. On microscopic examination, the cord from the control group was normal, whereas the cords from the study groups showed varying degrees of myelin damage and neuronal loss. These microscopic findings were dose-dependent. For the low-energy group (group 2), neuronal loss was insignificant compared to that in the control group. ESWT produced varying degrees of microscopic changes of the treated cords, but no neurological symptoms. The neuronal injury was dose-dependent and mild in the low-energy group.

  15. A Clinical Perspective and Definition of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can be complete or incomplete. The level of injury in SCI is defined as the most caudal segment with motor function rated at greater than or equal to 3/5, with pain and temperature preserved. The standard neurological classification of SCI provided by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) assigns grades from ASIA A (complete SCI) through ASIA E (normal sensory/motor), with B, C, and D representing varying degrees of injury between these extremes. The most common causes of SCI include trauma (motor vehicle accidents, sports, violence, falls), degenerative spinal disease, vascular injury (anterior spinal artery syndrome, epidural hematoma), tumor, infection (epidural abscess), and demyelinating processes (). (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B91)(Figure is included in full-text article.).

  16. The coding of cutaneous temperature in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chen; Hoon, Mark A; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is the initial stage that integrates temperature information from peripheral inputs. Here we used molecular genetics and in vivo calcium imaging to investigate the coding of cutaneous temperature in the spinal cord in mice. We found that heating or cooling the skin evoked robust calcium responses in spinal neurons, and their activation threshold temperatures distributed smoothly over the entire range of stimulation temperatures. Once activated, heat-responding neurons encoded the absolute skin temperature without adaptation and received major inputs from transient receptor potential (TRP) channel V1 (TRPV1)-positive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. By contrast, cold-responding neurons rapidly adapted to ambient temperature and selectively encoded temperature changes. These neurons received TRP channel M8 (TRPM8)-positive DRG inputs as well as novel TRPV1(+) DRG inputs that were selectively activated by intense cooling. Our results provide a comprehensive examination of the temperature representation in the spinal cord and reveal fundamental differences in the coding of heat and cold. PMID:27455110

  17. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and management of such cases. Case Description: An 18-year-old male presented with bilateral lower limb paresis. He was a known case of homozygous beta thalassemia major. He had undergone surgery for spinal cord compression due to EMH 4 months prior to presentation. Symptom resolution was followed by deterioration 5 days later. He was operated again at our hospital with complete resection of the mass. He underwent local radiotherapy to prevent recurrence. At 2 years follow-up, he showed complete resolution of symptoms. Follow-up imaging demonstrated no residual mass. Conclusion: The possibility of EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis as a cause of spinal cord compression. Treatment of such cases is usually done with blood transfusions, which can reduce the hematopoietic drive for EMH. Other options include surgery, hydroxyurea, radiotherapy, or a combination of these on a case to case basis. PMID:27069747

  18. Spinal cord injury and substance use: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lusilla-Palacios, P; Castellano-Tejedor, Carmina

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review recent findings about the prevalence of substance use (SU) and substance use disorders (SUD), and to discuss the related impact on health in spinal cord injury (SCI) population. For this purpose, computer-aided searches of MEDLINE (PubMed) and the Cochrane Library were conducted. From an initial pool of 59 articles, 52 met the inclusion criteria. Most of the studies referred to alcohol and tobacco and only a few studies reported on other substances. Study designs were mainly cross-sectional and descriptive, with scarce intervention and longitudinal studies.  Although a high prevalence of post-injury SU has been documented among SCI patients, limited research exists on pre-injury SU and on longitudinal studies. Moreover, when exploring SUD, it has not been systematically studied in accordance with CIE or DSM criteria. Alcohol appears to be the most consumed substance among this population. Additionally, those patients with SU have shown poorer outcomes in different health indicators. Therefore, more insight is required to increase scientific knowledge in this field and to recommend tailored preventive interventions and research priorities in relation to this population. PMID:26706812

  19. Spinal cord injury and substance use: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lusilla-Palacios, P; Castellano-Tejedor, Carmina

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this study was to review recent findings about the prevalence of substance use (SU) and substance use disorders (SUD), and to discuss the related impact on health in spinal cord injury (SCI) population. For this purpose, computer-aided searches of MEDLINE (PubMed) and the Cochrane Library were conducted. From an initial pool of 59 articles, 52 met the inclusion criteria. Most of the studies referred to alcohol and tobacco and only a few studies reported on other substances. Study designs were mainly cross-sectional and descriptive, with scarce intervention and longitudinal studies.  Although a high prevalence of post-injury SU has been documented among SCI patients, limited research exists on pre-injury SU and on longitudinal studies. Moreover, when exploring SUD, it has not been systematically studied in accordance with CIE or DSM criteria. Alcohol appears to be the most consumed substance among this population. Additionally, those patients with SU have shown poorer outcomes in different health indicators. Therefore, more insight is required to increase scientific knowledge in this field and to recommend tailored preventive interventions and research priorities in relation to this population.

  20. Learning from the spinal cord: How the study of spinal cord plasticity informs our view of learning

    PubMed Central

    Grau, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews research examining whether and how training can induce a lasting change in spinal cord function. A framework for the study of learning, and some essential issues in experimental design, are discussed. A core element involves delayed assessment under common conditions. Research has shown that brain systems can induce a lasting (memory-like) alteration in spinal function. Neurons within the lower (lumbosacral) spinal cord can also adapt when isolated from the brain by means of a thoracic transection. Using traditional learning paradigms, evidence suggests that spinal neurons support habituation and sensitization as well as Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. At a neurobiological level, spinal systems support phenomena (e.g., long-term potentiation), and involve mechanisms (e.g., NMDA mediated plasticity, protein synthesis) implicated in brain-dependent learning and memory. Spinal learning also induces modulatory effects that alter the capacity for learning. Uncontrollable/unpredictable stimulation disables the capacity for instrumental learning and this effect has been linked to the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Predictable/controllable stimulation enables learning and counters the adverse effects of uncontrollable simulation through a process that depends upon brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Finally, uncontrollable, but not controllable, nociceptive stimulation impairs recovery after a contusion injury. A process-oriented approach (neurofunctionalism) is outlined that encourages a broader view of learning phenomena. PMID:23973905

  1. Surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by cervical spine fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports regarding surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord injury. Our purpose is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of open-door expansive laminoplasty in combination with transpedicular screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury in the trauma population. Methods This was a retrospective study of 21 patients who had multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury with unstable fracture. An open-door expansive posterior laminoplasty combined with transpedicular screw fixation was performed under persistent intraoperative skull traction. Outcome measures included postoperative improvement in Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and incidence of complications. Results The average operation time was 190 min, with an average blood loss of 437 ml. A total of 120 transpedicular screws were implanted into the cervical vertebrae between vertebral C3 and C7, including 20 into C3, 34 into C4, 36 into C5, 20 into C6, and 10 into C7. The mean preoperative JOA score was 3.67 ± 0.53. The patients were followed for an average of 17.5 months, and the average JOA score improved to 8.17 ± 1.59, significantly higher than the preoperative score (t = 1.798, P < 0.05), with an average improvement of 44.7 ± 11.7%. Postoperative complications in four patients included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, delayed wound healing, pulmonary infection, and urinary system infection. All four patients were responsive to antibiotic treatment; one died from respiratory failure 3 months postoperatively. Conclusions The open-door expansive laminoplasty combined with posterior transpedicular screw fixation is feasible for treating multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by unstable fracture. Its advantages include minimum surgical trauma, less intraoperative blood loss, and satisfactory stable supportive effect for

  2. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  3. Spinal Cord Hemangioblastoma : Diagnosis and Clinical Outcome after Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Na, Joon Ho; Kim, Hyeong Soo; Eoh, Whan; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Jong Soo

    2007-01-01

    Objective Spinal cord hemangioblastoma is an uncommon vascular neoplasm with a benign nature and is associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease in 20-30% of patients. Total removal of these tumors without significant neurological deficit remains a great challenge. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of VHL mutation analysis and to evaluate surgical outcome of patients with spinal cord hemangioblastomas. Methods This study included nine patients treated for spinal cord hemangioblastomas at our institute between December 1994 and March 2006. There were four male and five female patients. Mean age was 37.8 years. The mean follow-up period was 22.4 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the complete neuraxis was done in all cases and VHL mutation analysis was performed in three cases for a definite diagnosis. Results Six patients had intramedullary tumor, and the remaining patients had intradural extramedullary lesions. Five patients were associated with VHL disease. The von Hippel-Lindau mutation analysis was done in three patients and two of them showed VHL gene abnormality. Tumors were located in the cervical cord in five cases and in the thoracic cord in four cases. All patients underwent surgical intervention, and total removal was achieved in six cases. All patients showed improvement or, at least, clinically stationary state. Surgical complications did not develop in any cases. Conclusion Spinal hemangioblastoma in this series has been safely and effectively removed via a posterior approach. Postoperatively, clinical outcome was excellent in the majority of cases. The VHL mutation analysis was useful in patients with family history and in those with multiple hemangioblastomas. PMID:19096585

  4. A Pilot Clinical Study of Olfactory Mucosa Autograft for Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    IWATSUKI, Koichi; TAJIMA, Fumihiro; OHNISHI, Yu-ichiro; NAKAMURA, Takeshi; ISHIHARA, Masahiro; HOSOMI, Koichi; NINOMIYA, Koshi; MORIWAKI, Takashi; YOSHIMINE, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of spinal cord axon regeneration have reported good long-term results using various types of tissue scaffolds. Olfactory tissue allows autologous transplantation and can easily be obtained by a simple biopsy that is performed through the external nares. We performed a clinical pilot study of olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) for chronic complete spinal cord injury in eight patients according to the procedure outlined by Lima et al. Our results showed no serious adverse events and improvement in both the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade and ASIA motor score in five patients. The preoperative post-rehabilitation ASIA motor score improved from 50 in all cases to 52 in case 2, 60 in case 4, 52 in case 6, 55 in case 7, and 58 in case 8 at 96 weeks after OMA. The AIS improved from A to C in four cases and from B to C in one case. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also seen in one patient, reflecting conductivity in the central nervous system, including the corticospinal tract. The MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation allow objective assessment of the integrity of the motor circuitry comprising both the corticospinal tract and the peripheral motor nerves.We show the feasibility of OMA for chronic complete spinal cord injury. PMID:27053327

  5. Regional spinal cord blood flow during local cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, T.; Monafo, W.W. )

    1990-06-01

    We used the tissue distribution of ({sup 14}C)butanol to quantitate regional blood flow in the spinal cord (RSCBF) of pentobarbital-anesthetized, normothermic rats in which segmental local cooling pentobarbital-anesthetized, normothermic rats in which segmental local cooling of the spinal cord (to 25-28{degrees}C) at vertebral levels C4-C6 (n = 6) or T13-L1 (n = 6) was induced. Thirty minutes later, blood flow measurements were made at seven levels of the spinal cord and in the sciatic nerve trunks and biceps femoris muscles. Sham-cooled rats served as controls (n = 12). In control rats, RSCBF varied between 41.5 +/- 2.4 and 65.1 +/- 3.2 ml.min-1.100 g-1. Local cooling of the C4-C6 cord segment reduced RSCBF by 32%, from 65.1 +/- 3.2 to 44.4 +/- 3.5 ml.min-1.100 g-1 (P less than 0.01). Tissue vascular resistance (R) in the cooled C4-C6 segment was elevated versus control. There were no other changes in RSCBF at the other cord levels or in the cauda equina. Similarly, local cooling of the T13-L1 segment resulted in a 40% fall in RSCBF in that segment, from 57.1 +/- 2.4 to 34.1 +/- 4.3 ml.min-1.100 g-1 (P less than 0.001). R in the cooled T13-L1 segment was elevated versus control. RSCBF was reduced by 30% in the adjacent proximal T12 segment (P less than 0.001) and by 21% in the adjacent distal L2-L3 segment (P less than 0.05). R was increased in both of these adjacent segments. RSCBF was not altered elsewhere in the cord.

  6. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  7. Spinal cord injury following chiropractic manipulation to the neck.

    PubMed

    Chakraverty, Julian; Curtis, Olivia; Hughes, Tom; Hourihan, Margaret

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is a rare complication of chiropractic treatment. This case report describes a 50-year-old man who developed neurological symptoms a few hours after manipulation (high velocity low amplitude [HVLA] technique) of the cervical spine. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the cervical spine revealed intramedullary high signal at the C2/3 level of the right side of the cervical cord on the T2-weighted images. The potential mechanism of injury and causes of the radiological appearance are discussed.

  8. Complications after spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jie; Guan, Zheng; Gao, Zhen; Xiang, Li; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Sheng-Li

    2016-07-01

    Since little has been reported about complications of spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome (TCS), we sought to delineate the characteristics of the condition.A total of 4 cases of adult TCS after spinal anesthesia were reviewed. The medical charts of the patients were obtained. Anesthesia, which was combined spinal and epidural anesthesia or spinal anesthesia was performed, and follow-up were carried out in all patients.The most common neurological symptom of adult TCS before surgery was occasional severe pain in back, perineal region, or legs. Frequent micturition, diminished knee and ankle reflexes, and difficulty in bending were exhibited in partial patients. Paraesthesia of perineal region or/and lower extremities existed 2 to 3 days after spinal anesthesia in all the cases. Weakness of lower extremities existed in 1 case. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed the low location of conus medullaris. At follow-up, 3 cases recovered completely within 3 weeks, and 1 case underwent permanent disability.These cases suggest anesthesiologists and surgeons alert to the association of adult TCS and spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia should be prohibited in patients with adult TCS to prevent neurological damages. PMID:27442670

  9. [SCS (spinal cord stimulation) in severe ischemia of the legs].

    PubMed

    Polisca, R; Domenichini, M; Signoretti, P; Marchi, P

    1992-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) of the low thoracic spinal epidural space was carried out in 11 patients with pain from peripheral arterial disease of the lower limbs. Conservative treatment or vasoactive drugs also failed. Results are reported relating to pain, exercise endurance on the bicycle ergometer, trophic lesion changes and TCpO2. After a mean postimulation follow-up period of 15 months, substantial pain relief was preoperative non healing skin ulcerations, but gangrenous conditions were not benefited. Exercise tolerance as measured on a bicycle ergometer increased by 40%. It is concluded that SCS is vary promising in severe limb ischemia where reconstruction surgery is not possible or has been unsuccessful.

  10. Segmental spinal cord hypoplasia in a Holstein Friesian calf.

    PubMed

    Binanti, D; Fantinato, E; De Zani, D; Riccaboni, P; Pravettoni, D; Zani, D D

    2013-08-01

    An 8-day-old female Holstein Friesian calf was examined because of congenital spastic paresis of the hind limbs. Myelography revealed deviation and thinning of subarachnoid contrast medium columns in the lumbar segment. Upon magnetic resonance imaging, the 'hour-glass' subdural compression appeared as a T1-hypointense, T2-hyperintense ovoidal area suggestive of cerebral spinal fluid collection, compatible with hydrosyringomyelia. The calf was euthanized and the necropsy confirmed the diagnosis of segmental spinal cord hypoplasia of the lumbar tract associated to hydromyelic and syringomyelic cavities.

  11. The use of dual growing rods to correct spinal deformity secondary to a low-grade spinal cord astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Elizabeth N.; Muthigi, Akhil; Frino, John; Powers, Alexander K.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intramedullary spinal cord astrocytomas are rare, and the majority are low grade, typically carrying a low risk of mortality, but a high risk of morbidity. Quality of life is, therefore, an important consideration in treating concomitant progressive kyphoscoliosis. Compared with fusion-based spinal stabilization, fusionless techniques may limit some complications related to early instrumentation of the developing spine. Another consideration is the timing of radiation therapy relative to both spinal maturity and spinal instrumentation. To date, there have been no reports of the use of a fusionless technique to treat spinal deformity secondary to an intramedullary spinal cord tumor. Herein, we report the use of fusionless spinal stabilization with dual growing rods in a boy with low-grade spinal cord astrocytoma after radiation therapy. PMID:26468485

  12. Is neuroinflammation in the injured spinal cord different than in the brain? Examining intrinsic differences between the brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Gensel, J C

    2014-08-01

    The field of neuroimmunology is rapidly advancing. There is a growing appreciation for heterogeneity, both in inflammatory composition and region-specific inflammatory responses. This understanding underscores the importance of developing targeted immunomodulatory therapies for treating neurological disorders. Concerning neurotrauma, there is a dearth of publications directly comparing inflammatory responses in the brain and spinal cord after injury. The question therefore remains as to whether inflammatory cells responding to spinal cord vs. brain injury adopt similar functions and are therefore amenable to common therapies. In this review, we address this question while revisiting and modernizing the conclusions from publications that have directly compared inflammation across brain and spinal cord injuries. By examining molecular differences, anatomical variations, and inflammatory cell phenotypes between the injured brain and spinal cord, we provide insight into how neuroinflammation relates to neurotrauma and into fundamental differences between the brain and spinal cord.

  13. Progressive inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration after traumatic brain or spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Faden, Alan I; Wu, Junfang; Stoica, Bogdan A; Loane, David J

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been linked to dementia and chronic neurodegeneration. Described initially in boxers and currently recognized across high contact sports, the association between repeated concussion (mild TBI) and progressive neuropsychiatric abnormalities has recently received widespread attention, and has been termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Less well appreciated are cognitive changes associated with neurodegeneration in the brain after isolated spinal cord injury. Also under-recognized is the role of sustained neuroinflammation after brain or spinal cord trauma, even though this relationship has been known since the 1950s and is supported by more recent preclinical and clinical studies. These pathological mechanisms, manifested by extensive microglial and astroglial activation and appropriately termed chronic traumatic brain inflammation or chronic traumatic inflammatory encephalopathy, may be among the most important causes of post-traumatic neurodegeneration in terms of prevalence. Importantly, emerging experimental work demonstrates that persistent neuroinflammation can cause progressive neurodegeneration that may be treatable even weeks after traumatic injury.

  14. Management of chronic symphysis pubis pain following child birth with spinal cord stimulator.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Ahsan

    2012-01-01

    The case of a 39 year old woman who had diastasis of pubic symphysis following childbirth and later developed severe chronic neuropathic pain and disability is presented. She received extensive surgical and medical treatment for 6 years with no improvement of symptoms. The VNRS (Visual Numerical Rating Scale) pain score was 7/10 or more most of the time. This was quite disabling in terms of her quality of life. A spinal cord stimulator was inserted after failure of other modalities of pain management which resulted in dramatic improvement in the quality of life measured with SF-36 questionnaire. Her pain score became 0/10 VNRS and she was free from opioids and psychotropic medications within 3 months post insertion. Spinal cord stimulator can be considered for the management of pain due to diastasis of pubic symphysis, not amenable to other therapies. PMID:22352111

  15. An efficient device to experimentally model compression injury of mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ropper, Alexander E; Zeng, Xiang; Anderson, Jamie E; Yu, Dou; Han, InBo; Haragopal, Hariprakash; Teng, Yang D

    2015-09-01

    We report an efficient and effective device to reproducibly model clinically relevant spinal cord injury (SCI) via controlled mechanical compression. In the present study, following skin incision, dorsal laminectomy was performed to expose T10 spinal cord of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (230-250 g). The vertebral column was suspended and stabilized by Allis clamps at T8 and 12 spinous processes. A metal impounder was then gently loaded onto T10 dura (20, 35 or 50 g × 5 min; n=7/group), resulting in acute mild, moderate, or severe standing weight compression, respectively. Neurobehavioral outcomes were evaluated using the BBB locomotor scale and inclined plane test for coordinated hindlimb function, and a battery of spinal reflex tests for sensorimotor functions, at 1 day following SCI and weekly thereafter for 7 weeks. Quantitative histopathology was used to assess injury-triggered loss of white matter, gray matter and ventral horn motor neurons. Immunocytochemical levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the cervical and lumbar regions were measured to determine the distal segment impact of T10 compression. The data demonstrates that the standardized protocol generates weight-dependent hindlimb motosensory deficits and neurodegeneration primarily at and near the lesion epicenter. Importantly, there are significantly increased GFAP and APP expressions in spinal cord segments involved in eliciting post-SCI allodynia. Therefore, the described system reliably produces compression trauma in manners partially emulating clinical quasi-static insults to the spinal cord, providing a pragmatic model to investigate pathophysiological events and potential therapeutics for compression SCI. PMID:26210871

  16. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood or amniotic epithelial stem cells alleviates mechanical allodynia after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Roh, Dae-Hyun; Seo, Min-Soo; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Park, Sang-Bum; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), and a variety of different stem cell types have been grafted into humans suffering from spinal cord trauma or into animal models of spinal injury. Although several studies have reported functional motor improvement after transplantation of stem cells into injured spinal cord, the benefit of these cells for treating SCI-induced neuropathic pain is not clear. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of transplanting human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) or amniotic epithelial stem cells (hAESCs) on SCI-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and thermal hyperalgesia (TH) in T13 spinal cord hemisected rats. Two weeks after SCI, hUCB-MSCs or hAESCs were transplanted around the spinal cord lesion site, and behavioral tests were performed to evaluate changes in SCI-induced MA and TH. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were also performed to evaluate possible therapeutic effects on SCI-induced inflammation and the nociceptive-related phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 receptor subunit. While transplantation of hUCB-MSCs showed a tendency to reduce MA, transplantation of hAESCs significantly reduced MA. Neither hUCB-MSC nor hAESC transplantation had any effect on SCI-induced TH. Transplantation of hAESCs also significantly reduced the SCI-induced increase in NMDA receptor NR1 subunit phosphorylation (pNR1) expression in the spinal cord. Both hUCB-MSCs and hAESCs reduced the SCI-induced increase in spinal cord expression of the microglial marker, F4/80, but not the increased expression of GFAP or iNOS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the transplantation of hAESCs into the injured spinal cord can suppress mechanical allodynia, and this effect seems to be closely associated with the modulation of spinal cord microglia activity and NR1 phosphorylation.

