Science.gov

Sample records for post-field season work

  1. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Post-field season work plan, September 1, 1994--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The preliminary data from the temperature and water table manipulations indicated that net CO{sub 2} flux of both tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems is sensitive to changes in water table depth and soil temperature. The preliminary results from the patch, landscape, and regional flux measurements indicate that there are large deficiencies in our current ability to extrapolate from patch and landscape levels to the region. During fall 1994, our primary goals are to: (1) Analyze a full season of net CO{sub 2} flux from the in situ manipulations, and determine the effects of water table depth and elevated temperature on the C balance of arctic ecosystems. Once this task is complete, the data will be published in a form that discusses the importance of these environmental controls, and their relevance to future CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. (2) Analyze tower- and aircraft-based eddy correlation flux data, and develop methods to reduce the time required to analyze these data. (3) Determine the importance of environmental controls of the exchange of CO{sub 2} at each spatial scale, and to develop the necessary routines that will permit the scaling of fine-scale flux data to landscape and regional scales. (4) Prepare manuscripts for publication on net CO{sub 2} flux data for each spatial scale, latitudinal flux pattern, and on methods and considerations for scaling from point measurements to the landscape and regional scale.

  2. Seasonal logging, process response, and geomorphic work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C.; Zimmermann, A.; Korup, O.; Iroume, A.; Francke, T.; Bronstert, A.

    2013-12-01

    Deforestation is a prominent anthropogenic cause of erosive overland flow and slope instability, boosting rates of soil erosion and concomitant sediment flux. Conventional methods of gauging or estimating post-logging sediment flux focus on annual timescales, but overlook potentially important process response on shorter intervals immediately following timber harvest. We resolve such dynamics from non-parametric Quantile Regression Forests (QRF) of high-frequency (3-min) measurements of stream discharge and sediment concentrations in similar-sized (~0.1 km2) forested Chilean catchments that were logged during either the rainy or the dry season. The method of QRF builds on the Random Forest algorithm, and combines quantile regression with repeated random sub-sampling of both cases and predictors which in turn provides model uncertainties. We find that, where no logging occurred, ~80% of the total sediment load was transported during extremely variable runoff events during only 5% of the monitoring period. Particularly dry-season logging dampened the role of these rare, extreme sediment-transport events by increasing load efficiency during more efficient moderate events. We conclude that QRF may reliably support forest management recommendations by providing robust simulations of post-logging response of water and sediment fluxes at high temporal resolution.

  3. Seasonal logging, process response, and geomorphic work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C. H.; Zimmermann, A.; Korup, O.; Iroumé, A.; Francke, T.; Bronstert, A.

    2013-09-01

    Deforestation is a prominent anthropogenic cause of erosive overland flow and slope instability, boosting rates of soil erosion and concomitant sediment flux. Conventional methods of gauging or estimating post-logging sediment flux focus on annual timescales, but potentially overlook important geomorphic responses on shorter time scales immediately following timber harvest. Sediments fluxes are commonly estimated from linear regression of intermittent measurements of water and sediment discharge using sediment rating curves (SRCs). However, these often unsatisfactorily reproduce non-linear effects such as discharge-load hystereses. We resolve such important dynamics from non-parametric Quantile Regression Forests (QRF) of high-frequency (3 min) measurements of stream discharge and sediment concentrations in similar-sized (~ 0.1 km2) forested Chilean catchments that were logged during either the rainy or the dry season. The method of QRF builds on the Random Forest (RF) algorithm, and combines quantile regression with repeated random sub-sampling of both cases and predictors. The algorithm belongs to the family of decision-tree classifiers, which allow quantifying relevant predictors in high-dimensional parameter space. We find that, where no logging occurred, ~ 80% of the total sediment load was transported during rare but high magnitude runoff events during only 5% of the monitoring period. The variability of sediment flux of these rare events spans four orders of magnitude. In particular dry-season logging dampened the role of these rare, extreme sediment-transport events by increasing load efficiency during more moderate events. We show that QRFs outperforms traditional SRCs in terms of accurately simulating short-term dynamics of sediment flux, and conclude that QRF may reliably support forest management recommendations by providing robust simulations of post-logging response of water and sediment discharge at high temporal resolution.

  4. Seasonal logging, process response, and geomorphic work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C. H.; Zimmermann, A.; Korup, O.; Iroumé, A.; Francke, T.; Bronstert, A.

    2014-03-01

    Deforestation is a prominent anthropogenic cause of erosive overland flow and slope instability, boosting rates of soil erosion and concomitant sediment flux. Conventional methods of gauging or estimating post-logging sediment flux often focus on annual timescales but overlook potentially important process response on shorter intervals immediately following timber harvest. We resolve such dynamics with non-parametric quantile regression forests (QRF) based on high-frequency (3 min) discharge measurements and sediment concentration data sampled every 30-60 min in similar-sized (˜0.1 km2) forested Chilean catchments that were logged during either the rainy or the dry season. The method of QRF builds on the random forest algorithm, and combines quantile regression with repeated random sub-sampling of both cases and predictors. The algorithm belongs to the family of decision-tree classifiers, which allow quantifying relevant predictors in high-dimensional parameter space. We find that, where no logging occurred, ˜80% of the total sediment load was transported during extremely variable runoff events during only 5% of the monitoring period. In particular, dry-season logging dampened the relative role of these rare, extreme sediment-transport events by increasing load efficiency during more efficient moderate events. We show that QRFs outperform traditional sediment rating curves (SRCs) in terms of accurately simulating short-term dynamics of sediment flux, and conclude that QRF may reliably support forest management recommendations by providing robust simulations of post-logging response of water and sediment fluxes at high temporal resolution.

  5. Living and working safely: challenges for migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Quandt, Sara A

    2011-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are essential to North Carolina agriculture, yet they experience major health risks. This commentary describes the characteristics of North Carolina farmworkers, important hazards they face, and the status of regulatory protections. Finally, it presents a summary of policy needed to protect the health of farmworkers.

  6. Workers With Irregular Hours During Seasonal Work Surges: Promoting Healthy Sleep.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    A significant proportion of the labor force works irregular hours during harvest, summer, or holiday work surges. Unfortunately such workers are often uninformed about the importance of sleep and fatigue management. Seasonally timed worker training can improve health and safety outcomes during work surges.

  7. Can a Seasoned Teacher Do Her Best Work on a Shifting College Landscape? An Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Beverley A.

    2013-01-01

    Grounded in self study and personal and professional reflection, this is an inquiry into how seasoned, long time and close to retirement teachers can do their best work on a shifting college landscape in a changing world. Recognizing teaching and learning as the college's core business, the author explores mentorship, community among…

  8. 29 CFR 784.113 - Work related to named operations performed in off- or dead-season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 784.113 Work related to named operations performed in off- or dead-season. Generally, during the dead or inactive season when operations named in section 13(a)(5) or 13(b)(4) are not being performed on...-season. 784.113 Section 784.113 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR...

