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Sample records for post-acute ambulatory patients

  1. Patient Preferences for Information on Post-Acute Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Sefcik, Justine S.; Nock, Rebecca H.; Flores, Emilia J.; Chase, Jo-Ana D.; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore what hospitalized patients would like to know about post-acute care (PAC) services to ultimately help them make an informed decision when offered PAC options. Thirty hospitalized adults 55 and older in a Northeastern U.S. academic medical center participated in a qualitative descriptive study with conventional content analysis as the analytical technique. Three themes emerged. Participants were interested in (1) receiving practical information about the services, (2) understanding “how it relates to me”, and (3) having opportunities to understand PAC options. Study findings inform clinicians about what information to include when discussing PAC options with older adults. Improving the quality of discharge planning discussions may better inform patient decision-making and as a result increase the numbers of patients who accept a plan of care that supports their recovery, meets their needs, and results in improved quality of life and fewer readmissions. PMID:26815304

  2. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  3. Design Considerations for Post-Acute Care mHealth: Patient Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Patrick; Hartzler, Andrea; Lober, William B; Evans, Heather L; Pratt, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Many current mobile health applications ("apps") and most previous research have been directed at management of chronic illnesses. However, little is known about patient preferences and design considerations for apps intended to help in a post-acute setting. Our team is developing an mHealth platform to engage patients in wound tracking to identify and manage surgical site infections (SSI) after hospital discharge. Post-discharge SSIs are a major source of morbidity and expense, and occur at a critical care transition when patients are physically and emotionally stressed. Through interviews with surgical patients who experienced SSI, we derived design considerations for such a post-acute care app. Key design qualities include: meeting basic accessibility, usability and security needs; encouraging patient-centeredness; facilitating better, more predictable communication; and supporting personalized management by providers. We illustrate our application of these guiding design considerations and propose a new framework for mHealth design based on illness duration and intensity.

  4. Post-acute care and vertical integration after the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Shay, Patrick D; Mick, Stephen S

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated changes resulting from the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act-including the proposed adoption of bundled payment systems and the promotion of accountable care organizations-have generated considerable controversy as U.S. healthcare industry observers debate whether such changes will motivate vertical integration activity. Using examples of accountable care organizations and bundled payment systems in the American post-acute healthcare sector, this article applies economic and sociological perspectives from organization theory to predict that as acute care organizations vary in the degree to which they experience environmental uncertainty, asset specificity, and network embeddedness, their motivation to integrate post-acute care services will also vary, resulting in a spectrum of integrative behavior.

  5. Telemanagement of Heart Failure Patients Across the Post-Acute Care Continuum.

    PubMed

    Dadosky, Amy; Overbeck, Heather; Barbetta, Laura; Bertke, Ken; Corl, Maureen; Daly, Kathleen; Hiles, Natasha; Rector, Nancy; Chung, Eugene; Menon, Santosh

    2017-09-13

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic condition causing nearly 1 million hospital admissions annually in the United States with 25% of patients rehospitalized within 30 days. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether telemanagement of HF patients throughout the post-acute continuum of care would reduce rehospitalization rates and improve patient self-care knowledge and satisfaction. HF patients discharged to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) received telemanagement by HF clinicians with opportunity for continuation at home with assistance of home healthcare (HHC) nurses. Wireless sensors worn at SNF and home captured continuous health information visible to HF clinicians on secure cloud database. Point-of-care devices were available at SNF. Patients had scheduled and as-needed video visits with audio and auscultation capacity with HF clinician. HF education was provided by SNF and HHC nursing. Patients were compared with historical control group receiving standard care at same SNF. Patients receiving telemanagement had 29% lower rehospitalization rates (17% vs. 24%), despite higher predicted rehospitalization risk. Median age was 81. Seven of eight patients who were rehospitalized in the telemanagement group had advanced HF symptoms (New York Heart Association Class IV). Five patients in telemanagement group were receiving continuous inotrope infusions. Patients reported good satisfaction and self-care knowledge. Reduction of rehospitalization rates was clinically significant in population of advanced age and HF symptoms. Technology enhanced communication content and timeliness across the post-acute care continuum. Post-acute telemanagement may reduce rehospitalization rates even in high-risk, older HF populations.

  6. Development and validation of a prediction model for patients discharged to post-acute care after colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Elizabeth A; Hoffman, Rebecca L; Wirtalla, Christopher; Karakousis, Giorgos; Kelz, Rachel R

    2017-04-01

    As payment shifts toward bundled reimbursement, decreasing unnecessary inpatient care may provide cost savings. This study examines the association between discharge status, hospital duration of stay, and cost for colorectal operation patients without complications and uses risk factors to predict the need for post-acute care. We used the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System and the California Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases to identify all patients who underwent operative resection for colorectal cancer in 2009-2010 and were discharged to home or post-acute care. Patients with complications were excluded. Duration of stay and inpatient costs were calculated. Risk factors associated with discharge to post-acute care were identified using multivariable logistic regression and were incorporated into a model to predict discharge status. A total of 5.4% of 23,942 patients were discharged to a post-acute care facility. Duration of sty was 2 days greater and $3,823 more costly for patients discharged to post-acute care. Significant risk factors included age, number of comorbidities, emergency admission, open operation, admission in the previous year, and a new ostomy. A scoring system using these factors accurately predicted discharge to post-acute care. Admissions after colorectal operations were greater and more costly for patients discharged to post-acute care even without operative complications. Risk factors can predict the need for post-acute care early in the postoperative course, thereby potentially facilitating early discharge planning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Design Considerations for Post-Acute Care mHealth: Patient Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Patrick; Hartzler, Andrea; Lober, William B.; Evans, Heather L.; Pratt, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Many current mobile health applications (“apps”) and most previous research have been directed at management of chronic illnesses. However, little is known about patient preferences and design considerations for apps intended to help in a post-acute setting. Our team is developing an mHealth platform to engage patients in wound tracking to identify and manage surgical site infections (SSI) after hospital discharge. Post-discharge SSIs are a major source of morbidity and expense, and occur at a critical care transition when patients are physically and emotionally stressed. Through interviews with surgical patients who experienced SSI, we derived design considerations for such a post-acute care app. Key design qualities include: meeting basic accessibility, usability and security needs; encouraging patient-centeredness; facilitating better, more predictable communication; and supporting personalized management by providers. We illustrate our application of these guiding design considerations and propose a new framework for mHealth design based on illness duration and intensity. PMID:25954465

  8. Diurnal Cortisol and Functional Outcomes in Post-Acute Rehabilitation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Lavinia; Saxbe, Darby; Alessi, Cathy A.; Woods, Diana Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cortisol is a stress-related hormone with a robust circadian rhythm where levels typically peak in the morning hours and decline across the day. Although acute cortisol increases resulting from stressors are adaptive, chronic elevated cortisol levels are associated with poor functioning. Studies have shown age-related changes in cortisol levels. The present study investigated the relationship between salivary diurnal cortisol and functional outcomes among older adults undergoing inpatient post-acute rehabilitation. Methods. Thirty-two older adults (mean age 78 years; 84% men) in a Veterans Administration inpatient post-acute rehabilitation unit were studied. Functional outcomes were assessed with the motor component of the Functional Independence Measure (mFIM; where mFIM change = discharge − admission score). Saliva samples were collected on 1 day at wake time, 45 minutes later, 11:30 AM, 2 PM, 4:30 PM, and bedtime. We analyzed the relationship between cortisol measures and functional outcomes, demographics, and health measures. Results. The analyses consistently showed that greater functional improvement (mFIM change) from admission to discharge was associated with lower comorbidity scores and higher cortisol levels at 2 PM, 4:30 PM, and bedtime. A morning cortisol rise was also associated with greater mFIM change. Conclusions. Measurement of cortisol in saliva may be a useful biological marker for identification of patients who are “at risk” of lower benefits from inpatient rehabilitation services and who may require additional assistance or intervention during their post-acute care stay. PMID:22219521

  9. Evaluation of Patient and Proxy Responses on the Activity Measure for Post Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Alan M.; Ni, Pengsheng; Rasch, Elizabeth K.; Appelman, Jed; Sandel, M. Elizabeth; Terdiman, Joseph; Chan, Leighton

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Our objective was to examine the agreement between adult patients with stroke and family member or clinician proxies in Activity Measure for Post Acute Care (AM-PAC) summary scores for daily activity, basic mobility, and applied cognitive function. Methods This study involved 67 patients with stroke admitted to a hospital within the Kaiser Permanente of Northern California system and were participants in a parent study on stroke outcomes. Each participant and proxy respondent completed the AM-PAC by personal or telephone interview at the point of hospital discharge and/or during one or more transitions to different post-acute care settings. Results The results suggest that for patients with a stroke proxy AM-PAC data are robust for family or clinician proxy assessment of basic mobility function, clinician proxy assessment of daily activity function, but less robust for family proxy assessment of daily activity function and for all proxy groups’ assessment of applied cognitive function. The pattern of disagreement between patient and proxy was, on average, relatively small and random. There was little evidence of systematic bias between proxy and patient reports of their functional status. The degree of concordance between patient and proxy was similar for those with moderate to severe strokes compared with mild strokes. Conclusions Patient and proxy ratings on the AM-PAC achieved adequate agreement for use in stroke research where using proxy respondents could reduce sample selection bias. The AM-PAC data can be implemented across institutional as well as community care settings while achieving precision and reducing respondent burden. PMID:22343646

  10. Can FES-Augmented Active Cycling Training Improve Locomotion in Post-Acute Elderly Stroke Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Elisabetta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Nava, Claudia; Longoni, Valentina; Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies advocated the use of active cycling coupled with functional electrical stimulation to induce neuroplasticity and enhance functional improvements in stroke adult patients. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the benefits induced by such a treatment are superior to standard physiotherapy. A single-blinded randomized controlled trial has been performed on post-acute elderly stroke patients. Patients underwent FES-augmented cycling training combined with voluntary pedaling or standard physiotherapy. The intervention consisted of fifteen 30-minutes sessions carried out within 3 weeks. Patients were evaluated before and after training, through functional scales, gait analysis and a voluntary pedaling test. Results were compared with an age-matched healthy group. Sixteen patients completed the training. After treatment, a general improvement of all clinical scales was obtained for both groups. Only the mechanical efficiency highlighted a group effect in favor of the experimental group. Although a group effect was not found for any other cycling or gait parameters, the experimental group showed a higher percentage of change with respect to the control group (e.g. the gait velocity was improved of 35.4% and 25.4% respectively, and its variation over time was higher than minimal clinical difference for the experimental group only). This trend suggests that differences in terms of motor recovery between the two groups may be achieved increasing the training dose. In conclusion, this study, although preliminary, showed that FES-augmented active cycling training seems to be effective in improving cycling and walking ability in post-acute elderly stroke patients. A higher sample size is required to confirm results. PMID:27990234

  11. Can FES-Augmented Active Cycling Training Improve Locomotion in Post-Acute Elderly Stroke Patients?

    PubMed

    Peri, Elisabetta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Nava, Claudia; Longoni, Valentina; Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona

    2016-06-13

    Recent studies advocated the use of active cycling coupled with functional electrical stimulation to induce neuroplasticity and enhance functional improvements in stroke adult patients. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the benefits induced by such a treatment are superior to standard physiotherapy. A single-blinded randomized controlled trial has been performed on post-acute elderly stroke patients. Patients underwent FES-augmented cycling training combined with voluntary pedaling or standard physiotherapy. The intervention consisted of fifteen 30-minutes sessions carried out within 3 weeks. Patients were evaluated before and after training, through functional scales, gait analysis and a voluntary pedaling test. Results were compared with an age-matched healthy group. Sixteen patients completed the training. After treatment, a general improvement of all clinical scales was obtained for both groups. Only the mechanical efficiency highlighted a group effect in favor of the experimental group. Although a group effect was not found for any other cycling or gait parameters, the experimental group showed a higher percentage of change with respect to the control group (e.g. the gait velocity was improved of 35.4% and 25.4% respectively, and its variation over time was higher than minimal clinical difference for the experimental group only). This trend suggests that differences in terms of motor recovery between the two groups may be achieved increasing the training dose. In conclusion, this study, although preliminary, showed that FES-augmented active cycling training seems to be effective in improving cycling and walking ability in post-acute elderly stroke patients. A higher sample size is required to confirm results.

  12. [Anesthesia for ambulatory patients].

    PubMed

    Landauer, B

    1975-11-13

    The specific problems of outpatient anesthesia are discussed with respect to the patient's condition, the anesthesist's qualification and pharmacological properties of anesthetics used. Methohexitone seems to be the best choice for induction. Problems may arise from the use of Propanidid, Ketamin and Diazepam. Nitrousoxide and Enflurane are a suitable completion. Endotracheal intubation, if needed, is facilitated by Suxamethonium, which is rapidly eliminated. Practical aspects of timing, premedication, induction, maintenance and ending of anesthesia are pointed out. After 1-2 hours the patient can be allowed to leave the hospital accompanied by a responsible person. Driving a car is not recommended before 24 hours have elapsed since anesthesia.

  13. Active music therapy approach for stroke patients in the post-acute rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Raglio, Alfredo; Zaliani, Alberto; Baiardi, Paola; Bossi, Daniela; Sguazzin, Cinzia; Capodaglio, Edda; Imbriani, Chiara; Gontero, Giulia; Imbriani, Marcello

    2017-01-30

    Guidelines in stroke rehabilitation recommend the use of a multidisciplinary approach. Different approaches and techniques with music are used in the stroke rehabilitation to improve motor and cognitive functions but also psychological outcomes. In this randomized controlled pilot trial, relational active music therapy approaches were tested in the post-acute phase of disease. Thirty-eight hospitalized patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were recruited and allocated in two groups. The experimental group underwent the standard of care (physiotherapy and occupational therapy daily sessions) and relational active music therapy treatments. The control group underwent the standard of care only. Motor functions and psychological aspects were assessed before and after treatments. Music therapy process was also evaluated using a specific rating scale. All groups showed a positive trend in quality of life, functional and disability levels, and gross mobility. The experimental group showed a decrease of anxiety and, in particular, of depression (p = 0.016). In addition, the strength of non-dominant hand (grip) significantly increased in the experimental group (p = 0.041). Music therapy assessment showed a significant improvement over time of non-verbal and sonorous-music relationships. Future studies, including a greater number of patients and follow-up evaluations, are needed to confirm promising results of this study.

  14. Lower Methylation of the ANGPTL2 Gene in Leukocytes from Post-Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Albert; Mamarbachi, Maya; Turcot, Valérie; Lessard, Samuel; Yu, Carol; Luo, Xiaoyan; Lalongé, Julie; Hayami, Doug; Gayda, Mathieu; Juneau, Martin; Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Lettre, Guillaume; Nigam, Anil; Thorin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is believed to regulate gene expression during adulthood in response to the constant changes in environment. The methylome is therefore proposed to be a biomarker of health through age. ANGPTL2 is a circulating pro-inflammatory protein that increases with age and prematurely in patients with coronary artery diseases; integrating the methylation pattern of the promoter may help differentiate age- vs. disease-related change in its expression. We believe that in a pro-inflammatory environment, ANGPTL2 is differentially methylated, regulating ANGPTL2 expression. To test this hypothesis we investigated the changes in promoter methylation of ANGPTL2 gene in leukocytes from patients suffering from post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS). DNA was extracted from circulating leukocytes of post-ACS patients with cardiovascular risk factors and from healthy young and age-matched controls. Methylation sites (CpGs) found in the ANGPTL2 gene were targeted for specific DNA methylation quantification. The functionality of ANGPTL2 methylation was assessed by an in vitro luciferase assay. In post-ACS patients, C-reactive protein and ANGPTL2 circulating levels increased significantly when compared to healthy controls. Decreased methylation of specific CpGs were found in the promoter of ANGPTL2 and allowed to discriminate age vs. disease associated methylation. In vitro DNA methylation of specific CpG lead to inhibition of ANGPTL2 promoter activity. Reduced leukocyte DNA methylation in the promoter region of ANGPTL2 is associated with the pro-inflammatory environment that characterizes patients with post-ACS differently from age-matched healthy controls. Methylation of different CpGs in ANGPTL2 gene may prove to be a reliable biomarker of coronary disease. PMID:27101308

  15. Factors Associated With Early Readmission Among Patients Discharged to Post-Acute Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Horney, Carolyn; Capp, Roberta; Boxer, Rebecca; Burke, Robert E

    2017-06-01

    Over a quarter of Medicare patients admitted to the hospital are discharged to post-acute care (PAC) facilities, but face high rates of readmission. Timing of readmission may be an important factor in identifying both risk for and preventability of future readmissions. This study aims to define factors associated with readmission within the first week of discharge to PAC facilities following hospitalization. This was a secondary analysis of the 2011 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases (SID) for California, Massachusetts, and Florida. The primary outcome was all-cause readmission within 7 days after hospital discharge, compared to readmission on days 8-30, for patients aged 65 and older who were discharged from the hospital to a PAC facility. Predictor variables included patient, index hospitalization, and hospital characteristics; multivariable logistic regression was used to identify significant predictors of readmission within 7 days. There were 81,173 hospital readmissions from PAC facilities in the first 30 days after hospital discharge. Patients readmitted within the first week were older, white, urban, had fewer comorbid illnesses, had a higher number of previous hospital admissions, and less commonly had Medicare as a payer. Longer index hospital length of stay (LOS) was associated with decreased risk of early readmission (OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.70-0.74 for LOS 4-7 days and 0.60; 95% CI 0.56-0.64 for LOS ≥8 days). Shorter length of index hospital stay is associated with earlier readmission and suggests that for this comorbid, older population, a shorter hospital stay may be detrimental. Readmission after 1 week is associated with increased chronic disease burden, suggesting they may be associated with factors that are less modifiable. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Thicker carotid intima-media thickness and increased plasma VEGF levels suffered by post-acute thrombotic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yueniwati, Yuyun; Darmiastini, Ni Komang; Arisetijono, Eko

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Atherosclerosis causes reduction of the oxygen supply to structures in the far arterial wall, provoking the release of factors that drive angiogenesis of vasa vasorum, including VEGF. Other studies have revealed the inflammatory response in atherosclerosis and the role of platelet factor 4 (PF4) as an anti-angiogenic chemokine through the inhibition of VEGF. This cross-sectional study aims at measuring the effect of atherosclerosis assessed through carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) against plasma VEGF levels in patients with post-acute thrombotic stroke. Materials and methods CIMT was assessed sonographically using GE Logiq S6 with 13 MHz frequency linear probe. VEGF-A plasma levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Differences among variables were compared statistically. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlation. Results A total of 25 patients with post-acute thrombotic stroke were identified in days 7 to 90. CIMT thickening was indicated in 88% of patients (1.202 ± 0.312 mm), while an increase in plasma VEGF was identified in all patients (178.28 ± 93.96 ng/mL). There was no significant correlation between CIMT and plasma VEGF levels in patients with post-acute thrombotic stroke (p=0.741). A significant correlation was recognized between CIMT and total cholesterol (p=0.029) and low-density lipoprotein (p=0.018). Conclusion There were no significant correlations between CIMT and plasma VEGF levels in patients with post-acute thrombotic stroke. However, plasma VEGF increased in patients with thrombotic stroke. CIMT measurement is a promising noninvasive modality to assess the vascular condition of patients with stroke and diabetes, while plasma VEGF cannot specifically assess vascular condition as it can be triggered by ischemic conditions in tissues of the whole body. PMID:28008280

  17. Which Patients Require More Care after Hospital Discharge? An Analysis of Post-Acute Care Use among Elderly Patients Undergoing Elective Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Greg D; Lawson, Elise H; Dawes, Aaron J; Gibbons, Melinda M; Zingmond, David S; Ko, Clifford Y

    2015-06-01

    The use of post-acute care is common among the elderly and accounts for $62 billion in annual Medicare expenditures. However, little is known about post-acute care use after surgery. Data were merged between the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) and Medicare claims for 2005 to 2008. Post-acute care use, including skilled nursing facilities (SNF), inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRF), and home health care (HHC) were analyzed for 3 operations: colectomy, pancreatectomy, and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Controlling for both preoperative risk factors and the occurrence of postoperative complications, we used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the odds of use for each type of post-acute care after elective surgery compared with home discharge. Post-acute care was used frequently for patients undergoing colectomy (40.0%; total n=10,932), pancreatectomy (46.0%; total n=2,144), and open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (44.9%; total n=1,736). Home health was the most frequently reported post-acute care service for each operation (range 23.2% to 31.5%) followed by SNF (range 12.0% to 15.0%), and then by IRF (range 2.5% to 5.4%). The majority of patients with at least 1 inpatient complication were discharged to post-acute care (range 58.6% for open AAA repair to 64.4% for colectomy). In multivariable analysis, specific preoperative risk factors, including advanced age, poor functional status, and inpatient complications were significantly associated with increased risk-adjusted odds of discharge to post-acute care for each operation studied. Among elderly patients, post-acute care use is frequent after surgery and is significantly associated with several preoperative risk factors and postoperative inpatient complications. Further work is needed to ensure that post-acute care services are used appropriately and cost-effectively. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by

  18. Predicting clinical instability of older patients in post-acute care units: a nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ju; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Peng, Li-Ning; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Li-Kuo; Liu, Chien-Liang; Chen, Liang-Kung; Wu, Yung-Hung

    2014-04-01

    Although patients admitted to post-acute care (PAC) units are usually clinically stable, unexpected medical conditions requiring acute ward readmissions still occur and can jeopardize the clinical effectiveness of PAC services. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate predictive factors for clinical instability of patients in PAC units to improve the quality of PAC services. This was a nationwide multicenter cohort study that recruited patients from five PAC units in Taiwan between July 2007 and June 2009. All patients received the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) within 72 h of PAC unit admissions. Conditions requiring acute ward re-admissions from PAC units were defined as clinical instability. Causes of clinical instability for all patients and data of CGA were collected for analysis. Of 918 enrolled participants, 119 (12.9%) experienced acute ward readmissions, including 106 (89.1%) admissions related to medical conditions and 13 (10.9%) for surgical causes. Common conditions included diseases of the respiratory system (n = 32, 26.9%), genitourinary system (n = 24, 20.2%) and digestive system (n = 14, 11.8%). Surgical conditions, mainly fractures and dislocation of upper limbs, were significantly more likely to occur later (P = 0.05) in the PAC unit admissions than medical conditions. Compared with the non-readmission group, the readmission group was leaner (mean body mass index 21.1 ± 2.8 vs 22.0 ± 3.8 kg/m(2) , P = 0.007), having poorer functional status (mean Barthel Index 41.0 ± 19.4 vs 45.4 ± 20.3, P = 0.02; mean IADL: 1.3 ± 1.6 vs 1.7 ± 1.8, P = 0.016), poorer cognitive function (mean Mini-Mental State Examination: 16.8 ± 6.4 vs 18.3 ± 6.4, P = 0.022), poorer ambulation (mean Timed Up & Go test 32.7 ± 18.7 vs 26.6 ± 11.7 s, P = 0.039) and poorer nutritional status (mean Mini-Nutrition Assessment 13.3 ± 5.7 vs 15.4 ± 5.8, P < 0

  19. Post-Acute Care Facility as a Discharge Destination for Patients in Need of Palliative Care in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme L; Japiassu, André M; Gomes, Lucia C; Pereira, Rogéria

    2017-01-01

    Patients with complex palliative care needs can experience delayed discharge, which causes an inappropriate occupancy of hospital beds. Post-acute care facilities (PACFs) have emerged as an alternative discharge destination for some of these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of admissions and characteristics of palliative care patients discharged from hospitals to a PACF. We conducted a retrospective analysis of PACF admissions between 2014 and 2016 that were linked to hospital discharge reports and electronic health records, to gather information about hospital-to-PACF transitions. In total, 205 consecutive patients were discharged from 6 different hospitals to our PACF. Palliative care patients were involved in 32% (n = 67) of these discharges. The most common conditions were terminal cancer (n = 42, 63%), advanced dementia (n = 17, 25%), and stroke (n = 5, 8%). During acute hospital stays, patients with cancer had significant shorter lengths of stay (13 vs 99 days, P = .004), a lower use of intensive care services (2% vs 64%, P < .001) and mechanical ventilation (2% vs 40%, P < .001), when compared to noncancer patients. Approximately one-third of discharges from hospitals to a PACF involved a heterogeneous group of patients in need of palliative care. Further studies are necessary to understand the trajectory of posthospitalized patients with life-limiting illnesses and what factors influence their decision to choose a PACF as a discharge destination and place of death. We advocate that palliative care should be integrated into the portfolio of post-acute services.

  20. Thirty-Day Hospital Readmission following Discharge from Post-acute Rehabilitation in Fee-for-Service Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Karmarkar, Amol; Graham, James E.; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Deutsch, Anne; Reistetter, Timothy; Snih, Soham Al; Granger, Carl V.

    2014-01-01

    Importance The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently identified 30-day readmission after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation facilities as a national quality indicator. Research is needed to determine the rates and factors related to readmission in this patient population. Objective Determine 30-day readmission rates and factors related to readmission for patients receiving post-acute inpatient rehabilitation. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 1,365 post-acute inpatient rehabilitation facilities providing services to Medicare fee-for service beneficiaries. Participants Records for 736,536 post-acute patients discharged from inpatient rehabilitation facilities to the community in 2006 through 2011. Mean age 78.0 (SD = 7.3) years. Sixty-three percent of patients were female and 85.1% were non-Hispanic white. Main Outcome and Measures 30-day readmission rates for the six largest diagnostic impairment categories receiving inpatient rehabilitation. These included stroke, lower extremity fracture, lower extremity joint replacement, debility, neurological disorders and brain dysfunction. Results Mean rehabilitation length of stay was 12.4 (SD = 5.3) days. The overall 30-day readmission rate was 11.8% (95%CI, 11.7%, 11.8%). Rates ranged from 5.8% (95%CI, 5.8%, 5.9%) for patients with lower extremity joint replacement to 18.8% (95%CI, 18.8%, 18.9%). for patients with debility. Rates were highest in men (13.0%; 95%CI, 12.8%, 13.1%), non-Hispanic blacks, (13.8%; 95%CI, 13.5%, 14.1%), dual eligible beneficiaries (15.1%; 95%CI, 14.9%, 15.4%), and in patients with tier 1 comorbidities (25.6%; 95%CI, 24.9%, 26.3%). Higher motor and cognitive functional status were associated with lower hospital readmission rates across the six impairment categories. Variability in adjusted readmission rates by state ranged from 9.2% to 13.6%. Approximately 50% of patients who were rehospitalized within the 30-day period were readmitted within 11 days of discharge

  1. Oxygen uptake response to cycle ergometry in post-acute stroke patients with different severity of hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Kai; Weng, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Tien-Wen; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated the impact of severity of hemiparesis on oxygen uptake (VO2) response in post-acute stroke patients. Sixty-four patients with a mean poststroke interval of 8.6 ± 3.8 days underwent a ramp cardiopulmonary exercise test on a cycling ergometer to volitional termination. Mean peak VO2 (VO2peak) and work efficiency (ΔVO2/ΔWR) were measured by open-circuit spirometry during standard upright ergometer cycling. Severity of the hemiparetic lower limb was assessed by Brunnstrom's motor recovery stages lower extremity (BMRSL). VO2peak was 10% lower in hemiparetic leg with BMRSL V than in that with BMRSL VI, 20% lower in BMRSL IV, and 50% lower in BMRSL III. ΔVO2/ΔWR was higher for the group with increased BMRSL. The relations were consistent after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, stroke type, hemiparetic side, modified Ashworth Scale, time poststroke, comorbidities, and medications. Our findings revealed that O2peak is dependent on the severity of hemiparesis in leg, and along with ΔO2/ΔWR closely related to the severity of hemiparesis in post-acute stroke patients, regardless of the types and locations of lesion after stroke, as well as the differences in comorbidities and medications. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Feasibility of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Myocardial Revascularization Therapy for Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients and Refractory Angina Pectoris Patients.

    PubMed

    Myojo, Masahiro; Ando, Jiro; Uehara, Masae; Daimon, Masao; Watanabe, Masafumi; Komuro, Issei

    2017-04-06

    Extracorporeal shockwave myocardial revascularization (ESMR) is one of the new treatment options for refractory angina pectoris (RAP), and some studies have indicated its effectiveness. A single-arm prospective trial to assess the feasibility of ESMR using Cardiospec for patients with post-acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and RAP was designed and performed. The patients were treated with 9 sessions of ESMR to the ischemic areas for 9 weeks. The feasibility measures included echocardiography; cardiac magnetic resonance imaging; troponin T, creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), and brain natriuretic peptide testing; and a Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ) survey. Three post-AMI patients and 3 RAP patients were enrolled. The post-AMI patients had already undergone revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the acute phase. In two patients, adverse events requiring admission occurred: one a lumbar disc hernia in a post-AMI patient and the other congestive heart failure resulting in death in an RAP patient. No apparent elevations in CK-MB and troponin T levels during the trial were observed. Echocardiography revealed no remarkable changes of ejection fraction; however, septal E/E' tended to decrease after treatments (11.6 ± 4.8 versus 9.2 ± 2.8, P = 0.08). Concerning the available SAQ scores for two RAP patients, one patient reported improvements in angina frequency and treatment satisfaction and the other reported improvements in physical limitations and angina stability. In this feasibility study, ESMR seems to be a safe treatment for both post-AMI patients and RAP patients. The efficacy of ESMR for post-AMI patients remains to be evaluated with additional studies.

  3. [A Delphi Method Survey of the Core Competences of Post-Acute-Care Nurses in Caring for Acute Stroke Patients].

    PubMed

    Chi, Shu-Ching; Yeh, Lily; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Lin, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Post-acute care (PAC) service is becoming increasingly important in Taiwan as a core focus of government policies that are designed to ensure continuity of care. In order to improve PAC nursing education and quality of care, the present study applies a modified Delphi method to identify the core competences of nurses who provide PAC services to acute stroke patients. We surveyed 18 experts in post-acute care and long-term care anonymously using a 29-question questionnaire in order to identify the essential professional skills that are required to perform PAC effectively. The results of this survey indicate that the core competences of PAC may be divided into two categories: Case Management and Care Management. Case Management includes Direct Care, Communication, Health Care Education, Nursing Consulting, and Family Assessment & Health Care. Care Management includes Interdisciplinary Teamwork, Patient Care Management, and Resource Integration. The importance and practicality of each item was evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. The experts required 2 rounds to reach a consensus about the importance and 3 rounds to determine the practicality of PAC core competences. This process highlighted the differing points of view that are held by professionals in the realms of nursing, medicine, and national health policy. The PAC in-job training program in its current form inadequately cul-tivates core competence in Care Management. The results of the present study may be used to inform the development of PAC nurse orientation training programs and continuing education courses.

  4. Antibiotic bacterial resistance in ambulatory patients.

    PubMed

    Yawn, B P; Wollan, P; Cockerill, F; Lydick, E

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluates trends in antibiotic resistance in patients who were treated in an ambulatory setting. The authors compiled the data from all lower respiratory track(sputum) cultures collected from ambulatory patients who visited the Olmsted Medical Center and Mayo Clinic between 1985 and 1998. Cultured organisms were identified, and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values were presented and categorized as susceptible, intermediate, or resistant based on the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines for MIC and antibiotic susceptibility. 4,297 potentially pathogenic organisms were obtained from sputum cultures for 1,921 patients. The most discernible changes in antibiotic resistance appeared to be in cultures positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A trend toward increasing resistance of isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae to beta-lactam drugs was observed in a portion of the population. An emerging intermediate susceptibility among isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudoumonas species was noted. Trends in antimicrobial resistance of respiratory pathogens from ambulatory patients are less clear than those from hospitalized patients, but must be monitored because of the high percentage of ambulatory patients who receive empirical therapies. Trends in intermediate susceptibility patterns may help reveal emerging antimicrobial resistance.

  5. A new hospice consulting system for terminal cancer patients in transferring to post-acute care options in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, P M-H; Liu, Y-Y L; Chao, T-C; Lin, H-L; Chen, M-B; Chen, P-M; Chiou, T-J

    2010-03-01

    The terminal cancer patients increase needs for hospice care day by day. A new hospice consulting system has been developed in Taiwan to provide options for terminal cancer patients in choosing a suitable post-acute hospice care while a combined hospice care system is also given by the consulting team in the acute wards. Hereinafter is our report. From March 2005 to January 2006, 313 terminal cancer patients were analysed. These patients had signed consent forms for palliative treatment and had received consultations from the new hospice consulting system. Multivariate analysis showed that the home care patients had better performance status (P = 0.012), less shortness of breath (P = 0.006), less limbs swelling (P = 0.043), less flatulency (P = 0.000) and less constipation (P = 0.018). Among the 162 patients with regular follow-up, the symptoms/signs were significantly improved after intervention of consulting team in pain (P = 0.000), shortness of breath (P = 0.000), difficulty in sleeping (P = 0.002), nausea (P = 0.004), constipation (P = 0.008), changes in skin (P = 0.024) and adoption (P = 0.000). This new system had significant improvement in the terminal cancer patients' symptoms/signs control in acute wards and could contribute to the care quality of home care patients.

  6. Measuring and improving ambulatory surgery patients' satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Farber, Janice

    2010-09-01

    The pressure on perioperative services to improve quality for health care consumers creates both challenges and opportunities. To make positive changes, many health care organizations contract with Press Ganey (PG), which processes an extensive database of more than 9.5 million surveys annually and provides benchmark reports to same-type organizations. To measure and improve ambulatory surgery patient satisfaction at one health care network in northeastern Pennsylvania, the nursing leaders in the ambulatory surgery center and OR undertook a quality improvement project focused on educating perioperative nurses on the use of PG reports. After we reviewed the PG reports and implemented changes with nursing staff members in perioperative areas, PG patient satisfaction scores improved regarding information about delays (4.1%) and center attractiveness (0.2%).

  7. Patient Perceptions of Mistakes in Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, Christine E.; Walter, Louise C.; Mitchell, C. Madeline; Sloane, Philip D.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT Little information exists about current patient perceptions of medical mistakes in ambulatory care within a diverse population. OBJECTIVES To learn about adults’ perceptions of mistakes in ambulatory care, what factors were associated with perceived mistakes, and whether or not the respondents changed physicians because of these perceived mistakes DESIGN Cross-sectional survey conducted in 2008 SETTING Seven primary care medical practices in North Carolina PARTICIPANTS One thousand six hundred ninety-seven English or Spanish speaking adults, aged 18 and older, who presented to a medical provider during the data collection period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES 1) Has a doctor in a doctor’s office ever made a mistake in your care? 2) In the past 10 years, has a doctor in a doctor’s office made a wrong diagnosis or misdiagnosed you? (If yes, how much harm did this cause you?) 3) In the last 10 years, has a doctor in a doctor’s office given you the wrong medical treatment or delayed treatment? (If yes, how much harm did this cause you?) 4) Have you ever changed doctors because of either a wrong diagnosis or a wrong treatment of a medical condition? RESULTS Two hundred sixty-five participants (15.6%) responded that a doctor had ever made a mistake, 13.4% reported a wrong diagnosis, 12.4% reported a wrong treatment, and 14.1% reported having changed doctors because of a mistake. Participants perceived mistakes and harm in both diagnostic care and medical treatment. Patients with chronic low back pain, higher levels of education, and poor physical health were at increased odds of perceiving harm, whereas African-Americans were less likely to perceive mistakes. CONCLUSIONS Patients perceived mistakes in their diagnostic and treatment care in the ambulatory setting. These perceptions had a concrete impact on the patient-physician relationship, often leading patients to seek another health care provider. PMID:20837835

  8. Perspectives of patients on factors relating to adherence to post-acute coronary syndrome medical regimens

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Kerzner, Anne; Havranek, Edward P; Plomondon, Mary E; Fagan, Katherine M; McCreight, Marina S; Fehling, Kelty B; Williams, David J; Hamilton, Alison B; Albright, Karen; Blatchford, Patrick J; Mihalko-Corbitt, Renee; Bryson, Chris L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Kirshner, Miriam A; Giacco, Eric J Del; Ho, P Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to cardioprotective medications after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) hospitalization is associated with increased risk of rehospitalization and mortality. Clinical trials of multifaceted interventions have improved medication adherence with varying results. Patients’ perspectives on interventions could help researchers interpret inconsistent outcomes. Identifying factors that patients believe would improve adherence might inform the design of future interventions and make them more parsimonious and sustainable. The objective of this study was to obtain patients’ perspectives on adherence to medical regimens after experiencing an ACS event and their participation in a medication adherence randomized control trial following their hospitalization. Patients and methods Sixty-four in-depth interviews were conducted with ACS patients who participated in an efficacious, multifaceted, medication adherence randomized control trial. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative approach. Results Participants described their post-ACS event experiences and how they affected their adherence behaviors. Patients reported that adherence decisions were facilitated by mutually respectful and collaborative provider–patient treatment planning. Frequent interactions with providers and medication refill reminder calls supported improved adherence. Additional facilitators included having social support, adherence routines, and positive attitudes toward an ACS event. The majority of patients expressed that being active participants in health care decision-making contributed to their health. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that respectful collaborative communication can contribute to medication adherence after ACS hospitalization. These results suggest a potential role for training health-care providers, including pharmacists, social workers, registered nurses, etc, to elicit and acknowledge the patients’ views regarding medication

  9. Multiple medication use in older patients in post-acute transitional care: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Runganga, Maureen; Peel, Nancye M; Hubbard, Ruth E

    2014-01-01

    Background Older adults with a range of comorbidities are often prescribed multiple medications, which may impact on their function and cognition and increase the potential for drug interactions and adverse events. Aims This study investigated the extent of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications in patients receiving post-discharge transitional home care and explored the associations of polypharmacy with patient characteristics, functional outcomes, and frailty. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted of 351 patients discharged home from hospital with support from six Transition Care Program (TCP) sites in two states of Australia. A comprehensive geriatric assessment was conducted at TCP admission and discharge using the interRAI Home Care assessment tool, with frailty measured using an index of 57 accumulated deficits. Medications from hospital discharge summaries were coded using the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. Results Polypharmacy (5–9 drugs) was observed in 46.7% and hyperpolypharmacy (≥10 drugs) in 39.2% of patients. Increasing numbers of medications were associated with greater number of comorbid conditions, a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dizziness, and dyspnea and increased frailty. At discharge from the program, the non-polypharmacy group (<5 drugs) had improved outcomes in Activities of Daily Living, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and fewer falls, which was mediated because of lower levels of frailty. The commonest drugs were analgesics (56.8%) and antiulcer drugs (52.7%). The commonest potentially inappropriate medications were tertiary tricyclic antidepressants. Conclusion Polypharmacy is common in older patients discharged from hospital. It is associated with frailty, falls, and poor functional outcomes. Efforts should be made to encourage regular medication reviews and

  10. Motor recovery monitoring using acceleration measurements in post acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Rao, Aravinda S; Fang, Kun; Yan, Bernard; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2013-04-16

    Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Its recovery and treatment depends on close clinical monitoring by a clinician especially during the first few hours after the onset of stroke. Patients who do not exhibit early motor recovery post thrombolysis may benefit from more aggressive treatment. A novel approach for monitoring stroke during the first few hours after the onset of stroke using a wireless accelerometer based motor activity monitoring system is developed. It monitors the motor activity by measuring the acceleration of the arms in three axes. In the presented proof of concept study, the measured acceleration data is transferred wirelessly using iMote2 platform to the base station that is equipped with an online algorithm capable of calculating an index equivalent to the National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) motor index. The system is developed by collecting data from 15 patients. We have successfully demonstrated an end-to-end stroke monitoring system reporting an accuracy of calculating stroke index of more than 80%, highest Cohen's overall agreement of 0.91 (with excellent κ coefficient of 0.76). A wireless accelerometer based 'hot stroke' monitoring system is developed to monitor the motor recovery in acute-stroke patients. It has been shown to monitor stroke patients continuously, which has not been possible so far with high reliability.

  11. Motor recovery monitoring in post acute stroke patients using wireless accelerometer and cross-correlation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dheeraj; Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Yan, Bernard; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a major reason for physical immobility and death. For effective treatment of stroke, early diagnosis and aggressive medication in the form of thrombolytic drugs is shown to be essential. In order to provide proper care, the patient should be kept under continuous monitoring during the first few hours after subjecting thrombolytic drugs and based on the response of the patient to the medication, line of treatment should be changed. In our previous work [1], we have shown the proof of principle by monitoring the motor activity of the stroke patient using accelerometer fitted on patient's arms. Based on preliminary analysis, we proposed methods using resultant acceleration signal and showed its effectiveness in predicting National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) stroke index. In this paper, novel technique based on cross-correlation of accelerometer values along different axes is developed for predicting the NIHSS index. An overall increase in prediction accuracy by over 7% compared to the earlier method is obtained. A multi-class support vector machine (SVM) classifier for cross correlation features is also designed and an overall prediction accuracy of 93% is achieved.

  12. Valued Life Activities, Smoking Cessation, and Mood in Post-Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrew M.; Srour, John Fani; Arrighi, James A.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Borrelli, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Continued engagement in valued life activities is a protective factor for depression and has been linked to readiness to quit smoking in medical populations, but has never been examined among Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) patients. The purpose of this study is to investigate relationships among valued life activities, mood, and smoking post-ACS. Methods Participants were 54 post-ACS patients who were smoking before ACS hospitalization. Data on mood, smoking status, engagement in valued activities, restriction of valued activities, and satisfactory replacement of restricted activities was collected 1-12 months post-ACS. Results Depressive symptoms were associated with both less valued activity engagement and greater valued activity restriction. Positive affect was associated with greater valued activity engagement and negative affect was associated with greater valued activity restriction. Satisfactory replacement of restricted activities was associated with greater positive affect, fewer depressive symptoms, and quitting smoking post-ACS. The majority of these relationships remained significant after controlling for relevant covariates, including physical functioning. Conclusions Valued activity restriction and engagement may contribute to depressed mood and failure to quit smoking in ACS patients. Psychotherapies that target greater engagement in valued life activities deserve further investigation in ACS patients. PMID:25471466

  13. Perioperative Management of the Ambulatory Anorectal Surgery Patient

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; Ternent, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is appropriate for most anorectal pathology. Ambulatory anorectal surgery can be performed at reduced cost compared with inpatient procedures with excellent safety, improved efficiency, and high levels of patient satisfaction. Several perioperative strategies are employed to control pain and avoid urinary retention, including the use of a multimodal pain regimen and restriction of intravenous fluids. Ambulatory anorectal surgery often utilizes standardized order sets and discharge instructions. PMID:26929746

  14. Place orientation and visual construction subdomains of the Mini Mental State Examination test as predictors of rehabilitation outcome of post-acute hip-fractured patients.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Avital; Kornyukov, Natalia; Brill, Shai

    2017-11-01

    The study aimed at assessing the relationship between various Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) subdomains and rehabilitation achievements in post-acute hip-fractured patients. Six hundred and five hip-fractured patients admitted during 2010-2013 to a post-acute geriatric rehabilitation center were included in the study. Main outcome measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) instrument, the motor FIM (mFIM), the Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score (MRFS) on the mFIM and length of stay (LOS). A logistic regression analysis tested the predictive value of MMSE subdomains for achieving a satisfactory functional gain (mFIM MRFS >30%) on operated patients admitted from community. Of all the six MMSE subdomains, place orientation and visual construction demonstrated significant predictive values for rehabilitation outcome. Patients who did not err on place orientation and visual construction MMSE domains had better probabilities [(OR 1.28, 95%CI, 1.05-1.58; p = 0.017); (OR 2.15, 95%CI, 1.28-3.59; p = 0.004), respectively] of achieving better rehabilitation achievements. Similar results were obtained for cognitively impaired patient groups [(OR 1.40 95%CI, 1.11-1.77; p = 0.005); (OR 2.47, 95%CI, 1.15-5.30; p = 0.021), respectively]. For the cognitively intact patient group, the variables with significant predictive value were time orientation and visual construction MMSE subdomains [(OR 2.26, 95%CI, 1.18-4.33; p = 0.014); (OR 2.87, 95%CI, 1.16-7.09; p = 0.022), respectively]. Post-acute hip-fractured patients scoring normally on place orientation and visual construction MMSE subdomains have a better chance of achieving favorable rehabilitation outcome. Implications for Rehabilitation Post-acute hip-fractured patients have a better chance to achieve a favorable rehabilitation outcome when scoring normally on place orientation and visual construction MMSE subdomains. Patients having difficulties in orientation and visual

  15. Is type D personality an independent risk factor for recurrent myocardial infarction or all-cause mortality in post-acute myocardial infarction patients?

    PubMed

    Condén, Emelie; Rosenblad, Andreas; Wagner, Philippe; Leppert, Jerzy; Ekselius, Lisa; Åslund, Cecilia

    2017-03-01

    Background Type D personality refers to a combination of simultaneously high levels of negative affectivity and social inhibition. The present study aimed to examine whether type D personality was independently associated with recurrent myocardial infarction or all-cause mortality in post-acute myocardial infarction patients, using any of the previously proposed methods for measuring type D personality. Design This was a prospective cohort study. Methods Utilising data from the Västmanland Myocardial Infarction Study, 946 post-acute myocardial infarction patients having data on the DS14 instrument used to measure type D personality were followed-up for recurrent myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality until 9 December 2015. Data were analysed using Cox regression, adjusted for established risk factors. Results In total, 133 (14.1%) patients suffered from type D personality. During a mean follow-up time for recurrent myocardial infarction of 5.7 (3.2) years, 166 (17.5%) patients were affected by recurrent myocardial infarction, of which 26 (15.7%) had type D personality, while during a mean follow-up time for all-cause mortality of 6.3 (2.9) years, 321 (33.9%) patients died, of which 42 (13.1%) had type D personality. After adjusting for established risk factors, type D personality was not significantly associated with recurrent myocardial infarction or all-cause mortality using any of the previously proposed methods for measuring type D personality. A weak association was found between the social inhibition part of type D personality and a decreased risk of all-cause mortality, but this association was not significant after taking missing data into account in a multiple imputation analysis. Conclusions No support was found for type D personality being independently associated with recurrent myocardial infarction or all-cause mortality in post-acute myocardial infarction patients, using any of the previously proposed methods for measuring type D personality.

  16. Car accidents after ambulatory surgery in patients without an escort.

    PubMed

    Chung, Frances; Assmann, Nicole

    2008-03-01

    Occasionally, ambulatory surgical patients present without an escort for their procedure. This creates a dilemma for caregivers, and allowing patients to drive may have an impact on their safety. The Canadian Medical Protective Association is a mutual defense organization for 95% of Canadian physicians. The national database is a unique and extensive repository of medico-legal data. We scanned this database for malpractice patients who were discharged after an ambulatory surgery procedure and allowed to drive home with a poor outcome. From this database, two malpractice cases of patients who were discharged without an escort after an ambulatory surgical procedure were reported. Both had a car accident and sustained serious injuries. Based on this we do not recommend discharge without an escort after general anesthesia, regional anesthesia, monitored anesthesia or sedation. Driving after ambulatory surgery cannot be considered safe and caregivers need to verify a safe ride home.

  17. Nurses' perceptions of preoperative teaching for ambulatory surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Tse, Kar-yee; So, Winnie Kwok-wei

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study to examine nurses' perceptions of the importance of providing preoperative information to ambulatory surgical patients, and factors that might influence their provision of such teaching. Ambulatory surgery is now widespread and creates a challenge for nurses to provide preoperative teaching in the limited contact time they have with patients. Although nurses act as key educators in patient teaching, little is known about their perceptions of the importance of preoperative teaching, or about current practice in the provision of such teaching for ambulatory surgical patients. A self-administered questionnaire including demographics and the Preoperative Teaching Questionnaire was completed by 91 of the 169 eligible nurses (response rate 53.8%) working in day-surgery units, operating theatres or outpatient clinics providing ambulatory surgery services in two public hospitals in Hong Kong in 2005. A discrepancy between nurses' perceptions and practice in relation to the provision of preoperative information was found. Limited teaching aids, tight operation schedules and language barriers affected the delivery of preoperative information to ambulatory surgical patients. The results highlight the importance of reviewing current preoperative teaching methods and improving the effectiveness of such teaching to enhance the quality of care for ambulatory surgical patients.

  18. Parenteral anticoagulation in ambulatory patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Akl, Elie A; Kahale, Lara A; Hakoum, Maram B; Matar, Charbel F; Sperati, Francesca; Barba, Maddalena; Yosuico, Victor E D; Terrenato, Irene; Synnot, Anneliese; Schünemann, Holger

    2017-09-11

    Anticoagulation may improve survival in patients with cancer through a speculated anti-tumour effect, in addition to the antithrombotic effect, although may increase the risk of bleeding. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of parenteral anticoagulants in ambulatory patients with cancer who, typically, are undergoing chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, immunotherapy or radiotherapy, but otherwise have no standard therapeutic or prophylactic indication for anticoagulation. A comprehensive search included (1) a major electronic search (February 2016) of the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1946 to February 2016; accessed via OVID) and Embase (1980 to February 2016; accessed via OVID); (2) handsearching of conference proceedings; (3) checking of references of included studies; (4) use of the 'related citation' feature in PubMed and (5) a search for ongoing studies in trial registries. As part of the living systematic review approach, we are running searches continually and we will incorporate new evidence rapidly after it is identified. This update of the systematic review is based on the findings of a literature search conducted on 14 August, 2017. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the benefits and harms of parenteral anticoagulation in ambulatory patients with cancer. Typically, these patients are undergoing chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, immunotherapy or radiotherapy, but otherwise have no standard therapeutic or prophylactic indication for anticoagulation. Using a standardized form we extracted data in duplicate on study design, participants, interventions outcomes of interest, and risk of bias. Outcomes of interested included all-cause mortality, symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE), symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), major bleeding, minor bleeding, and quality of life. We assessed the certainty of evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach

  19. Prevalence of stroke-related sarcopenia and its association with poor oral status in post-acute stroke patients: Implications for oral sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Ai; Yoshimura, Yoshihiro; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Tsuji, Yuri

    2016-12-10

    The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of stroke-related sarcopenia and its association with poor oral status in post-acute stroke patients. This cross-sectional study included 202 consecutive stroke patients who were admitted to convalescent rehabilitation wards in Japan. The Revised Oral Assessment Guide (ROAG) was used to assess oral status. Sarcopenia was defined as a loss of skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) with bioelectrical impedance and decreased muscle strength as measured by handgrip strength; cut-off values were adopted from the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to examine the associations between oral status, SMI, and HG. Study participants included 107 males and 95 females with a mean age of 72 ± 12 years. According to the ROAG, 82.2% of participants had slight to severe oral problems (median score: 11 [9-14]). The prevalence of stroke-related sarcopenia was 53.5%. Both SMI (mean: 6.1 ± 1.3) and handgrip strength (median: 15 [7-25]) were significantly lower in the group with oral problems (SMI = 5.8 ± 1.2, handgrip strength = 12 [6-20]) compared to individuals without oral problems (SMI = 7.4 ± .8, handgrip strength = 27 [23-34]) (p < .001). The ROAG score was independently associated with SMI and handgrip strength, after adjusting for sex, age, stroke severity, activities of daily living, cognitive level, nutritional status, comorbidities, and time from stroke onset. Poor oral status was associated with sarcopenia, reduced muscle mass and strength in post-acute stroke patients. Poor oral status and stroke-related sarcopenia were very common among the patients in this study, suggesting that healthcare providers should monitor for oral sarcopenia in post-acute stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Planning for ambulatory care: simple methods for improving patient flow.

    PubMed

    Schuh, S E; Tolins, I; Westphal, M C; Miller, M C

    1977-06-01

    A combined patient flow and work sampling study was done at the Ambulatory Pediatric Service of the Medical University of South Carolina. The biggest problem was that almost two thirds of the patient's time was spent waiting to see the doctor. Reasons for delay included too few examining rooms, the single block appointment system, and design of the facility.

  1. A System for Coding the Presenting Requests of Ambulatory Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Philip; Gordon, Michael J.; Gilson, John S.

    1977-01-01

    Effective methods developed to review and study the care of patients in hospital have not been applicable to ambulatory care, in which definitive diagnosis is the exception rather than the rule. A reasonable alternative to using diagnosis as the basis for assessing ambulatory care is to use the problems or requests presented by the patients themselves. A system has been developed for classifying and coding this information for flexible computer retrieval. Testing indicates that the system is simple in design, easily mastered by nonphysicians and provides reliable, useful data at a low cost. PMID:855324

  2. Post-acute rehabilitation care for older people in community hospitals and general hospitals--philosophies of care and patients' and caregivers' reported experiences: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Small, Neil; Green, John; Spink, Joanna; Forster, Anne; Young, John

    2009-01-01

    This article contrasts community hospital and general hospital philosophies of care and examines how they relate to patients' and caregivers' experiences. Semi-structured interviews with 42 staff were used to produce care setting vignettes in six community hospitals and four general hospitals in the midlands and north of England. The vignettes were used with 26 patients and 10 caregivers in semi-structured interviews. Community hospital and general hospital staff identified shared understandings of requirements for post-acute rehabilitation care for older people. Distinctive features were: general hospital--medical efficiency, helping patients get better, high standard of care, need for stimulation; community hospital--home-like setting, quiet, calm ambience, good views, orientated to elderly people, encouragement of social interaction, involvement of relatives in care. In the main there was symmetry between staff aspirations and patients' experience. However some concepts used and assumptions made by staff were not recognised by patients. These were characteristically reframed in patients' answers as if they were discussing subjective dimensions of care. There was patient and caregiver preference for the home-like environment of community hospitals. In care of older people, where the focus is rehabilitation, patient preferences are particularly pertinent and should be considered alongside clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness.

  3. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration

    PubMed Central

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients’ motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period. PMID:27512262

  4. Ambulatory ability after hip fracture. A prospective study in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Koval, K J; Skovron, M L; Aharonoff, G B; Meadows, S E; Zuckerman, J D

    1995-01-01

    Three hundred thirty-six community-dwelling, previously ambulatory, geriatric patients with hip fracture were observed prospectively to determine ambulatory ability at a minimum followup of 1 year. One hundred thirty-seven (41%) patients maintained their prefracture ambulatory ability at a minimum followup of 1 year; 134 (40%) patients remained ambulatory but became more dependent on assistive devices; 39 (12%) previous community ambulators became household ambulators, and 26 (8%) patients became nonfunctional ambulators. Analysis was performed to determine which pre- and postinjury factors were predictive of failure to recover ambulatory capacity 1 year after fracture. Potential predictor variables analyzed included age, gender, number of comorbid conditions, prefracture ambulatory ability, prefracture living situation, fracture type, American Society of Anesthesiologists rating of operative risk, type of surgery, and number of postoperative complications. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified significant contributions of age, prefracture ambulatory ability, American Society of Anesthesiologists rating of operative risk, and fracture type to ambulatory recovery.

  5. The Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) as a reliable screening tool for dementia when administered via videoconferencing in elderly post-acute hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lillian; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Rowland, Jeff; Varghese, Paul; Gray, Leonard C

    2012-04-01

    The Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) is a six-domain screening tool for dementia. We measured the practicality and reliability of administering the RUDAS in a telemedicine setting. Inpatients were recruited from a Geriatric and Rehabilitation Unit. Each patient was administered the RUDAS both face-to-face (FTF) and via videoconferencing (VC). The assessment format (FTF or VC) and the allocation of doctor (Doctor 1 or Doctor 2) to format were randomized. Scores from each assessment format were compared. The outcome of no difference was decided based on a difference in mean of no more than ± one point. Percentage agreement (agreement being ±2 points) was calculated on individual test scores. Forty-two patients (average age 75 years) completed the two assessments. Their mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 24.7 (range 10-30). The mean RUDAS score for both FTF and VC assessment was 24.9 (difference between the means 0.04), i.e. there was no significant difference. The results suggest that the RUDAS can be reliably administered via VC in post acute patients as an alternative to FTF administration.

  6. Centralized, stepped, patient preference-based treatment for patients with post-acute coronary syndrome depression: CODIACS vanguard randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Karina W; Bigger, J Thomas; Burg, Matthew M; Carney, Robert M; Chaplin, William F; Czajkowski, Susan; Dornelas, Ellen; Duer-Hefele, Joan; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Freedland, Kenneth E; Haas, Donald C; Jaffe, Allan S; Ladapo, Joseph A; Lespérance, Francois; Medina, Vivian; Newman, Jonathan D; Osorio, Gabrielle A; Parsons, Faith; Schwartz, Joseph E; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Shapiro, Peter A; Sheps, David S; Vaccarino, Viola; Whang, William; Ye, Siqin

    2013-06-10

    Controversy remains about whether depression can be successfully managed after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and the costs and benefits of doing so. To determine the effects of providing post-ACS depression care on depressive symptoms and health care costs. Multicenter randomized controlled trial. Patients were recruited from 2 private and 5 academic ambulatory centers across the United States. A total of 150 patients with elevated depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] score ≥10) 2 to 6 months after an ACS, recruited between March 18, 2010, and January 9, 2012. Patients were randomized to 6 months of centralized depression care (patient preference for problem-solving treatment given via telephone or the Internet, pharmacotherapy, both, or neither), stepped every 6 to 8 weeks (active treatment group; n = 73), or to locally determined depression care after physician notification about the patient's depressive symptoms (usual care group; n = 77). Change in depressive symptoms during 6 months and total health care costs. Depressive symptoms decreased significantly more in the active treatment group than in the usual care group (differential change between groups, -3.5 BDI points; 95% CI, -6.1 to -0.7; P = .01). Although mental health care estimated costs were higher for active treatment than for usual care, overall health care estimated costs were not significantly different (difference adjusting for confounding, -$325; 95% CI, -$2639 to $1989; P = .78). For patients with post-ACS depression, active treatment had a substantial beneficial effect on depressive symptoms. This kind of depression care is feasible, effective, and may be cost-neutral within 6 months; therefore, it should be tested in a large phase 3 pragmatic trial. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01032018.

  7. Survey of state health information exchanges regarding inclusion of Continuity of Care Documents for long-term post-acute care (LTPAC) patient assessment.

    PubMed

    Hassol, Andrea; Goodman, Laura; Younkin, Jim; Honicker, Mary; Chaundy, Kimberly; Walker, James M

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to measure awareness and interest among state health information exchanges (HIEs) in a tool that translates long-term post-acute care (LTPAC) patient assessment information to a Continuity of Care Document (CCD) format for sharing; whether any state HIEs currently integrate patient information from LTPAC providers; and the anticipated benefits and barriers to using such a tool. The study consisted of an online survey of state HIEs. Responses were received from representatives of 29 of the 51 HIEs (57 percent). Eleven of the 29 respondents (38 percent) were aware of the LTPAC-to-CCD translation tool, and 24 (83 percent of respondents) were interested in it or felt LTPAC providers in their state would be interested. Twenty-one of the 24 interested respondents (88 percent) indicated a desire for more information about this technology. Skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies receive no incentives for adoption of electronic health record systems and are not commonly included in HIEs. These organizations do, however collect extensive structured data about their patients (Minimum Data Set for nursing facilities, Outcome and Assessment Information Set for home health agencies) and transmit the data electronically to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). A tool is now available that will intercept the transmissions to CMS, transform content extracted from patient assessments into CCDs, and send the CCDs to a designated HIE. Responding HIEs reported almost no experience exchanging patient assessment information from LTPAC providers. Anticipated benefits include safer care transitions; anticipated barriers include information technology constraints in LTPAC settings.

  8. Survey of State Health Information Exchanges Regarding Inclusion of Continuity of Care Documents for Long-Term Post-Acute Care (LTPAC) Patient Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hassol, Andrea; Goodman, Laura; Younkin, Jim; Honicker, Mary; Chaundy, Kimberly; Walker, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to measure awareness and interest among state health information exchanges (HIEs) in a tool that translates long-term post-acute care (LTPAC) patient assessment information to a Continuity of Care Document (CCD) format for sharing; whether any state HIEs currently integrate patient information from LTPAC providers; and the anticipated benefits and barriers to using such a tool. Materials and Methods The study consisted of an online survey of state HIEs. Results Responses were received from representatives of 29 of the 51 HIEs (57 percent). Eleven of the 29 respondents (38 percent) were aware of the LTPAC-to-CCD translation tool, and 24 (83 percent of respondents) were interested in it or felt LTPAC providers in their state would be interested. Twenty-one of the 24 interested respondents (88 percent) indicated a desire for more information about this technology. Discussion Skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies receive no incentives for adoption of electronic health record systems and are not commonly included in HIEs. These organizations do, however collect extensive structured data about their patients (Minimum Data Set for nursing facilities, Outcome and Assessment Information Set for home health agencies) and transmit the data electronically to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). A tool is now available that will intercept the transmissions to CMS, transform content extracted from patient assessments into CCDs, and send the CCDs to a designated HIE. Conclusion Responding HIEs reported almost no experience exchanging patient assessment information from LTPAC providers. Anticipated benefits include safer care transitions; anticipated barriers include information technology constraints in LTPAC settings. PMID:25593573

  9. Improving Value in Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Comprehensive Patient Education and Management Program Decreases Discharge to Post-Acute Care Facilities and Post-Operative Complications.

    PubMed

    Pelt, Christopher E; Gililland, Jeremy M; Erickson, Jill A; Trimble, Dory E; Anderson, Mike B; Peters, Christopher L

    2017-08-19

    A step-by-step approach to creating a comprehensive patient education, expectation, and management program is described with the aim of reducing discharges to post-acute care centers (PACs) following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). We hypothesized that by lowering discharges to PACs, readmissions and reoperations would also decrease. Following the implementation of a multi-faceted patient education and management program, we retrospectively reviewed 927 TJAs who underwent surgery 12 months before (n = 465) and after (n = 462) the program was implemented. To assess the exposure of the pathway on discharge disposition as well as institutional 30-day and 90-day readmissions and reoperations, a modified Poisson regression was used. There was a 20% absolute reduction in discharges to PACs (<0.001). The frequency of 30-day readmissions was greater in patients who underwent TJA before implementation (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-3.69). The risk for 90-day readmissions (IRR 1.70, 95% CI 1.20-2.40) and reoperations (IRR 1.67, 95% CI 1.12-2.53) was greater prior to implementation. Discharge to PACs was associated with 2.4 and 3.10 times greater risk for 30-day readmissions (95% CI 1.28-4.56) and 30-day reoperations (95% CI 1.40-7.0), respectively. Patients discharged to PACs were also at greater risk for both 90-day readmissions (IRR 1.59, 95% CI 1.08-2.32) and 90-day reoperations (IRR 1.75, 95% CI 1.12-2.73). Our program led to a reduction in the number of patients being discharged to PACs following TJA, while also demonstrating a reduction in readmission and reoperations. Additionally, discharge to these facilities was an independent risk factor for these complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Decubitus lesions in patients referred to acute and post-acute home nursing care for the elderly in Genova].

    PubMed

    De Astis, V; Corbella, A; Bafico, F; Spinelli, E; Porcu, G; Bottari, L; Petrini, M; Madeddu, V

    1999-01-01

    The Elderly Services of USL 3 "Genovese" together with the team for Continuing Education designed and implemented a survey on the elderly clients referred to the home care and nursing home services. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency, distribution and severity of pressure ulcers. The data were collected during a period of seven months: from 1st November 1997 to 31st May 1998. One thousand seven hundred and twenty nine clients were observed; 705 (41%) had single or multiple pressure ulcers. Patients with multiple pressure ulcers accounted for 42% of the total. The sacrum was the most affected site (43% of the patients with a single ulcer and 33% with multiple ulcers). Patients with severe pressure ulcers (stages 3 degrees and 4 degrees NPUAP classification) accounted for 42% of the total. Pressure sores were observed in 15% of "at no risk" patients and in 40% of those at low risk (Norton Scale score). The study highlighted a lack of documentation (90% patients) on treatments performed in the hospital and prescribed at discharge for the pressure sores. These findings reflects possibly the fact that this aspect of care is unduly disregarded by nursing personnel, and that a goal-oriented retraining, underlining also the need of appropriate documentation, is warranted.

  11. An examination of the first 30 days after patients are discharged to the community from hip fracture post-acute care

    PubMed Central

    Leland, Natalie; Gozalo, Pedro; Christian, TJ; Bynum, Julie; Mor, Vince; Wetle, Terrie Fox; Teno, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-acute care (PAC) rehabilitation aims to maximize independence and facilitate a safe community transition. Yet little is known about PAC patients’ success in staying home post-discharge or differences on this outcome across PAC providers. Objectives Examine the percentage of PAC patients who remain in the community at least 30 days after discharge (i.e., successful community discharge) following hip fracture rehabilitation and describe differences among PAC facilities based on this outcome. Research Design Retrospective observational study. Subjects Community-dwelling, Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 75 years of age and older who experienced their first hip fracture between 1999–2007 (n=880,779). PAC facilities admitting hip fracture patients in 2006. Measures Successful community discharge, sites of readmission after PAC discharge. Results Between 1999 and 2007, 57% of patients achieved successful community discharge. Black were less likely (adjusted odds ratios=0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.82–0.86) than similar whites to achieve successful community discharge. Among all who re-entered the community (n=581,095), 14% remained in the community fewer than 30 days. Acute hospitals (67.5%) and institutional PAC (16.8%) were the most common sites of re-entry. The median proportion of successful community discharge among facilities was 49% (IQR: 33%–66%). Lowest-quartile facilities admitted older (85.9 vs. 84.1 years of age), sicker patients (e.g., higher rates of hospital complications 6.0% vs. 4.6%), but admitted fewer annually (7.1 vs. 19.3), compared to the highest quartile. Conclusions Re-entry into the healthcare system after PAC community discharge is common. Due to the distinct care needs of the PAC population there is a need for a quality measure that complements the current 30-day hospital readmission outcome and captures the objectives of PAC rehabilitation. PMID:26340664

  12. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume.

  13. [Preoperative tests recommendations in adult patients for ambulatory surgery].

    PubMed

    Zaballos, M; López-Álvarez, S; Argente, P; López, A

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic assessment traditionally included a series of laboratory tests intended to detect undiagnosed diseases, and to ensure that the patient undergoes surgery following safety criteria. These tests, without a specific clinical indication, are expensive, of questionable diagnostic value and often useless. In the context of outpatient surgery, recent evidence suggests that patients of any age without significant comorbidity, ASA physical status gradei and grade ii, do not need additional preoperative tests routinely. The aim of the present recommendations is to determine the general indications in which these tests should be performed in ASA gradei and grade ii patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

  14. DENTAL LOSS AMONG AMBULATORY PATIENTS WITH DIABETES.

    PubMed

    Izuora, Kenneth E; Ezeanolue, Echezona E; Neubauer, Michael F; Gewelber, Civon L; Allenback, Gayle L; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-06-01

    There is a high prevalence of dental loss among patients with diabetes. Understanding the factors that impact dental loss in this population will aid with developing new strategies for its prevention. Using a cross-sectional study design, diabetes patients presenting for routine clinic visit were evaluated with an investigator-administered questionnaire. Data was collected on demographics, dental history, duration, control and complications of diabetes. Among 202 subjects, 100 were female, mean age: 58.9 ± 13.2 years, duration of diabetes: 15.8 ± 11.0 years, and hemoglobin A1c: 7.7 ± 1.6%. Thirty-one patients (15.3%) had lost all their teeth and only 13 (6.4%) had all 32 of their natural teeth. Using multiple linear regression, older age (β= - 0.146; 95% CI: - 0.062 to - 0.230), not flossing (β= - 3.462; 95% CI: - 1.107 to - 5.817), and presence of diabetic retinopathy (β= - 4.271; 95% CI: - 1.307 to - 7.236) were significant predictors of dental loss. Dental loss is common in patients with diabetes and is associated with older age, diabetic retinopathy and not flossing. In order to reduce dental loss among patients with diabetes, regular flossing should be emphasized as an important component of dental care.