  17. [Nontraumatic spinal cord injury: etiology, demography and clinics].

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gonzales, Asencio; Sotomayor-Espichan, Rosa; Martínez-Romero, María; Kuroki-García, César

    2011-12-01

    We performed a retrospective and descriptive cross-sectional; study in 210 hospitalized patients with spinal cord injury at the National Institute of Rehabilitation (INR), Callao, Peru from 2000-2006. The goal was to describe etiology, and clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of non traumatic spinal cord injuries (LMNT). We found a prevalence of 27 % for LMNT, average age at onset of 32.0 years, male gender 50.5 %, and secondary education completed in 41.9 %, poverty 90.5 %. The infectious etiology (viral and bacterial) was predominant in 37.6 %, with 11.9 infected with HTLVI. Although the INR is a reference center, the findings can't be generalized because it isn't a representative sample of the Peruvian population, further studies are necessary to propose strategies for prevention and control, considering the high cost of integral rehabilitation treatment in these patients. PMID:22241260

  18. Remyelination by oligodendrocytes stimulated by antiserum to spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Lennon, V A; Benveniste, E N; Merrill, J E

    1987-01-01

    The new synthesis of myelin and the proliferation of oligodendrocytes was stimulated by serum from syngeneic mice immunized with homogenized spinal cord (SCH). Treatment with this antiserum produced a 10-fold increase in the area of remyelination in spinal cords that had become demyelinated previously as a result of infection by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus. Inflammation was decreased in regions of white matter that showed remyelination. Oligodendrocytes exposed to anti-SCH in vitro incorporated three to five times more [3H]thymidine than resting cells did and expressed more myelin basic protein in their cytoplasm, suggesting stimulation of myelinogenesis. Thus, there is a factor present in anti-SCH antiserum that stimulates central nervous system-type remyelination. This finding may provide clues for the therapy of patients with demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis.

  19. Prognostic value of cortical magnetic stimulation in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Clarke, C E; Modarres-Sadeghi, H; Twomey, J A; Burt, A A

    1994-08-01

    Cortical magnetic stimulation was performed in a consecutive series of 10 patients presenting within 15 days of traumatic spinal cord injury. In those patients with complete paraplegia or quadriplegia, motor evoked potentials at presentation were absent below the level of the lesion. Six months after the injury, potentials had returned in the biceps brachii and abductor pollicis brevis muscles in some quadriplegic cases, but remained absent from the tibialis anterior in all of this group. None of those with a complete lesion made a significant functional recovery. Of the three patients with incomplete quadriplegia, two showed a significant recovery after 6 months. Motor evoked potentials were recordable below the level of the lesion at presentation in these cases, although the latencies were prolonged. In the remaining patient who failed to improve, potentials were unrecordable throughout the study. This small pilot study suggests that cortical magnetic stimulation may be useful in refining the prognosis in patients with an incomplete spinal cord injury. PMID:7970860

  20. Plasma glutamine concentration in spinal cord injured patients.

    PubMed

    Rogeri, P S; Costa Rosa, L F B P

    2005-09-23

    Glutamine, a non-essential amino acid, is the most important source of energy for macrophages and lymphocytes. Reduction in its plasma concentration is related with loss of immune function, as leukocyte proliferation and cytokine production. It is well known that glutamine is largely produced by the skeletal muscle which is severely compromised as a consequence of the paralysis due to the damage of the spinal cord. In spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, infections, such as pneumonia and sepsis in general, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In comparison with the control group, a 54% decrease in plasma glutamine concentration was observed as well as a decrease in the production of TNF and IL-1 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultivated for 48 h in SCI patients. Therefore, we propose that a decrease in plasma glutamine concentration is an important contributor to the immunosuppression seen in SCI patients. PMID:16024049

  1. Spinal Cord Injury—Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, William H

    2007-01-01

    Summary: This special report traces the path of spinal cord injury (SCI) from ancient times through the present and provides an optimistic overview of promising clinical trials and avenues of basic research. The spinal cord injuries of Lord Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson, President James A. Garfield, and General George Patton provide an interesting perspective on the evolution of the standard of care for SCI. The author details the contributions of a wide spectrum of professionals in the United States, Europe, and Australia, as well as the roles of various government and professional organizations, legislation, and overall advances in surgery, anesthesia, trauma care, imaging, pharmacology, and infection control, in the advancement of care for the individual with SCI. PMID:17591221

  2. Inhibition downunder: an update from the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Martyn; Bourane, Steeve; Garcia-Campany, Lidia; Dalet, Antoine; Koch, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord perform dedicated roles in processing somatosensory information and shaping motor behaviors that range from simple protective reflexes to more complex motor tasks such as locomotion, reaching and grasping. Recent efforts examining inhibition in the spinal cord have been directed toward determining how inhibitory cell types are specified and incorporated into the sensorimotor circuitry, identifying and characterizing molecularly-defined cohorts of inhibitory neurons and interrogating the functional contribution these cells make to sensory processing and motor behaviors. Rapid progress is being made on all these fronts, driven in large part by molecular genetic and optogenetic approaches that are being creatively combined with neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and behavioral techniques. PMID:24743058

  3. Pulsatile spinal cord surrogate for intradural neuromodulation studies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S; Howard, M A; Rossen, J D; Brennan, T J; Dalm, B D; Dahdaleh, N S; Utz, M; Gillies, G T

    2012-01-01

    We have designed, built and tested a novel spinal cord surrogate that mimics the low-amplitude cardiac-driven pulsations of the human spinal cord, for use in developing intradural implants to be used in a novel form of neuromodulation for the treatment of intractable pain and motor system dysfunction. The silicone surrogate has an oval cross section, 10 mm major axis × 6 mm minor axis, and incorporates a 3 mm diameter × 3 cm long angioplasty balloon that serves as the pulsation actuator. When pneumatically driven at 1 Hz and 1.5 atmospheres (≈ 1140 mm Hg), the surrogate's diametric pulsation is ≈ 100 μm, which corresponds well to in vivo observations. The applications for this surrogate are presented and discussed. PMID:22188575

  4. Percutaneous Technique for Sclerotherapy of Vertebral Hemangioma Compressing Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Gabal, Abdelwahab M.

    2002-12-15

    Purpose: In this study we report a percutaneous technique to achieve sclerosis of vertebral hemangioma and decompression of the spinal cord and nerve roots. Methods: Under CT guidance the affected vertebral body is punctured by a biopsy needle and sclerosant is injected directly into the tumor. In the case of large paravertebral extension, additional injection is given in the paravertebral soft tissue component to induce shrinkage of the whole tumor mass and release of the compressed spinal cord. Results: Using this technique we treated five patients in whom vertebral hemangioma gave rise to neurologic symptoms.In three patients, sclerotherapy was the only treatment given. In the other two patients, sclerotherapy was preceded by transcatheter embolization. Neither decompressive surgery, radiation therapy nor stabilization was required with this technique. Conclusion: Our experience with CT-guided intraosseous sclerotherapy has proved highly satisfactory.

  5. FES-cycling training in spinal cord injured patients.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, S; Stampacchia, G; Gerini, A; Tombini, T; Carrozza, M C

    2013-01-01

    Among the objectives of spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation, (i) prevention of bony, muscular and joint trophism and (ii) limitation of spastic hypertone represent important goals to be achieved. The aim of this study is to use functional electrical stimulation (FES) to activate pedaling on cycle-ergometer and analyse effects of this technique for a rehabilitation training in SCI persons. Five spinal cord injured subjects were recruited and underwent a two months FES-cycling training. Our results show an increase of thigh muscular area and endurance after the FES-cycling training, without any increase of spasticity. This approach, which is being validated on a larger pool of patients, represents a potential tool for improving the rehabilitation outcome of complete and incomplete SCI persons.

  6. Photoplethysmographic sensors for perfusion measurements in spinal cord tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. P.; Kyriacou, P. A.

    2011-08-01

    Sensors for recording photoplethysmographic signals from the nervous tissue of the spinal cord are described. The purpose of these sensors is to establish whether perfusion is compromised in various states of injury which occur in certain animal models of spinal cord injury, for example compression injury. Various measures of perfusion are applicable such as the amplitude of the photoplethysmograph signal and the oxygen saturation, measured using a dual wavelength configuration. Signals are usually compared to baseline measurements made in uninjured subjects. This paper describes two types of probe, one based on optical fibres, and one in which optotes are placed in direct contact with the tissue surface. Results from a study based on a compression model utilising a fibreoptic sensor are presented.

  7. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (Gtr), contraction rate (Rc), and reflex loop time delay (td). It was found that there are significant increases in Gtr and Rc and decrease in td in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P < 0.05). This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  8. Developing clinical practice guidelines for spinal cord medicine. Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Biddle, A K; Fraher, E P

    2000-02-01

    This article describes the process used by the Consortium for Spinal Cord Medicine to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for managing and treating individuals with spinal cord injury and provides important information on lessons learned and the potential problems to avoid. Issues to consider during the guideline development process include topic selection and explication, methods for selecting the panel chair and panel members, the writing of recommendations and supporting scientific rationales, peer-reviewing guidelines, and the process for disseminating, implementing, and evaluating guidelines. The applicability, advantages, and disadvantages of available evidence and guideline recommendation grading systems and issues arising from the lack of scientific evidence supporting particular recommendations are also discussed.

  9. Nanomedicine strategies for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    White-Schenk, Désirée; Shi, Riyi; Leary, James F

    2015-01-01

    Neurological injury, such as spinal cord injury, has a secondary injury associated with it. The secondary injury results from the biological cascade after the primary injury and affects previous uninjured, healthy tissue. Therefore, the mitigation of such a cascade would benefit patients suffering a primary injury and allow the body to recover more quickly. Unfortunately, the delivery of effective therapeutics is quite limited. Due to the inefficient delivery of therapeutic drugs, nanoparticles have become a major field of exploration for medical applications. Based on their material properties, they can help treat disease by delivering drugs to specific tissues, enhancing detection methods, or a mixture of both. Incorporating nanomedicine into the treatment of neuronal injury and disease would likely push nanomedicine into a new light. This review highlights the various pathological issues involved in secondary spinal cord injury, current treatment options, and the improvements that could be made using a nanomedical approach. PMID:25673988

  10. Continuous Cervical Epidural Analgesia in Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Mahesh; Taha, Nafisa; Purohit, Navita; Kothari, Vatsal; Singh, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is a devastating complication of cancer. Patients may often require high doses of opioids that may cause side effects, myoclonus being one such. A 63-year-old male suffering from malignant spinal cord compression was admitted to our institution. The primary team managed him conservatively with pharmacotherapy with no relief of pain, and he experienced myoclonus and sedation as adverse effects. A continuous cervical epidural catheter with local anesthetic infusion was inserted for 5 days to control his pain. This relieved his pain, which was sustained even after we removed the epidural catheter on day 5, for up to 64 days until the time of his death. Continuous cervical epidural local anesthetic infusions may help with refractory pain by deafferentation of noxious stimuli. Central neuraxial blocks may be a valuable rescue in selected patients. PMID:27803576

  11. Shedding Light on Restoring Respiratory Function After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Alilain, Warren J.; Silver, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Loss of respiratory function is one of the leading causes of death following spinal cord injury. Because of this, much work has been done in studying ways to restore respiratory function following spinal cord injury (SCI) – including pharmacological and regeneration strategies. With the emergence of new and powerful tools from molecular neuroscience, new therapeutically relevant alternatives to these approaches have become available, including expression of light sensitive proteins called channelrhodopsins. In this article we briefly review the history of various attempts to restore breathing after C2 hemisection, and focus on our recent work using the activation of light sensitive channels to restore respiratory function after experimental SCI. We also discuss how such light-induced activity can help shed light on the inner workings of the central nervous system respiratory circuitry that controls diaphragmatic function. PMID:19893756

  12. A telerehabilitation intervention for persons with spinal cord dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Houlihan, Bethlyn Vergo; Jette, Alan; Paasche-Orlow, Michael; Wierbicky, Jane; Ducharme, Stan; Zazula, Judi; Cuevas, Penelope; Friedman, Robert H; Williams, Steve

    2011-09-01

    Pressure ulcers and depression are common preventable conditions secondary to a spinal cord dysfunction. However, few successful, low-cost preventive approaches have been identified. We have developed a dynamic automated telephone calling system, termed Care Call, to empower and motivate people with spinal cord dysfunction to improve their skin care, seek treatment for depression, and appropriately use the healthcare system. Herein, we describe the design and development of Care Call, its novel features, and promising preliminary results of our pilot testing. Voice quality testing showed that Care Call was able to understand all voice characteristics except very soft-spoken speech. Importantly, pilot study subjects felt Care Call could be particularly useful for people who are depressed, those with acute injury, and those without access to quality care. The results of a randomized controlled trial currently underway to evaluate Care Call will be available in 2011. PMID:21389846

  13. In Vivo Reprogramming for Brain and Spinal Cord Repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Wernig, Marius; Berninger, Benedikt; Nakafuku, Masato; Parmar, Malin; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Cell reprogramming technologies have enabled the generation of various specific cell types including neurons from readily accessible patient cells, such as skin fibroblasts, providing an intriguing novel cell source for autologous cell transplantation. However, cell transplantation faces several difficult hurdles such as cell production and purification, long-term survival, and functional integration after transplantation. Recently, in vivo reprogramming, which makes use of endogenous cells for regeneration purpose, emerged as a new approach to circumvent cell transplantation. There has been evidence for in vivo reprogramming in the mouse pancreas, heart, and brain and spinal cord with various degrees of success. This mini review summarizes the latest developments presented in the first symposium on in vivo reprogramming glial cells into functional neurons in the brain and spinal cord, held at the 2014 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in Washington, DC. PMID:26730402

  14. Macrophage and microglial plasticity in the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    David, S; Greenhalgh, A D; Kroner, A

    2015-10-29

    Macrophages in the injured spinal cord arise from resident microglia and from infiltrating peripheral myeloid cells. Microglia respond within minutes after central nervous system (CNS) injury and along with other CNS cells signal the influx of their peripheral counterpart. Although some of the functions they carry out are similar, they appear to be specialized to perform particular roles after CNS injury. Microglia and macrophages are very plastic cells that can change their phenotype drastically in response to in vitro and in vivo conditions. They can change from pro-inflammatory, cytotoxic cells to anti-inflammatory, pro-repair phenotypes. The microenvironment of the injured CNS importantly influences macrophage plasticity. This review discusses the phagocytosis and cytokine-mediated effects on macrophage plasticity in the context of spinal cord injury.

  15. Outcomes in Treatment for Intradural Spinal Cord Ependymomas

    SciTech Connect

    Volpp, P. Brian Han, Khanh; Kagan, A. Robert; Tome, Michael

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Spinal cord ependymomas are rare tumors, accounting for <2% of all primary central nervous system tumors. This study assessed the treatment outcomes for patients diagnosed with spinal cord ependymomas within the Southern California Kaiser Permanente system. Methods and Materials: We studied 23 patients treated with surgery with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The local and distant control rates and overall survival rates were determined. Results: The overall local control, overall recurrence, and 9-year overall survival rate was 96%, 17.4%, and 63.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate that en bloc gross total resection should be the initial treatment, with radiotherapy reserved primarily for postoperative cases with unfavorable characteristics such as residual tumor, anaplastic histologic features, or piecemeal resection. Excellent local control and overall survival rates can be achieved using modern microsurgical techniques, with or without local radiotherapy.

  16. Comprehensive assessment of walking function after human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Awai, Lea; Curt, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Regaining any locomotor function after spinal cord injury is not only of immediate importance for affected patients but also for clinical research as it allows to investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment and locomotor recovery. Clinical scores inform on functional outcomes that are clinically meaningful to value effects of therapy while they all lack the ability to explain underlying mechanisms of recovery. For this purpose, more elaborate recordings of walking kinematics combined with assessments of spinal cord conductivity and muscle activation patterns are required. A comprehensive assessment framework comprising of multiple complementary modalities is necessary. This will not only allow for capturing even subtle changes induced by interventions that are likely missed by standard clinical outcome measures. It will be fundamental to attribute observed changes to naturally occurring spontaneous recovery in contrast to specific changes induced by novel therapeutic interventions beyond the improvements achieved by conventional therapy.

  17. Biomaterial design considerations for repairing the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Ryan J; Rivet, Christopher J; Zuidema, Jonathan M; Popovich, Phillip G

    2011-01-01

    With increasing regularity, biomaterials are being designed with the goal of promoting repair of the injured spinal cord. Most often, the efficacy of novel biomaterials is tested using in vitro models; however, their true potential will be realized only after they are applied and evaluated in standardized in vivo spinal cord injury (SCI) models. The purpose of this review is to (1) provide a primer on SCI research including an overview of common pathogenic mechanisms that may respond to biomaterials and the in vivo models and outcomes assessment tools used to evaluate therapeutic efficacy; (2) review the types of biomaterials that have been tested in these models; (3) discuss which biomaterials might be applied to these models in the future; and (4) recommend future engineering strategies to create better in vivo models and assessment tools.

  18. The effect of whole-body resonance vibration in a porcine model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Chak, Jason; Dressler, Dan; Manouchehri, Neda; Okon, Elena B; Anderson, Lisa M; Melnyk, Angela D; Cripton, Peter A; Kwon, Brian K

    2015-06-15

    Whole-body vibration has been identified as a potential stressor to spinal cord injury (SCI) patients during pre-hospital transportation. However, the effect that such vibration has on the acutely injured spinal cord is largely unknown, particularly in the frequency domain of 5 Hz in which resonance of the spine occurs. The objective of the study was to investigate the consequences of resonance vibration on the injured spinal cord. Using our previously characterized porcine model of SCI, we subjected animals to resonance vibration (5.7±0.46 Hz) or no vibration for a period of 1.5 or 3.0 h. Locomotor function was assessed weekly and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected to assess different inflammatory and injury severity markers. Spinal cords were evaluated histologically to quantify preserved white and gray matter. No significant differences were found between groups for CSF levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and lL-8. Glial fibrillary acidic protein levels were lower in the resonance vibration group, compared with the non-vibrated control group. Spared white matter tissue was increased within the vibrated group at 7 d post-injury but this difference was not apparent at the 12-week time-point. No significant difference was observed in locomotor recovery following resonance vibration of the spine. Here, we demonstrate that exposure to resonance vibration for 1.5 or 3 h following SCI in our porcine model is not detrimental to the functional or histological outcomes. Our observation that a 3.0-h period of vibration at resonance frequency induces modest histological improvement at one week post-injury warrants further study.

  19. Deficiency in complement C1q improves histological and functional locomotor outcome after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Galvan, Manuel D.; Luchetti, Sabina; Burgos, Adrian M.; Nguyen, Hal X.; Hooshmand, Mitra J.; Anderson, Aileen J.; Hamers, Frank P.T.