  9. A prospective study of seasonal variation in shift-work tolerance.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Catherine; Bowman, Marilyn L; Bradley, Cheryl L; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2008-04-01

    Seasonal effects on shift-work tolerance were assessed using the Standardized Shiftwork Index and the 21-item Hamilton Depression Scale. Participants (N=88) mainly worked a two-day, two-night, four-off rotation with 12 h shifts changing at 06:00 and 18:00 h in Vancouver, Canada. At this latitude (approximately 49 degrees N), daylength varies seasonally from approximately 16 to approximately 8 h, and both daily commutes occur in the dark in mid-winter and in sunlight in mid-summer. Questionnaires were completed twice, near the summer and winter solstices (order counterbalanced). Outcome variables were mood, general psychological health, sleep quality, chronic fatigue, physical health, job satisfaction, and social and domestic disruption. Of these, general psychological health and mood were significantly worse in winter, while sleep was more disturbed in summer. In winter, 31% exceeded the cutoff for psychological distress, and >70% scored in the higher than normal range for depressive symptoms. In summer, the proportions dropped to 19% and 53%, respectively. Measures of physical health and psychosocial well-being showed no seasonal effects. Relationships among explanatory and outcome variables, assessed by linear regression and canonical correlations, were also stable across season. Neuroticism was the strongest predictor of tolerance to shift work. Age was predictive only of sleep disturbance in both summer and winter. These results indicate that time of year can affect important outcome measures in shift-work assessment and intervention studies. The high average scores on measures of psychological distress and depression in winter suggest that at northern latitudes, some shift schedules may increase the risk of seasonal-type depression.

  10. 29 CFR 784.113 - Work related to named operations performed in off- or dead-season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work related to named operations performed in off- or dead-season. 784.113 Section 784.113 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION... § 784.113 Work related to named operations performed in off- or dead-season. Generally, during the...

  11. Effects of diurnal and seasonal sleep deficiency on work effort and fatigue of shift workers.

    PubMed

    Khaleque, A

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to assess and compare the quantity and quality of sleep of morning, afternoon, and night shift workers during the winter and summer seasons, and to evaluate the effects of sleep deficiency on the work effort and fatigue of the workers. The subjects studied consisted of a sample of 150 textile workers, working on a monthly rotating 3-shift system: morning shift (06.00-11.00 and 14.00-17.00) afternoon shift (11.00-14.00 and 17.00-22.00), and night shift (22.00-06.00). Information concerning quantity and quality of sleep were registered daily over a week for every subject. The Ratings of Perceived Effort scale and the Feeling and Symptoms of Fatigue scale were used to collect information about feeling of effort and fatigue of the subjects. The results showed that the duration of sleep length is longest in the afternoon and shortest in the night shift both during summer and winter. The amount of sleep is shorter during summer during all three shifts. The workers spent more effort and felt more fatigued during summer than winter. The shift workers, particularly of the tropical region, like Bangladesh, seem to be worst affected in terms of quantity and quality of sleep, health and well-being due to extremely high temperature (30-45 degrees Celsius) during summer than winter (5-25 degrees Celsius). The workers think that the problems of shift work could be minimized by improving the quality of working and living conditions, reducing cycle of rotation, shortening working day and closing night shift during peak summer.

  12. Diurnal and seasonal mood vary with work, sleep, and daylength across diverse cultures.

    PubMed

    Golder, Scott A; Macy, Michael W

    2011-09-30

    We identified individual-level diurnal and seasonal mood rhythms in cultures across the globe, using data from millions of public Twitter messages. We found that individuals awaken in a good mood that deteriorates as the day progresses--which is consistent with the effects of sleep and circadian rhythm--and that seasonal change in baseline positive affect varies with change in daylength. People are happier on weekends, but the morning peak in positive affect is delayed by 2 hours, which suggests that people awaken later on weekends.

  13. Seasonal variation in the occurrence of venous thromboembolism: a report from the Korean Venous Thromboembolism Working Party.

    PubMed

    Jang, Moon Ju; Kim, Hee-Jin; Bang, Soo-Mee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Yhim, Ho-Young; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Kim, Yang-Ki; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Eun-Young; Kim, In-Ho; Park, Seonyang; Sohn, Hee-Jung; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Kim, Minji; Oh, Doyeun

    2012-10-01

    There have been conflicting results on seasonal variation in the occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE). It also has never been studied in Asian population. To address these issues, we investigated seasonal changes of the incidence of VTE in Korean population using 1,495 patients with VTE between January 2001 and December 2010. VTE occurred most frequently in the winter and least frequently in the summer (χ2=11.83, P=0.008). In the subset analyses, the same trend was shown in the PE±DVT group, the unprovoked VTE group, and the VTE without malignancy group. The monthly occurrence rate peaked in December and was at its lowest in July (P=0.004). In conclusion, our study provides evidence that there is an increased risk for VTE in Korean population in the winter season.

  14. A synthesis of the ongoing seasonal work in a west Greenland tidewater outlet glacier fjord, Godthåbsfjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, J.; Bendtsen, J.; Rysgaard, S.

    2015-12-01

    The coastal waters off west Greenland is subjected to significant temperature fluctuations which might affect the mass loss from local tidewater outlet glaciers from the Greenland Ice Sheet in different ways. We present a comprehensive hydrographic data set from a west Greenland fjord, Godthåbsfjord, a fjord in contact with the Greenland Ice Sheet through tidewater outlet glaciers. We analyze with respect to water masses, dynamics, seasonal and interannual hydrographic variability. Through seasonal observations of hydrographic and moored observations we recognize a seasonal pattern in the fjords circulation system, where an intermediate baroclinic circulation mode driven by tidal currents at the fjord entrance is associated as an important local heat source for the fjord. Four distinct circulation modes are observed in the fjord of which all can contribute to glacial ice melt. In water observation of a subglacial plume core will be presented and discussed with respect to vertical distribution of water masses and local heat budget in the fjord. The example of the extreme case of subglacial plume will be discussed (ice-dammed lake drainage).

  15. Lessons learned from the 2007-2008 cold and flu season: what worked and what was worthless.

    PubMed

    Moyad, Mark A; Robinson, Larry E

    2008-04-01

    The 2007-2008 cold and flu season had a feeble beginning but a dramatic end. Most states in the U.S. were reporting their highest number of flu cases well into February and March. It is concerning that not only the public but health care professionals have not embraced widespread vaccination because approximately 200,000 hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths a year continue to make this condition one of the leading preventable causes of morbidity and mortality. The real question that needs to be asked next year is who should not be vaccinated rather than who needs to be vaccinated. Preventive measures with soap and water and 62% ethyl alcohol hand gels continue to make sense, whereas the antibacterial soaps seem to provide no added protection and theoretically increase the risk of bacterial resistance. A few dietary supplements garnered some attention. Among products with clinical research, an oral 500 mg qd immunogenic fermentate (Epicor) reduced the risk and duration of cold and flu symptoms in subjects vaccinated for seasonal influenza. Two novel prescription medications (zanamivir [Relenza], and oseltamivir [Tamiflu]) are available for the prevention and/or treatment of influenza and also have demonstrated minimal resistance compared to the older medications. These FDA-approved medications should receive more attention because of their overall effectiveness in treating the flu during the first stages of the disease process.

  16. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that…

  17. 29 CFR 784.113 - Work related to named operations performed in off- or dead-season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the specified aquatic forms of life, employees performing work relating to the plant or equipment... PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT APPLICABLE TO FISHING AND OPERATIONS ON AQUATIC PRODUCTS Exemptions Provisions Relating to Fishing and Aquatic Products Principles Applicable to the Two...