  15. Impact of nutritional status on long-term functional outcomes of post-acute stroke patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hsiu-Chu; Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Peng, Li-Ning; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Liang-Kung; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Lo, Yuk-Keung; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional status is important in stroke care, but little is known regarding to the prognostic role of nutritional status on long-term functional outcomes among stroke survivors. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate to the prognostic role of nutritional status on long-term functional outcomes among stroke survivors. Data of acute stroke registry in Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital were retrieved for analysis. Overall, 483 patients (mean age = 70.7 ± 10.3 years) with first-ever stroke were found. Among them, 95 patients (19.7%) were malnourished at admission, 310 (mean age = 70.4 ± 10.1 years, 63.5% males) survived for 6 months, and 244 (78.7%) had good functional outcomes. Subjects with poor functional outcomes were older (74.7 ± 8.9 vs. 69.0 ± 10.1 years, p < 0.001), more likely to be malnourished (56.2% vs. 26.6%, p < 0.001), to develop pneumonia upon admission (23.3% vs. 12.7%, p = 0.027), had a longer hospital stay (23.5 ± 13.9 vs. 12.5 ± 8.2 days, p < 0.001), had a higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score (12.9 ± 9.3 vs. 4.9 ± 4.3, p < 0.001), poorer stroke recovery (NIHSS improvement: 6.9% vs. 27.4%, p = 0.005), and poorer functional improvement (Barthel index = BI improvement in the first month: 31.4% vs. 138%, p < 0.001). Older age (odds ratio = OR) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.03-1.11, p<0.001), baseline NIHSS score (OR = 1.23, 95%CI = 1.15-1.31, p < 0.001) and malnutrition at acute stroke (OR = 2.57, 95%CI: 1.29-5.13, p<0.001) were all independent risk factors for poorer functional outcomes. In conclusion, as a potentially modifiable factor, more attentions should be paid to malnutrition to promote quality of stroke care since the acute stage. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Can standardized sleep questionnaires be used to identify excessive daytime sleeping in older post-acute rehabilitation patients?

    PubMed

    Skibitsky, Megan; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Martin, Jennifer L; Harker, Judith; Alessi, Cathy; Saliba, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Excessive daytime sleeping is associated with poorer functional outcomes in rehabilitation populations and may be improved with targeted interventions. The purpose of this study was to test simple methods of screening for excessive daytime sleeping among older adults admitted for postacute rehabilitation. Secondary analysis of data from 2 clinical samples. Two postacute rehabilitation (PAR) units in southern California. Two hundred twenty-six patients older than 65 years with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score higher than 11 undergoing rehabilitation. The primary outcome was excessive daytime sleeping, defined as greater than 15% (1.8 hours) of daytime hours (8 am to 8 pm) sleeping as measured by actigraphy. Participants spent, on average, 16.2% (SD 12.5%) of daytime hours sleeping as measured by actigraphy. Thirty-nine percent of participants had excessive daytime sleeping. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was significantly associated with actigraphically measured daytime sleeping (P = .0038), but the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was not (P = .49). Neither the ESS nor the PSQI achieved sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be used as a screening tool for excessive daytime sleeping. Two additional models using items from these questionnaires were not significantly associated with the outcome. In an older PAR population, self-report items from existing sleep questionnaires do not identify excessive daytime sleeping. Therefore we recommend objective measures for the evaluation of excessive daytime sleeping as well as further research to identify new self-report items that may be more applicable in PAR populations. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Central line maintenance bundles and CLABSIs in ambulatory oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Michael L; Bundy, David G; Chen, Allen R; Milstone, Aaron M; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Pehar, Miriana; Herpst, Cynthia; Fratino, Lisa; Miller, Marlene R

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric oncology patients are frequently managed with central lines as outpatients, and these lines confer significant morbidity in this immune-compromised population. We aimed to investigate whether a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle reduces central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and bacteremias in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients. We conducted an interrupted time-series study of a maintenance bundle concerning all areas of central line care. Each of 3 target groups (clinic staff, homecare agency nurses, and patient families) (1) received training on the bundle and its importance, (2) had their practice audited, and (3) were shown CLABSI rates through graphs, in-service training, and bulletin boards. CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates were collected for 23 months before and 24 months after beginning the intervention and were compared by using a Poisson regression model. The mean CLABSI rate decreased by 48% from 0.63 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.32 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P = .005). The mean bacteremia rate decreased by 54% from 1.27 bacteremias per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.59 bacteremias per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P < .001). Implementation of a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle significantly reduced CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients with central lines. Further research is needed to determine if maintenance care bundles reduce ambulatory CLABSIs and bacteremia in other adult and pediatric populations.

  18. Central Line Maintenance Bundles and CLABSIs in Ambulatory Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, David G.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Pehar, Miriana; Herpst, Cynthia; Fratino, Lisa; Miller, Marlene R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pediatric oncology patients are frequently managed with central lines as outpatients, and these lines confer significant morbidity in this immune-compromised population. We aimed to investigate whether a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle reduces central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and bacteremias in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: We conducted an interrupted time-series study of a maintenance bundle concerning all areas of central line care. Each of 3 target groups (clinic staff, homecare agency nurses, and patient families) (1) received training on the bundle and its importance, (2) had their practice audited, and (3) were shown CLABSI rates through graphs, in-service training, and bulletin boards. CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates were collected for 23 months before and 24 months after beginning the intervention and were compared by using a Poisson regression model. RESULTS: The mean CLABSI rate decreased by 48% from 0.63 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.32 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P = .005). The mean bacteremia rate decreased by 54% from 1.27 bacteremias per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.59 bacteremias per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle significantly reduced CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients with central lines. Further research is needed to determine if maintenance care bundles reduce ambulatory CLABSIs and bacteremia in other adult and pediatric populations. PMID:24101764

  19. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions when using different patient education methods.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Katja; Salanterä, Sanna; Leppänen, Tiina; Vahlberg, Tero; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2012-07-01

    A randomised controlled trial was used to evaluate elective ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions during internet-based patient education or face-to-face education with a nurse. The internet-based patient education was designed for this study and patients used websites individually based on their needs. Patients in the control group participated individually in face-to-face patient education with a nurse in the ambulatory surgery unit. The theoretical basis for both types of education was the same. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients scored their emotions rather low at intervals throughout the whole surgical process, though their scores also changed during the surgical process. Emotion scores did not decrease after patient education. No differences in patients' emotions were found to result from either of the two different patient education methods.

  20. Annotated Bibliography: Understanding Ambulatory Care Practices in the Context of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement.

    PubMed

    Montano, Maria F; Mehdi, Harshal; Nash, David B

    2016-11-01

    The ambulatory care setting is an increasingly important component of the patient safety conversation. Inpatient safety is the primary focus of the vast majority of safety research and interventions, but the ambulatory setting is actually where most medical care is administered. Recent attention has shifted toward examining ambulatory care in order to implement better health care quality and safety practices. This annotated bibliography was created to analyze and augment the current literature on ambulatory care practices with regard to patient safety and quality improvement. By providing a thorough examination of current practices, potential improvement strategies in ambulatory care health care settings can be suggested. A better understanding of the myriad factors that influence delivery of patient care will catalyze future health care system development and implementation in the ambulatory setting.

  1. Peritoneal mucormycosis in a patient receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Polo, J R; Luño, J; Menarguez, C; Gallego, E; Robles, R; Hernandez, P

    1989-03-01

    A 48-year-old man receiving maintenance hemodialysis for 3 years and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for 1 year developed a clinical picture compatible with peritonitis. Three successive fluid cultures were negative, and only after filtration of a large volume of peritoneal fluid a fungus identified as a Rhizopus sp was isolated in cultures of the filtering devices. The same fungus was also isolated from the peritoneal catheter cuff. Intravenous amphotericin B was administered and both the abdominal and general conditions of the patient improved transiently. Twenty days after initiation of antifungal treatment, a clinical suspicion of intestinal perforation arose and an exploratory laparotomy was scheduled, but the patient died during the anesthetic induction. The patient never received deferoxamine; any conditions predisposing to mucormycosis, such as diabetes or immunosuppression, were also absent.

  2. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: nurses' experiences of teaching patients.

    PubMed

    Shubayra, Amnah

    2015-03-01

    Nine nurses were interviewed to determine nurses' experiences of teaching patients to use continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The material was analyzed using content analysis. Data were sorted into four themes and ten subthemes. The themes were presented as follows: Importance of language, individualized teaching, teaching needs and structure of care in teaching. The findings highlighted important insights into how nurses experience teaching patients to perform CAPD. The study revealed some barriers for the nurses during teaching. The major barrier was shortage of Arabic speaking nursing staff. Incidental findings involved two factors that played an important role in teaching, retraining and a special team to perform pre-assessments, including home visits. In conclusion, the findings of this study showed several factors that are considered as barriers for the nurses during teaching the CAPD patients and the need to improve the communication and teaching in the peritoneal dialysis units, including the importance of individualized teaching.

  3. Successful long-term ambulatory norepinephrine infusions in a patient with pure autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Zekeridou, A; Michel, P; Medlin, F; Hayoz, D; Lalive, P H; Kuntzer, T

    2015-08-01

    We present a case study of a patient with pure autonomic failure who was successfully treated with ambulatory norepinephrine (NE) infusions over a 9-year-period of time before death occurred unexpectedly. Given this patient's response to the NE infusion treatment, we discuss the option of ambulatory NE infusions as a treatment for severe orthostatic hypotension that is refractory to common treatments.

  4. Optimising postoperative pain management in the ambulatory patient.

    PubMed

    Shang, Allan B; Gan, Tong J

    2003-01-01

    Over 60% of surgery is now performed in an ambulatory setting. Despite improved analgesics and sophisticated drug delivery systems, surveys indicate that over 80% of patients experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Inadequate postoperative pain relief can prolong recovery, precipitate or increase the duration of hospital stay, increase healthcare costs, and reduce patient satisfaction. Effective postoperative pain management involves a multimodal approach and the use of various drugs with different mechanisms of action. Local anaesthetics are widely administered in the ambulatory setting using techniques such as local injection, field block, regional nerve block or neuraxial block. Continuous wound infusion pumps may have great potential in an ambulatory setting. Regional anaesthesia (involving anaesthetising regional areas of the body, including single extremities, multiple extremities, the torso, and the face or jaw) allows surgery to be performed in a specific location, usually an extremity, without the use of general anaesthesia, and potentially with little or no sedation. Opioids remain an important component of any analgesic regimen in treating moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. However, the incorporation of non-opioids, local anaesthetics and regional techniques will enhance current postoperative analgesic regimens. The development of new modalities of treatment, such as patient controlled analgesia, and newer drugs, such as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, provide additional choices for the practitioner. While there are different routes of administration for analgesics (e.g. oral, parenteral, intramuscular, transmucosal, transdermal and sublingual), oral delivery of medications has remained the mainstay for postoperative pain control. The oral route is effective, the simplest to use and typically the least expensive. The intravenous route has the advantages of a rapid onset of action and easier titratibility, and so is recommended for the

  5. Outcomes of Sinus Surgery in Ambulatory Patients with Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Ayesha N.; Mace, Jess C.; Smith, Timothy L

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous outcomes studies of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) have mostly excluded subjects with immunodeficiency or autoimmune disease. While expert opinion suggests these patients are often refractory to therapy, outcomes following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) are not well delineated. Objective We evaluated improvement in objective and quality of life (QoL) measures following endoscopic sinus surgery in adult patients treated in the ambulatory setting with immune dysfunction including immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases. Methods Patients with CRS associated with immune dysfunction (n=22) were evaluated and matched 1:1 with control subjects from a prospective cohort in a nested case-control design. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) and pre/postoperative endoscopic findings were recorded. Disease-specific QoL instruments (Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (RSDI) and Chronic Sinusitis Survey (CSS)) were administered pre- and postoperatively. Results Mean postoperative follow-up was similar for both cases (18.6±6.6 months) and controls (18.4±8.7 months). Preoperative CT and endoscopy scores (i.e. disease severity) were similar in both cases and controls. Post-operative endoscopy scores were significantly improved for both cases (p<0.001) and controls (p=0.012). Both groups had similar preoperative and postoperative scores on the CSS, however control subjects reported significantly worse RSDI baseline scores. Immunodeficiency and autoimmune cases and CRS controls experienced significant improvement in QoL after surgery (p≤0.041). Conclusion Immunodeficiency and autoimmune cases, in the ambulatory setting, present with similar severity of disease as compared to controls with CRS. We found similar improvements in both objective and QoL outcomes for case subjects and control subjects, suggesting that patients with immune dysfunction may experience similar benefit from ESS. PMID:20537292

  6. The content of hope in ambulatory patients with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Emily S; Helft, Paul R; Torke, Alexia M

    2013-01-01

    Although hope is a pervasive concept in cancer treatment, we know little about how ambulatory patients with cancer define or experience hope. We explored hope through semistructured interviews with ten patients with advanced (some curable, some incurable) colon cancer at one Midwestern, university-based cancer center. We conducted a thematic analysis to identify key concepts related to patient perceptions of hope. Although we did ask specifically about hope, patients also often revealed their hopes in response to indirect questions or by telling stories about their cancer experience. We identified four major themes related to hope: 1) hope is essential, 2) a change in perspective, 3) the content of hope, and 4) communicating about hope. The third theme, the content of hope, included three subthemes: a) the desire for normalcy, b) future plans, and c) hope for a cure. We conclude that hope is an essential concept for patients undergoing treatment for cancer as it pertains to their psychological well-being and quality of life, and hope for a cure is not and should not be the only consideration. In a clinical context, the exploration of patients' hopes and aspirations in light of their cancer diagnosis is important because it provides a frame for understanding their goals for treatment. Exploration of the content of patients' hope can not only help to illuminate misunderstandings but also clarify how potential treatments may or may not contribute to achieving patients' goals.

  7. Accelerometer recorder and display system for ambulatory patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berka, Martin; Żyliński, Marek; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a compact, wearable, rechargeable acceleration recorder to support long-term monitoring of ambulatory patients with motor disorders, and of software to display and analyze its output. The device consists of a microcontroller, operational amplifier, accelerometer, SD card, indicator LED, rechargeable battery, and associated minor components. It can operate for over a day without charging and can continuously collect data for three weeks without downloading to an outside system, as currently configured. With slight modifications, this period could be extended to several months. The accompanying software provides flexible visualization of the acceleration data over long periods, basic file operations and compression for easier archiving, annotation of segments of interest, and functions for calculation of various parameters and detection of immobility and vibration frequencies. Applications in analysis of gait and other movements are discussed.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of ceftizoxime in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, E D; Blair, A D

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ceftizoxime were studied in 12 patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. After a 3-g intravenous dose, the steady-state volume of distribution was 0.23 +/- 0.05 liter kg-1, with an elimination half-life of 9.7 +/- 5.1 h. The peritoneal clearance of ceftizoxime (2.8 +/- 0.7 ml min-1) contributed modestly to the overall serum clearance of the drug (17.1 +/- 7.4 ml min-1) and was greater than the renal clearance (0.8 +/- 0.8 ml min-1). The peritoneal concentration rose to 91 +/- 29 micrograms ml-1 at 6 h, which was 0.61 +/- 0.17 of the serum concentration. A 3-g intravenous dose of ceftizoxime given every 48 h would result in adequate activity against most susceptible organisms, but more frequent dosing may be necessary for less susceptible organisms. PMID:6314887

  9. Ambulatory monitoring for chronic cardiac and pulmonary patients.

    PubMed

    Zarakovitis, Konstantinos; Angelidis, Pantelis; Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Psymarnou, Markela

    2004-01-01

    In the Greek pilot of the e-Vital project, remote telemedicine services are provided to chronic cardiac and pulmonary patients who are not confined to a hospital (i.e. receiving home/ambulatory health care) with the aim of exploring the dynamics of interactive continuous chronic patient monitoring, particularly focusing on the impact on patient's quality of life, the patient's active involvement in their own care and according impact on the overall quality of healthcare provision, as well as the benefits for healthcare providers (time management, patient management, savings, etc). The current trial in progress validates the business potential of remote monitoring services and demonstrates the technical environment that enables patient-doctor interaction regardless of location and the according communication modes and protocols. The domain for applying the envisaged service is the private healthcare sector and the users groups include individual chronic patients with cardiac and pulmonary diseases. So far, from the patient's point of view, the service mainly appeals to patients with arrhythmias due to lightweight technology and easy processes involved in the transmission of 1-lead ECG. Asthma and COPD patients are also enthusiastic, as they can receive doctor advice in real time. From the health professional's point of view the service has real added value in the fields of diagnosis, prevention, monitoring and follow up. In the case of asthma and COPD the value of the service in diagnosis is even more apparent as these patients may be asymptomatic, when they visit their doctor and have exacerbations when they are at home. e-Vital in this case ensures that the healthcare professional will acquire the complete image of the patient condition. Finally, the experiences gained so far indicate that e-Vital could be particularly efficient in isolated areas, with shortage of experienced scientific personnel.

  10. Latissimus dorsi free flap for coverage of sacral radiodermatitis in the ambulatory patient

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.; Tofield, J.J.; Terranova, W.; Hurley, D.; Kenney, J.

    1987-07-01

    Ambulatory patients with large sacral ulcers can represent extremely challenging coverage problems. Technical options become fewer when sacral ulcers are coupled with radiation dermatitis. Latissimus dorsi free flap transfer, with direct anastomoses to sacral vessels, is described in 2 patients.

  11. Ambulatory oxygen: why do COPD patients not use their portable systems as prescribed? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with COPD on long term oxygen therapy frequently do not adhere to their prescription, and they frequently do not use their ambulatory oxygen systems as intended. Reasons for this lack of adherence are not known. The aim of this study was to obtain in-depth information about perceptions and use of prescribed ambulatory oxygen systems from patients with COPD to inform ambulatory oxygen design, prescription and management. Methods A qualitative design was used, involving semi-structured face-to-face interviews informed by a grounded theory approach. Twenty-seven UK community-dwelling COPD patients using NHS prescribed ambulatory systems were recruited. Ambulatory oxygen systems comprised cylinders weighing 3.4 kg, a shoulder bag and nasal cannulae. Results Participants reported that they: received no instruction on how to use ambulatory oxygen; were uncertain of the benefits; were afraid the system would run out while they were using it (due to lack of confidence in the cylinder gauge); were embarrassed at being seen with the system in public; and were unable to carry the system because of the cylinder weight. The essential role of carers was also highlighted, as participants with no immediate carers did not use ambulatory oxygen outside the house. Conclusions These participants highlighted previously unreported problems that prevented them from using ambulatory oxygen as prescribed. Our novel findings point to: concerns with the lack of specific information provision; the perceived unreliability of the oxygen system; important carer issues surrounding managing and using ambulatory oxygen equipment. All of these issues, as well as previously reported problems with system weight and patient embarrassment, should be addressed to improve adherence to ambulatory oxygen prescription and enhance the physical and social benefits of maintaining mobility in this patient group. Increased user involvement in both system development and service provision

  12. Adiposity is increased among High-Functioning, Non-Ambulatory Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sproule, Douglas M.; Montes, Jacqueline; Dunaway, Sally; Montgomery, Megan; Battista, Vanessa; Koenigsberger, Dorcas; Martens, Bill; Shen, Wei; Punyanitya, Mark; Benton, Maryjane; Butler, Hailly; Caracciolo, Jayson; Mercuri, Eugenio; Finkel, Richard; Darras, Basil; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Kaufmann, Petra

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between body composition and function in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is poorly understood. 53 subjects with SMA were stratified by type and Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale, Expanded score into three cohorts: Low-Functioning Non-Ambulatory (type 2 with Hammersmith score <12, n=19), High-Functioning Non-Ambulatory (type 2 with Hammersmith Score ≥ 12 or non-ambulatory type 3, n=17), and Ambulatory (n=17). Lean and fat mass was estimated using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Anthropometric data was incorporated to measure fat-free (lean mass in kg /stature in m2) and fat (fat mass in kg /stature in m2) mass indices, the latter compared to published age and sex norms. Feeding dysfunction among type 2 subjects was assessed by questionnaire. Fat mass index was increased in the High-Functioning Non-Ambulatory cohort (10.4 ± 4.5) compared with both the ambulatory (7.2 ± 2.1, p = 0.013) and Low-Functioning Non-Ambulatory (7.6 ± 3.1, p = 0.040) cohorts. 12 of 17 subjects (71%) in the High-Functioning Non-Ambulatory cohort had fat mass index >85th percentile for age and gender (connoting “at risk of overweight”) versus 9 of 19 subjects (47%) in the Low-Functioning Non-Ambulatory cohort and 8 of 17 ambulatory subjects (47%). Despite differences in clinical function, a similar proportion of low functioning (7/18, 39%) and high functioning (2/7, 29%) type 2 subjects reported swallowing or feeding dysfunction. Non-ambulatory patients with relatively high clinical function may be at particular risk of excess adiposity, perhaps reflecting access to excess calories despite relative immobility, emphasizing the importance of individualized nutritional management in SMA. PMID:20610154

  13. Ambulatory surgery in orthopedics: experience of over 10,000 patients.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ferrero, M A; Faour-Martín, O; Simon-Perez, C; Pérez-Herrero, M; de Pedro-Moro, J A

    2014-03-01

    The concept of day surgery is becoming an increasingly important part of elective surgery worldwide. Relentless pressure to cut costs may constrain clinical judgment regarding the most appropriate location for a patient's surgical care. The aim of this study was to determine clinical and quality indicators relating to our experience in orthopedic day durgery, mainly in relation to unplanned overnight admission and readmission rates. Additionally, we focused on describing the main characteristics of the patients that experienced complications, and compared the patient satisfaction rates following ambulatory and non-ambulatory procedures. We evaluated 10,032 patients who underwent surgical orthopedic procedures according to the protocols of our Ambulatory Surgery Unit. All complications that occurred were noted. A quality-of-life assessment (SF-36 test) was carried out both pre- and postoperatively. Ambulatory substitution rates and quality indicators for orthopedic procedures were also determined. The major complication rate was minimal, with no mortal cases, and there was a high rate of ambulatory substitution for the procedures studied. Outcomes of the SF-36 questionnaire showed significant improvement postoperatively. An unplanned overnight admission rate of 0.14 % was achieved. Our institution has shown that it is possible to provide good-quality ambulatory orthopedic surgery. There still appears to be the potential to increase the proportion of these procedures. Surgeons and anesthesiologists must strongly adhere to strict patient selection criteria for ambulatory orthopedic surgery in order to reduce complications in the immediate postoperative term.

  14. Telemedicine system for patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hidetomo

    2007-06-01

    Over recent decades, rapid progress in information and telecommunications technology has led to the application of these technologies in the medical field. In 1999, we reported on a telemedicine system (version 1.0) that used an automated peritoneal dialysis machine to collect data on patients with end-stage renal disease. After 2002, we focused on using cellular telephones in a new telemedicine system (version 2.0) to monitor patient data at home, including blood pressure (BP), heart rate, body weight, urine volume, and blood glucose. By 2003, we had developed a fully automatic system called I-converter (version 3.0) to collect data from a fully automatic device and send it via cellular telephone. After the fully automatic device measures a patient's BP, I-converter sends the data directly to the main server in our central data center. That server is directly connected to Web site by application service provider (ASP) technology. Recently, to make the system simpler, we developed a new version called D-converter (version 4.0). The telephone used in this new system is a Personal Handy-phone System (PHS). The PHS has several advantages: high-speed data transmission, low power output, little electromagnetic interference with medical devices, and easy locating of patients. The D-converter system uses a small computer and a PHS card called a Dopa card. Our telemedicine systems monitor continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients at home. For elderly and handicapped patients, these systems are very advantageous because they reduce visits to the outpatient clinic. In addition, data can be monitored at the patient's home in real time. The present paper reports our recent advances in telemedicine systems for CAPD patients.

  15. [Ambulatory prostate photoselective vaporisation with GreenLight laser (180W): prospective evaluation from 115 patients].

    PubMed

    Corbel, L; Della Negra, E; Berquet, G; Codet, Y P; Boulière, F; Braguet, R; Trifard, F

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this prospective study was the evaluation of ambulatory (less than 12h) prostate photoselective vaporisation (PVP) with GreenLight laser XPS. One hundred and fifteen consecutive patients eligible for ambulatory procedure according to selective criteria (age less than 80, no anticoagulation treatment, no diabetes, patient not alone at home) who underwent ambulatory PVP from 1st May 2012 to 30th June 2013 have been evaluated. The principal criterion was the success rate of ambulatory. Secondary criteria were 3 months functional results and complication rate and satisfaction rate on ambulatory procedure. Around 93.1% patients were successfully treated in ambulatory procedure. The main reason of failure was organizational. There were 2 conversions in monopolar resection and one operative complication. At 3 months, there were 11.5% grade 2 complications with 3.48% rehospitalizations and no reintervention. This study demonstrates the feasibility of ambulatory PVP. This procedure should be proposed to selected patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton R; Gridnev, Vladimir I; Shvartz, Vladimir A; Posnenkova, Olga M; Dovgalevsky, Pavel Ya

    2012-01-01

    The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P < .001). The risk ratio of achieving and maintaining the goal blood pressure in patients of active care management group was 5.44, CI (3.2-9.9; P = .005). Implementation of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone improves the quality of ambulatory care of hypertensive patients.

  17. 100 patient-years of ambulatory home total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Dudrick, S J; O'Donnell, J J; Englert, D M; Matheny, R G; Blume, E R; Nutt, R E; Hickey, M S; Barroso, A O

    1984-01-01

    More than 100 patient-years' experience has been acquired in the treatment of 133 patients with ambulatory home total parenteral nutrition (TPN) between May 1974 and December 1983. Indications for chronic or permanent home TPN include short bowel syndrome, malabsorption, scleroderma, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide syndrome. Indications for acute or temporary home TPN include Crohn's disease, malignancies, gastrointestinal fistulas, ulcerative colitis, anorexia nervosa, and numerous other disorders. Eighty-two patients in the acute group were treated primarily with percutaneously placed standard subclavian catheters and 51 patients in the chronic group have been treated thus far with implanted silicone rubber, Dacron-cuffed catheters for a cumulative total of 38,939 patient days. Of the 125 implanted catheters, 115 were placed in the superior vena cava and ten in the inferior vena cava for an average duration of 250 catheter-days, the longest single catheter remaining in situ for more than 8 1/2 years. Catheter-related sepsis occurred 33 times with the implanted catheters, or once every 2.6 catheter-years. One hundred and fourteen temporary catheters were placed percutaneously in the superior vena cava via a subclavian vein for an average duration of 68 days, the longest single catheter remaining in situ for 213 days. Catheter-related sepsis occurred seven times, equivalent to one episode per 3 catheter-years. Total catheter-related complications were quite infrequent and were directly related to duration of catheterization. They included venous thrombosis (12), clotted catheter (11), catheter failure or rupture (8), catheter compression (5) and inadvertent catheter removal (4). Twenty-six catheters were repaired or spliced in situ when the external segment was accidentally damaged or deteriorated secondary to long-term material fatigue. One remarkable patient has been maintained exclusively by TPN originally as an inpatient and subsequently as an outpatient

  18. Ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure monitoring in advanced heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Raza, Anoshia; Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an emerging epidemic associate with significant morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditure. Although there were major advances in pharmacologic and device based therapies for the management of HF, mortality of this condition remains high. Accurate monitoring of HF patients for exacerbations is very important to reduce recurrent hospitalizations and its associated complications. With the failure of clinical signs, tele-monitoring, and laboratory bio-markers to function as early markers of HF exacerbations, more sophisticated techniques were sought to accurately predict the circulatory status in HF patients in order to execute timely pharmacological intervention to reduce frequent hospitalizations. CardioMEMSTM (St. Jude Medical, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota) is an implantable, wireless pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) monitoring system which transmits the patient’s continuous PAPs to the treating health care provider in the ambulatory setting. PAP-guided medical therapy modification has been shown to significantly reduce HF-related hospitalization and overall mortality. In advanced stages of HF, wireless access to hemodynamic information correlated with earlier left ventricular assist device implantation and shorter time to heart transplantation. PMID:28163833

  19. Medicare's post-acute care payment: a review of the issues and policy proposals.

    PubMed

    Linehan, Kathryn

    2012-12-07

    Medicare spending on post-acute care provided by skilled nursing facility providers, home health providers, inpatient rehabilitation facility providers, and long-term care hospitals has grown rapidly in the past several years. The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission and others have noted several long-standing problems with the payment systems for post-acute care and have suggested refinements to Medicare's post-acute care payment systems that are intended to encourage the delivery of appropriate care in the right setting for a patient's condition. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 contained several provisions that affect the Medicare program's post-acute care payment systems and also includes broader payment reforms, such as bundled payment models. This issue brief describes Medicare's payment systems for post-acute care providers, evidence of problems that have been identified with the payment systems, and policies that have been proposed or enacted to remedy those problems.

  20. Prediction of Ambulatory Status After Hip Fracture Surgery in Patients Over 60 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To predict ambulatory capacity, 1 month after physical therapy following hip fracture surgery. Methods A retrospective chart review was carried out. Patients more than 60 years old, who underwent hip fracture surgery and received physical therapies, were selected (n=548). Age, gender, presence of cognitive dysfunction, combined medical diseases, combined fractures, previous history of hip surgery, prefracture ambulatory capacity, days from the fracture to surgery, type of fracture, type of surgery, presence of postoperative complications, days from the surgery to physical therapy, and total admission period, were collected. Prefracture ambulatory capacity and postoperative ambulatory capacity were classified into non-ambulatory status (NA), ambulation with assistive device (AA), and independent-ambulation without any assistive device (IA). Multiple-logistic regression analysis was performed for the prediction of postoperative ambulatory capacity. Results Age (odds ratio [OR]=0.94 for IA and 0.96 for IA or AA), gender (OR=1.64 for IA and 0.98 for IA or AA), prefracture ambulatory capacity (OR of IA=19.17 for IA; OR of IA=16.72 for IA or AA; OR of AA=1.26 for IA, OR of AA=9.46 for IA or AA), and combined medical disease (OR=2.02) were found to be the factors related to postoperative ambulatory capacity and the prediction model was set up using these four factors. Conclusion Using this model, we can predict the ambulatory capacity following hip fracture surgery. Further prospective studies should be constructed to improve postoperative ambulatory capacity. PMID:27606273

  1. A Case Report of Neisseria Mucosa Peritonitis in a Chronic Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Awdisho, Alan; Bermudez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Peritonitis is a leading complication of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. However, very rarely does Neisseria mucosa cause peritonitis. We describe an unusual case of N. mucosa peritonitis in a chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient. A 28-year-old Hispanic male presents with diffuse abdominal pain exacerbated during draining of the peritoneal fluid. Peritoneal fluid examination was remarkable for leukocytosis and gramnegative diplococci. Bacterial cultures were positive for N. mucosa growth. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with preservation of the dialysis catheter. This case highlights the rarity and importance of Neisseria mucosa causing peritonitis in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. There seems to be a unique association between N. mucosa peritonitis and chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. The patient was successfully managed with ciprofloxacin along with salvaging of the dialysis catheter. PMID:28191300

  2. Prognostic importance of ambulatory blood pressure recordings in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, R; Andersen, M J

    2006-04-01

    Ambulatory systolic blood pressure (BP) correlates better with risk factors for progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) compared to clinic measured BP, but its role in predicting end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in patients with CKD is unknown. In a cohort study of 217 Veterans with CKD BP was measured by ambulatory monitoring and in the clinic. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP was 133.5 +/- 16.6/73.1 +/- 11.1 mm Hg and clinic BP was 155.2 +/- 25.6/84.7 +/- 14.2 mm Hg. The composite renal end point of ESRD or death over a median follow-up of 3.5 years occurred in 75 patients (34.5%), death occurred in 52 patients (24.0%), and ESRD in 36/178 patients (20.2%). Thirty-nine patients died before reaching ESRD. One standard deviation (s.d.) increase in systolic BP increased the risk of composite outcome to 1.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32-2.17) for standard clinic measurement and to 1.88 (95% CI 1.48-2.39) for 24 h ambulatory BP recording. One s.d. increase in 24 h ambulatory systolic BP increased the risk of ESRD to 3.04 (95% CI 2.13-4.35) and to 2.20 (95% CI 1.43-3.39) when adjusted for standard clinic systolic BP. Non-dipping was associated with increased risk of total mortality and composite end point. In patients with CKD, BPs obtained by ambulatory monitoring are a stronger predictor of ESRD or death compared to BPs obtained in the clinic. Systolic ambulatory BP and nondipping are independent predictors for ESRD after adjusting for clinic BP. However, adjustment for other risk factors for CKD progression removes the independent prognostic value of ambulatory BP.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of cefepime in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbhaiya, R H; Knupp, C A; Pfeffer, M; Zaccardelli, D; Dukes, G M; Mattern, W; Pittman, K A; Hak, L J

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefepime were studied in 10 male patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis therapy. Five patients received a single 1,000-mg dose and the other five received a single 2,000-mg dose; all doses were given as 30-min intravenous infusions. Serial plasma, urine, and peritoneal dialysate samples were collected; and the concentrations of cefepime in these fluids were measured over 72 h by using a high-performance liquid chromatographic assay with UV detection. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by noncompartmental methods. The peak concentrations in plasma and the areas under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve for the 2,000-mg dose group were twice as high as those observed for the 1,000-mg dose group. The elimination half-life of cefepime was about 18 h and was independent of the dose. The steady-state volume of distribution was about 22 liters, and values for the 1,000- and 2,000-mg doses were not significantly different. The values for total body clearance and peritoneal dialysis clearance were about 15 and 4 ml/min, respectively. No dose dependency was observed for the clearance estimates. Over the 72-h sampling period, about 26% of the dose was excreted intact into the peritoneal dialysis fluid. For 48 h postdose, mean concentrations of cefepime in dialysate at the end of each dialysis interval exceeded the reported MICs for 90% of the isolates (MIC90s) for bacteria which commonly cause peritonitis resulting from continuous peritoneal dialysis. A parenteral dose of 1,000 or 2,000 mg of cefepime every 48 h would maintain the antibiotic levels in plasma and peritoneal fluid above the MIC90s for the most susceptible bacteria for the treatment of systemic and intraperitoneal infections [corrected]. PMID:1510432

  4. Bundling Post-Acute Care Services into MS-DRG Payments

    PubMed Central

    Vertrees, James C.; Averill, Richard F.; Eisenhandler, Jon; Quain, Anthony; Switalski, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective A bundled hospital payment system that encompasses both acute and post-acute care has been proposed as a means of creating financial incentives in the Medicare fee-for-service system to foster care coordination and to improve the current disorganized system of post care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the statistical stability of alternative designs of a hospital payment system that includes post-acute care services to determine the feasibility of using a combined hospital and post-acute care bundle as a unit of payment. Methods The Medicare Severity-Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRGs) were subdivided into clinical subclasses that measured a patient's chronic illness burden to test whether a patient's chronic illness burden had a substantial impact on post-acute care expenditures. Using Medicare data the statistical performance of the MS-DRGs with and without the chronic illness subclasses was evaluated across a wide range of post-acute care windows and combinations of post-acute care service bundles using both submitted charges and Medicare payments. Results The statistical performance of the MS-DRGs as measured by R2 was consistently better when the chronic illness subclasses are included indicating that MS-DRGs by themselves are an inadequate unit of payment for post-acute care payment bundles. In general, R2 values increased as the post-acute care window length increased and decreased as more services were added to the post-acute care bundle. Discussion The study results suggest that it is feasible to develop a payment system that incorporates significant post-acute care services into the MS-DRG inpatient payment bundle. This expansion of the basic DRG payment approach can provide a strong financial incentive for providers to better coordinate care potentially leading to improved efficiency and outcome quality. PMID:24753970

  5. Bundling post-acute care services into MS-DRG payments.

    PubMed

    Vertrees, James C; Averill, Richard F; Eisenhandler, Jon; Quain, Anthony; Switalski, James

    2013-01-01

    A bundled hospital payment system that encompasses both acute and post-acute care has been proposed as a means of creating financial incentives in the Medicare fee-for-service system to foster care coordination and to improve the current disorganized system of post care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the statistical stability of alternative designs of a hospital payment system that includes post-acute care services to determine the feasibility of using a combined hospital and post-acute care bundle as a unit of payment. The Medicare Severity-Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRGs) were subdivided into clinical subclasses that measured a patient's chronic illness burden to test whether a patient's chronic illness burden had a substantial impact on post-acute care expenditures. Using Medicare data the statistical performance of the MS-DRGs with and without the chronic illness subclasses was evaluated across a wide range of post-acute care windows and combinations of post-acute care service bundles using both submitted charges and Medicare payments. The statistical performance of the MS-DRGs as measured by R(2) was consistently better when the chronic illness subclasses are included indicating that MS-DRGs by themselves are an inadequate unit of payment for post-acute care payment bundles. In general, R(2) values increased as the post-acute care window length increased and decreased as more services were added to the post-acute care bundle. The study results suggest that it is feasible to develop a payment system that incorporates significant post-acute care services into the MS-DRG inpatient payment bundle. This expansion of the basic DRG payment approach can provide a strong financial incentive for providers to better coordinate care potentially leading to improved efficiency and outcome quality.

  6. Perceived illness intrusions among continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Usha; Kedlya, Prashanth G

    2012-09-01

    To study the perceived illness intrusion of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, to examine their demographics, and to find out the association among demographics, duration of illness as well as illness intrusion, 40 chronic kidney disease stage V patients on CAPD during 2006-2007 were studied. Inclusion criteria were patients' above 18 years, willing, stable, and completed at least two months of dialysis. Those with psychiatric co-morbidity were excluded. Sociodemographics were collected using a semi-structured interview schedule. A 14-item illness intrusion checklist covering various aspects of life was administered. The subjects had to rate the illness intrusion in their daily life and the extent of intrusion. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi square test of association. The mean age of the subjects was 56.05 ± 10.05 years. There was near equal distribution of gender. 82.5% were married, 70.0% belonged to Hindu religion, 45.0% were pre-degree, 25.0% were employed, 37.5% were housewives and 30.0% had retired. 77.5% belonged to the upper socioeconomic strata, 95.0% were from an urban background and 65.0% were from nuclear families. The mean duration of dialysis was 19.0 ± 16.49 months. Fifty-eight percent of the respondents were performing the dialysis exchanges by themselves. More than 95.0%were on three or four exchanges per day. All the 40 subjects reported illness intrusion in their daily life. Intrusion was perceived to some extent in the following areas: health 47.5%, work 25.0%, finance 37.5%, diet 40.0%, and psychological 50.0%. Illness had not intruded in the areas of relationship with spouse 52.5%, sexual life 30.0%, with friends 92.5%, with family 85.5%, social functions 52.5%, and religious functions 75.0%. Statistically significant association was not noted between illness intrusion and other variables. CAPD patients perceived illness intrusion to some extent in their daily life. Elderly, educated

  7. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Chrystian R.; Harris, Ila M.; Moon, Jean Y.; Westberg, Sarah M.; Kolar, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students’ competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  8. Impact of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis on treatment of renal failure in patients aged over 60.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, A J; Waldek, S; Platts, M M; Moorhead, P J; Brown, C B

    1984-01-01

    Thirty eight patients aged over 60 with end stage renal disease were treated by continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for up to three years. Most of these patients, because of their age or coexisting diseases, had been considered to be unsuitable for haemodialysis by the criteria used before the advent of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in 1980. Actuarial patient survival at one and two years was 72% and 61% respectively, and only two patients were permanently transferred to haemodialysis. Twenty one of the 23 survivors were fully rehabilitated, the remaining two being partially disabled but living at home. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis permits more liberal selection of patients with end stage renal disease for renal replacement treatment with excellent survival and rehabilitation and without overburdening scarce hospital haemodialysis facilities. PMID:6418297

  9. [Patient safety and a culture of responsibility in ambulatory care: strategies for improving practice].

    PubMed

    Lichte, Thomas; Klement, Andreas; Herrmann, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The development of a medical safety culture is spreading beyond the hospital into the ambulatory setting. Patient safety defined as "absence of unwanted events" (primum non nocere) can serve as a starting point for the advancement of our ambulatory medical care system. Error analyses conducted in GP and specialist practices will identify gaps and traps in the system and provide ideas for the development and implementation of new safety strategies in ambulatory patient care. In the light of the structures and processes of GP medical care aspects of patient safety will be correlated to the outcome quality and examples will be discussed. Possible strategies for the improvement of patient safety in GP practice will be presented from the perspective of both patient- and practice individuality.

  10. Ambulatory oral surgery: 1-year experience with 11 680 patients from Zagreb district, Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Jokić, Dražen; Macan, Darko; Perić, Berislav; Tadić, Marinka; Biočić, Josip; Đanić, Petar; Brajdić, Davor

    2013-01-01

    Aim To examine the types and frequencies of oral surgery diagnoses and ambulatory oral surgical treatments during one year period at the Department of Oral Surgery, University Hospital Dubrava in Zagreb, Croatia. Methods Sociodemographic and clinical data on 11 680 ambulatory patients, treated between January 1 and of December 31, 2011 were retrieved from the hospital database using a specific protocol. The obtained data were subsequently analyzed in order to assess the frequency of diagnoses and differences in sex and age. Results The most common ambulatory procedure was tooth extraction (37.67%) and the most common procedure in ambulatory operating room was alveolectomy (57.25%). The test of proportions showed that significantly more extractions (P < 0.001) and intraoral incisions (P < 0.001) were performed among male patients, whereas significantly more alveolectomies and apicoectomies were performed among female patients (P < 0.001). A greater prevalence of periodontal disease was found in patients residing in Zagreb than in patients residing in rural areas. Conclusion The data from this study may be useful for planning of ambulatory oral surgery services, budgeting, and sustaining quality improvement, enhancing oral surgical curricula, training and education of primary health care doctors and oral surgery specialists, and promoting patients’ awareness of the importance of oral health. PMID:23444246

  11. Ambulatory ECMO as a bridge to lung transplant in a previously well pediatric patient with ARDS.

    PubMed

    Turner, David A; Rehder, Kyle J; Bonadonna, Desiree; Gray, Alice; Lin, Shu; Zaas, David; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-08-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly implemented in patients with end-stage pulmonary disease as a bridge to lung transplant. Several centers have instituted an approach that involves physical rehabilitation and ambulation for patients supported with ECMO. Recent reports describe the successful use of ambulatory ECMO in patients with chronic respiratory illnesses being bridged to lung transplant. We describe the first case of a previously healthy pediatric patient with acute respiratory failure successfully supported with ambulatory ECMO as a bridge to lung transplant after an unsuccessful bridge to recovery. Although there are challenges associated with awake and ambulatory ECMO in children, this strategy represents an exciting breakthrough and a potential paradigm shift in ECMO management for pediatric acute respiratory failure. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Design of a Prospective Payment Patient Classification System for Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Averill, Richard F.; Goldfield, Norbert I.; Wynn, Mark E.; McGuire, Thomas E.; Mullin, Robert L.; Gregg, Laurence W.; Bender, Judith A.

    1993-01-01

    The Ambulatory Patient Groups (APGs) are a patient classification system that was developed to be used as the basis of a prospective payment system (PPS) for the facility cost of outpatient care. This article will review the key characteristics of a patient classification system for ambulatory care, describe the APG development process, and describe a payment model based on the APGs. We present the results of simulating the use of APGs in a prospective payment system, and conclude with a discussion of the implementation issues associated with an outpatient PPS. PMID:10133711

  13. Medicare's bundling pilot: including post-acute care services.

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2011-03-28

    Fee-for-service Medicare, in which a separate payment is made for each service, rewards health care providers for delivering more services, but not necessarily coordinating those services over time or across settings. To help address these concerns, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 requires Medicare to experiment with making a bundled payment for a hospitalization plus post-acute care, that is, the recuperative or rehabilitative care following a hospital discharge. This bundled payment approach is intended to promote more efficient care across the acute/post-acute episode because the entity that receives the payment has financial incentives to keep episode costs below the payment. Although the entity is expected to control costs through improved care coordination and efficiency, it could stint on care or avoid expensive patients instead. This issue brief focuses on the unique challenges posed by the inclusion of post-acute care services in a payment bundle and special considerations in implementing and evaluating the episode payment approach.

  14. Strategies for classifying patients based on office, home, and ambulatory blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Li, Yan; Wei, Fang-Fei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Shuai; Xu, Ting-Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang; Staessen, Jan A

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension guidelines propose home or ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as indispensable after office measurement. However, whether preference should be given to home or ambulatory monitoring remains undetermined. In 831 untreated outpatients (mean age, 50.6 years; 49.8% women), we measured office (3 visits), home (7 days), and 24-h ambulatory blood pressures. We applied hypertension guidelines for cross-classification of patients into normotension or white-coat, masked, or sustained hypertension. Based on office and home blood pressures, the prevalence of white-coat, masked, and sustained hypertension was 61 (10.3%), 166 (20.0%), and 162 (19.5%), respectively. Using daytime (from 8 am to 6 pm) instead of home blood pressure confirmed the cross-classification in 575 patients (69.2%), downgraded risk from masked hypertension to normotension (n=24) or from sustained to white-coat hypertension (n=9) in 33 (4.0%), but upgraded risk from normotension to masked hypertension (n=179) or from white-coat to sustained hypertension (n=44) in 223 (26.8%). Analyses based on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure were confirmatory. In adjusted analyses, both the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (+20.6%; confidence interval, 4.4-39.3) and aortic pulse wave velocity (+0.30 m/s; confidence interval, 0.09-0.51) were higher in patients who moved up to a higher risk category. Both indexes of target organ damage and central augmentation index were positively associated (P≤0.048) with the odds of being reclassified. In conclusion, for reliably diagnosing hypertension and starting treatment, office measurement should be followed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Using home instead of ambulatory monitoring misses the high-risk diagnoses of masked or sustained hypertension in over 25% of patients.

  15. Factors Associated with Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing an Ambulatory Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Young Hak; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Nam, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Young Ho; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing ambulatory surgery under general anesthesia experience considerable levels of postoperative nausea and vomiting (N/V) after their discharge. However, those complications have not been thoroughly investigated in hand surgery patients yet. We investigated factors associated with postoperative N/V in patients undergoing an ambulatory hand surgery under general anesthesia and determined whether patients' satisfaction with this setting is associated with postoperative N/V levels. Methods We prospectively evaluated 200 consecutive patients who underwent ambulatory hand surgeries under general anesthesia to assess their postoperative N/V visual analogue scale (VAS) levels during the first 24 hours after surgery and their satisfaction with an ambulatory surgery setting. Potential predictors of postoperative N/V were; age, sex, body mass index, smoking behavior, a history of postoperative N/V after previous anesthesia or motion sickness, preoperative anxiety level and the duration time of anesthesia. We conducted multivariate analyses to identify factors associated with postoperative N/V levels. We also conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine whether the N/V levels are associated with the patients' satisfaction with this setting. Here, potential predictors for satisfaction were sex, age, postoperative pain and N/V. Results Postoperative N/V were associated with a non-smoking history, a history of motion sickness and a high level of preoperative anxiety. Twenty-two patients (11%) were dissatisfied with the ambulatory setting and this dissatisfaction was independently associated with moderate (VAS 4-7) and high (VAS 8-10) levels of postoperative N/V and with a high level (VAS 8-10) of postoperative pain. Conclusions Although most of the patients were satisfied with the ambulatory surgery setting, moderate to high levels of N/V were associated with dissatisfaction of patients with this setting, suggesting a need for

  16. Relationship of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate with markers of hepatic function in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Tzamouranis, Dimitris G; Alexopoulou, Alexandra; Dourakis, Spyros P; Stergiou, George S

    2010-12-12

    There is evidence that in cirrhotic patients, certain hemodynamic parameters, such as blood pressure and heart rate, are related to the severity of liver disease. This study investigated whether non-invasive 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate are more closely associated with markers of liver disease severity than conventional office measurements. Ambulatory patients with cirrhosis underwent office blood pressure and heart rate measurements, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and blood laboratory tests. Fifty-one patients (32 men, mean age 57.4 ± 11.3 years) completed the study. Twenty six patients had compensated liver cirrhosis (group A) and 25 patients had more advanced liver disease (group B). Group A and B patients differed significantly both in ambulatory asleep diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.05) and office diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.01), which were lower in more advanced liver disease. Office blood pressure and heart rate correlations were similar to or even stronger than ambulatory ones. Ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate awake-asleep variation (dipping) showed a relatively flat pattern as markers of liver dysfunction were deteriorating. The strongest correlations were found with both ambulatory and office heart rate, which increased as indicators of severity of liver disease were worsening. Heart rate seems to be a more reliable marker of ongoing liver dysfunction than blood pressure. Evaluation of blood pressure and heart rate with 24-hour ambulatory measurement does not seem to offer more information than conventional office measurements.

  17. [Ambulatory blood pressure profiles of patients with permanent or occasional hypertension. Correlation with clinical data].

    PubMed

    Herpin, D; Amiel, A; Boutaud, P; Ciber, M A; Demange, J

    1987-06-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) recording was performed in 57 untreated hypertensive patients by means of the "Spacelabs" non-invasive apparatus. Patients were divided into two groups according to BP measurements previously made during medical consultation. Group I comprised 25 "permanently hypertensive" patients (diastolic BP always above 95 mmHg) and group II, 32 "occasionally hypertensive" patients (diastolic BP sometimes normal, sometimes above 95 mmHg). The same circadian rhythm was observed in both groups. The mean ambulatory BP level was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) in group I patients than in group II patients, either over the whole of the 24-hour period (142.0/88.0 versus 122.7/75.3 mmHg), or in day time (149.0/92.5 versus 128.2/78.9 mmHg) or at night (128.0/80.1 versus 111.5/68.0 mmHg). In contrast, there did not seem to be any significant difference between the two groups in relative long-term variability of BP, expressed as the standard deviation/mean BP values ratio. Comparison with clinical data showed that BP values measured during consultation (160/103 mmHg in group I, 143/94 mmHg in group II) were higher than ambulatory values and, chiefly, that there was very poor correlation between the two measurement methods, precluding any extrapolation. Automatic ambulatory BP recording provides for more accurate evaluation of hypertensive patients, enabling emotional "artefacts" to be excluded and patients "reactivity" to their socio-professional environment to be assessed. However, in the absence of sufficient epidemiological data, doctors should not feel authorized to base their therapeutic decisions on the sole data supplied by ambulatory BP recordings.

  18. Assessing patient safety in Canadian ambulatory surgery facilities: A national survey

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Jamil; Ho, Olivia A; Carman, Wayne W; Thoma, Achilles; Lalonde, Donald H; Lista, Frank

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been increased interest regarding patient safety and standards of care in Canadian ambulatory surgery facilities where surgical procedures are performed. The Canadian Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgical Facilities (CAAASF) is a national organization formed to establish and maintain standards to ensure that surgical procedures conducted outside of public hospitals are performed safely. OBJECTIVE: To determine how many procedures are performed annually at CAAASF member sites, and to examine complication rates and several key patient safety practices. METHODS: All 69 facilities accredited by the CAAASF were surveyed. The survey focused on procedural data, complication rates and patient safety interventions. RESULTS: In 2010, 40,240 estimated procedures were performed. A total of 263 (0.007%) complications were reported. Sixteen (0.0004%) patients required reoperations in hospital and 19 (0.0004%) patients required transfer to hospital on the day of surgery. There were only two mortalities within 30 days of surgery reported in the past five years. With regard to patient safety practices, 93% used antimicrobial prophylaxis, 100% used strategies to maintain normothermia and 82% used measures for venous thromboembolism prevention. CONCLUSION: The present study is the first to report on the Canadian experience in ambulatory surgery facilities and provides insight into current practices at these facilities. Appropriate accreditation of ambulatory surgery facilities, well-established patient safety-related standards of care, careful patient selection and procedures performed by qualified health care professionals with appropriate certification practicing within the scope of their practice form the basis for safe and effective ambulatory surgery. PMID:25152645

  19. Ambulatory Status Protects against Venous Thromboembolism in Acute Mild Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Sisante, Jason-Flor V; Abraham, Michael G; Phadnis, Milind A; Billinger, Sandra A; Mittal, Manoj K

    2016-10-01

    Ischemic stroke patients are at high risk (up to 18%) for venous thromboembolism. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study to understand the predictors of acute postmild ischemic stroke patient's ambulatory status and its relationship with venous thromboembolism, hospital length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. We identified 522 patients between February 2006 and May 2014 and collected data about patient demographics, admission NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale), venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, ambulatory status, diagnosis of venous thromboembolism, and hospital outcomes (length of stay, mortality). Chi-square test, t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test, and binary logistic regression were used for statistical analysis as appropriate. A total of 61 (11.7%), 48 (9.2%), and 23 (4.4%) mild ischemic stroke patients developed venous thromboembolism, deep venous thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism, respectively. During hospitalization, 281 (53.8%) patients were ambulatory. Independent predictors of in-hospital ambulation were being married (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.10-2.49), being nonreligious (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.34-3.62), admission NIHSS (per unit decrease in NIHSS; OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.39-1.91), and nonuse of mechanical venous thromboembolism prophylaxis (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.02-2.61). After adjusting for confounders, ambulatory patients had lower rates of venous thromboembolism (OR .47, 95% CI .25-.89), deep venous thrombosis (OR .36, 95% CI .17-.73), prolonged length of hospital stay (OR .24, 95% CI .16-.37), and mortality (OR .43, 95% CI .21-.84). Our findings suggest that for hospitalized acute mild ischemic stroke patients, ambulatory status is an independent predictor of venous thromboembolism (specifically deep venous thrombosis), hospital length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Relative Importance of Post-Acute Care and Readmissions for Post-Discharge Spending.

    PubMed

    Huckfeldt, Peter J; Mehrotra, Ateev; Hussey, Peter S

    2016-10-01

    To understand what patterns of health care use are associated with higher post-hospitalization spending. Medicare hospital, skilled nursing, inpatient rehabilitation, and home health agency claims, and Medicare enrollment data from 2007 and 2008. For 10 common inpatient conditions, we calculated variation across hospitals in price-standardized and case mix-adjusted Medicare spending in the 30 days following hospital discharge. We estimated the fraction of spending differences between low- and high-spending hospitals attributable to readmissions versus post-acute care, and within post-acute care between inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) versus skilled nursing facility (SNF) use. For each service, we distinguished between differences in probability of use and spending conditional on use. We identified index hospital claims and examined hospital and post-acute care occurring within a 30-day period following hospital discharge. For each Medicare Severity Diagnosis-Related Group (MS-DRG) at each hospital, we calculated average price-standardized Medicare payments for readmissions, SNFs, IRFs, and post-acute care overall (also including home health agencies and long-term care hospitals). There was extensive variation across hospitals in Medicare spending in the 30 days following hospital discharge. For example, the interquartile range across hospitals ranged from $1,245 for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to over $4,000 for myocardial infarction MS-DRGs. The proportion of differences attributable to readmissions versus post-acute care differed across conditions. For myocardial infarction, 74 to 93 percent of the variation was due to readmissions. For hip and femur procedures and joint replacement, 72 to 92 percent of the variation was due to differences in post-acute care spending. There was also variation in the relative importance of the type of post-acute spending. For hip and femur procedures, joint replacement, and stroke, whether patients received IRF

  1. Information needs of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in an ambulatory-care setting.

    PubMed

    Lock, Karen K; Willson, Barbara

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the information needs of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and to explore their preferred styles of receiving education in an ambulatory-care setting. Patient information needs and preferences were measured using a 17-item questionnaire. This descriptive study included a sample of 101 cancer patients undergoing outpatient chemotherapy. The most commonly expressed information needs concerned: side effects of treatment, drug information, and coping strategies. Some patients expressed a preference for information in their primary language. The results support the use of online learning in this setting. Patients identified one-on-one discussion with nurses and doctors as the preferred way to receive information. In order to meet the individual needs of cancer patients, education should be provided in a variety of learning modalities. The results of this study should help to guide patient education initiatives in oncology ambulatory care.

  2. Peritonitis Due to Roseomonas fauriae in a Patient Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bibashi, Evangelia; Sofianou, Danai; Kontopoulou, Konstantina; Mitsopoulos, Efstathios; Kokolina, Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    Roseomonas is a newly described genus of pink-pigmented, nonfermentative, gram-negative bacteria that have been recognized as a cause of human infections. Roseomonas fauriae is a species rarely isolated from clinical specimens. We report the first known case of peritonitis caused by R. fauriae in a patient receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. PMID:10618142

  3. The Use of the Ambulatory Setting for Patient Self-Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newkirk, Gary; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A self-instructional health education program that utilizes a slide-tape device was studied to determine whether it could be educationally effective in an ambulatory clinical setting without being an inconvenience to patients. Infant and child nutrition was chosen as the topic to be used in the waiting room of a pediatric clinic. (JMD)

  4. Monitored daily ambulatory activity, inflammation, and oxidative stress in patients with claudication.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W; Parker, Donald E; Montgomery, Polly S; Blevins, Steve M; Teague, April M; Casanegra, Ana I

    2014-07-01

    We determined the association between daily ambulatory activity and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and claudication. Patients with PAD (n = 134) limited by claudication were studied. Patients took 3275 ± 1743 daily strides for 273 ± 112 minutes each day, and their average daily cadence was 11.7 ± 2.7 strides/min. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was significantly and negatively associated with the total number of daily strides (P < .001), total daily ambulatory time (P < .01), peak activity index (P < .01), daily average cadence (P < .05), and the maximum cadences for 60 minutes (P < .05), 30 minutes (P < .05), 20 minutes (P < .05), and 5 minutes (P < .01). Oxidized low-density lipoprotein and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 were not significantly associated with any of the ambulatory measures (P > .05). We conclude that higher levels of community-based, daily ambulatory activity are associated with lower levels of inflammation but are not associated with markers of oxidative stress.

  5. Association between day-by-day and ambulatory blood pressure variability in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Masaya; Matsutani, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Kayama, Yosuke; Takeda, Norihiko; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2017-09-18

    It remains unclear whether ambulatory blood pressure variability (BPV) contributes toward day-by-day BPV, despite the fact that not only day-by-day but also ambulatory BPV is reported to be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes patients. This study aimed to determine the association between day-by-day BPV and ambulatory BPV, which is especially distinguished between diurnal and nocturnal BPV, in type 2 diabetes patients. Day-by-day and ambulatory BPV were assessed in 30 type 2 diabetes patients (aged 54±15 years; 87% men; glycated hemoglobin: 9.1±1.9%) in inpatient settings. Day-by-day systolic BPV was correlated significantly with diurnal systolic BPV (r=0.426, P=0.019), but not nocturnal systolic BPV (r=0.175, P=0.354). Multiple regression analysis showed that diurnal systolic BPV and diurnal mean systolic blood pressure were associated independently with day-by-day systolic BPV. With respect to type 2 diabetes, these findings suggest that day-by-day BPV is reflected in diurnal BPV rather than nocturnal BPV.

  6. Treatable renal failure found in non-ambulatory Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Motoki, Takahiro; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Komaki, Hirofumi; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Oya, Yasushi; Takeshita, Eri; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Saito, Takashi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Murata, Miho; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscular disorder in which respiratory and heart failures are the main causes of death. Intensive intervention in respiratory and cardiac function has dramatically improved the prognosis; however, dysfunction in other multiple organs may emerge in the later stages of the disease. We report the case of four non-ambulatory DMD patients who presented with renal failure. Common findings included decreased fluid intake, use of diuretics, and presence of chronic heart failure. The levels of serum cystatin C (CysC), a marker of kidney function unaffected by reduced muscle mass, were elevated in all four patients. In two patients, renal failure improved by increasing fluid intake, and discontinuing or reducing the dose of diuretics. The findings suggest that non-ambulatory DMD patients are at a risk of reduced kidney perfusion, which potentially leads to prerenal failure. Therefore, in DMD patients, dehydration signs and CysC levels should be monitored.

  7. Risk Factors for new accidental falls in elderly patients at traumatology ambulatory center.

    PubMed

    Porto Gautério, Daiane; Zortea, Bruna; Costa Santos, Silvana Sidney; da Silva Tarouco, Bárbara; Lopes, Manoel José; João Fonseca, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    To identify the risks factors for new accidental falls in elderly patients attended in the Traumatology Ambulatory of a University hospital in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Quantitative study of the type of multiple cases. Performed at the traumatology ambulatory, amongst fifteen elders that attended the inclusion criteria: age of sixty or more; patient at the traumatology ambulatory because of a fall motivated by accident, oriented and in conditions of answer an interview of data collectors. The data collection was made between April and June, 2013, with the Elderly Nursing Core Set scale (Lopes & Fonseca). The data analysis was made by a descriptive structure, which helped identify the existence of relation patterns among the cases. The risk factors for new accidental falls identified with larger incidence amongst the elders studied were: impaired balance (15/15), age above 65 (11/15), use of antihypertensive drugs (9/15), absence of non-slip material at home environment (7/15), in seven cases; rugs scattered at the floor of the house (6/15). The combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that include the environmental risks is considered a much more relevant cause to occur the new falls. The minimization of the home dangers, allied to the control of the elder intrinsic factors, may reduce the risks of causes. In that sense, is necessary that the nursing team make available more attention to the elderly assisted at the ambulatories, mainly those with sequelae due to fall accidents.

  8. Rupture of a non-traumatic anterior communicating artery aneurysm: Does location of aneurysm associate with functional independence following post-acute in-patient neurorehabilitation?

    PubMed

    Stabel, Henriette Holm; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk

    2017-09-18

    Patients with non-traumatic rupture of an aneurysm located at the anterior communicating artery (ACoA) often experience cognitive disabilities. It is unknown whether location of aneurysm also affects the possibility for improvement in functional independence compared to patients with an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (a-SAH) located elsewhere. The aim was to explore the association between location of aneurysm (ACoA versus other) and level of functional independence, measured by Functional Independence Measure (FIM), at discharge from rehabilitation. Additionally, age and FIM at admission were explored. Historical cohort study among 107 patients with a-SAH based on data from a clinical database and a population-based register. Data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Patients with ACoA were admitted with poorer cognitive FIM (median 6 (IQR 5-14) compared to patients with aneurysms located elsewhere (median 12 (IQR 6-23) (p = 0.0129); no difference at discharge. No association between aneurysm location and functional independence was observed. Higher age was associated with poorer outcome in bowel management OR 0.54 (95% CI 0.31-0.92), bladder management OR 0.59 (95% CI 0.35-0.98), comprehension OR 0.53 (95% CI 0.30-0.94), and memory OR 0.48 (95% CI 0.25-0.93). Overall, FIM at admission was associated with functional independence at discharge with the exception of stair walking and bladder management which did not reach statistical significance. ACoA was not associated with poorer level of functional independence compared to patients with a-SAH located elsewhere. Higher age was associated with poorer outcome in continence, comprehension, and memory, whereas higher FIM was associated with better functional independence across items at discharge.

  9. Effect of pharmacist care on medication adherence and cardiovascular outcomes among patients post-acute coronary syndrome: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Jaam, Myriam Jihad; Awaisu, Ahmed

    2017-06-13

    The impact of collaborative and multidisciplinary health care on the outcomes of care in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is well-established in the literature. However, there is lack of high quality evidence on the role of pharmacist care in this setting. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the impact of pharmacist care on patient outcomes (readmission, mortality, emergency visits, and medication adherence) in patients with ACS at or post-discharge. The following electronic databases and search engines were searched from their inception to September 2016: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, Campbell Library, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health System Evidence, Global Health Database, Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence-Based Practice Database, Academic Search Complete, ProQuest, PROSPERO, and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they evaluated the impact of pharmacist's care (compared with no pharmacist's care or usual care) on the outcomes of rehospitalization, mortality, and medication adherence in patients post-ACS discharge. Comparison of the outcomes with relevant statistics was summarized and reported. A total of 17 studies [13 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four non-randomized clinical studies] involving 8391 patients were included in the review. The studies were of variable quality (poor to good quality) or risk of bias (moderate to critical risk). The nature and intensity of pharmacist interventions varied among the studies including medication reconciliation, medication therapy management, discharge medication counseling, motivational interviewing, and post-discharge face-to-face or telephone follow-up. Pharmacist-delivered interventions significantly improved medication adherence in four out of 12 studies. However, these did not translate to significant improvements in the rates of readmissions, hospitalizations, emergency visits, and mortality

  10. Risk Assessment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Population of Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stierer, Tracey L.; Wright, Christopher; George, Anu; Thompson, Richard E.; Wu, Christopher L.; Collop, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aims of this study were to: (a) assess the prevalence of diagnosed OSA and symptoms of undiagnosed OSA in a cohort of ambulatory surgical patients, and (b) characterize the frequency of postoperative complications in outpatients with a diagnosis of or a propensity to OSA. Methods: Patients presenting for ambulatory surgery completed a self-administered questionnaire. Using a previously validated prediction model, the probability for OSA was determined. Patients with ≥ 70% propensities were considered to be at high risk of having the disorder. Relevant perioperative data and complications were tracked and recorded, and differences in median estimated propensities for OSA were considered by these data. Results: Three-thousand five hundred fifty-three patients completed the preoperative survey. A total of 2139 patients had perioperative data and estimated propensity scores. Ninety-four of the 2139 (4.4%) patients gave a self-reported prior diagnosis of OSA. One hundred three (4.8%) patients were found to be at high risk of OSA based on the survey and prediction model. Seventy-five percent of the patients with > 70% propensity for OSA had not yet been diagnosed. There was no association between OSA propensity scores and unplanned hospital admission, however there was an association of increased propensity with difficult intubation, intraoperative use of pressors, and postoperative oxygen saturation in the PACU. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that undiagnosed OSA may be relatively common in an ambulatory surgical population. There was no relationship between unplanned hospital admission and diagnosis of or increased risk of OSA. However, there was an association of increased perioperative events requiring additional anesthetic management in patients with a diagnosis of, or with a higher propensity to OSA. Citation: Stierer TL; Wright C; George A; Thompson RE; Wu CL; Collop N. Risk assessment of obstructive sleep apnea in a

  11. Hispanic residential ethnic density and depression in post-acute coronary syndrome patients: Re-thinking the role of social support.

    PubMed

    Denton, Ellen-Ge D; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Alcantara, Carmela; Clemow, Lynn; Brondolo, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    The ethnic density hypothesis suggests that ethnic density confers greater social support and consequently protects against depressive symptoms in ethnic minority individuals. However, the potential benefits of ethnic density have not been examined in individuals who are facing a specific and salient life stressor. We examined the degree to which the effects of Hispanic ethnic density on depressive symptoms are explained by socioeconomic resources and social support. Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, N = 472) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and measures of demographics, ACS clinical factors and perceived social support. Neighborhood characteristics, including median income, number of single parent households and Hispanic ethnic density, were extracted from the American Community Survey Census (2005-2009) for each patient using his or her geocoded address. In a linear regression analysis adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, Hispanic ethnic density was positively associated with depressive symptoms (β = .09, standard error (SE) = .04, p = .03). However, Hispanic density was no longer a significant predictor of depressive symptoms when neighborhood characteristics were controlled. The relationship of Hispanic density on depressive symptoms was moderated by nativity status. Among US-born patients with ACS, there was a significant positive relationship between Hispanic density and depressive symptoms and social support significantly mediated this effect. There was no observed effect of Hispanic density to depressive symptoms for foreign-born ACS patients. Although previous research suggests that ethnic density may be protective against depression, our data suggest that among patients with ACS, living in a community with a high concentration of Hispanic individuals is associated with constrained social and economic resources that are themselves associated with greater depressive symptoms. These data add to a growing body of literature

  12. Do ambulatory patients with spinal cord injury walk symmetrically?

    PubMed

    Kumprou, M; Amatachaya, P; Sooknuan, T; Thaweewannakij, T; Mato, L; Amatachaya, S

    2017-02-01

    Cross-sectional study. To explore the levels of walking symmetry in ambulatory participants with spinal cord injury (SCI), and compare levels of walking symmetry among those with different degrees of lesion severity and those who walked with various types of walking devices. A tertiary rehabilitation center and many communities in Thailand. Forty-six participants were assessed for their demographics, SCI characteristics and types of walking device used. Then they were recorded for the ability of walking over a 10-m walkway using a digital camera. The levels of walking symmetry were analyzed using a method of manual digitization and reported in terms of percents of step length ratio. Although the participants had bilateral sensorimotor impairments, they showed some degrees of walking asymmetry (~90%), particularly those with American Spinal Injury Association C (AIS C) (85%) and those who walked with a standard walker (78%). Their levels of walking symmetry also significantly differed from those with AIS D (92%; P<0.05) and those who walked without a walking device (95%; P<0.01). Walking symmetry has been reported as an important variable for the ability of well-controlled walking. Therefore, apart from levels of independent walking, rehabilitation professionals need to emphasize improvements in walking symmetry among these individuals.