    2009-01-01

    Although studies have suggested a role for the complement system in the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI), that role remains poorly defined. Additionally, the relative contribution of individual complement pathways in SCI is unknown. Our initial studies revealed that systemic complement activation was strongly influenced by genetic background and gender. Thus, to investigate the role of the classical complement pathway in contusion-induced SCI, male C1q knockout (KO) and wildtype (WT) mice on a complement sufficient background (BUB) received a mild-moderate T9 contusion injury with the Infinite Horizon (IH) impactor. BUB C1q KO mice exhibited greater locomotor recovery in comparison to BUB WT mice (p < 0.05). Improved recovery observed in BUB C1q KO mice was also associated with decreased threshold for withdrawal from a mild stimulus using von Frey filament testing. Surprisingly, quantification of microglia/macrophages (F4/80) by FACS analysis showed that BUB C1q KO mice exhibited a significantly greater percentage of macrophages in the spinal cord compared to BUB WT mice 3 days post injury (p < 0.05). However, this increased macrophage response appeared to be transient as stereological assessment of spinal cord tissue obtained 28 days post injury revealed no difference in F4/80 positive cells between groups. Stereological assessment of spinal cord tissue showed that BUB C1q KO mice had reduced lesion volume and an increase in tissue sparing in comparison to BUB WT mice (p < 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that initiation of the classical complement pathway via C1q is detrimental to recovery after SCI. PMID:19091977

  20. Evaluation of the Combination of Methylprednisolone and Tranilast after Spinal Cord Injury in Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Chuan, Xie Yun; Feng, Qiao Xiao; Alizada, Mujahid; Zhan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the neuroprotective functions of the combination therapy using methylprednisolone (MP) and tranilast (TR) after spinal cord injury (SCI) in adult rats. Methods Spinal cord compression injury model was achieved using Yasargil aneurysm clip. Rats were divided into control group, MP group, TR group, and combination therapy group using TR and MP. Rat models were assessed for locomotor functional recovery using Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) score, spinal cord water content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity 24 hours post SCI, haematoxylin and eosin staining and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) staining at 7 and 14 days post SCI. Results The spinal cord water content and MPO activity in the combination therapy group was significantly lower than the control group and the individual therapy groups p<0.05. The combination therapy group had significantly higher BBB scores than control group and individual therapy groups (p<0.05). At one week after SCI, GFAP expression in the combination group was significantly lower than the control group (p<0.05) but there was no significant difference compared to the individual therapy groups (p>0.05). At 2 weeks after SCI there was a slight decrease in GFAP expression compared to the first week but the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05), GFAP expression between the groups was not statistically significant p>0.05. Conclusion Combining MP and TR is therapeutically more effective in improving functional recovery, inhibiting inflammation and glial scar formation after acute SCI. PMID:27446512

  1. TWIK-Related Spinal Cord K+ Channel Expression Is Increased in the Spinal Dorsal Horn after Spinal Nerve Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hee Youn; Zhang, Enji; Park, Sangil; Chung, Woosuk; Lee, Sunyeul; Kim, Dong Woon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The TWIK-related spinal cord K+ channel (TRESK) has recently been discovered and plays an important role in nociceptor excitability in the pain pathway. Because there have been no reports on the TRESK expression or its function in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in neuropathic pain, we analyzed TRESK expression in the spinal dorsal horn in a spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. Materials and Methods We established a SNL mouse model by using the L5-6 spinal nerves ligation. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry to investigate TRESK expression in the dorsal horn and L5 dorsal rot ganglion (DRG). Results The SNL group showed significantly higher expression of TRESK in the ipsilateral dorsal horn under pain, but low expression in L5 DRG. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed that immunoreactivity of TRESK was mostly restricted in neuronal cells, and that synapse markers GAD67 and VGlut2 appeared to be associated with TRESK expression. We were unable to find a significant association between TRESK and calcineurin by double immunofluorescence. Conclusion TRESK in spinal cord neurons may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain following injury. PMID:26256973

  2. Impact of Voice and Communication Deficits for Individuals with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Living in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Elizabeth C.; Jarman, Leigh; Cornwell, Petrea L.; Amsters, Delena I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Post-spinal cord injury (SCI), individuals may exhibit mild to moderate impairments in aspects of speech influenced by impaired respiratory support. However, limited research has been conducted into the impact of these impairments on activity and participation when living in the community. Aims: To examine the nature and extent of…

  3. Fertility treatment in spinal cord injury and other neurologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Trofimenko, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Infertility in individuals with neurologic disorders is complex in etiology and manifestation. Its management therefore often requires a multimodal approach. This review addresses the implications of spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurologic disease on fertility, including the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and compromised semen parameters. Available treatment approaches discussed include assisted ejaculation techniques and assisted reproductive technology including surgical sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:26904416

  4. Fertility treatment in spinal cord injury and other neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Trofimenko, Vera; Hotaling, James M

    2016-02-01

    Infertility in individuals with neurologic disorders is complex in etiology and manifestation. Its management therefore often requires a multimodal approach. This review addresses the implications of spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurologic disease on fertility, including the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and compromised semen parameters. Available treatment approaches discussed include assisted ejaculation techniques and assisted reproductive technology including surgical sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:26904416

  5. Oscillating field stimulation in the treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Walters, Beverly C

    2010-12-01

    The application of electrical current to injured tissue is known to promote healing. The use of this modality in healing the injured spinal cord to promote neurologic recovery has been introduced as a potential treatment for patients who previously had minimal hope of recovery. In in vitro and in vivo experiments, neural regeneration has been seen to occur, especially when an oscillating field is used. With this modality, an electrical current is applied in which the polarity changes direction on a periodic basis, preventing the "die-back" phenomenon of severed neural pathways. This mechanism of recovery has been demonstrated in several species in which sacrifice has been undertaken and spinal cords examined. In a study of humans, a small number of patients participated in a single phase Ia trial in which the safety of an implantable device was demonstrated, with indications of probable benefit, consistent with laboratory and animal studies. In addition, a number of additional patients were treated, and their results were examined along with the original cohort and were compared with historical control subjects. The device used in this mode of treatment has not been approved for use in the general spinal cord-injured population, pending further study. A larger multi-institutional trial needs to be done to further demonstrate efficacy and effectiveness, and outcomes will need to be agreed upon by spinal cord injury researchers, patients, and regulators before widespread use will be permitted. Unfortunately, some subtle changes experienced and valued by patients are not recognized as important or desirable by regulators or by all researchers. PMID:21172690

  6. Astrocytoma with involvement of medulla oblongata, spinal cord and spinal nerves in a raccoon (Procyon lotor)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neoplasms affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems of wild animals are extremely rare. Described are clinical signs, pathologic and immunohistochemical findings in an adult female raccoon (Procyon lotor) with an astrocytoma which involved brainstem, cervical spinal cord and roots of the ...

  7. Biomechanical properties of the spinal cord: implications for tissue engineering and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Richard D; Choi, David; Phillips, James B

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury is a severely debilitating condition which can leave individuals paralyzed and suffering from autonomic dysfunction. Regenerative medicine may offer a promising solution to this problem. Previous research has focused primarily on exploring the cellular and biological aspects of the spinal cord, yet relatively little remains known about the biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue. Given that a number of regenerative strategies aim to deliver cells and materials in the form of tissue-engineered therapies, understanding the biomechanical properties of host spinal cord tissue is important. We review the relevant biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue and provide the baseline knowledge required to apply these important physical concepts to spinal cord tissue engineering. PMID:27592549

  8. Spinal Cord Lesions in Congenital Toxoplasmosis Demonstrated with Neuroimaging, Including Their Successful Treatment in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Burrowes, Delilah; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Sautter, Mari; Heydemann, Peter; Rabiah, Peter; Lee, Daniel; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies for persons in the National Collaborative Chicago-Based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) with symptoms and signs referable to the spinal cord were reviewed. Three infants had symptomatic spinal cord lesions, another infant a Chiari malformation, and another infant a symptomatic peri-spinal cord lipoma. One patient had an unusual history of prolonged spinal cord symptoms presenting in middle age. Neuroimaging was used to establish her diagnosis and response to treatment. This 43 year-old woman with congenital toxoplasmosis developed progressive leg spasticity, weakness, numbness, difficulty walking, and decreased visual acuity and color vision without documented re-activation of her chorioretinal disease. At 52 years of age, spinal cord lesions in locations correlating with her symptoms and optic atrophy were diagnosed with 3 Tesla MRI scan. Treatment with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine decreased her neurologic symptoms, improved her neurologic examination, and resolved her enhancing spinal cord lesions seen on MRI. PMID:23487348

  9. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats. PMID:26487860

  10. Biomechanical properties of the spinal cord: implications for tissue engineering and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Richard D; Choi, David; Phillips, James B

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury is a severely debilitating condition which can leave individuals paralyzed and suffering from autonomic dysfunction. Regenerative medicine may offer a promising solution to this problem. Previous research has focused primarily on exploring the cellular and biological aspects of the spinal cord, yet relatively little remains known about the biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue. Given that a number of regenerative strategies aim to deliver cells and materials in the form of tissue-engineered therapies, understanding the biomechanical properties of host spinal cord tissue is important. We review the relevant biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue and provide the baseline knowledge required to apply these important physical concepts to spinal cord tissue engineering.

  11. The Louisville Swim Scale: A Novel Assessment of Hindlimb Function following Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Burke, Darlene A.; Baldini, Angela D.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Baltzley, Ryan; Bunger, Michelle; Magnuson, David S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of animal studies examining the recovery of function following spinal cord injury use the BBB Open-Field Locomotor Scale as a primary outcome measure. However, it is now well known that rehabilitation strategies can bring about significant improvements in hindlimb function in some animal models. Thus, improvements in walking following spinal cord injury in rats may be influenced by differences in activity levels and housing conditions during the first few weeks post-injury. Swimming is a natural form of locomotion that animals are not normally exposed to in the laboratory setting. We hypothesized that deficits in, and functional recovery of, swimming would accurately represent the locomotor capability of the nervous system in the absence of any retraining effects. To test this hypothesis, we have compared the recovery of walking and swimming in rats following a range of standardized spinal cord injuries and two different retraining strategies. In order to assess swimming, we developed a rating system we call the Louisville Swimming Scale (LSS) that evaluates three characteristics of swimming that are highly altered by spinal cord injury— namely, hindlimb movement, forelimb dependency, and body position. The data indicate that the LSS is a sensitive and reliable method of determining swimming ability and the improvement in hindlimb function after standardized contusion injury of the thoracic spinal cord. Furthermore, the data suggests that when used in conjunction with the BBB Open-field Locomotor Scale, the LSS assesses locomotor capabilities that are not influenced by a retraining effect. PMID:17115911

  12. Serine-threonine protein kinase activation may be an effective target for reducing neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Mu; Yang, Yan-wei; Cheng, Wei-ping; Lu, Jia-kai; Hou, Si-yu; Dong, Xiu-hua; Liu, Shi-yao

    2015-01-01

    The signaling mechanisms underlying ischemia-induced nerve cell apoptosis are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of apoptosis-related signal transduction pathways following ischemic spinal cord injury, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), serine-threonine protein kinase (Akt) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury by inserting a catheter balloon in the left subclavian artery for 25 minutes. Rat models exhibited notable hindlimb dysfunction. Apoptotic cells were abundant in the anterior horn and central canal of the spinal cord. The number of apoptotic neurons was highest 48 hours post injury. The expression of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) and phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK) increased immediately after reperfusion, peaked at 4 hours (p-Akt) or 2 hours (p-ERK), decreased at 12 hours, and then increased at 24 hours. Phosphorylated JNK expression reduced after reperfusion, increased at 12 hours to near normal levels, and then showed a downward trend at 24 hours. Pearson linear correlation analysis also demonstrated that the number of apoptotic cells negatively correlated with p-Akt expression. These findings suggest that activation of Akt may be a key contributing factor in the delay of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord ischemia, particularly at the stage of reperfusion, and thus may be a target for neuronal protection and reduction of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury. PMID:26807120

  13. A mechanical microconnector system for restoration of tissue continuity and long-term drug application into the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Brazda, Nicole; Voss, Christian; Estrada, Veronica; Lodin, Homaira; Weinrich, Nils; Seide, Klaus; Müller, Jörg; Müller, Hans W

    2013-12-01

    Complete transection of the spinal cord leaves a gap of several mm which fills with fibrous scar tissue. Several approaches in rodent models have used tubes, foams, matrices or tissue implants to bridge this gap. Here, we describe a mechanical microconnector system (mMS) to re-adjust the retracted spinal cord stumps. The mMS is a multi-channel system of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), designed to fit into the spinal cord tissue gap after transection, with an outlet tubing system to apply negative pressure to the mMS thus sucking the spinal cord stumps into the honeycomb-structured holes. The stumps adhere to the microstructure of the mMS walls and remain in the mMS after removal of the vacuum. We show that the mMS preserves tissue integrity and allows axonal regrowth at 2, 5 and 19 weeks post lesion with no adverse tissue effects like in-bleeding or cyst formation. Preliminary assessment of locomotor function in the open field suggested beneficial effects of the mMS. Additional inner micro-channels enable local substance delivery into the lesion center via an attached osmotic minipump. We suggest that the mMS is a suitable device to adapt and stabilize the injured spinal cord after surgical resection of scar tissue (e.g., for chronic patients) or traumatic injuries with large tissue and bone damages.

  14. [Modeling the spine and spinal cord].

    PubMed

    Dubousset, Jean; Lavaste, Françoise; Skalli, Wafa; Lafage, Virginie

    2011-11-01

    3D reconstruction of the spine may cover morphological, mechanical and functional aspects, among others. Since the computer era, rapid progress has been made in the development of practical applications, as well in the analysis of spinal pathophysiology during growth and aging. This technology is particularly usefulfor the planning, simulation and execution of corrective surgery, invention of new procedures, and therapeutic follow-up. PMID:22844745

  15. [Spinal cord compression disclosing rib hydatidosis].

    PubMed

    Ousehal, A; Adil, A; El Azhari, A; Kadiri, R

    1995-12-01

    The authors report an exceptional case of spinal compression following an isolate rib hydatidosis. The CT scan has suspected the diagnosis. The authors recall the anatomoclinic features and specify the radiologic aspects of the osseous hydatidosis, especially the rib's localization which is very rare. MR imaging in addition of its diagnosis role showing a very evocative cyst images, is the exam of choice in order to appreciate the disease's extent and the degree of medular sufferance. PMID:8676297

  16. Aquaporin-4 in brain and spinal cord oedema.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, S; Papadopoulos, M C

    2010-07-28

    Brain oedema is a major clinical problem produced by CNS diseases (e.g. stroke, brain tumour, brain abscess) and systemic diseases that secondarily affect the CNS (e.g. hyponatraemia, liver failure). The swollen brain is compressed against the surrounding dura and skull, which causes the intracranial pressure to rise, leading to brain ischaemia, herniation, and ultimately death. A water channel protein, aquaporin-4 (AQP4), is found in astrocyte foot processes (blood-brain border), the glia limitans (subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid-brain border) and ependyma (ventricular cerebrospinal fluid-brain border). Experiments using mice lacking AQP4 or alpha syntrophin (which secondarily downregulate AQP4) showed that AQP4 facilitates oedema formation in diseases causing cytotoxic (cell swelling) oedema such as cerebral ischaemia, hyponatraemia and meningitis. In contrast, AQP4 facilitates oedema elimination in diseases causing vasogenic (vessel leak) oedema and therefore AQP4 deletion aggravates brain oedema produced by brain tumour and brain abscess. AQP4 is also important in spinal cord oedema. AQP4 deletion was associated with less cord oedema and improved outcome after compression spinal cord injury in mice. Here we consider the possible routes of oedema formation and elimination in the injured cord and speculate about the role of AQP4. Finally we discuss the role of AQP4 in neuromyelitis optica (NMO), an inflammatory demyelinating disease that produces oedema in the spinal cord and optic nerves. NMO patients have circulating AQP4 IgG autoantibody, which is now used for diagnosing NMO. We speculate how NMO-IgG might produce CNS inflammation, demyelination and oedema. Since AQP4 plays a key role in the pathogenesis of CNS oedema, we conclude that AQP4 inhibitors and activators may reduce CNS oedema in many diseases.

  17. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. PMID:27316567

  18. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Spinal Cord Injury: Clinical Practicability

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Trauma to the spinal cord often results not only in sensorimotor but also autonomic impairments. The loss of autonomic control over the cardiovascular system can cause profound blood pressure (BP) derangements in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) and may therefore lead to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in this population. The use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) allows insights into circadian BP profiles, which have been shown to be of good prognostic value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in able-bodied subjects. Past studies in SCI subjects using ABPM have shown that alterations in circadian BP patterns are dependent on the spinal lesion level. Tetraplegic subjects with sensorimotor complete lesions have a decreased daytime arterial BP, loss of the physiological nocturnal BP dip, and higher circadian BP variability, including potentially life-threatening hypertensive episodes known as autonomic dysreflexia (AD), compared with paraplegic and able-bodied subjects. The proposed underlying mechanisms of these adverse BP alterations mainly are attributed to a lost or decreased central drive to sympathetic spinal preganglionic neurons controlling the heart and blood vessels. In addition, several maladaptive anatomical changes within the spinal cord and the periphery, as well as the general decrease of physical daily activity in SCI subjects, account for adverse BP changes. ABPM enables the identification of adverse BP profiles and the associated increased risk for CVD in SCI subjects. Concurrently, it also might provide a useful clinical tool to monitor improvements of AD and lost nocturnal dip after appropriate treatments in the SCI population. PMID:24175653

  19. Exercise modulates chloride homeostasis after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Côté, Marie-Pascale; Gandhi, Sapan; Zambrotta, Marina; Houlé, John D

    2014-07-01

    Activity-based therapies are routinely integrated in spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation programs because they result in a reduction of hyperreflexia and spasticity. However, the mechanisms by which exercise regulates activity in spinal pathways to reduce spasticity and improve functional recovery are poorly understood. Persisting alterations in the action of GABA on postsynaptic targets is a signature of CNS injuries, including SCI. The action of GABA depends on the intracellular chloride concentration, which is determined largely by the expression of two cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs), KCC2 and NKCC1, which serve as chloride exporters and importers, respectively. We hypothesized that the reduction in hyperreflexia with exercise after SCI relies on a return to chloride homeostasis. Sprague Dawley rats received a spinal cord transection at T12 and were assigned to SCI-7d, SCI-14d, SCI-14d+exercise, SCI-28d, SCI-28d+exercise, or SCI-56d groups. During a terminal experiment, H-reflexes were recorded from interosseus muscles after stimulation of the tibial nerve and the low-frequency-dependent depression (FDD) was assessed. We provide evidence that exercise returns spinal excitability and levels of KCC2 and NKCC1 toward normal levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Acutely altering chloride extrusion using the KCC2 blocker DIOA masked the effect of exercise on FDD, whereas blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide returned FDD toward intact levels after SCI. Our results indicate that exercise contributes to reflex recovery and restoration of endogenous inhibition through a return to chloride homeostasis after SCI. This lends support for CCCs as part of a pathway that could be manipulated to improve functional recovery when combined with rehabilitation programs.

  20. Gene Delivery Strategies to Promote Spinal Cord Repair

    PubMed Central

    Walthers, Christopher M; Seidlits, Stephanie K

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapies hold great promise for the treatment of many neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic injuries in the central nervous system. However, development of effective methods to deliver such therapies in a controlled manner to the spinal cord is a necessity for their translation to the clinic. Although essential progress has been made to improve efficiency of transgene delivery and reduce the immunogenicity of genetic vectors, there is still much work to be done to achieve clinical strategies capable of reversing neurodegeneration and mediating tissue regeneration. In particular, strategies to achieve localized, robust expression of therapeutic transgenes by target cell types, at controlled levels over defined time periods, will be necessary to fully regenerate functional spinal cord tissues. This review summarizes the progress over the last decade toward the development of effective gene therapies in the spinal cord, including identification of appropriate target genes, improvements to design of genetic vectors, advances in delivery methods, and strategies for delivery of multiple transgenes with synergistic actions. The potential of biomaterials to mediate gene delivery while simultaneously providing inductive scaffolding to facilitate tissue regeneration is also discussed. PMID:25922572

  1. Hydraulic resistance exercise benefits cardiovascular fitness of spinal cord injured.

    PubMed

    Cooney, M M; Walker, J B

    1986-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of hydraulic resistance exercise training on fitness in spinal cord injured patients. Ten subjects (five quadriplegics and five paraplegics; seven males and three females) participated in a 9-wk training program. Subjects trained 3 times/wk. The 9-wk program was divided into three, 3-wk periods, designated stages I, II, and III. A discontinuous arm crank protocol was used to assess VO2max before and after training. Assessment of the intensity of the hydraulic resistance exercise was made by continuous ECG monitoring during training. A 60 to 90% maximum observed heart rate was calculated for subjects. The spinal cord-injured subjects' VO2max increased 28.1%, and maximum exercise power output increased 36.7% as a result of the 9-wk training program. Both of these findings were statistically significant (P less than 0.01). The exercise intensity was within a 60 to 90% training zone during stages II and III but not during stage I training. The results of this study indicate that hydraulic resistance exercise training may produce increased cardiovascular fitness in spinal cord-injured subjects.

  2. The role of extracellular matrix in spinal cord development.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Stefan; Faissner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The development of the spinal cord represents one of the most complex structure developments of the central nervous system (CNS) as it has to unfold along the longitudinal axis and within segmental cues. There it has to cope with on the one hand connection to the periphery (skeletal muscle, dermomyotome, smooth muscles) and connect it to the higher midbrain and cortical regions of the CNS. Major studies have been performed to analyze the specific subset of transcription factors of the different types of cells within the different segments of the spinal cord. But transcription factor expression is always a result of cellular positioning as the environment defines the intracellular changes during differentiation and in adulthood. The surrounding composed of mainly extracellular matrix does not only provide a "glue" to attach cells to each other but also provides signals with special domains docking to cell surface receptors and presents soluble molecules such as basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGFs) or Wnt-proteins. The availability of these molecules depends on the matrix composition and influences the transcription factor code of each cell. Recent research has also provided strong evidence that depletion of single matrix molecules like Tenascin C (TnC) can lead to developmental changes within the progenitor pools. Therefore beyond the transcription factor code that defines cellular properties we want to focus on the role of the extracellular matrix in the development of the spinal cord. PMID:26028310

  3. Endogenous repair after spinal cord contusion injuries in the rat.

    PubMed

    Beattie, M S; Bresnahan, J C; Komon, J; Tovar, C A; Van Meter, M; Anderson, D K; Faden, A I; Hsu, C Y; Noble, L J; Salzman, S; Young, W

    1997-12-01

    Contusion injuries of the rat thoracic spinal cord were made using a standardized device developed for the Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study (MASCIS). Lesions of different severity were studied for signs of endogenous repair at times up to 6 weeks following injury. Contusion injuries produced a typical picture of secondary damage resulting in the destruction of the cord center and the chronic sparing of a peripheral rim of fibers which varied in amount depending upon the injury magnitude. It was noted that the cavities often developed a dense cellular matrix that became partially filled with nerve fibers and associated Schwann cells. The amount of fiber and Schwann cell ingrowth was inversely related to the severity of injury and amount of peripheral fiber sparing. The source of the ingrowing fibers was not determined, but many of them clearly originated in the dorsal roots. In addition to signs of regeneration, we noted evidence for the proliferation of cells located in the ependymal zone surrounding the central canal at early times following contusion injuries. These cells may contribute to the development of cellular trabeculae that provide a scaffolding within the lesion cavity that provides the substrates for cellular infiltration and regeneration of axons. Together, these observations suggest that the endogenous reparative response to spinal contusion injury is substantial. Understanding the regulation and restrictions on the repair processes might lead to better ways in which to encourage spontaneous recovery after CNS injury. PMID:9417825

  4. Somatostatinergic nerves in the cervical spinal cord of the monkey.

    PubMed

    Burnweit, C; Forssmann, W G

    1979-08-01

    Somatostatinergic nerves in the spinal cord of the monkey were investigated utilizing immunohistochemistry with various antibodies against synthetic somatostatin. In contrast to earlier investigations, it is shown that somatostatinergic nerve endings occur in most of the areas of the grey matter of the spinal cord. The somatostatinergic axons are, however, characteristically distributed in three main regions: (1) Densely-packed endings are seen in lamina II of the substantia gelatinosa, forming a crescent-shaped pattern in the columna dorsalis. Somatostatin immunoreactivity is also seen in lamina I and in the Lissauer tract. (2) A fine network of fibers is observed around the central canal; the endings are concentrated on special cell bodies. Some single perikarya are also stained in this region. (3) A loose network of single fibers is found ending on perikarya of the columna lateralis or ventralis. The perikarya of the nerve axons, with the exception of those terminating in the columna dorsalis, have as yet not been identified. In order to better understand the somatostatinergic system of the spinal cord, these newly-detected somatostatinergic nerves must be studied and their exact pathways analyzed.