  18. Filling a capability and decision support gap between weather and seasonal forecasts: The role of USCLIVAR and initiating efforts of its MJO Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waliser, D. E.; Sperber, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    A decade ago there was a clear gap in our operational environmental prediction capabilities, and associated decision support guidance, at lead times beyond ten days and less than one month. Recognizing the need for making advances in the scientific understanding, model fidelity and prediction capabilities that could fill this gap, US CLIVAR formed the Madden-Julian Oscillation Working Group (MJOWG; 2006-09), as the MJO represented an obvious, unexploited source of predictability at these time scales. The MJOWG focused on advancements on two fronts, experimental to operational prediction of the MJO and weather/climate model experimentation, diagnostics and performance metrics. The former led to a multi-national operational MJO prediction capability hosted at NCEP/NOAA. The successful efforts of the MJOWG, and remaining work to do to further these objectives, led to the subsequent formation of the WCRP-WWRP MJO Task Force (MJOTF; 2010-present). Expanding the MJOWG efforts, the MJOTF advanced experimental to operational predictions of the boreal summer Intraseasonal Oscillation (BSISO). The multi-national operational BSISO predictions have been available since 2013 and are hosted by the APEC Climate Center (APCC), providing guidance on BSISO-driven onsets and breaks of the Asian summer monsoon. The success of these initial R2O MJO/BSISO prediction efforts led, in part, to the formation of the WCRP-WWRP Subseasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Prediction Project and North America Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) designed to improve the skill of S2S forecasts and advance their utilization by the applications community. The above developments, projects and capabilities, including key multi-model research experimentation, will be discussed, highlighting the role of US CLIVAR, and concluding with a summary of the outcomes and recommendations of the 2015 National Academy of Science report on Developing a U.S. Research Agenda to Advance Subseasonal to Seasonal Forecasting.

  19. Great Explorations in Math and Science[R] (GEMS[R]) The Real Reasons for Seasons. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Great Explorations in Math and Science"[R] ("GEMS"[R]) "The Real Reasons for Seasons" is a curriculum unit for grades 6-8 that focuses on the connections between the Sun and the Earth to teach students the scientific concepts behind the seasons. The unit utilizes models, hands-on investigations, peer-to-peer…

  20. Considering Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    1994-01-01

    Argues that the traditional way that the four seasons are taught is culturally biased and does not reflect the actual seasons in many parts of the United States and other nations. Suggests that early childhood programs should take into account the diversity of seasonal transitions. (MDM)

  1. DOMESTIC AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS IN THE UNITED STATES, COUNTIES IN WHICH AN ESTIMATED 100 OR MORE SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL WORKERS MIGRATED INTO THE AREA OF WORK DURING THE PEAK SEASON IN 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    THE NUMBER OF SEASONAL DOMESTIC AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS IN EACH COUNTY OF THE UNITED STATES IS PRESENTED GRAPHICALLY ON THIS 26 BY 40 INCH MAP. PUBLIC HEALTH AND OTHER SERVICE AGENCIES MAY USE IT AND ACCOMPANYING TABLES TO PLAN PROGRAM ADJUSTMENTS NECESSITATED BY THE WORKER INFLUX. THE DATA ARE CONFINED TO DOMESTIC WORKERS AND THEIR ACCOMPANYING…

  2. Changing Seasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2011-01-01

    In some ways, there is a season of change at the national level in early childhood. Some things are wrapping up while some developments aim to prepare the "field" for improvements in the next year and beyond, just as a garden plot is readied for the next planting season. Change is in the air, and there's hope of renewal, but what changes and how…

  3. Seasonal Influenza: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Christina; Freedman, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It also has major social and economic consequences in the form of high rates of absenteeism from school and work as well as significant treatment and hospitalization costs. In fact, annual influenza epidemics and the resulting deaths and lost days of productivity…

  4. Migrant and Seasonal Hired Adolescent Farmworkers: A Plan To Improve Working Conditions. Recommendations from the National Adolescent Farmworker Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vela Acosta, Martha, Ed.; Lee, Barbara, Ed.

    Agriculture is the second most common employer of youth and is associated with numerous occupational hazards, but few preventive efforts to protect adolescent farmworkers have been implemented or evaluated. The largest group of adolescent farmworkers is youth who live away from their natural families and migrate, mostly from Mexico, to work in…

  5. The FireWork air quality forecast system with near-real-time biomass burning emissions: Recent developments and evaluation of performance for the 2015 North American wildfire season

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Radenko; Chen, Jack; Anderson, Kerry; Moran, Michael D.; Beaulieu, Paul-André; Davignon, Didier; Cousineau, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Environment and Climate Change Canada’s FireWork air quality (AQ) forecast system for North America with near-real-time biomass burning emissions has been running experimentally during the Canadian wildfire season since 2013. The system runs twice per day with model initializations at 00 UTC and 12 UTC, and produces numerical AQ forecast guidance with 48-hr lead time. In this work we describe the FireWork system, which incorporates near-real-time biomass burning emissions based on the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System (CWFIS) as an input to the operational Regional Air Quality Deterministic Prediction System (RAQDPS). To demonstrate the capability of the system we analyzed two forecast periods in 2015 (June 2–July 15, and August 15–31) when fire activity was high, and observed fire-smoke-impacted areas in western Canada and the western United States. Modeled PM2.5 surface concentrations were compared with surface measurements and benchmarked with results from the operational RAQDPS, which did not consider near-real-time biomass burning emissions. Model performance statistics showed that FireWork outperformed RAQDPS with improvements in forecast hourly PM2.5 across the region; the results were especially significant for stations near the path of fire plume trajectories. Although the hourly PM2.5 concentrations predicted by FireWork still displayed bias for areas with active fires for these two periods (mean bias [MB] of –7.3 µg m−3 and 3.1 µg m−3), it showed better forecast skill than the RAQDPS (MB of –11.7 µg m−3 and –5.8 µg m−3) and demonstrated a greater ability to capture temporal variability of episodic PM2.5 events (correlation coefficient values of 0.50 and 0.69 for FireWork compared to 0.03 and 0.11 for RAQDPS). A categorical forecast comparison based on an hourly PM2.5 threshold of 30 µg m−3 also showed improved scores for probability of detection (POD), critical success index (CSI), and false alarm rate (FAR

  6. Skilling a Seasonal Workforce: A Way Forward for Rural Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Bound, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal work is crucial for the many rural regions reliant on seasonal industries such as agriculture, forestry, aquaculture and tourism. This report examines the diverse nature of the seasonal workforce in two locations and the approaches used in their training. The report finds that the seasonal workforce is diverse and has varied training…

  7. Managing Your Seasonal Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... antihistamines, topical nasal steroids, cromolyn sodium, decongestants, or immunotherapy. Read More "Seasonal Allergies" Articles Managing Your Seasonal Allergies / Diagnosis, Treatment & Research ...

  8. Sorting Out Seasonal Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Close ‹ Back to Healthy Living Sorting Out Seasonal Allergies Sneezing, runny nose, nasal congestion. Symptoms of the ... Georgeson. How do I know if I have seasonal allergies? According to Dr. Georgeson, the best way to ...

  9. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  10. Forecasting seasonal outbreaks of influenza

    PubMed Central

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Karspeck, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Influenza recurs seasonally in temperate regions of the world; however, our ability to predict the timing, duration, and magnitude of local seasonal outbreaks of influenza remains limited. Here we develop a framework for initializing real-time forecasts of seasonal influenza outbreaks, using a data assimilation technique commonly applied in numerical weather prediction. The availability of real-time, web-based estimates of local influenza infection rates makes this type of quantitative forecasting possible. Retrospective ensemble forecasts are generated on a weekly basis following assimilation of these web-based estimates for the 2003–2008 influenza seasons in New York City. The findings indicate that real-time skillful predictions of peak timing can be made more than 7 wk in advance of the actual peak. In addition, confidence in those predictions can be inferred from the spread of the forecast ensemble. This work represents an initial step in the development of a statistically rigorous system for real-time forecast of seasonal influenza. PMID:23184969

  11. Forecasting seasonal outbreaks of influenza.

    PubMed

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Karspeck, Alicia

    2012-12-11

    Influenza recurs seasonally in temperate regions of the world; however, our ability to predict the timing, duration, and magnitude of local seasonal outbreaks of influenza remains limited. Here we develop a framework for initializing real-time forecasts of seasonal influenza outbreaks, using a data assimilation technique commonly applied in numerical weather prediction. The availability of real-time, web-based estimates of local influenza infection rates makes this type of quantitative forecasting possible. Retrospective ensemble forecasts are generated on a weekly basis following assimilation of these web-based estimates for the 2003-2008 influenza seasons in New York City. The findings indicate that real-time skillful predictions of peak timing can be made more than 7 wk in advance of the actual peak. In addition, confidence in those predictions can be inferred from the spread of the forecast ensemble. This work represents an initial step in the development of a statistically rigorous system for real-time forecast of seasonal influenza.