  13. Mycobacterium fortuitum Peritonitis in a Patient on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Jyoti; Lathwal, Sumit; Kumar, Satish; Juyal, Deepak

    2013-12-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, an environmental organism, is capable of producing a variety of clinical infections such as cutaneous infections, abscesses and nosocomial infections. Rarely, it has been a documented as a cause of peritonitis in patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is one of the treatment options which are used for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Although peritonitis rates have declined in parallel with advances in peritoneal dialysis (PD) technology, peritonitis remains a leading complication of CAPD and it is the major cause for transfer to other methods of dialysis. We are reporting a case of M. fortuitum peritonitis in a patient who was undergoing CAPD, which was successfully treated. This case emphasizes the importance of mycobacterial cultures in patients with CAPD-associated peritonitis, whose routine cultures may yield no organisms.

  14. The creation and evaluation of an ambulatory orthopedic surgical patient education web site to support empowerment.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Katja; Suomi, Reima; Jääskeläinen, Miika; Kaljonen, Anne; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Salanterä, Sanna

    2010-01-01

    The use and evaluation of Web sites in ambulatory surgery patients' education are rare; hence, innovative approaches to educate these patients should be adopted and evaluated. The aim of this study was to describe the creation of and evaluate the utility and usability of an ambulatory orthopedic surgical patient education Web site. A descriptive study design was used. The evaluators were 72 ambulatory orthopedic surgery patients receiving education through a Web site. The data were collected after education preoperatively and 2 weeks postoperatively. Two instruments were used: "Patients' Evaluation of Education" and "Diary of the Use of the Website." Web site evaluators' scores for utility of the Web site ranged from 57.56 to 87.87 of 100. Utility of the Web site evaluations was significantly higher (P < .05) 2 weeks postoperatively than immediately after the operation. Web site evaluators' scores for usability of the Web site ranged from 85.69 to 88.32. The use of this program as educational material for orthopedic surgery patients was supported by the patients' opinions of the usability and utility of the Web site.

  15. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in patients with hyperthyroidism before and after control of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, P; Acosta, M; Sánchez, R; Fernández-Reyes, M J; Mon, C; Díez, J J

    2005-07-01

    Thyroid hormones have pronounced effects on the cardiovascular system. Thyrotoxicosis affects blood pressure (BP), modifying both diastolic (DBP) and systolic (SBP) pressures. There are no studies examining BP with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in hyperthyroidism before and after control of thyroid function. Our aims were (1) to analyse ABPM in a group of normotensive hyperthyroid patients before and after normalizing circulating thyroid hormones and (2) to compare these results with those obtained in a group of euthyroid subjects. We studied 20 normotensive hyperthyroid subjects [18 women; age (mean +/- SEM) 49.0 +/- 3.0 years] and 15 healthy subjects. Patients were evaluated by ABPM over 24 h, at diagnosis and after therapy (n = 18). The average 24-h, daytime and night-time SBP was significantly greater in hyperthyroid patients than in controls with no significant differences in DBP. Circadian BP rhythm, estimated by the difference between mean values of SBP, DBP and mean BP during daytime and night-time, was unchanged. The average 24-h and daytime SBP significantly decreased after normalizing thyroid function in the 18 hyperthyroid evaluated patients. Daytime SBP and DBP were higher than night-time values both before and after control of thyroid function. However, no differences in circadian BP rhythm were observed. Normotensive hyperthyroid patients exhibit higher ambulatory SBP throughout 24 h than normotensive euthyroid subjects. Control of hyperthyroidism decreases ambulatory SBP values. Mean nocturnal fall in BP is comparable in normotensive hyperthyroid patients and control subjects.

  16. Walking Clinic in ambulatory surgery--A patient based concept: A Portuguese pioneer project.

    PubMed

    Vinagreiro, M; Valverde, J N; Alves, D; Costa, M; Gouveia, P; Guerreiro, E

    2015-06-01

    Walking Clinic is an innovative, efficient and easily reproducible concept adapted to ambulatory surgery. It consists of a preoperative single day work-up, with a surgeon, an anesthetist and a nurse. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction and its determinants. A survey was applied to 171 patients (101 of the Walking Clinic group and 70 not engaged in this new concept). Patient satisfaction was assessed evaluating five major questionnaire items: secretariat (quality of the information and support given), physical space (overall comfort and cleanliness), nurses and medical staff (willingness and expertise), and patients (waiting time until pre-operative consults and exams, waiting time until being scheduled for surgery, surgery day waiting time and postoperative pain control). Furthermore, overall assessment of the received treatment, and probability of patient recommending or returning to our ambulatory unit were also analyzed. Walking Clinic group had overall better results in the five major questionnaire items assessed, with statistical significance, except for the physical space. It also showed better results regarding the sub-items postoperative pain control, waiting time until being scheduled for surgery and surgery day waiting time. The results confirm better patient satisfaction with this new concept. The Walking Clinic concept complements all the tenets of ambulatory surgery, in a more efficient manner. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preoperative Ambulatory Inspiratory Muscle Training in Patients Undergoing Esophagectomy. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Agrelli, Taciana Freitas; de Carvalho Ramos, Marisa; Guglielminetti, Rachel; Silva, Alex Augusto; Crema, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A major decline in pulmonary function is observed on the first day after upper abdominal surgery. This decline can reduce vital and inspiratory capacity and can culminate in restrictive lung diseases that cause atelectasis, reduced diaphragm movement, and respiratory insufficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative ambulatory respiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. The sample consisted of 20 adult patients (14 men [70%] and 6 women [30%]) with a diagnosis of advanced chagasic megaesophagus. A significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure was observed after inspiratory muscle training when compared with baseline values (from −55.059 ± 18.359 to −76.286 ± 16.786). Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training was effective in increasing respiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing esophagectomy and contributed to the prevention of postoperative complications. PMID:23113846

  18. Office and ambulatory blood pressure control in hypertensive patients treated with different two-drug and three-drug combinations.

    PubMed

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Banegas, José R; Vinyoles, Ernest; Gorostidi, Manuel; Segura, Julián; de la Cruz, Juan J; Ruilope, Luis M

    There is scarce information regarding ambulatory blood pressure (BP) achieved in daily practice with a wide range of antihypertensive drug combinations. We looked for differences in office and ambulatory BP among major drug combinations of two and three antihypertensive agents from a different drugs class. A total of 17187 patients treated with six types of two-drug combinations and 9724 treated with six types of three-drug combinations from the Spanish ABPM Registry were analyzed. We compared achieved office and ambulatory BP, as well as office (< 140/90 mmHg) and ambulatory (24-hour BP < 130/80; day BP < 135/85, and night BP < 120/70 mmHg) BP control among groups. The combination of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers with diuretics and the triple combination of RAS blockers with diuretics and calcium channel blockers (CCB) were associated with lower values of 24-hour, daytime and nighttime BP, as well as more pronounced nocturnal BP dip. Compared with such combinations (reference), other double combinations had lower rates of ambulatory BP control. Moreover, triple combinations containing alpha blockers also had lower rates of ambulatory BP control. We conclude that even with similar office BP control, differences exist among antihypertensive two-drug and three-drug combinations with respect to ambulatory BP control achieved during treatment, with RAS blockers/diuretics and RAS blockers/CCBs/diuretics obtaining better control rates. This can help physicians choose among drug combinations in order to obtain further ambulatory BP reductions.

  19. Clinical prediction model to identify vulnerable patients in ambulatory surgery: towards optimal medical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Mijderwijk, Herjan; Stolker, Robert Jan; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Klimek, Markus; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2016-09-01

    Ambulatory surgery patients are at risk of adverse psychological outcomes such as anxiety, aggression, fatigue, and depression. We developed and validated a clinical prediction model to identify patients who were vulnerable to these psychological outcome parameters. We prospectively assessed 383 mixed ambulatory surgery patients for psychological vulnerability, defined as the presence of anxiety (state/trait), aggression (state/trait), fatigue, and depression seven days after surgery. Three psychological vulnerability categories were considered-i.e., none, one, or multiple poor scores, defined as a score exceeding one standard deviation above the mean for each single outcome according to normative data. The following determinants were assessed preoperatively: sociodemographic (age, sex, level of education, employment status, marital status, having children, religion, nationality), medical (heart rate and body mass index), and psychological variables (self-esteem and self-efficacy), in addition to anxiety, aggression, fatigue, and depression. A prediction model was constructed using ordinal polytomous logistic regression analysis, and bootstrapping was applied for internal validation. The ordinal c-index (ORC) quantified the discriminative ability of the model, in addition to measures for overall model performance (Nagelkerke's R (2) ). In this population, 137 (36%) patients were identified as being psychologically vulnerable after surgery for at least one of the psychological outcomes. The most parsimonious and optimal prediction model combined sociodemographic variables (level of education, having children, and nationality) with psychological variables (trait anxiety, state/trait aggression, fatigue, and depression). Model performance was promising: R (2)  = 30% and ORC = 0.76 after correction for optimism. This study identified a substantial group of vulnerable patients in ambulatory surgery. The proposed clinical prediction model could allow healthcare

  20. A Score Predicting Posttreatment Ambulatory Status in Patients Irradiated for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Basic, Hiba; Karstens, Johann H.; Hoskin, Peter J.; Schild, Steven E.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To create a scoring system to predict ambulatory status after radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Methods and Materials: On the basis of a multivariate analysis of 2096 MSCC patients, a scoring system was developed. This included the five prognostic factors significantly associated with post-RT ambulatory status: primary tumor type, interval between tumor diagnosis and MSCC, visceral metastases, motor function before RT, and time developing motor deficits before RT. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the post-RT ambulatory rate (as a percentage) by 10. Total scores represented the sum of the scores for each factor and ranged between 21 and 44 points. Patients were divided into five groups according to this score. Results: The post-RT ambulatory rates were 6% (24 of 389) for patients with scores of {<=}28 points, 44% (121 of 278) for those with 29-31 points, 70% (212 of 303) for those with 32-34 points, 86% (315 of 266) for those with 35-37 points, and 99% (750 of 760) for those with {>=}38 points. The 3-month survival rates were 29%, 62%, 77%, 84%, and 98%, respectively. The 6-months survival rates were 6%, 31%, 42%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Conclusions: Because patients with scores of {<=}28 points had poor functional outcome after RT and extraordinarily poor survival rates, short-course RT to decrease pain or best supportive care may be considered. Patients with scores of 29-37 points should be considered surgical candidates, because RT-alone results were not optimal. Patients with scores of {>=}38 points seem to have excellent results with RT alone.

  1. Daily Energy Expenditure and Its Relation to Health Care Costs in Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    George, Jason; Abdulla, Rami Khoury; Yeow, Raymond; Aggarwal, Anshul; Boura, Judith; Wegner, James; Franklin, Barry A

    2017-02-15

    Our increasingly sedentary lifestyle is associated with a heightened risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cardiovascular mortality. Using the recently developed heart rate index formula in 843 patients (mean ± SD age 62.3 ± 15.7 years) who underwent 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring, we estimated average and peak daily energy expenditure, expressed as metabolic equivalents (METs), and related these data to subsequent hospital encounters and health care costs. In this cohort, estimated daily average and peak METs were 1.7 ± 0.7 and 5.5 ± 2.1, respectively. Patients who achieved daily bouts of peak energy expenditure ≥5 METs had fewer hospital encounters (p = 0.006) and median health care costs that were nearly 50% lower (p <0.001) than their counterparts who attained <5 METs. In patients whose body mass index was ≥30 kg/m(2), there were significant differences in health care costs depending on whether they achieved <5 or ≥5 METs estimated by ambulatory ECG monitoring (p = 0.005). Interestingly, patients who achieved ≥5 METs had lower and no significant difference in their health care costs, regardless of their body mass index (p = 0.46). Patients with previous percutaneous coronary intervention who achieved ≥5 METs had lower health care costs (p = 0.044) and fewer hospital encounters (p = 0.004) than those who achieved <5 METs. In conclusion, average and peak daily energy expenditures estimated from ambulatory ECG monitoring may provide useful information regarding health care utilization in patients with and without previous percutaneous coronary intervention, irrespective of body habitus. Our findings are the first to link lower intensities of peak daily energy expenditure, estimated from ambulatory ECG monitoring, with increased health care utilization.

  2. Assessment of patients with office hypertension by 24-hour noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    White, W B

    1986-11-01

    To assess the discrepancy between casual (office) and home blood pressure readings in patients performing home blood pressure monitoring, we analyzed office, home, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rates in 19 patients in a prospective four-week study. After the month of study, the average difference between mean office and manual home blood pressures in this office hypertensive group was 30 +/- 17/20 +/- 6 mm Hg. The blood pressures taken in the office were substantially greater than the 24-hour average blood pressures and ambulatory blood pressures during work or while at home (awake). An analysis of the automatic monitor readings while in the doctor's office and at 15-minute intervals after leaving the office showed a progressive reduction in blood pressure and heart rate during the first hour after leaving the office. A mean 24-hour blood pressure of less than 130/80 mm Hg was found in 13 (68%) patients. These data suggest that patients with office hypertension are usually normotensive but may have a persistent and recurrent pressor response in a medical care setting. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring provides confirmation of not only the office-home disparity, but also suggests that stress other than office visits fails to elicit a hypertensive response.

  3. The Use of the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in Patients Suspected of Secondary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Verbakel, Joshua R. A.; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Kraayvanger, Nicole; Dechering, Dirk G.; Postma, Cornelis T.

    2016-01-01

    The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is a marker of arterial stiffness and is derived from ambulatory 24-h blood pressure registration. We studied whether the AASI could be used as a predictive factor for the presence of renal artery stenosis (RAS) in patients with a suspicion of secondary hypertension and as such as a diagnostic tool for RAS. We included 169 patients with difficult-to-treat hypertension. They all underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring registration, imaging of the renal arteries, and cardiovascular risk measurement, including smoking, history, biometrics, blood pressure, renal function, lipids, and glucose metabolism. Performing univariate and multivariate analyses, we investigated if AASI and the other cardiovascular risk factors were related to the presence of RAS. Of the 169 patients (49% women), 31% had RAS. The mean AASI was 0.44 (0.16). The presence of RAS showed no significant correlation with AASI (r = 0.14, P = 0.06). Age (r = 0.19, P = 0.01), hypercholesterolemia (r = 0.26, P = 0.001), history of CVD (r = 0.22, P = 0.004), and creatinine clearance (r = −0.34, P < 0.001) all demonstrated a correlation with RAS. Although AASI is higher in patients with RAS, AASI does not independently predict the presence of RAS in hypertensive subjects. PMID:28018907

  4. [Nursing care in ambulatory surgery at a teaching hospital: patients, procedures and biological and psychosocial needs].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Tatiane Vegette; Araújo, Izilda Esmênia Muglia; Gallani, Maria Cecília Bueno Jayme

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive study aimed to characterize the profile of 167 subjects who were treated at the Ambulatory Surgical Center of a University Hospital in São Paulo State and procedures realized at the Ambulatory Surgical Center, as well as to identify the biological and psychosocial needs of these patients. Data were obtained through a semistructured interview and patients' files and were subject to descriptive analysis. The group was characterized by an equal number of individuals from both genders; average age was 51 years and socioeconomic levels were poor. The most common surgical and anesthetic procedures were ophthalmologic procedures and use of local anesthesia with or without sedation. The biological needs were: altered arterial pressure, electrocardiographic alterations, use of medication, allergy to medication, prolonged fasting, nausea, vomiting and pain. The psychosocial needs were: worry, fear, anxiety, discomfort caused by waiting for the realization of procedures and doubts or lack of information concerning perioperative care.

  5. Circadian pattern of ambulatory blood pressure in untreated hypertensive patients with and without metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Diana E; Hermida, Ramón C; Chayan, Luisa; Mojón, Artemio; Fontao, María J; Fernández, José R

    2009-08-01

    There is a strong association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and increased risk of end-organ damage, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cardiovascular mortality. Moreover, non-dipping (<10% decline in the asleep relative to the awake blood pressure [BP] mean) and elevated ambulatory pulse pressure (PP), among other factors related to the circadian BP pattern, have also been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This cross-sectional study investigated the circadian BP pattern in 2,045 non-diabetic untreated patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension (941 men/1,099 women), 48.7+/-11.9 yrs of age, classified by the presence or absence of MS. BP was measured by ambulatory monitoring for 48 consecutive hours to substantiate reproducibility of the dipping pattern. Physical activity was simultaneously monitored every min by wrist actigraphy to accurately calculate mean BP when awake and asleep for each subject. MS was present in 40.7% of the patients. Patients with MS were characterized by a significantly higher 24 h mean of systolic BP and a lower diastolic BP compared to patients without MS. Accordingly, ambulatory PP was significantly elevated the entire 24 h in MS patients. The prevalence of an altered non-dipper BP profile was significantly higher in MS patients (48.4 vs. 36.1% in patients without MS, p < 0.001). MS patients were characterized, among other risk factors, by significantly higher uric acid, fibrinogen, leukocyte count, hemoglobin and globular sedimentation velocity, plus lower estimated glomerular filtration rate. Apart from corroborating the significant increased prevalence of a blunted nocturnal BP decline in MS, this study documents ambulatory PP is higher in MS, without differences between groups in mean arterial pressure. This elevated PP might reflect increased arterial stiffness in MS. MS patients were also characterized by elevated values of relevant markers of cardiovascular risk, including fibrinogen and

  6. Severe cutaneous hypersensitivity to icodextrin in a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hun; Park, Hyeong Cheon; Sim, Soung Rok; Chung, Soo Jin; Kim, Ki Joong; Park, Woo Il; Hong, Soon Won; Ha, Sung Kyu

    2006-01-01

    Icodextrin, a glucose polymer, is widely used as an alternative to glucose as the osmotic agent in peritoneal dialysis (PD). We describe a case of a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient who developed severe cutaneous hypersensitivity after initiation of icodextrin PD solution. Erythematous skin lesions gradually disappeared after discontinuation of icodextrin PD solution. Although the safety and efficacy of icodextrin PD solution is well documented, clinicians should be mindful of the possibility of severe adverse cutaneous reactions to icodextrin PD solution.

  7. Recurrent bacterial peritonitis caused by Neisseria cinerea in a chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patient.

    PubMed

    George, M J; DeBin, J A; Preston, K E; Chiu, C; Haqqie, S S

    1996-10-01

    We present an unusual case of recurrent (chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis) CAPD-associated peritonitis caused by Neisseria cinerea. Using DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, we determined that the recurrent infection was caused by reinfection with a different N. cinerea strain rather than relapse with the index strain and that the probable origin of the reinfecting organism was the patient's upper respiratory tract.

  8. Ambulatory hernia surgery under local anesthesia is feasible and safe in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, A; León, J

    2010-02-01

    Ambulatory hernia surgery under local anesthesia is becoming more widely used worldwide. Although many reports include obese patients, there are no studies that report specifically on the feasibility and safety of ambulatory hernia surgery in this category of patients. This paper documents our experience in this respect. The present investigation is an observational study performed at the CRS Hernia Center, Santiago, Chile, on 510 obese and 1,521 non-obese patients with all kinds of hernias susceptible to ambulatory hernia repair under local anesthesia. Both tissue and mesh repairs were performed. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30. Patients with a BMI greater than 45 were excluded from this study. Operative time and pain experienced during the intervention were recorded. During the controls performed by a staff member at the 7th postoperative day, a questionnaire was answered by each patient regarding satisfaction, complaints, and postoperative pain. A second questionnaire was completed on the 30th postoperative day. Satisfaction and pain were both measured by means of a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS). The mean age was similar in both groups (51 years for non-obese and 52 years for obese patients). Obesity was present in 38.3% of women and in 17.5% of men (P < 0.002). Diabetes and hypertension were observed in a significantly (P < 0.004 and P < 0.02, respectively) higher proportion of obese patients. The duration of the operation on obese patients was 78 min compared with 62 min in non-obese patients (P < 0.001). Pain experienced during the intervention was significantly higher in obese patients with a VAS of 2.4 vs. in lean patients with a VAS of 2.0 (P < 0.01). At 24 h, pain was significantly higher and satisfaction significantly lower in obese patients (P < 0.007 and P < 0.0001, respectively). All other parameters were similar in both groups. At 30 days, infection was present in 0.7% of lean patients and in 2.1% of obese patients

  9. Peripheral Augmentation Index is Associated With the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in Patients With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S.; Patvardhan, Eshan A.; Karas, Richard H.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction is highly prevalent if not ubiquitous in patients with hypertension. We compared two different measures of vascular function obtained from digital volume waveforms with measures of ventricular-vascular load derived from 24-hour blood pressure (BP) recordings in patients with hypertension. Methods Digital pulsatile volume waveforms were captured via plethysmography (peripheral arterial tone, PAT) and used to derive augmentation index (a measure of ventricular-vascular coupling) and the pulse wave amplitude-reactive hyperemia index (a measure of microvascular reactivity). Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and the BP variability ratio (BPVR) were derived from 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings. Results There was a positive association between PAT-AIx and AASI (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). There was also a positive association between PAT-AIx and BPVR (r = 0.37, P < 0.05). PAT-AIx was not associated with PWA-RHI (r = -0.14, P > 0.05). PWA-RHI was not associated with AASI or BPVR (P > 0.05). Conclusions PAT-AIx is associated with ambulatory measures of vascular function and may offer clinical insight into vascular burden and cardiovascular disease risk in patients with hypertension independent of information obtained from PWA-RHI.

  10. A Pain Education Intervention for Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Inguinal Hernia Repair: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Monakshi; Watt-Watson, Judy; McGillion, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Background Inguinal hernia repair is a common ambulatory surgery after which many patients experience moderate to severe post-operative pain. Limited research has examined the effect of education interventions to reduce pain after ambulatory surgery. Purpose This trial evaluated the effectiveness of an individualized Hernia Repair Education Intervention (HREI) for patients following inguinal hernia repair. Method Pre-operatively, participants (N = 82) were randomized to either the intervention (HREI) or the usual care group. The HREI included written and verbal information regarding managing pain and two telephone support calls (before and after surgery). The primary outcome was WORST 24-h pain intensity on movement on post-operative day 2. Secondary outcomes included pain intensity at rest and movement, pain-related interference with activities, pain quality, analgesics consumed, and adverse effects at post-operative days 2 and 7. Results At day 2, the intervention group reported significantly lower scores across pain intensity outcomes, including WORST 24-h pain on movement and at rest (p < 0.001), and pain NOW on movement and at rest (p = 0.001). Conclusion These findings suggest that the HREI may improve patients' pain and function following ambulatory inguinal hernia repair. Further research should examine the effectiveness of an education intervention over a longer period of time.

  11. Skeletal muscle mass and exercise performance in stable ambulatory patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lang, C C; Chomsky, D B; Rayos, G; Yeoh, T K; Wilson, J R

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether skeletal muscle atrophy limits the maximal exercise capacity of stable ambulatory patients with heart failure. Body composition and maximal exercise capacity were measured in 100 stable ambulatory patients with heart failure. Body composition was assessed by using dual-energy X-ray absorption. Peak exercise oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and the anaerobic threshold were measured by using a Naughton treadmill protocol and a Medical Graphics CardioO2 System. VO2peak averaged 13.4 +/- 3.3 ml.min-1.kg-1 or 43 +/- 12% of normal. Lean body mass averaged 52.9 +/- 10.5 kg and leg lean mass 16.5 +/- 3.6 kg. Leg lean mass correlated linearly with VO2peak (r = 0.68, P < 0.01), suggesting that exercise performance is influences by skeletal muscle mass. However, lean body mass was comparable to levels noted in 1,584 normal control subjects, suggesting no decrease in muscle mass. Leg muscle mass was comparable to levels noted in 34 normal control subjects, further supporting this conclusion. These findings suggest that exercise intolerance in stable ambulatory patients with heart failure is not due to skeletal muscle atrophy.

  12. Effects of Payment Changes on Trends in Post-Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Buntin, Melinda Beeuwkes; Colla, Carrie Hoverman; Escarce, José J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test how the implementation of new Medicare post-acute payment systems affected the use of inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs), skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and home health agencies. Data Sources Medicare acute hospital, IRF, and SNF claims; provider of services file; enrollment file; and Area Resource File data. Study Design We used multinomial logit models to measure realized access to post-acute care and to predict how access to alternative sites of care changed in response to prospective payment systems. Data Extraction Methods A file was constructed linking data for elderly Medicare patients discharged from acute care facilities between 1996 and 2003 with a diagnosis of hip fracture, stroke, or lower extremity joint replacement. Principal Findings Although the effects of the payment systems on the use of post-acute care varied, most reduced the use of the site of care they directly affected and boosted the use of alternative sites of care. Payment system changes do not appear to have differentially affected the severely ill. Conclusions Payment system incentives play a significant role in determining where Medicare beneficiaries receive their post-acute care. Changing these incentives results in shifting of patients between post-acute sites. PMID:19490159

  13. Key drivers of patient experience in ambulatory paediatric cardiology.

    PubMed

    Allam, Shalini D; Mehta, Mary; Ben Khallouq, Bertha; Burrows, James F; Rosen, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Patient experience is becoming a central focus of healthcare. A broad range of studies on how to increase patient satisfaction ratings exists; however, they lack the specificity to adequately guide physicians and hospitals on how to improve patient experience. The objective of this study was to define the aspects of patient experience within paediatric cardiologist practices that can serve as predictors of excellent patient satisfaction. From 1 January, 2013 to 28 February, 2015 (26 months), outpatients who visited paediatric cardiologists were asked to complete a 39-question patient satisfaction survey regarding their experience. Surveys were collected over a 26-month period by Press Ganey, an independent provider of patient satisfaction surveys. Participants were asked to rate their experience on a 1-5 Likert-scale: a score of 1 demonstrated a "poor" experience, whereas a score of 5 demonstrated a "very good" experience. This retrospective study of 2468 responses determined that cheerfulness of the practice (r=0.85, p<0.001), a cohesive staff (r=0.83, p<0.001), and a care provider explaining problems and conditions (r=0.81, p<0.001) were key aspects of a paediatric cardiologist's practice that can be used as predictors of overall patient satisfaction. Awareness of how doctors can personalise a patient's experience is vital to achieve greater patient satisfaction and, ultimately, better patient outcomes.

  14. Effects of percutaneous coronary intervention on the ambulatory blood pressure of patients with hypertension and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Yang, Xuming; Liu, Wei; Cao, Tingting

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic characteristics and changing trends of ambulatory blood pressure in patients with hypertension and coronary heart disease before and after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and to determine the effects of PCI on the ambulatory blood pressure of patients with hypertension and coronary heart disease. A total of 126 patients with hypertension and unstable angina and who were hospitalized and received complete revascularization were enrolled in the study. The ambulatory blood pressure of the patients was monitored at three time points: 1-3 days before PCI (baseline), 3-6 days after PCI (1 week) and 1 month after PCI (1 month). The parameters between the time points were then compared using a t test. Each ambulatory blood pressure index after PCI was not statistically different from those before PCI (P > 0.05). However, 1 month after the PCI, all ambulatory blood pressure indices significantly decreased and statistically differed from those before PCI (P < 0.01). PCI can significantly improve the autonomic nerve function and ambulatory blood pressure indices of patients with hypertension and coronary heart disease.

  15. Real efficiency of ambulatory laser treatment at the patients with different rheumatic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidenco, Elena-Luminita; Ristache, Sanda; Belu, Luminita

    2001-06-01

    We consulted 189 patients, with different locomotory diseases: degenerative, posttraumatic and chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We followed the main clinical parameters: pain, limitation of mobility, affected function, inflammation and disorders of sensitivity. We applied an infrared LASER source of 100 mW (BTL), daily, for 5 days. The tolerance of the patients at the LASER treatment was excellent (100%). The evolution of the clinical parameters was variated, but inflammation, limitation of mobility and the affected function significantly improved (30-50%). We found a significant diminution of pain (27- 39%). We believe the LASER treatment in ambulatory conditions is essential for the function of the patients with different locomotory diseases.

  16. Post-Acute Care and ACOs — Who Will Be Accountable?

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, J Michael; Chernew, Michael E; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Landon, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine how the inclusion of post-acute evaluation and management (E&M) services as primary care affects assignment of Medicare beneficiaries to accountable care organizations (ACOs). Data Sources Medicare claims for a random 5 percent sample of 2009 Medicare beneficiaries linked to American Medical Association Group Practice data identifying provider groups sufficiently large to be eligible for ACO program participation. Study Design We calculated the fraction of community-dwelling beneficiaries whose assignment shifted, as a consequence of including post-acute E&M services, from the group providing their outpatient primary care to a different group providing their inpatient post-acute care. Principal Findings Assignment shifts occurred for 27.6 percent of 25,992 community-dwelling beneficiaries with at least one post-acute skilled nursing facility stay, and they were more common for those incurring higher Medicare spending. Those whose assignment shifted constituted only 1.3 percent of all community-dwelling beneficiaries cared for by large ACO-eligible organizations (n = 535,138), but they accounted for 8.4 percent of total Medicare spending for this population. Conclusions Under current Medicare assignment rules, ACOs may not be accountable for an influential group of post-acute patients, suggesting missed opportunities to improve care coordination and reduce inappropriate readmissions. PMID:23350910

  17. Strategies to reduce hyperthermia in ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Cox, Mary Jude; Long, William B; Winters, Kathryne L; Becker, Daniel G

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 400,000 Americans have multiple sclerosis. Worldwide, multiple sclerosis affects 2.5 million individuals. Multiple sclerosis affects two to three times as many women as men. The adverse effects of hyperthermia in patients with multiple sclerosis have been known since 1890. While most patients with multiple sclerosis experience reversible worsening of their neurologic deficits, some patients experience irreversible neurologic deficits. In fact, heat-induced fatalities have been encountered in multiple sclerosis patients subjected to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia can be caused through sun exposure, exercise, and infection. During the last 50 years, numerous strategies have evolved to reduce hyperthermia in individuals with multiple sclerosis, such as photoprotective clothing, sunglasses, sunscreens, hydrotherapy, and prevention of urinary tract infections. Hydrotherapy has become an essential component of rehabilitation for multiple sclerosis patients in hospitals throughout the world. On the basis of this positive hospital experience, hydrotherapy has been expanded through the use of compact aquatic exercise pools at home along with personal cooling devices that promote local and systemic hypothermia in multiple sclerosis patients. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America and NASA have played leadership roles in developing and recommending technology that will prevent hyperthermia in multiple sclerosis patients and should be consulted for new technological advances that will benefit the multiple sclerosis patient. In addition, products recommended for photoprotection by The Skin Cancer Foundation may also be helpful to the multiple sclerosis patient's defense against hyperthermia. Infections in the urinary tract, especially detrusor-external sphincter dyssynergia, are initially managed conservatively with intermittent self-catheterization and pharmacologic therapy. In those cases, refractory to conservative therapy, transurethral external

  18. Accuracy of patient's turnover time prediction using RFID technology in an academic ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Marchand-Maillet, Florence; Debes, Claire; Garnier, Fanny; Dufeu, Nicolas; Sciard, Didier; Beaussier, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Patients flow in outpatient surgical unit is a major issue with regards to resource utilization, overall case load and patient satisfaction. An electronic Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) was used to document the overall time spent by the patients between their admission and discharge from the unit. The objective of this study was to evaluate how a RFID-based data collection system could provide an accurate prediction of the actual time for the patient to be discharged from the ambulatory surgical unit after surgery. This is an observational prospective evaluation carried out in an academic ambulatory surgery center (ASC). Data on length of stay at each step of the patient care, from admission to discharge, were recorded by a RFID device and analyzed according to the type of surgical procedure, the surgeon and the anesthetic technique. Based on these initial data (n = 1520), patients were scheduled in a sequential manner according to the expected duration of the previous case. The primary endpoint was the difference between actual and predicted time of discharge from the unit. A total of 414 consecutive patients were prospectively evaluated. One hundred seventy four patients (42%) were discharged at the predicted time ± 30 min. Only 24% were discharged behind predicted schedule. Using an automatic record of patient's length of stay would allow an accurate prediction of the discharge time according to the type of surgery, the surgeon and the anesthetic procedure.

  19. [Influence of treatment with olmesartan on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring parameters in patients with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bregvadze, T R; Tseluĭko, V I; Mishchuk, N E

    2013-12-01

    Hypertension is the most common disease of the cardiovascular system. Active treatment of hypertension with adequate control of blood pressure (BP) can prevent complications, improve life quality and increase life expectancy. One of the interesting new antihypertensive agents, from the group of angiotensin receptor blockers is olmesartan. The obvious advantages of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to traditional one-time measurements of BP make this method perspective for quality control of anti-hypertensive therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of treatment with olmesartan on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring parameters in patients with hypertension. 38 out-patients with hypertension at the age of 25-84 years (mean 55,3±10,6) were studied. Patients received olmesartan 20 mg daily as monotherapy (20 patients (52,6%)) or in combination with other antihypertensive agents (18 patients (47,4%)). Treatment continued for 6 months. The complex examination included: measurement of office brachial BP, electrocardiography, echocardiography and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). As a result of treatment, office BP and diurnal BP, according to ABPM, significantly decreased; the favorable circadian BP profile dynamics were found: significantly less frequently observed lack of reduction in BP during night (daily index - non-dipper) - 18% vs. 64% (p <0,001), while the number of individuals with normal daily index (dipper) increased significantly - 76% vs. 28% (p <0,001). Also there was determined the significant reduction in daytime and nighttime systolic BP variability - by 1.5 mmHg and 2.1 mmHg, respectively, with the normalization of these parameters at the end of the observation period. The presented results allow conclude, that treatment of hypertensive patients with olmesartan provides significant decline not only in office BP, but also in diurnal BP, normalizes BP of active and passive periods, also - daily index and reduces BP

  20. Effects of Baroreflex Activation Therapy on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Patients With Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wallbach, Manuel; Lehnig, Luca-Yves; Schroer, Charlotte; Lüders, Stephan; Böhning, Enrico; Müller, Gerhard A; Wachter, Rolf; Koziolek, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) has been demonstrated to decrease office blood pressure (BP) in the randomized, double-blind Rheos trial. There are limited data on 24-hour BP changes measured by ambulatory BP measurements (ABPMs) using the first generation rheos BAT system suggesting a significant reduction but there are no information about the effect of the currently used, unilateral BAT neo device on ABPM. Patients treated with the BAT neo device for uncontrolled resistant hypertension were prospectively included into this study. ABPM was performed before BAT implantation and 6 months after initiation of BAT. A total of 51 patients were included into this study, 7 dropped out from analysis because of missing or insufficient follow-up. After 6 months, 24-hour ambulatory systolic (from 148 ± 17 mm Hg to 140 ± 23 mm Hg, P<0.01), diastolic (from 82 ± 13 mm Hg to 77 ± 15 mm Hg, P<0.01), day- and night-time systolic and diastolic BP (all P ≤ 0.01) significantly decreased while the number of prescribed antihypertensive classes could be reduced from 6.5 ± 1.5 to 6.0 ± 1.8 (P=0.03). Heart rate and pulse pressure remained unchanged. BAT was equally effective in reducing ambulatory BP in all subgroups of patients. This is the first study demonstrating a significant BP reduction in ABPM in patients undergoing chronically stimulation of the carotid sinus using the BAT neo device. About that BAT-reduced office BP and improved relevant aspects of ABPM, BAT might be considered as a new therapeutic option to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with resistant hypertension. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate BAT effects on ABPM in patients with resistant hypertension accurately. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Failure to follow-up test results for ambulatory patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Callen, Joanne L; Westbrook, Johanna I; Georgiou, Andrew; Li, Julie

    2012-10-01

    Serious lapses in patient care result from failure to follow-up test results. To systematically review evidence quantifying the extent of failure to follow-up test results and the impact for ambulatory patients. Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Inspec and the Cochrane Database were searched for English-language literature from 1995 to 2010. Studies which provided documented quantitative evidence of the number of tests not followed up for patients attending ambulatory settings including: outpatient clinics, academic medical or community health centres, or primary care practices. Four reviewers independently screened 768 articles. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria and reported wide variation in the extent of tests not followed-up: 6.8% (79/1163) to 62% (125/202) for laboratory tests; 1.0% (4/395) to 35.7% (45/126) for radiology. The impact on patient outcomes included missed cancer diagnoses. Test management practices varied between settings with many individuals involved in the process. There were few guidelines regarding responsibility for patient notification and follow-up. Quantitative evidence of the effectiveness of electronic test management systems was limited although there was a general trend towards improved test follow-up when electronic systems were used. Most studies used medical record reviews; hence evidence of follow-up action relied upon documentation in the medical record. All studies were conducted in the US so care should be taken in generalising findings to other countries. Failure to follow-up test results is an important safety concern which requires urgent attention. Solutions should be multifaceted and include: policies relating to responsibility, timing and process of notification; integrated information and communication technologies facilitating communication; and consideration of the multidisciplinary nature of the process and the role of the patient. It is essential that evaluations of interventions are undertaken and solutions

  2. Enhanced communication performance improvement and patient satisfaction in an endoscopy/ambulatory surgery unit.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    A nursing incentive directed toward enhanced communication, performance improvement, patient safety, and patient satisfaction was initiated by the staff nurses in an endoscopy unit of a 714-bed specialized teaching hospital. Data were collected from approximately 1,800 ambulatory patients using a hands-off communication tool. The population was evenly divided between males and females. The goals of the data collection focused on the utilization of a medical questionnaire given to patients prior to elective procedures. The purpose of this initial study was to ascertain whether the questionnaires contributed to patients' communication regarding their health record while facilitating the admission/assessment phase of undergoing an elective endoscopy procedure. The medical questionnaire also served as a patient education tool whereby staff promoted the importance of safe medication administration. The initiative will remain ongoing and future studies will monitor and identify areas needed for performance improvement, patient safety, and enhanced communication. Patient satisfaction is measured using Press Ganey results.

  3. Interior design for ambulatory care facilities: how to reduce stress and anxiety in patients and families.

    PubMed

    Frasca-Beaulieu, K

    1999-01-01

    The following article illustrates some important factors to consider when designing ambulatory care facilities (ACFs), and focuses on how wayfinding, noise control, privacy, security, color and lighting, general ambience, textures, and nature can have a profound influence on patient and family stress, consumer satisfaction, health and well-being. Other important design issues: convenience and accessibility, accommodation to various populations, consumer and family focus, patient education, image, as well as current equipment needs and future growth are examined in light of the prevailing trends in health care delivery. In sum, this feature explores the important stress-reducing and health-promoting elements involved in successful ACF design.

  4. Review of systems, physical examination, and routine tests for case-finding in ambulatory patients.

    PubMed

    Boland, B J; Wollan, P C; Silverstein, M D

    1995-04-01

    The screening value of the comprehensive review of systems and the complete physical examination in detecting unsuspected diseases for which therapeutic interventions are initiated has not been formally studied in ambulatory patients. The medical records of 100 randomly selected adult patients who had an ambulatory general medical evaluation at the Mayo Clinic in 1990-1991 were surveyed to compare review of systems and physical examination with routine laboratory tests, chest radiography, and electrocardiography as case-finding maneuvers. The main outcome measure was the therapeutic yield of each case-finding maneuver, defined as the proportion of maneuvers leading to a new therapy for a new clinically important diagnosis. The utilization rate of routine tests in the 100 patients (mean age: 59 +/- 16 years; 58% women) was high, ranging from 77 to 98%. Overall, the case-finding maneuvers led to 36 unsuspected clinically important diagnoses and resulted in 25 new therapeutic interventions. Higher therapeutic yield was observed for review of systems (7%), physical examination (5%), and lipid screening (9.2%) than for chemistry group (2.2%), complete blood count (1.8%), thyroid tests (1.5%), urinalysis (1.1%), electrocardiography (0%), or chest radiography (0%). The number of therapeutic interventions was not associated with patient's age (P = 0.55), sex (P = 0.88), comorbidity (P = 0.30) or with the time interval since the last general medical evaluation (P = 0.12). Based on therapeutic yield, these data suggest that review of systems and physical examination are valuable case-finding maneuvers in the periodic medical evaluation of ambulatory patients.

  5. Determinants of Slow Walking Speed in Ambulatory Patients Undergoing Maintenance Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifumi; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Matsuzawa, Ryota; Kutsuna, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Yoneki, Kei; Harada, Manae; Ishikawa, Ryoma; Watanabe, Takaaki; Yoshida, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Walking ability is significantly lower in hemodialysis patients compared to healthy people. Decreased walking ability characterized by slow walking speed is associated with adverse clinical events, but determinants of decreased walking speed in hemodialysis patients are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with slow walking speed in ambulatory hemodialysis patients. Subjects were 122 outpatients (64 men, 58 women; mean age, 68 years) undergoing hemodialysis. Clinical characteristics including comorbidities, motor function (strength, flexibility, and balance), and maximum walking speed (MWS) were measured and compared across sex-specific tertiles of MWS. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to examine whether clinical characteristics and motor function could discriminate between the lowest, middle, and highest tertiles of MWS. Significant and common factors that discriminated the lowest and highest tertiles of MWS from other categories were presence of cardiac disease (lowest: odds ratio [OR] = 3.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26-8.83, P<0.05; highest: OR = 2.84, 95% CI = 1.18-6.84, P<0.05), leg strength (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.40-0.95, P<0.05; OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.39-0.82, P<0.01), and standing balance (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.63-0.92, P<0.01; OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.68-0.97, P<0.05). History of fracture (OR = 3.35, 95% CI = 1.08-10.38; P<0.05) was a significant factor only in the lowest tertile. Cardiac disease, history of fracture, decreased leg strength, and poor standing balance were independently associated with slow walking speed in ambulatory hemodialysis patients. These findings provide useful data for planning effective therapeutic regimens to prevent decreases in walking ability in ambulatory hemodialysis patients.

  6. Nutritional parameters associated with prolonged hospital stay among ambulatory adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Caccialanza, Riccardo; Klersy, Catherine; Cereda, Emanuele; Cameletti, Barbara; Bonoldi, Alberto; Bonardi, Chiara; Marinelli, Maurizia; Dionigi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Background Comprehensive evaluations of the nutritional parameters associated with length of hospital stay are lacking. We investigated the association between malnutrition and length of hospital stay in a cohort of ambulatory adult patients. Methods From September 2006 to June 2009, we systematically evaluated 1274 ambulatory adult patients admitted to hospital for medical or surgical treatment. We evaluated the associations between malnutrition and prolonged hospital stay (> 17 days [> 75th percentile of distribution]) using multivariable log-linear models adjusted for several potential nutritional and clinical confounders recorded at admission and collected during and at the end of the hospital stay. Results Nutritional factors associated with a prolonged hospital stay were a Nutritional Risk Index score of less than 97.5 (relative risk [RR] 1.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–2.06) and an in-hospital weight loss of 5% or greater (RR 1.60, 95% CI 1.30–1.97). Sensitivity analysis of data for patients discharged alive and who had a length of stay of at least three days (n = 1073) produced similar findings (adjusted RR 1.51, 95% CI 1.20–1.89, for Nutritional Risk Index score < 97.5). A significant association was also found with in-hospital starvation of three or more days (RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01–1.28). Interpretation Nutritional risk at admission was strongly associated with a prolonged hospital stay among ambulatory adult patients. Another factor associated with length of stay was worsening nutritional status during the hospital stay, whose cause–effect relationship with length of stay should be clarified in intervention trials. Clinicians need to be aware of the impact of malnutrition and of the potential role of worsening nutritional status in prolonging hospital stay. PMID:20940233

  7. Ambulatory (24 h) blood pressure and arterial stiffness measurement in Marfan syndrome patients: a case control feasibility and pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Matthias; Nouri, Ghazaleh; Hametner, Bernhard; Parragh, Stephanie; Köster, Jelena; Mortensen, Kai; Schwarz, Achim; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Wassertheurer, Siegfried

    2016-05-06

    The aim of this work is the investigation of measures of ambulatory brachial and aortic blood pressure and indices of arterial stiffness and aortic wave reflection in Marfan patients. A case-control study was conducted including patients with diagnosed Marfan syndrome following Ghent2 nosology and healthy controls matched for sex, age and daytime brachial systolic blood pressure. For each subject a 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and 24 h pulse wave analysis measurement was performed. All parameters showed a circadian pattern whereby pressure dipping was more pronounced in Marfan patients. During daytime only Marfan patients with aortic root surgery showed increased pulse wave velocity. In contrast, various nighttime measurements, wave reflection determinants and circadian patterns showed a significant difference. The findings of our study provide evidence that ambulatory measurement of arterial stiffness parameters is feasible and that these determinants are significantly different in Marfan syndrome patients compared to controls in particular at nighttime. Further investigation is therefore indicated.

  8. Comparison of ambulatory blood pressure parameters of hypertensive patients with and without chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mojón, Artemio; Ayala, Diana E; Piñeiro, Luis; Otero, Alfonso; Crespo, Juan J; Moyá, Ana; Bóveda, Julia; de Lis, Jesús Pérez; Fernández, José R; Hermida, Ramón C

    2013-03-01

    There is strong association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and increased prevalence of hypertension, risk of end-organ damage, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Non-dipping, as determined by ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM), is frequent in CKD and has also been consistently associated with increased CVD risk. The reported prevalence of non-dipping in CKD is highly variable, probably due to relatively small sample sizes, reliance only on a single, low-reproducibility, 24-h ABPM evaluation per participant, and definition of daytime and nighttime periods by arbitrary fixed clock-hour spans. Accordingly, we assessed the circadian BP pattern of patients with and without CKD by 48-h ABPM to increase reproducibility of the results. This cross-sectional study involved 10 271 hypertensive patients (5506 men/4765 women), 58.0 ± 14.2 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, enrolled in the Hygia Project. Among the participants, 3227 (1925 men/1302 women) had CKD. At the time of recruitment, 568/2234 patients with/without CKD were untreated for hypertension. Patients with than without CKD were more likely to be men and of older age, have diagnoses of obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and/or obesity, plus have higher glucose, creatinine, uric acid, and triglyceride, but lower cholesterol, concentrations. In patients with CKD, ambulatory systolic BP (SBP) was significantly elevated (p < .001), mainly during the hours of nighttime sleep, independent of presence/absence of BP-lowering treatment. In patients without CKD, ambulatory diastolic BP (DBP), however, was significantly higher (p < .001), mainly during the daytime. Differing trends for SBP and DBP between groups resulted in large differences in ambulatory pulse pressure (PP), it being significantly greater (p < .001) for the entire 24 h in patients with CKD. Prevalence of non-dipping was significantly higher in patients with than without CKD (60.6% vs. 43.2%; p < .001

  9. Is walking symmetry important for ambulatory patients with spinal cord injury?

    PubMed

    Kumprou, Makamas; Amatachaya, Pipatana; Sooknuan, Thanat; Thaweewannakij, Thiwabhorn; Amatachaya, Sugalya

    2017-01-17

    To assess and compare the levels of walking symmetry in ambulatory participants with spinal cord injury (SCI) who had different degrees of lesion severity, levels of walking ability, and fall history. In addition, the study explored the relationship between the levels of walking symmetry and variables related to the ability of well-controlled walking of the participants. Cross-sectional study. Sixty-six eligible participants were assessed and interviewed for levels of walking symmetry, walking speed, functional endurance, symmetrical lower limb support ability, balance control, and fall history over the last 6 months. Participants walked asymmetrically (85%) similar to those with unilateral impairments (i.e., patients with stroke and amputee, 79-93%). The levels of walking symmetry were significantly correlated to walking speed, functional endurance and balance ability of the participants (p < 0.05). The problem and correlation were particularly apparent in those with the history of multiple falls (79%, r = 0.613-0.765, p < 0.005) Conclusions: The findings confirm problems of asymmetrical walking and the importance of walking symmetry for the ability of well-controlled walking and a risk of multiple falls in ambulatory participants with SCI. Therefore, apart from the levels of independence, the improvement of walking symmetry is crucial for these individuals. Implications for Rehabilitation: Ambulatory individuals with spinal cord injury walked asymmetrically at the same level as those with unilateral impairments such as patients with stroke and amputee. Their levels of walking symmetry were significantly related to the ability of well-controlled walking, particularly in those with the history of multiple falls. The finding confirmed the importance of walking symmetry as a crucial parameter to detect walking improvement and fall risk reduction. Apart from the levels of independence, rehabilitation professionals also need to emphasize on the improvement

  10. Ascertainment of Outpatient Visits by Patients with Diabetes: The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    PubMed Central

    Asao, Keiko; McEwen, Laura N.; Lee, Joyce M.; Herman, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To estimate and evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of providers’ diagnosis codes and medication lists to identify outpatient visits by patients with diabetes. Methods We used data from the 2006 to 2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of providers’ diagnoses and medication lists to identify patients with diabetes, using the checkbox for diabetes as the gold standard. We then examined differences in sensitivity by patients’ characteristics using multivariate logistic regression models. Results The checkbox identified 12,647 outpatient visits by adults with diabetes among the 70,352 visits used for this analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of providers’ diagnoses or listed diabetes medications were 72.3% (95% CI: 70.8% to 73.8%) and 99.2% (99.1% to 99.4%), respectively. Diabetic patients ≥75 years pf age, women, non-Hispanics, and those with private insurance or Medicare were more likely to be missed by providers’ diagnoses and medication lists. Diabetic patients who had more diagnosis codes and medications recorded, had glucose or hemoglobin A1c measured, or made office- rather than hospital-outpatient visits were less likely to be missed. Conclusions Providers’ diagnosis codes and medication lists fail to identify approximately one quarter of outpatient visits by patients with diabetes. PMID:25891975

  11. Utility of skinfold thickness measurement in non-ambulatory patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Kedoin, Chika; Ueyama, Hidetsugu; Maeda, Yasushi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ando, Yukio

    2017-01-01

    Nutritional disorders in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) worsen the medical condition. In particular, obesity is a serious problem that increases the risk of cardiomyopathy and affects nursing care. However, it is often difficult to evaluate body fatness in the advanced stages of DMD. Skinfold thickness measurement is a classical method to evaluate body fatness and is easily performed, even for bed-bound patients at home. We aimed to investigate the utility of skinfold thickness measurement in non-ambulatory DMD patients. Twenty-two patients with non-ambulatory, steroid-naive DMD ranging in age of 12-47 years were evaluated by body mass index (BMI), blood tests, measurement of triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), and abdominal computed tomography (CT) measurement of the areas of both subcutaneous and visceral fat. TSF showed good correlation with BMI (r = 0.80; p < 0.001), serum triglycerides (r = 0.67; p < 0.01), area of subcutaneous fat (r = 0.85; p < 0.0001), and area of visceral fat (r = 0.76; p < 0.0001). These results indicate the skinfold thickness measurement may be applicable as a screening tool in clinical practice where CT and magnetic resonance imaging assessment is often difficult in patients with advanced DMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index Is Higher in Hypertensive Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg; Neves, Mario Fritsch; Oigman, Wille; Bregman, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is a parameter obtained from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) that correlates with clinical endpoints. The aim of this study was to compare AASI in nondiabetic hypertensive patients with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD). Subjects with systemic arterial hypertension (SAH, n = 30) with normal renal function, aged 40 to 75 years, were compared to hypertensive patients with CKD (n = 30) presenting estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min by MDRD formula. ABPM was carried out in all patients. In CKD group, eGFR was 35.3 ± 2.8 ml/min. The mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) was similar in both groups. AASI was significantly higher in CKD group (0.45 ± 0.03 versus 0.37 ± 0.02, P < 0.05), positively correlated to age (r = 0.38, P < 0.01) and pulse pressure (r = 0.43, P < 0.01) and negatively correlated to nocturnal BP fall (r = -0.28, P = 0.03). These findings indicate the presence of stiffer vessels in CKD hypertensive patients. PMID:22675608

  13. Medication-related problem type and appearance rate in ambulatory hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Harold J; Drayer, Debra K; Muther, Richard S

    2003-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at risk for medication-related problems (MRP). The MRP number, type, and appearance rate over time in ambulatory HD patients has not been investigated. Methods Randomly selected HD patients were enrolled to receive monthly pharmaceutical care visits. At each visit, MRP were identified through review of the patient chart, electronic medical record, patient interview, and communications with other healthcare disciplines. All MRP were categorized by type and medication class. MRP appearance rate was determined as the number of MRP identified per month/number of months in study. The number of MRP per patient-drug exposures were determined using: {[(number of patients) × (mean number of medications)]/(number of months of study)} /number of MRP identified. Results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation or percentages. Results Patients were 62.6 ± 15.9 years old, had 6.4 ± 2.0 comorbid conditions, were taking 12.5 ± 4.2 medications, and 15.7 ± 7.2 doses per day at baseline. Medication-dosing problems (33.5%), adverse drug reactions (20.7%), and an indication that was not currently being treated (13.5%) were the most common MRP. 5,373 medication orders were reviewed and a MRP was identified every 15.2 medication exposures. Overall MRP appearance rate was 0.68 ± 0.46 per patient per month. Conclusion MRP continue to occur at a high rate in ambulatory HD patients. Healthcare providers taking care of HD patients should be aware of this problem and efforts to avoid or resolve MRP should be undertaken at all HD clinics. PMID:14690549

  14. Impact of an Elective Course in Community and Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practices on Student Perception of Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Michelle; Bennett, Marialice S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the impact of an elective course on students’ perception of opportunities and of their preparedness for patient care in community and ambulatory pharmacy settings. Design. Each course meeting included a lecture and discussion to introduce concepts and active-learning activities to apply concepts to patient care or practice development in a community or ambulatory pharmacy setting. Assessment. A survey was administered to students before and after the course. Descriptive statistics were used to assess student responses to survey questions, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to analyze the improvement in student responses with an alpha level set at 0.05. Students felt more prepared to provide patient care, develop or improve a clinical service, and effectively communicate recommendations to other health care providers after course completion. Conclusion. This elective course equipped students with the skills necessary to increase their confidence in providing patient care services in community and ambulatory settings. PMID:27168617

  15. Relapsing peritonitis with Bacillus cereus in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Eyð Tausen; Vang, Amanda Gratton; á Steig, Torkil; Gaini, Shahin

    2016-04-26

    We present a case where Bacillus cereus was determined to be the causative agent of relapsing peritonitis in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The patient, a 70-year-old man from the Faroe Islands, was admitted with relapsing peritonitis four times over a 3-month period. Peritoneal cultures were positive for growth of B. cereus, a rare bacterial cause of peritonitis. The cultures demonstrated susceptibility to vancomycin, and therefore the patient was treated with intraperitoneal vancomycin, intraperitoneal gentamycin and oral ciprofloxacin. As a result of the relapsing B. cereus peritonitis diagnosis and a CT scan showing contraction of the peritoneum after longstanding inflammation, the peritoneal catheter was removed and the patient converted to haemodialysis. To date, the patient has not been readmitted due to peritonitis. A lack of proper hygiene when changing the dialysis bag was the suspected source of infection with B. cereus. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Comparing venous thromboembolism prophylactic strategies for ambulatory multiple myeloma patients on immunomodulatory drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Dede, Ruth J; Pruemer, Jane M

    2016-04-01

    Patients with multiple myeloma have an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism. The risk for venous thromboembolism further increases when these patients are placed on immunomodulatory drug therapy. This study aims to determine the incidence of venous thromboembolism in patients with multiple myeloma receiving immunomodulatory drug therapy in the ambulatory setting at UC Health and to investigate adherence with guidelines developed by The National Comprehensive Cancer Network for venous thromboembolism prevention in this patient population. A retrospective chart review of patients with multiple myeloma initiated on immunomodulatory drug therapy between January 2000 and January 2014 was conducted. Sixty-two cases met inclusion criteria and were included for analysis. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines were followed in 33.9% of cases. The rate of venous thromboembolism was 4.8% in guideline adherent cases and 12.2% in guideline nonadherent cases (p = 0.65). The overall incidence of venous thromboembolism was 9.7%. No patients on a low-molecular-weight-heparin agent or warfarin developed a venous thromboembolism, 7.9% patients on aspirin therapy developed a venous thromboembolism, and 23.1% patients on no pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis developed a venous thromboembolism (p = 0.26). Ambulatory patients with multiple myeloma who are considered for immunomodulatory drug therapy should be placed on pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis based on individual venous thromboembolism and bleeding risk factors. This study identified the need for increased adherence to national guidelines for venous thromboembolism prevention in patients with multiple myeloma receiving immunomodulatory drug therapy so as to increase the quality of care provided at UC Health. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Preoperative Laboratory Testing in Patients Undergoing Elective, Low-Risk Ambulatory Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Duncan, Casey B.; Brown, Kimberly M.; Han, Yimei; Townsend, Courtney M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Routine preoperative laboratory testing for ambulatory surgery is not recommended. Methods Patients who underwent elective hernia repair (N = 73,596) were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database (2005–2010). Patterns of preoperative testing were examined. Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with testing and postoperative complications. Results A total of 46,977 (63.8%) patients underwent testing, with at least one abnormal test recorded in 61.6% of patients. In patients with no NSQIP comorbidities (N = 25,149) and no clear indication for testing, 54% received at least one test. In addition, 15.3% of tested patients underwent laboratory testing the day of the operation. In this group, surgery was done despite abnormal results in 61.6% of same day tests. In multivariate analyses, testing was associated with older age, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) class >1, hypertension, ascites, bleeding disorders, systemic steroids, and laparoscopic procedures. Major complications (reintubation, pulmonary embolus, stroke, renal failure, coma, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, septic shock, bleeding, or death) occurred in 0.3% of patients. After adjusting for patient and procedure characteristics, neither testing nor abnormal results were associated with postoperative complications. Conclusions Preoperative testing is overused in patients undergoing low-risk, ambulatory surgery. Neither testing nor abnormal results were associated with postoperative outcomes. On the basis of high rates of testing in healthy patients, physician and/or facility preference and not only patient condition currently dictate use. Involvement from surgical societies is necessary to establish guidelines for preoperative testing. PMID:22868362

  18. Post-acute crisis text messaging outreach for suicide prevention: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Berrouiguet, Sofian; Gravey, Michel; Le Galudec, Mickaël; Alavi, Zarrin; Walter, Michel

    2014-07-30

    Several post-suicide prevention strategies such as sending postcards or making phone calls have been used to keep in contact with suicide attempters. The continuity of care has been beneficial to the prevention of post-acute suicidal behaviors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and acceptability of text messaging outreach in post-acute suicide attempters. Eighteen post-suicidal patients were included in a prospective, monocentric, open-label, 2 months pilot study. The text messages were sent from the intranet program that we specially developed for the study. Technical feasibility of this text message intervention was evaluated by the analysis of text message reports. Acceptability of such intervention was evaluated by a standardized phone interview. Our study showed that receiving text messages sent from an intranet program after a suicide attempt is technically possible. This post-crisis outreach program was accepted by the patients who found it to have a positive preventive impact. Text messaging outreach offers several advantages such as lower cost, and easier utilization compared to current post-acute care strategies. We suggest further randomized controlled trials in a large sample of suicidal patients to assess the efficacy of this novel outreach tool for prevention of post-acute suicide.

  19. The You CAN campaign: teamwork training for patients and families in ambulatory oncology.

    PubMed

    Weingart, Saul N; Simchowitz, Brett; Eng, Terry Kahlert; Morway, Laurinda; Spencer, Justin; Zhu, Junya; Cleary, Christine; Korman-Parra, Janet; Horvath, Kathleen

    2009-02-01

    Health care organizations have begun to adapt high-performance teamwork training techniques from aviation to clinical environments. Oncology care is often delivered in multispecialty teams and with the patient's and family's active involvement. To examine the potential value of a patient-oriented teamwork intervention, a teamwork training initiative for oncology patients and their families was developed at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The content and format of the initiative evolved iteratively on the basis of several core team-training concepts derived from the research literature in health care and aviation. Initially a targeted intervention, the program evolved into a multifaceted campaign that included internal marketing, staff training, and one-on-one patient outreach by a group of volunteers. The You CAN campaign sought to convey a positive and empowering message that encouraged patients to (1) check for hazards in the environment, (2) ask questions of clinicians, and (3) notify staff of safety concerns. The You CAN campaignwas conducted from July through September 2007. To assess its progress, patients were surveyed at baseline and during the campaign. On the basis of the survey results, 32% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 25%-38%) of the ambulatory clinic population, or 1,145 patients, were exposed to the campaign. Although patients rated the quality of teamwork and communication favorably at both baseline and followup, there was no significant change in the self-reported use of teamwork techniques on a written survey. However, 39% (95% CI: 27%-51%) of those who were exposed to the campaign said that it changed their behavior. A training program for patients and their families is feasible in ambulatory oncology and may be applicable to other clinical settings.

  20. Improving patient experience in a pediatric ambulatory clinic: a mixed method appraisal of service delivery.

    PubMed

    Soeteman, Marijn; Peters, Vera; Busari, Jamiu O

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, customer satisfaction surveys showed that patients were unhappy with the services provided at our ambulatory clinic. In response, we performed an appraisal of our services, which resulted in the development of a strategy to reduce waiting time and improve quality of service. Infrastructural changes to our clinic's waiting room, consultation rooms, and back offices were performed, and schedules were redesigned to reduce wait time to 10 minutes and increase consultation time to 20 minutes. Our objective was to identify if this would improve 1) accessibility to caregivers and 2) quality of service and available amenities. We conducted a multi-method survey using 1) a patient flow analysis to analyze the flow of service and understand the impact of our interventions on patient flow and 2) specially designed questionnaires to investigate patients' perceptions of our wait time and how to improve our services. The results showed that 79% of our respondents were called in to see a doctor within 20 minutes upon arrival. More patients (55%) felt that 10-20 minutes was an acceptable wait time. We also observed a perceived increase in satisfaction with wait time (94%). Finally, a large number of patients (97%) were satisfied with the quality of service and with the accessibility to caregivers (94%). The majority of our patients were satisfied with the accessibility to our ambulatory clinics and with the quality of services provided. The appraisal of our operational processes using a patient flow analysis also demonstrated how this strategy could effectively be applied to investigate and improve quality of service in patients.

  1. Impact of value added services on patient waiting time at the ambulatory pharmacy Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

    PubMed

    Loh, Benjamin C; Wah, Kheng F; Teo, Carolyn A; Khairuddin, Nadia M; Fairuz, Fairenna B; Liew, Jerry E

    2017-01-01

    Value added services (VAS) are an innovative dispensing system created to provide an alternative means of collecting partial drug supply from our hospital. This in turn was projected to reduce the necessity for patient to visit pharmacy counter and thus reduce the burden of prescription handling. To evaluate the impact of increased VAS uptake following promotional campaign towards patient waiting time and to explore factors that may affect patient waiting time at the Ambulatory Pharmacy, Queen Elizabeth Hospital. A quasi experimental study design was conducted from September 2014 till June 2015 at the Ambulatory Pharmacy. During pre-intervention phase, baseline parameters were collected retrospectively. Then, VAS promotional campaign was carried out for six months and whilst this was done, the primary outcome of patient waiting time was measured by percentage of prescription served less than 30 minutes. A linear regression analysis was used to determine the impact of increased VAS uptake towards patient waiting time. An increased in percentage of VAS registration (20.9% vs 35.7%, p<0.001) was observed after the promotional campaign. The mean percentage of prescription served less than 30 minutes increased from 83.2% SD=15.9 to 90.3% SD=11.5, p=0.001. After controlling for covariates, it was found that patient waiting time was affected by number of pharmacy technicians (b=-0.0349, 95%CI-0.0548 : -0.0150, p=0.001), number of pharmacy counters (b=0.1125, 95%CI 0.0631 : 0.1620, p<0.001), number of prescriptions (b=0.0008, 95%CI 0.0004 : 0.0011, p<0.001), and number of refill prescriptions (b=0.0004, 95%CI 0.0002 : 0.0007, p<0.001). The increased in percentage of VAS registration was associated with reduction in number of refill prescription (b=-2.9838, 95%CI -4.2289 : -1.7388, p<0.001). Patient waiting time at the Ambulatory Pharmacy improved with the increased in VAS registration. The impact of increased VAS uptake on patient waiting time resulted from reduction in

  2. Improving patient experience in a pediatric ambulatory clinic: a mixed method appraisal of service delivery

    PubMed Central

    Soeteman, Marijn; Peters, Vera; Busari, Jamiu O

    2015-01-01

    Objective In 2013, customer satisfaction surveys showed that patients were unhappy with the services provided at our ambulatory clinic. In response, we performed an appraisal of our services, which resulted in the development of a strategy to reduce waiting time and improve quality of service. Infrastructural changes to our clinic’s waiting room, consultation rooms, and back offices were performed, and schedules were redesigned to reduce wait time to 10 minutes and increase consultation time to 20 minutes. Our objective was to identify if this would improve 1) accessibility to caregivers and 2) quality of service and available amenities. Design We conducted a multi-method survey using 1) a patient flow analysis to analyze the flow of service and understand the impact of our interventions on patient flow and 2) specially designed questionnaires to investigate patients’ perceptions of our wait time and how to improve our services. Results The results showed that 79% of our respondents were called in to see a doctor within 20 minutes upon arrival. More patients (55%) felt that 10–20 minutes was an acceptable wait time. We also observed a perceived increase in satisfaction with wait time (94%). Finally, a large number of patients (97%) were satisfied with the quality of service and with the accessibility to caregivers (94%). Conclusion The majority of our patients were satisfied with the accessibility to our ambulatory clinics and with the quality of services provided. The appraisal of our operational processes using a patient flow analysis also demonstrated how this strategy could effectively be applied to investigate and improve quality of service in patients. PMID:25848303

  3. Patient safety in the ambulatory setting. A clinician-based approach.

    PubMed

    Plews-Ogan, Margaret L; Nadkarni, Mohan M; Forren, Sue; Leon, Darlene; White, Donna; Marineau, Don; Schorling, John B; Schectman, Joel M

    2004-07-01

    Voluntary reporting of near misses/adverse events is an important but underutilized source of information on errors in medicine. To date, there is very little information on errors in the ambulatory setting and physicians have not traditionally participated actively in their reporting or analysis. To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of clinician-based near miss/adverse event voluntary reporting coupled with systems analysis and redesign as a model for continuous quality improvement in the ambulatory setting. We report the initial 1-year experience of voluntary reporting by clinicians in the ambulatory setting, coupled with root cause analysis and system redesign by a patient safety committee made up of clinicians from the practice. Internal medicine practice site of a large teaching hospital with 25,000 visits per year. There were 100 reports in the 1-year period, increased from 5 in the previous year. Faculty physicians reported 44% of the events versus 22% by residents, 31% by nurses, and 3% by managers. Eighty-three percent were near misses and 17% were adverse events. Errors involved medication (47%), lab or x-rays (22%), office administration (21%), and communication (10%) processes. Seventy-two interventions were recommended with 75% implemented during the study period. This model of clinician-based voluntary reporting, systems analysis, and redesign was effective in increasing error reporting, particularly among physicians, and in promoting system changes to improve care and prevent errors. This process can be a powerful tool for incorporating error reporting and analysis into the culture of medicine.