  5. Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Rat Spinal Cord In-Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab

    2008-05-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), an MRI technique based on probing the structure of tissues at a microscopic level is used to determine regional values of Fractional Anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (Dav) of excised and in-vivo rat spinal cords. Two pulse sequences: Spin Echo (SE) and Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) are optimized to provide the best image quality, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the greatest spatial resolution at reasonable acquisition times in the rat spinal cord. The study was conducted using a 7T BRUKER BioSpec MRI animal scanner. In the ex-vivo experiments images with the spatial resolution of 100 μm and the SNR of 1.938 ± 0.010 were acquired in 2 minutes. After optimization both methods were applied in-vivo. The values of FA and Dav acquired in this study showed good correlation with the literature values. Furthermore, results from these studies should provide the necessary baseline data for serial DTI in injured spinal cord in future studies.

  6. Caffeine treatment aggravates secondary degeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Chang; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in some form of paralysis. Recently, SCI therapy has been focused on preventing secondary injury to reduce both neuroinflammation and lesion size so that functional outcome after an SCI may be improved. Previous studies have shown that adenosine receptors (AR) are a major regulator of inflammation after an SCI. The current study was performed to examine the effect of caffeine, a pan-AR blocker, on spontaneous functional recovery after an SCI. Animals were assigned into 3 groups randomly, including sham, PBS and caffeine groups. The rat SCI was generated by an NYU impactor with a 10 g rod dropped from a 25 mm height at thoracic 9 spinal cord level. Caffeine and PBS were injected daily during the experiment period. Hind limb motor function was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale at 1 week and 4 weeks after the SCI. Spinal cord segments were collected after final behavior evaluation for morphological analysis. The tissue sparing was evaluated by luxol fast blue staining. Immunofluorescence stain was employed to assess astrocyte activation and neurofilament positioning, while microglia activation was examined by immunohistochemistry stain.The results showed that spontaneous functional recovery was blocked after the animals were subjected caffeine daily. Moreover, caffeine administration increased the demyelination area, promoted astrocyte and microglia activation and decreased the quantity of neurofilaments. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity effect of caffeine may be associated with the inhibition of neural repair and the promotion of neuroinflammation. PMID:26746340

  7. Nitrous oxide myelopathy posing as spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Dalyai, Richard; Flanders, Adam E; Harrop, James

    2012-05-01

    The authors describe a patient who presented with acute tetraparesis and a proposed acute traumatic spinal cord injury that was the result of nitrous oxide myelopathy. This 19-year-old man sustained a traumatic fall off a 6-ft high wall. His examination was consistent with a central cord syndrome with the addition of dorsal column impairment. Cervical MRI demonstrated an isolated dorsal column signal that was suggestive of a nontraumatic etiology. The patient's symptoms resolved entirely over the course of 48 hours. Nitrous oxide abuse is increasing in prevalence. Its toxic side effects can mask vitamin B12 and folate deficiency and central cord syndrome. The patient's history and radiographic presentation are key to establishing a diagnosis.

  8. The action of local anaesthetics on the spinal cord of the cat.

    PubMed

    TAVERNER, D

    1960-03-01

    The effects of intravenously injected lignocaine, procaine and amethocaine on the monosynaptic and polysynaptic reflexes and the cord dorsum potentials elicited by selective electrical stimulation of appropriate afferent fibres have been investigated in decerebrate cats before and after strychnine. The three drugs depress the amplitude of the reflex responses in the basal preparation for 40 to 50 min. Smaller doses eliminate the reflex augmentation produced by strychnine for comparable periods. Very small doses selectively abolish the augmentation of the P component of the cord dorsum response induced by strychnine. The drugs have no effect on post-tetanic potentiation of the monosynaptic reflex response evoked from the gastrocnemius muscle in the cat. Their activity on the spinal cord is roughly proportional to their local anaesthetic potency. The ratios of the doses which produce the same central activity are amethocaine 3: lignocaine 10: procaine 20.

  9. Exercise recommendations for individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Patrick L; Nash, Mark S

    2004-01-01

    Persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) exhibit deficits in volitional motor control and sensation that limit not only the performance of daily tasks but also the overall activity level of these persons. This population has been characterised as extremely sedentary with an increased incidence of secondary complications including diabetes mellitus, hypertension and atherogenic lipid profiles. As the daily lifestyle of the average person with SCI is without adequate stress for conditioning purposes, structured exercise activities must be added to the regular schedule if the individual is to reduce the likelihood of secondary complications and/or to enhance their physical capacity. The acute exercise responses and the capacity for exercise conditioning are directly related to the level and completeness of the spinal lesion. Appropriate exercise testing and training of persons with SCI should be based on the individual's exercise capacity as determined by accurate assessment of the spinal lesion. The standard means of classification of SCI is by application of the International Standards for Classification of Spinal Cord Injury, written by the Neurological Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury Association. Individuals with complete spinal injuries at or above the fourth thoracic level generally exhibit dramatically diminished cardiac acceleration with maximal heart rates less than 130 beats/min. The work capacity of these persons will be limited by reductions in cardiac output and circulation to the exercising musculature. Persons with complete spinal lesions below the T(10) level will generally display injuries to the lower motor neurons within the lower extremities and, therefore, will not retain the capacity for neuromuscular activation by means of electrical stimulation. Persons with paraplegia also exhibit reduced exercise capacity and increased heart rate responses (compared with the non-disabled), which have been associated with circulatory limitations

  10. Improving outcome of sensorimotor functions after traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In the rehabilitation of a patient suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI), the exploitation of neuroplasticity is well established. It can be facilitated through the training of functional movements with technical assistance as needed and can improve outcome after an SCI. The success of such training in individuals with incomplete SCI critically depends on the presence of physiological proprioceptive input to the spinal cord leading to meaningful muscle activations during movement performances. Some actual preclinical approaches to restore function by compensating for the loss of descending input to spinal networks following complete/incomplete SCI are critically discussed in this report. Electrical and pharmacological stimulation of spinal neural networks is still in the experimental stage, and despite promising repair studies in animal models, translations to humans up to now have not been convincing. It is possible that a combination of techniques targeting the promotion of axonal regeneration is necessary to advance the restoration of function. In the future, refinement of animal models according to clinical conditions and requirements may contribute to greater translational success. PMID:27303641

  11. Intradural Extramedullary Tuberculoma of the Spinal Cord Following Tuberculous Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Deok-Ki; Kwon, Young-Min

    2015-06-01

    Intradural extramedullary tuberculoma of the spinal cord (IETSC) is an uncommon disease which can occurs secondary to tuberculous meningitis. A 31-year-old woman was diagnosed as tuberculous meningitis after mental disorientation. Her mentality was recovered after antituberculous therapy. After 7 months of antituberculous therapy, paraplegia has developed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass lesion between the T1 and T12 spinal levels with arachnoid thickening which results in the development of tuberculoma. She received surgical resection of IETSC followed by antituberculous therapy and neurological function has been improved. The two years after surgical treatment, spinal MRI showed syringomyelia between T1 to L1. But, her neurological outcome was not aggravated. PMID:26217394

  12. Measurement of Intraspinal Pressure After Spinal Cord Injury: Technical Note from the Injured Spinal Cord Pressure Evaluation Study.

    PubMed

    Werndle, Melissa C; Saadoun, Samira; Phang, Isaac; Czosnyka, Marek; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Zofia; Smielewski, Peter; Jamous, Ali; Bell, B Anthony; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is routinely measured in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). We describe a novel technique that allowed us to monitor intraspinal pressure (ISP) at the injury site in 14 patients who had severe acute traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), analogous to monitoring ICP after brain injury. A Codman probe was inserted subdurally to measure the pressure of the injured spinal cord compressed against the surrounding dura. Our key finding is that it is feasible and safe to monitor ISP for up to a week in patients after TSCI, starting within 72 h of the injury. With practice, probe insertion and calibration take less than 10 min. The ISP signal characteristics after TSCI were similar to the ICP signal characteristics recorded after TBI. Importantly, there were no associated complications. Future studies are required to determine whether reducing ISP improves neurological outcome after severe TSCI. PMID:27165930

  13. Adult spinal cord ependymal layer: a promising pool of quiescent stem cells to treat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Elena; Malas, Stavros

    2013-11-28

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major health burden and currently there is no effective medical intervention. Research performed over the last decade revealed that cells surrounding the central canal of the adult spinal cord and forming the ependymal layer acquire stem cell properties either in vitro or in response to injury. Following SCI activated ependymal cells generate progeny cells which migrate to the injury site but fail to produce the appropriate type of cells in sufficient number to limit the damage, rendering this physiological response mainly ineffective. Research is now focusing on the manipulation of ependymal cells to produce cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage which are primarily lost in such a situation leading to secondary neuronal degeneration. Thus, there is a need for a more focused approach to understand the molecular properties of adult ependymal cells in greater detail and develop effective strategies for guiding their response during SCI.

  14. The Radiation Dose-Response of the Human Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize the radiation dose-response of the human spinal cord. Methods and Materials: Because no single institution has sufficient data to establish a dose-response function for the human spinal cord, published reports were combined. Requisite data were dose and fractionation, number of patients at risk, number of myelopathy cases, and survival experience of the population. Eight data points for cervical myelopathy were obtained from five reports. Using maximum likelihood estimation correcting for the survival experience of the population, estimates were obtained for the median tolerance dose, slope parameter, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio in a logistic dose-response function. An adequate fit to thoracic data was not possible. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments involving the cervical cord were also analyzed. Results: The estimate of the median tolerance dose (cervical cord) was 69.4 Gy (95% confidence interval, 66.4-72.6). The {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy. At 45 Gy, the (extrapolated) probability of myelopathy is 0.03%; and at 50 Gy, 0.2%. The dose for a 5% myelopathy rate is 59.3 Gy. Graphical analysis indicates that the sensitivity of the thoracic cord is less than that of the cervical cord. There appears to be a sensitizing effect from hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Conclusions: The estimate of {alpha}/{beta} is smaller than usually quoted, but values this small were found in some studies. Using {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy, one would expect a considerable advantage by decreasing the dose/fraction to less than 2 Gy. These results were obtained from only single fractions/day and should not be applied uncritically to hyperfractionation.

  15. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Spinal Metastases Recurring in Close Proximity to Previously Irradiated Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Jackson, Paul S.; Minn, A. Yuriko; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: As the spinal cord tolerance often precludes reirradiation with conventional techniques, local recurrence within a previously irradiated field presents a treatment challenge. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 51 lesions in 42 patients treated from 2002 to 2008 whose spinal metastases recurred in a previous radiation field (median previous spinal cord dose of 40 Gy) and were subsequently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Results: SRS was delivered to a median marginal dose of 20 Gy (range, 10-30 Gy) in 1-5 fractions (median, 2), targeting a median tumor volume of 10.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-128.6 cm{sup 3}). Converting the SRS regimens with the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3), the median spinal cord maximum single-session equivalent dose (SSED) was 12.1 Gy{sub 3} (range, 4.7-19.3 Gy{sub 3}). With a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 2-47 months), the Kaplan-Meier local control and overall survival rates at 6/12 months were 87%/73% and 81%/68%, respectively. A time to retreatment of {<=}12 months and the combination of time to retreatment of {<=}12 months with an SSED of <15 Gy{sub 10} were significant predictors of local failure on univariate and multivariate analyses. In patients with a retreatment interval of <12 months, 6/12 month local control rates were 88%/58%, with a SSED of >15 Gy{sub 10}, compared to 45%/0% with <15 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. One patient (2%) experienced Grade 4 neurotoxicity. Conclusion: SRS is safe and effective in the treatment of spinal metastases recurring in previously irradiated fields. Tumor recurrence within 12 months may correlate with biologic aggressiveness and require higher SRS doses (SSED >15 Gy{sub 10}). Further research is needed to define the partial volume retreatment tolerance of the spinal cord and the optimal target dose.

  16. Monoaminergic modulation of spinal viscero-sympathetic function in the neonatal mouse thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Amanda L; Sawchuk, Michael; Hochman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    Descending serotonergic, noradrenergic, and dopaminergic systems project diffusely to sensory, motor and autonomic spinal cord regions. Using neonatal mice, this study examined monoaminergic modulation of visceral sensory input and sympathetic preganglionic output. Whole-cell recordings from sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) in spinal cord slice demonstrated that serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine modulated SPN excitability. Serotonin depolarized all, while noradrenaline and dopamine depolarized most SPNs. Serotonin and noradrenaline also increased SPN current-evoked firing frequency, while both increases and decreases were seen with dopamine. In an in vitro thoracolumbar spinal cord/sympathetic chain preparation, stimulation of splanchnic nerve visceral afferents evoked reflexes and subthreshold population synaptic potentials in thoracic ventral roots that were dose-dependently depressed by the monoamines. Visceral afferent stimulation also evoked bicuculline-sensitive dorsal root potentials thought to reflect presynaptic inhibition via primary afferent depolarization. These dorsal root potentials were likewise dose-dependently depressed by the monoamines. Concomitant monoaminergic depression of population afferent synaptic transmission recorded as dorsal horn field potentials was also seen. Collectively, serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine were shown to exert broad and comparable modulatory regulation of viscero-sympathetic function. The general facilitation of SPN efferent excitability with simultaneous depression of visceral afferent-evoked motor output suggests that descending monoaminergic systems reconfigure spinal cord autonomic function away from visceral sensory influence. Coincident monoaminergic reductions in dorsal horn responses support a multifaceted modulatory shift in the encoding of spinal visceral afferent activity. Similar monoamine-induced changes have been observed for somatic sensorimotor function, suggesting an integrative

  17. Valproic acid attenuates microgliosis in injured spinal cord and purinergic P2X4 receptor expression in activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Yen; Chen, Po-See; Wang, Jing-Wen; Chuang, De-Maw; Yang, Chung-Shi; Tzeng, Shun-Fen

    2013-05-01

    Peripheral injection with a high dose of valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, into animals with mild or moderate spinal cord injury (SCI) for 1 week can reduce spinal cord tissue loss and promote hindlimb locomotor recovery. A purinergic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) receptor subtype, P2X4 receptor (P2X4 R), has been considered as a potential target to diminish SCI-associated inflammatory responses. In this study, using a minipump-based infusion system, we found that intraspinal infusion with VPA for 3 days into injured spinal cord significantly improved hindlimb locomotion of rats with severe SCI induced by a 10-g NYU impactor dropping from the height of 50 mm onto the spinal T9/10 segment. The neuronal fibers in the injured spinal cord tissues were significantly preserved in VPA-treated rats compared with those observed in vehicle-treated animals. Moreover, the accumulation of microglia/macrophages and astrocytes in the injured spinal cord was attenuated in the animal group receiving VPA infusion. VPA also significantly reduced P2X4 R expression post-SCI. Furthermore, in vitro study indicated that VPA, but not the other HDAC inhibitors, sodium butyrate and trichostatin A (TSA), caused downregulation of P2X4 R in microglia activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-triggered signaling was involved in the effect of VPA on the inhibition of P2X4 R gene expression. In addition to the findings from others, our results also provide important evidence to show the inhibitory effect of VPA on P2X4 R expression in activated microglia, which may contribute to reduction of SCI-induced gliosis and subsequently preservation of spinal cord tissues. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula draining into spinal cord veins: case report].

    PubMed

    Seda, Lauro Franco; Pieruccetti, Marco Antonio; Freitas, José Maria Modenesi; Listik, Sérgio; Pereira, Clemente Augusto Brito

    2002-09-01

    We present an usual case of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary and spinal cord venous plexus drainage and discuss its etiological, physiopathological, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  19. Role of endogenous neural stem cells in spinal cord injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Stenudd, Moa; Sabelström, Hanna; Frisén, Jonas

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury is followed by glial scar formation, which has positive and negative effects on recovery from the lesion. More than half of the astrocytes in the glial scar are generated by ependymal cells, the neural stem cells in the spinal cord. We recently demonstrated that the neural stem cell-derived scar component has several beneficial functions, including restricting tissue damage and neural loss after spinal cord injury. This finding identifies endogenous neural stem cells as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injury.

  20. Vascular Diseases of the Spinal Cord: Infarction, Hemorrhage, and Venous Congestive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Shawn M; Jeong, William J; Morales, Humberto; Abruzzo, Todd A

    2016-10-01

    Vascular pathologies of the spinal cord are rare and often overlooked. This article presents clinical and imaging approaches to the diagnosis and management of spinal vascular conditions most commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ischemia, infarction, hemorrhage, aneurysms, and vascular malformations of the spine and spinal cord are discussed. Pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical classification schemes, clinical presentations, imaging findings, and treatment modalities are considered. Recent advances in genetic and syndromic vascular pathologies of the spinal cord are also discussed. Clinically relevant spinal vascular anatomy is reviewed in detail. PMID:27616317

  1. Impaired immune responses following spinal cord injury lead to reduced ability to control viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Held, Katherine S.; Steward, Oswald; Blanc, Caroline; Lane, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries disrupt central autonomic pathways that regulate immune function, and increasing evidence suggests that this may cause deficiencies in immune responses in people with spinal cord injuries. Here we analyze the consequences of spinal cord injury (SCI) on immune responses following experimental viral infection of mice. Female C57BL/6 mice received complete crush injuries at either thoracic level 3 (T3) or 9 (T9), and 1 week post-injury, injured mice and un-injured controls were infected with different dosages of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV, a positive-strand RNA virus). Following MHV infection, T3- and T9-injured mice exhibited increased mortality in comparison to un-injured and laminectomy controls. Infection at all dosages resulted in significantly higher viral titer in both T3- and T9-injured mice compared to un-injured controls. Investigation of anti-viral immune responses revealed impairment of cellular infiltration and effector functions in mice with SCI. Specifically, cell-mediated responses were diminished in T3-injured mice, as seen by reduction in virus-specific CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production and decreased numbers of activated antigen presenting cells compared to infected un-injured mice. Collectively, these data indicate that the inability to control viral replication following SCI is not level dependent and that increased susceptibility to infection is due to suppression of both innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:20832407

  2. A Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion Injury Model in Non-Human Primates (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Salegio, Ernesto A.; Sparrey, Carolyn J.; Camisa, William; Fischer, Jason; Leasure, Jeremi; Buckley, Jennifer; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S.; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Moseanko, Rod; Strand, Sarah; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Haefeli, Jenny; Ma, Xiaokui; Nielson, Jessica L.; Edgerton, V.R.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of a non-human primate (NHP) model of spinal cord injury (SCI) based on mechanical and computational modeling is described. We scaled up from a rodent model to a larger primate model using a highly controllable, friction-free, electronically-driven actuator to generate unilateral C6-C7 spinal cord injuries. Graded contusion lesions with varying degrees of functional recovery, depending upon pre-set impact parameters, were produced in nine NHPs. Protocols and pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to optimize the predictability of outcomes by matching impact protocols to the size of each animal's spinal canal, cord, and cerebrospinal fluid space. Post-operative MRI confirmed lesion placement and provided information on lesion volume and spread for comparison with histological measures. We evaluated the relationships between impact parameters, lesion measures, and behavioral outcomes, and confirmed that these relationships were consistent with our previous studies in the rat. In addition to providing multiple univariate outcome measures, we also developed an integrated outcome metric describing the multivariate cervical SCI syndrome. Impacts at the higher ranges of peak force produced highly lateralized and enduring deficits in multiple measures of forelimb and hand function, while lower energy impacts produced early weakness followed by substantial recovery but enduring deficits in fine digital control (e.g., pincer grasp). This model provides a clinically relevant system in which to evaluate the safety and, potentially, the efficacy of candidate translational therapies. PMID:26788611

  3. Bipedal locomotion of bonnet macaques after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Babu, Rangasamy Suresh; Anand, P; Jeraud, Mathew; Periasamy, P; Namasivayam, A

    2007-10-01

    Experimental studies concerning the analysis of locomotor behavior in spinal cord injury research are widely performed in rodent models. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the degree of functional recovery in reflex components and bipedal locomotor behavior of bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata) after spinal contusive injury. Six monkeys were tested for various reflex components (grasping, righting, hopping, extension withdrawal) and were trained preoperatively to walk in bipedal fashion on the simple and complex locomotor runways (narrow beam, grid, inclined plane, treadmill) of this investigation. The overall performance of the animals'motor behavior and the functional status of limb movements during bipedal locomotion were graded by the Combined Behavioral Score (CBS) system. Using the simple Allen weight-drop technique, a contusive injury was produced by dropping a 13-g weight from a height of 30 cm to the exposed spinal cord at the T12-L1 vertebral level of the trained monkeys. All the monkeys showed significant impairments in every reflex activity and in walking behavior during the early part of the postoperative period. In subsequent periods, the animals displayed mild alterations in certain reflex responses, such as grasping, extension withdrawal, and placing reflexes, which persisted through a 1-year follow-up. The contused animals traversed locomotor runways--narrow beam, incline plane, and grid runways--with more steps and few errors, as evaluated with the CBS system. Eventually, the behavioral performance of all spinal-contused monkeys recovered to near-preoperative level by the fifth postoperative month. The findings of this study reveal the recovery time course of various reflex components and bipedal locomotor behavior of spinal-contused macaques on runways for a postoperative period of up to 1 year. Our spinal cord research in primates is advantageous in understanding the characteristics of hind limb functions only, which possibly

  4. Predicting Postoperative C5 Palsy Using Preoperative Spinal Cord Rotation.

    PubMed

    Chugh, A Jessey; Gebhart, Jeremy J; Eubanks, Jason D

    2015-09-01

    The development of C5 nerve palsy after cervical decompression surgery has been well documented. The goal of this study was to determine whether preoperative spinal cord rotation could be used as a predictor of C5 palsy in patients who underwent posterior cervical decompression at C4-C6. The authors reviewed the records of 72 patients who had posterior decompression and 77 patients who had anterior decompression. With the patients undergoing anterior decompression used as a control group, magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed for area of the spinal cord, anterior-posterior diameter, and cord rotation relative to the vertebral body. The rate of C5 palsy was 7.3%. Average degrees of rotation were 3.83°±2.47° and 3.45°±2.23° in the anterior and posterior groups, respectively. A statistically significant association was detected between degree of rotation and C5 palsy. Point-biserial correlations were 0.58 (P<.001) and 0.60 (P<.001) in the anterior and posterior groups, respectively. With a diagnostic cutoff of 6°, the sensitivity and specificity of identifying patients with C5 palsy in the posterior group were 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.94) and 0.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.86-0.98), respectively. The results suggested that preoperative spinal cord rotation may be a valid predictor of C5 nerve palsy after posterior cervical decompression. With mild rotation defined as less than 6°, moderate rotation as 6° to 10°, and severe rotation as greater than 10°, the prevalence of C5 palsy in the posterior group was 2 of 65 for mild rotation, 3 of 6 for moderate rotation, and 1 of 1 for severe rotation.