  12. Key Facts about Seasonal Flu Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Newsletters Key Facts About Seasonal Flu Vaccine Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... can spread through that community. How do flu vaccines work? Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in ...

  13. Personal, Seasonal Suns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an art project designed for upper-elementary students to (1) imagine visual differences in the sun's appearance during the four seasons; (2) develop ideas for visually translating their personal experiences regarding the seasons to their sun drawings; (3) create four distinctive seasonal suns using colors and imagery to…

  14. Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) KidsHealth > For Parents > Seasonal Allergies (Hay ... en español Alergia estacional (fiebre del heno) About Seasonal Allergies "Achoo!" It's your son's third sneezing fit of ...

  15. Seasonal Variation in Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrero, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Seasonality analyses are important in medical research. If the incidence of a disease shows a seasonal pattern, then an environmental factor must be considered in its etiology. We discuss a method for the simultaneous analysis of seasonal variation in multiple groups. The nuts and bolts are explained using simple trigonometry, an elementary…

  16. Influenza Seasonal Summary, 2014-2015 Season

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-14

    Previous Centers for Disease Conu·ol and Prevention ( CDC ) rep011s estimated 3,000 to 49,000 influenza-associated deaths per season in the United States (US...patients may elevate resistance to these medications or reduce seasonal availability. 8 The CDC released two updates via the CDC Health Advis01y Network...waiting for confnmatory laborat01y testing. These alelis, released during Week 53 (3 December 2014) and Week 1 (9 Januruy 2015), also reinforced CDC

  17. A simple method for defining malaria seasonality

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background There is currently no standard way of defining malaria seasonality, resulting in a wide range of definitions reported in the literature. Malaria cases show seasonal peaks in most endemic settings, and the choice and timing for optimal malaria control may vary by seasonality. A simple approach is presented to describe the seasonality of malaria, to aid localized policymaking and targeting of interventions. Methods A series of systematic literature reviews were undertaken to identify studies reporting on monthly data for full calendar years on clinical malaria, hospital admission with malaria and entomological inoculation rates (EIR). Sites were defined as having 'marked seasonality' if 75% or more of all episodes occurred in six or less months of the year. A 'concentrated period of malaria' was defined as the six consecutive months with the highest cumulative proportion of cases. A sensitivity analysis was performed based on a variety of cut-offs. Results Monthly data for full calendar years on clinical malaria, all hospital admissions with malaria, and entomological inoculation rates were available for 13, 18, and 11 sites respectively. Most sites showed year-round transmission with seasonal peaks for both clinical malaria and hospital admissions with malaria, with a few sites fitting the definition of 'marked seasonality'. For these sites, consistent results were observed when more than one outcome or more than one calendar year was available from the same site. The use of monthly EIR data was found to be of limited value when looking at seasonal variations of malaria transmission, particularly at low and medium intensity levels. Conclusion The proposed definition discriminated well between studies with 'marked seasonality' and those with less seasonality. However, a poor fit was observed in sites with two seasonal peaks. Further work is needed to explore the applicability of this definition on a wide-scale, using routine health information system data

  18. Teaching with the Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Describes a natural science course designed to teach students that nature is nearby rather than somewhere else. Students learn about local flora and fauna, track the weather, and closely monitor the progression of the seasons. The course uses no textbook, regularly uses the outdoors as a classroom, and follows the seasons' phenology as the…

  19. Global breast cancer seasonality.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Nawaz, Hamayun; Yang, Chul-Ho; Wood, Patricia A; Hrushesky, William J M

    2010-08-01

    Human breast cancer incidence has seasonal patterns that seem to vary among global populations. The aggregate monthly frequency of breast cancer diagnosis was collected and examined for 2,921,714 breast cancer cases diagnosed across 64 global regions over spans from 2 to 53 years. Breast cancer is consistently diagnosed more often in spring and fall, both in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, regardless of presumable menopausal status (50). This seasonality is increasingly more prominent as population distance from the equator increases and this latitude dependence is most pronounced among women living in rural areas. Moreover, the overall annual incidence (2005-2006), per 100,000 population, of breast cancer increased as the latitude of population residence increased. These data make it clear that human breast cancer discovery occurs non-randomly throughout each year with peaks near both equinoxes and valleys near both solstices. This stable global breast cancer seasonality has implications for better prevention, more accurate screening, earlier diagnosis, and more effective treatment. This complex latitude-dependent breast cancer seasonality is clearly related to predictable local day/night length changes which occur seasonally. Its mechanism may depend upon seasonal sunlight mediation of vitamin D and seasonal mediation of nocturnal melatonin peak level and duration.

  20. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table ... More "Managing Allergies" Articles How to Control Your Seasonal Allergies / Allergy Diagnosis and Treatment / Seasonal Allergy Research at ...

  1. Seasonality of Suicidal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jong-Min; Okusaga, Olaoluwa; Postolache, Teodor T.

    2012-01-01

    A seasonal suicide peak in spring is highly replicated, but its specific cause is unknown. We reviewed the literature on suicide risk factors which can be associated with seasonal variation of suicide rates, assessing published articles from 1979 to 2011. Such risk factors include environmental determinants, including physical, chemical, and biological factors. We also summarized the influence of potential demographic and clinical characteristics such as age, gender, month of birth, socioeconomic status, methods of prior suicide attempt, and comorbid psychiatric and medical diseases. Comprehensive evaluation of risk factors which could be linked to the seasonal variation in suicide is important, not only to identify the major driving force for the seasonality of suicide, but also could lead to better suicide prevention in general. PMID:22470308

  2. PMC from 2009 Season

    NASA Video Gallery

    Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC) from the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (AIM-CIPS) instrument for the 2009 season in the northern polar region. The North Pole (90N...

  3. 2012 Swimming Season Factsheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  4. Seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Kurlansik, Stuart L; Ibay, Annamarie D

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal affective disorder is a combination of biologic and mood disturbances with a seasonal pattern, typically occurring in the autumn and winter with remission in the spring or summer. In a given year, about 5 percent of the U.S. population experiences seasonal affective disorder, with symptoms present for about 40 percent of the year. Although the condition is seasonally limited, patients may have significant impairment from the associated depressive symptoms. Treatment can improve these symptoms and also may be used as prophylaxis before the subsequent autumn and winter seasons. Light therapy is generally well tolerated, with most patients experiencing clinical improvement within one to two weeks after the start of treatment. To avoid relapse, light therapy should continue through the end of the winter season until spontaneous remission of symptoms in the spring or summer. Pharmacotherapy with antidepressants and cognitive behavior therapy are also appropriate treatment options and have been shown to be as effective as light therapy. Because of the comparable effectiveness of treatment options, first-line management should be guided by patient preference.