  4. Impaired autonomic nervous system activity during sleep in family caregivers of ambulatory dementia patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shihomi; Onishi, Joji; Hirai, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The number of dementia patients requiring care is rapidly increasing in Japan. Consequently, a large percentage of family members, including spouses and children of those with dementia, are assuming the role of primary caregiver. Many caregivers develop health problems including sleep disorders. Some report poor quality of sleep even when sleep duration is normal. In the present study, we used actigraphy and heart rate variability spectral analysis to assess autonomic nervous system activity and quality of sleep in family caregivers of people with ambulatory dementia. The 20 caregivers who participated in our study exhibited significantly higher levels of sympathetic nervous system activity during sleep than noncaregivers. This abnormal activity was most prominent during the first half of the sleep period and was not related to overall sleep duration. We propose that relaxation is inhibited during the first half of the sleep period in this caregiver population. This may be due to increased stress, as caregivers of people with ambulatory dementia may worry about their patients waking and wandering at night, potentially injuring themselves. Our findings indicate a need for increased support for caregivers of people with dementia, including the assessment and treatment of sleep disorders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. [Residual renal function and nutritional status in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Natasa; Lausević, Mirjana; Stojimirović, Biljana

    2005-01-01

    During the last years, an increasing number of patients with end-stage renal failure caused by various underlying diseases, all over the world, is treated by renal replacement therapy. NUTRITIONAL STATUS: Malnutrition is often found in patients affected by renal failure; it is caused by reduced intake of nutritional substances due to anorexia and dietary restrictions hormonal and metabolic disorders, comorbid conditions and loss of proteins, amino-acids, and vitamins during the dialysis procedure itself. Nutritional status significantly affects the outcome of patients on chronic dialysis treatment. Recent epiodemiological trials have proved that survival on chronic continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis program depends more on residual renal function (RRF) than on peritoneal clearances of urea and creatinine. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of RRF on common biochemical and anthropometric markers of nutrition in 32 patients with end-stage renal failure with various underlying diseases during the first 6 months on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The mean residual creatinine clearance was 8,3 ml/min and the mean RRF was 16,24 l/week in our patients at the beginning of the chronic peritoneal dialysis treatment. During the follow-up, the RRF slightly decreased, while the nutritional status of patients significantly improved. Gender and age, as well as the leading disease and peritonitis didn't influence the RRF during the first 6 months of CAPD treatment. We found several positive correlations between RRF and laboratory and anthropometric markers of nutrition during the follow-up, proving the positive influence of RRF on nutritional status of patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis.

  6. Paecilomyces variotii peritonitis in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Uzunoglu, E; Sahin, A M

    2017-03-28

    Paecilomyces variotii (P. variotii) is an extremely rare cause of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritonitis. When diagnosed, it usually portends poor prognosis. Patient's survival depends on early laboratory diagnosis and proper treatment. We herein report a P. variotii peritonitis in a patient on CAPD which is a quite rare clinical entity. Laboratory diagnosis was confirmed via both morphological analysis and DNA sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility tests were performed and interpreted according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M38-A2 guidelines. After laboratory diagnosis, the patient was treated succesfully with liposomal amphotericin B and itraconazole combination and the peritoneal catheter was removed. This case is worthy of reporting since P. variotii is an uncommon cause of peritonitis and leads to dilemmas in both laboratory diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  7. Assessing the Functional Status of Older Cancer Patients in an Ambulatory Care Visit

    PubMed Central

    Overcash, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Functional status assessment is a useful and essential component of the complete history and physical exam of the older patient diagnosed with cancer. Functional status is the ability to conduct activities that are necessary for independence and more executive activities, such as money management, cooking, and transportation. Assessment of functional status creates a portal into interpreting the health of in older persons. Understanding limitations and physical abilities can help in developing cancer treatment strategies, patient/family teaching needs, and in-home services that enhance patient/family care. This article will review the benefits of functional assessment, instruments that can be used during an ambulatory care visit, and interventions that can address potential limitations. PMID:27417801

  8. ICF Based Comprehensive Evaluation for Post-Acute Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Kwang Dong; Shin, Hyung Ik

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of the ICF for initial comprehensive evaluation of early post-acute spinal cord injury. A comprehensive evaluation of 62 early post-acute spinal cord injury (SCI) patients was conducted by rehabilitation team members, such as physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, nutritionists, medical social-workers, and nurses. They recorded each of their evaluation according to the ICF first level classification. The contents of the comprehensive evaluation were linked to the ICF second level categories, retrospectively. The linked codes were analyzed descriptively and were also compared with the brief ICF core set for early post-acute SCI. In the evaluation of early post-acute SCI patients based on the ICF first level categories, 19 items from the body functions domain, such as muscle power functions (b730) and urination functions (b620), 15 items from the body structures domain, including spinal cord and related structures (s120), 11 items from the activities and participation domain, such as transferring oneself (d420) and walking (d450), and 9 items from the environmental factors domain, e.g., health professionals (e355), were linked to the ICF second level categories. In total, 82.4% of all contents were linked to the brief ICF core set. Prognosis insight, a personal factor not linkable to an ICF code, was mentioned in 29.0% of all patients. First level ICF categories can provide a structural base for a comprehensive evaluation in early post-acute spinal cord injury. However, frequently linked items, including the brief core set, as well as personal factors should be considered via a checklist in order to prevent the omission of significant contents.

  9. ICF Based Comprehensive Evaluation for Post-Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Kwang Dong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of the ICF for initial comprehensive evaluation of early post-acute spinal cord injury. Method A comprehensive evaluation of 62 early post-acute spinal cord injury (SCI) patients was conducted by rehabilitation team members, such as physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, nutritionists, medical social-workers, and nurses. They recorded each of their evaluation according to the ICF first level classification. The contents of the comprehensive evaluation were linked to the ICF second level categories, retrospectively. The linked codes were analyzed descriptively and were also compared with the brief ICF core set for early post-acute SCI. Results In the evaluation of early post-acute SCI patients based on the ICF first level categories, 19 items from the body functions domain, such as muscle power functions (b730) and urination functions (b620), 15 items from the body structures domain, including spinal cord and related structures (s120), 11 items from the activities and participation domain, such as transferring oneself (d420) and walking (d450), and 9 items from the environmental factors domain, e.g., health professionals (e355), were linked to the ICF second level categories. In total, 82.4% of all contents were linked to the brief ICF core set. Prognosis insight, a personal factor not linkable to an ICF code, was mentioned in 29.0% of all patients. Conclusion First level ICF categories can provide a structural base for a comprehensive evaluation in early post-acute spinal cord injury. However, frequently linked items, including the brief core set, as well as personal factors should be considered via a checklist in order to prevent the omission of significant contents. PMID:23342313

  10. Survival in Mediterranean ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure. A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Frigola-Capell, Eva; Comin-Colet, Josep; Davins-Miralles, Josep; Gich-Saladich, Ignasi J; Wensing, Michel; Verdú-Rotellar, Jose M

    2013-07-01

    Scarce research has been performed in ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure in the Mediterranean area. Our aim was to describe survival trends in our target population and the impact of prognostic factors. We carried out a population-based retrospective cohort study in Catalonia (north-east Spain) of 5659 ambulatory patients (60% women; mean age 77 [10] years) with incident chronic heart failure. Eligible patients were selected from the electronic patient records of primary care practices from 2005 and were followed-up until 2007. During the follow-up period deaths occurred in 950 patients (16.8%). Survival after the onset of chronic heart failure at 1, 2, and 3 years was 90%, 80%, 69%, respectively. No significant differences in survival were found between men and women (P=.13). Cox proportional hazard modelling confirmed an increased risk of death with older age (hazard ratio=1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.07), diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio=1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-1.76), chronic kidney disease (hazard ratio=1.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.45-2.05), and ischemic heart disease (hazard ratio=1.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.36). Hypertension (hazard ratio=0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.84) had a protective effect. Service planning and prevention programs should take into consideration the relatively high survival rates found in our area and the effect of prognostic factors that can help to identify high risk patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Patients as reliable reporters of medical care process. Recall of ambulatory encounter events.

    PubMed

    Brown, J B; Adams, M E

    1992-05-01

    This study explores the reliability of a data source on the quality and content of care rarely used in studies comparing the performance of health care organizations, that is, patient reports obtained from surveys. Evidence of patient survey reliability and validity and report data on patient reporting accuracy were reviewed for ten events that may have occurred during an initial health assessment for new adult enrollees of a health maintenance organization (HMO). Reports of 380 patients obtained through telephone survey were compared with medical records. For chest radiograph, mammogram, and electrocardiogram (EKG), patient reports exhibited both sensitivity and specificity. For serum cholesterol test, patients proved to be sensitive but not specific reporters. For blood pressure measurement, stool kit, and rectal examination, false negative rates were low (less than or equal to 0.10); they were somewhat higher for breast self-examination instruction and pelvic examination (0.21 and 0.22, respectively). Only for testicular self-examination instruction did patient reports fail to confirm medical record documentation (false negative rate = 0.53). Multivariate analysis showed a small association between increasing patient age and decreasing confirmation. Gender did not affect reporting ability, and agreement did not deteriorate over a 2- to 3-month postencounter interval. Patient reports appear to merit greater use in comparative studies of technical quality of care. Key words: quality of health care; quality assurance; health care; ambulatory care; patient recall; patient reports.

  12. Complications of ambulatory major dermatological surgery in patients older than 85 years.

    PubMed

    Paradela, S; Pita-Fernández, S; Peña, C; Fernández-Jorge, B; García-Silva, J; Mazaira, M; Fonseca, E

    2010-10-01

    During the last decades, the progressive ageing of the population has resulted in a rising skin cancer incidence. Although previous studies detected no higher morbidity for dermatological surgery in senior patients, their exclusion from optimal surgical treatment remains as a common clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine the diseases treated with ambulatory major dermatological surgery, the surgical morbidity and the associated variables in ≥ 85 year-old patients. This is an observational study on 247 successive patients older than 85 years of age who underwent dermatological surgery in a single Ambulatory Mayor Surgery unit. Studied variables were age, gender, tobacco-alcohol exposure, co-morbid medical conditions, blood-thinning medication, antibiotic prophylaxis, number of lesions, location, histopathological diagnosis, area of skin removed, surgical technique, type of flap, length of surgery, entrance order, suture thread, surgical complications and need of post-operative admission. The most common site was head and neck (82.7%). The most frequent tumour was basal cell carcinoma (45.1%), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (38.7%) and melanoma (8.3%). Direct closure was the most frequent procedure (55.6%). Of the total number of patients, 7.9% of patients suffered complications; necrosis followed by cellulitis were the most frequent. Length of surgical procedure, area of skin removed and reconstruction with skin-graft were significantly related to higher risk of post-operative complications. No intra or post-surgical mortality or life-threatening local complications were detected. Most post-surgical local complications appeared after wide excisions and complex reconstruction techniques that prolonged the length of the surgery. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  13. Evaluation of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid C-reactive protein in patients with peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Kumaresan; Padmanabhan, Giri; Vijayaraghavan, Bhooma

    2016-05-01

    Severe peritonitis causing death is one of the most devastating complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since the predictive value of C-reactive protein (CRP) in PD fluid has not been assessed, the objective of the present study is to evaluate its predictive value and clinical correlation in patients on PD with peritonitis. One hundred and twenty patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) were enrolled and their serum and fluid CRP (Fl. CRP) were evaluated at the start of CAPD. All patients who developed peritonitis were further evaluated for serum and fluid CRP. The patients were categorized into four groups, namely: normal patients (control group), patients with peritonitis, patients with peritonitis leading to catheter removal, and death due to peritonitis. Sixty-five patients developed peritonitis of whom, catheter removal was performed in eight patients. Five patients died due to peritonitis-related complications. Fl. CRP showed a significant difference among the three groups, unlike S. CRP. Estimation of CRP in the peritoneal fluid may be a useful marker to monitor the onset of peritonitis.

  14. Associations between preoperative physical therapy and post-acute care utilization patterns and cost in total joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Snow, Richard; Granata, Jaymes; Ruhil, Anirudh V S; Vogel, Karen; McShane, Michael; Wasielewski, Ray

    2014-10-01

    Health-care costs following acute hospital care have been identified as a major contributor to regional variation in Medicare spending. This study investigated the associations of preoperative physical therapy and post-acute care resource use and its effect on the total cost of care during primary hip or knee arthroplasty. Historical claims data were analyzed using the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Limited Data Set files for Diagnosis Related Group 470. Analysis included descriptive statistics of patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, procedures, and post-acute care utilization patterns, which included skilled nursing facility, home health agency, or inpatient rehabilitation facility, during the ninety-day period after a surgical hospitalization. To evaluate the associations, we used bivariate and multivariate techniques focused on post-acute care use and total episode-of-care costs. The Limited Data Set provided 4733 index hip or knee replacement cases for analysis within the thirty-nine-county Medicare hospital referral cluster. Post-acute care utilization was a significant variable in the total cost of care for the ninety-day episode. Overall, 77.0% of patients used post-acute care services after surgery. Post-acute care utilization decreased if preoperative physical therapy was used, with only 54.2% of the preoperative physical therapy cohort using post-acute care services. However, 79.7% of the non-preoperative physical therapy cohort used post-acute care services. After adjusting for demographic characteristics and comorbidities, the use of preoperative physical therapy was associated with a significant 29% reduction in post-acute care use, including an $871 reduction of episode payment driven largely by a reduction in payments for skilled nursing facility ($1093), home health agency ($527), and inpatient rehabilitation ($172). The use of preoperative physical therapy was associated with a 29% decrease in the use of any post-acute care

  15. Patient cost-sharing for ambulatory neuropsychiatric services in Abu Dhabi, UAE.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Samer; Abouallaban, Yousef; Alhamad, Sultan; Meirambayeva, Aizhan

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are of high concern and burden of disease in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The aim of this study is to describe patient cost-sharing patterns, insurance coverage of ambulatory neuropsychiatric disorders, and utilization of neuropsychiatric services in Abu Dhabi. The study utilized the data published by Health Authority-Abu Dhabi (HAAD) and the American Center for Psychiatry and Neurology (ACPN) records in Abu Dhabi. The data were collected from the ACPN to describe patterns of insurance coverage and patient cost-sharing. The data included information on patient visits to the ACPN from January 1, 2010 till May 16, 2013. The data also included insurance coverage, total cost of treatment for each patient and the amount of coinsurances and deductibles paid by each patient. Additionally, the study utilized data published by HAAD on health services utilization, and health insurance plans in 2014. The percentage of total costs paid by patients and insurance were calculated by insurance groups and health service. Insurance plans with different patient cost-sharing arrangements for mental health treatment benefits were divided into three groups. ANOVA and MANOVA analyses were performed to test for differences among three categories of neuropsychiatric services (neurology, psychiatry and psychotherapy) in terms of the total costs and patient cost-sharing. The data were analysed using STATA version 12. About 36 % of the total costs on ambulatory neuropsychiatric services was paid directly by patients; 1 % of total costs was covered by patients as co-insurances and deductibles, and 63 % of total costs was covered by insurance providers. The average cost per visit was about 485 AED ($132), including 304 AED ($83) paid by insurance and 181 AED ($49) paid by patient. About 44 % of total costs was related to psychiatry services, 28 % of total costs was related to neurology services, and 28 % of total costs was related to psychotherapy services

  16. The Effect of Primary Care Provider Turnover on Patient Experience of Care and Ambulatory Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ashok; Pollack, Craig E; Asch, David A; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M

    2015-07-01

    Primary care provider (PCP) turnover is common and can disrupt patient continuity of care. Little is known about the effect of PCP turnover on patient care experience and quality of care. To measure the effect of PCP turnover on patient experiences of care and ambulatory care quality. Observational, retrospective cohort study of a nationwide sample of primary care patients in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We included all patients enrolled in primary care at the VHA between 2010 and 2012 included in 1 of 2 national data sets used to measure our outcome variables: 326,374 patients in the Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (SHEP; used to measure patient experience of care) associated with 8441 PCPs and 184,501 patients in the External Peer Review Program (EPRP; used to measure ambulatory care quality) associated with 6973 PCPs. Whether a patient experienced PCP turnover, defined as a patient whose provider (physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant) had left the VHA (ie, had no patient encounters for 12 months). Five patient care experience measures (from SHEP) and 11 measures of quality of ambulatory care (from EPRP). Nine percent of patients experienced a PCP turnover in our study sample. Primary care provider turnover was associated with a worse rating in each domain of patient care experience. Turnover was associated with a reduced likelihood of having a positive rating of their personal physician of 68.2% vs 74.6% (adjusted percentage point difference, -5.3; 95% CI, -6.0 to -4.7) and a reduced likelihood of getting care quickly of 36.5% vs 38.5% (adjusted percentage point difference, -1.1; 95% CI, -2.1 to -0.1). In contrast, PCP turnover was not associated with lower quality of ambulatory care except for a lower likelihood of controlling blood pressure of 78.7% vs 80.4% (adjusted percentage point difference, -1.44; 95% CI, -2.2 to -0.7). In 9 measures of ambulatory care quality, the difference between patients who experienced no

  17. Ultrafiltration capacity and peritoneal fluid kinetics in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Zhe, Xing-wei; Tian, Xin-kui; Cheng, Lei; Wang, Tao

    2008-01-01

    Volume control is critical for peritoneal dialysis. Although peritoneal equilibration test (PET) has been used to clarify the peritoneal membrane characteristics, it is not able to adequately predict peritoneal fluid removal and optimize appropriately the dwell time. In the present study, we applied computer simulation and performed a more detailed evaluation of the fluid kinetics in patients with different ultrafiltration (UF) capacity. Patients who used three to four exchanges of 2.27% glucose dialysate per day (poor UF capacity group), and patients who used three to four exchanges of 1.36% glucose dialysate per day (good UF capacity group) to achieve adequate amount of peritoneal fluid removal were included in the present analysis. All included patients were asked to record appropriately their dialysis exchanges for the assessment of their peritoneal fluid transport characteristics. Seventeen continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients were selected in the present study, nine in poor UF capacity group and eight in good UF capacity group. Patients in poor UF capacity group had significantly higher daily glucose exposure, higher dialysate-to-plasma ratio of creatinine (D/P creatinine) values, and higher peritoneal fluid absorption rate, K(e), as compared to patients with good UF capacity. Our results suggest that patients with poor UF capacity have significant higher peritoneal small solute transport rate, and more importantly, higher peritoneal fluid absorption rate as compared to patients with good UF capacity.

  18. Close association of vascular and valvular calcification and prognosis of patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Gen, Shikou; Inoue, Tsutomu; Nodaira, Yuka; Ikeda, Naofumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Nakamoto, Hidetomo; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the association between vascular and valvular calcification and the prognosis of patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Data were collected from the records of patients introduced onto CAPD therapy during 1999 - 2006 at the Department of Nephrology, Saitama Medical University. At the start of CAPD, cardiac and vascular echography were used to examine 162 patients (average age: 56 +/- 5 years; 58 men, 104 women; 43 with and 119 without diabetes) for evaluation of vascular and valvular calcification. Both vascular and valvular calcification were found in 32 patients. Vascular calcification was found in 16, and valvular calcification in 11. Over 5 years, 11 patients suffered from cardiovascular disease (7 with stroke, 4 with myocardial infarction). All of these patients had vascular or valvular calcification at the start of CAPD therapy. We also used Cox hazard analysis to examine values for Ca, P, Ca x P, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and lipids. None of these values were independent contributory factors for incidence of cardiovascular disease in patients on CAPD. These data suggest the importance of vascular and valvular echography to evaluate patients on CAPD, especially at the start of CAPD therapy. Vascular and valvular calcification are important factors for determining the prognosis of patients on CAPD.

  19. Risk Stratification of Ambulatory Patients with Advanced Heart Failure Undergoing Evaluation for Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tomoko S.; Stevens, Gerin R; Jiang, Jeffrey; Schulze, P. Christian; Gukasyan, Natalie; Lippel, Matthew; Levin, Alison; Homma, Shunichi; Mancini, Donna; Farr, Maryjane

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk stratification of ambulatory heart failure (HF) patients has relied upon peak VO2 (pVO2) <14 mL/min/kg. We investigated whether additional clinical variables might further specify risk of death, ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation (INTERMACS<4) or heart transplantation (HTx; Status 1A or 1B) within one-year after HTx evaluation. We hypothesized that right ventricular stroke work index (RVSWI), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) and the Model for End-stage Liver Disease-Albumin score (MELD-A) would be additive prognostic predictors. Methods We retrospectively collected data on 151 ambulatory patients undergoing HTx evaluation. Primary outcomes were defined as HTx, LVAD or death within one-year following evaluation. Results Our cohort was 54.9±11.1 year-old, 79.1% male, 37.6% with ischemic etiology (LVEF 21±11% and pVO2 12.6±3.5ml/min/kg). Fifty outcomes (33.1%) occurred (27 HTx, 15 VAD, and 8 deaths). Univariate logistic regression showed significant association of RVSWI (mmHg-L/m2) (OR0.47, p=0.036), PCWP (mmHg) (OR2.65, p=0.007), and MELD-A (OR2.73, p=0.006) with one-year events. Stepwise regression showed independent correlation of RVSWI<5 (OR6.70; p<0.01), PCWP>20 (OR5.48; p<0.01), MELD-A>14 (OR3.72; p<0.01) and pVO2<14 (OR3.36; p=0.024) with one-year events. A scoring system was composed with MELD-A>14 and pVO2<14, 1 point each, and PCWP>20 and RVSWI<5, 2 points each. A cutoff at 4 demonstrated a 54% sensitivity and 88% specificity for one-year events. Conclusions Ambulatory HF patients have significant one-year event rates. Risk stratification based on exercise performance, left-sided congestion, right ventricular dysfunction and liver congestion allows prediction of one-year prognosis. This study endorses early and timely referral for VAD and/or transplant. PMID:23415315

  20. The Effect of Primary Care Provider Turnover on Patient Experience of Care and Ambulatory Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ashok; Pollack, Craig E.; Asch, David A.; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Primary care provider (PCP) turnover is common and can disrupt patient continuity of care. Little is known about the effect of PCP turnover on patient care experience and quality of care. OBJECTIVE To measure the effect of PCP turnover on patient experiences of care and ambulatory care quality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational, retrospective cohort study of a nationwide sample of primary care patients in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We included all patients enrolled in primary care at the VHA between 2010 and 2012 included in 1 of 2 national data sets used to measure our outcome variables: 326 374 patients in the Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (SHEP; used to measure patient experience of care) associated with 8441 PCPs and 184 501 patients in the External Peer Review Program (EPRP; used to measure ambulatory care quality) associated with 6973 PCPs. EXPOSURES Whether a patient experienced PCP turnover, defined as a patient whose provider (physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant) had left the VHA (ie, had no patient encounters for 12 months). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Five patient care experience measures (from SHEP) and 11 measures of quality of ambulatory care (from EPRP). RESULTS Nine percent of patients experienced a PCP turnover in our study sample. Primary care provider turnover was associated with a worse rating in each domain of patient care experience. Turnover was associated with a reduced likelihood of having a positive rating of their personal physician of 68.2% vs 74.6% (adjusted percentage point difference, −5.3; 95% CI, −6.0 to −4.7) and a reduced likelihood of getting care quickly of 36.5% vs 38.5% (adjusted percentage point difference, −1.1; 95% CI, −2.1 to −0.1). In contrast, PCP turnover was not associated with lower quality of ambulatory care except for a lower likelihood of controlling blood pressure of 78.7% vs 80.4% (adjusted percentage point difference, −1.44; 95

  1. More Daytime Sleeping Predicts Less Functional Recovery Among Older People Undergoing Inpatient Post-Acute Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Cathy A.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Webber, Adam P.; Alam, Tarannum; Littner, Michael R.; Harker, Judith O.; Josephson, Karen R.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To study the association between sleep/wake patterns among older adults during inpatient post-acute rehabilitation and their immediate and long-term functional recovery Design: Prospective, observational cohort study Setting: Two inpatient post-acute rehabilitation sites (one community and one Veterans Administration) Participants: Older patients (aged ≥ 65 years, N = 245) admitted for inpatient post-acute rehabilitation Interventions: None Measurements and Results: Based on 7-day wrist actigraphy during the rehabilitation stay, mean nighttime percent sleep was only 52.2% and mean daytime percent sleep was 15.8% (16.3% based on structured behavioral observations). Using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), participants reported their sleep was worse during rehabilitation compared to their premorbid sleep. Functional recovery between admission and discharge from rehabilitation (measured by the motor component of the Functional Independence Measure) was not significantly associated with reported sleep quality (PSQI scores) or actigraphically measured nighttime sleep. However, more daytime percent sleep (estimated by actigraphy and observations) during the rehabilitation stay was associated with less functional recovery from admission to discharge, even after adjusting for other significant predictors of functional recovery (mental status, hours of rehabilitation therapy received, rehospitalization, and reason for admission; adjusted R2 = 0.267, P < 0.0001). More daytime sleeping during rehabilitation remained a significant predictor of less functional recovery in adjusted analyses at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions: Sleep disturbance is common among older people undergoing inpatient post-acute rehabilitation. These data suggest that more daytime sleeping during the rehabilitation stay is associated with less functional recovery for up to three months after admission for rehabilitation. Citation: Alessi CA; Martin JL; Webber AP; Alam T

  2. Echocardiographic Assessment of Pulmonary Artery Systolic Pressure and Outcomes in Ambulatory Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P.; Siwamogsatham, Sarawut; Hayek, Salim; Li, Song; Deka, Anjan; Marti, Catherine N.; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V.; Butler, Javed

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with worse outcomes and is rapidly being recognized as a therapeutic target. To facilitate pragmatic research efforts, data regarding the prognostic importance of noninvasively assessed pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) in stable ambulatory patients with HF are needed. Methods and Results We examined the association between echocardiographic PASP and outcomes in 417 outpatients with HF (age, 54±13 years; 60.7% men; 50.4% whites; 24.9% with preserved ejection fraction). Median PASP was 36 mm Hg (interquartile range [IQR]: 29, 46). After a median follow‐up of 2.6 years (IQR: 1.7, 3.9) there were 72 major events (57 deaths; 9 urgent heart transplants; and 6 ventricular assist device implantations) and 431 hospitalizations for HF. In models adjusting for clinical risk factors and therapy, a 10‐mm Hg higher PASP was associated with 37% higher risk (95% CI: 18, 59; P<0.001) for major events, and 11% higher risk (95% CI: 1, 23; P=0.039) for major events or HF hospitalization. The threshold that maximized the likelihood ratio for both endpoints was 48 mm Hg; those with PASP ≥48 mm Hg (N=84; 20.1%) had an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.33 (95% CI: 1.96, 5.65; P<0.001) for major events and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.11; P=0.037) for major events or HF hospitalization. Reduced right ventricular systolic function had independent prognostic utility over PASP for adverse outcomes. Right atrial pressure and transtricuspid gradient both contributed to risk. Conclusions Elevated PASP, determined by echocardiography, identifies ambulatory patients with HF at increased risk for adverse events. PMID:24492947

  3. Decreasing patient length of stay via new flexible exam room allocation policies in ambulatory care clinics.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Vahab; Griffin, Jacqueline; Stahl, James E

    2017-08-09

    To address prolonged lengths of stay (LOS) in ambulatory care clinics, we analyze the impact of implementing flexible and dynamic policies for assigning exam rooms to providers. In contrast to the traditional approaches of assigning specific rooms to each provider or pooling rooms among all practitioners, we characterize the impact of alternate compromise policies that have not been explored in previous studies. Since ambulatory care patients may encounter multiple different providers in a single visit, room allocation can be determined separately for each encounter accordingly. For the first phase of the visit, conducted by the medical assistant, we define a dynamic room allocation policy that adjusts room assignments based on the current state of the clinic. For the second phase of the visit, conducted by physicians, we define a series of room sharing policies which vary based on two dimensions, the number of shared rooms and the number of physicians sharing each room. Using a discrete event simulation model of an outpatient cardiovascular clinic, we analyze the benefits and costs associated with the proposed room allocation policies. Our findings show that it is not necessary to fully share rooms among providers in order to reduce patient LOS and physician idle time. Instead, most of the benefit of pooling can be achieved by implementation of a compromise room allocation approach, limiting the need for significant organizational changes within the clinic. Also, in order to achieve most of the benefits of room allocation policies, it is necessary to increase flexibility in the two dimensions simultaneously. These findings are shown to be consistent in settings with alternate patient scheduling and distinctions between physicians.

  4. Comparative Study on Trace Element Excretions between Nonanuric and Anuric Patients Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Siyun; Yao, Ying; Wan, Yunan; Liang, Wangqun; Meng, Ruiwei; Jin, Qiman; Wu, Nannan; Xu, Fangyi; Ying, Chenjiang; Zuo, Xuezhi

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have been reported on alterations of trace elements (TE) in peritoneal dialysis patients. Our objective was to investigate and assess the characteristics of daily TE excretions in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. This cross-sectional study included 61 CAPD patients (nonanuric/anuric: 45/16) and 11 healthy subjects in Wuhan, China between 2013 and 2014. The dialysate and urine of patients and urine of healthy subjects were collected. The concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and arsenic (As) in dialysate and urine were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Various clinical variables were obtained from automatic biochemical analyzer. Daily Cu, Zn, Se, and Mo excretions in nonanuric patients were higher than healthy subjects, while arsenic excretion in anuric patients was lower. A strong and positive correlation was observed between Se and Mo excretion in both dialysate (β = 0.869, p < 0.010) and urine (β = 0.968, p < 0.010). Furthermore, the clinical variables associated with Se excretion were found to be correlated with Mo excretion. Our findings indicated that nonanuric CAPD patients may suffer from deficiency of some essential TEs, while anuric patients are at risk of arsenic accumulation. A close association between Se and Mo excretion was also found. PMID:27999390

  5. [Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (CABPM): clinical characteristics of 31,530 patients].

    PubMed

    Sierra, Cristina; De la Sierra, Alejandro; Sobrino, Javier; Segura, Julián; Banegas, José Ramón; Gorostidi, Manuel; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2007-06-02

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in hypertensive patients. This study reports the clinical characteristics of 31,530 patients included in the Spanish Registry of ABPM. A total number of 767 investigators recruited patients with suspected or confirmed hypertension to whom an ABPM was indicated with a validated device and included them in the study. Mean blood pressures from daytime, nighttime, and the whole 24-hour period were all measured. Circadian patterns were defined depending on nocturnal systolic blood pressure fall: extreme dipper (> 20%), dipper (10%-20%), non-dipper (< 10%) and riser (nocturnal blood pressure increase). 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure values were lower than those obtained at the office. Twenty percent of patients exhibited elevated office blood pressure with normal values on ABPM ( hypertensives or false resistant) whereas 9% showed increased values on ABPM, but normal at the office (masked hypertension). The non-dipper or riser circadian patterns were present in more than half of the patients (40.2% and 13.4%, respectively) and were associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Almost one third of hypertensive patients exhibit blood pressure values that are not concordant between office and ABPM. More than a half of patients, especially those at higher risk, present a circadian pattern with an inadequate nocturnal blood pressure fall.

  6. Severe "sweet" pleural effusion in a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Maude, Rapeephan R; Barretti, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hydrothorax is a rare complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) which can progress quickly to cause acute respiratory distress. We present a 76 year-old female with a past medical history significant for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on daily home peritoneal dialysis for 2 years presented to the hospital from home with shortness of breath at rest and cough for 2 days prior to admission. She developed severe respiratory distress and had emergent pleurocentesis that released 3.8 L of pleural fluid. The analysis showed significantly high sugar indicative of hydrothorax from CAPD. She underwent thoracotomy with pleurodesis and switched to hemodialysis for 6 weeks before resuming CAPD. A high glucose concentration in the pleural fluid is pathognomonic for hydrothorax from dialysis fluid after rule out other possible causes of pleural effusion. Patients who are on CAPD presenting with marked pleural effusion should prompt clinicians to consider the differential diagnosis of pleuroperitoneal communications.

  7. [Differences between office and ambulatory control of hypertension in very elderly patients. The CARDIORISC - MAPAPRES project].

    PubMed

    Llisterri, José L; Alonso, Francisco J; Gorostidi, Manuel; Sierra, Cristina; de La Sierra, Alejandro; Banegas, José R; Segura, Julián; Sobrino, Javier; De La Cruz, Juan J; Madruga, Felipe; Aranda, Pedro; Redon, Josep; Ruilope, Luis M

    2009-11-28

    Hypertension is highly prevalent in the very elderly. We studied control rates of hypertension according to clinic blood pressure (BP) and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) in treated hypertensives aged > or =80 years. Data came from the Spanish Society of Hypertension ABPM Registry (CARDIORISC - MAPAPRES project), which comprises a nation-wide network of more than 1,000 physicians sending standardized ABPM registries via web. Between June 2004 and April 2007 we obtained a 33.829-patient database. Control of hypertension was defined at the clinic when office BP was <140/90mmHg and at the ABPM when mean BP during the 24-h period was <130/80mmHg. We identified 2,311 patients (6.8%) aged > or =80 years. Mean age (SD) was 83.1 (3.2) years and 63% were women. Control of clinic BP was observed in 21.5% of cases (95%CI: 19.1-23.9) and control of 24-h BP in ABPM was 42.1% (95%CI: 39.7-45.3). Prevalence of masked hypertension was 7.0% (95%CI: 6.0-8.0) and prevalence of office-resistant control (white coat) was 27.6% (95% CI: 25.7-29.4). Diabetes, kidney disease, and duration of hypertension were associated with lack of control in ABPM. In very old hypertensives, control of clinic BP was 21.5% but ambulatory-based hypertension control was 42.1%. Physicians should be aware that the likelihood of misestimating BP control is high in these subjects. A wider use of ABPM in the elderly with hypertension should be considered.

  8. Post-acute surgical ward round proforma improves documentation.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahrouqi, Haitham; Oumer, Ramadan; Tapper, Richard; Roberts, Ross

    2013-01-01

    In health care, record keeping of doctor-patient encounters is vital for quality patient care and medico-legal reasons. We audited the documentation of post-acute consultant ward round (PACWR) in our department before and six months after an introduction of a proforma (standard form). The clinical notes of all patients admitted acutely under General Surgery over a period of one week before and one week after the introduction of a proforma were reviewed to note whether time and date, signature, impression and dietary plan were documented after PACWR. The nurses were also surveyed on the day of the PACWR for their certainty regarding the dietary plan of their patients and whether they had to contact the surgical team for clarification. There were 108 and 103 patients eligible for the first and second study periods respectively. After the introduction of the proforma, there was a statistically significant improvement in the documentation of time and date (37% vs. 72%, p-value < 0.01) and impression (40% vs. 61%, p-value < 0.01). Improvement in the documentation of the dietary plan reached statistical significant only when the analysis was restricted to the cases where a proforma was filled out (78 out of 103 patients). Introduction of the proforma had no statistically significant impact on the nurses' certainty regarding their patients' dietary plan and the number of times they had to contact the surgical teams. In conclusion, PACWR proforma improves overall documentation. This will help in avoiding adverse effects on patient care and medico-legal ramifications.

  9. Clinical features of 8295 patients with resistant hypertension classified on the basis of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Segura, Julián; Banegas, José R; Gorostidi, Manuel; de la Cruz, Juan J; Armario, Pedro; Oliveras, Anna; Ruilope, Luis M

    2011-05-01

    We aimed to estimate the prevalence of resistant hypertension through both office and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in a large cohort of treated hypertensive patients from the Spanish Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry. In addition, we also compared clinical features of patients with true or white-coat-resistant hypertension. In December 2009, we identified 68 045 treated patients with complete information for this analysis. Among them, 8295 (12.2% of the database) had resistant hypertension (office blood pressure ≥140 and/or 90 mm Hg while being treated with ≥3 antihypertensive drugs, 1 of them being a diuretic). After ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, 62.5% of patients were classified as true resistant hypertensives, the remaining 37.5% having white-coat resistance. The former group was younger, more frequently men, with a longer duration of hypertension and a worse cardiovascular risk profile. The group included larger proportions of smokers, diabetics, target organ damage (including left ventricular hypertrophy, impaired renal function, and microalbuminuria), and documented cardiovascular disease. Moreover, true resistant hypertensives exhibited in a greater proportion a riser pattern (22% versus 18%; P<0.001). In conclusion, this study first reports the prevalence of resistant hypertension in a large cohort of patients in usual daily practice. Resistant hypertension is present in 12% of the treated hypertensive population, but among them more than one third have normal ambulatory blood pressure. A worse risk profile is associated with true resistant hypertension, but this association is weak, thus making it necessary to assess ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for a correct diagnosis and management.

  10. [Left ventricular dysfunction measured in diabetic patients with chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Arrieta, Gustavo; Mendoza-Hernández, María Elsa; Pacheco-Aranda, Erika; Rivas-Duro, Miguel; Robles-Parra, Héctor Manuel; Espinosa-Vázquez, Raúl Arturo; Hernández-Cabrera, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    In diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) treated with dialysis, the diastolic and systolic left ventricular dysfunction is frequent. The aim was to assess by echocardiography the prevalence of diastolic and systolic ventricular dysfunction in diabetic patients with CRF treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Sixty diabetic patients with CRF in CAPD were studied. The mean age was 54.5 +/- 12 years (27-78 years). The left ventricular filling pattern (LVFP) as a diastolic function parameter and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) as a systolic function parameter were measured by transthoracic echocardiography. Descriptive statistical analysis was used. 27 (45 %) patients were women and 33 (55 %) were men. In 55 (91.7 %) left ventricular concentric hypertrophy was observed. Fifty-two patients (86.7 %) showed LVFP type I; three (5 %) had the type II; two (3.3 %) showed pseudonormal pattern and three (5 %) had a normal LVFP. The LVEF was 0.63 +/- 0.09 (CI = 0.41-0.82). Forty nine (81.7 %) patients had LVEF equal or greater than 0.55. The prevalence of diastolic left ventricular dysfunction was 95 % and the prevalence of systolic left ventricular dysfunction was 18.3%.

  11. Low level of self-reported physical activity in ambulatory patients new to dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Kirsten L.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Kutner, Nancy G.; Dalrymple, Lorien S.; Grimes, Barbara A.; Kaysen, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Physical inactivity contributes to the frailty and the decline in function that develops over time among patients with end-stage renal disease. We assessed physical activity among 1547 ambulatory patients new to dialysis in the United States Renal Data System Comprehensive Dialysis Study. We used a self-reporting Human Activity Profile that included Maximal and Adjusted Activity Scores and compared results to established norms by age and gender. Physical activity was found to be extremely low with scores for all age and gender categories below the 5th percentile of healthy individuals and 95% of patients had scores consonant with low fitness. Older age, female gender, diabetes, atherosclerotic disease, and a low level of education were associated with lower activity scores assessed by univariate and multivariable linear regression analysis. Higher serum albumin, creatinine, and lower body mass index, but not hemoglobin levels, were associated with greater physical activity. By multivariable analysis, patients on hemodialysis using a catheter reported lower levels of physical activity compared to those on peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis using an arteriovenous fistula, or with a graft. Lower Maximal and Adjusted Activity Scores were associated with poor physical function and mental health. Hence, physical activity is distressingly low among patients new to dialysis. Thus, strategies to enhance activity in these patients should be explored. PMID:20811334

  12. Oral intake and serum levels of ascorbic acid in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, S L; Lee, E J; Myint, C C; Ong, K T; Tay, M E; Yusuf, N; Ong, C N

    2001-01-01

    Oral intake of ascorbic acid is essential for optimum health in human beings. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients have an increased need for ascorbic acid, because of increased loss through dialysate, reduced intake owing to nausea and loss of appetite, and increased oxidative stress. However, optimum intake is still controversial. We studied 50 clinically stable patients to determine the relationship between oral ascorbic acid intake and serum ascorbic acid (SAA) level. Total oral intake ranged from 28 mg daily to 412 mg daily. Only one patient had an oral intake of ascorbic acid below 60 mg per day. The SAA levels ranged from 1 mg/L to 36.17 mg/L. Although a strong correlation existed between intake and SAA (p < 0.001, R2 = 0.47), the variation in SAA at any given intake level was wide. Of the studied patients, 62% had an SAA < 8.7 mg/L, 40% had an SAA < 5.1 mg/L (below the level in a healthy population), and 12% had a level below 2 mg/L (scorbutic). None of the patients demonstrated clinical manifestations of scurvy. Our results show that, in CAPD patients, ascorbic acid deficiency can be reliably detected only with SAA measurements, and oral intake may influence SAA level. To maintain ascorbic acid in the normal range for healthy adults, daily oral intake needs to be increased above the U.S. recommended dietary allowance to 80-140 mg.

  13. Compliance assessment of ambulatory Alzheimer patients to aid therapeutic decisions by healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Compliance represents a major determinant for the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy. Compliance reports summarising electronically compiled compliance data qualify healthcare needs and can be utilised as part of a compliance enhancing intervention. Nevertheless, evidence-based information on a sufficient level of compliance is scarce complicating the interpretation of compliance reports. The purpose of our pilot study was to determine the compliance of ambulatory Alzheimer patients to antidementia drugs under routine therapeutic use using electronic monitoring. In addition, the forgiveness of donepezil (i.e. its ability to sustain adequate pharmacological response despite suboptimal compliance) was characterised and evidence-based guidance for the interpretation of compliance reports was intended to be developed. Methods We determined the compliance of four different antidementia drugs by electronic monitoring in 31 patients over six months. All patients were recruited from the gerontopsychiatric clinic of a university hospital as part of a pilot study. The so called medication event monitoring system (MEMS) was employed, consisting of a vial with a microprocessor in the lid which records the time (date, hour, minute) of every opening. Daily compliance served as primary outcome measure, defined as percentage of days with correctly administered doses of medication. In addition, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of donepezil were simulated to systematically assess therapeutic undersupply also incorporating study compliance patterns. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS and Microsoft Excel. Results Median daily compliance was 94% (range 48%-99%). Ten patients (32%) were non-compliant at least for one month. One-sixth of patients taking donepezil displayed periods of therapeutic undersupply. For 10 mg and 5 mg donepezil once-daily dosing, the estimated forgiveness of donepezil was 80% and 90% daily compliance or two and one dosage omissions at

  14. The Rules of Engagement: Perspectives on Secure Messaging From Experienced Ambulatory Patient Portal Users.

    PubMed

    Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; Schnierle, Jeanette; Florian, Hannah; Agarwal, Aradhna; Rundell, Kristen; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-07-04

    Patient portals have shown promise in engaging individuals in self-management of chronic conditions by allowing patients to input and track health information and exchange secure electronic messages with their providers. Past studies have identified patient barriers to portal use including usability issues, low health literacy, and concerns about loss of personal contact as well as provider concerns such as increased time spent responding to messages. However, to date, studies of both patient and provider perspectives on portal use have focused on the pre-implementation or initial implementation phases and do not consider how these issues may change as patients and providers gain greater experience with portals. Our study examined the following research question: Within primary care offices with high rates of patient-portal use, what do experienced physician and patient users of the ambulatory portal perceive as the benefits and challenges of portal use in general and secure messaging in particular? This qualitative study involved 42 interviews with experienced physician and patient users of an ambulatory patient portal, Epic's MyChart. Participants were recruited from the Department of Family Medicine at a large Academic Medical Center (AMC) and included providers and their patients, who had been diagnosed with at least one chronic condition. A total of 29 patients and 13 primary care physicians participated in the interviews. All interviews were conducted by telephone and followed a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed verbatim to permit rigorous qualitative analysis. Both inductive and deductive methods were used to code and analyze the data iteratively, paying particular attention to themes involving secure messaging. Experienced portal users discussed several emergent themes related to a need for greater clarity on when and how to use the secure messaging feature. Patient concerns included worry about imposing on their physician's time

  15. The Rules of Engagement: Perspectives on Secure Messaging From Experienced Ambulatory Patient Portal Users

    PubMed Central

    Schnierle, Jeanette; Florian, Hannah; Agarwal, Aradhna; Rundell, Kristen; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-01-01

    Background Patient portals have shown promise in engaging individuals in self-management of chronic conditions by allowing patients to input and track health information and exchange secure electronic messages with their providers. Past studies have identified patient barriers to portal use including usability issues, low health literacy, and concerns about loss of personal contact as well as provider concerns such as increased time spent responding to messages. However, to date, studies of both patient and provider perspectives on portal use have focused on the pre-implementation or initial implementation phases and do not consider how these issues may change as patients and providers gain greater experience with portals. Objective Our study examined the following research question: Within primary care offices with high rates of patient-portal use, what do experienced physician and patient users of the ambulatory portal perceive as the benefits and challenges of portal use in general and secure messaging in particular? Methods This qualitative study involved 42 interviews with experienced physician and patient users of an ambulatory patient portal, Epic’s MyChart. Participants were recruited from the Department of Family Medicine at a large Academic Medical Center (AMC) and included providers and their patients, who had been diagnosed with at least one chronic condition. A total of 29 patients and 13 primary care physicians participated in the interviews. All interviews were conducted by telephone and followed a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed verbatim to permit rigorous qualitative analysis. Both inductive and deductive methods were used to code and analyze the data iteratively, paying particular attention to themes involving secure messaging. Results Experienced portal users discussed several emergent themes related to a need for greater clarity on when and how to use the secure messaging feature. Patient concerns included worry

  16. Poor Self-Reported Sleep Quality Predicts Mortality within One Year of Inpatient Post-Acute Rehabilitation among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Fiorentino, Lavinia; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the association between self-reported sleep quality among older adults during inpatient post-acute rehabilitation and one-year survival. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Two inpatient post-acute rehabilitation sites (one community and one Veterans Administration). Participants: Older patients (aged ≥ 65 years, n = 245) admitted for inpatient post-acute rehabilitation. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Within one year of post-acute rehabilitation, 57 participants (23%) were deceased. Cox proportional hazards models showed that worse Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) total scores during the post-acute care stay were associated with increased mortality risk when controlling for amount of rehabilitation therapy received, comorbidities, and cognitive functioning (Hazard ratio [95% CI] = 1.11 [1.02-1.20]). Actigraphically estimated sleep was unrelated to mortality risk. Conclusions: Poorer self-reported sleep quality, but not objectively estimated sleep parameters, during post-acute rehabilitation was associated with shorter survival among older adults. This suggests self-reported poor sleep may be an important and potentially modifiable risk factor for negative outcomes in these vulnerable older adults. Studies of interventions to improve sleep quality during inpatient rehabilitation should therefore be undertaken, and the long-term health benefits of improved sleep should be explored. Citation: Martin JL; Fiorentino L; Jouldjian S; Mitchell M; Josephson KR; Alessi CA. Poor self-reported sleep quality predicts mortality within one year of inpatient post-acute rehabilitation among older adults. SLEEP 2011;34(12):1715-1721. PMID:22131610

  17. [Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a useful tool for all patients].

    PubMed

    de la Sierra, A

    Clinical blood pressure measurement (BP) is an occasional and imperfect way of estimating this biological variable. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is by far the best clinical tool for measuring an individual's blood pressure. Mean values over 24h, through the daytime and at night all make it more possible to predict organic damage and the future development of the disorder. ABPM enables the detection of white-coat hypertension and masked hypertension in both the diagnosis and follow-up of treated patients. Although some of the advantages of ABPM can be reproduced by more automated measurement without the presence of an observer in the clinic or self-measurement at home, there are some other elements of great interest that are unique to ABPM, such as seeing what happens to a patient's BP at night, the night time dipping pattern and short-term variability, all of which relate equally to the patient's prognosis. There is no scientific or clinical justification for denying these advantages, and ABPM should form part of the evaluation and follow-up of practically all hypertensive patients. Rather than continuing unhelpful discussions as to its availability and acceptability, we should concentrate our efforts on ensuring its universal availability and clearly explaining its advantages to both doctors and patients.

  18. Service quality and patient experiences of ambulatory care in a specialized clinic vs. a general hospital.

    PubMed

    De Regge, Melissa; De Groote, Hélène; Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Brugada, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    Health care organizations are constantly looking for ways to establish a differential advantage to attract customers. To this end, service quality has become an important differentiator in the strategy of health care organizations. In this study, we compared the service quality and patient experience in an ambulatory care setting of a physician-owned specialized facility with that of a general hospital. A comparative case study with a mixed method design was employed. Data were gathered through a survey on health service quality and patient experience, completed with observations, walkthroughs, and photographic material. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both the investigated health care facilities. A significant distinction can be made between the two facilities in terms of interpersonal quality (p = 0.001) and environmental quality (P ≤ 0.001), in favor of the medical center. The difference in environmental quality is also indicated by the scores given by participants who had been in both facilities. Qualitative analysis showed higher administrative quality in the medical center. Environmental quality and patient experience can predict the interpersonal quality; for environmental quality, interpersonal quality and age are significant predictors. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both facilities. The medical center has higher service quality for interpersonal and environmental service quality and is more process-centered.

  19. Evaluation of sedation in oral and maxillofacial surgery in ambulatory patients: failure and complications.

    PubMed

    Senel, Ahmet Can; Altintas, Nuray Yilmaz; Senel, Figen Cizmeci; Pampu, Alper; Tosun, Emre; Ungor, Cem; Dayisoylu, Ezher Hamza; Tuzuner, Tamer

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluated the failure and complication rates of sedation in ambulatory patients undergoing oral and maxillofacial surgery. This retrospective cohort study was carried out among 619 patients who had undergone maxillofacial surgical procedures under intravenous sedation with midazolam and fentanyl. Each patient's age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, systemic condition, surgical procedure, complications, and failures were recorded for evaluation. A total of 400 patients with ASA I, 199 with ASA II, and 20 with ASA III between the ages of 9 months and 84 years were included in the study. The most common systemic disorders in our patients were mental retardation (35%), hypertension (19%), and epilepsy (15%). Evaluation of the cases revealed 9 complications (1.4%) and 9 sedation failures (1.4%). The complications were bradycardia, postoperative agitation and hallucination, drug reaction, vomiting and nausea, desaturation, and hypotension. Our results in the oral and maxillofacial surgery clinic revealed low complication and failure rates. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The preoperative use of the relaxation response with ambulatory surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Domar, A D; Noe, J M; Benson, H

    1987-01-01

    The efficacy of the regular elicitation of the relaxation response in reducing surgical anxiety and pain in an ambulatory surgery setting was studied in a population of patients scheduled for the surgical removal of a skin cancer. Forty-nine patients with skin cancer were enrolled in the study immediately after being informed of the ned for surgery; 21 of these patients elicited the relaxation response 20 minutes per day until the day of surgery, 21 read for 20 minutes per day, and 7 were noncompliant and were excluded from the study. Contrary to expectations, neither group of patients showed any increase in anxiety immediately before or after surgery on either psychological or physiological measures. Thus, there were no differences between the two groups on any of the psychological or physiological measures of anxiety, nor were there any differences in pain perception. There were statistically significant subjective differences; the experimental patients stated that the relaxation-response technique had reduced their anxiety several days before surgery and reportedly experienced their highest levels of anxiety prior to entering the study, while the controls experienced their highest levels of anxiety during and after surgery. This suggests that (1) minor outpatient surgery does not lead to detectable increased anxiety levels on the day of surgery and (2) regular elicitation of the relaxation response can alter subjective reports of distress associated with surgery.

  1. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can unmask hypertension in patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Bacaksiz, Ahmet; Erdogan, Ercan; Sonmez, Osman; Sevgili, Emrah; Tasal, Abdurrahman; Onsun, Nahide; Topukcu, Bugce; Kulaç, Beytullah; Uysal, Omer; Goktekin, Omer

    2013-01-01

    Background Psoriasis vulgaris is one of the most prevalent chronic, inflammatory skin disorders. Patients with psoriasis have excess risk of essential hypertension. Masked hypertension (MH), defined as normal office blood pressure (BP) with elevated ambulatory BP (ABPM), has been drawing attention recently due to its association with increased risk of developing sustained hypertension, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MH in psoriatic patients. Material/Methods On hundred and ten middle-aged, normotensive, non-obese patients with psoriasis vulgaris and 110 age- and sex-matched normotensive controls were included in the study. ABPM was performed in all participants over a 24-h period. The clinical severity of the disease was determined according to current indexes. Results The prevalence of MH among subjects with psoriasis vulgaris was 31.8% and increased compared to control subjects (p<0.01). Predictors of MH in patients with psoriasis vulgaris were detected as male sex, smoking, obesity-related anthropometric measures, and disease activity. Male sex, waist circumference, and diffuse psoriatic involvement were detected as independent predictors of MH. Conclusions MH is prevalent in patients with psoriasis vulgaris. Assessment with ABPM and close follow-up for development of hypertension is reasonable. PMID:23800996

  2. Complications of ambulatory oral surgery in patients over 65 years of age.

    PubMed

    Amado-Cuesta, Susana; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduardo; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2004-01-01

    Serious systemic disorders such as hypertension, cerebrovascular or heart disease, diabetes and psychiatric problems are common in elderly patients, and lead to the prescription of different drugs. This may in turn influence oral health, and the dentist should be familiarized with these situations when providing dental treatment in elderly patients. A retrospective study was made of 196 patients over age 65 years to evaluate the type of ambulatory surgery performed under locoregional anesthesia, taking into account the presence of background systemic pathology, multiple drug therapy, oral and dental health, the cause of consultation and the type of anesthesia used, relating these parameters to the development of intra- or postoperative systemic and/or local complications. Some systemic disease was documented in 88% of the patents-- hypertension being the most frequent disorder (in 45% of subjects with systemic disease). On the other hand, 78% of the patients used some medication, and 77% presented for hard-tissue treatment (tooth extractions, bone remodeling, etc.); 61% of all treatments comprised the removal of root fragments (54% of all hard-tissue interventions), symptomatic third molars (15%) or other dental inclusions. Only mild or moderate complications were recorded (13%) -- either local (n = 25) or systemic (n = 1). No significant relation was observed between the development of intra- or postoperative complications and the type of treatment provided or the medication used by these patients. Only diabetes was associated with a significant increase in intra- and postoperative local complications (p<0.003).

  3. Effects of ketanserin on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Strano, A; Novo, S; Raineri, A; Alaimo, G; Abrignani, M G; Cutietta, A

    1986-04-01

    Ketanserin is a new potent antiserotonergic drug which, unlike previous ones, is selective for S2-serotoninergic receptors and does not have an agonist action. A trial was carried out on medium-term treatment with ketanserin or propranolol in subjects suffering from mild to moderate hypertension. The trial was designed as a double-blind crossover randomized study comparing either ketanserin or propranolol with placebo. Thirteen patients completed the study, which was divided into two groups (A and B). Systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MBP) blood pressures were measured by non-invasive, intermittent ambulatory monitoring performed using a Pressurometer II, from Del Mar Avionics. Heart rate was measured using a continuous electrocardiogram monitoring. Systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced both after ketanserin (A:11.1%; B:10.8%) and propranolol (A:11.7%; B:11.8%) but in group A its decrease was more pronounced after propranolol (P less than 0.01). Diastolic blood pressure was significantly reduced both after ketanserin (A:11.5%; B:11.1%) and propranolol (A:11.4%; B:11.9%), as was MBP (A:11.9%; B:11.8% for ketanserin and A:11.9%; B:11.9% for propranolol). The heart rate diminished significantly only after propranolol administration (P less than 0.01). Ambulatory monitoring showed a significant 24-h reduction of SBP after administration of propranolol (P less than 0.0025) and ketanserin (A:P less than 0.0025, B: P less than 0.005). Diastolic blood pressure was also significantly reduced after ketanserin (P less than 0.0005) and propranolol (A: P less than 0.0025, B: P less than 0.0005). The heart rate obtained by continuous electrocardiogram monitoring diminished significantly only after propranolol administration (P less than 0.0005). No significant changes of circadian behaviour of blood pressure were observed.

  4. Ambulatory Holter monitoring in asymptomatic patients with DDD pacemakers - do we need ACC/AHA Guidelines revision?

    PubMed

    Chudzik, Michal; Klimczak, Artur; Wranicz, Jerzy Krzysztof

    2013-10-31

    We sought to determine the usefulness of ambulatory 24-hour Holter monitoring in detecting asymptomatic pacemaker (PM) malfunction episodes in patients with dual-chamber pacemakers whose pacing and sensing parameters were proper, as seen in routine post-implantation follow-ups. Ambulatory 24-hour Holter recordings (HM) were performed in 100 patients with DDD pacemakers 1 day after the implantation. Only asymptomatic patients with proper pacing and sensing parameters (assessed on PM telemetry on the first day post-implantation) were enrolled in the study. The following parameters were assessed: failure to pace, failure to sense (both oversensing and undersensing episodes) as well as the percentage of all PM disturbances. Despite proper sensing and pacing parameters, HM revealed PM disturbances in 23 patients out of 100 (23%). Atrial undersensing episodes were found in 12 patients (p < 0.005) with totally 963 episodes and failure to capture in 1 patient (1%). T wave oversensing was the most common ventricular channel disorder (1316 episodes in 9 patients, p < 0.0005). Malfunction episodes occurred sporadically, leading to pauses of up to 1.6 s or temporary bradycardia, which were, nevertheless, not accompanied by clinical symptoms. No ventricular pacing disturbances were found. Asymptomatic pacemaker dysfunction may be observed in nearly 25% of patients with proper DDD parameters after implantation. Thus, ambulatory HM during the early post-implantation period may be a useful tool to detect the need to reprogram PM parameters.

  5. Improving the management of iron deficiency in ambulatory heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Carl; Patel, Hitesh; Allen, Chris; Vazir, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Based on clinical trial data patients with heart failure (HF) and evidence of iron deficiency should be offered intravenous (iv) iron with the aim of improving exercise capacity and symptoms. Baseline measurement in outpatient HF clinics demonstrated that only 50% of patients who may be eligible for iv iron were investigated with iron studies. Our aim was to make sure that 90% of the patients attending our heart failure clinics who were symptomatic and had an ejection fraction (EF) ≤45% should have their iron studies checked within the last six months. In an effort to increase the proportion of suitable patients in whom iron studies are requested, we carried out three plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles each with a different intervention. These interventions included a presentation of the clinical trial evidence at a HF multidisciplinary meeting, email reminders prior to clinic and stickers in the patient notes (repeated twice). The effect of each intervention was measured with the outcome being the proportion of eligible patients in whom iron studies were documented within the previous 6 months. The interventions increased the number of suitable patients who had iron studies checked, to as high as 100%, however this effect was not sustained. Root cause analysis revealed that clinicians were unenthusiastic to continue performing iron studies due to inefficiency in the process of admitting patients and giving them iv iron. For example median in-hospital stay of seven hours for an infusion that is given over 15 minutes. In an attempt to improve patient and physician satisfaction we piloted an ambulatory outpatient service to deliver iv iron. We demonstrated that this service was feasible and more efficient as less time was required waiting for a bed or spent in hospital and was less costly. In summary we have demonstrated interventions which can increase the identification of patients who would benefit from iv iron and piloted a new time and cost efficient system of

  6. Influence of lightweight ambulatory oxygen on oxygen use and activity patterns of COPD patients receiving long-term oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Hecht, Ariel; Tiep, Brian; Albert, Richard K; Anthonisen, Nicholas R; Bailey, William C; Connett, John E; Cooper, J Allen; Criner, Gerard J; Curtis, Jeffrey; Dransfield, Mark; Lazarus, Stephen C; Make, Barry; Martinez, Fernando J; McEvoy, Charlene; Niewoehner, Dennis E; Reilly, John J; Scanlon, Paul; Scharf, Steven M; Sciurba, Frank C; Woodruff, Prescott

    2012-02-01

    Lightweight ambulatory oxygen devices are provided on the assumptions that they enhance compliance and increase activity, but data to support these assumptions are lacking. We studied 22 patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving long-term oxygen therapy (14 men, average age = 66.9 y, FEV(1) = 33.6%pred, PaO(2) at rest = 51.7 torr) who were using E-cylinders as their portable oxygen. Subjects were recruited at 5 sites and studied over a 2-week baseline period and for 6 months after randomizing them to either continuing to use 22-lb E-cylinders towed on a cart or to carrying 3.6-lb aluminum cylinders. Utilizing novel electronic devices, ambulatory and stationary oxygen use was monitored continuously over the 2 weeks prior to and the 6 months following randomization. Subjects wore tri-axial accelerometers to monitor physical activity during waking hours for 2-3 weeks prior to, and at 3 and 6 months after, randomization. Seventeen subjects completed the study. At baseline, subjects used 17.2 hours of stationary and 2.5 hours of ambulatory oxygen daily. At 6 months, ambulatory oxygen use was 1.4 ± 1.0 hrs in those randomized to E-cylinders and 1.9 ± 2.4 hrs in those using lightweight oxygen (P = NS). Activity monitoring revealed low activity levels prior to randomization and no significant increase over time in either group. In this group of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, providing lightweight ambulatory oxygen did not increase either oxygen use or activity. Future efforts might focus on strategies to encourage oxygen use and enhance activity in this patient group. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT003257540).

  7. The effect of continuous nursing intervention guided by chronotherapeutics on ambulatory blood pressure of older hypertensive patients in the community.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mei; Cheng, Shu-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Jiang, He; Cong, Ji-Yan; Zang, Xiao-Ying; Zhao, Yue

    2014-08-01

    To explore the effect of continuous nursing intervention guided by chronotherapeutics so as to provide the easy, noninvasive, effective and acceptable intervention for older hypertensive patients in the community. Many researchers studied the effect of administration at different times on blood pressure control and circadian rhythm. However, the individual administrative time was set ambiguously in previous studies. A semi-experimental study. In the study, 90 eligible patients were recruited and separated into three groups randomly, which were the control group, intervention group A (behaviour and chronotherapy intervention) and intervention group B (behaviour intervention). At 6 and 12 months after the study, the intervention groups were measured 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. There were significant differences in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring parameters of the two intervention groups at different measurement times, and there were interaction between measurement time and different groups. The number of patients with dipper increased and reverse dipper decreased in group A as the intervention applied. There were statistical differences between two groups. The number of patients with morning surge in group A decreased more, and there were statistical differences between two groups at six months after the intervention. The behaviour and chronotherapy intervention based on the patients' ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can control casual blood pressure much better and last longer, which can also improve patients' indexes of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring better than behaviour intervention only. The behaviour and chronotherapy intervention can increase patients' nocturnal blood pressure drop, increase the number of patients with dipper and decrease reverse dipper, and improve blood pressure surge in the morning. Nurses can use continuous nursing intervention guided by chronotherapeutics to help improve hypertension of older patients

  8. Respiratory muscle weakness in uremic patients under continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Fernández, P; Sánchez Agudo, L; Calatrava, J M; Escuin, F; Selgas, R; Martínez, M E; Montero, A; Sánchez-Sicilia, L

    1984-01-01

    The increasingly frequent use of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) as substitutive therapy in terminal renal failure has induced the investigation of the advantages and disadvantages of this therapeutic modality. The effects of CAPD on pulmonary function are one of the aspects currently under study. Based on previous data suggesting the existence of extrapulmonary ventilatory restriction in uremic patients under CAPD, we have studied in these patients the respiratory muscle function as expressed in the maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and assessed the impact of the infusion of 2 liters of dialysis fluid into the peritoneal cavity on both MIP and the pulmonary volumes. Uremic patients evidenced significantly lower MIP values as compared with healthy controls. The filling of the peritoneal cavity induced, both in the supine and in the sitting position, a restrictive effect and an increase in the inspiratory capacity. We conclude that uremic patients under CAPD evidence a respiratory muscle dysfunction of as yet unclear cause. Our findings further suggest that the infusion of 2 liters of dialysis fluid into the peritoneal cavity induces not only a restrictive effect, but also an increase in the strength of the respiratory muscles, the latter effect being probably due to increased diaphragmatic contractility.

  9. Impact of medication packaging on adherence and treatment outcomes in older ambulatory patients.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Philip J; Murphy, John E; Pedersen, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate medication adherence and treatment outcomes in elderly outpatients using daily-dose blister packaging (Pill Calendar) compared with medications packaged in bottles of loose tablets. Randomized controlled trial. Ambulatory care clinics at Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus; University of Arizona Health Science Center, Tucson; and Riverside Methodist Hospital Family Medicine Clinic, Columbus, Ohio, from July 1, 2002, to December 31, 2004. 85 individuals 65 years of age or older being treated with lisinopril for hypertension. Patients were randomly assigned to receive lisinopril in either daily-dose blister packaging (Pill Calendar) or traditional bottles of loose tablets. Adherence was assessed by prescription refill regularity and medication possession ratio (MPR). Treatment outcome and use of medical services were assessed by medical record review of blood pressure and morbidity associated with poorly controlled hypertension. Patients receiving lisinopril in the daily-dose blister packaging (Pill Calendar) refilled their prescriptions on time more often (P = 0.01), had higher MPRs (P = 0.04), and had lower diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01) than patients who had their medications packaged in traditional bottles of loose tablets. Providing medications in a package that identifies the day each dose is intended to be taken and provides information on proper self-administration can improve treatment regimen adherence and treatment outcomes in elderly patients.

  10. Circadian rhythmicity in substance use disorder male patients with and without comorbid depression under ambulatory and therapeutic community treatment.

    PubMed

    Antúnez, Juan Manuel; Capella, María Del Mar; Navarro, José Francisco; Adan, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Although there have been described alterations of circadian rhythmicity both in patients with substance use disorder (SUD) and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), the circadian characteristics of SUD patients with comorbid MDD (SUD-MDD) are unknown. Likewise, the possible influence of the different modalities of treatments (ambulatory or therapeutic community) upon the circadian rhythmicity of SUD patients has not been characterized. Therefore, this study analyzes the circadian rhythmic profiles of SUD and SUD-MDD patients under ambulatory and therapeutic community treatment. The sample was composed of 40 SUD and 40 SUD-MDD men, aged 22-55 yrs, under treatment and with abstinence for at least three months (including each group 20 ambulatory and 20 from therapeutic community). Patients completed a sociodemographic, clinical and sleep-wake schedules interview, the Composite Scale of Morningness, and wore on the wrist an ambulatory device known as iButton® Thermochron DS1921H, which registered their distal skin temperature every two minutes for 48 hours. All the groups showed a tendency to morningness without differences among them in concordance with their sleep-wake schedules. With regard to distal skin temperature circadian rhythm, SUD patients showed higher values than SUD-MDD in amplitude, relative amplitude, percentage rhythm, and first harmonic power, and lower minimum temperature in 10 consecutive hours (p < .043, in all cases). Therapeutic community group values were lower in minimum temperature and higher in amplitude, relative amplitude, and 12 harmonic accumulated power (p < .028, in all cases) as compared to ambulatory ones. Moreover, all groups showed higher Rayleigh vector and rhythm stability as compared to normative population (p < .043, in both cases). The circadian rhythmic differences observed for diagnosis and type of treatment are indicative of a higher circadian rhythmicity robustness in SUD and therapeutic community patients as

  11. [National survey of preoperative management and patient selection in ambulatory surgery centers].