  5. Cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury: always for good?

    PubMed Central

    Moxon, Karen A.; Oliviero, Antonio; Aguilar, Juan; Foffani, Guglielmo

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity constitutes the basis of behavioral changes as a result of experience. It refers to neural network shaping and re-shaping at the global level and to synaptic contacts remodeling at the local level, either during learning or memory encoding, or as a result of acute or chronic pathological conditions. ‘Plastic’ brain reorganization after central nervous system lesions has a pivotal role in the recovery and rehabilitation of sensory and motor dysfunction, but can also be “maladaptive”. Moreover, it is clear that brain reorganization it is not a “static” phenomenon but rather a very dynamic process. Spinal cord injury immediately initiates a change in brain state and starts cortical reorganization. In the long term, the impact of injury – with or without accompanying therapy – on the brain is a complex balance between supraspinal reorganization and spinal recovery. The degree of cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury is highly variable, and can range from no reorganization (i.e. “silencing”) to massive cortical remapping. This variability critically depends on the species, the age of the animal when the injury occurs, the time after the injury has occurred, and the behavioral activity and possible therapy regimes after the injury. We will briefly discuss these dependencies, trying to highlight their translational value. Overall, it is not only necessary to better understand how the brain can reorganize after injury with or without therapy, it is also necessary to clarify when and why brain reorganization can be either “good” or “bad” in terms of its clinical consequences. This information is critical in order to develop and optimize cost-effective therapies to maximize functional recovery while minimizing maladaptive states after spinal cord injury. PMID:24997269

  6. Cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury: always for good?

    PubMed

    Moxon, K A; Oliviero, A; Aguilar, J; Foffani, G

    2014-12-26

    Plasticity constitutes the basis of behavioral changes as a result of experience. It refers to neural network shaping and re-shaping at the global level and to synaptic contacts remodeling at the local level, either during learning or memory encoding, or as a result of acute or chronic pathological conditions. 'Plastic' brain reorganization after central nervous system lesions has a pivotal role in the recovery and rehabilitation of sensory and motor dysfunction, but can also be "maladaptive". Moreover, it is clear that brain reorganization is not a "static" phenomenon but rather a very dynamic process. Spinal cord injury immediately initiates a change in brain state and starts cortical reorganization. In the long term, the impact of injury - with or without accompanying therapy - on the brain is a complex balance between supraspinal reorganization and spinal recovery. The degree of cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury is highly variable, and can range from no reorganization (i.e. "silencing") to massive cortical remapping. This variability critically depends on the species, the age of the animal when the injury occurs, the time after the injury has occurred, and the behavioral activity and possible therapy regimes after the injury. We will briefly discuss these dependencies, trying to highlight their translational value. Overall, it is not only necessary to better understand how the brain can reorganize after injury with or without therapy, it is also necessary to clarify when and why brain reorganization can be either "good" or "bad" in terms of its clinical consequences. This information is critical in order to develop and optimize cost-effective therapies to maximize functional recovery while minimizing maladaptive states after spinal cord injury.

  7. Dendritic spine dysgenesis contributes to hyperreflexia after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Samira P; Liu, Shujun; Waxman, Stephen G; Tan, Andrew M

    2015-03-01

    Hyperreflexia and spasticity are chronic complications in spinal cord injury (SCI), with limited options for safe and effective treatment. A central mechanism in spasticity is hyperexcitability of the spinal stretch reflex, which presents symptomatically as a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes and exaggerated tendon jerks. In this study we tested the hypothesis that dendritic spine remodeling within motor reflex pathways in the spinal cord contributes to H-reflex dysfunction indicative of spasticity after contusion SCI. Six weeks after SCI in adult Sprague-Dawley rats, we observed changes in dendritic spine morphology on α-motor neurons below the level of injury, including increased density, altered spine shape, and redistribution along dendritic branches. These abnormal spine morphologies accompanied the loss of H-reflex rate-dependent depression (RDD) and increased ratio of H-reflex to M-wave responses (H/M ratio). Above the level of injury, spine density decreased compared with below-injury spine profiles and spine distributions were similar to those for uninjured controls. As expected, there was no H-reflex hyperexcitability above the level of injury in forelimb H-reflex testing. Treatment with NSC23766, a Rac1-specific inhibitor, decreased the presence of abnormal dendritic spine profiles below the level of injury, restored RDD of the H-reflex, and decreased H/M ratios in SCI animals. These findings provide evidence for a novel mechanistic relationship between abnormal dendritic spine remodeling in the spinal cord motor system and reflex dysfunction in SCI.

  8. Transplantation of neural progenitor cells in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y; Bouyer, J; Shumsky, J S; Haas, C; Fischer, I

    2016-04-21

    Previous studies demonstrated that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) transplanted into a subacute contusion injury improve motor, sensory, and bladder function. In this study we tested whether transplanted NPCs can also improve functional recovery after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) alone or in combination with the reduction of glial scar and neurotrophic support. Adult rats received a T10 moderate contusion. Thirteen weeks after the injury they were divided into four groups and received either: 1. Medium (control), 2. NPC transplants, 3. NPC+lentivirus vector expressing chondroitinase, or 4. NPC+lentivirus vectors expressing chondroitinase and neurotrophic factors. During the 8 weeks post-transplantation the animals were tested for functional recovery and eventually analyzed by anatomical and immunohistochemical assays. The behavioral tests for motor and sensory function were performed before and after injury, and weekly after transplantation, with some animals also tested for bladder function at the end of the experiment. Transplant survival in the chronic injury model was variable and showed NPCs at the injury site in 60% of the animals in all transplantation groups. The NPC transplants comprised less than 40% of the injury site, without significant anatomical or histological differences among the groups. All groups also showed similar patterns of functional deficits and recovery in the 12 weeks after injury and in the 8 weeks after transplantation using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan rating score, the grid test, and the Von Frey test for mechanical allodynia. A notable exception was group 4 (NPC together with chondroitinase and neurotrophins), which showed a significant improvement in bladder function. This study underscores the therapeutic challenges facing transplantation strategies in a chronic SCI in which even the inclusion of treatments designed to reduce scarring and increase neurotrophic support produce only modest functional improvements. Further

  9. Physical exercise improves arterial stiffness after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle; Currie, Katharine D.; West, Christopher R.; Gee, Cameron M.; Krassioukov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective/background Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), the gold-standard assessment of central arterial stiffness, has prognostic value for cardiovascular disease risk in able-bodied individuals. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV in athletes and non-athletes with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional comparison. Methods Aortic PWV was assessed in 20 individuals with motor-complete, chronic SCI (C2–T5; 18 ± 8 years post-injury) using applanation tonometry at the carotid and femoral arterial sites. Ten elite hand-cyclists were matched for sex to 10 non-athletes; age and time since injury were comparable between the groups. Heart rate and discrete brachial blood pressure measurements were collected throughout testing. Outcome measures Aortic PWV, blood pressure, heart rate. Results Aortic PWV was significantly lower in athletes vs. non-athletes (6.9 ± 1.0 vs. 8.7 ± 2.5 m/second, P = 0.044). There were no significant between-group differences in resting supine mean arterial blood pressure (91 ± 19 vs. 81 ± 10 mmHg) and heart rate (60 ± 10 vs. 58 ± 6 b.p.m.). Conclusion Athletes with SCI exhibited improved central arterial stiffness compared to non-athletes, which is in agreement with the previous able-bodied literature. This finding implies that chronic exercise training may improve arterial health and potentially lower cardiovascular disease risk in the SCI population. PMID:24976366

  10. Diffusion Tensor Imaging as a Predictor of Locomotor Function after Experimental Spinal Cord Injury and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Brian J.; Harel, Noam Y.; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Papademetris, Xenophon; Coman, Daniel; Wang, Xingxing; Hasan, Omar; Kaufman, Adam; Globinsky, Ronen; Staib, Lawrence H.; Cafferty, William B.J.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes long-term disability with limited functional recovery linked to the extent of axonal connectivity. Quantitative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of axonal integrity has been suggested as a potential biomarker for prognostic and therapeutic evaluation after trauma, but its correlation with functional outcomes has not been clearly defined. To examine this application, female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent midthoracic laminectomy followed by traumatic spinal cord contusion of differing severities or laminectomy without contusion. Locomotor scores and hindlimb kinematic data were collected for 4 weeks post-injury. Ex vivo DTI was then performed to assess axonal integrity using tractography and fractional anisotropy (FA), a numerical measure of relative white matter integrity, at the injury epicenter and at specific intervals rostral and caudal to the injury site. Immunohistochemistry for tissue sparing was also performed. Statistical correlation between imaging data and functional performance was assessed as the primary outcome. All injured animals showed some recovery of locomotor function, while hindlimb kinematics revealed graded deficits consistent with injury severity. Standard T2 magnetic resonance sequences illustrated conventional spinal cord morphology adjacent to contusions while corresponding FA maps indicated graded white matter pathology within these adjacent regions. Positive correlations between locomotor (Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score and gait kinematics) and imaging (FA values) parameters were also observed within these adjacent regions, most strongly within caudal segments beyond the lesion. Evaluation of axonal injury by DTI provides a mechanism for functional recovery assessment in a rodent SCI model. These findings suggest that focused DTI analysis of caudal spinal cord should be studied in human cases in relationship to motor outcome to augment outcome biomarkers for clinical cases. PMID

  11. Prolonged Local Hypothermia Has No Long-Term Adverse Effect on the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Vipin, Ashwati; Kortelainen, Jukka; Al-Nashash, Hasan; Chua, Soo Min; Thow, Xinyuan; Manivannan, Janani; Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to be neuroprotective and is one of the most effective and promising first-line treatments for central nervous system (CNS) trauma. At present, induction of local hypothermia, as opposed to general hypothermia, is more desired because of its ease of application and safety; fewer side effects and an absence of severe complications have been noted. Local hypothermia involves temperature reduction of a small and specific segment of the spinal cord. Our group has previously shown the neuroprotective effect of short-term, acute moderate general hypothermia through improvements in electrophysiological and motor behavioral assessments, as well as histological examination following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We have also shown the benefit of using short-term local hypothermia versus short-term general hypothermia post-acute SCI. The overall neuroprotective benefit of hypothermia can be categorized into three main components: (1) induction modality, general versus local, (2) invasive, semi-invasive or noninvasive, and (3) duration of hypothermia induction. In this study, a series of experiments were designed to investigate the feasibility, long-term safety, as well as eventual complications and side effects of prolonged, semi-invasive, moderate local hypothermia (30°C±0.5°C for 5 and 8 hours) in rats with uninjured spinal cord while maintaining their core temperature at 37°C±0.5°C. The weekly somatosensory evoked potential and motor behavioral (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan) assessments of rats that underwent 5 and 8 hours of semi-invasive local hypothermia, which revealed no statistically significant changes in electrical conductivity and behavioral outcomes. In addition, 4 weeks after local hypothermia induction, histological examination showed no anatomical damages or morphological changes in their spinal cord structure and parenchyma. We concluded that this method of prolonged local hypothermia is feasible, safe, and has the

  12. Spinal cord stimulation as a treatment for refractory neuropathic pain in tethered cord syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The spinal cord is a target for many neurosurgical procedures used to treat chronic severe pain. Neuromodulation and neuroablation are surgical techniques based on well-known specific anatomical structures. However, anatomical and electrophysical changes related to the tethered spinal cord make it more difficult to use these procedures. Case presentation We report the case of a 37-year-old Caucasian woman who had several surgical interventions for tethered cord syndrome. These interventions resulted in severe neuropathic pain in her lower back and right leg. This pain was treated by spinal cord stimulation using intra-operative sensory mapping, which allowed the cord's optimal placement in a more caudal position. Conclusion The low-voltage and more caudally placed electrodes are specific features of this treatment of tethered cord syndrome. PMID:20184768

  13. Photochemically induced spinal ischaemia: a model of spinal cord trauma in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olby, Natasha J.; Blakemore, W. F.

    1995-05-01

    Focal thrombosis was induced in the dorsal funiculus of the rat spinal cord by exposing the cord to light following intravenous injection of the photoactive dye, rose bengal. The light source was a 599 standing wave dye laser, pumped by an Innova 70 - 4 argon ion laser (Coherent Ltd, Cambridge, UK) and the light was delivered to the operative site via an optical fiber. The histological characteristics of the development and resolution of the lesion have been studied. Forty rats were examined with light and electron microscopy at various time points between 30 minutes and one month after irradiation and the lesion length was measured. Platelet aggregation, increased extracellular space in the white matter and vacuolation of the neurones and glia of the grey matter were present 30 minutes after injury. Progressive necrosis of the white and grey matter developed over the subsequent 24 hours to produce a fusiform lesion that occupied the dorsal funiculus and dorsal horns of the spinal cord at its center and tapered cranially and caudally along the dorsal columns for a total distance of seven millimeters. By one month after injury the area of necrosis had become a cyst lined by astrocytes ventrolaterally and meningeal cells dorsally. Measurements of lesion length showed a variability of 26%. This model of spinal cord trauma produces a lesion that is sufficiently reproducible to be suitable for performing studies aimed at tissue preservation and repair.

  14. Current concepts in the immediate management of acute spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Tator, C H; Rowed, D W

    1979-01-01

    The management of acute spinal cord injuries has changed considerably during the past 10 years owing to new information about the pathophysiology of cord trauma and new diagnostic and treatment methods. It is now known that the cord suffers not only from the immediate physical effects of trauma, but also from secondary pathologic processes, such as ischemia and edema, which are treatable in the first few hours after injury. New neuroradiologic and neurophysiological techniques, such as the recording of the somatosensory evoked potential, increase the accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis in the acute phase. Current immediate treatment includes the administration of steroids and mannitol, with careful attention to respiratory and cardiovascular homeostasis, to overcome post-traumatic ischemia and edema, and immobilization of the spine with devices such as the halo. New surgical procedures are used in selected cases to improve neurologic recovery, to provide rigid immobilization of the spine or to allow earlier mobilization of the patient. The care of spinal cord injuries in the acute phase is facilitated by multidisciplinary units. Images FIG. 1A FIG. 1B FIG. 3 PMID:117894

  15. Spinal cord infarction is an unusual complication of intracranial neuroendovascular intervention.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Noriaki; Miyachi, Shigeru; Okamaoto, Takeshi; Izumi, Takashi; Asai, Takumi; Yamanouchi, Takashi; Ota, Keisuke; Oda, Keiko; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    Spinal cord infarction is an unusual complication of intracranial neuroendovascular intervention. The authors report on two cases involving spinal cord infarction after endovascular coil embolization for large basilar-tip aneurysms. Each aneurysm was sufficiently embolized by the stent/balloon combination-assisted technique or double catheter technique. However, postoperatively, patients presented neurological symptoms without cranial nerve manifestation. MRI revealed multiple infarctions at the cervical spinal cord. In both cases, larger-sized guiding catheters were used for an adjunctive technique. Therefore, guiding catheters had been wedged in the vertebral artery (VA). The wedge of the VA and flow restriction may have caused thromboemboli and/or hemodynamic insufficiency of the spinal branches from the VA (radiculomedullary artery), resulting in spinal cord infarction. Spinal cord infarction should be taken into consideration as a complication of endovascular intervention for lesions of the posterior circulation.

  16. Hindlimb loading determines stepping quantity and quality following spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Timoszyk, Wojciech K; Nessler, Jeff A; Acosta, Cynthia; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Reinkensmeyer, David J; de Leon, Ray

    2005-07-19

    We compared the bipedal hindlimb stepping ability of untrained and trained (step-trained 6 min/day) spinal rats (mid-thoracic spinal cord transection at post-natal day 5) at different levels of body weight support on a treadmill over a 40-day period, starting at 69 days of age. A robotic device provided precise levels of body weight support and recorded hindlimb movement. We assessed stepping ability using: (1) step quantity determined from the measured hindlimb movement, (2) ordinal scales of paw placement, weight-bearing, and limb flexion, and (3) the lowest level of body weight support at which stepping was maintained. Stepping quantity and quality depended strongly on the level of support provided. Stepping ability improved with time, but only at the higher levels of weight-bearing, and independently of training. Increasing limb loading by gradually decreasing body weight support altered the spatiotemporal properties of the steps, resulting in an increase in step length and stance duration and a decrease in swing and step cycle duration. The rats progressively improved their ability to support more load before collapsing from a maximum of about 42 g ( approximately 25% of body weight) at Day 1 to 73 g ( approximately 35% of body weight) at Day 40. We conclude that the level of hindlimb loading provided to a spinally transected rat strongly influences the quantity and quality of stepping. Furthermore, the relationship between stepping ability and loading conditions changes with time after spinal cord transection and is unaltered by small amounts of step training. Finally, load-bearing failure point can be a quantitative measure of locomotor recovery following spinal cord injury, especially for severely impaired animals that cannot step unassisted.

  17. Basic fibroblast growth factor attenuates the degeneration of injured spinal cord motor endplates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianlong; Sun, Jianfeng; Tang, Yongxiang; Guo, Gangwen; Zhou, Xiaozhe; Chen, Yanliang; Shen, Minren

    2013-01-01

    The distal end of the spinal cord and neuromuscular junction may develop secondary degeneration and damage following spinal cord injury because of the loss of neural connections. In this study, a rat model of spinal cord injury, established using a modified Allen's method, was injected with basic fibroblast growth factor solution via subarachnoid catheter. After injection, rats with spinal cord injury displayed higher scores on the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale. Motor function was also well recovered and hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that spinal glial scar hyperplasia was not apparent. Additionally, anterior tibial muscle fibers slowly, but progressively, atrophied. nohistochemical staining showed that the absorbance values of calcitonin gene related peptide and acetylcholinesterase in anterior tibial muscle and spinal cord were similar, and injection of basic broblast growth factor increased this absorbance. Results showed that after spinal cord injury, the distal motor neurons and motor endplate degenerated. Changes in calcitonin gene related peptide and acetylcholinesterase in the spinal cord anterior horn motor neurons and motor endplate then occurred that were consistent with this regeneration. Our findings indicate that basic fibroblast growth factor can protect the endplate through attenuating the decreased expression of calcitonin gene related peptide and acetylcholinesterase in anterior horn motor neurons of the injured spinal cord. PMID:25206531

  18. Severity-dependent expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in traumatic spinal cord injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liqun; Jones, Nigel R; Blumbergs, Peter C; Van Den Heuvel, Corinna; Moore, Emma J; Manavis, Jim; Sarvestani, Ghafar T; Ghabriel, Mounir N

    2005-04-01

    The post-traumatic inflammatory response in acute spinal cord contusion injury was studied in the rat. Mild and severe spinal cord injury (SCI) was produced by dropping a 10 g weight from 3 and 12 cm at the T12 vertebral level. Increased immunoreactivity of TNF-alpha in mild and severe SCI was detected in neurons at 1 h post-injury, and in neurons and microglia at 6 h post-injury, with a less significant increase in mild SCI. Expression was short-lived and declined sharply by 1 d post-injury. RT-PCR showed an early significant up-regulation of IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha mRNAs, maximal at 6 h post-injury with return to control levels by 24 h post-injury, the changes being less statistically significantly in mild SCI. Western blot showed early transient increases of IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha proteins in severe SCI but not mild SCI. Immunocytochemical, western blotting and RT-PCR analyses suggest that endogenous cells (neurons and microglia) in the spinal cord, not blood-borne leucocytes, contribute to IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha production in the post-traumatic inflammatory response and that their up-regulation is greater in severe than mild SCI. PMID:15851082

  19. Arteriovenous fistulas of the brain and the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, F H; Rüfenacht, D A; Sundt, T M; Nichols, D A; Fode, N C

    1993-07-01

    Arteriovenous (AV) fistulas of cerebral and spinal arteries are characterized angiographically by an immediate AV transition without a capillary bed or "nidus" as occurs in AV malformations (AVM's). The clinical presentation, morphology, radiology, and treatment of 12 patients with cerebral AV fistulas and of 12 patients with spinal AV fistulas are reviewed. In the patients with cerebral lesions, headache and seizure disorders were the most common presentations followed by subarachnoid hemorrhage, cardiac failure, progressive neurological dysfunction, and incidental detection on prenatal ultrasound study. In patients with spinal AV fistulas, weakness and sensory disturbance in the lower extremities were the most frequent clinical presentations followed by back pain, disturbances of micturition, and grand mal seizure. The etiology of the symptom complex produced by AV fistulas in each of these locations differed, with venous hypertension being important in spinal cord lesions. Of the patients with cerebral lesions, nine had a single AV fistula, one had two fistulas, and two had multiple fistulas. An AVM was observed in five patients with fistulas (two large, three small). Nine patients exhibited extramedullary AV fistulas of the spine, of whom eight had a single fistula and one had three fistulas; three patients had intramedullary spinal AV fistulas. An arterial aneurysm was found in association with two fistulas, one cerebral and one spinal. Venous ectasias or varices, frequently exhibiting mural calcification, were observed to be prominent in all AV fistulas involving cerebral arteries and in two involving spinal arteries. The location and size of the venous complexes reflected the diameter of the fistula. In addition to conventional imaging techniques (cerebral angiography, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging), MR angiography was a helpful adjunct in the evaluation of fistulas. Treatment strategies employed for AV fistulas in both

  20. Development of Surrogate Spinal Cords for the Evaluation of Electrode Arrays Used in Intraspinal Implants

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Kmech, Jonn; Mushahwar, Vivian K.