  5. Harvesting in seasonal environments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cailin; Boyce, Mark S; Daley, Daryl J

    2005-06-01

    Most harvest theory is based on an assumption of a constant or stochastic environment, yet most populations experience some form of environmental seasonality. Assuming that a population follows logistic growth we investigate harvesting in seasonal environments, focusing on maximum annual yield (M.A.Y.) and population persistence under five commonly used harvest strategies. We show that the optimal strategy depends dramatically on the intrinsic growth rate of population and the magnitude of seasonality. The ordered effectiveness of these alternative harvest strategies is given for different combinations of intrinsic growth rate and seasonality. Also, for piecewise continuous-time harvest strategies (i.e., open/closed harvest, and pulse harvest) harvest timing is of crucial importance to annual yield. Optimal timing for harvests coincides with maximal rate of decline in the seasonally fluctuating carrying capacity. For large intrinsic growth rate and small environmental variability several strategies (i.e., constant exploitation rate, linear exploitation rate, and time-dependent harvest) are so effective that M.A.Y. is very close to maximum sustainable yield (M.S.Y.). M.A.Y. of pulse harvest can be even larger than M.S.Y. because in seasonal environments population size varies substantially during the course of the year and how it varies relative to the carrying capacity is what determines the value relative to optimal harvest rate. However, for populations with small intrinsic growth rate but subject to large seasonality none of these strategies is particularly effective with M.A.Y. much lower than M.S.Y. Finding an optimal harvest strategy for this case and to explore harvesting in populations that follow other growth models (e.g., involving predation or age structure) will be an interesting but challenging problem.

  6. Seasonality in human cognitive brain responses

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Christelle; Muto, Vincenzo; Jaspar, Mathieu; Kussé, Caroline; Lambot, Erik; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Degueldre, Christian; Balteau, Evelyne; Luxen, André; Middleton, Benita; Archer, Simon N.; Collette, Fabienne; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Daily variations in the environment have shaped life on Earth, with circadian cycles identified in most living organisms. Likewise, seasons correspond to annual environmental fluctuations to which organisms have adapted. However, little is known about seasonal variations in human brain physiology. We investigated annual rhythms of brain activity in a cross-sectional study of healthy young participants. They were maintained in an environment free of seasonal cues for 4.5 d, after which brain responses were assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they performed two different cognitive tasks. Brain responses to both tasks varied significantly across seasons, but the phase of these annual rhythms was strikingly different, speaking for a complex impact of season on human brain function. For the sustained attention task, the maximum and minimum responses were located around summer and winter solstices, respectively, whereas for the working memory task, maximum and minimum responses were observed around autumn and spring equinoxes. These findings reveal previously unappreciated process-specific seasonality in human cognitive brain function that could contribute to intraindividual cognitive changes at specific times of year and changes in affective control in vulnerable populations. PMID:26858432

  7. Seasonality in human cognitive brain responses.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christelle; Muto, Vincenzo; Jaspar, Mathieu; Kussé, Caroline; Lambot, Erik; Chellappa, Sarah L; Degueldre, Christian; Balteau, Evelyne; Luxen, André; Middleton, Benita; Archer, Simon N; Collette, Fabienne; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-03-15

    Daily variations in the environment have shaped life on Earth, with circadian cycles identified in most living organisms. Likewise, seasons correspond to annual environmental fluctuations to which organisms have adapted. However, little is known about seasonal variations in human brain physiology. We investigated annual rhythms of brain activity in a cross-sectional study of healthy young participants. They were maintained in an environment free of seasonal cues for 4.5 d, after which brain responses were assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they performed two different cognitive tasks. Brain responses to both tasks varied significantly across seasons, but the phase of these annual rhythms was strikingly different, speaking for a complex impact of season on human brain function. For the sustained attention task, the maximum and minimum responses were located around summer and winter solstices, respectively, whereas for the working memory task, maximum and minimum responses were observed around autumn and spring equinoxes. These findings reveal previously unappreciated process-specific seasonality in human cognitive brain function that could contribute to intraindividual cognitive changes at specific times of year and changes in affective control in vulnerable populations.

  8. Assessing hurricane season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-12-01

    With the official conclusion of the Atlantic hurricane season on 29 November, Irene was the only hurricane to strike the United States this year and the first one since Hurricane Ike made landfall in Texas in 2008, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Irene “broke the ‘hurricane amnesia’ that can develop when so much time lapses between landfalling storms,” indicated Jack Hayes, director of NOAA's National Weather Service. “This season is a reminder that storms can hit any part of our coast and that all regions need to be prepared each and every season.” During the season, there were 19 tropical storms, including 7 that became hurricanes; 3 of those were major hurricanes, of category 3 or above. The activity level was in line with NOAA predictions. The agency stated that Hurricane Irene was an example of improved accuracy in forecasting storm tracks: NOAA National Hurricane Center had accurately predicted the hurricane's landfall in North Carolina and its path northward more than 4 days in advance.

  9. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... do a thorough evaluation, which generally includes: Physical exam. Your doctor may do a physical exam and ask in-depth questions about your health. ... to cope with SAD Learn how to manage stress In addition to your treatment plan for seasonal ...

  10. Seasonal Change Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    The author describes how the yearlong Investigating Seasonal Change at North Ponds project enabled third-grade students to take on the role of environmental scientists, recording and analyzing environmental data from ponds near their school. The students used an array of technological tools to explore and report on the causes and effects of…

  11. Weatherwords: The Hurricane Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Information and anecdotes are provided for the following topics: the typical length of the hurricane season for the North Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico; specifics related to the practice of naming hurricanes; and categorical details related to the Saffir/Simpson scale for rating hurricane magnitude. (JJK)

  12. A Season for Birth

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2008-01-01

    In this column, the editor of the Journal of Perinatal Education reflects on changing seasons and how birth remains a constant wonder. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth.

  13. Algorithms for in-season nutrient management in cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The demand for improved decision making products for cereal production systems has placed added emphasis on using plant sensors in-season, and that incorporate real-time, site specific, growing environments. The objective of this work was to describe validated in-season sensor based algorithms prese...

  14. Evaluation of Canadian Seasonal to Interannual Prediction System: seasonal hindcasts of the recent past climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M.

    2015-12-01

    Canadian Seasonal to Interannual Prediction System (CanSIPS) has been operationally active within the Meteorological Service of Canada since the year of 2011. This coupled (atmosphere-land-ocean) system is in charge of producing seasonal forecasts of near surface temperature and precipitation for the following 12 months with respect to the forecast onset. CanSIPS comprises two coupled atmosphere-land-ocean models: CanCM3 and CanCM4 developed in Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis. Each model produces ten-member ensemble forecasts which generate twenty member ensemble predictions. In this work we evaluate seasonal hindcasts of the recent past climate (1981-2010) simulated by the CanSIPS system. The importance of such evaluation stems from the fact that seasonal hindcasts can be used to calibrate the results of the seasonal predictions. Calibrated forecasts have in general more skill compared to the raw predictions. Moreover, verification of seasonal hindcasts enables an estimation of the expected performance of the prediction system over various regions and seasons (i.e. expected skill maps). Evaluation will be presented against reanalysis data. Near surface temperature and precipitation will be assessed over different geographical locations and various lead times.

  15. Discrimination of chicken seasonings and beef seasonings using electronic nose and sensory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huaixiang; Li, Fenghua; Qin, Lan; Yu, Haiyan; Ma, Xia

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the feasibility of electronic nose as a method to discriminate chicken and beef seasonings and to predict sensory attributes. Sensory evaluation showed that 8 chicken seasonings and 4 beef seasonings could be well discriminated and classified based on 8 sensory attributes. The sensory attributes including chicken/beef, gamey, garlic, spicy, onion, soy sauce, retention, and overall aroma intensity were generated by a trained evaluation panel. Principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant factor analysis (DFA), and cluster analysis (CA) combined with electronic nose were used to discriminate seasoning samples based on the difference of the sensor response signals of chicken and beef seasonings. The correlation between sensory attributes and electronic nose sensors signal was established using partial least squares regression (PLSR) method. The results showed that the seasoning samples were all correctly classified by the electronic nose combined with PCA, DFA, and CA. The electronic nose gave good prediction results for all the sensory attributes with correlation coefficient (r) higher than 0.8. The work indicated that electronic nose is an effective method for discriminating different seasonings and predicting sensory attributes.