    PubMed

    Papaceit, J; Olona, M; Ramón, C; García-Aguado, R; Rodríguez, R; Rull, M

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine both the selection and preparation criteria in patients in various Spanish ambulatory surgery centers, as well as the impact of these criteria on their results. The results were compared according to the type of functional structure of the units (autonomous or integrated). We performed a cross sectional, descriptive study through postal survey. The survey contained the following items: type of unit, surgical procedures, selection criteria, preoperative assessment and management, and qualitative and quantitative indexes of the activity performed in 2000. A total of 123 units were included with a response rate of 39%. The selection criteria showed a high degree of consensus. The outpatient anesthesia clinic was used for preoperative assessment by 97.9% of the units. Most units routinely requested preoperative tests (hemostasis and hemogram by 89%; biochemical parameters by 72.9%) and to a lesser extent chest X-ray (33.3%) and electrocardiogram (35.4%). The introduction of procedures for the management of coexisting diseases was scarce (25-64.6%). Units using the outpatient anesthesia clinic in all patients had a lower cancellation rate (1.5% vs 4.4%). Autonomous units were significantly more likely to accept patients with high surgical-anesthetic risk than integrated units. Autonomous units also showed a significantly lower number of admissions (1.2% vs 1.9%, p = 0.003), mean stay (240 min vs 367 min, p = 0.002), and recovery time (150 min vs 212 min, p = 0.001) than integrated units. No statistically significant differences were found in the remaining parameters. Scientifically based protocols for patient selection, preoperative assessment and perioperative management of distinct processes and for the rational use of laboratory tests should be more widely used. The need for an outpatient anesthesia clinic for preoperative assessment was notable. The results of our survey indicate that better results in performance indexes

  12. Survival analysis of Iranian patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis using cure model.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Ali Asghar; Najafi, Iraj; Mahmoodi, Mahmood; Shojaee, Abbas; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2013-05-29

    Peritoneal dialysis is one of the most prevalent types of dialysis prescribed to the patients suffering from renal failure. Studies on the factors affecting the survival of these patients have mainly used log-rank test and Cox analysis. The present study aimed to investigate the risk factors affecting short- and long term survival of patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) using cure model. The data obtained retrospectively from 20 medical centers in Iran, between 1996 and 2009. All patients with renal failure who had been treated by CAPD and followed at least 3 months were included in the study. The STATA (11.0) software and CUREREGR module were used for survival analysis using cure model. Totally 2006 patients were included in this study. The major reasons for renal failure were hypertension (35.4%) and diabetes (33.6%). The median of survival time was 4.8 years with a 95% confidence interval of 4.3 to 5.6 years. The percentage of long-lived patients surviving was 40% (95% CI: 32%, 47%). The analysis showed that the effect of diabetes, serum albumin level, age, diastolic blood pressure, and medical center was significant on the long-term survival of the patients. In addition, in short-term survival the effects of age, albumin, and medical center were significant. By improving the quality of medical care in centers, nutritional status, controlling co-morbidities can help the patients on CAPD with better health and increase their short and long term survival.

  13. Successful use of icodextrin in elderly patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hidetomo; Babazono, Tetsuya; Kasai, Kenji; Kuriyama, Satoru; Sugimoto, Tokuichiro; Nakayama, Masaaki; Hamada, Chieko; Furuya, Ryuichi; Hasegawa, Hirohumi; Kasahara, Masato; Moriishi, Misaki; Tomo, Tadashi; Miyazaki, Masanobu; Yorioka, Noriaki; Sato, Manaka; Yamabe, Kaoru; Kawaguchi, Yoshindo

    2005-01-01

    In peritoneal dialysis (PD), a 7.5% polyglucose-containing dialysis solution (icodextrin) provides prolonged ultrafiltration as compared with glucose-based dialysis solutions. In the present study, we attempted to clarify the safety and effectiveness of icodextrin in elderly patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Clinical data and outcomes of 16 patients aged 65 or older were monitored for 12 weeks before and during icodextrin treatment. The group included 13 men and 3 women with a mean age of 69 +/- 5 years (range: 66-78 years). The underlying kidney disease was chronic nephritis in 7 patients, diabetes mellitus in 8 patients, and nephrosclerosis in I patient. From the beginning of peritoneal dialysis, 1 patients had been treated with icodextrin; the other 10 were changed to icodextrin from glucose dialysis solution. At the end of study, body weight had increased to 63.8 +/- 9.3 kg from 61.6 +/- 9.3 kg, accompanied by an increase in ultrafiltration to 480 +/- 207 mL daily from 369 +/- 436 mL daily. No significant change in urine volume occurred. Despite the increase in body weight, cardiothoracic rate decreased to 51.1% +/- 3.4% from 52.3% +/- 4.9%. All patients reported an improvement of edema and appetite. Edema scores were significantly decreased to 0.85 +/- 0.90 from 1.63 +/- 0.96 (p < 0.03). No adverse side effects were associated with the use of icodextrin. From the foregoing data, we concluded that, as compared with conventional glucose solution, icodextrin has beneficial effects on ultrafiltration volume and clinical symptoms in elderly patients on CAPD.

  14. Risk Factors for the First Episode of Peritonitis in Southern Chinese Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoguang; Huang, Rong; Wang, Juan; Ye, Hongjian; Guo, Qunying; Yi, Chunyan; Lin, Jianxiong; Zhou, Qian; Shao, Fengmin; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Background The first episode of peritonitis affects survival of the peritoneal membrane as a medium for dialysis as well as survival of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate risk factors associated with the first episode of peritonitis in Southern Chinese continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. Methods This is a single-center, retrospective, cohort study. All incident CAPD patients from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2010 were recruited, and followed up until their first episode of peritonitis or 31 December, 2012. Baseline demographic, socioeconomic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Cox proportional model was used to determine the factors associated with the first episode of peritonitis. Results In a cumulative 30756.5 patient-months follow-up (the median vintage 26.1 months) of 1117 CAPD patients, 309(27.7%) patients presented the first episodes of peritonitis. The cumulative peritonitis-free survival was 86.2%, 78.1%, 71.4% and 57.8% at 1, 2, 3 and 5 year, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with risk for the first episode of peritonitis were elderly patients (>65 years) [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.427, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.051 to 1.938, P = 0.023], male(HR = 1.315, 95% CI = 1.028 to 1.684, P = 0.030), lower education level (HR = 1.446, 95% CI: 1.127 to 1.855, P = 0.004) and albumin <38g/L (HR = 1.425, 95% CI: 1.112 to 1.825, P = 0.005). Conclusions Older age, male, lower educational level and hypoalbuminemia at the commencement of PD were the risk factors associated with the first episode of peritonitis in Southern Chinese CAPD patients. PMID:25222609

  15. Robust and Accurate Modeling Approaches for Migraine Per-Patient Prediction from Ambulatory Data.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Josué; De Orbe, M Irene; Gago, Ana; Sobrado, Mónica; Risco-Martín, José L; Mora, J Vivancos; Moya, José M; Ayala, José L

    2015-06-30

    Migraine is one of the most wide-spread neurological disorders, and its medical treatment represents a high percentage of the costs of health systems. In some patients, characteristic symptoms that precede the headache appear. However, they are nonspecific, and their prediction horizon is unknown and pretty variable; hence, these symptoms are almost useless for prediction, and they are not useful to advance the intake of drugs to be effective and neutralize the pain. To solve this problem, this paper sets up a realistic monitoring scenario where hemodynamic variables from real patients are monitored in ambulatory conditions with a wireless body sensor network (WBSN). The acquired data are used to evaluate the predictive capabilities and robustness against noise and failures in sensors of several modeling approaches. The obtained results encourage the development of per-patient models based on state-space models (N4SID) that are capable of providing average forecast windows of 47 min and a low rate of false positives.

  16. Robust and Accurate Modeling Approaches for Migraine Per-Patient Prediction from Ambulatory Data

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, Josué; Irene De Orbe, M.; Gago, Ana; Sobrado, Mónica; Risco-Martín, José L.; Vivancos Mora, J.; Moya, José M.; Ayala, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most wide-spread neurological disorders, and its medical treatment represents a high percentage of the costs of health systems. In some patients, characteristic symptoms that precede the headache appear. However, they are nonspecific, and their prediction horizon is unknown and pretty variable; hence, these symptoms are almost useless for prediction, and they are not useful to advance the intake of drugs to be effective and neutralize the pain. To solve this problem, this paper sets up a realistic monitoring scenario where hemodynamic variables from real patients are monitored in ambulatory conditions with a wireless body sensor network (WBSN). The acquired data are used to evaluate the predictive capabilities and robustness against noise and failures in sensors of several modeling approaches. The obtained results encourage the development of per-patient models based on state-space models (N4SID) that are capable of providing average forecast windows of 47 min and a low rate of false positives. PMID:26134103

  17. Abdominal catastrophes and other unusual events in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Steiner, R W; Halasz, N A

    1990-01-01

    Primary bacterial peritonitis and catheter-associated infections compose the large majority of abdominal events in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. Yet occasionally primary pathology involving the abdominal viscera develops, and surgery is frequently considered. The early manifestations of intraabdominal inflammation or bleeding in patients undergoing CAPD depend on the pathological process, its access to the peritoneal cavity, and whether generalized bacterial peritonitis supervenes to obscure helpful physical findings. Clear dialysate is not a reliable sign that major pathology is absent, nor does initial stabilization of the clinical course with antibiotic therapy uniformly indicate that surgery will not be necessary. Polymicrobial peritonitis may develop in cholecystitis, pancreatitis, or from a colonic source, the latter featuring more bacterial species and more gram-negative and anaerobic organisms. A history directed at progression of symptoms and sites of abdominal discomfort and an examination for deep local tenderness and bowel incarcerated in an abdominal wall hernia are essential. Measurement of dialysate amylase and Gram stain of dialysate for food fibers may be helpful. Imaging techniques such as abdominal radiographs for dilated bowel or free subdiaphragmatic air, ultrasonography of the gallbladder or pancreas, computed tomographic (CT) scanning of the lower abdomen, and water-soluble contrast colonic studies may help identify the pathologic process. Special studies such as these should be considered early in the course of suspected unusual abdominal events in patients on CAPD.

  18. Renal sympathetic denervation in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension after witnessed intake of medication before qualifying ambulatory blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Fadl Elmula, Fadl Elmula Mohamed; Hoffmann, Pavel; Fossum, Eigil; Brekke, Magne; Gjønnæss, Eyvind; Hjørnholm, Ulla; Kjær, Vibeke N; Rostrup, Morten; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Os, Ingrid; Stenehjem, Aud-E; Høieggen, Aud

    2013-09-01

    It is unknown whether the decline in blood pressure (BP) after renal denervation (RDN) is caused by denervation itself or concomitantly improved drug adherence. We aimed to investigate the BP lowering effect of RDN in true treatment-resistant hypertension by excluding patients with poor drug adherence. Patients with resistant hypertension (n=18) were referred for a thorough clinical and laboratory work-up. Treatment-resistant hypertension was defined as office systolic BP>140 mm Hg, despite maximally tolerated doses of ≥ 3 antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic. In addition, ambulatory daytime systolic BP>135 mm Hg was required after witnessed intake of antihypertensive drugs to qualify. RDN (n=6) was performed with Symplicity Catheter System. The mean office and ambulatory BPs remained unchanged at 1, 3, and 6 months in the 6 patients, whereas there was no known change in antihypertensive medication. Two patients, however, had a fall in both office and ambulatory BPs. Our findings question whether BP falls in response to RDN in patients with true treatment-resistant hypertension. Additional research must aim to verify potential BP lowering effect and identify a priori responders to RDN before this invasive method can routinely be applied to patients with drug-resistant hypertension. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01673516.

  19. A retrospective analysis of ambulatory burn patients: focus on wound dressings and healing times

    PubMed Central

    Gravante, Gianpiero; Montone, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In this study, we retrospectively analysed healing times of ambulatory burn patients after silver-based dressings were introduced in late December 2005, and compared the results with those obtained before. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data were collected in November–December 2005 and in January–February 2006. We excluded from the study: (i) admitted patients; (ii) patients with mixed superficial partial thickness and deep partial thickness burns; (iii) patients with full-thickness burns; and (iv) operated patients that came for follow-up. We recorded the age, sex, cause (flame vs scald), burn depth, dressings used and healing times. RESULTS We selected 347 patients corresponding to 455 burned areas (64.4% superficial and 35.6% deep; 47.7% treated in 2005 and 52.3% in 2006). During the years 2005 and 2006, there was an increase in the use of silver-based dressings (2005, 9.7%; 2006, 38.7%; chi-squared test, P < 0.001) and a decrease in the use of paraffin gauzes (2005, 66.4%; 2006, 40.3%; chi-squared test, P < 0.001). The healing time of overall burns and of superficial burns showed no significant differences between 2005 and 2006. However, in deep partial thickness burns, a significant reduction was present (2006, 19; 2005, 29 days; Student's t-test, P < 0.01). Among all dressings, paraffin gauzes had the shortest healing times in superficial burns (5 days); with silver-based dressings in deep burns, the healing times were nanocrystalline silver (16 days) and silver carboxymethylcellulose (21 days). CONCLUSIONS Results of our retrospective study would suggest that paraffin gauzes are a valuable option in superficial burns, while silver-based dressings are preferable in deep burns. PMID:19995488

  20. Influence of age and hypertension treatment-time on ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Crespo, Juan J; Mojón, Artemio; Chayán, Luisa; Fontao, María J; Fernández, José R

    2013-03-01

    Some studies based on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) have reported a reduction in sleep-time relative BP decline towards a more non-dipping pattern in the elderly, but rarely have past studies included a proper comparison with younger subjects, and no previous report has evaluated the potential role of hypertension treatment time on nighttime BP regulation in the elderly. Accordingly, we evaluated the influence of age and time-of-day of hypertension treatment on the circadian BP pattern assessed by 48-h ABPM. This cross-sectional study involved 6147 hypertensive patients (3108 men/3039 women), 54.0 ± 13.7 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, with 2137 (978 men/1159 women) being ≥60 yrs of age. At the time of study, 1809 patients were newly diagnosed and untreated, and 4338 were treated with hypertension medications. Among the later, 2641 ingested all their prescribed BP-lowering medications upon awakening, whereas 1697 ingested the full daily dose of ≥1 hypertension medications at bedtime. Diagnosis of hypertension in untreated patients was based on ABPM criteria, specifically an awake systolic (SBP)/diastolic (DBP) BP mean ≥135/85 mm Hg and/or an asleep SBP/DBP mean ≥120/70 mm Hg. Collectively, older in comparison with younger patients were more likely to have diagnoses of microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome, anemia, and/or obesity. In addition, the group of older vs. younger patients had higher glucose, creatinine, uric acid, triglycerides, and fibrinogen, but lower cholesterol, hemoglobin, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. In older compared with younger patients, ambulatory SBP was significantly higher and DBP significantly lower (p < .001), mainly during the hours of nighttime sleep and initial hours after morning awakening. The prevalence of non-dipping was significantly higher in older than younger patients (63.1% vs. 41.1%; p < .001). The largest difference between

  1. The Negative Impact of Early Peritonitis on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Peng; Wang, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Chu; Wen, Yao-Ko; Chiu, Ping-Fang; Yang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    ♦ Background: Peritonitis rate has been reported to be associated with technique failure and overall mortality in previous literatures. However, information on the impact of the timing of the first peritonitis episode on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients is sparse. The aim of this research is to study the influence of time to first peritonitis on clinical outcomes, including technique failure, patient mortality and dropout from peritoneal dialysis (PD). ♦ Methods: A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted over 10 years at a single PD unit in Taiwan. A total of 124 patients on CAPD with at least one peritonitis episode comprised the study subjects, which were dichotomized by the median of time to first peritonitis into either early peritonitis patients or late peritonitis patients. Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze the correlation of the timing of first peritonitis with clinical outcomes. ♦ Results: Early peritonitis patients were older, more diabetic and had lower serum levels of creatinine than the late peritonitis patients. Early peritonitis patients were associated with worse technique survival, patient survival and stay on PD than late peritonitis patients, as indicated by Kaplan-Meier analysis (log-rank test, p = 0.04, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). In the multivariate Cox regression model, early peritonitis was still a significant predictor for technique failure (hazard ratio (HR), 0.54; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.30 - 0.98), patient mortality (HR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.13 - 0.92) and dropout from PD (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.30 - 0.82). In continuous analyses, a 1-month increase in the time to the first peritonitis episode was associated with a 2% decreased risk of technique failure (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97 - 0.99), a 3% decreased risk of patient mortality (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95 - 0.99), and a 2% decreased risk of dropout from PD (HR, 98%; 95% CI, 0.97 - 0.99). Peritonitis rate was inversely

  2. Characteristics, drug combinations and dosages of primary care patients with uncontrolled ambulatory blood pressure and high medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Larissa; Pavlik, Valory N; Hyman, David J

    2013-01-01

    Most studies on the prevalence and determinants of resistant hypertension (RH) do not account for white coat hypertension, medication non-adherence, or use of suboptimal treatment dosages. We studied the characteristics, drug combinations, and dosages of patients on at least three antihypertensives of different classes who had uncontrolled blood pressure on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and high medication adherence measured by electronic monitoring. The data were collected as part of the baseline measures of a hypertension control trial. Of 140 monitored primary care patients, all with uncontrolled office blood pressure, 69 (49%) were on at least three antihypertensives of different classes. Of these 69, 15 (22%) were controlled on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, 20 (29%) were uncontrolled and non-adherent, leaving only 34 (49%) adherent to their medications and having uncontrolled ambulatory hypertension (uncontrolled RH). Thirty-one (91%) of the 34 uncontrolled RH patients were prescribed a diuretic, of which 24 were on hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg. Less than half of the patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blocker, or calcium channel blocker were prescribed maximal doses of these agents. Half of the RH can be attributed to white coat effect and poor medication adherence, and all of the remaining patients were on apparently suboptimal drug combinations and/or dosages. Primary care physicians need to be educated regarding the optimal treatment of RH. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of Physical Activity with Survival among Ambulatory Patients on Dialysis: The Comprehensive Dialysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaysen, George A.; Dalrymple, Lorien S.; Grimes, Barbara A.; Glidden, David V.; Anand, Shuchi; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Despite high mortality and low levels of physical activity (PA) among patients starting dialysis, the link between low PA and mortality has not been carefully evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The Comprehensive Dialysis Study was a prospective cohort study that enrolled patients who started dialysis between June 2005 and June 2007 in a random sample of dialysis facilities in the United States. The Human Activity Profile (HAP) was administered to estimate PA among 1554 ambulatory enrolled patients in the Comprehensive Dialysis Study. Patients were followed until death or September 30, 2009, and the major outcome was all-cause mortality. Results The average age was 59.8 (14.2) years; 55% of participants were male, 28% were black, and 56% had diabetes mellitus. The majority (57.3%) had low fitness estimated from the HAP score. The median follow-up was 2.6 (interquartile range, 2.2–3.1) years. The association between PA and mortality was linear across the range of scores (1–94). After multivariable adjustment, lower adjusted activity score on the HAP was associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.23–1.39 per 10 points). Patients in the lowest level of fitness experienced a 3.5-fold (95% confidence interval, 2.54–4.89) increase in risk of death compared with those with average or above fitness. Conclusions Low levels of PA are strongly associated with mortality among patients new to dialysis. Interventions aimed to preserve or enhance PA should be prospectively tested. PMID:23124787

  4. [Simplified topical anesthesia protocol for ambulatory cataract surgery: safety and patient and surgeon satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Batta, B; Fuchs-Buder, T; Tréchot, F; Angioi, K

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess safety and efficacy of cataract surgery (CS) under topical anesthesia alone, i.e. without pre-anesthetic evaluation and without direct presence of an anesthesiologist. To this end we assessed the incidence of patients' preoperative anxiety, perioperative adverse events and patients' and surgeons' satisfaction. Patients undergoing CS under topical anesthesia over a one-month period were included. An anesthesiologist and nurse anesthetist were present in the area and could intervene in case of an adverse event. Patients' anxiety was scored using the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety & Information Scale (APAIS), and their satisfaction with the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale (ISAS). Surgeons' satisfaction was scored with a VAS from 0 to 10 (0: surgery not possible & 10: excellent surgical conditions). One hundred and twenty-four consecutive patients were included; mean age was 71 (±9.4) years. Mean APAIS I was 6.4/20 (±3.7). Mean APAIS II was 3.1 (±1.8). Mean ISAS score was 5.5/6 (±0.6), indicating high patient satisfaction. Surgeon satisfaction score was 8.9/10 (±1.7). Twenty-three adverse events occurred of which 16 required interventions by the anaesthesiologist or surgeon: 5 supplemental local or regional anaesthesia, 6 iv-analgesia, 5 management of hypertension. These preliminary data suggest that a simplified topical anesthesia protocol for ambulatory CS appears to be feasible and safe, as long as an anesthesia team is present in the area to intervene if needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Ambulatory electromyogram activity in the upper trapezius region: patients with muscle pain vs. pain-free control subjects.

    PubMed

    Carlson, C R; Wynn, K T; Edwards, J; Okeson, J P; Nitz, A J; Workman, D E; Cassisi, J

    1996-03-01

    This study compared the ambulatory electromyogram activity of persons reporting pain in the shoulder and cervical regions with an equal group of persons not reporting such pain. Ambulatory electromyogram data were obtained over 3-day periods. In addition, all participants completed several standard psychological questionnaires. The results were analyzed with inferential statistics to determine whether subjects reporting significant pain in the shoulder and cervical regions had greater ambulatory electromyogram activity than an equal number of subjects not reporting pain. Considerable controversy exists regarding the role of muscle activity in the etiology and maintenance of muscle pain disorders. Given the availability of ambulatory recording devices that can provide a detailed record of muscle activity over an extended period of time, the present research was conducted to determine whether persons reporting shoulder and cervical pain could be differentiated from a group of normal subjects. All subjects (N = 20) completed a battery of tests with standardized psychometric instruments and then were fitted with ambulatory electromyogram monitors to record electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius region of the dominant side; the time, duration, and amplitude of electromyogram activity greater than 2 microV was recorded. The monitors were worn during normal working hours (mean, 6.2 hours per day) over 3 consecutive days. In addition to wearing the monitors, all subjects completed hourly self-ratings of perceived muscle tension during the recording periods. As expected, subjects with muscle pain reported significantly more pain (mean, 4.9) than did the normal control subjects (mean, 0.9), t(15) = 3.29, P < 0.01. However, patients with muscle pain did not have greater average electromyogram activity (mean, 6.4 microV) over the 3-day period as compared to the normal controls (mean, 7.1 microV), t(18) = -0.25, P < 0.80. Self-monitoring of perceived muscle tension

  6. Patient-as-observer approach: an alternative method for hand hygiene auditing in an ambulatory care setting.

    PubMed

    Le-Abuyen, Sheila; Ng, Jessica; Kim, Susie; De La Franier, Anne; Khan, Bibi; Mosley, Jane; Gardam, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A survey pilot asked patients to observe the hand hygiene compliance of their health care providers. Patients returned 75.1% of the survey cards distributed, and the overall hand hygiene compliance was 96.8%. Survey results and patient commentary were used to motivate hand hygiene compliance. The patient-as-observer approach appeared to be a viable alternative for hand hygiene auditing in an ambulatory care setting because it educated, engaged, and empowered patients to play a more active role in their own health care. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Disposition of emergency department patients with psychiatric comorbidity: results from the 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kunen, S; Prejean, C; Gladney, B; Harper, D; Mandry, C V

    2006-01-01

    Background Few emergency department (ED) studies have examined how psychiatric comorbidity relates to hospitalisation decisions. Methods We assessed the relationship of psychiatric comorbidity to hospitalisation decisions among ED patients in the 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Results Patients with psychiatric comorbidity were five times more likely to be hospitalised than patients with a single psychiatric diagnosis. The most frequent psychiatric comorbidities involved substance use disorders (SUDs). Conclusions Psychiatric disorders are underdiagnosed among ED patients. We believe that this underdiagnosis may be partly responsible for the high hospitalisation rates of ED patients with SUDs PMID:16549572

  8. Recovery Profile and Patient Satisfaction After Ambulatory Anesthesia for Dental Treatment-A Crossover Comparison Between Propofol and Sevoflurane.

    PubMed

    Ohkushi, Keita; Fukuda, Ken-Ichi; Koukita, Yoshihiko; Kaneko, Yuzuru; Ichinohe, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which anesthetic was preferable for ambulatory anesthesia: propofol alone or sevoflurane alone. A crossover study was performed to compare the recovery profile and patient satisfaction after 2 anesthesia methods. Twenty healthy patients with severe anxiety toward dental treatment undergoing 2 sessions of day-case dental treatment received either propofol or sevoflurane anesthesia. The order of these methods was randomized. The depths of anesthesia were kept constant using bispectral index (BIS) monitoring. Observations on recovery profiles were performed in the emergence phase, in the recovery phase, and 24 hours after discharge. Patient satisfaction and preference were obtained by a questionnaire. Most of the recovery profiles in the emergence phase such as time to eye opening to respond to verbal command, time to BIS ≥ 75, and time to extubation were shorter in the sevoflurane group than in the propofol group. All recovery profiles in the recovery phase showed no differences between the 2 groups. Based on the subject's satisfaction and preference, propofol was evaluated as a better anesthetic for ambulatory anesthesia than sevoflurane. Higher patient satisfaction and a greater preference for future dental treatment were revealed for propofol anesthesia. Propofol may be more suitable for ambulatory anesthesia for dental treatment.

  9. The effect of depression on sleep quality and the circadian rhythm of ambulatory blood pressure in older patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina; Li, Yun

    2017-05-01

    To explore the effect of depression on the sleep quality, and the circadian rhythm of ambulatory blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension. A total of 73 older patients with hypertension were screened for depression and divided into two groups. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the circadian rhythm of ambulatory blood pressure were compared between the non-depressed (control) and depressed (case) group. In the case group, 24h ambulatory SBP and DBP, and nocturnal SBP and DBP were higher than in the control group, and the circadian rhythm of non-dipper was higher (67.22% vs 40.13%,P<0.01). There was a positive correlation between PSQI and depression (r=0.432, P<0.01). There was a significant correlation between sleep quality and depression in older patients with hypertension. Depression increases the circadian rhythm of non-dipper in older patients with hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk factors and outcomes of high peritonitis rate in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuanshi; Xie, Xishao; Xiang, Shilong; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shou, Zhangfei; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Peritonitis remains a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). A high peritonitis rate (HPR) affects continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients’ technique survival and mortality. Predictors and outcomes of HPR, rather than the first peritonitis episode, were rarely studied in the Chinese population. In this study, we examined the risk factors associated with HPR and its effects on clinical outcomes in CAPD patients. This is a single center, retrospective, observational cohort study. A total of 294 patients who developing at least 1 episode of peritonitis were followed up from March 1st, 2002, to July 31, 2014, in our PD center. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with HPR, and the Cox proportional hazard model was conducted to assess the effects of HPR on clinical outcomes. During the study period of 2917.5 patient-years, 489 episodes of peritonitis were recorded, and the total peritonitis rate was 0.168 episodes per patient-year. The multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with HPR include a quick occurrence of peritonitis after CAPD initiation (shorter than 12 months), and a low serum albumin level at the start of CAPD. In the Cox proportional hazard model, HPR was a significant predictor of technique failure. There were no differences between HPR and low peritonitis rate (LPR) group for all-cause mortality. However, when the peritonitis rate was considered as a continuous variable, a positive correlation was observed between the peritonitis rate and mortality. We found the quick peritonitis occurrence after CAPD and the low serum albumin level before CAPD were strongly associated with an HPR. Also, our results verified that HPR was positively correlated with technique failure. More importantly, the increase in the peritonitis rate suggested a higher risk of all-cause mortality. These results may help to identify and target patients who are at higher risk of HPR at the start

  11. Post-acute care disparities in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lan, Roy H; Kamath, Atul F

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the socioeconomic factors that influence hospitalization and post-discharge metrics after joint replacement is important for identifying key areas of improvement in the delivery of orthopaedic care. An institutional administrative data set of 2869 patients from an academic arthroplasty referral center was analyzed to quantify the relationship between socioeconomic factors and post-acute rehabilitation care received, length of stay, and cost of care. The study used International Classification of Disease, ninth edition coding in order to identify cohorts of patients who received joint arthroplasty of the knee and hip between January 2007 and May 2015. The study found that females (odds ratio [OR], 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.74-2.46), minorities (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.78-2.51), and non-private insurance holders (OR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.26-1.94) were more likely to be assigned to institutional care after discharge. The study also found that minorities (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.24-1.70) and non-private insurance holders (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.16-1.77) are more likely to exhibit longer length of stay. Mean charges were higher for males when compared to females ($80,010 vs $74,855; P < .001), as well as total costs ($19,910 vs $18,613; P = .001). Socioeconomic factors such as gender, race, and insurance status should be further explored with respect to healthcare policies seeking to influence quality of care and health outcomes.

  12. Long-term outcomes in patients with ambulatory new york heart association class III and IV heart failure undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, John; Bassiouny, Mohammed; Tedford, Ryan J; Baranowski, Bryan; Spragg, David; Cantillon, Daniel; Varma, Niraj; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ambulatory New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV heart failure were significantly underrepresented in clinical trials of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The natural long-term trajectory of survival free of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or heart transplant in patients with ambulatory class IV symptoms who underwent CRT has not been established. We extracted clinical data on 723 consecutive patients with NYHA class III or ambulatory class IV heart failure, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%, and a QRS duration ≥120 ms who underwent CRT from September 30, 2003, to August 6, 2007. Chart notes immediately before CRT were reviewed to confirm NYHA class status before CRT. Kaplan-Meier curves and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model were constructed to determine long-term survival free of heart transplant and LVAD based on NYHA class status. Of the 723 patients, 52 had ambulatory class IV symptoms. Over a mean follow-up of 5.0 ± 2.5 years controlling for many possible confounders, ambulatory NYHA class IV status was independently associated with poor long-term outcomes. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival free of LVAD or heart transplant for class III versus ambulatory class IV patients was 92.0%, 84.0%, 75.0%, 68.1%, and 63.2% versus 75.0%, 61.5%, 52.0%, 45%, and 40.4%, respectively. Although patients with ambulatory class IV heart failure receiving CRT have inferior long-term outcomes compared with those with class III symptoms, survival in class IV patients continues to parallel class III patients over an extended follow-up. At 5 years, survival free of LVAD or heart transplant in ambulatory class IV patients receiving CRT is 40%.

  13. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction in Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinics: Findings of the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Maureen D.; Warm, Eric; Julian, Katherine A.; Rosenblum, Michael; Thomas, Kris; Drake, Sean; Gwisdalla, Keri Lyn; Langan, Michael; Nabors, Christopher; Pereira, Anne; Smith, Amy; Sweet, David; Varney, Andrew; Francis, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many internal medicine programs have reorganized their resident continuity clinics to improve the ambulatory care experience for residents. The effect of this redesign on patient satisfaction is largely unknown. Methods Our multi-institutional, cross-sectional study included 569 internal medicine residents from 11 programs participating in the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative. An 11-item patient satisfaction survey from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems was used to assess patient satisfaction, comparing patient satisfaction in traditional models of weekly continuity clinic with 2 new clinic models. We then examined the relationship between patient satisfaction and other practice variables. Results Patient satisfaction responses related to resident listening and communication skills, knowledge of medical history, perception of adequate visit time, overall rating, and willingness to refer to family and friends were significantly better in the traditional and block continuity models than the combination model. Higher ambulatory workload was associated with reduced patient perception of respect shown by the physician. The percentage of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin < 8% was positively correlated with number of visits, knowledge of medical history, perception of respect, and higher scores for recommending the physician to others. The percentage of diabetic patients with low density lipoprotein < 100 mg/dL was positively correlated with the physician showing respect. Conclusions Patient satisfaction was similar in programs using block design and traditional models for continuity clinic, and both outperformed the combination model programs. There was a delicate balance between workload and patient perception of the physician showing respect. Care outcome measures for diabetic patients were associated with aspects of patient satisfaction. PMID:26279771

  14. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction in Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinics: Findings of the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Francis, Maureen D; Warm, Eric; Julian, Katherine A; Rosenblum, Michael; Thomas, Kris; Drake, Sean; Gwisdalla, Keri Lyn; Langan, Michael; Nabors, Christopher; Pereira, Anne; Smith, Amy; Sweet, David; Varney, Andrew; Francis, Mark L

    2014-09-01

    Many internal medicine programs have reorganized their resident continuity clinics to improve the ambulatory care experience for residents. The effect of this redesign on patient satisfaction is largely unknown. Our multi-institutional, cross-sectional study included 569 internal medicine residents from 11 programs participating in the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative. An 11-item patient satisfaction survey from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems was used to assess patient satisfaction, comparing patient satisfaction in traditional models of weekly continuity clinic with 2 new clinic models. We then examined the relationship between patient satisfaction and other practice variables. Patient satisfaction responses related to resident listening and communication skills, knowledge of medical history, perception of adequate visit time, overall rating, and willingness to refer to family and friends were significantly better in the traditional and block continuity models than the combination model. Higher ambulatory workload was associated with reduced patient perception of respect shown by the physician. The percentage of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin < 8% was positively correlated with number of visits, knowledge of medical history, perception of respect, and higher scores for recommending the physician to others. The percentage of diabetic patients with low density lipoprotein < 100 mg/dL was positively correlated with the physician showing respect. Patient satisfaction was similar in programs using block design and traditional models for continuity clinic, and both outperformed the combination model programs. There was a delicate balance between workload and patient perception of the physician showing respect. Care outcome measures for diabetic patients were associated with aspects of patient satisfaction.

  15. Autonomic and Hemodynamic Correlates of Daily Life Activity and Ambulatory Myocardial Ischemia in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    angina pectoris from coronary artery disease. Am J Cardiol, 61, 989-93. Bernardi, L., Wdowczyk-Szulc, J., Valenti, C., Castoldi, S., Passino, C...stable angina pectoris . Am J Cardiol, 83, 596-8, A8. Bystritsky, A., Craske, M., Maidenberg, E., Vapnik, T. & Shapiro, D. (1995). Ambulatory monitoring...coronary arteries during dynamic exercise in patients with classic angina pectoris : reversibility by nitroglycerin. Circulation, 73, 865-76. Goldberg

  16. [Icodextrin improve angiogenesis of peritoneal membrane in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Dai, Hui-li; Lin, Ai-wu; Qian, Jia-qi; Fang, Wei; Ni, Zhao-hui; Cao, Li-ou; Lin, Xing-hui; Wu, Qing-wei

    2010-11-02

    To observe the effect of icodextrin on peritoneal membrane angiogenesis in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. This was a randomized double-blind perspective study of CAPD patients at our center between January 2006 to December 2006. The patients were randomized to receive either 7.5% icodextrin (ICO, n = 27) or glucose (GLU, n = 27) solution at night for 4 weeks. Peritoneal membrane function was defined as dialysate dwell for 4 hours to plasma ratio of creatinine (4 h D/Pcr) at baseline. Ultrafiltration volume, creatinine clearance (Ccr), VEGF and IL-6 in peritoneal effluent during the long night dwell (UF) dialysate were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks. The VEGF appearance was used to adjust the influences of dwell time and ultrafiltration volume. A total of 54 patients were enrolled. The baseline conditions showed no difference between the groups. After 2 and 4 weeks of therapy, both net UF and peritoneal creatinine clearance of long dwell were significantly higher in the ICO group than the GLU group. VEGF in night dwell PD solution was positively correlated with D/PCr (r = 0.68, P < 0.01)and negatively correlated to 4 hour ultrafiltration volume (r = -0.51, P < 0.01). The VEGF appearance was comparable between two groups at baseline. After a follow-up of 4 weeks, the VEGF appearance had an increasing tendency in the GLU group and a decreasing tendency in the ICO group but there was no significant difference. The ΔVEGF appearance (VEGF appearance in 4 week-VEGF appearance at baseline) was different between the GLU and ICO groups (9.5 ± 20.2 vs -13.4 ± 26.1, P < 0.01). IL-6 in night dwell dialysate had no difference between two groups. As compared with glucose-based solution, 7.5% icodextrin significantly decreases the local VEGF level in dialysate.

  17. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: perspectives on patient selection in low- to middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Wearne, Nicola; Kilonzo, Kajiru; Effa, Emmanuel; Davidson, Bianca; Nourse, Peter; Ekrikpo, Udeme; Okpechi, Ikechi G

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem that continues to show an unrelenting global increase in prevalence. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease has been predicted to grow the fastest in low- to middle-income countries (LMICs). There is evidence that people living in LMICs have the highest need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) despite the lowest access to various modalities of treatment. As continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) does not require advanced technologies, much infrastructure, or need for dialysis staff support, it should be an ideal form of RRT in LMICs, particularly for those living in remote areas. However, CAPD is scarcely available in many LMICs, and even where available, there are several hurdles to be confronted regarding patient selection for this modality. High cost of CAPD due to unavailability of fluids, low patient education and motivation, low remuneration for nephrologists, lack of expertise/experience for catheter insertion and management of complications, presence of associated comorbid diseases, and various socio-demographic factors contribute significantly toward reduced patient selection for CAPD. Cost of CAPD fluids seems to be a major constraint given that many countries do not have the capacity to manufacture fluids but instead rely heavily on fluids imported from developed countries. There is need to invest in fluid manufacturing (either nationally or regionally) in LMICs to improve uptake of patients treated with CAPD. Workforce training and retraining will be necessary to ensure that there is coordination of CAPD programs and increase the use of protocols designed to improve CAPD outcomes such as insertion of catheters, treatment of peritonitis, and treatment of complications associated with CAPD. Training of nephrology workforce in CAPD will increase workforce experience and make CAPD a more acceptable RRT modality with improved outcomes. PMID:28115864

  18. Predictors of Residual Renal Function Decline in Patients Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Szeto, Cheuk-Chun; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Chow, Kai-Ming; Chung, Sebastian; Yu, Vincent; Cheng, Phyllis Mei-Shan; Leung, Chi-Bon; Law, Man-Ching; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Background: Residual renal function (RRF) is an important prognostic indicator in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. We determined the predictors of RRF loss in a cohort of incident CAPD patients. ♦ Methods: We reviewed the record of 645 incident CAPD patients. RRF loss is represented by the slope of decline of residual glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as well as the time to anuria. ♦ Results: The average rate of residual GFR decline was -0.083 ± 0.094 mL/min/month. The rate of residual GFR decline was faster with a higher proteinuria (r = -0.506, p < 0.0001) and baseline residual GFR (r = -0.560, p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that proteinuria, baseline residual GFR, and the use of diuretics were independent predictors of residual GFR decline. Cox proportional hazard model showed that proteinuria, glucose exposure, and the number of peritonitis episodes were independent predictors of progression to anuria, while a higher baseline GFR was protective. Each 1 g/day of proteinuria is associated with a 13.2% increase in the risk of progressing to anuria, each 10 g/day higher glucose exposure is associated with a 2.5% increase in risk, while each peritonitis episode confers a 3.8% increase in risk. ♦ Conclusions: Our study shows that factors predicting the loss of residual solute clearance and urine output are different. Proteinuria, baseline residual GFR, and the use of diuretics are independently related to the rate of RRF decline in CAPD patients, while proteinuria, glucose exposure, and the number of peritonitis episodes are independent predictors for the development of anuria. The role of anti-proteinuric therapy and measures to prevent peritonitis episodes in the preservation of RRF should be tested in future studies. PMID:24497594

  19. Severe “sweet” pleural effusion in a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Rapeephan R.; Barretti, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hydrothorax is a rare complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) which can progress quickly to cause acute respiratory distress. Case presentation We present a 76 year-old female with a past medical history significant for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on daily home peritoneal dialysis for 2 years presented to the hospital from home with shortness of breath at rest and cough for 2 days prior to admission. She developed severe respiratory distress and had emergent pleurocentesis that released 3.8 L of pleural fluid. The analysis showed significantly high sugar indicative of hydrothorax from CAPD. She underwent thoracotomy with pleurodesis and switched to hemodialysis for 6 weeks before resuming CAPD. Conclusion A high glucose concentration in the pleural fluid is pathognomonic for hydrothorax from dialysis fluid after rule out other possible causes of pleural effusion. Patients who are on CAPD presenting with marked pleural effusion should prompt clinicians to consider the differential diagnosis of pleuroperitoneal communications. PMID:26029545

  20. Association between red cell distribution width and mortality in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Peng; Tsai, Shr-Mei; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Although red cell distribution width (RDW) has emerged as a biomarker of clinical prognostic value across a variety of clinical settings in the last two decades, limited evidence is available for its role in end-stage renal disease. We enrolled 313 incident patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in this retrospective observational study from 2006 to 2015. In the fully adjusted model of Cox regression analysis, the adjusted hazard ratios for the high RDW group versus the low RDW group were 2.58 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.31–5.09, p = 0.006) and 3.48 (95% CI = 1.44–8.34, p = 0.006) for all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, respectively. Based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analysis, RDW (AUC = 0.699) had a stronger predictive value for all-cause and CVD-related mortality than other biological markers including hemoglobin (AUC = 0.51), ferritin (AUC = 0.584), iron saturation (AUC = 0.535), albumin (AUC = 0.683) and white blood cell count (AUC = 0.588). Given that RDW is a readily available hematological parameter without the need for additional cost, we suggest that it can be used as a valuable index to stratify the risk of mortality beyond a diagnosis of anemia. PMID:28367961

  1. Clinical value of ambulatory blood pressure in pediatric patients after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Krmar, Rafael T; Ferraris, Jorge R

    2017-08-25

    Hypertension is a highly prevalent co-morbidity in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Undertreated hypertension is associated with cardiovascular complications and negatively impacts renal graft survival. Thus, the accurate measurement of blood pressure is of the utmost importance for the correct diagnosis and subsequent management of post-renal transplant hypertension. Data derived from the general population, and to a lesser extent from the pediatric population, indicates that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is superior to blood pressure measurements taken in the clinical setting for the evaluation of true mean blood pressure, identification of patients requiring antihypertensive treatment, and in the prediction of cardiovascular outcome. This Educational Review will discuss the clinical value of ABPM in the identification of individual blood pressure phenotypes, i.e., normotension, new-onset hypertension, white-coat hypertension, masked hypertension, controlled blood pressure, and undertreated/uncontrolled hypertension in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Finally, we examine the utility of performing repeated ABPM for treatment monitoring of post-renal transplant hypertension and on surrogate markers related to relevant clinical cardiovascular outcomes. Taken together, our review highlights the clinical value of the routine use of ABPM as a tool for identifying and monitoring hypertension in pediatric kidney transplant recipients.

  2. Correlation between ambulatory function and clinical factors in hemiplegic patients with intact single lateral corticospinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To define the relationship between the complete destruction of 1 lateral corticospinal tract (CST), as demonstrated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, and ambulatory function 6 months following stroke. Twenty-six adults (17 male, 9 female) with poststroke hemiplegia who were transferred to the physical medicine and rehabilitation department. Participants underwent DTI tractography, which showed that 1 lateral CST had been clearly destroyed. Functional ambulation classification (FAC) scores at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the patients’ ability to walk. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the Korean version of the modified Barthel index (K-MBI) at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the degree of functional recovery. Of the 26 patients, 18 were nonambulatory (FAC level 1–3), and 8 were able to walk without support (FAC level 4–6). The type of stroke (infarction or hemorrhage), site of the lesion, spasticity of lower extremities, cranioplasty, and the time taken from onset to MRI were not statistically significantly correlated with the ability to walk. However, statistically significant correlations were found in relation to age, K-MBI scores, and initial NIHSS scores. Despite the complete damage to the lesion site and the preservation of 1 unilateral CST, as shown by DTI, good outcomes can be predicted on the basis of younger age, low NIHSS scores, and high MBI scores at onset. PMID:27495041

  3. The patient is the teacher: ambulatory patient-centred student-based interprofessional education where the patient is the teacher who improves patient care outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fiddes, P J; Brooks, P M; Komesaroff, P

    2013-07-01

    The patient's role as the key to medical student education was enunciated by Osler in 1903 and remains central to the broader imperative of interprofessional education. Interprofessional education needs to progress from the patient's passive bedside or office role to assume a more active and primary role by his/her participation as the teacher, immersed in student education. To date, the achievements in interprofessional education have been limited, but ambulatory patient-centred learning opportunities involving direct student to patient dialogues and mixed health professional student engagement with patients as teachers are emerging within various interprofessional student clinic formats. There is good evidence that such approaches lead to actual improvements in patient outcomes.

  4. Post-Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tiffanie K; Fuchs, Barry D; Small, Dylan S; Halpern, Scott D; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A; Baillie, Charles A; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F; Mikkelsen, Mark E

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of post-acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. To examine the rate of post-acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010-2012), we compared post-acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Post-acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0-26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38-1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Post-acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with adverse readmission outcomes.

  5. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients are unable to increase dietary intake to recommended levels.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Debbie; Higgins, Bernie; Stevens, Judith M

    2007-09-01

    This study's objective was to determine whether offering dietary advice was effective in supporting patients in adjusting energy intake. We performed a prospective, randomized, controlled trial of dietary intervention involving 59 patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis over a 4-month follow-up period. The study involved outpatients on home-based renal replacement therapy. All participants were adult patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. All eligible patients were invited to take part. Subjects were randomized into two groups: control and intervention. Those with diabetes mellitus, malabsorption, malignancy, or eating disorders were excluded. Baseline measurements to assess current dietary intake and nutritional status were performed in all subjects. Measurements included a 5-day food diary, subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometry, and serum biochemistry. After analysis of the food diaries, the participants in the control group were given follow-up dietary advice that would enable them to match intake with current dietary recommendations for this group of 1.2 g of protein per kilogram of ideal body weight, 25 cal/kg ideal body weight. Participants in the intervention group were given follow-up dietary advice that would encourage them to match energy intake with an estimate of total energy expenditure based on their calculated basal metabolic rate and physical activity level as designated using information from SGA, with a significantly lower protein intake of 0.8 to 1.0 g/kg ideal body weight and an emphasis on calories from carbohydrate and fat. Both groups completed further 5-day food diaries at 2 and 4 months to assess their ability to make the recommended changes. SGA, anthropometry, and biochemistry were all remeasured at the end of the study period. Differences in energy and protein intakes between and within the two groups from baseline to 4 months were assessed. Protein and energy intakes did not change during 4

  6. Risk Factors for Mortality in Chinese Patients on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Hong; Gong, Xiaoli; Liu, Fuyou; Peng, Youming; Cheng, Meichu; Zhang, Hongqing; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yuyuan; Guo, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Objective: The intent of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome and risk factors affecting mortality of the continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients in a single peritoneal dialysis (PD) center over a period of 10 years. ♦ Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients on PD from June 2001 to June 2011. The clinical and biochemical data were collected from the medical records. Clinical variables included gender, age at the start of PD, smoking status, body mass index (BMI), cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), presence of diabetes mellitus and blood pressure. Biochemical variables included hemoglobin, urine volume, residual renal function (RRF), serum albumin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, total cholesterol, triglyceride, comorbidities, and outcomes. Survival curves were made by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses to identify mortality risk factors were performed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. ♦ Results: A total of 421 patients were enrolled, 269 of whom were male (63.9%). The mean age at the start of PD was 57.9 ± 14.8 years. Chronic glomerulonephritis was the most common cause of ESRD (39.4%). Estimation of patient survival by Kaplan-Meier was 92.5%, 80.2%, 74.4%, and 55.7% at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Patient survival was associated with age (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.641 [1.027 – 2.622], p = 0.038), cardiovascular disease (HR: 1.731 [1.08 – 2.774], p = 0.023), hypertriglyceridemia (HR: 1.782 [1.11 – 2.858], p = 0.017) in the Cox proportional hazards model analysis. Estimation of technique survival by Kaplan-Meier was 86.7%, 68.8%, 55.7%, and 37.4% at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years, respectively. In the Cox proportional hazards model analysis, age (HR: 1.672 [1.176 – 2.377], p = 0.004) and hypertriglyceridemia (HR: 1.511 [1.050 – 2.174], p = 0.026) predicted technique failure. ♦ Conclusion: The PD patients in our center exhibited comparable or even

  7. Divestment of Beds and Related Ambulatory Services to Other Communities While Maintaining a Patient- and Family-Centred Approach.

    PubMed

    Corring, Deborah J; Gibson, Deborah; MustinPowell, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Individuals living with serious mental illness who require acute and/or tertiary mental healthcare services represent one of the most complex patient groups in the healthcare service delivery system. Provincial mental health policy has been committed to providing services closer to home and in the community rather than an institution wherever possible for some time. This paper articulates the strategies used by one organization to ensure the successful transfer of beds and related ambulatory services to four separate communities. In addition a case study is also provided to describe in more detail the complex changes that took place in order to accomplish the divestments of beds and related ambulatory services to one of the partner hospitals.

  8. Comparing patients seen in pediatric resident continuity clinics and national ambulatory medical care survey practices: a study from the continuity research network.

    PubMed

    Serwint, Janet R; Thoma, Kathleen A; Dabrow, Sharon M; Hunt, Lynn E; Barratt, Michelle S; Shope, Timothy R; Darden, Paul M

    2006-09-01

    The goal was to compare visit data from Continuity Research Network practices with data for a nationally representative sample of pediatric visits in practice settings from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. A cross-sectional study comparing data for Continuity Research Network practice visits during a 1-week period in 2002 with data from the 2000 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey was performed. Continuity Research Network and National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data were derived from 30 patient visits per practice site for patients < 22 years of age, with the primary care providers being residents and practicing pediatricians, respectively. Eighteen Continuity Research Network practices reported on 540 visits, compared with 32 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey physicians reporting on 792 visits. Continuity Research Network patients were more likely to be black non-Hispanic or Hispanic/Latino and to have public insurance. The top 5 reasons for visits were the same for Continuity Research Network and National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey visits, although the orders varied slightly. These 5 reasons accounted for 58% of Continuity Research Network visits and 49% of National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey visits. Continuity Research Network visits were more likely to result in patient instructions to return at a specific time (78% vs 52%). Residents in Continuity Research Network practices provide care to more underserved patients but evaluate problems that are similar to those observed in office practices; the Continuity Research Network practices thus provide important training experiences for residents who will serve both minority and nonminority children.

  9. The relationship between dietary salt intake and ambulatory blood pressure variability in non-diabetic hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ozkayar, Nihal; Dede, Fatih; Ates, Ihsan; Akyel, Fatma; Yildirim, Tolga; Altun, Bulent

    High dietary salt intake was reported to increase blood pressure by numerous studies, but no study has investigated the effect of dietary salt intake on blood pressure variability (BPV). This study aimed to determine if daily salt intake is related to ambulatory BPV. The study included 136 primary hypertensive patients (92 male, 44 female) with a mean age of 50.7±11.1 years. All the patients underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to determine both the 24-h systolic and 24-h diastolic BPV. 24-h urine sodium was measured. The correlation between BPV and 24-h urinary sodium was investigated. Logarithmic transformation of 24-h urinary sodium [log(24-h urinary sodium)] was positively correlated with the mean 24-h systolic ARV, and nighttime systolic ARV (r=0.371 and p=0.001, r=0.329 and p=0.028, respectively). Similarly, log(24-h urinary sodium) was positively correlated with mean 24-h diastolic ARV and nighttime diastolic ARV (r=0.381 and p=0.001, r=0.320 and p=0.020 respectively). Log(24-h urinary sodium) was an independent predictor of BPV based on multivariate regression analysis. Dietary salt intake might play a role in the pathogenesis of ambulatory BPV. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a new patient-based measure of pediatric ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patricia; Ding, Lin; Ham, Hazen P; Schor, Edward L; Hays, Ron D; Cleary, Paul D

    2009-11-01

    In 1995, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research initiated the Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) project to develop and evaluate survey protocols for collecting reliable and valid assessments of health care from consumers. CAHPS surveys are used throughout the United States for evaluating ambulatory and hospital care experiences, including a version for assessing pediatric ambulatory care; however, pediatric experts thought that the existing pediatric instruments did not adequately assess developmental and preventive care. The objective of this study was to develop and test an Ambulatory Pediatric CAHPS survey that focuses on clinicians and groups and includes measures of developmental and preventive care. To develop the survey, we conducted 2 focus groups and conducted 9 cognitive interviews. We conducted a telephone pretest with 20 parents and coded potential problems with the interview (behavioral coding). We conducted a dual-language field test of the instrument with 670 parents who reported about their children's ambulatory care. We used data from that survey to assess the reliability and validity of the measures. Questions about developmental monitoring and preventive care were developed and tested. Two scales that were based on those new questions had good internal consistency (coefficient alpha) and inter-physician reliability. A consortium of CAHPS investigators and federal sponsors have approved the resulting instrument as a national measure of pediatric care. A new instrument for assessing ambulatory pediatric care by clinicians and groups that includes questions about developmental and preventive care is now available for use.

  11. Development of a New Patient-Based Measure of Pediatric Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Patricia; Ding, Lin; Ham, Hazen P.; Schor, Edward L.; Hays, Ron D.; Cleary, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In 1995, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research initiated the Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) project to develop and evaluate survey protocols for collecting reliable and valid assessments of health care from consumers. CAHPS surveys are used throughout the United States for evaluating ambulatory and hospital care experiences, including a version for assessing pediatric ambulatory care; however, pediatric experts thought that the existing pediatric instruments did not adequately assess developmental and preventive care. The objective of this study was to develop and test an Ambulatory Pediatric CAHPS survey that focuses on clinicians and groups and includes measures of developmental and preventive care. METHODS To develop the survey, we conducted 2 focus groups and conducted 9 cognitive interviews. We conducted a telephone pretest with 20 parents and coded potential problems with the interview (behavioral coding). We conducted a dual-language field test of the instrument with 670 parents who reported about their children’s ambulatory care. We used data from that survey to assess the reliability and validity of the measures. RESULTS Questions about developmental monitoring and preventive care were developed and tested. Two scales that were based on those new questions had good internal consistency (coefficient α) and interphysician reliability. A consortium of CAHPS investigators and federal sponsors have approved the resulting instrument as a national measure of pediatric care. CONCLUSIONS A new instrument for assessing ambulatory pediatric care by clinicians and groups that includes questions about developmental and preventive care is now available for use. PMID:19822587

  12. Assessing the relationship between patient satisfaction and clinical quality in an ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    Bosko, Tawnya; Wilson, Kathryn

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the relationship between patient satisfaction and a variety of clinical quality measures in an ambulatory setting to determine if there is significant overlap between patient satisfaction and clinical quality or if they are separate domains of overall physician quality. Assessing this relationship will help to determine whether there is congruence between different types of clinical quality performance and patient satisfaction and therefore provide insight to appropriate financial structures for physicians. Design/methodology/approach Ordered probit regression analysis is conducted with overall rating of physician from patient satisfaction responses to the Clinician and Groups Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey as the dependent variable. Physician clinical quality is measured across five composite groups based on 26 Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures aggregated from patient electronic health records. Physician and patient demographic variables are also included in the model. Findings Better physician performance on HEDIS measures are correlated with increases in patient satisfaction for three composite measures: antibiotics, generics, and vaccination; it has no relationship for chronic conditions and is correlated with decrease in patient satisfaction for preventative measures, although the negative relationship for preventative measures is not robust in sensitivity analysis. In addition, younger physicians and male physicians have higher satisfaction scores even with the HEDIS quality measures in the regression. Research limitations/implications There are four primary limitations to this study. First, the data for the study come from a single hospital provider organization. Second, the survey response rate for the satisfaction measure is low. Third, the physician clinical quality measure is the percent of the physician's relevant patient population that met

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Quinupristin-Dalfopristin in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Curtis A.; Taylor, Claude A.; Zimmerman, Stephen W.; Bridson, William E.; Chevalier, Paul; Pasquier, Olivier; Baybutt, Robert I.

    1999-01-01

    Quinupristin-dalfopristin may be useful for treatment of organisms causing peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis, including methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. The pharmacokinetic profiles of single intravenous doses of this combination streptogramin antibiotic of 7.5 mg/kg of body weight were characterized for eight noninfected patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Comparison was made to pharmacokinetic profiles determined for eight healthy volunteers matched by age, sex, and race. Drug was measured in dialysate up to 6 h following the dose. Plasma and dialysate were assayed for parent compounds and metabolites. Mean pharmacokinetic parameters were compared between groups. No statistically significant differences were observed between groups for maximal concentrations in plasma, times to maximal concentration, areas under the curve, distribution volumes, rates of total body clearance, or half-lives in plasma for quinupristin and dalfopristin. No statistically significant differences were observed in maximal concentrations in plasma, times to maximal concentration, areas under the curve, or half-lives for cysteine, the glutathione conjugates of quinupristin, or the pristinamycin IIA metabolite of dalfopristin. The measurements in dialysate of the parent and most metabolites were below the expected MICs. Dialysis clearance was insignificant. Quinupristin-dalfopristin was well tolerated in both groups, causing only mild adverse events that resolved prior to discharge from the study. The disposition of quinupristin, dalfopristin, or their primary metabolites following a single dose was unaltered in patients receiving peritoneal dialysis. Intravenous dosing of this antibiotic combination is unlikely to be adequate for the treatment of peritonitis associated with peritoneal dialysis. PMID:9869581

  14. Acute cardiovascular effects of the Wenchuan earthquake: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring of hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yucheng; Li, Jing; Xian, Hong; Li, JiangBo; Liu, Si; Liu, GuanJian; Lin, JianNan; Han, Jun; Zeng, Zhi

    2009-09-01

    An increased incidence of cardiovascular events and sudden death occurs after an earthquake. However, the mechanism underlying this is not clear. Previous studies attributed this phenomenon to earthquake-induced elevation of sympathetic activity. This study investigated the acute cardiovascular effects of the Wenchuan earthquake on hypertensive or suspected hypertensive patients. We studied the role of earthquake-induced changes in blood pressure and heart rate in the occurrence of post-earthquake cardiovascular events. This study included 11 patients who were undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring when the Wenchuan earthquake occurred. Trends in blood pressure and heart rate were analyzed, and blood pressure variability (BPV) data were obtained. The mean post-earthquake blood pressure rose rapidly from 125.8+/-17.3/72.1+/-11.9 to 150.5+/-20.3/98+/-10.6 mm Hg (average time of first measurement was 13.8+/-6.3 min after the first tremor), and blood pressure remained high until 6 h after the earthquake. Nighttime blood pressure declined to the mean pre-earthquake daytime levels. The mean daytime blood pressure after the earthquake was greater than the pre-earthquake daytime mean (systolic blood pressure: 138.9+/-14.6 vs. 129.5+/-13.6 mm Hg, P=0.009; diastolic blood pressure (DBP): 81.8+/-13.1 vs. 76.9+/-11.9 mm Hg, P=0.011). Pre- and post-earthquake BPV differed among individuals, but circadian variation was absent in all cases and nightly decreases were less than 10%. These data strongly suggest that significant post-earthquake elevation of blood pressure and abnormal circadian variation of blood pressure are related to the occurrence of post-earthquake cardiovascular events.

  15. Relationship between Ambulatory BP and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Hypertensive CKD

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahboob; Hu, Bo; Appel, Lawrence J.; Charleston, Jeanne; Contreras, Gabriel; Faulkner, Marquetta L.; Hiremath, Leena; Jamerson, Kenneth A.; Lea, Janice P.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Pogue, Velvie A.; Rostand, Stephen G.; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw J.; Wright, Jackson T.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer; Wang, Xuelei; Phillips, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Abnormal ambulatory BP (ABP) profiles are commonplace in CKD, yet the prognostic value of ABP for renal and cardiovascular outcomes is uncertain. This study assessed the relationship of baseline ABP profiles with CKD progression and subsequent cardiovascular outcomes to determine the prognostic value of ABP beyond that of clinic BP measurements. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Between 2002 and 2003, 617 African Americans with hypertensive CKD treated to a clinic BP goal of <130/80 mmHg were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. Participants were followed for a median of 5 years. Primary renal outcome was a composite of doubling of serum creatinine, ESRD, or death. The primary cardiovascular outcome was a composite of myocardial infarction, hospitalized congestive heart failure, stroke, revascularization procedures, cardiovascular death, and ESRD. Results Multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that higher 24-hour systolic BP (SBP), daytime, night-time, and clinic SBP were each associated with subsequent renal (hazard ratio, 1.17–1.28; P<0.001) and cardiovascular outcomes (hazard ratio, 1.22–1.32; P<0.001). After controlling for clinic SBP, ABP measures were predictive of renal outcomes in participants with clinic SBP <130 mmHg (P<0.05 for interaction). ABP predicted cardiovascular outcomes with no interaction based on clinic BP control. Conclusions ABP provides additional information beyond that of multiple clinic BP measures in predicting renal and cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive CKD. The primary utility of ABP in these CKD patients was to identify high-risk individuals among those patients with controlled clinic BP. PMID:22935847

  16. Medium-term results of Mini-arc for urinary stress incontinence in ambulatory patients under local anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Almog; Nasra, Rasha; Shachar, Inbar Ben; Braun, Naama Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the medium-term outcome and patient's satisfaction after Single-incision mini-sling (SIMS) procedure done under local anesthesia in ambulatory set up for patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Materials and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study, including all patients submitted to SIMS procedure for SUI with MiniArc (AMS, U.S.A) without concomitant surgery between January 2011 and March 2013. Patients were followed up during 12 months after surgery and once a year subsequently. Telephone interviews were conducted to evaluate patient satisfaction. Outcome masseurs included: SUI cure rate, urinary urge incontinence (UUI) cure rate in patients with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI), intra and post-operative complications and patient satisfaction. Results Ninety-three patients were included with mean follow-up of 23 months. Fifty percent had MUI with predominant SUI. The cure rates of SUI (objective and subjective) were 89%. UUI was cured in 40% of patients. No major complications occur, neither voiding obstruction or groin pain. Telephone interviews conducted after 26 months on average revealed high satisfaction rate from the procedure (8.8 out of 10) and from the local anesthesia. Visual analog scale (VAS) rating was low during and after the procedure (2.38 and 2.69 respectively). Conclusions The SIMS procedure is safe and highly effective for SUI and it can be performed successfully under local anesthesia in an ambulatory setup. PMID:27813384

  17. Comparing patients who leave the ED prematurely, before vs after medical evaluation: a National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey analysis.

    PubMed

    Moe, Jessica; Belsky, Justin Brett

    2016-05-01

    Many patients leave the Emergency Department (ED) before beginning or completing medical evaluation. Some of these patients may be at higher medical risk depending on their timing of leaving the ED. To compare patient, hospital, and visit characteristics of patients who leave before completing medical care to patients who leave before ED evaluation. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of ED visits using the 2009-2011 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. A total of 100962 ED visits were documented in the 2009-2011 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, representing a weighted count of 402211907 total ED visits. 2646 (2.62%) resulted in a disposition of left without completing medical care. Of these visits, 1792 (67.7%) left before being seen by a medical provider versus 854 (32.3%) who left after medical provider evaluation but before a final disposition. Patients who left after being assessed by a medical provider were older, had higher acuity visits, were more likely to have visited an ED without nursing triage, arrived more often by ambulance, and were more likely to have private insurance than to be self-paying or to have other payment arrangements (e.g. worker's compensation or charity/no charge). When comparing all patients who left the ED before completion of care, those who left after versus before medical provider evaluation differed in their patient, hospital, and visit characteristics and may represent a high risk patient group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Patient satisfaction in ambulatory cataract surgery : Differences between outpatients in a special surgery or in a hospital].

    PubMed

    Stein, I; Schoenfelder, T; Kugler, J

    2017-01-03

    The evaluation of patient satisfaction provides important information about subjective quality indicators from the patient's perspective. In Germany, cataract surgery is mostly done ambulatory in a special surgery or in a hospital. This study examines if there are differences in global patient satisfaction of either outpatient setting and if there are different determinants of global satisfaction with regard to the outpatient settings. The survey comprises ambulatory operated cataract patients in Saxony between 2014 and 2015. A total of 4800 cataract patients sent back a standardized, written questionnaire. Regression analysis identified determinants of global patient satisfaction in both groups. The most influencing parameters for the global satisfaction were satisfaction with the treatment outcome, atmosphere and facilities in the surgery or hospital as well as the staff's level of kindness. Results of the conducted study show most identified determinants of patient satisfaction are associated with service variables, such as atmosphere and facilities in surgery or hospital and waiting time in surgery or hospital. These aspects should be focused on to improve patient satisfaction in cataract patients.

  19. Utility of ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH and motility monitoring in noncardiac chest pain: report of 90 patients and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lacima, Gloria; Grande, Luis; Pera, Manuel; Francino, Antonio; Ros, Emilio

    2003-05-01

    It is unclear whether prolonged motility monitoring improves the diagnostic yield of standard esophageal tests in patients with noncardiac chest pain. Our aim was to assess the diagnostic value of ambulatory 24-hr pH and pressure monitoring in patients with noncardiac chest pain. Stationary manometry, edrophonium testing, and ambulatory pH and motility studies were performed in 90 consecutive patients with recurrent chest pain and normal coronary angiograms. Normality limits of ambulatory 24-hr motility were established in 30 healthy controls. The diagnoses of specific esophageal motility disorders (nutcracker esophagus and diffuse esophageal spasm) by stationary and ambulatory manometry were discordant in 48% of the patients. Edrophonium testing was positive in 9 patients, but correlated poorly with esophageal diagnoses. During ambulatory studies, 144 chest pain events occurred in 42 patients, and 72 (50%) were related to esophageal dysfunction. Strict temporal associations of events with esophageal dysfunction in relation to ambulatory 24-hr pH/motility scores permitted four patient categorizations: true positives (event-related and abnormal tests), N = 15; true negatives (event-unrelated and abnormal tests), N = 10; reduced esophageal pain threshold (event-related and normal tests), N = 4; and indeterminate origin (event-unrelated and normal tests), N = 13. Overall, 19 patients (21%) had a probable esophageal cause for chest pain (14 esophageal motility disorder, 4 acid reflux, 1 both). In conclusion, ambulatory manometry increases the diagnostic yield of standard esophageal testing in noncardiac chest pain, but the gain is small. Causes of chest pain other than high esophageal pressures and acid reflux must still be sought in most patients with chest pain of unknown origin after a negative cardiac work-up.

  20. Medication Errors in Ambulatory Paediatric Patient Setting--How Close, or Far, are we from an Error Free Process?

    PubMed

    Elashwah, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The medication management pathway (MMP) outlines the medication journey from the decision to prescribe through to monitoring the outcomes. Medication errors (MEs) can occur at any point of the pathway. MEs in children may result in poor health outcomes; and as children are more vulnerable to dose calculation and administration errors especially in the ambulatory setting, this cohort may be at a higher risk of adverse outcomes. This review aimed to identify MEs in children and attribute them to the steps within the MMP for paediatric ambulatory patients. A systematic search of studies related to MEs in children was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts in the period from Jan 1991 to June 2011, using keywords pertaining to children, medication errors and ambulatory settings. Thirty articles met the review inclusion criteria and the findings of these studies were reported. Based on the MMP, 26 studies reported prescribing errors, 7 dispensing errors, and 12 administration errors. Twelve studies reported errors at more than one time point within the MMP; four studies at 2 stages and 8 studies at 3 stages. The most common types of the errors identified were dose errors which commonly occurred during prescribing, dispensing, or administration. Studies have highlighted that MEs occurring in children, with most of the errors reported at the prescribing stage. This could be a reflection of the studies' focus, and further work is needed to review errors occurring at other time points during the medication management cycle. Identifying where errors occur will contribute to the development of novel strategies to detect and prevent these errors in ambulatory settings.

  1. [Double post-acute myocardial infarction complication: rupture of the interventricular septum and acute mitral insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Curcio Ruigómez, A; Martín Jiménez, J; Wilhelmi Ayza, M; Soria Delgado, J L

    1997-02-01

    We present a case of double post acute myocardial infarction complication: ventricular septal defect and acute and severe mitral insufficiency. As a consequence of the delay in the diagnosis, the patient developed pulmonary hypertension with values at the systemic level. The patient underwent surgery in order to close the ventricular septal defect and aneurysmectomy, resulting in posterior regression of mitral insufficiency and pulmonary circuit values became normal. The ethology, diagnosis, evolution and treatment of this exceptional association of acute post myocardial infarction complications are discussed.