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a surrogate spinal cord for evaluating the mechanical suitability of electrode arrays for intraspinal implants. The mechanical and interfacial properties of candidate materials (including silicone elastomers and gelatin hydrogels) for the surrogate cord were tested. The elastic modulus was characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis, and compared with values of actual human spinal cords from the literature. Forces required to indent the surrogate cords to specified depths were measured to obtain values under static conditions. Importantly, to quantify surface properties in addition to mechanical properties normally considered, interfacial frictional forces were measured by pulling a needle out of each cord at a controlled rate. The measured forces were then compared to those obtained from rat spinal cords. Formaldehyde-crosslinked gelatin, 12 wt% in water, was identified as the most suitable material for the construction of surrogate spinal cords. To demonstrate the utility of surrogate spinal cords in evaluating the behavior of various electrode arrays, cords were implanted with two types of intraspinal electrode arrays (one made of individual microwires and another of microwires anchored with a solid base), and cord deformation under elongation was evaluated. The results demonstrate that the surrogate model simulates the mechanical and interfacial properties of the spinal cord, and enables in vitro screening of intraspinal implants. PMID:23358939

  1. Cellular Transplantation Strategies for Spinal Cord Injury and Translational Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Reier, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Basic science advances in spinal cord injury and regeneration research have led to a variety of novel experimental therapeutics designed to promote functionally effective axonal regrowth and sprouting. Among these interventions are cell-based approaches involving transplantation of neural and non-neural tissue elements that have potential for restoring damaged neural pathways or reconstructing intraspinal synaptic circuitries by either regeneration or neuronal/glial replacement. Notably, some of these strategies (e.g., grafts of peripheral nerve tissue, olfactory ensheathing glia, activated macrophages, marrow stromal cells, myelin-forming oligodendrocyte precursors or stem cells, and fetal spinal cord tissue) have already been translated to the clinical arena, whereas others have imminent likelihood of bench-to-bedside application. Although this progress has generated considerable enthusiasm about treating what once was thought to be a totally incurable condition, there are many issues to be considered relative to treatment safety and efficacy. The following review reflects on different experimental applications of intraspinal transplantation with consideration of the underlying pathological, pathophysiological, functional, and neuroplastic responses to spinal trauma that such treatments may target along with related issues of procedural and biological safety. The discussion then moves to an overview of ongoing and completed clinical trials to date. The pros and cons of these endeavors are considered, as well as what has been learned from them. Attention is primarily directed at preclinical animal modeling and the importance of patterning clinical trials, as much as possible, according to laboratory experiences. PMID:15717046

  2. Cellular transplantation strategies for spinal cord injury and translational neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Reier, Paul J

    2004-10-01

    Basic science advances in spinal cord injury and regeneration research have led to a variety of novel experimental therapeutics designed to promote functionally effective axonal regrowth and sprouting. Among these interventions are cell-based approaches involving transplantation of neural and non-neural tissue elements that have potential for restoring damaged neural pathways or reconstructing intraspinal synaptic circuitries by either regeneration or neuronal/glial replacement. Notably, some of these strategies (e.g., grafts of peripheral nerve tissue, olfactory ensheathing glia, activated macrophages, marrow stromal cells, myelin-forming oligodendrocyte precursors or stem cells, and fetal spinal cord tissue) have already been translated to the clinical arena, whereas others have imminent likelihood of bench-to-bedside application. Although this progress has generated considerable enthusiasm about treating what once was thought to be a totally incurable condition, there are many issues to be considered relative to treatment safety and efficacy. The following review reflects on different experimental applications of intraspinal transplantation with consideration of the underlying pathological, pathophysiological, functional, and neuroplastic responses to spinal trauma that such treatments may target along with related issues of procedural and biological safety. The discussion then moves to an overview of ongoing and completed clinical trials to date. The pros and cons of these endeavors are considered, as well as what has been learned from them. Attention is primarily directed at preclinical animal modeling and the importance of patterning clinical trials, as much as possible, according to laboratory experiences.

  3. Contusive spinal cord injury up regulates mu-opioid receptor (mor) gene expression in the brain and down regulates its expression in the spinal cord: possible implications in spinal cord injury research.

    PubMed

    Michael, Felicia Mary; Mohapatra, Alok Nath; Venkitasamy, Lavanya; Chandrasekar, Kirubhanand; Seldon, Tenzin; Venkatachalam, Sankar

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the dreaded neurological conditions and finding a cure for it has been a hot area of research. Naloxone - a mu-opiate receptor (mor) antagonist was considered for SCI treatment based on its positive effects under shock conditions. In contrary to animal studies based reports about the potential benefits of naloxone in treating SCI, a large scale clinical trial [National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study II (NASCIS II)] conducted in USA failed to witness any effectiveness. The inconsistency noticed was intriguing. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to re-examine the role of naloxone in treating SCI using a highly standardised Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study (MASCIS) animal model of contusive SCI. Results indicated that naloxone produced negligible and insignificant neuroprotection. In an attempt to understand the cause for the failure, it was found that mu-opioid receptor (mor) gene expression was upregulated in the brain but was down regulated in the spinal cord after contusive SCI. Given that the beneficial effects of naloxone are through its action on the mor, the results indicate that unlike the brain, spinal cord might not be bracing to utilise the opiate system in the repair process. This could possibly explain the failure of naloxone treatment in NASCIS II. To conclude, opiate antagonists like naloxone may be neuroprotective for treating traumatic brain injuries, but not for traumatic/contusive spinal cord injuries. PMID:26039701

  4. Changes in Pain Processing in the Spinal Cord and Brainstem after Spinal Cord Injury Characterized by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Stroman, Patrick W; Khan, Hamza S; Bosma, Rachel L; Cotoi, Andrea I; Leung, Roxanne; Cadotte, David W; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has a number of devastating consequences, including high prevalence of chronic pain and altered pain sensitivity. The causes of altered pain states vary depending on the injury and are difficult to diagnose and treat. A better understanding of pain mechanisms after SCI is expected to lead to better diagnostic capabilities and improved treatments. We therefore applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brainstem and spinal cord in a group of participants with previous traumatic SCI to characterize changes in pain processing as a result of their injuries. The same thermal stimulus was applied to the medial palm (C8 dermatome) as a series of repeated brief noxious thermal pulses in a group of 16 participants with a cervical (n = 14) and upper thoracic (n = 2) injuries. Functional MRI of the brainstem and spinal cord was used to determine the neuronal activity evoked by the noxious stimulation, and connectivity between regions was characterized with structural equation modeling (SEM). The results show that pain ratings, the location and magnitude of blood oxygenation-level dependent fMRI results, and connectivity assessed with SEM varied widely across participants. However, the results varied in relation to the perceived pain and the level/severity of injuries, particularly in terms of hypothalamus connectivity with other regions, and descending modulation via the periaqueductal gray matter-rostral ventromedial medulla-cord pathway. The results, therefore, appear to provide sensitive indicators of each individual's pain response, and information about the mechanisms of altered pain sensitivity. The ability to characterize changes in pain processing in individuals with SCI represents a significant technological advance. PMID:26801315

  5. The ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord differs from other species and shows ependymoma-like features.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Florensa-Vila, José; Ferrer, Isidro; Grassner, Lukas; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    Several laboratories have described the existence of undifferentiated precursor cells that may act like stem cells in the ependyma of the rodent spinal cord. However, there are reports showing that this region is occluded and disassembled in humans after the second decade of life, although this has been largely ignored or interpreted as a post-mortem artefact. To gain insight into the patency, actual structure, and molecular properties of the adult human spinal cord ependymal region, we followed three approaches: (i) with MRI, we estimated the central canal patency in 59 control subjects, 99 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, and 26 patients with non-traumatic spinal cord injuries. We observed that the central canal is absent from the vast majority of individuals beyond the age of 18 years, gender-independently, throughout the entire length of the spinal cord, both in healthy controls and after injury; (ii) with histology and immunohistochemistry, we describe morphological properties of the non-lesioned ependymal region, which showed the presence of perivascular pseudorosettes, a common feature of ependymoma; and (iii) with laser capture microdissection, followed by TaqMan® low density arrays, we studied the gene expression profile of the ependymal region and found that it is mainly enriched in genes compatible with a low grade or quiescent ependymoma (53 genes); this region is enriched only in 14 genes related to neurogenic niches. In summary, we demonstrate here that the central canal is mainly absent in the adult human spinal cord and is replaced by a structure morphologically and molecularly different from that described for rodents and other primates. The presented data suggest that the ependymal region is more likely to be reminiscent of a low-grade ependymoma. Therefore, a direct translation to adult human patients of an eventual therapeutic potential of this region based on animal models should be approached with caution. PMID:25882650

  6. The ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord differs from other species and shows ependymoma-like features.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Florensa-Vila, José; Ferrer, Isidro; Grassner, Lukas; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    Several laboratories have described the existence of undifferentiated precursor cells that may act like stem cells in the ependyma of the rodent spinal cord. However, there are reports showing that this region is occluded and disassembled in humans after the second decade of life, although this has been largely ignored or interpreted as a post-mortem artefact. To gain insight into the patency, actual structure, and molecular properties of the adult human spinal cord ependymal region, we followed three approaches: (i) with MRI, we estimated the central canal patency in 59 control subjects, 99 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, and 26 patients with non-traumatic spinal cord injuries. We observed that the central canal is absent from the vast majority of individuals beyond the age of 18 years, gender-independently, throughout the entire length of the spinal cord, both in healthy controls and after injury; (ii) with histology and immunohistochemistry, we describe morphological properties of the non-lesioned ependymal region, which showed the presence of perivascular pseudorosettes, a common feature of ependymoma; and (iii) with laser capture microdissection, followed by TaqMan® low density arrays, we studied the gene expression profile of the ependymal region and found that it is mainly enriched in genes compatible with a low grade or quiescent ependymoma (53 genes); this region is enriched only in 14 genes related to neurogenic niches. In summary, we demonstrate here that the central canal is mainly absent in the adult human spinal cord and is replaced by a structure morphologically and molecularly different from that described for rodents and other primates. The presented data suggest that the ependymal region is more likely to be reminiscent of a low-grade ependymoma. Therefore, a direct translation to adult human patients of an eventual therapeutic potential of this region based on animal models should be approached with caution.

  7. Functional Regeneration Following Spinal Transection Demonstrated in the Isolated Spinal Cord of the Larval Sea Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, A. H.; Mackler, S. A.; Selzer, M. E.

    1986-04-01

    Axons in the larval sea lamprey can regenerate across the site of a spinal cord transection and form functioning synapses with some of their normal target neurons. The animals recover normal-appearing locomotion, but whether the regenerating axons and their synaptic connections are capable of playing a functional role during this behavior is unknown. To test this, ``fictive'' swimming was induced in the isolated spinal cord by the addition of D-glutamate to the bathing solution. Ventral root discharges of segments above and below a healed transection showed a high degree of phase-locking. This strongly suggests that the behavioral recovery is mediated by regenerated functional synaptic connections subserving intersegmental coordination of the central pattern generator for locomotion.

  8. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocyte Progenitors Aid in Functional Recovery of Sensory Pathways following Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    All, Angelo H.; Bazley, Faith A.; Gupta, Siddharth; Pashai, Nikta; Hu, Charles; Pourmorteza, Amir; Kerr, Candace

    2012-01-01

    Background Transplantations of human stem cell derivatives have been widely investigated in rodent models for the potential restoration of function of neural pathways after spinal cord injury (SCI). Studies have already demonstrated cells survival following transplantation in SCI. We sought to evaluate survival and potential therapeutic effects of transplanted human embryonic stem (hES) cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in a contusive injury in rats. Bioluminescence imaging was utilized to verify survivability of cells up to 4 weeks, and somatosensory evoked potential (SSEPs) were recorded at the cortex to monitor function of sensory pathways throughout the 6-week recovery period. Principal Findings hES cells were transduced with the firefly luciferase gene and differentiated into OPCs. OPCs were transplanted into the lesion epicenter of rat spinal cords 2 hours after inducing a moderate contusive SCI. The hES-treatment group showed improved SSEPs, including increased amplitude and decreased latencies, compared to the control group. The bioluminescence of transplanted OPCs decreased by 97% in the injured spinal cord compared to only 80% when injected into an uninjured spinal cord. Bioluminescence increased in both experimental groups such that by week 3, no statistical difference was detected, signifying that the cells survived and proliferated independent of injury. Post-mortem histology of the spinal cords showed integration of human cells expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and myelin basic protein without the expression of markers for astrocytes (GFAP) or pluripotent cells (OCT4). Conclusions hES-derived OPCs transplanted 2 hours after contusive SCI survive and differentiate into OLs that produce MBP. Treated rats demonstrated functional improvements in SSEP amplitudes and latencies compared to controls as early as 1 week post-injury. Finally, the hostile injury microenvironment at 2 hours post-injury initially caused increased cell

  9. Neuroprotective Effects of Perflurocarbon (Oxycyte) after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Adly; Hajec, Marygrace C.; Stanger, Richard; Wan, Wen; Young, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in irreversible and permanent neurological deficits and long-term disability. Vasospasm, hemorrhage, and loss of microvessels create an ischemic environment at the site of contusive or compressive SCI and initiate the secondary injury cascades leading to progressive tissue damage and severely decreased functional outcome. Although the initial mechanical destructive events cannot be reversed, secondary injury damage occurs over several hours to weeks, a time frame during which therapeutic intervention could be achieved. One essential component of secondary injury cascade is the reduction in spinal cord blood flow with resultant decrease in oxygen delivery. Our group has recently shown that administration of fluorocarbon (Oxycyte) significantly increased parenchymal tissue oxygen levels during the usual postinjury hypoxic phase, and fluorocarbon has been shown to be effective in stroke and head injury. In the current study, we assessed the beneficial effects of Oxycyte after a moderate-to-severe contusion SCI was simulated in adult Long-Evans hooded rats. Histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis showed that the administration of 5 mL/kg of Oxycyte perfluorocarbon (60% emulsion) after SCI dramatically reduced destruction of spinal cord anatomy and resulted in a marked decrease of lesion area, less cell death, and greater white matter sparing at 7 and 42 days postinjury. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining showed a significant reduced number of apoptotic cells in Oxycyte-treated animals, compared to the saline group. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential neuroprotective effect of Oxycyte treatment after SCI, and its beneficial effects may be, in part, a result of reducing apoptotic cell death and tissue sparing. Further studies to determine the most efficacious Oxycyte dose and its mechanisms of protection are warranted. PMID:24025081

  10. AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY OF CULTURED RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Bunge, Richard P.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Peterson, Edith R.

    1965-01-01

    Explants prepared from 17- to 18-day fetal rat spinal cord were allowed to mature in culture; such preparations have been shown to differentiate and myelinate in vitro (61) and to be capable of complex bioelectric activity (14–16). At 23, 35, or 76 days, the cultures were fixed (without removal from the coverslip) in buffered OsO4, embedded in Epon, sectioned, and stained for light and electron microscopy. These mature explants generally are composed of several strata of neurons with an overlying zone of neuropil. The remarkable cytological similarity between in vivo and in vitro nervous tissues is established by the following observations. Cells and processes in the central culture mass are generally closely packed together with little intervening space. Neurons exhibit well developed Nissl bodies, elaborate Golgi regions, and subsurface cisternae. Axosomatic and axodendritic synapses, including synaptic junctions between axons and dendritic spines, are present. Typical synaptic vesicles and increased membrane densities are seen at the terminals. Variations in synaptic fine structure (Type 1 and Type 2 synapses of Gray) are visible. Some characteristics of the cultured spinal cord resemble infrequently observed specializations of in vivo central nervous tissue. Neuronal somas may display minute synapse-bearing projections. Occasionally, synaptic vesicles are grouped in a crystal-like array. A variety of glial cells, many apparently at intermediate stages of differentiation, are found throughout the otherwise mature explant. There is ultrastructural evidence of extensive glycogen deposits in some glial processes and scattered glycogen particles in neuronal terminals. This is the first description of the ultrastructure of cultured spinal cord. Where possible, correlation is made between the ultrastructural data and the known physiological properties of these cultures. PMID:14326105

  11. Differential Neuroproteomic and Systems Biology Analysis of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Moghieb, Ahmed; Bramlett, Helen M; Das, Jyotirmoy H; Yang, Zhihui; Selig, Tyler; Yost, Richard A; Wang, Michael S; Dietrich, W Dalton; Wang, Kevin K W

    2016-07-01

    Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with many consequences and no known effective treatment. Although it is quite easy to diagnose traumatic SCI, the assessment of injury severity and projection of disease progression or recovery are often challenging, as no consensus biomarkers have been clearly identified. Here rats were subjected to experimental moderate or severe thoracic SCI. At 24h and 7d postinjury, spinal cord segment caudal to injury center versus sham samples was harvested and subjected to differential proteomic analysis. Cationic/anionic-exchange chromatography, followed by 1D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was used to reduce protein complexity. A reverse phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomic platform was then utilized to identify proteome changes associated with SCI. Twenty-two and 22 proteins were up-regulated at 24 h and 7 day after SCI, respectively; whereas 19 and 16 proteins are down-regulated at 24 h and 7 day after SCI, respectively, when compared with sham control. A subset of 12 proteins were identified as candidate SCI biomarkers - TF (Transferrin), FASN (Fatty acid synthase), NME1 (Nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1), STMN1 (Stathmin 1), EEF2 (Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2), CTSD (Cathepsin D), ANXA1 (Annexin A1), ANXA2 (Annexin A2), PGM1 (Phosphoglucomutase 1), PEA15 (Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15), GOT2 (Glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase 2), and TPI-1 (Triosephosphate isomerase 1), data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003473. In addition, Transferrin, Cathepsin D, and TPI-1 and PEA15 were further verified in rat spinal cord tissue and/or CSF samples after SCI and in human CSF samples from moderate/severe SCI patients. Lastly, a systems biology approach was utilized to determine the critical biochemical pathways and interactome in the pathogenesis of SCI. Thus, SCI candidate biomarkers identified can be used to correlate with disease progression or

  12. Novel combination strategies to repair the injured mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2008-01-01

    Due to the varied and numerous changes in spinal cord tissue following injury, successful treatment for repair may involve strategies combining neuroprotection (pharmacological prevention of some of the damaging intracellular cascades that lead to secondary tissue loss), axonal regeneration promotion (cell transplantation, genetic engineering to increase growth factors, neutralization of inhibitory factors, reduction in scar formation), and rehabilitation. Our goal has been to find effective combination strategies to improve outcome after injury to the adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Combination interventions tested have been implantation of Schwann cells (SCs) plus neuroprotective agents and growth factors administered in various ways, olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) implantation, chondroitinase addition, or elevation of cyclic AMP. The most efficacious strategy in our hands for the acute complete transection/SC bridge model, including improvement in locomotion [Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan Scale (BBB)], is the combination of SCs, OECs, and chondroitinase administration (BBB 2.1 vs 6.6, 3 times more myelinated axons in the SC bridge, increased serotonergic axons in the bridge and beyond, and significant correlation between the number of bridge myelinated axons and functional improvement). We found the most successful combination strategy for a subacute spinal cord contusion injury (12.5-mm, 10-g weight, MASCIS impactor) to be SCs and elevation of cyclic AMP (BBB 10.4 vs 15, significant increases in white matter sparing, in myelinated axons in the implant, and in responding reticular formation and red and raphe nuclei, and a significant correlation between the number of serotonergic fibers and improvement in locomotion). Thus, in two injury paradigms, these combination strategies as well as others studied in our laboratory have been found to be more effective than SCs alone and suggest ways in which clinical application may be developed. PMID:18795474

  13. Irradiation of Pediatric High-Grade Spinal Cord Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Wu Shengjie; Kun, Larry E.; Broniscer, Alberto; Sanford, Robert A.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To report the outcome using radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric patients with high-grade spinal cord tumors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was conducted that included 17 children with high-grade spinal cord tumors treated with RT at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital between 1981 and 2007. Three patients had gross total resection, 11 had subtotal resection, and 3 underwent biopsy. The tumor diagnosis was glioblastoma multiforme (n = 7), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 8), or anaplastic oligodendroglioma (n = 2). Seven patients received craniospinal irradiation (34.2-48.6 Gy). The median dose to the primary site was 52.2 Gy (range, 38-66 Gy). Results: The median progression-free and overall survivals were 10.8 and 13.8 months, respectively. Local tumor progression at 12 months (79% vs. 30%, p = 0.02) and median survival (13.1 vs. 27.2 months, p = 0.09) were worse for patients with glioblastoma multiforme compared with anaplastic astrocytoma or oligodendroglioma. The median overall survival was shorter for patients when failure included neuraxis dissemination (n = 8) compared with local failure alone (n = 5), 9.6 vs. 13.8 months, p = 0.08. Three long-term survivors with World Health Organization Grade III tumors were alive with follow-up, ranging from 88-239 months. Conclusions: High-grade spinal cord primary tumors in children have a poor prognosis. The propensity for neuraxis metastases as a component of progression after RT suggests the need for more aggressive therapy.