  16. Twin seasonality in a rural Catalonian population.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Miquel; García-Moro, Clara; Toja, Domingo Isaac; Esparza, Mireia; González-José, Rolando

    2004-12-01

    The seasonality of twinning in the Spanish populations has not been studied until now. Differences between seasonal distribution of the twin conceptions and those of the single births have been observed in other populations. The aim of this work is to explore the frequency of twinning in a rural population from Catalonia during the nineteenth century, as well as the seasonality patterns characterizing each of the twinning types. Data corresponding to all births recorded at Tortosa (South Catalonia) from 1801 to 1900 have been analyzed in order to study the twinning distribution. The distribution of the moving averages of the monthly rates of twins shows a peak in autumn. Twinning distribution differs from the total births' distribution in Tortosa. This fact is very clear in the case of unlike-sexed twins that have their greater incidence in the last quarter of the year, while the total maternities have their peak in the first one.

  17. Gondwanaland's seasonal cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.; Short, David A.; Mengel, John G.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional energy balance climate model has been used to simulate the seasonal temperature cycle on a supercontinent-sized land mass. Experiments with idealized and realistic geography indicate that the land-sea configuration in high latitudes exerts a strong influence on the magnitude of summer warming. These simulations provide significant insight into the evolution of climate during the Palaeozoic, and raise questions about the presumed pre-eminent role of carbon dioxide in explaining long-term climate change.

  18. Seasonal Allergies: Diagnosis, Treatment & Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Seasonal Allergies Diagnosis, Treatment & Research Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... ear infection Asthma exacerbation Sinus infection Asthma exacerbation Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Asthma and Allergic Diseases Cooperative ...

  19. Flu Season Starting to Peak

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162917.html Flu Season Starting to Peak More severe strain of ... 6, 2017 FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Flu season is in full swing and it's starting ...

  20. Season and Disease.

    PubMed

    Stallybrass, C O

    1928-05-01

    THE SEASONAL VARIATIONS IN DISEASE, AS IS THE CASE IN THE SPREAD OF INFECTIVE DISEASES GENERALLY, DEPEND UPON THREE PRIMARY FACTORS: (1) the presence of the micro-organisms of adequate virulence and infectivity; (2) the means of transmission to (3) the susceptible tissues of the susceptible individual. All other factors, in this relation largely climatic, can act directly only through these three primary factors and are therefore termed secondary. The paper is largely an attempt to express the effect of the variations in the secondary factors in terms of the alterations they produce in the primary factors. The total effect of the three primary factors in the spread of infection is termed "dispersability" and a ratio or measure of dispersability is described. This ratio emphasizes occurrences in the pre-epidemic period.The relationship of temperature and humidity to the alimentary, respiratory and percutaneous diseases and to the ectodermoses, is investigated. In the autumnal group of infections, attention is drawn to the action of carriers in causing a rise in dispersability in the spring and the frequent occurrence of a double wave of dispersability.The effect of climatic changes is often cumulative, and this is most evident in the autumnal group of infections, the seasonal occurrence of which cannot be directly explained by temperature changes, or even by the action of light on phagocytes. The possibility of vitamin deficiency or excess producing cumulative effects is considered.Secular changes in seasonal periodicities are investigated and these are associated with other changes, such as the intrinsic periodicities, mode of spread, etc., the combined changes being described by the terms aggradation and degradation of disease.Slides covering the majority of the infective diseases of temperate climates and exhibiting the secular changes in Liverpool, and various geographical differences, in some 175 curves displayed.

  1. Seasonal trends of biogenic terpene emissions.

    PubMed

    Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan Woodfin; Milford, Jana; Guenther, Alex

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from six coniferous tree species, i.e. Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Picea pungens (Blue Spruce), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir) and Pinus longaeva (Bristlecone Pine), as well as from two deciduous species, Quercus gambelii (Gamble Oak) and Betula occidentalis (Western River Birch) were studied over a full annual growing cycle. Monoterpene (MT) and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions rates were quantified in a total of 1236 individual branch enclosure samples. MT dominated coniferous emissions, producing greater than 95% of BVOC emissions. MT and SQT demonstrated short-term emission dependence with temperature. Two oxygenated MT, 1,8-cineol and piperitone, were both light and temperature dependent. Basal emission rates (BER, normalized to 1000μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 30°C) were generally higher in spring and summer than in winter; MT seasonal BER from the coniferous trees maximized between 1.5 and 6.0μgg(-1)h(-1), while seasonal lows were near 0.1μgg(-1)h(-1). The fractional contribution of individual MT to total emissions was found to fluctuate with season. SQT BER measured from the coniferous trees ranged from <0.01 to 0.15μgg(-1)h(-1). BER of up to 1.2μgg(-1)h(-1) of the SQT germacrene B were found from Q. gambelii, peaking in late summer. The β-factor, used to define temperature dependence in emissions modeling, was not found to exhibit discernible growth season trends. A seasonal correction factor proposed by others in previous work to account for a sinusoidal shaped emission pattern was applied to the data. Varying levels of agreement were found between the data and model results for the different plant species seasonal data sets using this correction. Consequently, the analyses on this extensive data set suggest that it is not feasible to apply a universal seasonal correction factor across different vegetation species. A modeling exercise comparing two case scenarios, (1) without and (2

  2. Central solar heating plants with seasonal storage

    SciTech Connect

    Breger, D.S.; Sunderland, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    The University of Massachusetts has recently started a two year effort to identify and design a significant Central Solar Heating Plant with Seasonal Storage (CSHPSS) in Massachusetts. The work is closely associated with the U.S. participation in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on CSHPSS. The University is working closely with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to assist in identifying State facilities as potential sites and to explore and secure State support which will be essential for product development after the design phase. Currently, the primary site is the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus with particular interest in several large buildings which are funded for construction over the next 4-5 years. Seasonal thermal energy storage will utilize one of several geological formations.

  3. Seasonality in submesoscale turbulence.

    PubMed

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Klymak, Jody M; Gula, Jonathan

    2015-04-21

    Although the strongest ocean surface currents occur at horizontal scales of order 100 km, recent numerical simulations suggest that flows smaller than these mesoscale eddies can achieve important vertical transports in the upper ocean. These submesoscale flows, 1-100 km in horizontal extent, take heat and atmospheric gases down into the interior ocean, accelerating air-sea fluxes, and bring deep nutrients up into the sunlit surface layer, fueling primary production. Here we present observational evidence that submesoscale flows undergo a seasonal cycle in the surface mixed layer: they are much stronger in winter than in summer. Submesoscale flows are energized by baroclinic instabilities that develop around geostrophic eddies in the deep winter mixed layer at a horizontal scale of order 1-10 km. Flows larger than this instability scale are energized by turbulent scale interactions. Enhanced submesoscale activity in the winter mixed layer is expected to achieve efficient exchanges with the permanent thermocline below.

  4. Seasonal soybean crop reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaster, E. W. (Principal Investigator); Chance, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented from field measurements of 1980 including 5 acquisitions of handheld radiometer reflectance measurements, 7 complete sets of parameters for implementing the Suits mode, and other biophysical parameters to characterize the soybean canopy. LANDSAT calculations on the simulated Brazilian soybean reflectance are included along with data collected during the summer and fall on 1981 on soybean single leaf optical parameters for three irrigation treatments. Tests of the Suits vegetative canopy reflectance model for the full hemisphere of observer directions as well as the nadir direction show moderate agreement for the visible channels of the MSS and poor agreement in the near infrared channel. Temporal changes in the spectral characteristics of the single leaves were seen to occur as a function of maturity which demonstrates that the absorptance of a soybean single leaf is more a function of thetransmittancee characteristics than the seasonally consistent single leaf reflectance.