  2. Cervical spine surgery performed in ambulatory surgical centers: Are patients being put at increased risk?

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spine surgeons are being increasingly encouraged to perform cervical operations in outpatient ambulatory surgical centers (ASC). However, some studies/data coming out of these centers are provided by spine surgeons who are part or full owners/shareholders. In Florida, for example, there was a 50% increase in ASC (5349) established between 2000–2007; physicians had a stake (invested) in 83%, and outright owned 43% of ASC. Data regarding “excessive” surgery by ASC surgeon-owners from Idaho followed shortly thereafter. Methods: The risks/complications attributed to 3279 cervical spine operations performed in 6 ASC studies were reviewed. Several studies claimed 99% discharge rates the day of the surgery. They also claimed major complications were “picked up” within the average postoperative observation window (e.g., varying from 4–23 hours), allowing for appropriate treatment without further sequelae. Results: Morbidity rates for outpatient cervical spine ASC studies (e.g. some with conflicts of interest) varied up to 0.8–6%, whereas morbidity rates for 3 inpatient cervical studies ranged up to 19.3%. For both groups, morbidity included postoperative dysphagia, epidural hematomas, neck swelling, vocal cord paralysis, and neurological deterioration. Conclusions: Although we have no clear documentation as to their safety, “excessive” and progressively complex cervical surgical procedures are increasingly being performed in ASC. Furthermore, we cannot rely upon ASC-based data. At least some demonstrate an inherent conflict of interest and do not veridically report major morbidity/mortality rates for outpatient procedures. For now, cervical spine surgery performed in ASC would appear to be putting patients at increased risk for the benefit of their surgeon-owners. PMID:27843687

  3. Repeated Burkholderia cepacia Peritonitis in a Patient Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, B L; Velickovic-Radovanovic, R M; Andjelkovic-Apostolovic, M R; Cvetkovic, T P; Dinic, M M; Radivojevic, J D

    2015-06-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (B cepacia) is a rare opportunistic pathogen in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritonitis. We describe the first case of repeated B cepacia CAPD peritonitis, occurring in an outpatient environment, treated with antimicrobial medication without peritoneal catheter removal. B cepacia may lead to repeat infection, therefore, we should insist on catheter removal during each peritonitis episode.

  4. Repeated Burkholderia cepacia Peritonitis in a Patient Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Apostolovic, BL; Velickovic-Radovanovic, RM; Andjelkovic-Apostolovic, MR; Cvetkovic, TP; Dinic, MM; Radivojevic, JD

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia cepacia (B cepacia) is a rare opportunistic pathogen in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritonitis. We describe the first case of repeated B cepacia CAPD peritonitis, occurring in an outpatient environment, treated with antimicrobial medication without peritoneal catheter removal. B cepacia may lead to repeat infection, therefore, we should insist on catheter removal during each peritonitis episode. PMID:26426187

  5. Prevalence of memory disorders in ambulatory patients aged ≥70 years with chronic heart failure (from the EFICARE study).

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien; de Groote, Pascal; Galinier, Michel; Isnard, Richard; Logeart, Damien; Komajda, Michel

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this multicenter observational study conducted in France was to determine the prevalence of memory impairment in ambulatory patients aged≥70 years with chronic heart failure (HF). Two hundred ninety-one cardiologists recruited 912 ambulatory patients with HF (mean age 79.2±5.8 years) from January to November 2009. Memory was evaluated by the delayed-recall Memory Impairment Screen (MIS-D). Memory impairment was defined as MIS-D score≤6 and severe memory impairment as MIS-D score≤4. HF was diagnosed 4.4±4.8 years earlier and mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 43.6±12.0%. Memory impairment was found in 416 subjects (45.6%, 95% confidence interval 42.4 to 48.8) and severe memory impairment in 213 subjects (23.4%, 95% confidence interval 20.6 to 26.1), whereas cardiologists only suspected memory impairment in 109 patients (12%; before evaluation by MIS). Determinants of memory disorders included older age, lower education level, depression, history of stroke, renal failure, and less regular physical activity. The severity of memory impairment increased with increasing severity of HF (New York Heart Association classification; p<0.00001). In conclusion, memory impairment in older patients with HF is common. The use of a simple-to-use tool such as the MIS-D may identify patients at risk and enable implementation of management strategies to improve therapeutic compliance.

  6. Integrating patient safety and clinical pharmacy services into the care of a high-risk, ambulatory population: a collaborative approach.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Carolyn M; Stillwell, Tracy; Johnson, Deborah; Wilson, Sally; Fitzgerald, Lynn

    2013-06-01

    Lincoln Community Health Center participated in a Health Resources and Services Administration-sponsored Patient Safety and Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative aimed at facilitating integration of pharmacy services proven to enhance patient safety into care provided to a high-risk, ambulatory population. The Collaborative used the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle of learning from the Model for Improvement endorsed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement to guide changes. Outcomes targeted for improvement included medication reconciliation, obesity screening and follow-up planning, adverse drug events (patient safety), and delivery of clinical pharmacy services. Primary changes that resulted from conducting 54 PDSA cycles of learning included enhanced data access, centralized medication access through formulary expansion, implemented a medication reconciliation guideline, designated a single point of accountability in the pharmacy, improved efficiency, staff performed nontraditional roles, extended the existing adverse drug event program, and improved communication. Changes made to integrate patient safety and clinical pharmacy services into the care of a high-risk, ambulatory population not only improved all targeted outcomes but also helped establish Lincoln Community Health Center as the patient's medical home.

  7. The comparison of QT dispersion and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring amongst diabetic patients with and without microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Yeo, C K; Hapizah, M N; Khalid, B A K; Wan Nazainimoon, W M; Khalid, Y

    2004-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an important coronary artery disease risk factor. The presence of microalbuminuria, which indicates renal involvement in diabetic patients, is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. There are suggestions that diabetic patients with microalbuminuria have more adverse risk profile such as higher ambulatory blood pressure and total cholesterol levels to account for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. QT dispersion is increasingly being recognized as a prognostic factor for coronary artery disease and sudden death. Some studies have suggested that QT dispersion is an important predictor of mortality in Type II diabetic patients. Our cross sectional study was to compare the QT dispersion and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring between diabetic patients with microalbuminuria and those without microalbuminuria. Diabetic patients with overt coronary artery disease were excluded from the study. A total of 108 patients were recruited of which 57 patients had microalbuminuria and 51 were without microalbuminuria. The mean value of QT dispersion was significantly higher in patients with microalbuminuria than in patients without microalbuminuria (58.9 +/- 27.9 ms vs. 47.1 +/- 25.0 ms, p < 0.05). The mean 24 hour systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly higher in patients with microalbuminuria than in patients without microalbuminuria (129.5 +/- 12.3 mm Hg vs 122.3 +/- 10.2 mm Hg, p < 0.05 and 78.4 +/- 6.9 mm Hg vs 75.3 +/- 6.8 mm Hg, p < 0.05, respectively). Our study suggests that QT dispersion prolongation, related perhaps to some autonomic dysfunction, is an early manifestation of cardiovascular aberration in diabetic patients with microalbuminuria. The higher blood pressure levels recorded during a 24-hour period min diabetics with microalbuminuria could also possibly account for the worse cardiovascular outcome in this group of patients.

  8. [A double-blind nomifensine-nortriptyline trial in ambulatory patients conducted by psychiatrists in private practice: results and comments].

    PubMed

    Coudray, J P; Dufour, H; Garello, J L; Mollo, Y; Pascal, F; Poisson, D; Scotto, J C; Simart, G; Sormani, J; Tourame, G

    1978-06-28

    Nomifensine and nortriptyline were compared in a collaborative trial by psychiatrists in private practice. The trial impiled:--selection of ambulatory depressed patients--randomization in parallel groups (respectively 31 and 34 subjects)--administration in double-blind condition of 4 capsuels daily of either compound during 4 weeks--quotation of depressvie syndrom with Hamilton depression scale before treatment after 2 and 4 weeks. The analysis of results shows clear improvment of depression scores, equivalent in both groups (non significant difference and posterior rejection of an alternative hypothesis). Practical problems encountered in controlled trials in psychiatrist's outpatients are discussed.

  9. Quality improvement and patient safety in the pediatric ambulatory setting: current knowledge and implications for residency training.

    PubMed

    Neuspiel, Daniel R; Hyman, Daniel; Lane, Mariellen

    2009-08-01

    The outpatient environment has been the leading edge of improvement work in pediatrics and it has similarly served as an effective locale for the training of pediatric residents in the science of improvement. This review summarizes what is known about the measurement of quality and patient safety in pediatric ambulatory settings. The current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements for resident training in improvement and their application in these settings are discussed. Some approaches and challenges to meeting these requirements are reviewed. Finally, some future directions that this work may follow are presented; the goal is to strengthen the effectiveness of improvement methods and their linkage to professional education.

  10. Oral Treatment Options for Ambulatory Patients with Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Simon; Wojna, Alexandra; Hell, Markus

    2010-01-01

    An increase in extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli has been observed in outpatient settings. Consequently, 100 ESBL-positive E. coli isolates from ambulatory patients with clinically confirmed urinary tract infections were collected by a single laboratory between October 2004 and January 2008. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the oral antibiotics fosfomycin, pivmecillinam, and nitrofurantoin and the parenteral antibiotic ertapenem. Susceptibility rates indicate that fosfomycin (97%), nitrofurantoin (94%), and pivmecillinam (85%) could be considered important oral treatment options. PMID:20585127

  11. Hotel-based ambulatory care for complex cancer patients: a review of the University College London Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Sive, Jonathan; Ardeshna, Kirit M; Cheesman, Simon; le Grange, Franel; Morris, Stephen; Nicholas, Claire; Peggs, Karl; Statham, Paula; Goldstone, Anthony H

    2012-12-01

    Since 2005, University College London Hospital (UCLH) has operated a hotel-based Ambulatory Care Unit (ACU) for hematology and oncology patients requiring intensive chemotherapy regimens and hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Between January 2005 and 2011 there were 1443 patient episodes, totaling 9126 patient days, with increasing use over the 6-year period. These were predominantly for hematological malignancy (82%) and sarcoma (17%). Median length of stay was 5 days (range 1-42), varying according to treatment. Clinical review and treatment was provided in the ACU, with patients staying in a local hotel at the hospital's expense. Admission to the inpatient ward was arranged as required, and there was close liaison with the inpatient team to preempt emergency admissions. Of the 523 unscheduled admissions, 87% occurred during working hours. An ACU/hotel-based treatment model can be safely used for a wide variety of cancers and treatments, expanding hospital treatment capacity, and freeing up inpatient beds for those patients requiring them.

  12. Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Normal and Abnormal 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, P.; Stevenson, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) plays an important role in assessing cardiovascular prognosis, through presence or absence of ABPM-related prognostic features. Objectives. To study relationship between 24-hour ABPM and cardiovascular outcomes in patients from Chesterfield Royal Hospital. Material and Methods. Over 12 months from the 1st of August 2002, 1187 individuals had 24-hour ABPM performed. Cardiovascular outcomes were studied in a subset (297) of the original cohort, made up by every 4th consecutive subject. The following ABPM-related prognostic features were studied—high day time systolic and diastolic BP (≥135, ≥85 mmHg), high night time systolic and diastolic BP (≥120 mmHg, ≥75 mmHg), absence of nocturnal dip (≤10% fall in night time SBP), high early morning SBP (≥140 mmHg), and morning surge (≥20/15 mmHg). The cardiovascular outcomes studied in the fourth table included fatal and nonfatal MI, new diagnosis of angina, acute coronary syndrome, sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmias, acute LVF, cerbrovascular events, peripheral vascular disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and CKD stage 3 or above. Results. Over a followup period of 2015 ± 116 days (1720–2305 days) 82 cardiovascular events occurred in 61 subjects. Cardiac arrhythmias were the most common CV outcome (34 events) followed by cerebrovascular events (15). Statistically significant associations found were between cerebrovascular events and absent nocturnal dip ≤ 10% (P = .05) and high day time DBP (P = .029), peripheral vascular disease and morning surge ≥ 20/15 mmHg (P = .014), cardiac arrhythmias and high day time and night time DBP (P = .009 and .033, resp.). Conclusion. Significant associations were found between cerebrovascular events and absent nocturnal dip ≤ 10% and high day time DBP, peripheral vascular disease and morning surge ≥ 20/15 mmHg, cardiac arrhythmias and high day time and night time DBP. PMID

  13. Determinants of patient satisfaction in ambulatory oncology: a cross sectional study based on the OUT-PATSAT35 questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with satisfaction with care in cancer patients undergoing ambulatory treatment. We investigated associations between patients' baseline clinical and socio-demographic characteristics, as well as self-reported quality of life, and satisfaction with care. Methods Patients undergoing ambulatory chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 2 centres in France were invited, at the beginning of their treatment, to complete the OUT-PATSAT35, a 35 item and 13 scale questionnaire evaluating perception of doctors, nurses and aspects of care organisation. Additionally, for each patient, socio-demographic variables, clinical characteristics and self-reported quality of life using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire were recorded. Results Among 692 patients included between January 2005 and December 2006, only 6 were non-responders. By multivariate analysis, poor perceived global health strongly predicted dissatisfaction with care (p < 0.0001). Patients treated by radiotherapy (vs patients treated by chemotherapy) reported lower levels of satisfaction with doctors' technical and interpersonal skills, information provided by caregivers, and waiting times. Patients with primary head and neck cancer (vs other localisations), and those living alone were less satisfied with information provided by doctors, and younger patients (< 55 years) were less satisfied with doctors' availability. Conclusions A number of clinical of socio-demographic factors were significantly associated with different scales of the satisfaction questionnaire. However, the main determinant was the patient's global health status, underlining the importance of measuring and adjusting for self-perceived health status when evaluating satisfaction. Further analyses are currently ongoing to determine the responsiveness of the OUT-PATSAT35 questionnaire to changes over time. PMID:22204665

  14. Incorporating patient-reported outcomes to improve emotional distress screening and assessment in an ambulatory oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Anne C; Buia Amport, Stephanie; Corjulo, Diane; Harvey, Katherine L; McCorkle, Ruth

    2015-05-01

    Assessment of distress and well-being of patients with cancer is not always documented or addressed in a clinical visit, reflecting a need for improved psychosocial screening. A multidisciplinary team completed process mapping for emotional distress assessment in two clinics. Barriers were identified through cause-and-effect analysis, and an intervention was chosen. Patient-reported outcomes were collected over 6 months using the validated National Comprehensive Cancer Network Emotional Distress Thermometer (EDT) paper tool. The American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures were compared before and after intervention. During 6 months, a total of 864 tools were collected from 1,344 patients in two ambulatory clinics (64%). Electronic medical record documentation of distress increased from 19.2% to 34% during the 6 months before and after intervention. QOPI measures showed an increase in emotional well-being documentation. Of 29 new and 835 return patients, 62% indicated mild distress (EDT, 0 to 3), 18% moderate (EDT, 4 to 6), and 11% severe (EDT, 7 to 10). The average distress score of new patients was significantly higher than that of return patients (5.39 [n = 26] v 2.52 [n = 754]; P < .001). The top problems for patients with moderate and severe distress were worry, fatigue, pain, and nervousness; depression and sadness were particularly noted in patients reporting severe distress. Eleven percent of patients were referred to the social worker on site. A pilot intervention collecting Patient-reported outcomes in two ambulatory clinics led to increase in psychosocial distress screening followed by sustained improvement, indicated by both process and QOPI measures. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. [Taking care of the caregiver: evaluation of the degree of satisfaction, stress levels and expectations of caregivers of patients attending an ambulatory unit for Alzheimer disease evaluation].

    PubMed

    Marabotto, Marco; Raspo, Silvio; Gerardo, Bruno; Cena, Paola; Bonetto, Martina; Cappa, Giorgetta

    2011-04-01

    According to literature, challenges associated with caregiving of demented should be taken into great consideration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the knowledge about dementia and health services dedicated to demented care among the caregivers of the patients attending our Dementia Ambulatory, caregivers' level of autonomy in taking care of the demented patients, their levels of stress and the degree of their satisfaction as the services provided by our Dementia Ambulatory. Our data show how a memory clinic needs to take care of both patients and their caregivers, with particular stress on caregiver specific education and well-being.

  16. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on clinic and ambulatory blood pressures in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and resistant hypertension: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Muxfeldt, Elizabeth S; Margallo, Victor; Costa, Leonardo M S; Guimarães, Gleison; Cavalcante, Aline H; Azevedo, João C M; de Souza, Fabio; Cardoso, Claudia R L; Salles, Gil F

    2015-04-01

    The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressures (BPs) in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea is not established. We aimed to evaluate it in a randomized controlled clinical trial, with blinded assessment of outcomes. Four hundred thirty-four resistant hypertensive patients were screened and 117 patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea, defined by an apnea-hypopnea index ≥15 per hour, were randomized to 6-month CPAP treatment (57 patients) or no therapy (60 patients), while maintaining antihypertensive treatment. Clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BPs were obtained before and after 6-month treatment. Primary outcomes were changes in clinic and ambulatory BPs and in nocturnal BP fall patterns. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol (limited to those with uncontrolled ambulatory BPs) analyses were performed. Patients had mean (SD) 24-hour BP of 129(16)/75(12) mm Hg, and 59% had uncontrolled ambulatory BPs. Mean apnea-hypopnea index was 41 per hour and 58.5% had severe obstructive sleep apnea. On intention-to-treat analysis, there was no significant difference in any BP change, neither in nocturnal BP fall, between CPAP and control groups. The best effect of CPAP was on night-time systolic blood pressure in per-protocol analysis, with greater reduction of 4.7 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -11.3 to +3.1 mm Hg; P=0.24) and an increase in nocturnal BP fall of 2.2% (95% confidence interval, -1.6% to +5.8%; P=0.25), in comparison with control group. In conclusion, CPAP treatment had no significant effect on clinic and ambulatory BPs in patients with resistant hypertension and moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea, although a beneficial effect on night-time systolic blood pressure and on nocturnal BP fall might exist in patients with uncontrolled ambulatory BP levels. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. [Efficacy and tolerance of alprazolam and bromazepam in flexible doses. Double-blind study in 119 ambulatory anxious patients].

    PubMed

    Ropert, R; Bernes, J; Dachary, J M

    1987-01-01

    Double-blind study comparing efficacy and safety of alprazolam and bromazepam in 119 ambulatory anxious patients receiving flexible dosage. 119 ambulatory anxious patients (global score on the Hamilton anxiety rating scale between 18 and 35) have been included in this double-blind trial (duration 4 weeks) comparing alprazolam and bromazepam given at flexible dosage. The global score on the Hamilton anxiety rating scale improved by 57.8% and 55.3% for alprazolam and bromazepam respectively. The percentage of therapeutic success according to the psychiatrist and the patient were respectively 82.7% and 79.3% for alprazolam compared to 74.1% and 71.9% for bromazepam. Fewer side-effects were recorded in the alprazolam group (97) than in the bromazepam group (120) and global safety of alprazolam seemed superior (p = 0.07). At trial-end, mean dosage reached 1.70 mg/day for alprazolam and 10.35 mg for bromazepam, but no correlation was found between anxiety intensity and optimal daily dosage used; however, a correlation has been found between the improvement of the overall Hamilton rating scale score and the dosage given (p = 0.02). The overall results suggest that the efficacy/safety ratio is better for alprazolam.

  18. Prognostic impact of clinic and ambulatory blood pressure components in high-risk type 2 diabetic patients: the Rio de Janeiro Type 2 Diabetes Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Salles, Gil F; Leite, Nathalie C; Pereira, Basílio B; Nascimento, Emilia M; Cardoso, Claudia R L

    2013-11-01

    The prognostic importance of tight clinic blood pressure (BP) control is controversial in diabetic patients. The objective was to investigate the prognostic impact of clinic and ambulatory BPs for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes. In a prospective cohort study, 565 type 2 diabetic patients had clinical, laboratory and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) data obtained at baseline and during follow-up. The primary endpoints were a composite of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. Multivariable Cox survival and splines regression analyses assessed associations between each BP component [SBP, DBP and pulse pressure (PP)] and the endpoints. After a median follow-up of 5.75 years, 88 total cardiovascular events and 70 all-cause deaths occurred. After adjustments for cardiovascular risk factors, clinic SBP and DBPs were predictive of the composite endpoint but not of all-cause mortality, whereas all ambulatory BP components were predictors of both endpoints. Ambulatory systolic and PPs were the strongest predictors and achieved ambulatory BPs during follow-up improved risk prediction in relation to baseline values. When categorized at clinically relevant cut-off values, risk began only at clinic BPs at least 140/90 mmHg, whereas for ambulatory BPs it began at lower values (≥120/75 mmHg for the 24-h period). ABPM provides more valuable information regarding cardiovascular risk stratification than office BPs and should be performed, if possible, in every high-risk type 2 diabetic patient. Achieved 24-h ambulatory BPs less than 120/75 mmHg are associated with significant cardiovascular protection and, if confirmed by other studies, may be considered as BP treatment targets.

  19. Mobile phone-based telemedicine system for the home follow-up of patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramos, Carlos; Cerdán, María Teresa; López, Rodrigo S

    2009-01-01

    A pilot study was done to address the efficacy of a General Packet Radio Service mobile phone-based telemedicine system used to improve follow-up after ambulatory surgery. The method involves sending images of surgical wounds or other areas from the patient's home, to assess local complications and avoid unnecessary hospital visits. Ninety-six (N = 96) patients were enrolled in the study. The phone used was a Nokia 6600, which provides images in Joint Photographic Experts Group format. These images were sent via e-mail and visualized on a standard 17-inch screen of a personal computer. After the follow-up period, self-reported patient satisfaction was assessed by analyzing the replies to a 9-item questionnaire. Thirty of the 96 patients (31.3%) reported local problems including: hematoma in 20 (66.7%) patients, surgical bandage blood-stained in 7 (23.3%), exudates in 1 (3.3%), allergic skin reactions in 1 (3.3%), and bandage too tight in 1 (3.3%). In total, 225 photographs were evaluated by 3 physicians. In all cases, it was possible to identify and assess the postoperative problem with consensus among the 3 physicians. Images served to resolve patients' concerns in 20 individuals (66.7%). In 10 patients (33.3%), concerns were satisfied but it was suggested that follow-up images be sent in the following days. Only 1 patient (3.3%) was asked to visit the hospital. The telemedicine system proposed increases the efficiency of home follow-up to ambulatory surgery, avoids unnecessary hospital visits, and clearly improves patient satisfaction.

  20. Predictors of payment behavior among the medically uninsured: a prospective cohort study of patients seeking ambulatory services.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Saul J; Andes, Steven

    2010-11-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of uninsured patients who attempt to pay for their care. This study sought to identify predictors of payment after receiving care at three urban hospitals. One hundred and seventy uninsured ambulatory patients were interviewed about their health status, income, and credit and payment histories at the point of care. Eighteen months later, data on payment outcomes were extracted from the medical financial records for each subject. Patients were more likely to make a payment if they reported higher income, health insurance for other services, or worrying about their credit. They were less likely to pay anything if they owed a large sum, were seeking care at the public site, or had received care in an emergency room. Specific characteristics of uninsured patients, the site of care, and the size of the bill are all associated with payment outcome.

  1. Using reliability of change analysis to evaluate post-acute neuro-rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christina; Kneebone, Ian I; Strauss, Clara; Jones, Anna-Marie

    2016-01-01

    It is important to evaluate change in order to re-assure commissioners, staff and patients of the effectiveness of interventions, but also in order to identify areas for improvement. To consider whether analysis of improvement at the level of the individual, taking into account measurement error, may offer a further valuable way to assess change and inform service development over considering change at the group level in a post-acute neuro-rehabilitation unit. Pre and post intervention Scores on the FIM+FAM Full Scale and Cognitive and Motor subscales were considered for eighteen patients aged between 35 and 81 with mixed diagnoses who attended a post-acute inpatient neuro-rehabilitation unit for treatment. Statistically significant improvements were achieved on the FIM+FAM Full Scale and Cognitive and Motor subscales in a whole group analysis. Reliable change analyses for each patient within each subscale however identified only half of the sample achieved reliable improvement within the Motor domain and just one person within the Cognitive domain (5.6%). Findings are consistent with the emphasis of the rehabilitation unit on physical/motor function, and unsurprising as many of those assessed had multiple sclerosis, an often deteriorative condition. Use of reliable change analysis allowed a more detailed understanding of intervention impact, potentially identifying what services reliably work for whom, thereby informing future planning.

  2. Oral risedronate sodium improves bone mineral density in non-ambulatory patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cohran, Valeria; Cassedy, Amy; Hawkins, Andre; Bean, Judy; Heubi, James

    2013-01-01

    Investigate the efficacy of risedronate sodium (Procter and Gamble, Cincinnati, USA) for treating reduced lumbar spine (LS) bone mineral density (BMD) in non-ambulatory patients. Nine (10-39 years, mean age 23.0 years, 7 males) in the risedronate arm and 10 (10-35 years, mean age 21.4 years, 8 males) in the placebo arm completed 24 months of therapy at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The primary outcome was change in LS BMD assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Secondary outcomes included changes in serum bone markers, bone specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and N-telopeptides. Mixed models examined group, time, and the group by time interaction for the 4 post-baseline time points. The change in LS BMD score from baseline to 24 months was 0.069 (95% CI 0.014 to 0.124) in risedronate participants compared to -0.015 (95% CI -0.073 to 0.042) (t Value = -2.40, P > t=0.03) in the controls. When controlling for baseline scores, the difference was consistent across four post-baseline time points tested (F=5.67, Pr > F=0.03). No differences in serum bone markers were observed. Risedronate increases LS BMD in non-ambulatory patients with minimal side effects.

  3. Can technology change the work of nurses? Evaluation of a drug monitoring system for ambulatory chronic disease patients.

    PubMed

    Callen, Joanne; Hordern, Antonia; Gibson, Kathryn; Li, Ling; Hains, Isla M; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of an electronic drug monitoring system (eDMS) for ambulatory rheumatology patients on time nurses spent on, and the process of, drug monitoring. The study was conducted in the Rheumatology Department of a large metropolitan hospital. The eDMS, a module of the Hospital Clinical Information System (HCIS), was designed to allow electronic ordering and subsequent monitoring of ambulatory patients on long-term, immunosuppressive rheumatology medications. Quantitative measures collected before and after the intervention were: time spent on specific nursing activities; who nurses spent time with; format and location of documentation monitoring; and patient throughput. Qualitative data from interviews and observations were collected to ascertain the impact of the eDMS on nurses' monitoring activities. Nurses spent significantly less time on medication monitoring tasks (33.1% versus 26.4%, P=0.003) and significantly more time on patient care (6.5-18.1%, P<0.0001) following implementation of the eDMS. Nurses also spent significantly more time with patients (7.7-19.8%, P<0.0001) and relatives (0.4-3.7%, P=0.01) after the system was implemented. The time saved on monitoring allowed the number of nurse directed clinics and patient throughput to increase following eDMS implementation. Qualitative data supported results from the timing study with nurses reporting that the monitoring process was more standardised, safer, took less time and simplified documentation. The eDMS was associated with a reduction in time spent on the complex task of medication monitoring allowing nurses to spend a greater proportion of their time on other patient care activities. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Con: Ambulatory blood pressure measurement in patients receiving haemodialysis: a sore arm and a waste of time?

    PubMed

    Jardine, Alan G

    2015-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become popular in the investigation and management of patients with essential hypertension. In patients receiving haemodialysis, ABPM identifies patients who may fare worse in the long term. However, the available studies are small, and when conventional risk factors are included, there is no added value to ABPM over conventional BP measurements. In haemodialysis, ABPM remains an experimental investigation, and in the absence of specific, evidence-based targets for blood pressure in this population, it would be better to invest in large-scale trials to provide specific blood pressure targets and strategies, rather than concentrating on an alternative technique for blood pressure measurement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficacy of acupuncture during post-acute phase of rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mikashima, Yoshinori; Takagi, Tadashi; Tomatsu, Taisuke; Horikoshi, Mariko; Ikari, Katsunori; Momohara, Shigeki

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether acupuncture is effective in reducing pain and swelling around the knee and improving range of motion (ROM) during the post-acute phase of rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Following TKA, 80 knees in 80 patients were randomly assigned to either an acupuncture treatment group (Group A) or a control group (Group C). In Group A, the complementary treatment of acupuncture was performed three times/week from postoperative day 7 until postoperative day 21. Outcome measures were: i) pain as assessed by a visual analog scale; ii) reduction of swelling around the knee as indicated by its circumference at the center of the patella; and iii) ROM of the affected knee. Group A patients had significantly reduced pain and swelling around the knees and earlier recovery of ROM than did those in Group C. Acupuncture provides effective treatment during the post-acute phase of rehabilitation after TKA with respect to pain relief, reduction of swelling around the knee, and early recovery of ROM.

  6. Using Electronic Case Summaries to Elicit Multi-Disciplinary Expert Knowledge about Referrals to Post-Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Sarah; Potashnik, Sheryl; Topaz, Maxim; Holmes, John; Shih, Nai-Wei; Naylo, Mary D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Eliciting knowledge from geographically dispersed experts given their time and scheduling constraints, while maintaining anonymity among them, presents multiple challenges. Objectives Describe an innovative, Internet based method to acquire knowledge from experts regarding patients who need post-acute referrals. Compare, 1) the percentage of patients referred by experts to percentage of patients actually referred by hospital clinicians, 2) experts’ referral decisions by disciplines and geographic regions, and 3) most common factors deemed important by discipline. Methods De-identified case studies, developed from electronic health records (EHR), contained a comprehensive description of 1,496 acute care inpatients. In teams of three, physicians, nurses, social workers, and physical therapists reviewed case studies and assessed the need for post-acute care referrals; Delphi rounds followed when team members did not agree. Generalized estimating equations (GEEs) compared experts’ decisions by discipline, region of the country and to the decisions made by study hospital clinicians, adjusting for the repeated observations from each expert and case. Frequencies determined the most common case characteristics chosen as important by the experts. Results The experts recommended referral for 80% of the cases; the actual discharge disposition of the patients showed referrals for 67%. Experts from the Northeast and Midwest referred 5% more cases than experts from the West. Physicians and nurses referred patients at similar rates while both referred more often than social workers. Differences by discipline were seen in the factors identified as important to the decision. Conclusion The method for eliciting expert knowledge enabled national dispersed expert clinicians to anonymously review case summaries and make decisions about post-acute care referrals. Having time and a comprehensive case summary may have assisted experts to identify more patients in

  7. Accuracy of diagnoses predicted from a simple patient questionnaire stratified by the duration of general ambulatory training: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Takanori; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Ohta, Mitsuyasu; Noda, Kazutaka; Tsukamoto, Tomoko; Takada, Toshihiko; Miyahara, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of diseases predicted from patient responses to a simple questionnaire completed prior to examination by doctors with different levels of ambulatory training in general medicine. Before patient examination, five trained physicians, four short-term-trained residents, and four untrained residents examined patient responses to a simple questionnaire and then indicated, in rank order according to their subjective confidence level, the diseases they predicted. Final diagnosis was subsequently determined from hospital records by mentor physicians 3 months after the first patient visit. Predicted diseases and final diagnoses were codified using the International Classification of Diseases version 10. A "correct" diagnosis was one where the predicted disease matched the final diagnosis code. A total of 148 patient questionnaires were evaluated. The Herfindahl index was 0.024, indicating a high degree of diversity in final diagnoses. The proportion of correct diagnoses was high in the trained group (96 of 148, 65%; residual analysis, 4.4) and low in the untrained group (56 of 148, 38%; residual analysis, -3.6) (χ (2)=22.27, P<0.001). In cases of correct diagnosis, the cumulative number of correct diagnoses showed almost no improvement, even when doctors in the three groups predicted ≥4 diseases. Doctors who completed ambulatory training in general medicine while treating a diverse range of diseases accurately predicted diagnosis in 65% of cases from limited written information provided by a simple patient questionnaire, which proved useful for diagnosis. The study also suggests that up to three differential diagnoses are appropriate for diagnostic prediction, while ≥4 differential diagnoses barely improved the diagnostic accuracy, regardless of doctors' competence in general medicine. If doctors can become able to predict the final diagnosis from limited information, the correct diagnostic outcome may improve and save further

  8. Accuracy of diagnoses predicted from a simple patient questionnaire stratified by the duration of general ambulatory training: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Takanori; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Ohta, Mitsuyasu; Noda, Kazutaka; Tsukamoto, Tomoko; Takada, Toshihiko; Miyahara, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy of diseases predicted from patient responses to a simple questionnaire completed prior to examination by doctors with different levels of ambulatory training in general medicine. Participants and methods Before patient examination, five trained physicians, four short-term-trained residents, and four untrained residents examined patient responses to a simple questionnaire and then indicated, in rank order according to their subjective confidence level, the diseases they predicted. Final diagnosis was subsequently determined from hospital records by mentor physicians 3 months after the first patient visit. Predicted diseases and final diagnoses were codified using the International Classification of Diseases version 10. A “correct” diagnosis was one where the predicted disease matched the final diagnosis code. Results A total of 148 patient questionnaires were evaluated. The Herfindahl index was 0.024, indicating a high degree of diversity in final diagnoses. The proportion of correct diagnoses was high in the trained group (96 of 148, 65%; residual analysis, 4.4) and low in the untrained group (56 of 148, 38%; residual analysis, −3.6) (χ2=22.27, P<0.001). In cases of correct diagnosis, the cumulative number of correct diagnoses showed almost no improvement, even when doctors in the three groups predicted ≥4 diseases. Conclusion Doctors who completed ambulatory training in general medicine while treating a diverse range of diseases accurately predicted diagnosis in 65% of cases from limited written information provided by a simple patient questionnaire, which proved useful for diagnosis. The study also suggests that up to three differential diagnoses are appropriate for diagnostic prediction, while ≥4 differential diagnoses barely improved the diagnostic accuracy, regardless of doctors’ competence in general medicine. If doctors can become able to predict the final diagnosis from limited information, the correct

  9. Higher ambulatory blood pressure relates to new cerebral microbleeds: 2-year follow-up study in lacunar stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Klarenbeek, Pim; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Rouhl, Rob P W; Knottnerus, Iris L H; Staals, Julie

    2013-04-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) is associated with the presence of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in cross-sectional studies. However, longitudinal studies did not show a convincing relationship. We aimed to determine the association between elevated BP levels and the occurrence of new CMBs after a 2-year follow-up in first-ever lacunar stroke patients using ambulatory BP monitoring. Ninety-six first-ever lacunar stroke patients underwent brain MRI and ambulatory BP monitoring at baseline and after 2-year follow-up. We used logistic regression analyses to assess the association of BP levels with new CMBs. We found new CMBs in 17 patients (18%). Higher 24-hour, day and night systolic BP (odds ratio, 2.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-5.21 per SD increase for 24-hour BP) and diastolic BP (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-3.90 per SD increase for 24-hour BP) at baseline were associated with the development of new CMBs independent of age and sex. BP levels decreased during follow-up in both patients with and without new CMBs. Unlike BP levels at baseline, there was no difference in BP levels at follow-up between patients with and without new CMBs. Both higher systolic and diastolic BP levels were associated with the development of new CMBs in a population of lacunar stroke patients. Decrease of BP levels during follow-up did not halt progression of CMBs; however, it remains to be determined whether (early) intervention with antihypertensive drugs can slow down progression of CMBs.

  10. GENDER DIFFERENCES IN DAILY AMBULATORY ACTIVITY PATTERNS IN PATIENTS WITH INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Parker, Donald E.; Montgomery, Polly S.; Khurana, Aman; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M.; Blevins, Steve M.

    2010-01-01

    Purposes To compare the pattern of daily ambulatory activity in men and women with intermittent claudication, and to determine whether calf muscle hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2) is associated with daily ambulatory activity. Methods Forty men and 41women with peripheral arterial disease limited by intermittent claudication were assessed on their community-based ambulatory activity patterns for one week with an ankle-mounted step activity monitor, and on calf muscle StO2 during a treadmill test. Results Women had lower adjusted daily maximal cadence (mean ± SE) for five continuous minutes of ambulation (26.2 ± 1.2 strides/min vs. 31.0 ± 1.2 strides/min; p = 0.009), for one minute of ambulation (43.1 ± 0.9 strides/min vs. 47.2 ± 0.9 strides/min; p=0.004), and for intermittent ambulation determined by the peak activity index (26.3 ± 1.2 strides/min vs. 31.0 ± 1.2 strides/min; p = 0.009). Women also had lower adjusted time to minimum calf muscle StO2 during exercise (p = 0.048), which was positively associated with maximal cadence for five continuous minutes (r = 0.51; p < 0.01), maximal cadence for 1 minute (r = 0.42; p < 0.05), and peak activity index (r = 0.44; p < 0.05). These associations were not significant in men. Conclusion Women with intermittent claudication ambulate slower in the community setting than men, particularly for short continuous durations of up to five minutes and during intermittent ambulation at peak cadences. Furthermore, the daily ambulatory cadences of women are correlated with their calf muscle StO2 during exercise, as women who walk slower in the community setting reach their minimum calf muscle StO2 sooner than those who walk at faster paces. Women with intermittent claudication should be encouraged to not only walk more on a daily basis, but to do so at a pace that is faster than their preferred speed. PMID:20692790

  11. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae peritonitis in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Joon; Gwak, Won-Gun

    2010-08-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is known as a pathogen of occupational diseases or a zoonosis. We report a case of E. rhusiopathiae peritonitis in a 50-yr-old male undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). He was suffered from mild abdominal pain with a distinctive erysipeloid skin lesion. E. rhusiopathiae was considered to be introduced through a lacerated wound on his hand when he was exposed to contaminated materials. He was treated successfully with a first generation cephalosporin. To our knowledge, CAPD peritonitis due to E. rhusiopathiae is very rare, and this is a report of the first case in Asia.

  12. Investing in Post-Acute Care Transitions: Electronic Information Exchange Between Hospitals and Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Cross, Dori A; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health information exchange (HIE) is expected to help improve care transitions from hospitals to long-term care (LTC) facilities. We know little about the prevalence of hospital LTC HIE in the United States and what contextual factors may motivate or constrain this activity. Cross-sectional analysis of U.S. acute-care hospitals responding to the 2014 AHA IT Supplement survey and with available readmissions data (n = 1,991). We conducted multivariate logistic regression to explore the relationship between hospital LTC HIE and selected IT and policy characteristics. Over half of the hospitals in our study (57.2%) reported engaging in some form of HIE with LTC providers: 33.9% send-only, 0.5% receive-only, and 22.8% send and receive. Hospitals that engaged in some form of LTC HIE were more likely than those that did not engage to have attested to meaningful use (odds ratio [OR], 1.87; P = .01 for stage 1 and OR, 2.05; P < .01 for stage 2), participate in a regional HIE effort (OR, 1.34; P = .021), and exchange information electronically with other hospitals or ambulatory providers (OR, 4.54; P < .01). Organizational affiliation with a skilled nursing facility (OR, 1.29; P = .041) and higher 30-day readmission rates (OR, 1.19; P = .016) were also associated with LTC HIE, but not accountable care organization nor bundled payment participation. As payment to LTC providers and hospitals increasingly emphasizes total patient care and paying for value, those leading these organizations have new incentives to pursue collaborative relationships. Hospitals appear to be investing in electronic information exchange with LTCs as part of a general strategy to adopt EHRs and engage in HIE, but also potentially to strengthen ties to LTC providers and to reduce readmissions. To achieve widespread connectivity, continued focus on adoption of related health IT infrastructure and greater emphasis on aligning incentives for hospital-LTC care transitions would

  13. Ambulatory blood pressure thresholds for diagnosis of hypertension in patients with and without type 2 diabetes based on cardiovascular outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Mojón, Artemio; Fernández, José R

    2013-03-01

    Currently recommended ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) thresholds for diagnosis of hypertension do not differentiate, as international guidelines do for clinic BP, uncomplicated persons at low risk from those at higher risk, e.g., patients with diabetes, for target injury and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We aimed to derive diagnostic thresholds for the awake and asleep systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP means based upon CVD outcomes (death from all causes, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, coronary revascularization, heart failure, acute arterial occlusion of the lower extremities, thrombotic occlusion of the retinal artery, hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke, and transient ischemic attack) for patients with and without diabetes. We prospectively studied 3344 subjects (1718 men/1626 women), 52.6 ± 14.5 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, 607 with type 2 diabetes, during a median follow-up of 5.6 yrs. Those with hypertension at baseline were randomized to ingest all their prescribed hypertension medications upon awakening or the entire daily dose of ≥1 of them at bedtime. At baseline, BP was measured at 20-min intervals from 07:00 to 23:00 h and at 30-min intervals at night for 48 h, and physical activity was simultaneously monitored every minute by wrist actigraphy to accurately derive the awake and asleep BP means. Identical assessment was scheduled annually and more frequently (quarterly) if treatment adjustment was required. Cox regression analysis was used to derive outcome-based reference thresholds for ABPM in subjects with and without diabetes. CVD risk was consistently greater in patients with than without diabetes for awake SBP/DBP means ≥130/75 mm Hg and asleep means ≥110/65 mm Hg. Derived outcome-based reference thresholds for persons without diabetes were 135/85 mm Hg for the awake and 120/70 mm Hg for the asleep SBP/DBP means. In terms of CVD outcome, the equivalent cutoff threshold values for patients

  14. The effect of aliskiren versus ramipril-based treatment on the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Andreadis, E A; Angelopoulos, E T; Kolyvas, G N; Agaliotis, G D; Mousoulis, C G; Mousoulis, G P

    2014-02-01

    Aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of two renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in arterial stiffness reduction in previously untreated hypertensive patients. In this open label study, 154 naïve, or not treated in the last six months hypertensive patients were randomly assigned to receive aliskiren 300 mg or ramipril 5 mg daily. Six weeks after the initiation of treatment, patients were evaluated for blood pressure (BP) control. Patients with SBP ≥140 and/or DBP ≥90 mmHg were assigned to an adjunct of 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide as combination treatment. A re-evaluation of BP control was done after another 6 weeks. Individuals with BP ≥140/90 mmHg were further administered amlodipine 5 mg. The final evaluation was performed six months after the start of the study. Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was carried out and the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) was calculated at baseline and after 6 months of treatment. Aliskiren-based therapy, as compared with ramipril-based therapy reduced BP to a similar degree: 13±11 vs. 12±11 mmHg reduction in systolic (P=0.34) and 8±7 vs. 7±7 mmHg reduction in diastolic BP (P=0.44). AASI was reduced by 0.04±0.1 in the aliskiren group and by 0.02±0.2 in the ramipril group. AASI reduction did not differ significantly in the two groups (P=0.13). In hypertensive patients, aliskiren-based treatment as well as ramipril-based treatment appears to have a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness. As arterial stiffness is an important modifiable risk factor, our findings highlight the value of aliskiren beyond BP lowering properties.

  15. An algorithm to detect low incidence arrhythmic events in electrocardiographic records from ambulatory patients.

    PubMed

    Hungenahally, S K; Willis, R J

    1994-11-01

    An algorithm was devised to detect low incidence arrhythmic events in electrocardiograms obtained during ambulatory monitoring. The algorithm incorporated baseline correction and R wave detection. The RR interval was used to identify tachycardia, bradycardia, and premature ventricular beats. Only a few beats before and after the arrhythmic event were stored. The software was evaluated on a prototype hardware system which consisted of an Intel 86/30 single board computer with a suitable analog pre-processor and an analog to digital converter. The algorithm was used to determine the incidence and type of arrhythmia in records from an ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) database and from a cardiac exercise laboratory. These results were compared to annotations on the records which were assumed to be correct. Standard criteria used previously to evaluate algorithms designed for arrhythmia detection were sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy. Sensitivities ranging from 77 to 100%, specificities from 94 to 100%, and diagnostic accuracies from 92 to 100% were obtained on the different data sets. These results compare favourably with published results based on more elaborate algorithms. By circumventing the need to make a continuous record of the ECG, the algorithm could form the basis for a compact monitoring device for the detection of arrhythmic events which are so infrequent that standard 24-h Holter monitoring is insufficient.

  16. Delirium Detection and Impact of Comorbid Health Conditions in a Post-Acute Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Stelmokas, Julija; Gabel, Nicolette; Flaherty, Jennifer M.; Rayson, Katherine; Tran, Kathileen; Anderson, Jason R.; Bieliauskas, Linas A.

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis and under-detection of delirium may occur in many medical settings. This is important to address as delirium clearly increases risk of morbidity and mortality in such settings. This study assessed whether Veterans who screened positive on a delirium severity measure (Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale; MDAS) differed from those with and without corresponding medical documentation of delirium in terms of cognitive functioning, psychiatric/medical history, and medication use. A medical record review of 266 inpatients at a VA post-acute rehabilitation unit found that 10.9% were identified as delirious according to the MDAS and/or medical records. Of the Veterans who screened positive on the MDAS (N = 19), 68.4% went undetected by medical screening. Undetected cases had a higher number of comorbid medical conditions as measured by the Age-Adjusted Charlson Index (AACI) scores (median = 9, SD = 3.15; U = 5.5, p = .003) than medically documented cases. For Veterans with a score of 7 or greater on the AACI, the general relative risk for delirium was 4.46. Delirium is frequently under-detected in a post-acute rehabilitation unit, particularly for Veterans with high comorbid illness. The relative risk of delirium is up to 4.46 for those with high medical burden, suggesting the need for more comprehensive delirium screening in these patients. PMID:27902744

  17. Medicare payment reform and provider entry and exit in the post-acute care market.

    PubMed

    Huckfeldt, Peter J; Sood, Neeraj; Romley, John A; Malchiodi, Alessandro; Escarce, José J

    2013-10-01

    To understand the impacts of Medicare payment reform on the entry and exit of post-acute providers. Medicare Provider of Services data, Cost Reports, and Census data from 1991 through 2010. We examined market-level changes in entry and exit after payment reforms relative to a preexisting time trend. We also compared changes in high Medicare share markets relative to lower Medicare share markets and for freestanding relative to hospital-based facilities. We calculated market-level entry, exit, and total stock of home health agencies, skilled nursing facilities, and inpatient rehabilitation facilities from Provider of Services files between 1992 and 2010. We linked these measures with demographic information from the Census and American Community Survey, information on Certificate of Need laws, and Medicare share of facilities in each market drawn from Cost Report data. Payment reforms reducing average and marginal payments reduced entries and increased exits from the market. Entry effects were larger and more persistent than exit effects. Entry and exit rates fluctuated more for home health agencies than skilled nursing facilities. Effects on number of providers were consistent with entry and exit effects. Payment reform affects market entry and exit, which in turn may affect market structure, access to care, quality and cost of care, and patient outcomes. Policy makers should consider potential impacts of payment reforms on post-acute care market structure when implementing these reforms. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  18. Medicare Payment Reform and Provider Entry and Exit in the Post-Acute Care Market

    PubMed Central

    Huckfeldt, Peter J; Sood, Neeraj; Romley, John A; Malchiodi, Alessandro; Escarce, José J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand the impacts of Medicare payment reform on the entry and exit of post-acute providers. Data Sources Medicare Provider of Services data, Cost Reports, and Census data from 1991 through 2010. Study Design We examined market-level changes in entry and exit after payment reforms relative to a preexisting time trend. We also compared changes in high Medicare share markets relative to lower Medicare share markets and for freestanding relative to hospital-based facilities. Data Extraction Methods We calculated market-level entry, exit, and total stock of home health agencies, skilled nursing facilities, and inpatient rehabilitation facilities from Provider of Services files between 1992 and 2010. We linked these measures with demographic information from the Census and American Community Survey, information on Certificate of Need laws, and Medicare share of facilities in each market drawn from Cost Report data. Principal Findings Payment reforms reducing average and marginal payments reduced entries and increased exits from the market. Entry effects were larger and more persistent than exit effects. Entry and exit rates fluctuated more for home health agencies than skilled nursing facilities. Effects on number of providers were consistent with entry and exit effects. Conclusions Payment reform affects market entry and exit, which in turn may affect market structure, access to care, quality and cost of care, and patient outcomes. Policy makers should consider potential impacts of payment reforms on post-acute care market structure when implementing these reforms. PMID:23557215

  19. Development and Initial Psychometric Evaluation of the Post-Acute Acuity Rating for Children

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Jane E.; Dumas, Helene M.

    2015-01-01

    The Post-Acute Acuity Rating for Children (PAARC) is the first known acuity rating intended to reflect medical severity based on age, reason for admission, diagnoses, dependence in activities of daily living, and technology reliance for children admitted to post-acute care rehabilitation hospitals. Content validity was tested using an expert panel scoring the Content Validity Index (CVI). Concurrent validity was examined using clinician's opinion of acuity at admission, the Complexity Index, and All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Group (APR-DRG) codes. Predictive validity was examined with acute care readmission within 30 days. Interrater reliability was assessed using admission histories from closed cases. Content validity was established and concurrent validity was moderate to high with clinician opinion (rho = .76, p < .001), the Complexity Index (rho = .76, p < .001), and APR-DRGs (rho = .349, p = .001). Predictive validity was moderate (rho = .504, p = .005) and returns to acute care within 30 days. Interrater reliability was excellent (ICC = 0.97; 95% CI = 0.92–0.90, p < .001). Experts agreed that the PAARC's content is relevant, simple, and representative of the population. The PAARC measured well against indicators of medical complexity for pediatric outpatient care and medical record coding and was reliable between raters. This work supports proceeding with additional development and validity testing of the PAARC. PMID:26609433

  20. Feasibility of cardiopulmonary exercise testing and training using a robotics-assisted tilt table in dependent-ambulatory stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Saengsuwan, Jittima; Huber, Celine; Schreiber, Jonathan; Schuster-Amft, Corina; Nef, Tobias; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2015-09-26

    We evaluated the feasibility of an augmented robotics-assisted tilt table (RATT) for incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and exercise training in dependent-ambulatory stroke patients. Stroke patients (Functional Ambulation Category ≤ 3) underwent familiarization, an incremental exercise test (IET) and a constant load test (CLT) on separate days. A RATT equipped with force sensors in the thigh cuffs, a work rate estimation algorithm and real-time visual feedback to guide the exercise work rate was used. Feasibility assessment considered technical feasibility, patient tolerability, and cardiopulmonary responsiveness. Eight patients (4 female) aged 58.3 ± 9.2 years (mean ± SD) were recruited and all completed the study. For IETs, peak oxygen uptake (V'O2peak), peak heart rate (HRpeak) and peak work rate (WRpeak) were 11.9 ± 4.0 ml/kg/min (45 % of predicted V'O2max), 117 ± 32 beats/min (72 % of predicted HRmax) and 22.5 ± 13.0 W, respectively. Peak ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were on the range "hard" to "very hard". All 8 patients reached their limit of functional capacity in terms of either their cardiopulmonary or neuromuscular performance. A ventilatory threshold (VT) was identified in 7 patients and a respiratory compensation point (RCP) in 6 patients: mean V'O2 at VT and RCP was 8.9 and 10.7 ml/kg/min, respectively, which represent 75 % (VT) and 85 % (RCP) of mean V'O2peak. Incremental CPET provided sufficient information to satisfy the responsiveness criteria and identification of key outcomes in all 8 patients. For CLTs, mean steady-state V'O2 was 6.9 ml/kg/min (49 % of V'O2 reserve), mean HR was 90 beats/min (56 % of HRmax), RPEs were > 2, and all patients maintained the active work rate for 10 min: these values meet recommended intensity levels for bouts of training. The augmented RATT is deemed feasible for incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing and exercise training in dependent-ambulatory

  1. Use of Risk Models to Predict Death in the Next Year Among Individual Ambulatory Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Larry A; Matlock, Daniel D; Shetterly, Susan M; Xu, Stanley; Levy, Wayne C; Portalupi, Laura B; McIlvennan, Colleen K; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Johnson, Eric S; Smith, David H; Magid, David J

    2017-04-01

    The clinical practice guidelines for heart failure recommend the use of validated risk models to estimate prognosis. Understanding how well models identify individuals who will die in the next year informs decision making for advanced treatments and hospice. To quantify how risk models calculated in routine practice estimate more than 50% 1-year mortality among ambulatory patients with heart failure who die in the subsequent year. Ambulatory adults with heart failure from 3 integrated health systems were enrolled between 2005 and 2008. The probability of death was estimated using the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) and the Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure (MAGGIC) risk calculator. Baseline covariates were collected from electronic health records. Missing covariates were imputed. Estimated mortality was compared with actual mortality at both population and individual levels. One-year mortality. Among 10 930 patients with heart failure, the median age was 77 years, and 48.0% of these patients were female. In the year after study enrollment, 1661 patients died (15.9% by life-table analysis). At the population level, 1-year predicted mortality among the cohort was 9.7% for the SHFM (C statistic of 0.66) and 17.5% for the MAGGIC risk calculator (C statistic of 0.69). At the individual level, the SHFM predicted a more than 50% probability of dying in the next year for 8 of the 1661 patients who died (sensitivity for 1-year death was 0.5%) and for 5 patients who lived at least a year (positive predictive value, 61.5%). The MAGGIC risk calculator predicted a more than 50% probability of dying in the next year for 52 of the 1661 patients who died (sensitivity, 3.1%) and for 63 patients who lived at least a year (positive predictive value, 45.2%). Conversely, the SHFM estimated that 8496 patients (77.8%) had a less than 15% probability of dying at 1 year, yet this lower-risk end of the score range captured nearly two-thirds of deaths (n = 997

  2. Perceived value of stroke outcome measures across the post-acute care continuum: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Danzl, Megan M; Hunter, Elizabeth G

    2013-04-01

    Connecting the continuum of post-acute care stroke services may be important for easing patients' transition between settings and facilitating recovery and community reintegration. The use of outcome measures is suggested as one means of connecting the continuum. The purpose of this qualitative case study is to describe administrators' and physiotherapists' perceived value of an outcomes program across the post-acute care stroke continuum at a rehabilitation hospital. Data were collected through individual interviews and focus groups with 18 participants. Three themes emerged on the value of the outcomes program: 1) enhanced communication; 2) supports clinical decision-making; and 3) value of objective data. These findings lend support for the use of standardized outcome measures by physiotherapists in stroke rehabilitation. Findings from this study may be useful for organizations and physiotherapists who wish to integrate outcome measures into practice.

  3. Olmesartan medoxomil-based antihypertensive therapy evaluated by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: efficacy in high-risk patient subgroups.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G; Germino, F Wilford; Neutel, Joel M

    2012-12-01

    Hypertension affects approximately 26% of the world's adult population and is a recognized major risk factor for morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal diseases. However, despite the availability of a range of effective antihypertensive agents and a growing awareness of the consequences of high blood pressure (BP), the treatment and control of hypertension remains suboptimal. A number of patient subgroups are categorized as 'high risk' and may have hypertension that is more difficult to treat, including obese individuals, patients with stage 2 hypertension, those with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), patients with coronary artery disease or a history of stroke, and Black patients. As the benefits of lowering BP in patients with hypertension are unequivocal, particularly in high-risk patients, treating high-risk patients with hypertension to BP goals and maintaining 24-hour BP control is important to help reduce cardiovascular risk and improve outcomes. Although the BP goals recommended in current consensus guidelines for the management of patients with hypertension are based on cuff BP measurements, ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) provides a valuable diagnostic tool and allows a more accurate assessment of BP levels throughout the 24-hour dosing period. ABPM is a better predictor of prognosis than office BP measurement and is also useful for assessing whether antihypertensive therapy remains effective in the critical last few hours of the dosing period, which usually coincides with the morning BP surge associated with arousal and arising. ABPM has been adopted by new evidence-based guidelines in the United Kingdom to confirm a suspected diagnosis of hypertension, which is an indication of the growing importance of ABPM in the management of hypertension. This review provides an overview of the efficacy and safety of antihypertensive therapy based on olmesartan medoxomil ± hydrochlorothiazide and amlodipine

  4. Clinical value of ambulatory blood pressure: Is it time to recommend for all patients with hypertension?

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Kario, Kazuomi; Covic, Adrian; Bertelsen, Nathan; Afsar, Baris; Ozkok, Abdullah; Wiecek, Andrzej; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension is a very common disease, and office measurements of blood pressure are frequently inaccurate. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) offers a more accurate diagnosis, more detailed readings of average blood pressures, better blood pressure measurement during sleep, fewer false positives by detecting more white-coat hypertension, and fewer false negatives by detecting more masked hypertension. ABPM offers better management of clinical outcomes. For example, based on more accurate measurements of blood pressure variability, ABPM demonstrates that taking antihypertensive medication at night leads to better controlled nocturnal blood pressure, which translates into less end organ damage and fewer clinical complications of hypertension. For these reasons, albeit some shortcomings which were discussed, ABPM should be considered as a first-line tool for diagnosing and managing hypertension.

  5. Effect of Omega-3 fatty acids on blood pressure and serum lipids in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Naini, Afsoon Emami; Keyvandarian, Nooshin; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Taheri, Shahram; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and hyperlipidemia are two major risk factors for cardiovascular disease in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. This study was designed to investigate the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on blood pressure (BP) and serum lipids in CAPD patients. This study was a randomized double-blind clinical trial in which 90 CAPD patients were randomly assigned to either the omega-3 or the placebo group. Patients in omega-3 group received 3 g/day omega-3 for 8 weeks, whereas patients in the control group received placebo. At baseline and at the end of 8 weeks, the patients' BP was controlled, and serum biochemistry was measured. Mean systolic BP decreased (-22.2 ± 14.2 mmHg) in the omega-3 group at the end of the study while in the placebo group increased (+0.5 ± 30.2 mmHg) (P < 0.0001). Mean diastolic BP of the omega-3 group decreased more (-11.95 ± 11.9 mmHg) comparing with the placebo group (-1.1 ± 17.3 mmHg) (P = 0.001). There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean changes in serum triglyceride, and total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The results of this study indicate that omega-3 reduced BP significantly but had no effect on lipid profile in our CAPD patients.

  6. Patient Education: A Better Way to Achieve Compliance in the Ambulatory Care Setting. Proceedings from a Conference Held at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York, New York, May 29, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Nicholas, Ed.; And Others

    These proceedings consist of the texts of eight papers presented at a conference on patient education. Included in the volume are the following conference presentations: "An Educational Framework in the Ambulatory Care Setting," by Jeannette J. Simmons; "The Status of Education in Ambulatory Care: A Report of the American Hospital…

  7. Patient Education: A Better Way to Achieve Compliance in the Ambulatory Care Setting. Proceedings from a Conference Held at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York, New York, May 29, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Nicholas, Ed.; And Others

    These proceedings consist of the texts of eight papers presented at a conference on patient education. Included in the volume are the following conference presentations: "An Educational Framework in the Ambulatory Care Setting," by Jeannette J. Simmons; "The Status of Education in Ambulatory Care: A Report of the American Hospital…

  8. Treatment-time regimen of hypertension medications significantly affects ambulatory blood pressure and clinical characteristics of patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ríos, María T; Crespo, Juan J; Moyá, Ana; Domínguez-Sardiña, Manuel; Otero, Alfonso; Sánchez, Juan J; Mojón, Artemio; Fernández, José R; Ayala, Diana E

    2013-03-01

    Patients with resistant hypertension (RH) are at greater risk for stroke, renal insufficiency, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events than are those for whom blood pressure (BP) is responsive to and well controlled by therapeutic interventions. Although all chronotherapy trials have compared the effects on BP regulation of full daily doses of medications when ingested in the morning versus at bedtime, prescription of the same medications in divided doses twice daily (BID) is frequent. Here, we investigated the influence of hypertension treatment-time regimen on the circadian BP pattern, degree of BP control, and relevant clinical and laboratory medicine parameters of RH patients evaluated by 48-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). This cross-sectional study evaluated 2899 such patients (1701 men/1198 women), 64.2 ± 11.8 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, enrolled in the Hygia Project. Among the participants, 1084 were ingesting all hypertension medications upon awakening (upon-awakening regimen), 1436 patients were ingesting the full daily dose of ≥1 of them at bedtime (bedtime regimen), and 379 were ingesting split doses of ≥1 medications BID upon awakening and at bedtime (BID regimen). Patients of the bedtime regimen compared with the other two treatment-time regimens had lower likelihood of microalbuminuria and chronic kidney disease; significantly lower albumin/creatinine ratio, glucose, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; plus higher estimated glomerular filtration rate and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The bedtime regimen was also significantly associated with lower asleep systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP means than the upon-awakening and BID regimens. The sleep-time relative SBP and DBP decline was significantly attenuated by the upon-awakening and BID regimens (p < .001), resulting in significantly higher prevalence of non-dipping in these two treatment-time regimen groups (80.5% and 77.3%, respectively

  9. Comparison of peritonitis rates and patient survival in automated and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: a 10-year single center experience.

    PubMed

    El-Reshaid, Wael; Al-Disawy, Hanan; Nassef, Hossameldeen; Alhelaly, Usama

    2016-09-01

    Peritonitis is a common complication in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and automated peritoneal dialysis (APD). In this retrospective study, peritonitis rates and patient survival of 180 patients on CAPD and 128 patients on APD were compared in the period from January 2005 to December 2014 at Al-Nafisi Center in Kuwait. All patients had prophylactic topical mupirocin at catheter exit site. Patients on CAPD had twin bag system with Y transfer set. The peritonitis rates were 1 in 29 months in CAPD and 1 in 38 months in APD (p < 0.05). Percentage of peritonitis free patients over 10-year period in CAPD and APD were 49 and 60%, respectively (p < 0.05). Time to develop peritonitis was 10.25 ± 3.1 months in CAPD compared to 16.1 ± 4 months in APD (p < 0.001). Relapse and recurrence rates were similar in both groups. Median patient survival in CAPD and APD groups with peritonitis was 13.1 ± 1 and 14 ± 1.4 months respectively (p = 0.3) whereas in peritonitis free patients it was 15 ± 1.4 months in CAPD and 23 ± 3.1 months in APD (p = 0.025). APD had lower incidence rate of peritonitis than CAPD. Patient survival was better in APD than CAPD in peritonitis free patients but was similar in patients who had peritonitis.

  10. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Amy N; Ragucci, Kelly R; Fermo, Joli D; Whitley, Heather P

    2009-10-01

    Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR) measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT) device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic using point-of-care testing (POCT) device versus venipuncture within ambulatory care clinics at our institution. All patients currently treated with warfarin therapy who were managed by clinical pharmacists for anticoagulation monitoring at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Family Medicine Center and University Diagnostic Center, were enrolled. Patients were asked to complete a satisfaction survey regarding their anticoagulation monitoring. In addition, data related to emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and percent of time in the INR therapeutic range for 6 months pre- and post-implementation of POCT device was collected. This information was obtained through an electronic patient information database, Oacis. A total of 145 patients were included in the data collection from the two clinics. The majority (41%) of these patients were taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation. Satisfaction surveys were completed by 86 (59 %) of patients. The surveys revealed that POCT device was preferred over venipuncture in 95% of patients. Reasons for the preference included more face-to-face interaction, less wait time, less pain, less blood needed, and quicker results. Of the 145 patients who were included in the objective data analysis, no significant differences were found in the number of hospitalizations, ED visits, or percent of time in the INR therapeutic range pre- and post-implementation of POCT device. The results of this study demonstrate

  11. Risks to patient safety associated with implementation of electronic applications for medication management in ambulatory care--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carling, Cheryl L L; Kirkehei, Ingvild; Dalsbø, Therese Kristine; Paulsen, Elizabeth

    2013-12-05

    The objective was to find evidence to substantiate assertions that electronic applications for medication management in ambulatory care (electronic prescribing, clinical decision support (CDSS), electronic health record, and computer generated paper prescriptions), while intended to reduce prescribing errors, can themselves result in errors that might harm patients or increase risks to patient safety. Because a scoping search for adverse events in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) yielded few relevant results, we systematically searched nine databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for systematic reviews and studies of a wide variety of designs that reported on implementation of the interventions. Studies that had safety and adverse events as outcomes, monitored for them, reported anecdotally adverse events or other events that might indicate a threat to patient safety were included. We found no systematic reviews that examined adverse events or patient harm caused by organizational interventions. Of the 4056 titles and abstracts screened, 176 full-text articles were assessed for inclusion. Sixty-one studies with appropriate interventions, settings and participants but without patient safety, adverse event outcomes or monitoring for risks were excluded, along with 77 other non-eligible studies. Eighteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 5 non-randomized controlled trials (non-R,CTs) and 15 observational studies were included. The most common electronic intervention studied was CDSS and the most frequent clinical area was cardio-vascular, including anti-coagulants. No RCTS or non-R,CTS reported adverse event. Adverse events reported in observational studies occurred less frequently after implementation of CDSS. One RCT and one observational study reported an increase in problematic prescriptions with electronic prescribing The safety implications of electronic medication management in ambulatory care have not been

  12. [Effectiveness of dermatologic minor surgery in the office of the family physician and patient satisfaction in relation with ambulatory surgery].

    PubMed

    Arribas Blanco, J M; Gil Sanz, M E; Sanz Rodrigo, C; Morón Merchante, I; Muñoz-Quirós Aliaga, S; Lòpez Romero, A; González-Baylín Monje, M L; Laguna Delgado, L; Verdugo Rosado, M

    1996-12-07

    The minor surgery by family physicians increase the primary care competences. The purpose of this work is to prove patients' satisfaction and minor surgery effectiveness practiced by family physicians in health centers with respect to ambulatory's general surgeon. Case-control retrospective study, comparing dermatological surgical procedures performed by 4 family physicians and 8 3rd-year Family Physician residents with surgical procedures wade made by a surgeon over one a year period. Variables analysed include: descriptive samples homogeneity, surgery effectiveness (waiting time, esthetic results, healing time and number of visits, and histopathologic correlation) and patients' satisfaction (with the waiting time, with the results of surgery and with the physician). Minor surgical procedures carried out by 146 family physicians and 61 general surgeons were compared, in congruence with the analyzed descriptive homogeneity's parameters. Family physicians average waiting time was the lower, with a mean of 45 days less than the surgeon. Patient's satisfaction with the physician was higher when family physician were involved (p < 0.001); the same could be applied for the waiting time (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences over the effectiveness and patients' satisfaction. The dermatologic minor surgery by family physician is effective, satisfactory for patients, and has less waiting time. This results justify the introduction of minor surgery in the family physicians office.

  13. The effect of menarche age, parity and lactation on bone mineral density in premenopausal ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sioka, Chrissa; Fotopoulos, Andreas; Papakonstantinou, Stilianos; Georgiou, Athanasia; Pelidou, Sygliti-Henrietta; Kyritsis, Athanasios P; Kalef-Ezra, John A

    2015-07-01

    Although pregnancy and breast-feeding do not have any deleterious effect on disease activity in female multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, their role on bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis risk is unknown. We investigated the role of age at menarche, parity and lactation on BMD expressed as percentage of the mean BMD (%BMD) in 46 pre-menopausal ambulatory female MS patients using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans in lumbar spine (LS) and hip. MS female patients with age at menarche ≥13 years old had reduced %BMD compared to those with menarche age <13 years (95.2±10.7 vs 102.1±13.3, p=0.05 in LS; 90.5±12.6 vs 99.8±12.6, p=0.02 in hip). Parity did not result in any statistically significant changes in either LS or hip. Patients that breastfed their offspring compared to those that did not had significantly lower BMD in both LS (93.9±9.3 vs 110.7±15.6, p=0.004) and hip (91.6±10.7 vs 105.6±15.3, p=0.02). MS female patients with menarche at age≥13 years and those who breastfed their offspring may have reduced BMD. Larger studies are needed to verify these findings and establish a definite role of menarche age and breast feeding with BMD.