  14. Cadmium induces alterations in the human spinal cord morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sarchielli, Erica; Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Marini, Mirca; Vannelli, Gabriella B; Gulisano, Massimo

    2012-02-01

    The effects of cadmium on the central nervous system are still relatively poorly understood and its role in neurodegenerative diseases has been debated. In our research, cultured explants from 25 human foetal spinal cords (10-11 weeks gestational age) were incubated with 10 and 100 μM cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) for 24 h. After treatment, an immunohistochemical study [for Sglial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)], a Western blot analysis (for GFAP, β-Tubulin III, nerve growth factor receptor, Caspase 8 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase), and a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay (for detection of apoptotic bodies) were performed. The treatment with CdCl(2) induced a significant and dose-dependent change in the ratio motor neurons/glial cells in the ventral horns of human foetal spinal cord. The decrease of the choline acetyltransferase-positive cells (motor neurons) and the reduction of β Tubulin III indicate that CdCl(2) specifically affects motor neurons of the ventral horns. While the number of motor neurons decreased for the activation of apoptotic pathways (as shown by the increased expression of Caspase 8, nerve growth factor receptor, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase), glial cells, both in the subependymal zone and in the gray matter of the ventral horns, increased (as shown by the increase of GFAP expression). These results provide the evidence that during human spinal cord development, CdCl(2) may affect the fate of neural and glial cells thus, being potentially involved in the etiopathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Body composition of active persons with spinal cord injury and with poliomyelitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study sought to evaluate the body composition of subjects with active spinal cord injuries and polio. Two groups of males and females, active, free-living, of similar ages and body mass index (BMI), were distributed according to the source of deficiency: SCI – low spinal cord injury (T5-T12) an...

  16. Macrophage activation and its role in repair and pathology after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gensel, John C; Zhang, Bei

    2015-09-01

    The injured spinal cord does not heal properly. In contrast, tissue repair and functional recovery occur after skin or muscle injuries. The reason for this dichotomy in wound repair is unclear but inflammation, and specifically macrophage activation, likely plays a key role. Macrophages have the ability to promote the repair of injured tissue by regulating transitions through different phase of the healing response. In the current review we compare and contrast the healing and inflammatory responses between spinal cord injuries and tissues that undergo complete wound resolution. Through this comparison, we identify key macrophage phenotypes that are inaptly triggered or absent after spinal cord injury and discuss spinal cord stimuli that contribute to this maladaptive response. Sequential activation of classic, pro-inflammatory, M1 macrophages and alternatively activated, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages occurs during normal healing and facilitates transitions through the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases of repair. In contrast, in the injured spinal cord, pro-inflammatory macrophages potentiate a prolonged inflammatory phase and remodeling is not properly initiated. The desynchronized macrophage activation after spinal cord injury is reminiscent of the inflammation present in chronic, non-healing wounds. By refining the role macrophages play in spinal cord injury repair we bring to light important areas for future neuroinflammation and neurotrauma research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury.

  17. Spinal cord stimulation for treatment of failed back surgery syndrome--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, R; Ahmad, T S

    1999-12-01

    Severe, persistent back pain following back surgery is often referred to as Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS). Conservative measures such as physiotherapy, back strengthening exercises, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and epidural steroids may be inadequate to alleviate pain. Spinal Cord Stimulators were implanted into two patients suffering from FBSS. Both patients responded successfully to spinal cord stimulation with reduction of pain and disability.

  18. Posterior spinal cord infarction due to fibrocartilaginous embolization in a 16-year-old athlete.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Seema; Brown, Wendy; Dayal, Anuradha; Carpenter, Jessica L

    2014-07-01

    Spinal cord infarction is extremely rare in children, and, similar to cerebrovascular infarcts, the pathogenesis is different from adults. Spinal cord infarcts are most commonly reported in adults in the context of aortic surgery; in children, the etiology is frequently unknown. Fibrocartilaginous embolization is a potential cause of spinal cord infarct in both populations. It is a process that occurs when spinal injury has resulted in disc disease, and subsequently disc fragments embolize to the cord, resulting in ischemia and/or infarction. In this report, we present a 16-year-old athlete who presented with symptoms of acute myelopathy after a period of intense exercise. Our original concern was for an inflammatory process of the spinal cord; however, given her history of competitive tumbling and degenerative disc changes on her initial spine magnetic resonance imaging scan, diffusion-weighted imaging was performed, which demonstrated acute spinal cord infarction. Unlike many cases of spinal cord infarction, our patient was fortunate to make a near-complete recovery. This case highlights the importance of recognizing rare causes of spinal cord pathology and considering infarction in the differential diagnosis of acute myelopathy because management and prognosis varies.

  19. Religiosity and Spirituality among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: Attitudes, Beliefs, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; Glover-Graf, Noreen M.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 157 persons with spinal cord injury completed the "Spirituality and Spinal Cord Injury Survey" in relation to their spiritual and/or religious attitudes, beliefs, and practices in terms of adapting to their disability. Factor analysis accounting for 69% of the variance revealed four factors related to Spiritual Help and Improvement…

  20. Expression of PirB in normal and injured spinal cord of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yingchun; Qian, Rongjun; Rao, Jing; Weng, Mixia; Yi, Xuxia

    2010-08-01

    The expression of paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB) in normal and injured spinal cord of rats was investigated. The SD rat hemi-sectioned spinal cord injury (SCI) model was established. Before and 1, 3, 7, 10 days after SCI, the spinal cord tissues were harvested, and Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to examine the expression and location of PirB. The results showed that the expression level of PirB in the normal spinal cord of SD rats was low. At the first day after SCI, the expression of PirB was obviously increased, and that in the injured spinal cord from the first day to the 10th day was significantly higher than in the normal spinal cord. The positive expression of PirB in neurons from different regions of gray matter of the injured spinal cord was seen. It was concluded that the expression of PirB in the normal spinal cord of rats was low. The expression of PirB in SCI was significantly increased till at least the 10th day.

  1. Employment among Spinal Cord Injured Patients Living in Turkey: A Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunduz, Berrin; Erhan, Belgin; Bardak, Ayse Nur

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of employment and to establish the factors affecting vocational status in spinal cord injured patients living in Turkey. One hundred and fifty-two traumatic spinal cord injured patients older than 18 years with injury duration of at least 1 year and living in the community were included in the study;…

  2. A 20-year Longitudinal Perspective on the Vocational Experiences of Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crewe, Nancy M.

    2000-01-01

    Uses interviews conducted in 1974 and 1994 to investigate the vocational experiences of individuals with spinal cord injuries. Participants had received a spinal cord injury 22-45 years previously. Results revealed that all but seven of the participants had been in remunerative employment. Work experiences, comprehensive rehabilitation service,…

  3. Influence of Alcohol Intake on the Course and Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiwerski, J. E.; Krasuski, M.

    1992-01-01

    This study compared the neurological state and results of treatment for patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who were intoxicated (n=424) or sober (n=769) on admission to a Warsaw (Poland) hospital. In the intoxicated group, the number of patients with symptoms of complete spinal cord injury was much greater than that of the sober group. (DB)

  4. Protocols for Ectopic Hair Growth from Transplanted Whisker Follicles on the Spinal Cord of Mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenluo; Liu, Fang; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Isolated whisker follicles from nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) mice, containing hair-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells, were histocultured in three dimensions on Gelfoam(®) for 3 weeks for subsequent transplantation to the spinal cord in order to heal an induced injury with the HAP stem cells. The hair shafts were removed from Gelfoam(®)-histocultured whisker follicles, and the remaining parts of the whisker follicles, containing GFP-nestin-expressing (HAP) stem cells, were transplanted into the injured spinal cord of nude mice, along with the Gelfoam(®). After 90 days, the mice were sacrificed and the spinal cord injuries were observed to have healed. ND-GFP expression was intense at the healed area of the spinal cord, as observed by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating that the HAP stem cells were involved in healing the spinal cord. The transplanted whisker follicles produced remarkably long hair shafts in the spinal cord over 90 days and curved and enclosed the spinal cord. This result changes our concept of hair growth, demonstrating it is not limited to the skin and that hair growth appears related to HAP stem cells as both increased in tandem on the spinal cord.

  5. Ginsenoside Rd inhibits apoptosis following spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baogang; Zhu, Qingsan; Man, Xiaxia; Guo, Li; Hao, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rd has a clear neuroprotective effect against ischemic stroke. We aimed to verify the neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside Rd in spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury and explore its anti-apoptotic mechanisms. We established a spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury model in rats through the occlusion of the abdominal aorta below the level of the renal artery for 1 hour. Successfully established models were injected intraperitoneally with 6.25, 12.5, 25 or 50 mg/kg per day ginsenoside Rd. Spinal cord morphology was observed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Intraperitoneal injection of ginsenoside Rd in ischemia/reperfusion injury rats not only improved hindlimb motor function and the morphology of motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord, but it also reduced neuronal apoptosis. The optimal dose of ginsenoside Rd was 25 mg/kg per day and the optimal time point was 5 days after ischemia/reperfusion. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis showed ginsenoside Rd dose-dependently inhibited expression of pro-apoptotic Caspase 3 and down-regulated the expression of the apoptotic proteins ASK1 and JNK in the spinal cord of rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. These findings indicate that ginsenoside Rd exerts neuroprotective effects against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury and the underlying mechanisms are achieved through the inhibition of ASK1-JNK pathway and the down-regulation of Caspase 3 expression. PMID:25374589

  6. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles proceeds through activation of Sox2-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In contrast to mammals, amphibians, such as adult urodeles (for example, newts) and anuran larvae (for example, Xenopus) can regenerate their spinal cord after injury. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. Results Here, we report that tail amputation results in a global increase of Sox2 levels and proliferation of Sox2+ cells. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 diminished proliferation of spinal cord resident cells affecting tail regeneration after amputation, suggesting that spinal cord regeneration is crucial for the whole process. After spinal cord transection, Sox2+ cells are found in the ablation gap forming aggregates. Furthermore, Sox2 levels correlated with regenerative capabilities during metamorphosis, observing a decrease in Sox2 levels at non-regenerative stages. Conclusions Sox2+ cells contribute to the regeneration of spinal cord after tail amputation and transection. Sox2 levels decreases during metamorphosis concomitantly with the lost of regenerative capabilities. Our results lead to a working hypothesis in which spinal cord damage activates proliferation and/or migration of Sox2+ cells, thus allowing regeneration of the spinal cord after tail amputation or reconstitution of the ependymal epithelium after spinal cord transection. PMID:22537391

  7. [MR investigation of spinal cord herniation in the thoracic spine].

    PubMed

    Kenéz, József; Barsi, Péter; Várallyay, György; Bobest, Mátyás; Veres, Róbert

    2002-05-20

    Transdural herniation of the spinal cord is thought to be previously extremely rare and very often misdiagnosed. Possible reasons may be iatrogenic and traumatic or in about one third of cases it may be unknown, where the probable origin might be a congenital dural defect. The pathology may show characteristic and misleading MR patterns of the thoracic spine, emphasising the importance of these patterns. This anomaly can lead to progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. Surgical intervention, consisting the repair of the dural defect may result in improvement or even complete regression of the neurologic deficits.

  8. Spinal cord injury--scientific challenges for the unknown future.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Leif; Aldskogius, Håkan; Holtz, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The history of spinal cord injuries starts with the ancient Egyptian medical papyrus known as the Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus. The papyrus written about 2500 B.C.by the physician and architect of the Sakkara pyramids Imhotep, describes "crushed vertebra in his neck" as well as symptoms of neurological deterioration. An ailment not to be treated was the massage to the patients at that time. This fatalistic attitude remained until the end of World War II when the first rehabilitation centre focused on the rehabilitation of spinal cord injured patients was opened. Our knowledge of the pathophysiological processes, both the primary as well as the secondary, has increased tremendously. However, all this knowledge has only led to improved medical care but not to any therapeutic method to restore, even partially, the neurological function. Neuroprotection is defined as measures to counteract secondary injury mechanisms and/or limit the extent of damage caused by self-destructive cellular and tissue processes. The co-existence of several distinctly different injury mechanisms after trauma has provided opportunities to explore a large number of potentially neuroprotective agents in animal experiments such as methylprednisolone sodium succinate. The results of this research have been very discouraging and pharmacological neuroprotection for patients with spinal cord injury has fallen short of the expectations created by the extensive research and promising observations in animal experiments. The focus of research has now, instead, been transformed to the field of neural regeneration. This field includes the discovery of regenerating obstacles in the nerve cell and/or environmental factors but also various regeneration strategies such as bridging the gap at the site of injury as well as transplantation of foetal tissue and stem cells. The purpose of this review is to highlight selected experimental and clinical studies that form the basis for undertaking future challenges in

  9. [Pressure sore in patients with spinal cord injuries].

    PubMed

    Colin, D; Lebastard, N

    1995-10-15

    Pressure sore is a frequent and severe complication in spinal cord injured patients because of many specific risk factors. The patient must be responsible for his prevention program. An early and continuous education enables him to know the occurrence mechanisms of pressure sore and manage himself this prevention. A regular inspection of the risk areas is necessary and every beginning sore must lead to ask an advice from a specialist and to practice a complete check up. Wound healing may be obtained by an early and adequate treatment. If it is not the case surgical operation is necessary provided that a careful nursing is assured.

  10. Spinal cord injury-induced pain: mechanisms and treatments.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Philip J; Middleton, James W

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a common consequence of a spinal cord injury (SCI) and has a major impact on quality of life through its impact on physical function, mood and participation in work, recreational and social activities. Several types of pain typically present following SCI with central neuropathic pain being a frequent and difficult to manage occurrence. Despite advances in our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to this type of pain and an increasing number of trials examining treatment efficacy, our ability to relieve neuropathic SCI pain is still very limited. Optimal management relies upon an integrated approach that uses a combination of pharmacological and nonpharmacological options. PMID:26402151

  11. Spinal Cord Decompression Sickness in a Sport Scuba Diver.

    PubMed

    Zwingelberg, K M

    1981-10-01

    In brief: A 26-year-old diver suffered spinal cord decompression sickness even though he did not exceed the time and depth limits set in standard US Navy diving tables. This case shows that when dives are strenuous and almost reach time and depth limits they may exceed the parameters of the tables. The case also illustrates the importance of rapid diagnosis and hyperbaric oxygen treatment of pressure-related diving casualties. The author says optimum treatment of decompression sickness depends on a high level of suspicion, an accurate diving history, and prompt treatment with hyperbaric oxygen.

  12. An update on functional electrical stimulation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gorman, P H

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical engineering as applied to neurologic rehabilitation have finally borne clinically relevant fruit. Nowhere is this more evident than in the field of functional electrical stimulation (FES). This article highlights the remarkable clinical progress that has been made in the use of electrical stimulation for restoring movement and function in individuals with spinal cord injury. Specific attention is given to respiratory-assist devices, hand-grasp systems, standing and walking, and bladder control. This review article features discussion of eight devices that have gone through the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory approval process. PMID:11402876

  13. Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Osteoporosis: Pathogenesis and Emerging Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Battaglino, Ricardo A.; Lazzari, Antonio A.; Garshick, Eric; Morse, Leslie R.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury causes rapid, severe osteoporosis with increased fracture risk. Mechanical unloading after paralysis results in increased osteocyte expression of sclerostin, suppressed bone formation, and indirect stimulation of bone resorption. At this time there are no clinical guidelines to prevent bone loss after SCI and fractures are common. More research is required to define the pathophysiology and epidemiology of SCI-induced osteoporosis. This review summarizes emerging therapeutics including anti-sclerostin antibodies, mechanical loading of the lower extremity with electrical stimulation, and mechanical stimulation via vibration therapy. PMID:22983921

  14. Spinal cord injury--scientific challenges for the unknown future.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Leif; Aldskogius, Håkan; Holtz, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The history of spinal cord injuries starts with the ancient Egyptian medical papyrus known as the Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus. The papyrus written about 2500 B.C.by the physician and architect of the Sakkara pyramids Imhotep, describes "crushed vertebra in his neck" as well as symptoms of neurological deterioration. An ailment not to be treated was the massage to the patients at that time. This fatalistic attitude remained until the end of World War II when the first rehabilitation centre focused on the rehabilitation of spinal cord injured patients was opened. Our knowledge of the pathophysiological processes, both the primary as well as the secondary, has increased tremendously. However, all this knowledge has only led to improved medical care but not to any therapeutic method to restore, even partially, the neurological function. Neuroprotection is defined as measures to counteract secondary injury mechanisms and/or limit the extent of damage caused by self-destructive cellular and tissue processes. The co-existence of several distinctly different injury mechanisms after trauma has provided opportunities to explore a large number of potentially neuroprotective agents in animal experiments such as methylprednisolone sodium succinate. The results of this research have been very discouraging and pharmacological neuroprotection for patients with spinal cord injury has fallen short of the expectations created by the extensive research and promising observations in animal experiments. The focus of research has now, instead, been transformed to the field of neural regeneration. This field includes the discovery of regenerating obstacles in the nerve cell and/or environmental factors but also various regeneration strategies such as bridging the gap at the site of injury as well as transplantation of foetal tissue and stem cells. The purpose of this review is to highlight selected experimental and clinical studies that form the basis for undertaking future challenges in

  15. Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) on Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Samaddar, Sreyashi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has become one of the most leading concerns in the past decade. Preclinical and research studies are now ongoing trying to understand the molecular mechanisms and develop treatment strategies for this neurodegenerative condition. In the last decade, researchers have deciphered few of the leading players that play a major role in worsening the condition. But till date none of these have been applied to the clinical treatment of patients with SCI. Here in this chapter I discuss about one of the dietary requirements that could ameliorate the condition of these patients. PMID:27651246

  16. Management of Pediatric Spinal Cord Astrocytomas: Outcomes With Adjuvant Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Zachary D.; Moningi, Shalini; Jallo, George I.; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Wharam, Moody D.; Terezakis, Stephanie A.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Pediatric intramedullary spinal cord tumors are exceedingly rare; in the United States, 100 to 200 cases are recognized annually, of these, most are astrocytomas. The purpose of this study is to report the outcomes in pediatric patients with spinal cord astrocytomas treated at a tertiary care center. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved retrospective single-institution study was performed for pediatric patients with spinal cord astrocytomas treated at our hospital from 1990 to 2010. The patients were evaluated on the extent of resection, progression-free survival (PFS), and development of radiation-related toxicities. Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate regression model methods were used for analysis. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included in the study, 24 with grade 1 or 2 (low-grade) tumors and 5 with grade 3 or 4 (high-grade) tumors. The median follow-up time was 55 months (range, 1-215 months) for patients with low-grade tumors and 17 months (range, 10-52 months) for those with high-grade tumors. Thirteen patients in the cohort received chemotherapy. All patients underwent at least 1 surgical resection. Twelve patients received radiation therapy to a median radiation dose of 47.5 Gy (range, 28.6-54.0 Gy). Fifteen patients with low-grade tumors and 1 patient with a high-grade tumor exhibited stable disease at the last follow-up visit. Acute toxicities of radiation therapy were low grade, whereas long-term sequelae were infrequent and manageable when they arose. All patients with low-grade tumors were alive at the last follow-up visit, compared with 1 patient with a high-grade tumor. Conclusion: Primary pediatric spinal cord astrocytomas vary widely in presentation and clinical course. Histopathologic grade remains a major prognostic factor. Patients with low-grade tumors tend to have excellent disease control and long-term survival compared to those with high-grade tumors. This experience suggests that radiation therapy

  17. Patients' perspectives of a spinal cord injury unit.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A L

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an ethnographic description of the subculture of a spinal cord injury (SCI) unit. The research method was qualitative, combining ethnographic interviews, participant observation, and document review. A 30 bed SCI facility on the west coast was selected as the setting for this ethnographic description. The developmental research sequence model (Spradley, 1980) and grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) were used for data analysis. Findings indicate optimal rehabilitation is a creative and individualized process of reintegration. Reintegration prepares the individual for coping with physical limitations, architectural barriers, and societal prejudices while simultaneously making the person feel intact and valued. Successful reintegration promotes a "fit" between the newly injured spinal cord patient and the home environment. The patient learns to compensate for the physical limitations of the spinal cord injury in a manner that promotes safety, comfort, and personal worth. Successful reintegration assures the newly injured SCI patient returns to a viable occupation, feels physically attractive, participates in a rich, full social life, and maintains family ties. Four phases of reintegration emerged: buffering, transcending, toughening, and launching. Buffering is the nurturing and protective process of lessening, absorbing, or protecting the newly injured SCI patient against the shock of multiple ramifications of the injury and the indignities of being a patient; Transcending is the process of helping SCI patients recognize and rise above culturally imposed limitations and negative beliefs about people with disabilities. The "toughening up" process focuses on compensating for physical limitations, gaining independence, and maintaining social interactions without "using the disability." Launching is the process of (1) exposing rehabilitation patients to the real world, (2) exploring the range of options for living in the

  18. Human lumbosacral spinal cord interprets loading during stepping.

    PubMed

    Harkema, S J; Hurley, S L; Patel, U K; Requejo, P S; Dobkin, B H; Edgerton, V R

    1997-02-01

    Studies suggest that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can generate steplike oscillating electromyographic (EMG) patterns, but it remains unclear to what degree these efferent patterns depend on the phasic peripheral sensory information associated with bilateral limb movements and loading. We examined the role of sensory information related to lower-extremity weight bearing in modulating the efferent motor patterns of spinal-cord-injured (SCI) subjects during manually assisted stepping on a treadmill. Four nonambulatory subjects, each with a chronic thoracic spinal cord injury, and two nondisabled subjects were studied. The level of loading, EMG patterns, and kinematics of the lower limbs were studied during manually assisted or unassisted stepping on a treadmill with body weight support. The relationships among lumbosacral motor pool activity [soleus (SOL), medial gastrocnemius (MG), and tibialis anterior (TA)], limb load, muscle-tendon length, and velocity of muscle-tendon length change were examined. The EMG mean amplitude of the SOL, MG, and TA was directly related to the peak load per step on the lower limb during locomotion. The effects on the EMG amplitude were qualitatively similar in subjects with normal, partial, or no detectable supraspinal input. Responses were most consistent in the SOL and MG at load levels of < 50% of a subject's body weight. The modulation of the EMG amplitude from the SOL and MG, both across steps and within a step, was more closely associated with limb peak load than muscle-tendon stretch or the velocity of muscle-tendon stretch. Thus stretch reflexes were not the sole source of the phasic EMG activity in flexors and extensors during manually assisted stepping in SCI subjects. The EMG amplitude within a step was highly dependent on the phase of the step cycle regardless of level of load. These data suggest that level of loading on the lower limbs provides cues that enable the human lumbosacral spinal cord to modulate efferent

  19. Brefeldin A-induced neurotoxicity in cultured spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Seiji; Shinpo, Kazuyoshi; Tsuji, Sachiko; Yabe, Ichiro; Niino, Masaaki; Tashiro, Kunio

    2003-02-15

    Brefeldin A (BFA) is a fungus metabolite that is known to cause the disassembly of the Golgi complex and apoptosis in exposed cells, both of which have been suggested as playing roles in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This study showed that BFA caused neurotoxicity and apoptotic nuclear changes in cultured spinal neurons of rat spinal cord in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The spinal motor neurons were more vulnerable to this neurotoxicity. The cultured spinal neurons showed irreversible disassembly of the Golgi apparatus as early as 1 hr after exposure to BFA. BFA induced the expression and activation of caspase-12 beginning 8 hr after exposure. The level of the cleaved form of caspase-3 had increased 12 hr after the addition of BFA. Free radical generation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed in the later stages of neurotoxicity caused by BFA. Collectively, our data suggests that BFA is an excellent agent for reproducing the pathophysiological features of ALS. This in vitro model may be useful in attempts to study the mechanisms of this neurodegenerative disease and to examine therapeutic potentials. PMID:12548716

  20. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 Section 359.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1 What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries...