  5. Seasonal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Anthony E; Bridges, Carolyn B; Cox, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    Influenza vaccines are the mainstay of efforts to reduce the substantial health burden from seasonal influenza. Inactivated influenza vaccines have been available since the 1940s and are administered via intramuscular injection. Inactivated vaccines can be given to anyone six months of age or older. Live attenuated, cold-adapted influenza vaccines (LAIV) were developed in the 1960s but were not licensed in the United States until 2003, and are administered via nasal spray. Both vaccines are trivalent preparations grown in eggs and do not contain adjuvants. LAIV is licensed for use in the United States for healthy nonpregnant persons 2-49 years of age.Influenza vaccination induces antibodies primarily against the major surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA); antibodies directed against the HA are most important for protection against illness. The immune response peaks at 2-4 weeks after one dose in primed individuals. In previously unvaccinated children <9 years of age, two doses of influenza vaccine are recommended, as some children in this age group have limited or no prior infections from circulating types and subtypes of seasonal influenza. These children require both an initial priming dose and a subsequent booster dose of vaccine to mount a protective antibody response.The most common adverse events associated with inactivated vaccines are sore arm and redness at the injection site; systemic symptoms such as fever or malaise are less commonly reported. Guillian-Barré Syndrome (GBS) was identified among approximately 1 per 100,000 recipients of the 1976 swine influenza vaccine. The risk of influenza vaccine-associated GBS from seasonal influenza vaccine is thought to be at most approximately 1-2 cases per 1 million vaccinees, based on a few studies that have found an association; other studies have found no association.The most common adverse events associated with LAIV are nasal congestion, headache, myalgias or fever. Studies of the

  6. Volatile Transport in Pluto's Super Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, Alissa M.; Binzel, Richard; Young, Leslie; Stern, S. Alan; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Weaver, Harold A.; NASA New Horizons Composition Team, The NASA New Horizons GGI Team

    2016-10-01

    The data returned from NASA's New Horizons' reconnaissance of the Pluto system shows striking albedo variations from polar to equatorial latitudes as well as sharp boundaries for longitudinal variations. Pluto has a high obliquity (currently around 119 degrees) which varies by more than 23 degrees (between roughly 103 and 127 degrees) over a period of less than 3 million years. These obliquity properties, combined with Pluto's orbital regression in longitude of perihelion (360 degrees over 3.7 million years), create epochs of "Super Seasons" on Pluto. A "Super Season" occurs, for example, when Pluto happens to be pole-on towards the Sun at the same time as perihelion. In such a case, one pole experiences a short, intense summer (relative to its long-term average) followed by a longer than average period of winter darkness. By complement, the other pole experiences a much longer, but less intense summer and short winter season. We explore the relationship between albedo variations and volatile transport for the current epoch as well as historical epochs during which Pluto experienced these "Super Seasons". Our investigation suggests Pluto's orbit creates the potential for runaway albedo variations, particularly in the equatorial region, which would create and support stark longitudinal contrasts like the ones we see between the informally named Tombaugh and Cthulhu Regios.This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons mission.

  7. Seasonal variability in anthropogenic halocarbon emissions.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Drew R; Miller, Angela M; Goldstein, Allen H

    2010-07-15

    Ambient concentrations of eight predominantly anthropogenic halocarbons were measured via in situ gas chromatography in California's South Coast air basin for both summer and fall during the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols at Riverside (SOAR). Ongoing emissions of the banned halocarbons methylchloroform and CFC-11 were observed in the South Coast air basin, whereas CFC-113 emissions have effectively ceased. We estimate anthropogenic emissions in the South Coast air basin for methylchloroform, CFC-11, HCFC-141b, chloroform, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and dichloromethane based on regressions of halocarbon to carbon monoxide mixing ratios and carbon monoxide emission inventories. We estimate per capita methylchloroform and chloroform emissions in the South Coast air basin for the year 2005 to be 6.6 +/- 0.4 g/(person.year) and 19 +/- 1 g/(person.year), respectively. We compare our results to national emission estimates calculated from previous work; for several compounds, emissions in the South Coast air basin are significantly lower than national per capita emissions. We observed strong seasonal differences in anthropogenic emissions of methylchloroform and chloroform; emissions were 4.5 and 2.5 times greater in summer than in fall, respectively. Possible seasonal sources include landfills and water chlorination. We conclude that seasonal variability in methylchloroform emissions has not been included in previous inventories and may cause errors in methylchloroform emission estimates after the year 2000 and seasonally resolved inversion calculations of hydroxyl radical abundance.

  8. Vaccine Effectiveness - How Well Does the Seasonal Flu Vaccine Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Influenza Virus Infection Guidance for Standards-Based Electronic Laboratory Reporting Clinical Signs and Symptoms of Influenza ... Week (NIVW) About NIVW NIVW Key Messages NIVW Digital Toolkit Communication Resources Print Material Animated Images Images ...

  9. Diversity and change in suicide seasonality over 125 years

    PubMed Central

    Ajdacic-Gross, V.; Bopp, M.; Sansossio, R.; Lauber, C.; Gostynski, M.; Eich, D.; Gutzwiller, F.; Rossler, W.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recent research has corroborated the notion that seasonality in suicide is more heterogeneous and less consistent than postulated by former scholars. This work investigates the smoothing out of suicide seasonality in Switzerland between the late 19th and the end of the 20th century. It includes analyses by region and by suicide method. Methods: Monthly suicide frequencies in Switzerland are available for the period 1876–2000. Data on canton/region are available for the periods 1901–1920 and 1969–2000, and data on suicide method for the periods 1881–1920 and 1969–2000. Analyses focusing on the overall change rely on data aggregated by quinquennia. The Edwards' test and the peak-low ratio were used in univariate analyses of seasonality. Putative determinants of the peak-low ratio were examined using regression analysis with cantonal data. Results: The decrease of seasonal effects in suicide applies to a period of more than 100 years in Switzerland. Big differences of seasonal effects have existed all the time with regard to specific methods and to specific regions. No seasonality was apparent in poisoning, and in Geneva and Basle City, respectively. However, the seasonal effects have been most impressive in drowning and hanging suicides, and in rural Catholic regions. In regression analysis, the decline in suicide seasonality is associated with the decline in the agricultural work force. Conclusions: The smoothing out of suicide seasonality in Switzerland has been a continuous long term process, which probably started by the end of 19th century. Seasonal effects in suicide will probably fade away in most regions of Switzerland and in most suicide methods. This process is in parallel with the disappearance of the traditional rural society. PMID:16234425

  10. Regional-seasonal weather forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Abarbanel, H.; Foley, H.; MacDonald, G.; Rothaus, O.; Rudermann, M.; Vesecky, J.

    1980-08-01

    In the interest of allocating heating fuels optimally, the state-of-the-art for seasonal weather forecasting is reviewed. A model using an enormous data base of past weather data is contemplated to improve seasonal forecasts, but present skills do not make that practicable. 90 references. (PSB)

  11. Seasonality in submesoscale turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Klymak, Jody M.; Gula, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Although the strongest ocean surface currents occur at horizontal scales of order 100 km, recent numerical simulations suggest that flows smaller than these mesoscale eddies can achieve important vertical transports in the upper ocean. These submesoscale flows, 1–100 km in horizontal extent, take heat and atmospheric gases down into the interior ocean, accelerating air–sea fluxes, and bring deep nutrients up into the sunlit surface layer, fueling primary production. Here we present observational evidence that submesoscale flows undergo a seasonal cycle in the surface mixed layer: they are much stronger in winter than in summer. Submesoscale flows are energized by baroclinic instabilities that develop around geostrophic eddies in the deep winter mixed layer at a horizontal scale of order 1–10 km. Flows larger than this instability scale are energized by turbulent scale interactions. Enhanced submesoscale activity in the winter mixed layer is expected to achieve efficient exchanges with the permanent thermocline below. PMID:25897832

  12. Sargassum filipendula alginate from Brazil: seasonal influence and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Caroline; Espindola, Ana Paula D M; Kleinübing, Sirlei Jaiana; Tasic, Ljubica; da Silva, Meuris Gurgel Carlos

    2014-10-13

    The aim of this work is focused on the extraction and characterization of the Brazilian seaweed Sargassum filipendula alginate. Alginates obtained at different seasons were characterized by liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The alginate extraction efficiency was about 20%. Different seasons of the year and different stages in the life cycle of Sargassum sp. in southeastern Brazil influenced the M/G and, consequently, the technological properties of extracted alginates.