  14. Associations of proteinuria, fluid volume imbalance, and body mass index with circadian ambulatory blood pressure in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yasushi; Otani, Takatoshi; Tai, Reibin; Okada, Takayuki; Tanaka, Kentarou; Tanaka, Yoshihide; Sakai, Ken; Aikawa, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and hypervolemic status are the main causes of hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, it is difficult to differentiate between them. We aimed to assess the associations of body mass index (BMI) and total body water (TBW) with ambulatory blood pressure (ABP). Body composition by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and 24-h ABP were measured in 40 patients with CKD. TBW was assessed using corrected TBWBIA adjusted for body surface area (cTBWBIA) and the TBWBIA/TBWWatson ratio obtained using an anthropometric formula (Watson). Elevated ABP (average 24-h BP ≥ 135/85 mmHg) was noted in 23 patients, who were more likely to have a higher cTBWBIA and TBWBIA/TBWWatson ratio than patients without elevated BP. Patients with nocturnal non-dipping (<10% drop in BP during sleep) were more likely to have a higher TBWBIA/TBWWatson ratio. Proteinuria and the TBWBIA/TBWWatson ratio were significant independent factors for 24-h ABP. BMI had a positive correlation with the cTBWBIA, TBWBIA/TBWWatson ratio and furosemide use. Hypertension is dependent on proteinuria and fluid volume imbalance. The TBWBIA/TBWWatson ratio can serve as an indicator of fluid volume-dependent hypertension. BMI is affected by TBW, in which case BMI can become less involved with 24-h ABP. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Patient visits to a national practice-based research network: comparing pediatric research in office settings with the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

    PubMed

    Slora, Eric J; Thoma, Kathleen A; Wasserman, Richard C; Pedlow, Steven E; Bocian, Alison B

    2006-08-01

    Our objective with this study was to assess the extent to which patients who are seen by practitioners in Pediatric Research in Office Settings, a national primary care practice-based research network, are representative of those who are seen in ambulatory office-based pediatric primary care in the United States. Pediatric Research in Office Settings patient data were collected from the offices of 57 randomly selected network practitioners as part of an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality-funded effort to describe primary care visits and replicate the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey in primary care practice-based research networks. These data were from 1706 randomly selected pediatric patient visits that occurred between March and June 2002. National comparison data were 948 randomly selected pediatric patient visits that occurred between March and June 2000 in the offices of the 33 primary care pediatric practitioners who had participated in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. The groups were compared on patient demographics (age, gender, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, as represented by Medicaid status), visit characteristics (percentages of patients referred, practitioner designation of visit as acute versus nonacute, and continuity of care), the top patient/parent-articulated reasons for visit, and the top practitioner diagnoses. Comparisons revealed substantial similarities between Pediatric Research in Office Settings and national data, including gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and visit characteristics. Differences were noted for age and race, with Pediatric Research in Office Settings children approximately 1 year older and comprising a significantly lower proportion of black patients than their National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey counterparts. Although the top 6 reasons that were articulated by parents for outpatient visits in the 2 groups were remarkably similar in rank order and proportions, there were

  16. Ambulatory Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Trull, Timothy J.; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Ambulatory assessment (AA) covers a wide range of assessment methods to study people in their natural environment, including self-report, observational, and biological/physiological/behavioral. AA methods minimize retrospective biases while gathering ecologically valid data from patients’ everyday life in real time or near real time. Here, we report on the major characteristics of AA, and we provide examples of applications of AA in clinical psychology (a) to investigate mechanisms and dynamics of symptoms, (b) to predict the future recurrence or onset of symptoms, (c) to monitor treatment effects, (d) to predict treatment success, (e) to prevent relapse, and (f) as interventions. In addition, we present and discuss the most pressing and compelling future AA applications: technological developments (the smartphone), improved ecological validity of laboratory results by combined lab-field studies, and investigating gene-environment interactions. We conclude with a discussion of acceptability, compliance, privacy, and ethical issues. PMID:23157450

  17. Combined baseline and one-month changes in big endothelin-1 and brain natriuretic peptide plasma concentrations predict clinical outcomes in patients with left ventricular dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction: Insights from the Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study (EPHESUS) study.

    PubMed

    Olivier, A; Girerd, N; Michel, J B; Ketelslegers, J M; Fay, R; Vincent, J; Bramlage, P; Pitt, B; Zannad, F; Rossignol, P

    2017-08-15

    Increased levels of neuro-hormonal biomarkers predict poor prognosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicated by left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD). The predictive value of repeated (one-month interval) brain natriuretic peptides (BNP) and big-endothelin 1 (BigET-1) measurements were investigated in patients with LVSD after AMI. In a sub-study of the Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study (EPHESUS trial), BNP and BigET-1 were measured at baseline and at 1month in 476 patients. When included in the same Cox regression model, baseline BNP (p=0.0003) and BigET-1 (p=0.026) as well as the relative changes (after 1month) from baseline in BNP (p=0.049) and BigET-1 (p=0.045) were predictive of the composite of cardiovascular death or hospitalization for worsening heart failure. Adding baseline and changes in BigET-1 to baseline and changes in BNP led to a significant increase in prognostic reclassification as assessed by integrated discrimination improvement index (5.0%, p=0.01 for the primary endpoint). Both increased baseline and changes after one month in BigET-1 concentrations were shown to be associated with adverse clinical outcomes, independently from BNP baseline levels and one month changes, in patients after recent AMI complicated with LVSD. This novel result may be of clinical interest since such combined biomarker assessment could improve risk stratification and open new avenues for biomarker-guided targeted therapies. In the present study, we report for the first time in a population of patients with reduced LVEF after AMI and signs or symptoms of congestive HF, that increased baseline values of BNP and BigET-1 as well as a further rise of these markers over the first month after AMI, were independently predictive of future cardiovascular events. This approach may therefore be of clinical interest with the potential of improving risk stratification after AMI with reduced LVEF while

  18. Azilsartan in Patients With Mild to Moderate Hypertension Using Clinic and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Measurements.

    PubMed

    Perez, Alfonso; Cao, Charlie

    2017-01-01

    This was a phase 2, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind dose-ranging study. Hypertensive adults (n=555) received one of five doses of azilsartan (AZL; 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40 mg), olmesartan medoxomil (OLM) 20 mg, or placebo once daily. The primary endpoint was change in trough clinic diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at week 8. Compared with placebo, all AZL doses (except 2.5 mg) provided statistically and clinically significant reductions in DBP and systolic blood pressure (SBP) based on both clinic blood pressure (BP) and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). AZL 40 mg was statistically superior vs OLM. Clinic BP was associated with a pronounced placebo effect (-6 mm Hg), whereas this was negligible with ABPM (±0.5 mm Hg). Adverse event frequency was similar in the AZL and placebo groups. Based on these and other findings, subsequent trials investigated the commercial AZL medoxomil tablet at doses 20 to 80 mg/d using 24-hour ABPM. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Emergence of resistance in staphylococci after long-term mupirocin application in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Cavdar, Caner; Atay, Tuba; Zeybel, Mujdat; Celik, Ali; Ozder, Ayse; Yildiz, Serkan; Gulay, Zeynep; Camsari, Taner

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the effects of once-weekly mupirocin application to catheter exit sites on Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CNS) colonization and investigated the resistance of those bacteria to methicillin (MeR) and mupirocin (MuR). We enrolled 36 continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients (mean age: 55.1 +/- 1.4 years) into the study. The patients (men/women: 21/15) had been applying mupirocin to the catheter exit site once weekly before the start of the study (mupirocin treatment duration: 3.1 +/- 2.0 years). During the study period, swabs were taken monthly from the nares, axillae, inguinal area, and catheter exit site. The swabs were inoculated on blood plates. Methicillin and mupirocin susceptibility were tested by disc diffusion according to the interpretative criteria of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. We evaluated a total of 144 cultures. Among CNS isolates, the MuR was 66%, and the MeR was 38.8%. At the start of the study period, 3 patients were S. aureus nasal carriers. In nasal swabs, no MeR S. aureus was identified, and only 1 MuR S. aureus was found. Once-weekly application of mupirocin at the exit site in CAPD patients led to comparable rates of colonization by MuR S. aureus as did thrice-weekly or more frequent application. Clinical results showing high mupirocin and methicillin resistance in CNS are controversial.

  20. Use of an Exercise Technology in Post-Acute Care of a Skilled Nursing Facility: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Cimarolli, Verena R; Reinhardt, Joann P; Minahan, Jillian; Burack, Orah; Thomas, Channing; Melly, Regina

    2017-08-23

    Use of exercise technologies has benefits for community-dwelling older adults in terms of improved gait and balance. But research on the feasibility of use of exercise technologies in various geriatric health care settings is lacking. Hence, the current study examined the feasibility of implementing an exercise technology intended to augment rehabilitation in patients receiving post-acute care (PAC) in a skilled nursing facility (SNF). We focused on 3 indicators of feasibility: extent of usage (including predictors of more intense use), patients' acceptability of the technology, and limited efficacy. Cross-sectional study with data from patients' electronic medical records (EMR), exercise technology portal, and patient interviews. SNF. A sample of post-acute patients (n = 237). Sociodemographic and health-related variables, time spent using the technology, and 8 items of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES). Average time spent using the technology varied greatly (range, 1-460 minutes). A regression analysis showed that patients who had a longer length of stay (β = .01, P < .05) and were younger (β = -0.01, P < .05) spent significantly more time using the technology. Acceptability of technology was high among patients. Finally, patients who used the technology had lower 30-day rehospitalization rates. Exercise technology is feasible to use in supporting rehabilitation in patients receiving PAC in a SNF and seems to have beneficial effects. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing the Psychedelic "After-Glow" in Ayahuasca Users: Post-Acute Neurometabolic and Functional Connectivity Changes Are Associated with Enhanced Mindfulness Capacities.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Frederic; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Valle, Marta; Roberto, Natalia; Domínguez-Clavé, Elisabet; Elices, Matilde; Luna, Luís Eduardo; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C; de Araujo, Draulio B; Friedlander, Pablo; Barker, Steven A; Álvarez, Enrique; Soler, Joaquim; Pascual, Juan C; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2017-09-01

    Ayahuasca is a plant tea containing the psychedelic 5-HT2A agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine and harmala monoamine-oxidase inhibitors. Acute administration leads to neurophysiological modifications in brain regions of the default mode network, purportedly through a glutamatergic mechanism. Post-acutely, ayahuasca potentiates mindfulness capacities in volunteers and induces rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant patients. However, the mechanisms underlying these fast and maintained effects are poorly understood. Here, we investigated in an open-label uncontrolled study in 16 healthy volunteers ayahuasca-induced post-acute neurometabolic and connectivity modifications and their association with mindfulness measures. Using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional connectivity, we compared baseline and post-acute neurometabolites and seed-to-voxel connectivity in the posterior and anterior cingulate cortex after a single ayahuasca dose. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed post-acute reductions in glutamate+glutamine, creatine, and N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartylglutamate in the posterior cingulate cortex. Connectivity was increased between the posterior cingulate cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex, and between the anterior cingulate cortex and limbic structures in the right medial temporal lobe. Glutamate+glutamine reductions correlated with increases in the "nonjudging" subscale of the Five Facets Mindfulness Questionnaire. Increased anterior cingulate cortex-medial temporal lobe connectivity correlated with increased scores on the self-compassion questionnaire. Post-acute neural changes predicted sustained elevations in nonjudging 2 months later. These results support the involvement of glutamate neurotransmission in the effects of psychedelics in humans. They further suggest that neurometabolic changes in the posterior cingulate cortex, a key region within the default mode network, and increased connectivity between the

  2. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF POOR SLEEP AFTER INPATIENT POST-ACUTE REHABILITATION: THE ROLE OF DEPRESSION AND PRE-ILLNESS SLEEP QUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael N.; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the unique impact of poor sleep and symptoms of depression on sleep quality for up to one year after inpatient post-acute rehabilitation among older adults. Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Setting Two in-patient post-acute rehabilitation facilities Participants 245 individuals over age 65 years (mean age=80 years, 38% female) Interventions None. Measurements Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) during the post-acute care stay twice to evaluate pre-illness sleep quality and sleep quality during the post-acute care stay, and again at 3, 6, 9 and 12-months follow-up. Demographics, symptoms of depression, cognitive functioning, and comorbidities were also assessed. Results Across time points, sleep was significantly disturbed for many individuals. Nested regression models predicting PSQI total score at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months showed that variables entered in Block 1 (age, gender, cognitive functioning and comorbidities) were significant predictors of poor sleep at 6-months, but not at 3, 9 or 12 months follow-up. Depression (Block 2) and pre-illness PSQI total score (Block 3) were significant predictors of PSQI total score at all follow-up time points. PSQI total score during post-acute care (Block 4) explained a significant proportion of variance only at the 3-month follow-up. Conclusions This study confirms that chronic poor sleep is common among older adults during post-acute rehabilitation, and resolution of sleep disturbance after acute health events may be a lengthy process. Our findings expand understanding of the role of depressive symptoms and pre-existing sleep complaints in predicting poor sleep over time among these vulnerable older adults. PMID:22617164

  3. Assessing the Psychedelic “After-Glow” in Ayahuasca Users: Post-Acute Neurometabolic and Functional Connectivity Changes Are Associated with Enhanced Mindfulness Capacities

    PubMed Central

    Sampedro, Frederic; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Valle, Marta; Roberto, Natalia; Domínguez-Clavé, Elisabet; Elices, Matilde; Luna, Luís Eduardo; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C; de Araujo, Draulio B; Friedlander, Pablo; Barker, Steven A; Álvarez, Enrique; Soler, Joaquim; Pascual, Juan C; Feilding, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Ayahuasca is a plant tea containing the psychedelic 5-HT2A agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine and harmala monoamine-oxidase inhibitors. Acute administration leads to neurophysiological modifications in brain regions of the default mode network, purportedly through a glutamatergic mechanism. Post-acutely, ayahuasca potentiates mindfulness capacities in volunteers and induces rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant patients. However, the mechanisms underlying these fast and maintained effects are poorly understood. Here, we investigated in an open-label uncontrolled study in 16 healthy volunteers ayahuasca-induced post-acute neurometabolic and connectivity modifications and their association with mindfulness measures. Methods Using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional connectivity, we compared baseline and post-acute neurometabolites and seed-to-voxel connectivity in the posterior and anterior cingulate cortex after a single ayahuasca dose. Results Magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed post-acute reductions in glutamate+glutamine, creatine, and N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartylglutamate in the posterior cingulate cortex. Connectivity was increased between the posterior cingulate cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex, and between the anterior cingulate cortex and limbic structures in the right medial temporal lobe. Glutamate+glutamine reductions correlated with increases in the “nonjudging” subscale of the Five Facets Mindfulness Questionnaire. Increased anterior cingulate cortex-medial temporal lobe connectivity correlated with increased scores on the self-compassion questionnaire. Post-acute neural changes predicted sustained elevations in nonjudging 2 months later. Conclusions These results support the involvement of glutamate neurotransmission in the effects of psychedelics in humans. They further suggest that neurometabolic changes in the posterior cingulate cortex, a key region within the default

  4. Changes in nutritional status on follow-up of an incident cohort of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Narayan; Gupta, Amit; Sinha, Archana; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Kumar, Alok; Kumar, Ramesh

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of malnutrition in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients in India has not been studied in much detail. We studied various nutritional indices of end-stage renal disease patients at the initiation of therapy. Two hundred and eighty-three CAPD patients (204 were male; mean +/- SD age, 50 +/- 14 years) were assessed for their nutritional status at the initiation of therapy. Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometry, dietary diary, subjective global assessment (SGA), and serum albumin. The patients were categorized into different grades of malnutrition, based on their nutritional indices: (1) normal nutritional status, (2) mild-moderate malnutrition, and (3) severe malnutrition. Based on SGA, 71/283 (25.08%) had a normal nutritional status, 192/283 (67.84%) had mild-moderate malnutrition, and 20/283 (7.07%) had severe malnutrition. However, on categorizing patients in different grades of malnutrition based on serum albumin, 103/283 (36.4%) had a normal nutritional status, 175/283(61.84%) had mild-moderate malnutrition, and (5/283) 1.77% had severe malnutrition. Their mean calorie and protein intake was significantly lower than recommended (National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcome and Quality Initiative guidelines). Individual dietary counseling was performed, an individual diet chart was given to each patient, and counseling was repeated. There was a significant increase in nutrient intake and in grades of malnutrition of these patients during follow-up. We conclude that the majority of the patients were already malnourished at the initiation of CAPD, and that nutrient intake and nutritional parameters improved during the follow-up of these patients.

  5. Description and Students’ Perceptions of a Required Geriatric Clerkship in Post-Acute Rehabilitative Care

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Miho K.; Meuleman, John R.; Shorr, Ron I.; Beyth, Rebecca J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes medical students’ evaluation of a geriatric clerkship in post-acute rehabilitative care settings. This was a cross sectional study of fourth-year medical students who completed a mandatory 2-week rotation at a post-acute care facility. Students were provided with three instructional methods: 1) Web-based interactive learning modules; 2) Small group sessions with Geriatric faculty; and 3) Geriatric Interdisciplinary Care Summary (GICS), a grid that students used to formulate comprehensive interdisciplinary care plans for their own patients. After the rotation, students evaluated the overall clerkship, patient care activities and usefulness of the three instructional methods using a 5-point Likert scale (1 to 5: Poor to Excellent), and listed their area of future specialty. Among 156 students who completed the rotation, 117 (75%) completed the evaluation. Thirty (26%) chose specialties providing chronic disease management such as family, internal medicine, and psychiatry; 34 (29%) chose specialties providing primarily procedural services such as surgery, radiology, anesthesiology, pathology, and radiation oncology. Students rated the usefulness of the GICS as good to very good (mean ± SD: 3.3 ± 1.0). Similarly, they rated overall clerkship as good to excellent (3.8 ± 1.0). The ANOVA test revealed no significant group difference in any of the responses from students with Overall clerkship [F(112,4)=1.7, p=0.2]. Students rated the geriatric clerkship favorably and found the multi-modal instruction to be useful. Even among students whose career choice was not primary care, geriatrics was a good model for interdisciplinary care training and could serve as a model for other disciplines. PMID:19682134

  6. Fish meal supplementation and ambulatory blood pressure in patients with hypertension: relevance of baseline membrane fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Colussi, GianLuca; Catena, Cristiana; Dialti, Valeria; Pezzutto, Francesca; Mos, Lucio; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2014-03-01

    Studies on fish oil effects on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) are inconclusive. We evaluated fish effects on fatty acid composition of red blood cell (RBC) membrane and ABP values and tested the hypothesis that the starting membrane fatty acid composition affects the ability to incorporate additional polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and decrease blood pressure. In 55 hypertensive patients, we measured RBC membrane fatty acid by gas chromatography and performed ABP monitoring. Patients received nutritional counseling and 3 weekly meals of trout rich in PUFA. In 42 patients, RBC membrane fatty acid and ABP were reassessed after 6 months. At baseline, the PUFA/saturated fatty acid (SFA) ratio of RBC membrane (PUFA/SFA) was inversely related to 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime systolic and pulse pressure, a relationship that was independent of covariables. At follow-up, the PUFA/SFA ratio increased in 20 (48%) of 42 patients. Patients with increased PUFA/SFA ratio at follow-up had lower baseline PUFA/SFA ratio than patients without such increase. Fish meal supplementation decreased 24-hour systolic and diastolic pressure only in patients who had increased PUFA/SFA ratio, a change that was more prominent during the nighttime. The change in PUFA/SFA was inversely and independently related to the change in 24-hour systolic and pulse pressure, and a logistic regression analysis indicated low baseline PUFA/SFA ratio as the only independent predictor of PUFA/SFA increase and blood pressure decrease. The ability of fish meals to increase membrane PUFA content and decrease blood pressure in hypertensive patients depends upon the starting membrane fatty acid composition.

  7. Association of ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate with advanced white matter lesions in ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Sung; Lim, Young-Hyo; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Hee-Tae; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Lim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Young-Jun; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Young Seo

    2014-02-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are a common finding in stroke patients, and the most important risk factors are old age and hypertension. Although many studies have described the association between WMLs and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) parameters in healthy subjects and hypertensive patients, little is known about the association in hypertensive ischemic stroke patients. From July 2009 to June 2012, 169 consecutive hypertensive noncardioembolic ischemic stroke patients were recruited within 1 week of suffering a stroke, and ABPM was applied 1 or 2 weeks after stroke onset. The subjects were classified into 2 groups according to the presence of advanced WMLs, and their ABPM parameters were compared. Finally, multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the independent relationships between WMLs and ABPM parameters. Seventy (41%) patients had advanced WMLs. In univariable analysis, higher 24-hour, awake, and asleep systolic blood pressure (SBP)/diastolic blood pressure levels and 24-hour pulse pressure were associated with advanced WMLs. However, circadian blood pressure parameters such as 24-hour BP variability, morning surge, and nocturnal dipping pattern were not associated with advanced WMLs. After adjustments, old age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.063; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.024-1.104; P = 0.002), high 24-hour SBP levels (OR = 1.055; 95% CI = 1.028-1.082; P < 0.001), and high 24-hour heart rate (OR = 1.041; 95% CI = 1.006-1.078; P = 0.023) were independently associated with advanced WMLs. In addition to old age and elevated 24-hour SBP, increased heart rate is associated with advanced WMLs in ischemic stroke patients. Heart rate deserves more attention in predicting advanced WMLs in those patients.

  8. Sedation shared decision-making in ambulatory venous access device placement: Effects on patient choice, satisfaction and recovery time.

    PubMed

    Chittle, Melissa D; Oklu, Rahmi; Pino, Richard M; He, Ping; Sheridan, Robert M; Martino, Joanne; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-08-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the impact of shared decision-making when selecting a sedation option, from no sedation (local anesthetic), minimal sedation (anxiolysis with a benzodiazepine) or moderate sedation (benzodiazepine and opiate), for venous access device placement (port-a-cath and tunneled catheters) on patient choice, satisfaction and recovery time. This is an IRB-approved, HIPPA-compliant, retrospective study of 198 patients (18-85 years old, 60% female) presenting to an ambulatory vascular interventional radiology department for venous access device placement between 22 October 2014 and 7 October 2015. Patients were educated about sedation options and given the choice of undergoing the procedure with no sedation (local anesthetic only), or minimal or moderate sedation. Satisfaction was assessed through three survey questions. No sedation was selected by 53/198 (27%), minimal sedation by 71/198 (36%) and moderate sedation by 74/198 (37%). All subjects would recommend the option to another patient and valued the opportunity to select a sedation option. Post-procedure recovery time differences were statistically significant (p<0.0001) with median recovery times of 0 minutes for no sedation, 38 minutes for minimal sedation and 64 minutes for moderate sedation. In conclusion, patient sedation preference for venous access device placement is variable, signifying there is a role for shared decision-making as it empowers the patient to select the option most aligned with his or her goals. The procedure is well-tolerated, associated with high satisfaction, and the impact on departmental flow is notable because patients choosing no or minimal sedation results in a decreased post-procedure recovery time burden.

  9. Impact of insurance and hospital ownership on hospital length of stay among patients with ambulatory care-sensitive conditions.

    PubMed

    Mainous, Arch G; Diaz, Vanessa A; Everett, Charles J; Knoll, Michele E

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Some studies suggest proprietary (for-profit) hospitals are maximizing financial margins from patient care by limiting therapies or decreasing length of stay for uninsured patients. This study examines the role of insurance related to length of stay once the patient is in the hospital and risk for mortality, particularly in a for-profit environment. METHODS We undertook an analysis of hospitalizations in the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) of the 5-year period of 2003 to 2007 for patients aged 18 to 64 years (unweighted n = 849,866; weighted n = 90 million). The analysis included those who were hospitalized with both ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs), hospitalizations considered to be preventable, and non-ACSCs. We analyzed the transformed mean length of stay between individuals who had Medicaid or all other insurance types while hospitalized and those who were hospitalized without insurance. This analysis was stratified by hospital ownership. We also examined the relationship between in-hospital mortality and insurance status. RESULTS After controlling for comorbidities; age, sex, and race/ethnicity; and hospitalizations with either an ACSC or non-ACSC diagnosis, patients without insurance tended to have a significantly shorter length of stay. Across all hospital types, the mean length of stay for ACSCs was significantly shorter for individuals without insurance (2.77 days) than for those with either private insurance (2.89 days, P = .04) or Medicaid (3.19, P <.01). Among hospitalizations for ACSCs, in-hospital mortality rate for individuals with either private insurance or Medicaid was not significantly different from the mortality rate for those without insurance. CONCLUSIONS Patients without insurance have shorter lengths of stay for both ACSCs and non-ACSCs. Future research should examine whether patients without insurance are being discharged prematurely.

  10. Pharmacotherapy in rehabilitation of post-acute traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Saurabha; Iaccarino, Mary Alexis; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-06-01

    There are nearly 1.8 million annual emergency room visits and over 289,000 annual hospitalizations related to traumatic brain injury (TBI). The goal of this review article is to highlight pharmacotherapies that we often use in the clinic that have been shown to benefit various sequelae of TBI. We have decided to focus on sequelae that we commonly encounter in our practice in the post-acute phase after a TBI. These symptoms are hyper-arousal, agitation, hypo-arousal, inattention, slow processing speed, memory impairment, sleep disturbance, depression, headaches, spasticity, and paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity. In this review article, the current literature for the pharmacological management of these symptoms are mentioned, including medications that have not had success and some ongoing trials. It is clear that the pharmacological management specific to those with TBI is often based on small studies and that often treatment is based on assumptions of how similar conditions are managed when not relating to TBI. As the body of the literature expands and targeted treatments start to emerge for TBI, the function of pharmacological management will need to be further defined. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Failure of efforts to contain costs of care after colorectal procedures: Nationwide trends in length of stay, costs and post-acute care utilization.

    PubMed

    Al-Mazrou, Ahmed M; Onur, Baser; Kiran, Ravi P

    2017-04-25

    This study aims to report trends in healthcare resource utilization and costs after colorectal surgery in the US. From all-payer inpatient data, patients who were discharged after elective colorectal procedures (2002-2011) were identified. Trends in postoperative hospital stay, costs and post-acute care were evaluated. Of 251,583 included patients, median length of stay was 6 days. Trends over time suggested a progressive reduction in hospital stay after surgery until 2008 after which there was an increase (6.6 days in 2002, 5.9 days in 2008 and 6.1 days in 2010). Costs (peak:2011, $51,731) and post-acute care (peak:2011, 19.4%) continued to increase throughout. While length of stay over the last decade reduced, a further reduction may not be feasible. Meanwhile, inpatient costs as well as the use of post-acute care programs have continued to rise. Healthcare planning needs to focus on patients who cannot be discharged early, and more comprehensively evaluate the interplay between length of stay, readmissions, inpatient and post-acute care utilization if we are to contain overall healthcare costs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Ambulatory Assessment.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Ryan W; Wycoff, Andrea M; Trull, Timothy J

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, significant technological advances have changed our understanding of dynamic processes in clinical psychology. A particularly important agent of change has been ambulatory assessment (AA). AA is the assessment of individuals in their daily lives, combining the twin benefits of increased ecological validity and minimized retrospective biases. These benefits make AA particularly well-suited to the assessment of dynamic processes, and recent advancements in technology are providing exciting new opportunities to understand these processes in new ways. In the current article, we briefly detail the capabilities currently offered by smartphones and mobile physiological devices, as well as some of the practical and ethical challenges of incorporating these new technologies into AA research. We then provide several examples of recent innovative applications of AA methodology in clinical research, assessment, and intervention and provide a case example of AA data generated from a study utilizing multiple mobile devices. In this way, we aim to provide a sense of direction for researchers planning AA studies of their own.

  13. Hospital to Post-Acute Care Facility Transfers: Identifying Targets for Information Exchange Quality Improvement.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christine D; Cumbler, Ethan; Honigman, Benjamin; Burke, Robert E; Boxer, Rebecca S; Levy, Cari; Coleman, Eric A; Wald, Heidi L

    2017-01-01

    Information exchange is critical to high-quality care transitions from hospitals to post-acute care (PAC) facilities. We conducted a survey to evaluate the completeness and timeliness of information transfer and communication between a tertiary-care academic hospital and its related PAC facilities. This was a cross-sectional Web-based 36-question survey of 110 PAC clinicians and staff representing 31 PAC facilities conducted between October and December 2013. We received responses from 71 of 110 individuals representing 29 of 31 facilities (65% and 94% response rates). We collapsed 4-point Likert responses into dichotomous variables to reflect completeness (sufficient vs insufficient) and timeliness (timely vs not timely) for information transfer and communication. Among respondents, 32% reported insufficient information about discharge medical conditions and management plan, and 83% reported at least occasionally encountering problems directly related to inadequate information from the hospital. Hospital clinician contact information was the most common insufficient domain. With respect to timeliness, 86% of respondents desired receipt of a discharge summary on or before the day of discharge, but only 58% reported receiving the summary within this time frame. Through free-text responses, several participants expressed the need for paper prescriptions for controlled pain medications to be sent with patients at the time of transfer. Staff and clinicians at PAC facilities perceive substantial deficits in content and timeliness of information exchange between the hospital and facilities. Such deficits are particularly relevant in the context of the increasing prevalence of bundled payments for care across settings as well as forthcoming readmissions penalties for PAC facilities. Targets identified for quality improvement include structuring discharge summary information to include information identified as deficient by respondents, completion of discharge summaries

  14. Initial Clinical Experience With a New Automated Antitachycardia Pacing Algorithm: Feasibility and Safety in an Ambulatory Patient Cohort.

    PubMed

    Yee, Raymond; Fisher, John D; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika; Smith, Timothy W; Kenigsberg, David N; Canby, Robert; Jackson, Troy; Taepke, Robert; DeGroot, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Antitachycardia pacing (ATP) in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) decreases patient shock burden but has recognized limitations. A new automated ATP (AATP) based on electrophysiological first principles was designed. The study objective was to assess the feasibility and safety of AATP in ambulatory ICD patients. Enrolled patients had dual chamber or cardiac resynchronization therapy ICDs, history of ≥1 ICD-treated ventricular tachycardias (VT)/ventricular fibrillation episode, or a recorded, sustained monomorphic VT. Detection was set to ventricular fibrillation number of intervals to detect=24/32, VT number of intervals to detect≥16, and a fast VT zone of 240 to 320 ms. AATP prescribed the components and delivery of successive ATP sequences in real time, using the same settings for all patients. ICD datalogs were uploaded every ≈3 months, at unscheduled visits, exit, and death. Episodes and adverse events were adjudicated by separate committees. Results were adjusted (generalized estimating equations) for multiple episodes. AATP was downloaded into the ICDs of 144 patients (121 men), aged 67.4±11.9 years, left ventricular ejection fraction 33.1±13.6% (n=137), and treated 1626 episodes in 49 patients during 14.5±5.1 months of follow-up. Datalogs permitted adjudication of 702 episodes, including 669 sustained monomorphic VT, 20 polymorphic VT, 10 supraventricular tachycardia, and 3 malsensing episodes. AATP terminated 39 of 69 (59% adjusted) sustained monomorphic VT in the fast VT zone, 509 of 590 (85% adjusted) in the VT zone, and 6 of 10 in the ventricular fibrillation zone. No supraventricular tachycardias converted to VT or ventricular fibrillation. No anomalous AATP behavior was observed. The new AATP algorithm safely generated ATP sequences and controlled therapy progression in all zones without need for individualized programing. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Potential drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions among ambulatory cancer patients: a prevalence study using an advanced screening method.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Roelof W F; Swart, Eleonora L; Boom, Frits A; Schuitenmaker, Martin S; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G

    2010-12-13

    The pharmacotherapeutic treatment of patients with cancer is generally associated with multiple side-effects. Drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions between anti-cancer drugs or interactions with medication to treat comorbidity can reinforce or intensify side-effects.The aim of the present study is to gain more insight into the prevalence of drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions among patients being treated in the outpatient day care departments for oncology and hematological illnesses. For the first time the prevalence of drug interactions with OTC-drugs in cancer patients will be studied. Possible risk factors for the occurrence of these drug-related problems will also be studied. A multicenter cross-sectional observational study of the epidemiology of drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions is performed among all oncology and hemato-oncology patients treated with systemic anti-cancer drugs at the oncology and hematology outpatient day care department of the VU University medical center and the Zaans Medical Center. In this article the prevalence of potential drug interactions in outpatient day-care patients treated with anti-cancer agents is studied using a novel more extensive screening method. If this study shows a high prevalence of drug interactions clinical pharmacists and oncologists must collaborate to develop a pharmaceutical screening programme, including an automated electronic warning system, to support drug prescribing for ambulatory cancer patient. This programme could minimize the occurrence of drug related problems such as drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions, thereby increasing quality of life. This study is registered, number NTR2238.

  16. Exfoliated mesothelial cell and CA-125 in automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients.

    PubMed

    Kanjanabuch, Talerngsak; Puttipittayathorn, Nopadol; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Lieusuwan, Songkiat; Katavetin, Pisut; Mahatanan, Nanta; Sriudom, Kanda; Chirananthavat, Thanit; Thongbor, Nisa; Eiam-Ong, Somchai

    2011-09-01

    Automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) becomes the first option for peritoneal dialysis, nowadays overtaking continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in many countries. The comparison of peritoneal membrane alteration in CAPD and APD is inconclusive. The authors therefore compared the peritoneal membrane changes in patients undergoing CAPD and APD. In naive end stage renal disease patients, the choice of PD modes (CAPD or APD) was dependent on the patient's decision. Thirty-six CAPD and 25APD patients with a total of 287 patient-months were compared. The peritoneal mass parameter, exfoliated mesothelial cell (MTC) and dialysate CA-125, as well as modified peritoneal equilibrium test (mPET) with 4.25% dextrose solution was simultaneously evaluated at 1 and 6 month follow-up. Although the peritoneal function (as measured by D/P creatinine, D/D0 glucose, sodium dipping, and dialysate protein loss), adequacy, serum albumin, nutritional status, and residual renal function showed no significant differences between groups at 1 and 6 months, CA-125 but not MTC was higher in APD compared with CAPD at the first month of PD beginning. Due to the single time-point measurement limitation, the authors compared the peritoneal mass parameter differences between 1 and 6 month. During 6-month follow-up, CA-125 decreased 30 +/- 5% vs. 7 +/- 5% and MTC decreased 5 +/- 12% vs. 40 +/- 11% in APD and CAPD, respectively. The higher CA-125 reduction in APD and greater changes of MTC in CAPD suggested that there was less viable mesothelial cell in APD compared with CAPD. The authors observed that both APD and CAPD damaged peritoneum. However, there might be higher peritoneal injury in APD patients. The proper randomization study in longer follow-up period is mandatory to confirm this observation.

  17. One-year trend in pain and disability relief recall in acute and chronic ambulatory low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Haas, Mitchell; Nyiendo, Joanne; Aickin, Mikel

    2002-01-01

    Clinicians use patients' recall of pain and disability relief as indicators of therapeutic effectiveness. Recall can change over time, however, and is influenced by factors other than true relief, including current health status. We have determined the trend in the relative contribution of current pain/disability and actual relief (current-baseline score) to relief recall over the course of 1 year. Self-referred patients (n=1182) seeking treatment from primary-care medical doctors and chiropractors in community-based clinics were asked to record present pain and disability, as well as perceived relief at five follow-up time points from 2 weeks to 12 months after initial consultation for acute and chronic low back pain (LBP). Multiple regression analysis was performed at each time point and over the five follow-up time points. We found a clear logarithmic time trend of increasing dependence of pain relief recall on present pain (P<0.0001) and a concomitant pattern of decreasing dependence on actual pain relief (P<0.0001). The patterns are fairly consistent for acute and chronic patients. The principal independent predictor of perceived pain/disability relief appears to be present pain/disability with actual relief playing a smaller role at all time points (P<0.0001) except for disability relief recall at 2 weeks (P=0.103). The findings are robust in LBP sufferers. Complaint characteristics including LBP chronicity, sciatica, LBP history, and comorbidity; psychosocial variables including stress, depression, and well being; sociodemographics; and treating provider type are not important independent predictors of pain and disability relief recall in ambulatory LBP patients. Perceived relief is too weakly related to present pain and disability to be accurate enough for use as a clinical assessment tool for individual patients. Physicians may need to use objective relief data to give the patient a realistic idea of actual improvement.

  18. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of spironolactone for hypokalemia in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Yongsiri, Somchai; Thammakumpee, Jiranuch; Prongnamchai, Suriya; Tengpraettanakorn, Pechngam; Chueansuwan, Rachaneeporn; Tangjaturonrasme, Siriporn; Dinchuthai, Pakaphan

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of hypokalemia in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients is about 15-60%, leading to significant complications. There is no standard treatment other than potassium supplement in this setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of spironolactone 25 mg/day in CAPD patients who have a history of hypokalemia. This is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in CAPD patients who had a history of hypokalemia. Study intervention is 4 weeks of oral spironolactone 25 mg/day or placebo, cross-over after a 2-week wash-out period. The primary outcome was the difference of serum potassium before and after 4 weeks of spironolactone treatment. Serum potassium was measured every 2 weeks, serum magnesium, urine and peritoneal fluid potassium measured before and after each treatment period. We enrolled 24 patients, and 20 completed the cross-over study. Ten patients were anuric. The total doses of potassium supplement were the same during the study period. Serum potassium levels before and after study intervention were not significantly different in both groups (4.23 ± 0.64 vs. 3.90 ± 0.59 mEq/L for spironolactone P = 0.077 and 3.84 ± 0.62 vs. 3.91 ± 0.52 for placebo P = 0.551). Total 24-h potassium, magnesium, sodium excretion, urine volume and ultrafiltration volume were not affected by spironolactone or placebo. There was one episode of hyperkalemia (5.6 mEq/L) during the spironolactone treatment period. Spironolactone 25 mg/day does not have a significant effect on serum potassium or urine and peritoneal excretion rate in CAPD patients who have a history of hypokalemia.

  19. Correlation between ambulatory function and clinical factors in hemiplegic patients with intact single lateral corticospinal tract: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-08-01

    To define the relationship between the complete destruction of 1 lateral corticospinal tract (CST), as demonstrated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, and ambulatory function 6 months following stroke.Twenty-six adults (17 male, 9 female) with poststroke hemiplegia who were transferred to the physical medicine and rehabilitation department. Participants underwent DTI tractography, which showed that 1 lateral CST had been clearly destroyed.Functional ambulation classification (FAC) scores at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the patients' ability to walk. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the Korean version of the modified Barthel index (K-MBI) at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the degree of functional recovery.Of the 26 patients, 18 were nonambulatory (FAC level 1-3), and 8 were able to walk without support (FAC level 4-6). The type of stroke (infarction or hemorrhage), site of the lesion, spasticity of lower extremities, cranioplasty, and the time taken from onset to MRI were not statistically significantly correlated with the ability to walk. However, statistically significant correlations were found in relation to age, K-MBI scores, and initial NIHSS scores.Despite the complete damage to the lesion site and the preservation of 1 unilateral CST, as shown by DTI, good outcomes can be predicted on the basis of younger age, low NIHSS scores, and high MBI scores at onset.

  20. Ambulatory monitoring in the evaluation of blood pressure in patients with borderline hypertension and the role of the defense reflex.

    PubMed

    Pickering, T G; Harshfield, G A; Kleinert, H D; Laragh, J H

    1982-01-01

    The differences between blood pressure (BP) readings taken in the clinic and during normal daily activities were assessed in two studies using a noninvasive ambulatory BP monitor (Avionics). In the first study 30 untreated hypertensive patients (17 with borderline pressures, average diastolic less than or equal to 95, and 13 established hypertensives, diastolics above 95) and 5 normotensive subjects had 30 readings taken in the physician's office and 30 while at home. Conventional sphygmomanometer BPs were also recorded in the office. In the borderline group home BPs were significantly lower than clinic BPs, whereas this difference was less marked for the established and normotensive group. In the second study BP was measured every 15 minutes for 24 hours in 25 normal subjects, 25 borderline and 25 established hypertensives, and readings categorized according to four recording situations: physician's office, work, at home, and sleep. BPs in all groups were highest at work and lowest asleep, and directional changes were similar. Both hypertensive groups showed higher BPs in the physician's office than at home, while normal subjects showed no difference. BPs recorded in the physician's office were good predictors of 24 hour average BP in normal and established hypertensive subjects, but not in the borderline group: in such patients 24 hour monitoring may be of particular value in evaluating the need for treatment.

  1. [Medical care unit -- a suitable instrument for ambulatory patient-adequate care and performance-related remuneration].

    PubMed

    Rudolph, P; Isensee, D; Gerlach, E; Gross, H

    2013-02-01

    The question of whether a medical care unit is an appropriate tool for outpatient care has been discussed for a long time. Our aim is to investigate whether the MCU is an effective instrument for outpatient care and adequate performance-related remuneration. This retro- and prospective overview of the work included statements on legal foundations for medical care units, for reimbursement of services in medical care units, the development of medical care centres in Germany and a listing of the specific advantages and disadvantages of an MCU. This article focuses on the generally applicable facts and complements them with examples from general, visceral and vascular surgery. The main quantitative data on medical centre statistics come from different publications of the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance for Physicians. From a legal point of view the instrument MCU allows the participating of ambulatory and stationary care in the framework of medical care contracts. This has been especially extended for stationary applications, including the spectrum of possibilities that can contribute under certain circumstances for the provision of medical care in underdeveloped regions. Freelancers can benefit primarily from financial risk and minimising bureaucratic routine. The remuneration for services performed in the MCU is analogous to that of other ambulatory care providers. Basically, there are no disadvantages, but a greater design freedom and opportunities for the generation of aggregates are visible. The number of MCU in Germany has quadrupled in the last five years, indicating an establishment of an outpatient care landscape. MCU offers from the patient's perspective, providers and policy specific advantages and disadvantages. Indeed the benefits outweigh the disadvantages, but this is not yet verified by qualitative studies. The question of the appropriateness of medical care units as outpatient care instrumentation must be considered differentially

  2. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Portal Implementation Toolkit for Ambulatory Clinics: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Diblasi, Catherine; Gonzales, Eva; Silver, Kristi; Zhu, Shijun; Sagherian, Knar; Kongs, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Personal health records and patient portals have been shown to be effective in managing chronic illnesses. Despite recent nationwide implementation efforts, the personal health record and patient portal adoption rates among patients are low, and the lack of support for patients using the programs remains a critical gap in most implementation processes. In this study, we implemented the Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit in a large diabetes/endocrinology center and assessed its preliminary impact on personal health record and patient portal knowledge, self-efficacy, patient-provider communication, and adherence to treatment plans. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit is composed of Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General, clinic-level resources for clinicians, staff, and patients, and Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit Plus, an optional 4-week online resource program for patients ("MyHealthPortal"). First, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General was implemented, and all clinicians and staff were educated about the center's personal health record and patient portal. Then general patient education was initiated, while a randomized controlled trial was conducted to test the preliminary effects of "MyHealthPortal" using a small sample (n = 74) with three observations (baseline and 4 and 12 weeks). The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group in patient-provider communication at 4 weeks (t56 = 3.00, P = .004). For other variables, the intervention group tended to show greater improvement; however, the differences were not significant. In this preliminary study, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit showed potential for filling the gap in the current

  3. Administration-time-dependent effects of hypertension treatment on ambulatory blood pressure in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Juan J; Piñeiro, Luis; Otero, Alfonso; Castiñeira, Carmen; Ríos, María T; Regueiro, Antonio; Mojón, Artemio; Lorenzo, Sonia; Ayala, Diana E; Hermida, Ramón C

    2013-03-01

    Many published prospective trials have reported clinically meaningful morning-evening, treatment-time differences in the blood pressure (BP)-lowering efficacy, duration of action, and safety of most classes of hypertension medications. Most important, it was recently documented that routine ingestion of the full daily dose of ≥1 hypertension medications at bedtime, compared with ingestion of all of them upon awakening, significantly reduces cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping (<10% decline in the asleep relative to the awake BP mean), as determined by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), are frequent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and both are associated with increased CVD risk. Here, we investigated the influence of hypertension treatment time on the circadian BP pattern and degree of BP control of hypertensive patients with CKD evaluated by 48-h ABPM. This cross-sectional study evaluated 2659 such patients (1585 men/1074 women), 64.9 ± 13.2 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, enrolled in the Hygia Project, involving primary care centers of northwest Spain and designed to evaluate prospectively CVD risk by ABPM; 1446 were ingesting all BP-lowering medications upon awakening, whereas 1213 patients were ingesting ≥1 medications at bedtime. Among the latter, 359 patients were ingesting all medications at bedtime, whereas 854 were ingesting the full daily dose of some medications upon awakening and the others at bedtime. Those ingesting all medications upon awakening had significantly higher total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol than those ingesting ≥1 medications at bedtime. Moreover, patients ingesting all medications at bedtime had the lowest fasting glucose, serum creatinine, and uric acid. Ingestion of ≥1 medications at bedtime was significantly associated with lower asleep systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP means than treatment with all medications upon awakening. The sleep-time relative SBP

  4. Helping You Choose Quality Ambulatory Care

    MedlinePlus

    Helping you choose: Quality ambulatory care When you need ambulatory care, you should find out some information to help you choose the best ... the center follows rules for patient safety and quality. Go to Quality Check ® at www. qualitycheck. org ...

  5. Average T-wave alternans activity in ambulatory ECG records predicts sudden cardiac death in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, Violeta; Laguna, Pablo; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Vázquez, Rafael; Bayés-Genís, Antoni; de Luna, Antoni Bayés; Martínez, Juan Pablo

    2012-03-01

    T-wave alternans (TWA) is a well-documented noninvasive electrocardiographic (ECG) method useful for identifying patients at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the long-term average TWA activity on Holter monitoring provides prognostic information in patients with chronic heart failure. Twenty-four-hour Holter ECGs from 650 ambulatory patients with mild-to-moderate chronic heart failure were analyzed in the study. Average TWA activity was measured by using a fully automated multilead technique, and 2 indices were proposed to quantify TWA: an index quantifying the average TWA activity in the whole recording (IAA), which was used to define a positive/negative TWA test, and an index quantifying the average TWA activity at heart rates between 80 and 90 beats/min (IAA(90)). Patients were divided into TWA positive (TWA+) and TWA negative (TWA-) groups by setting a cut point of 3.7 μV for IAA, corresponding to the 75th percentile of the distribution of IAA in the population. After a median follow-up of 48 months, the survival rate was significantly higher in the TWA- group for cardiac death and SCD (p = .017 and p = .001, respectively). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that both TWA+ and IAA(90) were associated with SCD with hazard rates of 2.29 (p = .004) and 1.07 per μV (p = .046), respectively. The average TWA activity measured automatically from Holter ECGs predicted SCD in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic heart failure. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Infection and allergy incidence in ambulatory surgery patients using white petrolatum vs bacitracin ointment. A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smack, D P; Harrington, A C; Dunn, C; Howard, R S; Szkutnik, A J; Krivda, S J; Caldwell, J B; James, W D

    1996-09-25

    To assess the effect of white petrolatum vs bacitracin ointment on wound infection incidence, allergic contact dermatitis incidence, and healing characteristics. Randomized, double-blind, prospective trial comparing white petrolatum with bacitracin ointment in postprocedure wound care. A general outpatient dermatology clinic and a tertiary referral advanced surgical procedure clinic at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC. A total of 922 patients who had dermatologic surgery with a total of 1249 wounds. The incidence of infection and allergic contact dermatitis during a follow-up period of 4 weeks. Healing characteristics were secondary outcomes. Of the 922 patients enrolled, 440 in the white petrolatum group and 444 in the bacitracin group were evaluable for clinical response. The 2 treatment groups had comparable baseline characteristics. Thirteen patients developed postprocedure infection (1.5%), 9 (2.0%) in the white petrolatum group vs 4 (0.9%) in the bacitracin group (95% confidence interval for difference, -0.4% to 2.7%; P=.37). Eight infections (1.8%) in the white petrolatum group were due to Staphylococcus aureus vs none in the bacitracin group (P=.004). No patient in the group using white petrolatum developed allergic contact dermatitis vs 4 patients (0.9%) in the group using bacitracin (P=.12). Additionally, there were no clinically significant differences in healing between the treatment groups on day 1 (P=.98), day 7 (P=.86), or day 28 (P=.28) after the procedure. White petrolatum is a safe, effective wound care ointment for ambulatory surgery. In comparison with bacitracin, white petrolatum possesses an equally low infection rate and minimal risk for induction of allergy.

  7. Why older adults may decline offers of post-acute care services: A qualitative descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Sefcik, Justine S; Ritter, Ashley Z; Flores, Emilia J; Nock, Rebecca H; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H

    The most common post-acute care (PAC) services available to patients after hospital discharge include home care, skilled nursing facilities, nursing homes, inpatient rehabilitation, and hospice. Patients who need PAC and receive services have better outcomes, however almost one-third of those offered services decline. Little research exists on PAC decision-making and why patients may decline services. This qualitative descriptive study explored the responses of thirty older adults to the question: "Can you, from the patient point of view, tell me why someone would not want post hospital care?" Three themes emerged. Participants may decline due to 1) previous negative experiences with PAC, or 2) a preference to be home. Some participants stated, "I'd be there" and would not decline services. Participants also discussed 3) why other patients might decline PAC which included patients' past experiences, lack of understanding/preconceived ideas, and preferences. Clinical implications include assessing patients' knowledge and experience before providing recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring profile in urban African black and European white untreated hypertensive patients matched for age and sex.

    PubMed

    Polónia, Jorge; Madede, Tavares; Silva, José A; Mesquita-Bastos, José; Damasceno, Albertino

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) profile in never-treated black hypertensive patients living in Africa, Mozambique (20-80 years), versus never-treated white hypertensive patients living in Europe. ABP recordings of untreated black hypertensive patients and white hypertensive patients with 24-h ABP of 130/80 mmHg or more were retrospectively selected from two computerized database records of ABP and matched for age by decades, sex, and BMI. Black hypertensive patients were n=548, 47 ± 12 years, 52% women, BMI=28.0 ± 8.2 kg/m(2), 7% smokers, 7% diabetics; white hypertensive patients were n=604, 47 ± 15 years, 52% women, BMI=27.4 ± 5.1 kg/m(2), 8.4% diabetics, and 18% smokers (P<0.02). Black hypertensive patients versus white hypertensive patients showed higher casual blood pressure (BP) 160/104 ± 19/14 versus 149/97 ± 18/12 mmHg, 24-h ABP 146/92 ± 16/13 versus 139/85 ± 11/10 mmHg, daytime ABP 150/95 ± 16/13 versus 143/88 ± 13/11 mmHg, night-time BP 139/84 ± 17/13 versus 130/78 ± 13/10 mmHg (all P<0.001) and lower night-time BP fall 8.3 ± 6.9 versus 10.1 ± 8.7% (P<0.02) and higher BP variability. Differences were still significant in all decades above 30 years of age and when calculations were carried out separately for both men and women. The average 24-h heart rate did not differ between groups. Our data suggest that untreated black hypertensive patients systematically present higher clinic and ABP values and a lower night-time BP fall than untreated white hypertensive patients for all spectra of age distribution. This might be the reason for the worse cardiovascular prognosis described in black hypertensive patients compared with white hypertensive patients.

  9. Clinical and biochemical characteristics of type 2 diabetic patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: relationships with insulin requirement.

    PubMed

    Wong, T Y; Chan, J C; Szeto, C C; Leung, C B; Li, P K

    1999-09-01

    Although glycemic control has an important impact on the clinical outcomes of patients with diabetes undergoing dialysis, there is a paucity of data on the relationship between glucose metabolism and clinical parameters in these patients. In this study, we compared a cohort of 48 patients with type II diabetes undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) with 84 age- and sex-matched patients with type II diabetes with similar disease duration but normal renal function. Compared with those with normal renal function, patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing CAPD had greater serum angiotensin-converting enzyme activity (median, 57.4 U/L; range, 33.5 to 100.0 U/L v 46.9 U/L; range, 11.6 to 111.2 U/L; P < 0.005), fasting C-peptide (median, 9.1 ng/mL; range, 0.9 to 30.0 ng/mL v 2.2 ng/mL; range, 0.2 to 20.3 ng/mL; P < 0.0001) and triglyceride levels, and lower serum albumin concentrations. Among the patients undergoing CAPD, there was a preponderance of men in the insulin-treated group. Insulin-treated patients also had greater plasma albumin levels and body weights and lower fasting serum C-peptide levels (2.81 +/- 1.77 v 3.12 +/- 2.04 ng/mL; analysis of variance, P = 0.007 adjusted for fasting glucose concentration). Multivariate analysis showed duration of diabetes, hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) level, and body weight were independent determinants of insulin requirement in patients undergoing CAPD. The daily insulin dosage required was related to the duration of diabetes (r = 0.5; P = 0.007). In summary, among patients with end-stage renal failure, insulin-treated patients had greater body weights and plasma albumin levels but lower cholesterol levels. Plasma C-peptide concentration and duration of diabetes were the main determinants of insulin requirement, reflecting a decrease in beta-cell reserve, whereas the daily insulin dose correlated mainly with body weight, HbA(1c) level, and duration of diabetes. Kt/V had no effect on insulin resistance or

  10. Ambulatory blood pressure in untreated and treated hypertensive patients at high altitude: the High Altitude Cardiovascular Research-Andes study.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Grzegorz; Villafuerte, Francisco C; Faini, Andrea; Anza-Ramírez, Cecilia; Revera, Miriam; Giuliano, Andrea; Caravita, Sergio; Gregorini, Francesca; Lombardi, Carolina; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Macarlupu, Jose Luis; Ossoli, Deborah; Landaveri, Leah; Lang, Morin; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Sosa, José Manuel; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco

    2015-06-01

    Blood pressure increases during acute exposure to high altitude in healthy humans. However, little is known on altitude effects in hypertensive subjects or on the treatment efficacy in this condition. Objectives of High Altitude Cardiovascular Research (HIGHCARE)-Andes Lowlanders Study were to investigate the effects of acute high-altitude exposure on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive subjects and to assess antihypertensive treatment efficacy in this setting. One hundred untreated subjects with mild hypertension (screening blood pressure, 144.1±9.8 mm Hg systolic, 92.0±7.5 mm Hg diastolic) were randomized to double-blind placebo or to telmisartan 80 mg+modified release nifedipine 30 mg combination. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was performed off-treatment, after 6 weeks of treatment at sea level, on treatment during acute exposure to high altitude (3260 m) and immediately after return to sea level. Eighty-nine patients completed the study (age, 56.4±17.6 years; 52 men/37 women; body mass index, 28.2±3.5 kg/m(2)). Twenty-four-hour systolic blood pressure increased at high altitude in both groups (placebo, 11.0±9 mm Hg; P<0.001 and active treatment, 8.1±10.4 mm Hg; P<0.001). Active treatment reduced 24-hour systolic blood pressure both at sea level and at high altitude (147.9±11.1 versus 132.6±12.4 mm Hg for placebo versus treated; P<0.001; 95% confidence interval of the difference 10.9-19.9 mm Hg) and was well tolerated. Similar results were obtained for diastolic, for daytime blood pressure, and for nighttime blood pressure. Treatment was well tolerated in all conditions. Our study demonstrates that (1) 24-hour blood pressure increases significantly during acute high-altitude exposure in hypertensive subjects and (2) treatment with angiotensin receptor blocker-calcium channel blocker combination is effective and safe in this condition. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01830530. © 2015

  11. Diagnostic Errors in Ambulatory Care: Dimensions and Preventive Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Hardeep; Weingart, Saul N.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on patient safety in ambulatory care, progress in understanding and reducing diagnostic errors in this setting lag behind many other safety concerns such as medication errors. To explore the extent and nature of diagnostic errors in ambulatory care, we identified five dimensions of ambulatory care from which errors may…

  12. Effectiveness of the Bern Ambulatory Interprofessional Rehabilitation (BAI-Reha) programme for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gantschnig, Brigitte Elisabeth; Heigl, Franziska; Widmer Leu, Colette; Bütikofer, Lukas; Reichenbach, Stephan; Villiger, Peter Matthias

    2017-05-10

    Chronic pain has a high impact on individuals and society. (Cost-)effective interventions are desperately needed. We evaluated short- and long-term effects of the Bern Ambulatory Interprofessional Rehabilitation (BAI-Reha) for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. We analysed data prospectively collected from patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain before and after BAI-Reha (at 12 weeks, 1 year and 2 years) using linear mixed-models and logistic generalised estimating equations. The first thirty consecutive patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, aged between 20 and 73 years (mean 44.83, standard deviation 12.57 years) were included. We found significant changes over time compared with baseline for return to work (p <0.001), Euro quality of life visual analogue scale score (p = 0.026), burden of suffering (p = 0.001), self-rated and observed quality of daily life task motor performance (p <0.001 and p = 0.012, respectively) but not for pain intensity (p = 0.16) and observed quality of daily life task process performance (p = 0.28). At the first postintervention visit we found significant differences compared with baseline in return to work (odds ratio 5.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.80-15.39], burden of suffering (mean difference 5.26, 95% CI 2.09-8.44], self-rated quality (mean difference 2.31, 95% CI 1.57-3.05) and satisfaction (mean difference 2.80, 95% CI 1.95-3.66) with daily life task performance, and observed quality with daily life task motor performance (mean difference 0.31, 95% CI 0.02-0.60). This study confirms earlier data and supports the effectiveness of interprofessional rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  13. Development and evaluation of CAHPS questions to assess the impact of health information technology on patient experiences with ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    McInnes, D Keith; Brown, Julie A; Hays, Ron D; Gallagher, Patricia; Ralston, James D; Hugh, Mildred; Kanter, Michael; Serrato, Carl A; Cosenza, Carol; Halamka, John; Ding, Lin; Cleary, Paul D

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about whether health information technology (HIT) affects patient experiences with health care. To develop HIT questions that assess patients care experiences not evaluated by existing ambulatory Consumer Assessment of Health Plans and Systems (CAHPS) measures. We reviewed published articles and conducted focus groups and cognitive testing to develop survey questions. We collected data, using mail and the internet, from patients of 69 physicians receiving care at an academic medical center and 2 regional integrated delivery systems in late 2009 and 2010. We evaluated questions and scales about HIT using factor analysis, item-scale correlations, and reliability (internal consistency and physician-level) estimates. We found support for 3 HIT composites: doctor use of computer (2 items), e-mail (2 items), and helpfulness of provider's website (4 items). Corrected item-scale correlations were 0.37 for the 2 doctor use of computer items and 0.71 for the 2 e-mail items, and ranged from 0.50 to 0.60 for the provider's website items. Cronbach α was high for e-mail (0.83) and provider's website (0.75), but only 0.54 for doctor use of computer. As few as 50 responses per physician would yield reliability of 0.70 for e-mail and provider's website. Two HIT composites, doctor use of computer (P<0.001) and provider's website (P=0.02), were independent predictors of overall ratings of doctors. New CAHPS HIT items were identified that measure aspects of patient experiences not assessed by the CAHPS C&G 1.0 survey.

  14. Development and Evaluation of CAHPS® Questions to Assess the Impact of Health Information Technology on Patient Experiences with Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, D. Keith; Brown, Julie A.; Hays, Ron D.; Gallagher, Patricia; Ralston, James D.; Hugh, Mildred; Kanter, Michael; Serrato, Carl A.; Cosenza, Carol; Halamka, John; Ding, Lin; Cleary, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about whether health information technology (HIT) affects patient experiences with health care. Objective To develop HIT questions that assess patients care experiences not evaluated by existing ambulatory CAHPS measures. Research Design We reviewed published articles and conducted focus groups and cognitive testing to develop survey questions. We collected data, using mail and the internet, from patients of 69 physicians receiving care at an academic medical center and two regional integrated delivery systems in late 2009 and 2010. We evaluated questions and scales about HIT using factor analysis, item-scale correlations, and reliability (internal consistency and physician-level) estimates. Results We found support for three HIT composites: doctor use of computer (2 items), e-mail (2 items), and helpfulness of provider’s website (4 items). Corrected item-scale correlations were 0.37 for the two doctor use of computer items and 0.71 for the two e-mail items, and ranged from 0.50 to 0.60 for the provider’s website items. Cronbach’s alpha was high for e-mail (0.83) and provider’s website (0.75), but only 0.54 for doctor use of computer. As few as 50 responses per physician would yield reliability of 0.70 for e-mail and provider’s website. Two HIT composites, doctor use of computer (p<0.001) and provider’s website (p=0.02), were independent predictors of overall ratings of doctors. Conclusions New CAHPS HIT items were identified that measure aspects of patient experiences not assessed by the CAHPS C&G 1.0 survey. PMID:23064271

  15. Prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 test in ambulatory patients with chest pain: comparison with cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.; Lilly, D.R.; Gascho, J.A.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Oliner, C.A.; Ryan, J.M.; Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 stress test in ambulatory patients with chest pain who were also referred for cardiac catheterization. Accordingly, 4 to 8 year (mean +/- 1SD, 4.6 +/- 2.6 years) follow-up data were obtained for all but one of 383 patients who underwent both exercise thallium-201 stress testing and cardiac catheterization from 1978 to 1981. Eighty-three patients had a revascularization procedure performed within 3 months of testing and were excluded from analysis. Of the remaining 299 patients, 210 had no events and 89 had events (41 deaths, nine nonfatal myocardial infarctions, and 39 revascularization procedures greater than or equal to 3 months after testing). When all clinical, exercise, thallium-201, and catheterization variables were analyzed by Cox regression analysis, the number of diseased vessels (when defined as greater than or equal to 50% luminal diameter narrowing) was the single most important predictor of future cardiac events (chi 2 = 38.1) followed by the number of segments demonstrating redistribution on delayed thallium-201 images (chi 2 = 16.3), except in the case of nonfatal myocardial infarction, for which redistribution was the most important predictor of future events. When coronary artery disease was defined as 70% or greater luminal diameter narrowing, the number of diseased vessels significantly (p less than .01) lost its power to predict events (chi 2 = 14.5). Other variables found to independently predict future events included change in heart rate from rest to exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), ST segment depression on exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias on exercise (chi 2 = 5.9), and beta-blocker therapy (chi 2 = 4.3).

  16. Relationship of ambulatory blood pressure and body mass index to left ventricular mass index in pediatric patients with casual hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Prema; Chikkabyrappa, Sathish; Donda, Keyur; Osmolovsky, Marina; Rojas, Mary; Rafii, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    Both obesity and hypertension are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in children. Our objective was to compare the prevalence of LVH in obese and nonobese subjects with casual hypertension who underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Untreated children (aged 6-20 years) underwent 24-hour ABPM, and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured. Subjects were classified into three groups: white coat hypertension (WCH), prehypertension (pre-HT), and hypertension (HT). The prevalence of LVH was compared between obese and nonobese subjects among the groups. Of 69 children who underwent ABPM, thirty-two patients (46%) had WCH, 13 (19%) had pre-HT, and 24 (35%) had HT. Mean age, BMI, and LVMI were similar in the groups (P = not significant [NS]). In all, 22 patients (32%) had LVH, with no difference among WCH versus pre-HT versus HT (37.5% vs. 46% vs. 16.7%, P = NS). Twenty-seven subjects (39%) were obese. The ratio of LVH in obese to nonobese was 55.5% to 16.6% (P = .001). In both pre-HT and WCH, patients with LVH had a significantly higher BMI z score (P = .02 and P = .01, respectively). LVMI correlated strongly with BMI z score (P = .0001) but not with any blood pressure parameter. Almost half of children with casual HT have WCH. LVH is prevalent in a third of children with HT, pre-HT, and WCH. In both pre-HT and WCH, patients with LVH were more likely to be obese. More than half of all the obese subjects had LVH. Obese children in all three groups may be at a greater risk for end organ damage. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of ICF categories relevant for nursing in the situation of acute and early post-acute rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Martin; Boldt, Christine; Grill, Eva; Strobl, Ralf; Stucki, Gerold

    2008-01-01

    Background The recovery of patients after an acute episode of illness or injury depends both on adequate medical treatment and on the early identification of needs for rehabilitation care. The process of early beginning rehabilitation requires efficient communication both between health professionals and the patient in order to effectively address all rehabilitation goals. The currently used nursing taxonomies, however, are not intended for interdisciplinary use and thus may not contribute to efficient rehabilitation management and an optimal patient outcome. The ICF might be the missing link in this communication process. The objective of this study was to identify the categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) categories relevant for nursing care in the situation of acute and early post-acute rehabilitation. Methods First, in a consensus process, "Leistungserfassung in der Pflege" (LEP) nursing interventions relevant for the situation of acute and early post-acute rehabilitation were selected. Second, in an integrated two-step linking process, two nursing experts derived goals of LEP nursing interventions from their practical knowledge and selected corresponding ICF categories most relevant for patients in acute and post-acute rehabilitation (ICF Core Sets). Results Eighty-seven percent of ICF Core Set categories could be linked to goals of at least one nursing intervention variable of LEP. The ICF categories most frequently linked with LEP nursing interventions were respiration functions, experience of self and time functions and focusing attention. Thirteen percent of ICF Core Set categories could not be linked with LEP nursing interventions. The LEP nursing interventions which were linked with the highest number of different ICF-categories of all were "therapeutic intervention", "patient-nurse communication/information giving" and "mobilising". Conclusion The ICF Core Sets for the acute hospital and early post-acute

  18. Pediatric ambulatory anesthesia.

    PubMed

    August, David A; Everett, Lucinda L

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric patients often undergo anesthesia for ambulatory procedures. This article discusses several common preoperative dilemmas, including whether to postpone anesthesia when a child has an upper respiratory infection, whether to test young women for pregnancy, which children require overnight admission for apnea monitoring, and the effectiveness of nonpharmacological techniques for reducing anxiety. Medication issues covered include the risks of anesthetic agents in children with undiagnosed weakness, the use of remifentanil for tracheal intubation, and perioperative dosing of rectal acetaminophen. The relative merits of caudal and dorsal penile nerve block for pain after circumcision are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of cefradine, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim and their metabolites in a patient with peritonitis undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Martea, M; Hekster, Y A; Vree, T B; Voets, A J; Berden, J H

    1987-04-24

    Cefradine and co-trimoxazole pharmacokinetics were studied in a patient with peritonitis that complicated continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Concentrations in the plasma reached after oral administration of 500 mg cefradine four times daily and 400/80 mg co-trimoxazole four times daily were for cefradine 100 micrograms/ml, for trimethoprim 15 micrograms/ml, and for sulfamethoxazole 100 micrograms/ml, respectively. In the dialysate concentrations were reached of 35-70 micrograms/ml cefradine, 2-5 micrograms/ml trimethoprim and 8-17 micrograms/ml sulfamethoxazole. The values for sulfamethoxazole are regarded too low to be clinically effective. Half-lives, protein binding values and CAPD clearances are presented. Low CAPD clearances were obtained during the night and high values during the day. The dosage yielded too high plasma trimethoprim concentrations, while sulfamethoxazole dialysate concentrations were too low. It seems questionable therefore whether co-trimoxazole can be used orally for the treatment of CAPD peritonitis.