  1. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 Section 359.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1 What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries...

  2. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 Section 359.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1 What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries...

  3. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 Section 359.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1 What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries...

  4. 34 CFR 359.1 - What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Spinal Cord Injuries Program? 359.1 Section 359.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES General § 359.1 What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries...

  5. Development of a multi-electrode array for spinal cord epidural stimulation to facilitate stepping and standing after a complete spinal cord injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stimulation of the spinal cord has been shown to have great potential for improving function after motor deficits caused by injury or pathological conditions. Using a wide range of animal models, many studies have shown that stimulation applied to the neural networks intrinsic to the spinal cord can result in a dramatic improvement of motor ability, even allowing an animal to step and stand after a complete spinal cord transection. Clinical use of this technology, however, has been slow to develop due to the invasive nature of the implantation procedures, the lack of versatility in conventional stimulation technology, and the difficulty of ascertaining specific sites of stimulation that would provide optimal amelioration of the motor deficits. Moreover, the development of tools available to control precise stimulation chronically via biocompatible electrodes has been limited. In this paper, we outline the development of this technology and its use in the spinal rat model, demonstrating the ability to identify and stimulate specific sites of the spinal cord to produce discrete motor behaviors in spinal rats using this array. Methods We have designed a chronically implantable, rapidly switchable, high-density platinum based multi-electrode array that can be used to stimulate at 1–100 Hz and 1–10 V in both monopolar and bipolar configurations to examine the electrophysiological and behavioral effects of spinal cord epidural stimulation in complete spinal cord transected rats. Results In this paper, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of using high-resolution stimulation parameters in the context of improving motor recovery after a spinal cord injury. We observed that rats whose hindlimbs were paralyzed can stand and step when specific sets of electrodes of the array are stimulated tonically (40 Hz). Distinct patterns of stepping and standing were produced by stimulation of different combinations of electrodes on the array located at specific

  6. Plasticity of interneuronal networks of the functionally isolated human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The loss of walking after human spinal cord injury has been attributed to the dominance of supraspinal over spinal mechanisms. The evidence for central pattern generation in humans is limited due to the inability to conclusively isolate the circuitry from descending and afferent input. However, studying individuals following spinal cord injury with no detectable influence on spinal networks from supraspinal centers can provide insight to their interaction with afferent input. The focus of this article is on the interaction of sensory input with human spinal networks in the generation of locomotor patterns. The functionally isolated human spinal cord has the capacity to generate locomotor patterns with appropriate afferent input. Locomotor Training is a rehabilitative strategy that has evolved from animal and humans studies focused on the neural plasticity of the spinal cord and has been successful for many people with acute and chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. However, even those individuals with clinically complete spinal cord injury that generate appropriate locomotor patterns during stepping with assistance on a treadmill with body weight support cannot sustain overground walking. This suggests that although a significant control of locomotion can occur at the level of spinal interneuronal networks the level of sustainable excitability of these circuits is still compromised. Future studies should focus on approaches to increase the central state of excitability and may include neural repair strategies, pharmacological interventions or epidural stimulation in combination with Locomotor Training. PMID:18042493

  7. The challenge of spinal cord injury care in the developing world

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Anthony S.; O'Connell, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Great strides have been made in reducing morbidity and mortality following spinal cord injury (SCI), and improving long-term health and community participation; however, this progress has not been uniform across the globe. This review highlights differences in global epidemiology of SCI and the ongoing challenges in meeting the needs of individuals with SCI in the developing world, including post-disaster. Significant disparities persist, with life expectancies of 2 years or less not uncommon for persons living with paraplegia in many developing countries. The international community has an important role in improving access to appropriate care following SCI worldwide. PMID:22330185

  8. Spinal cord stimulation for radicular pain following retained bullet in the spinal canal.

    PubMed

    Keel, John C; Lau, Mary E; Gulur, Padma

    2013-01-01

    We are reporting on the implantation of a spinal cord stimulator to treat intractable radicular pain following a retained bullet fragment in the spinal canal. Such retained fragments are associated with risks including pain, neurological deficit, infection, toxic effects, and migration. Our patient was a young man with radicular pain and history of a gunshot entering the abdomen. Computed tomography of the spine had revealed a nearly complete bullet in the right paracentral canal at L4, partially extending into the lateral recess. He presented 17 months after his injury with gradually worsening pain and parasthesias radiating from the back to the whole right leg and foot. There was no weakness. As the patient had failed conservative therapy, procedural options were considered. In this case, the potential benefits of epidural steroid injection by any approach might not have outweighed risks of infection, related to foreign body and local steroid, or possible migration due to mechanical forces during injection. As he may well need repeated epidural steroid injections to manage his pain, this increases his risk for infection. A percutaneous trial spinal cord stimulation lead was placed, with epidural entry well away from the bullet. After good results, a permanent system was implanted. There was no evidence of infection or migration, and excellent pain relief was achieved. Bullets and other foreign bodies retained in the spinal canal can cause progressive neurologic symptoms through reactive tissue formation and compression. Spinal cord stimulation can relieve radicular pain while avoiding risks associated with altering the location of the offending foreign body. PMID:23511684

  9. Spinal Cord in Multiple Sclerosis: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features and Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Alex; Auger, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an idiopathic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system that affects not only the brain but also the spinal cord. In the diagnostic and monitoring process of MS, spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not performed as commonly as brain MRI, mainly because of certain technical difficulties and the increase in total acquisition time. Nonetheless, spinal cord MRI findings are important to establish a prompt accurate diagnosis of MS, impart prognostic information, and provide valuable data for monitoring the disease course in certain cases. In this article, we discuss the technical aspects of spinal cord MRI, the typical MRI features of the spinal cord in MS, the clinical indications for this examination, and the differential diagnosis with other disorders that may produce similar clinical or MRI findings. PMID:27616313

  10. Nanog interact with CDK6 to regulates astrocyte cells proliferation following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jun; Ni, Yingjie; Xu, Lin; Xu, Hongliang; Cai, Zhengdong

    2016-01-22

    Previous research had reported transcription factors Nanog expressed in pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCS) that played an important role in regulating the cell proliferation. Nanog levels are frequently elevated in ESCS, but the role in the spinal cord was not clear. To examine the biological relevance of Nanog, we studied its properties in spinal cord injury model. The expression of Nanog and PCNA was gradually increased and reached a peak at 3 day by western blot analysis. The expression of Nanog was further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Double immunofluorescent staining uncovered that Nanog can co-labeled with PCNA and GFAP in the spinal cord tissue. In vitro, Nanog can promote the proliferation of astrocyte cell by Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter (FACS) and CCK8. Meanwhile, the cell-cycle protein CDK6 could interact with Nanog in the spinal cord tissue. Taken together, these data suggested that both Nanog may play important roles in spinal cord pathophysiology via interact with CDK6.

  11. A huge ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord with subtle atypical manifestations and hyperhidrosis: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Haddadi, Kaveh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ependymomas are the most common neuroepithelial tumors of the spinal cord, accounting for 50–60% of spinal cord gliomas. The nonspecific clinical presentation of a spinal cord tumor frequently results in delay of diagnosis with opposing outcomes. Presentation of case We report a 34-year-old man presented with abnormally enhanced sweating on the left side of his neck, upper extremity, and chest that had been occurring for 1 year. In the sagittal MRI there were a centrally localized mass lesion extending from medulla and C1 to T2 vertebra level and expanding the cord. Surgical elimination of the tumor was performed with posterior midline approach and near total resection of tumor was achieved. Conclusion Cervical intramedullary ependymal is a rare, slow growing spinal cord tumor. Attention to uncommon characteristics like hyperhidrosis might be an important key to early diagnosis of this rare spinal tumor. Surgical resection is the choice of treatment with infrequent recurrence. PMID:26741275

  12. Chitosan produces potent neuroprotection and physiological recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngnam; Shi, Riyi; Borgens, Richard B

    2010-05-01

    Chitosan, a non-toxic biodegradable polycationic polymer with low immunogenicity, has been extensively investigated in various biomedical applications. In this work, chitosan has been demonstrated to seal compromised nerve cell membranes thus serving as a potent neuroprotector following acute spinal cord trauma. Topical application of chitosan after complete transection or compression of the guinea pig spinal cord facilitated sealing of neuronal membranes in ex vivo tests, and restored the conduction of nerve impulses through the length of spinal cords in vivo, using somatosensory evoked potential recordings. Moreover, chitosan preferentially targeted damaged tissues, served as a suppressor of reactive oxygen species (free radical) generation, and the resultant lipid peroxidation of membranes, as shown in ex vivo spinal cord samples. These findings suggest a novel medical approach to reduce the catastrophic loss of behavior after acute spinal cord and brain injury.

  13. Extrinsic and Intrinsic Regulation of Axon Regeneration by MicroRNAs after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Teng, Zhao-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a devastating disease which disrupts the connections between the brain and spinal cord, often resulting in the loss of sensory and motor function below the lesion site. Most injured neurons fail to regenerate in the central nervous system after injury. Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to the general failure of axonal regeneration after injury. MicroRNAs can modulate multiple genes' expression and are tightly controlled during nerve development or the injury process. Evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs and their signaling pathways play important roles in mediating axon regeneration and glial scar formation after spinal cord injury. This article reviews the role and mechanism of differentially expressed microRNAs in regulating axon regeneration and glial scar formation after spinal cord injury, as well as their therapeutic potential for promoting axonal regeneration and repair of the injured spinal cord.

  14. Activity-dependent plasticity of spinal circuits in the developing and mature spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, Behdad; Koceja, David M

    2012-01-01

    Part of the development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) occurs through interactions with the environment. Through physical activities and interactions with the world, an animal receives considerable sensory information from various sources. These sources can be internally (proprioceptive) or externally (such as touch and pressure) generated senses. Ample evidence exists to demonstrate that the sensory information originating from large diameter afferents (Ia fibers) have an important role in inducing essential functional and morphological changes for the maturation of both the brain and the spinal cord. The Ia fibers transmit sensory information generated by muscle activity and movement. Such use or activity-dependent plastic changes occur throughout life and are one reason for the ability to acquire new skills and learn new movements. However, the extent and particularly the mechanisms of activity-dependent changes are markedly different between a developing nervous system and a mature nervous system. Understanding these mechanisms is an important step to develop strategies for regaining motor function after different injuries to the CNS. Plastic changes induced by activity occur both in the brain and spinal cord. This paper reviews the activity-dependent changes in the spinal cord neural circuits during both the developmental stages of the CNS and in adulthood. PMID:22900208

  15. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated alternative activation of microglia is protective after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stirling, David P; Cummins, Karen; Mishra, Manoj; Teo, Wulin; Yong, V Wee; Stys, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Improving neurological outcome after spinal cord injury is a major clinical challenge because axons, once severed, do not regenerate but 'dieback' from the lesion site. Although microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the brain and spinal cord respond rapidly to spinal cord injury, their role in subsequent injury or repair remains unclear. To assess the role of microglia in spinal cord white matter injury we used time-lapse two-photon and spectral confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein-labelled microglia, yellow fluorescent protein-labelled axons, and Nile Red-labelled myelin of living murine spinal cord and revealed dynamic changes in white matter elements after laser-induced spinal cord injury in real time. Importantly, our model of acute axonal injury closely mimics the axonopathy described in well-characterized clinically relevant models of spinal cord injury including contusive-, compressive- and transection-based models. Time-lapse recordings revealed that microglia were associated with some acute pathophysiological changes in axons and myelin acutely after laser-induced spinal cord injury. These pathophysiological changes included myelin and axonal spheroid formation, spectral shifts in Nile Red emission spectra in axonal endbulbs detected with spectral microscopy, and 'bystander' degeneration of axons that survived the initial injury, but then succumbed to secondary degeneration. Surprisingly, modulation of microglial-mediated release of neurotoxic molecules failed to protect axons and myelin. In contrast, sterile stimulation of microglia with the specific toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam2CSK4 robustly increased the microglial response to ablation, reduced secondary degeneration of central myelinated fibres, and induced an alternative (mixed M1:M2) microglial activation profile. Conversely, Tlr2 knock out: Thy1 yellow fluorescent protein double transgenic mice experienced greater axonal dieback than littermate controls. Thus, promoting an alternative

  16. Spinal Plasticity and Behavior: BDNF-Induced Neuromodulation in Uninjured and Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huie, J. Russell

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophic factor family of signaling molecules. Since its discovery over three decades ago, BDNF has been identified as an important regulator of neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and cellular and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to function in the formation and maintenance of certain forms of memory. Neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory in the hippocampus shares distinct characteristics with spinal cord nociceptive plasticity. Research examining the role BDNF plays in spinal nociception and pain overwhelmingly suggests that BDNF promotes pronociceptive effects. BDNF induces synaptic facilitation and engages central sensitization-like mechanisms. Also, peripheral injury-induced neuropathic pain is often accompanied with increased spinal expression of BDNF. Research has extended to examine how spinal cord injury (SCI) influences BDNF plasticity and the effects BDNF has on sensory and motor functions after SCI. Functional recovery and adaptive plasticity after SCI are typically associated with upregulation of BDNF. Although neuropathic pain is a common consequence of SCI, the relation between BDNF and pain after SCI remains elusive. This article reviews recent literature and discusses the diverse actions of BDNF. We also highlight similarities and differences in BDNF-induced nociceptive plasticity in naïve and SCI conditions. PMID:27721996

  17. Conditional Sox9 ablation improves locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury by increasing reactive sprouting.

    PubMed

    McKillop, William M; York, Elisa M; Rubinger, Luc; Liu, Tony; Ossowski, Natalie M; Xu, Kathy; Hryciw, Todd; Brown, Arthur

    2016-09-01

    The absence of axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been attributed to the up-regulation of axon-repelling molecules, such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) present in the glial scar that forms post-SCI. We previously identified the transcription factor SOX9 as a key up-regulator of CSPG production and also demonstrated that conditional Sox9 ablation leads to decreased CSPG levels and improved recovery of hind limb function after SCI. We herein demonstrate increased neural input onto spinal neurons caudal to the lesion in spinal cord injured Sox9 conditional knock out mice as indicated by increased levels of the presynaptic markers synaptophysin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) compared to controls. Axonal sparing, long-range axonal regeneration and reactive sprouting were investigated as possible explanations for the increase in neural inputs caudal to the lesion and for the improved locomotor outcomes in spinal cord-injured Sox9 conditional knock out mice. Whereas retrograde tract-tracing studies failed to reveal any evidence for increased axonal sparing or for long-range regeneration in the Sox9 conditional knock out mice, anterograde tract-tracing experiments demonstrated increased reactive sprouting caudal to the lesion after SCI. Finally we demonstrate that application of a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor to reduce CSPG degradation in Sox9 conditional knock out mice prevents the improvements in locomotor recovery observed in untreated Sox9 conditional knock out mice. These results suggest that improved recovery of locomotor function in Sox9 conditional knock out mice after SCI is due to increased reactive sprouting secondary to reduced CSPG levels distal to the lesion.

  18. TRANSDUCED SCHWANN CELLS PROMOTE AXON GROWTH AND MYELINATION AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Kevin L.; Pearse, Damien D.; Blits, Bas; Garg, Maneesh S.; Oudega, Martin; Wood, Patrick M.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2007-01-01

    We sought to directly compare growth and myelination of local and supraspinal axons by implanting into the injured spinal cord Schwann cells (SCs) transduced ex vivo with adenoviral (AdV) or lentiviral (LV) vectors encoding a bifunctional neurotrophin molecule (D15A). D15A mimics actions of both neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Transduced SCs were injected into the injury center one week after a moderate thoracic (T8) adult rat spinal cord contusion. D15A expression and bioactivity in vitro; D15A levels in vivo; and graft volume, SC number, implant axon number and cortico-, reticulo-, raphe-, coerulo-spinal and sensory axon growth were determined for both types of vectors employed to transduce SCs. ELISAs revealed that D15A-secreting SC implants contained significantly higher levels of neurotrophin than non-transduced SC and AdV/GFP and LV/GFP SC controls early after implantation. At 6 wk post-implantation, D15A-secreting SC grafts exhibited 5-fold increases in graft volume, SC number and myelinated axon counts and a 3-fold increase in myelinated to unmyelinated (ensheathed) axon ratios. The total number of axons within grafts of LV/GFP/D15A SCs was estimated to be over 70,000. Also 5-HT, DβH, and CGRP axon length was increased up to 5-fold within D15A grafts. In sum, despite qualitative differences using the two vectors, increased neurotrophin secretion by the implanted D15A SCs led to the presence of a significantly increased number of axons in the contusion site. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential for utilizing neurotrophin-transduced SCs to repair the injured spinal cord. PMID:17719577

  19. Spinal Cord Injury Caused by Stab Wounds: Incidence, Natural History, and Relevance for Future Research.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Euan J; Purcell, Mariel; Barnett, Susan C; Allan, David B

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury caused by stab wounds (SCISW) results from a partial or complete transection of the cord, and presents opportunities for interventional research. It is recognized that there is low incidence, but little is known about the natural history or the patient's suitability for long-term clinical outcome studies. This study aims to provide population-based evidence of the demographics of SCISW, and highlight the issues regarding the potential for future research. The database of the Queen Elizabeth National Spinal Injuries Unit (QENSIU), the sole center for treating SCI in Scotland, was reviewed between 1994 and 2013 to ascertain the incidence, demographics, functional recovery, and mortality rates for new SCISW. During this 20 year period, 35 patients with SCISW were admitted (97.1% male, mean age 30.0 years); 31.4% had a cervical injury, 60.0% had a thoracic injury, and 8.6% had a lumbar injury. All had a neurological examination, with 42.9% diagnosed as motor complete on admission and 77.1% discharged as motor incomplete. A total of 70.4% of patients with an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) level of A to C on admission had an improved AIS level on discharge. Nine (25.7%) patients have died since discharge, with mean life expectancy for these patients being 9.1 years after injury (20-65 years of age). Patients had higher levels of comorbidities, substance abuse, secondary events, and poor compliance compared with the general SCI population, which may have contributed to the high mortality rate observed post-discharge. The low incidence, heterogeneous nature, spontaneous recovery rate, and problematic follow-up makes those with penetrating stab injuries of the spinal cord a challenging patient group for SCI research.

  20. Chemically defined medium enhances bioelectric activity in mouse spinal cord-dorsal root ganglion cultures.

    PubMed

    Habets, A M; Baker, R E; Brenner, E; Romijn, H J

    1981-02-23

    Co-cultures of mouse spinal cord with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures were grown either in horse serum (HS)-supplemented medium or in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The cytoarchitecture of cord--DRG explants was fully retained in CDM, with little or no distortion due to flattening of the explant, as is invariably observed in HS-supplemented cultures. Functional properties such as bioelectric activity and DRG--spinal cord interconnectivity were well sustained in CDM.