  20. Effects of cigarette smoking on ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability in treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yuko; Kawano, Yuhei; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Iwashima, Yoshio; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Nakamura, Satoko

    We investigated the influence of cigarette smoking on the levels and circadian patterns of blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and HR variability (HRV) in hypertensive patients. Sixteen hypertensive smokers (57 ± 2 years old) receiving antihypertensive treatments participated in this study. Ambulatory monitoring of BP, HR, and electrocardiograms was performed every 30 min for 24 hours on a smoking day and nonsmoking day in a randomized crossover manner. Average 24-hour BP and daytime BP were significantly higher in the smoking period than in the nonsmoking period. No significant differences were observed in nighttime BP between the two periods. Average 24-hour and daytime HR, but not nighttime HR, were also higher in the smoking period than in the nonsmoking period. The daytime high frequency (HF) component of HRV was attenuated more in the smoking period than in the nonsmoking period. No significant differences were observed in the low frequency (LF) components of HRV or LF/HF ratio between the two periods. These results demonstrated that cigarette smoking increased the daytime and average 24-hour BP and HR, and the increases observed in daytime BP and HR were associated with the attenuation of parasympathetic nerve activity.

  1. 76 FR 65885 - Medicare Program; Changes to the Ambulatory Surgical Centers Patient Rights Conditions for Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... inconveniences and patient travel issues. They believe the CfC should be expanded so that urgent (nonemergency... inconveniences and patient travel issues. After considering the public comments and the potential negative impact... patient prior to the start of the surgical procedure. With this new requirement, ASCs will have ample...

  2. Post-Acute Care Data for Predicting Readmission After Ischemic Stroke: A Nationwide Cohort Analysis Using the Minimum Data Set.

    PubMed

    Fehnel, Corey R; Lee, Yoojin; Wendell, Linda C; Thompson, Bradford B; Potter, N Stevenson; Mor, Vincent

    2015-09-22

    Reducing hospital readmissions is a key component of reforms for stroke care. Current readmission prediction models lack accuracy and are limited by data being from only acute hospitalizations. We hypothesized that patient-level factors from a nationwide post-acute care database would improve prediction modeling. Medicare inpatient claims for the year 2008 that used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes were used to identify ischemic stroke patients older than age 65. Unique individuals were linked to comprehensive post-acute care assessments through use of the Minimum Data Set (MDS). Logistic regression was used to construct risk-adjusted readmission models. Covariates were derived from MDS variables. Among 39 178 patients directly admitted to nursing homes after hospitalization due to acute stroke, there were 29 338 (75%) with complete MDS assessments. Crude rates of readmission and death at 30 days were 8448 (21%) and 2791 (7%), respectively. Risk-adjusted models identified multiple independent predictors of all-cause 30-day readmission. Model performance of the readmission model using MDS data had a c-statistic of 0.65 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.66). Higher levels of social engagement, a marker of nursing home quality, were associated with progressively lower odds of readmission (odds ratio 0.71, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.92). Individual clinical characteristics from the post-acute care setting resulted in only modest improvement in the c-statistic relative to previous models that used only Medicare Part A data. Individual-level characteristics do not sufficiently account for the risk of acute hospital readmission. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate and Formed Colistin in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Koomanachai, Pornpan; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B.; Chen, Gong; Lee, Hee Ji; Jitmuang, Anupop; Wasuwattakul, Somkiat; Sritippayawan, Suchai; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Colistin, administered intravenously as its inactive prodrug colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), is increasingly used as last-line therapy to combat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. CMS dosing needs to be adjusted for renal function. The impact of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) on the pharmacokinetics of both CMS and colistin has not been studied. No CMS dosing recommendations are available for patients receiving CAPD. Eight CAPD patients received a single intravenous CMS dose (150 mg colistin base activity [CBA]) over 30 min. Serial blood and dialysate samples, and cumulative urine where applicable, were collected over 25 h. CMS and colistin concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Population pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations were conducted. The total body clearance of CMS (excluding CAPD clearance) was 1.77 liters/h (44%) [population mean (between-subject variability)], while CAPD clearance was 0.088 liter/h (64%). The population mean terminal half-life of CMS was 8.4 h. For colistin, the total clearance/fraction of CMS metabolized to colistin (fm) (excluding CAPD clearance) was 2.74 liters/h (50%), the CAPD clearance was 0.101 liter/h (34%), and the mean terminal half-life was 13.2 h. Monte Carlo simulations suggested a loading dose of 300 mg CBA on day 1 and a maintenance dose of either 150 mg or 200 mg CBA daily to achieve a target average steady-state plasma colistin concentration of 2.5 mg/liter. Clearance by CAPD was low for both CMS and formed colistin. Therefore, CMS doses should not be increased during CAPD. Modeling and simulation enabled us to propose the first evidence-based CMS dosage regimen for CAPD patients. PMID:24189256

  4. An Analysis of Several Dimensions of Patient Safety in Ambulatory-Care Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-09

    office it is difficult to discuss errors 13 Briefing other personnel before procedure (e.g. biopsy) is important for patient safety . 16...48 Patient safety is constantly reinforced as the priority in this office. 49 I feel burned out from work. 50 Important issues are well... safety , 5.loint Commissionlournal on Quality and Patient Safety , 29, 598-609. ACKNOLWEDGEMENTS: They say that travel is critically important in

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for pulmonary arterial hypertension in end-stage renal disease patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Shiqi; Ma, Jinling; Gong, Jian; Qiu, Guizhen; Ren, Yueqin; Zen, Ying; Shi, Yongbing

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a major complication in renal failure patients, but very little information is available on the cardiovascular parameters in these patients. The prevalence and risk factors for PAH were systematically evaluated in patients with end-stage renal diseases (ESRD) undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Between January 2010 and January 2014, 177 ESRD patients (85 males and 92 females) undergoing CAPD therapy were recruited. General data, biochemical parameters and echocardiographic findings were collected and PAH risk factors studied. Study participants consisted of 65 patients (36.52%) with PAH (PAH group) and 112 patients without PAH (non-PAH group). The interdialytic weight gain, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure and hypertensive nephropathy incidence in the PAH group were significantly higher than the non-PAH group (all p < 0.05). There were significant differences between PAH group and non-PAH group in C-reactive protein-positive rate, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), hemoglobin, prealbumin and serum albumin levels (all p < 0.05). Compared with non-PAH group, PAH group showed significant increases in right ventricular internal diameter (RVID), right ventricular outflow tract diameter (RVOTD), main pulmonary artery diameter, left atrial diameter (LAD), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, interventricular septal thickness, left ventricular mass index, early diastolic mitral annulus velocity and valve calcification incidence (all p < 0.05), and decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), tricuspid annulus plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and early diastolic blood flow peak and mitral annulus velocity (E/E') (all p < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that DBP, NT-proBNP, LAD, RVID, RVOTD, LVEF, TAPSE and E/E' are major risk factors for PAH. We observed a high incidence of PAH in ESRD patients

  6. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index is not associated with magnetic resonance imaging markers of cerebral small vessel disease in lacunar stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Klarenbeek, Pim; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Staals, Julie

    2015-05-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is associated with microvascular damage in other organs, but the association with microvascular brain damage is unknown. The association of AASI with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers of cerebral small vessel disease in 143 patients with lacunar stroke was investigated. We performed 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and scored the presence of lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, perivascular spaces, and cerebral microbleeds on brain MRI. In logistic regression analyses, AASI was associated with white matter hyperintensities, but, after adjustment for age and sex, this association lost significance. AASI was not associated with lacunes, microbleeds, or perivascular spaces. Systolic and diastolic 24-hour blood pressure values were associated with lacunes, perivascular spaces, and microbleeds independent of age and sex. Despite its significance and growing interest as a possible prognostic and therapeutic target in (micro)vascular diseases, AASI seems to have no added value over standard 24-hour blood pressure in cerebral small vessel disease.

  7. Neonatal abstinence outcomes in post-acute care: A brief report.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jane E; Dumas, Helene M; Leslie, David

    2015-01-01

    To describe characteristics and care outcomes in a pediatric post-acute rehabilitation hospital for infants with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). Demographic and clinical data were combined for 43 infants accounting for 46 admissions over a two-year period with a diagnosis of NAS and a goal of weaning from treatment medications. Mean age at admission for the total sample was 21 days. One hundred percent of the infants were weaned from treatment medications at discharge and all infants were discharged to a home setting. Mean length of stay in post-acute care was 24 days (SD = 12.80; range = 4-70 days) while the mean cost of admissions was $27,904. Ninety-one percent had a public payer. Post-acute care clinical outcomes were excellent. Post-acute care for infants with NAS could be an effective way to free NICU beds and reduce hospital costs for this population of infants.

  8. [Atopic keratoconjunctivitis in patients of the pediatric dermatology ambulatory in a reference center].

    PubMed

    Moscovici, Bernardo Kaplan; Cesar, Andréa Santucci; Nishiwaki-Dantas, Maria Cristina; Mayor, Silvia A Soutto; Marta, Alessandra Cristine; Marques, Junia Cabral

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of atopic keratoconjunctivitis, its symptoms and changes in patients of Pediatric Dermatology Service of 'Santa Casa de Misericordia de São Paulo' Hospital with a previous diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. Fifty-two patients with atopic dermatitis under 16 years old (mean age 8.9 +/- 4.1 between 2 and 16 years old) were evaluated through a protocol of questions and assessment of signs and symptoms. The signs and symptoms were graded from 0 (absent) to 4 (highest intensity), and in some cases only as present or not. The analysis was descriptive and statistical, with a 5% significance level. The frequency of atopic keratoconjunctivitis was 76.9% among the 52 patients with atopic dermatitis, including atopic conjunctivitis (26.7%) and atopic blepharitis (50.2%). Atopic dermatitis is more frequent in female patients and atopic conjunctivitis in male. Age was practically the same in both groups. The most frequent symptoms were red eye and itching, especially in the atopic conjunctivitis group. Itching was the most intense symptom and was present in all patients of the atopic conjunctivitis group. Blepharitis and papillae were the most common signs. Other signs were less frequent. The tear break-up time was changed in most patients. The prevalence of atopic keratoconjunctivitis was 76.9% in patients with atopic dermatitis. Itching was the most frequent symptom, followed by red eye, in patients with atopic conjunctivitis. Blepharitis and papillae were the most frequent signs in patients with atopic conjunctivitis. Due to the increasing prevalence of atopic dermatitis in children, it would be prudent to perform a routine ophthalmologic evaluation of these patients. From the patients evaluated in this study, none had been previously monitored with ophthalmological exams.

  9. Visual Barriers to Prevent Ambulatory ALzheimer's Patients from Exiting through an Emergency Door.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namazi, Kevan H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Conducted study on Alzheimer's unit to test seven different visual barrier conditions for reducing patient exits. Findings indicated that exiting was eliminated under two conditions. Results suggest visual agnosia, the inability to interpret what the eye sees, may be used as tool in managing wandering behavior of Alzheimer's patients. (Author/NB)

  10. Visual Barriers to Prevent Ambulatory ALzheimer's Patients from Exiting through an Emergency Door.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namazi, Kevan H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Conducted study on Alzheimer's unit to test seven different visual barrier conditions for reducing patient exits. Findings indicated that exiting was eliminated under two conditions. Results suggest visual agnosia, the inability to interpret what the eye sees, may be used as tool in managing wandering behavior of Alzheimer's patients. (Author/NB)

  11. Secure e-mailing between physicians and patients: transformational change in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Terhilda; Meng, Di; Wang, Jian J; Palen, Ted E; Kanter, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Secure e-mailing between Kaiser Permanente physicians and patients is widespread; primary care providers receive an average of 5 e-mails from patients each workday. However, on average, secure e-mailing with patients has not substantially impacted primary care provider workloads. Secure e-mail has been associated with increased member retention and improved quality of care. Separate studies associated patient portal and secure e-mail use with both decreased and increased use of other health care services, such as office visits, telephone encounters, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Directions for future research include more granular analysis of associations between patient-physician secure e-mail and health care utilization.

  12. Prevalence of Torture Survivors Among Foreign-Born Patients Presenting to an Urban Ambulatory Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Sondra S; Norredam, Marie; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Piwowarczyk, Linda; Heeren, Tim; Grodin, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence of torture among foreign-born patients presenting to urban medical clinics is not well documented. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of torture among foreign-born patients presenting to an urban primary care practice. DESIGN A survey of foreign-born patients. PATIENTS Foreign-born patients, age ≥18, presenting to the Primary Care Clinic at Boston Medical Center. MEASUREMENTS Self-reported history of torture as defined by the UN, and history of prior disclosure of torture. RESULTS Of the 308 eligible patients, 88 (29%) declined participation, and 78 (25%) were not included owing to lack of a translator. Par ticipants had a mean age of 47 years (range 19 to 76), were mostly female (82/142, 58%), had been in the United States for an average of 14 years (range 1 month to 53 years), and came from 35 countries. Fully, 11% (16/142, 95 percent confidence interval 7% to 18%) of participants reported a history of torture that was consistent with the UN definition of torture. Thirty-nine percent (9/23) of patients reported that their health care provider asked them about torture. While most patients (15/23, 67%) reported discussing their experience of torture with someone in the United States, 8 of 23 (33%) reported that this survey was their first disclosure to anyone in the United States. CONCLUSION Among foreign-born patients presenting to an urban primary care center, approximately 1 in 9 met the definition established by the UN Convention Against Torture. As survivors of torture may have significant psychological and physical sequelae, these data underscore the necessity for primary care physicians to screen for a torture history among foreign-born patients. PMID:16808779

  13. Feasibility of the collection of patient-reported outcomes in an ambulatory neurology clinic.

    PubMed

    Moura, Lidia M V R; Schwamm, Eli; Moura Junior, Valdery; Seitz, Michael P; Hsu, John; Cole, Andrew J; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-12-06

    To determine whether patients could self-report physical and mental health assessments in the waiting room and whether these assessments would be associated with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-10) scores. We offered iPad-based surveys to consecutive adult neurology patients at check-in to collect patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). We collected demographic and clinical data on 6,075 patients through survey or administrative claims and PROMs from participating patients. We compared demographic characteristics of participants and nonparticipants and tested associations between physical and mental health scores and mRS and QOLIE-10. Of 6,075 patients seen by neurologists during the study period, 2,992 (49.3%) participated in the survey. Compared to nonparticipating patients, participating patients more often were privately insured (53.5% vs 42.7%, p < 0.01), married (51.5% vs 47.9%, p < 0.01), and seen in general neurology (nonsubspecialty) clinics (53.1% vs 46.6%, p < 0.01) and more likely to report English as their preferred language (50.1% vs 38.4%, p < 0.01). Participating patients had a mean physical health T score of 28.7 (SD 15) and mental health T score of 33 (SD 15), which were 3 and 2 SD worse than the average for the US general population, respectively. Mean T scores in every category of the mRS were different from every other category (n = 232, p < 0.01). Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-10 T scores were linearly associated with QOLIE-10 scores (n = 202, p < 0.01) CONCLUSIONS: Systematic digital collection of PROMs is feasible. Differences among survey participants and nonparticipants highlight the need to develop multilingual measurement tools that may improve collection from vulnerable populations. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Promoting neurological recovery in the post-acute stroke phase: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Dirk M; Chopp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Profound cellular and biochemical remodeling processes occur in the brain following an ischemic stroke, raising the possibility that we may be able to promote neurological recovery by harnessing the brain's endogenous recovery processes with pharmacological or cell-based therapies. There is a compelling body of evidence that cerebral plasticity and neurological recovery can be stimulated in the post-acute ischemic brain in this manner. This overview of neurorestorative therapies highlights the main challenges in their development, and summarizes the implications of these findings to stroke patients. Key Message: Neurorestorative therapies are a highly promising avenue of treatment for the restitution of neuronal networks damaged by stroke. The key supporting data have so far been obtained using in vivo models in animals, underscoring the need to validate these findings in humans. For human studies, several potentially confounding variables should be kept in mind, including age, and the presence of risk factors and comorbidities (such as hyperlipidemia and diabetes). Stroke patients vary considerably in age and genetic background, as well as in the etiology, localization and size of brain infarcts. The choice of patient population is a critical factor in the success of clinical trials, as patient heterogeneity could mask any potential therapeutic benefits. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Achievement of national cholesterol education program goals by patients with dyslipidemia in rural ambulatory care settings.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, Rehan; Chattha, Ashraf A; Bhullar, Navneet; Katsetos, Manny; Schulman, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) of the National Cholesterol Education Program provides guidelines for managing dyslipidemia; however, studies from large centers find that most dyslipidemic patients fail to achieve management goals. Few data exist on lipid management in rural settings. To determine the proportion of rural dyslipidemic patients achieving ATP III goals, records of 461 patients were reviewed from 4 practices. Only 54% of the patients with dyslipidemia achieved ATP III goals. Patients with diabetes or with a family history of premature coronary heart disease were less likely to achieve ATP III goals (odds ratio 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.84 and odds ratio 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.71, respectively). Patients taking statins were more likely to achieve goals (odds ratio 3.23; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-4.89). These results indicate that a significant proportion of patients with dyslipidemia in rural practices do not achieve management goals. Strategies to improve lipid management in rural practices are needed.

  16. Prevalence of torture survivors among foreign-born patients presenting to an urban ambulatory care practice.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Sondra S; Norredam, Marie; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Piwowarczyk, Linda; Heeren, Tim; Grodin, Michael A

    2006-07-01

    The prevalence of torture among foreign-born patients presenting to urban medical clinics is not well documented. To determine the prevalence of torture among foreign-born patients presenting to an urban primary care practice. A survey of foreign-born patients. Foreign-born patients, age > or = 18, presenting to the Primary Care Clinic at Boston Medical Center. Self-reported history of torture as defined by the UN, and history of prior disclosure of torture. Of the 308 eligible patients, 88 (29%) declined participation, and 78 (25%) were not included owing to lack of a translator. Participants had a mean age of 47 years (range 19 to 76), were mostly female (82/142, 58%), had been in the United States for an average of 14 years (range 1 month to 53 years), and came from 35 countries. Fully, 11% (16/142, 95 percent confidence interval 7% to 18%) of participants reported a history of torture that was consistent with the UN definition of torture. Thirty-nine percent (9/23) of patients reported that their health care provider asked them about torture. While most patients (15/23, 67%) reported discussing their experience of torture with someone in the United States, 8 of 23 (33%) reported that this survey was their first disclosure to anyone in the United States. Among foreign-born patients presenting to an urban primary care center, approximately 1 in 9 met the definition established by the UN Convention Against Torture. As survivors of torture may have significant psychological and physical sequelae, these data underscore the necessity for primary care physicians to screen for a torture history among foreign-born patients.

  17. The effect of low-GDP solution on ultrafiltration and solute transport in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-Hyang; Do, Jun-Young; Park, Jong-Won; Yoon, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported benefits for human peritoneal mesothelial cell function of a neutral-pH dialysate low in glucose degradation products (GDPs). However, the effects of low-GDP solution on ultrafiltration (UF), transport of solutes, and control of body water remain elusive. We therefore investigated the effect of low-GDP solution on UF, solute transport, and control of body water. Among 79 new continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, 60 completed a 12-month protocol (28 in a lactate-based high-GDP solution group, 32 in a lactate-based low-GDP solution group). Clinical indices--including 24-hour UF volume (UFV), 24-hour urine volume (UV), residual renal function, and dialysis adequacy--were measured at months 1, 6, and 12. At months 1, 6, and 12, UFV, glucose absorption, 4-hour dialysate-to-plasma (D/P) creatinine, and 1-hour D/P Na(+) were assessed during a modified 4.25% peritoneal equilibration test (PET). Body composition by bioelectric impedance analysis was measured at months 1 and 12 in 26 CAPD patients. Daily UFV was lower in the low-GDP group. Despite similar solute transport and aquaporin function, the low-GDP group also showed lower UFV and higher glucose absorption during the PET. Factors associated with UFV during the PET were lactate-based high-GDP solution and 1-hour D/P Na(+). No differences in volume status and obesity at month 12 were observed, and improvements in hypervolemia were equal in both groups. Compared with the high-GDP group, the low-GDP group had a lower UFV during a PET and a lower daily UFV during the first year after peritoneal dialysis initiation. Although the low-GDP group had a lower daily UFV, no difficulties in controlling edema were encountered.

  18. Effect of intraperitoneal injection of sulodexide on peritoneal function and albumin leakage in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Guedri, Yosra; Damma, K Najla; Toumi, Melek; Sahtout, Wissal; Azzabi, Awatef; Mrabet, Sinda; Nouira, Safa; Saidane, Dalila; Amor, Samira; Belarbia, Anis; Zellama, Dorsaf; Achour, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal protein loss is one of the inevitable consequences during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Our objective was to study the effect of sulodexide on the protein loss and efficiency of dialysis. This study included six patients receiving CAPD treated with sulodexide at the dose of 600 IU/day given by intraperitoneal injection for 10 days. Clinical and biologic parameters were assessed before starting the treatment (D0 and after 10 days of treatment (D10. We also evaluated the benefit of therapy persisting 20 days after the end of treatment (D30. The sulodexide administration produced a significant improvement of the peritoneal function as determined by a significant increase in the following ratios measured at the 4 th h of dwell time on D0 and D30: dialysate-to plasma (D/P) creatinine from 0.63 ± 1.45 to 0.85 ± 0.073 (P = 0.028) and D/P urea from 0.63 ± 0.15 to 79 ± 0.2 (P = 0.048). A significant decrease of albumin leakage was observed, which was 0.90 ± 0.40 g/L at baseline, 0.67 ± 0.36 g/L on the 10 th day, and 0.43 ± 0.22g/L 20 days after the end of treatment. Within 10-day treatment period, use of sulodexide resulted in a reduction in the peritoneal loss of albumin, in addition to improvement of the quality of dialysis and the residual renal function among these patients.

  19. Ambulatory hypercholesterolemia management in patients with atherosclerosis. Gender and race differences in processes and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Persell, Stephen D; Maviglia, Saverio M; Bates, David W; Ayanian, John Z

    2005-02-01

    To determine whether outpatient cholesterol management varies by gender or race among patients with atherosclerosis, and assess factors related to subsequent cholesterol control. Retrospective cohort study. Primary care clinics affiliated with an academic medical center. Two hundred forty-three patients with coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral vascular disease and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)>130 mg/dl. The primary process of care assessed for 1,082 office visits was cholesterol management (medication intensification or LDL-C monitoring). Cholesterol management occurred at 31.2% of women's and 38.5% of men's visits (P=.01), and 37.3% of black and 31.7% of white patients' visits (P=.09). Independent predictors of cholesterol management included female gender (adjusted risk ratio [ARR], 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 0.97), seeing a primary care clinician other than the patient's primary care physician (ARR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.11 to 0.45), and having a new clinical problem addressed (ARR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.74). After 1 year, LDL-C <130 mg/dl occurred less often for women than men (41% vs 61%; P=.003), black than white patients (39% vs 58%; P=.01), and patients with only Medicare insurance than with commercial insurance (37% vs 58%; P=.008). Adjustment for clinical characteristics and management attenuated the relationship between achieving an LDL-C <130 mg/dl and gender. In this high-risk population with uncontrolled cholesterol, cholesterol management was less intensive for women than men but similar for black and white patients. Less intense cholesterol management accounted for some of the disparity in cholesterol control between women and men but not between black and white patients.

  20. Patient Satisfaction with Pharmacist-Led Collaborative Follow-Up Care in an Ambulatory Rheumatology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jill J; Katz, Steven J; Cor, M Ken

    2017-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is known to increase with pharmacist intervention in general outpatient clinics and with nurse-led care in rheumatology clinics. The aim of the present study was to describe and compare patient satisfaction with two different types of care: a pharmacist physician collaborative model and a traditional physician model in a rheumatology clinic setting. A cross-sectional survey of inflammatory arthritis patients seen during a follow-up visit in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, was conducted over a ten-week period. Patient satisfaction was measured using a modified version of the validated Leeds Satisfaction Questionnaire, which uses a five-point Likert scale to measure six dimensions of satisfaction, and compared between the collaborative care and traditional physician models. A total of 62 patients completed the questionnaire (21 collaborative care and 41 traditional physician model). The average age of respondents was 52 years and the majority were female. The mean score for satisfaction across the six dimensions was 4.56 in the collaborative care group and 4.30 in the traditional physician group (p = 0.02). Patient satisfaction in the collaborative care group was consistently higher across all dimensions. No difference was noted between participants seen for the first time compared with those seen two or more times by the pharmacist. A collaborative care model can exceed the already high expectations for care of patients with inflammatory arthritis. Our findings support the role of pharmacists using a collaborative care approach to care for patients in rheumatology clinics. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Pre-operative ambulatory measurement of asymmetric lower limb loading during walking in total hip arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramírez, Alicia; Weenk, Dirk; Lecumberri, Pablo; Verdonschot, Nico; Pakvis, Dean; Veltink, Peter H

    2013-04-20

    questionnaires outcomes. Inter-limb asymmetry can be evaluated with the instrumented shoes supplying important additional information about the individual gait pattern, which is not represented by gait velocity and questionnaires usually used. Therefore, this new ambulatory measurement system is able to provide complementary information to gait velocity and questionnaires outcomes to assess the functional capacity of patients with hip osteoarthritis.

  2. Risk factors and outcomes of high peritonitis rate in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuanshi; Xie, Xishao; Xiang, Shilong; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shou, Zhangfei; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-12-01

    Peritonitis remains a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). A high peritonitis rate (HPR) affects continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients' technique survival and mortality. Predictors and outcomes of HPR, rather than the first peritonitis episode, were rarely studied in the Chinese population. In this study, we examined the risk factors associated with HPR and its effects on clinical outcomes in CAPD patients.This is a single center, retrospective, observational cohort study. A total of 294 patients who developing at least 1 episode of peritonitis were followed up from March 1st, 2002, to July 31, 2014, in our PD center. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with HPR, and the Cox proportional hazard model was conducted to assess the effects of HPR on clinical outcomes.During the study period of 2917.5 patient-years, 489 episodes of peritonitis were recorded, and the total peritonitis rate was 0.168 episodes per patient-year. The multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with HPR include a quick occurrence of peritonitis after CAPD initiation (shorter than 12 months), and a low serum albumin level at the start of CAPD. In the Cox proportional hazard model, HPR was a significant predictor of technique failure. There were no differences between HPR and low peritonitis rate (LPR) group for all-cause mortality. However, when the peritonitis rate was considered as a continuous variable, a positive correlation was observed between the peritonitis rate and mortality.We found the quick peritonitis occurrence after CAPD and the low serum albumin level before CAPD were strongly associated with an HPR. Also, our results verified that HPR was positively correlated with technique failure. More importantly, the increase in the peritonitis rate suggested a higher risk of all-cause mortality.These results may help to identify and target patients who are at higher risk of HPR at the start of CAPD and to

  3. Herbal medicine: a survey of use in Nigerian presurgical patients booked for ambulatory anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Utilization of herbal medicines in the preoperative period by Nigerian patients booked for day case surgery has not been explored. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 60 patients presenting for day-case surgery at a tertiary healthcare institution over a 3-week period in August 2011 was conducted. Using a structured questionnaire, inquiries were made concerning use of herbal medicines in the immediate preoperative period. Socio-demographic characteristics, information on use of concurrent medical prescriptions, types of herbs used, reasons for use, perceived side effects and perceived efficacy were obtained. Data were evaluated using descriptive statistics and Chi-square. Results Fifty-two (86.7%) were American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class 1 while 8 (13%) were ASA 2. Most patients (86.7%) had their procedures done under local infiltration with monitored anaesthesia care (MAC), while 5.0% and 8.3% had their procedures done under regional and general anaesthesia, respectively. About 48.3% of respondents were on concurrent medical prescriptions while 51.7% were not. Forty percent (40%) of patients admitted to use of herbal medicine, all by the oral route, in the immediate perioperative period; 87.5% did not inform their doctor of their herbal use. Types of herbs used included ‘dogonyaro’, ‘agbo’, ‘nchanwu’, and Tahitian noni. Treatment of malaria was commonest reason for use in 29.2% of patients, while cough and concurrent surgical condition were reasons given by 12.5% of patients, respectively. Seventy-nine percent (79.2%) of patients considered their herbal medications effective. Perceived side effects of herbal medication (16.6%) included fever, waist pain and intoxication. There were no variations in use between ASA 1 and ASA 2 patients and none between respondents on conventional medication against those that were not. Variables such as age less than 35 years, female gender, being married and being an urban dweller did not show

  4. Preoperative ambulatory measurement of asymmetric leg loading during sit-to-stand in hip arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramírez, Alicia; Weenk, Dirk; Lecumberri, Pablo; Verdonschot, Nico; Pakvis, Dean; Veltink, Peter H

    2014-05-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (TGA) is a successful surgical procedure to treat patients with hip osteoarthritis. Clinicians use different questionnaires to evaluate these patients. Gait velocity and these questionnaires; usually show significant improvement after TGA . This clinical evaluation does, however, not provide objective, quantifiable information about the movement patterns underlying the functional capacity, which is clinically important and can currently only be obtained in a gait laboratory. There is a need to improve patient instructions and to quantify the rehabilitation process. The sit-to-stand (STS) movement is an objective performance-based task, whose assessment is related with the evaluation of functional recovery. Twenty two patients with hip osteoarthritis participated in this study. For each patient, validated questionnaires were administered and gait velocity was measured. Time, ground reaction forces, and lower limb asymmetry parameters were calculated using the instrumented force shoes (IFS) during STS movement with and without armrest. Significant inter-limb asymmetry was observed. No correlation was found between any parameter and gait velocity and questionnaires outcomes. Significant differences in time and force parameters between with/without armrest were found. Concluding, inter-limb asymmetry can be evaluated with the IFS supplying important additional information not represented by gait velocity and questionnaires usually used.

  5. Oxygen delivery for ambulatory patients. How the Micro-Trach increases mobility.

    PubMed

    Heimlich, H J

    1988-11-01

    Transtracheal oxygen delivery with the Micro-Trach is state-of-the-art treatment for patients requiring long-term oxygen therapy. The Micro-Trach diminishes dyspnea because it bypasses the anatomic dead space in the respiratory tract. It eliminates the waste of oxygen that escapes from the nose and mouth when a nasal cannula is used. Therefore, a small oxygen container lasts longer, increasing the patient's mobility. The patient's appetite improves because oxygen is not diverted during deglutition, and the senses of smell and taste are restored. Rehabilitation is enhanced through increased mobility and improved nutrition. Transtracheal instillation of saline solution cleanses the respiratory tract and stimulates coughing, opening occluded air passages. There are fewer lung infections and hospitalizations for infective exacerbations of disease. Prescribed saline solution, mucolytics, and antibiotics can also be instilled through the Micro-Trach to treat cystic fibrosis. This use and others are still being explored.

  6. Development of an Ambulatory Clinical Pharmacy Prioritization Prediction Model for Patients With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Simon W; Russo-Alvarez, Giavanna; Cristiani, Cari; Rothberg, Michael B

    2016-09-01

    Health care reform and the projected shortage of primary care physicians necessitate more efficient use of multidisciplinary collaboration. No studies, to date, have evaluated factors associated with treatment success among patients referred to a clinical pharmacist. To develop a prediction model using patient factors to assist in selecting patients with diabetes most likely to benefit from pharmacy interventions. A retrospective, nested case-control study was performed. A prediction model using multivariable logistic regression was developed, with model calibration and internal validation. Adult patients with diabetes who had a baseline hemoglobin A1C (A1C) ≥9%, who were consulted for collaborative pharmacy care between July 2009 and July 2014 were included. Success (cases) was defined as a decrease in A1C by 2% or a value of A1C <8% 1 year after the initial visit. Failures were those who did not achieve the A1C goal or were lost to follow-up. A total of 544 unique patients were included, with 243 (44.7%) classified as clinical successes and 301 as clinical failures. Independent factors associated with success included past medical history of cerebrovascular accident and higher baseline A1C, whereas use of short-acting insulin and higher number of classes of diabetic medications at baseline corresponded with failure. A prediction model for success using these factors had an optimism-adjusted C-statistics of 0.629, with good calibration. Referred patients with diabetes have baseline characteristics that are predictive of clinical success. A predictive model based on those factors performed well and might be utilized to improve pharmacist efficiency in the face of constrained resources. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. [Risk factors of serious bleeding among ambulatory patients taking antivitamin K aged 75 and over].

    PubMed

    Blas-Châtelain, C; Chauvelier, S; Foti, P; Debure, C; Hanon, O

    2014-05-01

    The benefits of anti-vitamin K (AVK) drugs have been acknowledged in several indications. Such indications increasing with increasing age, AVK prescriptions also increases with age. At the same time, conditions involving significant bleeding are common in this elderly population. It is thus essential to recognize the determining factors. This study included all patients taking AVK drugs aged 75 years and older who sought emergency care at the Cochin Hospital from January to December 2011 for significant bleeding. These patients were compared with a cohort of patients aged 75 years or older who were taking AVK drugs and who were admitted to the same unit during the same time period for other reasons. The case-control comparison included demographic data, comorbidity factors, multiple medications, emergency measured INR, and CHA2DS2VASC level. The hemorrhagic risk was evaluated by HEMORR2HAGES and HAS-BLED. A total of 34 patients were studied and compared with 70 case-controls. The Charlson comorbidity index was higher in patients than case-controls (P<0.05), with a much higher hemorrhagic risk for scores ≥ 9 (OR=2.5; P<0.05). Multiple medication was also more predominant in patients (P<0.05). The risk of serious hemorrhage was also higher when the hemorrhagic scores were high, especially for HEMORR2HAGES (P<0.0001) and HAS-BLED (P<0.001). The risk of serious hemorrhage in elderly outpatients taking AVK drugs is related to their higher comorbidity and hemorrhagic levels which need to be evaluated before starting or stopping AVK treatment.

  8. Low seroprevalence of diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis in ambulatory adult patients: the need for lifelong vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Mine Durusu; Soyler, Canan; Ascioglu, Sibel; Cankurtaran, Mustafa; Unal, Serhat

    2014-07-01

    Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis and measles are vaccine preventable diseases that have been reported to cause morbidity and mortality in adult population in the recent years. We aimed to document the seropositivity rates and vaccination indication for these four vaccine preventable diseases among adult and elderly patients who were seen as outpatients in a university hospital. Blood samples for tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis and measles antibodies were obtained. Results were evaluated with regards to protection levels and booster vaccine indications according to the cut-off values. A total of 1367 patients consented for the study and 1303 blood samples were available for analysis at the end of the study. The antibody levels against measles conferred protection in 98% of patients. However, 65% of the patients had no protection for diphtheria, 69% had no protection for tetanus and 90% of the patients had no protection for pertussis. Only 1.3% of the study population had seropositivity against three of the diseases-Tdap booster was indicated in 98.7%. Multivariable logistic regression showed that tetanus protection decreased with increasing age. Having a chronic disease was associated with a lower rate of protective antibodies for pertussis. We demonstrated very low rates of protection against three of the vaccine preventable diseases of childhood-diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus. Booster vaccinations are required in adult life in accordance with national and international adult vaccination guidelines. The concept of "lifelong vaccination" should be implemented and every encounter with the patient should be regarded as a chance for catch-up. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Significance of hydrocephalus following severe brain injury during post-acute rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Dénes, Zoltán; Lantos, Agnes; Szél, István; Thomka, Magdolna; Vass, Mátyás; Barsi, Péter

    2010-11-30

    We report our experiences with hydrocephalus in early rehabilitation over a seven-year period. Retrospective study in Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit of the National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation, between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2008. At our institute in the last seven years, we treated 83 patients with secondary and six patients with primary hydrocephalus. The majority of hydrocephalus was of post traumatic origin (52) and remaining 23 following stroke (SAH, AVM, ICH) or brain operation (tumour--seven, and one cranioplasty), and all these patients had undergone ventricular shunt implantation. Mean age of patients was 36 (14-80) years. Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in our rehabilitation unit in 20 of 83 cases and the other patients were shunted before transfer to our unit. The median time point of shunting was 70 (range: 20-270) days after trauma, brain surgery or stroke. Post-operative complications were seen in 12 of 89 patients: six infections and six shunt failure and revision was necessary in 14%. In PTH cases, the post-operative improvement was seen in 40 of 52 patients being shunted and corresponded to FIM scores. At the other 31 cases, with non-traumatic origin, only two patients remain unchanged. Hydrocephalus is considered to be a frequent and important complication after severe brain damage. The incidence of hydrocephalus treated with shunt implantation in our neuro-rehabilitation unit was 4.4%. The postoperative improvement was 77%. Posttraumatic hydrocephalus concerns 5.2% of patients with severe TBI during last seven years in our institution. Diagnosis of posttraumatic hydrocephalus was established in 24%, and complication after shunt implantation (14%) was also recognized in the post-acute rehabilitation unit. It is strongly recommended for the team working at such type of units to obtain clinical practice. Teamwork, good cooperation between acute and postacute-care is necessary for successful rehabilitation of these patients.

  10. Pre-operative ambulatory measurement of asymmetric lower limb loading during walking in total hip arthroplasty patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    variables studied and questionnaires outcomes. Conclusion Inter-limb asymmetry can be evaluated with the instrumented shoes supplying important additional information about the individual gait pattern, which is not represented by gait velocity and questionnaires usually used. Therefore, this new ambulatory measurement system is able to provide complementary information to gait velocity and questionnaires outcomes to assess the functional capacity of patients with hip osteoarthritis. PMID:23602092

  11. The effectiveness of therapeutic patient education on adherence to oral anti-cancer medicines in adult cancer patients in ambulatory care settings: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Arthurs, Gilly; Simpson, Janice; Brown, Andrea; Kyaw, Ohnma; Shyrier, Sharon; Concert, Catherine M

    2015-06-12

    Adherence to oral cancer medicines is a challenge for adult patients with cancer. Education specifically tailored for an individual patient with cancer may improve adherence. Therapeutic patient education when utilized effectively may maximize health outcomes and positively affect the quality of life of adult patients with cancer. Currently, there are no published systematic reviews specific to the effectiveness of therapeutic patient education on improvement of oral anti-cancer medicines adherence in patients with cancer. To synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of therapeutic patient education on adherence to oral anti-cancer medicines in adult cancer patients 18 years and older in an ambulatory care setting. Types of participants: This review considered studies involving adults of any ethnicity, race or gender, aged 18 years or older who were diagnosed with any form of cancer, receiving oral anti-cancer medicines in an ambulatory care setting. Types of intervention(s): This review considered studies on the use of therapeutic patient education as the additional intervention to routine patient education for promoting oral anti-cancer medicine adherence in adult patients with cancer in an ambulatory care setting. Routine patient education was considered as a comparator. Types of outcomes: The outcome considered was adherence to prescribed oral anti-cancer medicines. Types of studies: This review considered experimental and observational studies. The literature search included published and unpublished studies in the English Language from 1953 through August 2014. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, Excerpta Medica Database, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition was conducted using identified keywords and indexed terms across all included databases. A search for grey literature and electronic hand searching of relevant journals was also performed. Two reviewers independently evaluated the

  12. Patient and clinician communication of self-reported insomnia during ambulatory cancer care clinic visits.

    PubMed

    Siefert, Mary Lou; Hong, Fangxin; Valcarce, Bianca; Berry, Donna L

    2014-01-01

    Insomnia, the most commonly reported sleep-wake disturbance in people with cancer, has an adverse effect on quality of life including emotional well-being, distress associated with other symptoms, daily functioning, relationships, and ability to work. The aim of this study was to describe the content of discussions between clinicians and 120 patients with self-reported insomnia and to examine the associations of sociodemographic, clinical, and environmental factors with insomnia. A secondary analysis was conducted with self-reported symptom data and sociodemographic, clinical, and environmental factors. Recordings of clinician and patient discussions during clinic visits were examined by conducting a content analysis. Severe insomnia was more likely to be reported by women, minority, and lower-income individuals. Seven major topics were identified in the discussions. The clinicians did not always discuss insomnia; discussion rates differed by diagnosis and clinical service. Reporting of insomnia by the patient and clinician communication about insomnia may have differed by demographic and clinical characteristics. Clinicians attended to insomnia about half the time with management strategies likely to be effective. Explanations may be that insomnia had a low clinician priority for the clinic visit or lack of clear evidence to support insomnia interventions. A better understanding is needed about why insomnia is not addressed even when reported by patients; it is well known that structured assessments and early interventions can improve quality of life. Research is warranted to better understand potential disparities in cancer care.

  13. The Frequency of Frailty in Ambulatory Patients With Chronic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Neha; Raj, Rishi; Islam, Ebtesam Attaya; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of frailty in patients with chronic lung diseases. We studied 120 patients with chronic lung disease using Fried's criteria (gait speed, weight loss, exhaustion, grip strength, and physical activity). The study population (56% women) had a mean age of 64 ± 13 years, mean body mass index of 31± 9 kg/m(2), and a mean FEV(1) (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) of 60% ± 25% of predicted. The average gait speed was 52.1 ± 14.3 m/min; 18% were frail, 64% prefrail, and 18% robust. Gait speed correlated with frailty status and decreased as frailty worsened (57 m/min in robust subjects and 41 m/min in frail subjects). Slow gait speeds (<60 m/min) had a 95% sensitivity and 34% specificity to predict frailty. Patients with chronic lung disease frequently meet Fried's criteria for frailty. Gait speed can be used to screen these patients to determine if a more detailed evaluation is needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. [Secondary ambulatory prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism: outcome of patients who were lost to follow-up].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Hajduk, B; Kober, J; Filipecki, S

    1998-01-01

    We have attempted to determine the outcome of 87 out-patients who were lost from follow-up. Several factors have been assessed: causes of lost from follow-up duration of oral anticoagulation, recurrent venous thromboembolic events, cause of death (if applicable).

  15. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Fluid Overload in Southern Chinese Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianying; Wu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xiao; Yu, Xueqing

    2013-01-01

    Background Fluid overload is frequently present in CAPD patients and one of important predictors of mortality. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors in a cohort study of Southern Chinese CAPD patients. Methods The patients (receiving CAPD 3 months and more) in our center were investigated from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009. Multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to assess the patient’s body composition and fluid status. Results A total of 307 CAPD patients (43% male, mean age 47.8±15.3 years) were enrolled, with a median duration of PD 14.6 (5.9–30.9) months. Fluid overload (defined by Extracellular water/Total body water (ECW/TBW)≥0.40) was present in 205 (66.8%) patients. Univariate analysis indicated that ECW/TBW were inversely associated with body mass index (r = −0.11, P = 0.047), subjective global assessment score (r = −0.11, P = 0.004), body fat mass (r = −0.15, P = 0.05), serum albumin (r = −0.32, P<0.001), creatinine (r = −0.14, P = 0.02), potassium (r = −0.15, P = 0.02), and residual urine output (r = −0.14, P = 0.01), positively associated with age (r = 0.27, P<0.001), Chalrlson Comorbidity Index score (r = 0.29, P<0.001), and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.22, P<0.001). Multivariate linear regression showed that lower serum albumin (β = −0.223, P<0.001), lower body fat mass (β = −0.166, P = 0.033), old age (β = 0.268, P<0.001), higher systolic blood pressure (β = 0.16, P = 0.006), less residual urine output (β = −0.116, P = 0.042), and lower serum potassium (β = −0.126, P = 0.03) were independently associated with higher ECW/TBW. After 1 year of follow-up, the cardiac event rate was significantly higher in the patients with fluid overload (17.1% vs 6.9%, P = 0.023) than that of the normal hydrated patients. Conclusions The prevalence of fluid

  16. Relationship between ambulatory performance and self-rated disability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Rob; Johnson, Michael; Goytan, Michael; Passmore, Steven; Berrington, Neil; Kriellaars, Dean

    2012-07-01

    A cross-sectional study. To identify the relationship between performance measures derived from accelerometry and subjective reports of pain, disability, and health in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Accelerometers have emerged as a measure of performance, providing the ability to characterize the pattern and magnitude of real-life activity, and sedentarism. Pain and loss of function, particularly ambulation, are common in LSS. The extent to which pain, perceived disability, and self-rated health relate to performance in patients with LSS is not well known. Data regarding self-reported pain, disability (Oswestry Disability Index, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand), and health (36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]) were collected from patients with LSS (n = 33). Physical activity, ambulation, and inactivity performance measures were derived from 7-day accelerometer records. Correlation and stepwise regression were used. The physical function subscale of the SF-36, a non-pathology-specific outcome, had the best overall correlation to physical activity and ambulation (average r = 0.53) compared with pain (average r = 0.32) and disability (average r = -0.45) outcomes. Stepwise regression models for performance were predominantly single-variable models (4 of 8 models); pain was not selected as a predictor. A second non-pathology-specific outcome, the Disabilities of Arm Shoulder and Hand, improved the prediction of performance in 5 of 8 models. Subjective measures of pain and disability had limited ability to account for real-life performance in patients with LSS. Future research is required to identify determinants of performance in patients with LSS because barriers to activity may not be disease-specific.

  17. Depressive Symptoms, Patient Satisfaction, and Quality of Life Over Time in Automated and Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Prospective Multicenter Propensity-Matched Study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee-Yeon; Jang, Hye Min; Kim, Yang Wook; Cho, Seong; Kim, Hye-Young; Kim, Sung-Ho; Bang, Kitae; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, So Young; Jo, Sang Kyung; Lee, Jonghyo; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Jang-Hee; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2016-05-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important clinical outcome for dialysis patients. However, relative superiority in HRQOL between automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) are not clearly known. We compared HRQOL over time between APD and CAPD patients and evaluated factors associated with HRQOL.All 260 incident patients initiating APD or CAPD at multiple centers throughout Korea were prospectively enrolled in this study between October 2010 and February 2013. HRQOL, depressive symptoms, and renal treatment satisfaction were assessed 1 and 12 months after the start of dialysis by the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 36 (KDQOL-36), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Renal Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (RTSQ), respectively.Of 196 patients who completed all questionnaires and did not change the peritoneal dialysis (PD) modality during the 1-year follow-up period, 160 were matched. APD patients showed better baseline HRQOL than CAPD patients for the symptoms, patient satisfaction, pain, and social function domains. There were no differences in HRQOL between the 2 groups at 12 months, and CAPD patients had significantly greater improvements in symptoms (P = 0.02), the mental composite summary (P = 0.03), and health status domains (P = 0.03) than APD patients. There were similar improvements in depressive symptoms (P = 0.01) and patient satisfaction with treatment (P = 0.01) in CAPD and APD patients. Interestingly, depressive symptoms, not PD modality, was the most influential and consistent factor for HRQOL. Despite the spontaneous improvement of depressive symptoms, considerable PD patients still had depressive symptoms at the 1-year appointment.APD has no advantage over CAPD for HRQOL. Considering the substantial negative effect of depressive symptoms on HRQOL, it is important to evaluate PD patients for depression and to treat those with depression to improve

  18. A novel symptom cluster analysis among ambulatory HIV/AIDS patients in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Namisango, Eve; Harding, Richard; Katabira, Elly T; Siegert, Richard J; Powell, Richard A; Atuhaire, Leonard; Moens, Katrien; Taylor, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Symptom clusters are gaining importance given HIV/AIDS patients experience multiple, concurrent symptoms. This study aimed to: determine clusters of patients with similar symptom combinations; describe symptom combinations distinguishing the clusters; and evaluate the clusters regarding patient socio-demographic, disease and treatment characteristics, quality of life (QOL) and functional performance. This was a cross-sectional study of 302 adult HIV/AIDS outpatients consecutively recruited at two teaching and referral hospitals in Uganda. Socio-demographic and seven-day period symptom prevalence and distress data were self-reported using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Schedule. QOL was assessed using the Medical Outcome Scale and functional performance using the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Symptom clusters were established using hierarchical cluster analysis with squared Euclidean distances using Ward's clustering methods based on symptom occurrence. Analysis of variance compared clusters on mean QOL and functional performance scores. Patient subgroups were categorised based on symptom occurrence rates. Five symptom occurrence clusters were identified: Cluster 1 (n=107), high-low for sensory discomfort and eating difficulties symptoms; Cluster 2 (n=47), high-low for psycho-gastrointestinal symptoms; Cluster 3 (n=71), high for pain and sensory disturbance symptoms; Cluster 4 (n=35), all high for general HIV/AIDS symptoms; and Cluster 5 (n=48), all low for mood-cognitive symptoms. The all high occurrence cluster was associated with worst functional status, poorest QOL scores and highest symptom-associated distress. Use of antiretroviral therapy was associated with all high symptom occurrence rate (Fisher's exact=4, P<0.001). CD4 count group below 200 was associated with the all high occurrence rate symptom cluster (Fisher's exact=41, P<0.001). Symptom clusters have a differential, affect HIV/AIDS patients' self-reported outcomes, with the subgroup experiencing high

  19. Relationship between malnutrition-inflammation syndrome and ultrafiltration volume in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tinroongroj, Nantawan; Jittikanont, Suparoek; Lumlertgul, Dusit

    2011-09-01

    Malnutrition inflammation syndrome may contribute to a change of peritoneum, leading to high peritoneal membrane transport, peritoneal albumin loss, and increased glucose uptake into systemic circulation and decreased ultrafiltration (UF) volume. Fluid overload is a common problem among CAPD patients which has an effect on morbidity and mortality in these patients. The present study was designed as a pilot to find out a correlation between malnutrition and UF volume in CAPD patients. A cross-sectional study was comducted in 42 stable CAPD cases at CAPD clinic, Maharaj Chiang Mai Hospital. Subjective global assessment score (SGA), malnutrition inflammation score (MIS), and laboratory values were utilized to identify nutritional and inflammatory status. Peritoneal equilibration test (PET) was performed to measure UF volume while bioelectrical impedance assay was determined to measure extracellular fluid volume (ECF), lean body mass (LBM), lean fat mass, and fluid status. Of 42 CAPD patients, 30 subjects were classified to have normal nutritional status while 12 patients were categorized to have malnutrition. Only 1 patient was classified to have malnutrition inflammation syndrome. MIS scores and serum albumin were significantly different between 2 groups (p < 0.001). PET-UF volume was significantly decreased in the malnutrition group (p < 0.05), especially when serum albumin was less than 3.0 g/dl. PET-UF volume was reduced 137.44 ml for every 1 g/dl of serum albumin below 3.0 g/dl. Residual renal function (RRF) was also significantly reduced in malnutrition group (p < 0.05). Malnutrition, decreased RRF and decreased UF volume led to ECF expansion, hypertension, and fluid overload. Other factors that were correlated with UF volume were ACEI and/or ARB use (p < 0.05) and total protein loss per day (p < 0.05). There was a significantly positive correlation between malnutrition and reduction of UF volume. Other factors that were correlated with UF volume were ACEI and

  20. Successful Treatment of Idiopathic Eosinophilic Peritonitis by Oral Corticosteroid Therapy in a Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yaowen; Gao, Chenni; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic peritonitis is a well-described complication of peritoneal dialysis and is often associated with either a reaction to the dialysis system constituent (tubing, sterilant or solution) or an underlying bacterial or fungal reaction. We report a case of eosinophilic peritonitis, which is treated by oral prednisone acetate therapy. A 43-year-old female patient developed end-stage renal disease and underwent continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for 2.5 years. The patient received 2,000 ml of 1.5% dialysis solution (PD2) with three exchanges daily and 2,000 ml of 2.5% PDF overnight (PD2). She went to the consultation because of a constant turbid peritoneal dialysis effluent for 3 months without abdominal pain. Repeated peritoneal effluent samples showed an elevated white blood cell count of 500 cells/mm3, with 87% eosinophils. The peripheral blood test revealed a white blood cell count of 3.8 × 109/l, with 32.2% eosinophils. Etiology like bacterial and fungal infection was excluded by peritoneal fluid culture. Turbidness persisted in spite of diagnostic antibiotic treatment. Given the fact that we found a significant elevation of eosinophils in the peripheral blood and an absolute increase in the eosinophil count of >30/mm3 in dialysis fluid (up to 400/mm3 in our patient), obvious dialysate effluent turbidness, negative results of repeated peritoneal fluid cultures, inefficacy of antibiotic therapy, and negativity of serum tumor and immunological markers, we drew the conclusion that the patient had idiopathic eosinophilic peritonitis. Oral corticosteroid was administered at once (20 mg prednisone acetate daily), which was gradually weaned off and stopped over an 8-week period. Afterwards, the dialysis effluent became clear, and the cytological analysis showed that the white blood cell count decreased to 1 × 106/l, with no eosinophils. This case reminds us that the diagnosis of eosinophilic peritonitis should be considered when repeated cultures are

  1. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ojeh, Victor B.; Naima, Nasir; Abah, Isaac O.; Falang, Kakjing D.; Lucy, Ogwuche; London, Ibrahim; Dady, Christiana; Agaba, Patricia; Agbaji, Oche

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs), and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV-infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH). Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions) were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3%) patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10) years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%), unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1%) and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%). Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%), rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%), change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%), and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%). A total of 389 (93%) out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212) of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89) were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49). However, 7.5% (30) prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21) were not dispensed, and 3% (12) were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors. PMID:26131046

  2. Approach to fever assessment in ambulatory cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, M.K.; Walker-Dilks, C.; Atzema, C.; Morris, A.; Gupta, R.; Halligan, R.; Kouroukis, T.; McCann, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background This guideline was prepared by the Fever Assessment Guideline Development Group, a group organized by the Program in Evidence-Based Care at the request of the Cancer Care Ontario Systemic Treatment Program. The mandate was to develop a standardized approach (in terms of definitions, information, and education) for the assessment of fever in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods The guideline development methods included a search for existing guidelines, literature searches in medline and embase for systematic reviews and primary studies, internal review by content and methodology experts, and external review by targeted experts and intended users. Results The search identified eight guidelines that had partial relevance to the topic of the present guideline and thirty-eight primary studies. The studies were mostly noncomparative prospective or retrospective studies. Few studies directly addressed the topic of fever except as one among many symptoms or adverse effects associated with chemotherapy. The recommendations concerning fever definition are supported mainly by other existing guidelines. No evidence was found that directly pertained to the assessment of fever before a diagnosis of febrile neutropenia was made. However, some studies evaluated approaches to symptom management that included fever among the symptoms. Few studies directly addressed information needs and resources for managing fever in cancer patients. Conclusions Fever in patients with cancer who are receiving systemic therapy is a common and potentially serious symptom that requires prompt assessment, but currently, evidence to inform best practices concerning when, where, and by whom that assessment is done is very limited. PMID:27536179

  3. Repeat prescribing: scale, problems and quality management in ambulatory care patients.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Peter A G M; Dautzenberg, Maaike

    2004-01-01

    The reported scale of repeat prescriptions ranges from 29% to 75% of all items prescribed, depending on the definition of repeat prescribing and other variables. It is likely that a substantial part of repeat prescribing by general practitioners (GPs) occurs without direct doctor-patient contact. While this reduces the workload for the GP and is convenient for the patient, it does not provide the adequate control that is needed to ensure that every repeat prescription is still appropriate, effective and well tolerated, and that it is still being viewed upon and taken by the patient as intended. Infrequent therapy reviews may lead to failure to prevent, identify and solve drug-related problems and drug wastage, and may, thereby, have a negative impact on the effectiveness, safety or cost of the medications prescribed. Studies evaluating the repeat prescribing process have shown that GPs and medical practices vary widely in their degree of administrative and clinical control of repeat prescriptions. Contrary to the opinion that GPs cannot change prescribing behaviour when the prescription is initiated by a medical specialist, GPs have their own responsibility for controlling the repeats of such prescriptions. Intervention studies suggest that a medication review by a pharmacist can help to reduce drug-related problems with repeat prescriptions, and the effectiveness of the intervention may be increased by combining the medication review with a consultation of the patient's medical records and a patient interview. In several studies, such an intervention was relatively inexpensive and, therefore, feasible. However, these conclusions should be viewed with appropriate caution because a number of caveats pertain. There is still no evidence that these types of intervention improve health-related quality of life or reduce healthcare cost, and so far only a few trials have produced any evidence of clinical improvement. As implicit and explicit screening criteria have their

  4. Information perception, wishes, and satisfaction in ambulatory cancer patients under active treatment: patient-reported outcomes with QLQ-INFO25

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ana Catarina; Ferreira-Santos, Fernando; Lago, Lissandra Dal; de Azambuja, Evandro; Pimentel, Francisco Luís; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine; Razavi, Darius

    2014-01-01

    Background Information is vital to cancer patients. Physician–patient communication in oncology presents specific challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate self-reported information of cancer patients in ambulatory care at a comprehensive cancer centre and examine its possible association with patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics. Patients and methods This study included adult patients with solid tumours undergoing chemotherapy at the Institute Jules Bordet’s Day Hospital over a ten-day period. EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-INFO25 questionnaires were administered. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Results 101 (99%) fully completed the questionnaires. They were mostly Belgian (74.3%), female (78.2%), with a mean age of 56.9 ± 12.8 years. The most frequent tumour was breast cancer (58.4%). Patients were well-informed about the disease and treatments, but presented unmet information domains. The Jules Bordet patients desired more information on treatment side effects, long-term outcome, nutrition, and recurrence symptoms. Patients on clinical trials reported having received less information about their disease and less written information than patients outside clinical trials. Higher information levels were associated with higher quality of life (QoL) scores and higher patient satisfaction. Conclusion Patients were satisfied with the information they received and this correlated with higher QoL, but they still expressed unmet information wishes. Additional studies are required to investigate the quality of the information received by patients enrolled in clinical trials. PMID:24834120

  5. Selection and visualisation of outcome measures for complex post-acute acquired brain injury rehabilitation interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Catherine Elaine Longworth; Malley, Donna; Bateman, Andrew; Clare, Isabel C.H.; Wagner, Adam P.; Gracey, Fergus

    2016-01-01

    Background Outcome measurement challenges rehabilitation services to select tools that promote stakeholder engagement in measuring complex interventions. Objectives To examine the suitability of outcome measures for complex post-acute acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation interventions, report outcomes of a holistic, neuropsychological ABI rehabilitation program and propose a simple way of visualizing complex outcomes. Methods Patient/carer reported outcome measures (PROMS), experience measures (PREMS) and staff-rated measures were collected for consecutive admissions over 1 year to an 18-week holistic, neuropsychological rehabilitation programme at baseline, 18 weeks and 3- and 6-month follow-up. Results Engagement with outcome measurement was poorest for carers and at follow-up for all stakeholders. Dependence, abilities, adjustment, unmet needs, symptomatology including executive dysfunction, and self-reassurance showed improvements at 18 weeks. Adjustment, social participation, perceived health, symptomatology including dysexecutive difficulties, and anxiety were worse at baseline for those who did not complete rehabilitation, than those who did. A radar plot facilitated outcome visualization. Conclusions Engagement with outcome measurement was best when time and support were provided. Supplementing patient- with staff-rated and attendance measures may explain missing data and help quantify healthcare needs. The MPAI4, EBIQ and DEX-R appeared suitable measures to evaluate outcomes and distinguish those completing and not completing neuropsychological rehabilitation. PMID:27341362

  6. Simplification of HAART therapy on ambulatory HIV patients in Malaysia:a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Velvanathan, Tineshwaran; Islahudin, Farida; Sim, Benedict L.; Taha, Nur A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the impact of fixed-dose combination (FDC) containing emtricitabine (FTC), tenofovir (TDF), and efavirenz (EFV) versus a free-dose combination (FRC) of the same three drugs on clinical outcomes, adherence and quality of life in Malaysian outpatients with HIV. Methods: HIV patients (n=120) on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the infectious disease clinic of Hospital Sungai Buloh were randomized to either FDC (n=60) or FRC (n=60). Morisky scores, health-related quality of life scores and clinical outcomes such as CD4 count and viral load were assessed in both groups at baseline and six months. Result: Patients on FDC (108 SD=1.1) had a significantly higher CD4 count increase compared to the FRC group (746.1 SD=36.3 vs 799.8 SD=33.8) (p <0.001). The viral load profile was unchanged and remained undetectable in both groups. The quality of life EQ-5D scores showed a positive correlation with CD4 counts in the FDC group (ρ=0.301, p=0.019) at six months. On the other hand, quality of life EQ-VAS scores was significantly associated with medication adherence in the FDC group at six months (ρ=0.749, p=0.05). However, no significant changes or associations were observed in the FRC group. Conclusion: Management of HAART using an FDC demonstrated a positive clinical outcome, adherence and quality of life within six months in local HIV patients. PMID:28042354

  7. Immediate and long-term functional impact of repetitive locomotor training as an adjunct to conventional physiotherapy for non-ambulatory patients after stroke.

    PubMed

    Mehrholz, Jan; Werner, Cordula; Hesse, Stefan; Pohl, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the heart rate intensity during gait training and to evaluate the relationship between heart rate intensity during gait training and walking ability of patients after stroke. We included non-ambulatory patients within six weeks after first stroke. Over four weeks patients were trained five times a week, with either 20 minutes of repetitive locomotor training and 25 min of physiotherapy (RLT-PT), or 45 min of PT alone. We assessed the heart rate intensity during training period. Additionally we assessed walking ability (Functional Ambulation Categories) and the rate of independent ability to perform activities of daily life (Barthel Index) at the end of study and six months and three years later on. We included 30 patients in each group. Patients in RLT-PT group exercised longer in the HR target zone than in the PT group (16.1+/-11.8 min vs. 5.3+/-5.6 min, p<0.001). Higher heart rates were associated with independent walking at the end of study, at six months and at three years after the end of study (Fishers exact test, p=0.014, p=0.012 and p=0.017, respectively). Higher heart rate intensities during gait-training of non-ambulatory post-stroke patients may improve walking function.

  8. Midazolam is associated with delay in recovery and agitation after ambulatory general anesthesia for dental treatment in patients with disabilities: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shigeru; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Mori, Takayuki; Egusa, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2012-06-01

    Some patients with intellectual disabilities (IDs) who undergo total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) have complications associated with the anesthesia such as prolonged recovery. The purposes of this study were to estimate the frequency of TIVA complications among patients with IDs and to identify factors associated with TIVA complications. This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study. Study samples were selected from the clinical records of patients with IDs who underwent ambulatory general anesthesia in a special dental clinic at the Okayama University Hospital, Okayama, Japan. Predictor variables were patient background, anesthesia-related variables, and dental treatment. Outcome variables were delayed recovery and the complication of agitation. Factors affecting delayed recovery and complications were examined with multivariable analysis. We enrolled 106 cases (81 male and 25 female patients) in this study. The mean age was 23.9 years. Serious complications were not observed in any cases. The amount of intravenous midazolam was an independent determinant of delayed recovery. Oral midazolam contributed to delayed recovery, although it is very useful for induction in patients with a high level of fear. Oral midazolam and a younger age were independent predictors of agitation. Intravenous midazolam may not have an advantage in ambulatory general anesthesia. Oral midazolam contributes to delayed recovery and is an independent predictor of agitation. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). 3 years' therapeutic experience in 100 patients].

    PubMed

    Rottembourg, J; de Groc, F; Jacq, D; Issad, B; El Shahat, Y; Aqraflotis, A; Seidler, A; Legrain, M

    1983-03-01

    The pros and cons of CAPD are weighed up on the basis of a 3-year study on 100 patients with renal insufficiency (61 men, 36 women and 3 children). If equal groups are compared, the survival rate corresponds to that of haemodialysis. Continuous detoxication and dehydration lead to a good uraemic metabolic situation (creatinine 960 mumol/l, urea 24 mmol/l, haemoglobin 98 g/l, albumin 31 g/l. The serum electrolytes are well-balanced, anorganic phosphate is normal. The rise in cholesterol and triglycerides observed is a possible negative influence with regard to arterial sclerosis. The functioning of the kidneys is not affected by CAPD. The main risks of this method of therapy are peritonitis and loss of protein via the peritoneal dialysate, which can be favourably influenced by strictly antiseptic handling when changing the dialysate bag and a sufficient protein supply in the diet. In France 10-15% of all patients with terminal renal insufficiency will be treated with CAPD in future.

  10. Preventive and promotive medicine in ambulatory clinical practice: a prospective simulated patient study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y Y; Nordin, M; Suleiman, A B

    1995-12-01

    This study examines the extent to which preventive and promotive advice is integrated into the clinical practice of doctors. Using a cross-sectional descriptive survey design, the study compares the performance of doctors in giving healthy lifestyle advice for five clinical conditions, their perceived practice and their rating on the importance of disseminating selected key lifestyle messages. A total of 28 volunteers were trained to simulate the five clinical conditions which required related health advice and to rate the doctors' performance with the use of a prepared checklist. Simulated patient ratings of 343 doctor-patient encounters provided the data on doctors' health promotion efforts for the selected clinical conditions. A post-visit self-administered questionnaire survey of a sub-sample of 100 doctors gave an insight into their opinions and perceived practice. Only in 49% of the instances was a health promotion message given. The doctors' encouraging interest in health education and health promotion and their positive perceptions of their volume of healthy lifestyle counselling were not borne out in actual clinical practice. The results indicate that the extent of preventive and promotive health education in both the public and private health sectors is unacceptably low. The matter needs to be addressed through training programmes as well as the formulation of clear health promotion priorities and strategies in Malaysia.

  11. Health economic burden of patients with restless legs syndrome in a German ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    Dodel, Richard; Happe, Svenja; Peglau, Ines; Mayer, Geert; Wasem, Jürgen; Reese, Jens-Peter; Giani, Guido; Geraedts, Max; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin

    2010-01-01

    The primary characteristics of restless legs syndrome (RLS), including severe sleep disorders, restlessness in the evening and discomfort while at rest, have substantial impact on normal daily activities. Because of the high prevalence of RLS in the general population, it is necessary to evaluate the economic impact of RLS. To determine the health economic burden of patients with RLS in Germany. A total of 519 RLS patients (mean age: 65.2 +/- 11.1 years) in different stages of disease were recruited in five health centres (university hospitals, district hospitals and office-based neurologists) by applying the diagnostic criteria of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. A questionnaire was administered that assessed healthcare resource consumption as well as socioeconomic, demographic, clinical and health status. In addition, the International RLS severity scale (IRLS), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), EQ-5D and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were addressed in the assessment. Direct and indirect costs (euro, year 2006 values) were derived from various German economic resources and calculated from the perspective of the healthcare and transfer payment providers. We calculated average total costs over the 3-month observation period. It was determined that average total costs were euro2090 for this period. The average direct medical and non-medical costs from the perspective of the health insurance provider were determined to be euro780, with euro300 attributed to drug costs and euro354 to hospitalization costs. Average total indirect costs amounted to euro1308 and were calculated based on productivity loss, using the human capital approach. As cost-driving factors we identified disease severity according to the IRLS (p < 0.01) and ESS (p < 0.04). Health-related quality of life was determined to be substantially affected by RLS; the mean EQ-5D visual analogue scale (VAS) was 55.6, considerably lower than that of the age-matched general population. RLS

  12. [Ambulatory measurement of blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Mallion, J M; Tremel, F; Siché, J P; Azzouzi, L; Baguet, J P

    1995-12-09

    The advent of new techniques has greatly contributed to the development of ambulatory measurement as a noninvasive method for evaluating blood pressure. The technique implies use of a validated and reliable standardized apparatus. The operator must strictly comply with operating procedures, which must also be explained to the patient. Ambulatory measurement can be meaningful only if the results are compatible with reference values, which have now been established, and if the causes of possible error can be recognized and interpreted. Ambulatory blood pressure measurement has greatly improved our knowledge of physiological and pathological variations over the circadian cycle including day/night variability and the effects of psychosensorial stimulation. Diagnostic indications are clearly identified and include borderline hypertension suspected but not identified after about 3 months, the white coat effect, severe hypertension when modifications in the circadian cycle are suspected, paroxysmal hypertension, suspected pheochromocytoma, and gravid hypertension or an inversion of the circadian cycle possibly preceding an episode of eclampsia. There are also a certain number of particular indications in patients with degenerative or primary conditions affecting their autonomy. The true prognostic value of these recordings was recognized several years ago and has been confirmed by clinical trials. For example, the white blouse effect has no significant implication in terms or predicting less favourable morbidity or mortality. Finally, ambulatory blood pressure measurement has been definitively shown to be a valid m