  13. The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. “The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution...region. OBJECTIVES The objective of this work is to determine the seasonal evolution of the floe size distribution (Figure 1), paying particular...framework for the floe size distribution. 2. Calculate the evolution of floe size distribution during spring and summer. 3. Determine the floe

  14. Impacts of "wet seasons get wetter, dry seasons get drier"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C.; Lan, C.; Lee, C.; Chung, C.; Laio, Y.; Chiang, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Global temperatures have increased for the past few decades. Changes to the global hydrological cycle have also been observed, but with a greater uncertainty and a strong spatial variation. The most robust change is that wet regions get wetter and dry regions get drier. Here we demonstrate that the tendency of wet-get-wetter and dry-get-drier occurs over the course of the seasonal cycle: wet seasons get wetter and dry seasons get drier, enhancing the annual precipitation range. Over 1979-2010, the globally-averaged changes in precipitation are 13.64±2.86%°C-1, -39.73±7.38%°C-1 and 33.03±6.42%°C-1 respectively for wet seasons, dry seasons, and the annual range. The trend magnitudes vary over a shorter evaluation period (1988-2010), but the sign of the tendencies remain the same. The magnitudes of these globally-averaged trends imply an inconclusive change in the strength of the corresponding tropical circulation. Regionally, the "wet seasons get wetter (dry seasons get drier)" tendency occurs over areas with greater (less) annual mean precipitation. The enhanced annual precipitation range may strongly impact local agriculture and water resources even in situations where the annual mean precipitation does not change significantly.

  15. Seasonal mortality in zoo ruminants.

    PubMed

    Carisch, Lea; Müller, Dennis W H; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Bingaman Lackey, Laurie; Rensch, E Eberhard; Clauss, Marcus; Zerbe, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    While seasonality has often been investigated with respect to reproduction, seasonality of mortality has received less attention. We investigated whether a seasonal signal of mortality exists in wild ruminants kept in zoos, using data from 60,591 individuals of 88 species. We quantified the mortality in the 3 consecutive months with the highest above-baseline mortality (3 MM). 3 MM was not related to relative life expectancy of species, indicating that seasonal mortality does not necessarily impact husbandry success. Although 3 MM was mainly observed in autumn/winter months, there was no evidence for an expected negative relationship with the latitude of the species' natural habitat and no positive relationship between 3 MM and the mean temperature in that habitat, indicating no evidence for species from lower latitudes/warmer climates being more susceptible to seasonal mortality under zoo conditions. 3 MM was related to reproductive biology, with seasonally reproducing species also displaying more seasonal mortality. This pattern differed between groups: In cervids, the onset of seasonal mortality appeared linked to the onset of rut in both sexes. This was less evident in bovids, where in a number of species (especially caprids), the onset of female seasonal mortality was linked to the lambing period. While showing that the origin of a species from warmer climate zones does not constrain husbandry success in ruminants in terms of an increased seasonal mortality, the results suggest that husbandry measures aimed at protecting females from rutting males are important, especially in cervids. Zoo Biol. 36:74-86, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Sub-seasonal Modulation of Indian Summer Monsoon Seasonal Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. W.; Moron, V.; Pai, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the Indian Summer Monsoon is more predictable during the early and late stages of the season, with a drop in rainfall predictability during the core monsoon months of July and August. Various theories have been advanced for this sub-seasonal evolution, but its origins are still poorly understood. We use a new 0.25-degree 1901-2014 daily rainfall dataset from the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) to investigate this phenomenon at near-local scale, using more than a century of data. The analysis is based on daily rainfall characteristics, including the spatial coherence of sub-seasonal rainfall anomalies, and on relating these to large-scale moisture variables computed from reanalysis data. Indian summer monsoon rainfall is partitioned into three sub-seasonal phases, with a steep ramp-up (June), persistent core (July-August), and a slower decay phase (Sept-Oct). Spatial coherence of sub-seasonal rainfall anomalies is shown to be highest during the onset and decay phases with a marked mark drop during the core phase. Systematic shifts in seasonal timing are found to typify rainfall anomalies during the onset and decay phases, with ENSO preferentially impacting the latter. We identify a large-scale low-level moisture threshold as a necessary condition for local daily rainfall occuring at >5% of spatial locations across monsoonal India. Sub-seasonal rainfall variability during the onset and decay phases is argued to be controlled largely by the crossing of this threshold. However, this necessary condition is generally easily met during the core season, at which time interannual variability in low-level moisture and interannual correlation between rainfall and large-scale ascent both decrease. This decrease in large-scale control and the loss of spatial coherence imply that sub-seasonal to seasonal rainfall variations at local scales during the core of the monsoon are largely a result of local-scale processes, and are thus

  17. Seasonality of Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B.; Pyle, D. M.; Dade, W. B.; Jupp, T.

    2001-12-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity in the last three hundred years reveals that the frequency of onset of volcanic eruptions varies systematically with the time of year. We analysed the Smithsonian catalogue of more than 3200 subaerial eruptions recorded during the last 300 years. We also investigated continuous records, which are not part of the general catalogue, of individual explosions at Sakurajima volcano (Japan, 150 events per year since 1955) and Semeru (Indonesia, 100,000 events during the period 1997-2000). A higher proportion (as much as 18 percent of the average monthly rate) of eruptions occur worldwide between December and March. This observation is statistically significant at above the 99 percent level. This pattern is independent of the time interval considered, and emerges whether individual eruptions are counted with equal weight or with weights proportional to event explosivity. Elevated rates of eruption onset in boreal winter months are observed in northern and southern hemispheres alike, as well as in most volcanically-active regions including, most prominently, the 'Ring of Fire' surrounding the Pacific basin. Key contributors to this regional pattern include volcanoes in Central and South America, the volcanic provinces of the northwest Pacific rim, Indonesia and the southwest Pacific basin. On the smallest spatial scales, some individual volcanoes for which detailed histories exist exhibit peak levels in eruption activity during November-January. Seasonality is attributed to one or more mechanisms associated with the annual hydrological cycle, and may correspond to the smallest time-scale over which fluctuations in stress due to the redistribution of water-masses are felt by the Earth's crust. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment, and offer new insight into possible changes in volcanic activity during periods of long-term changes in global sea level.

  18. Seasonality of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B.; Pyle, D.; Dade, B.; Jupp, T.

    2003-04-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity in the last three hundred years reveals that the frequency of onset of volcanic eruptions varies systematically with the time of year. We analysed the Smithsonian catalogue of more than 3200 subaerial eruptions recorded during the last 300 years. We also investigated continuous records, which are not part of the general catalogue, of individual explosions at Sakurajima volcano (Japan, 150 events per year since 1955) and Semeru (Indonesia, 100,000 events during the period 1997-2000). A higher proportion (as much as 18 percent of the average monthly rate) of eruptions occur worldwide between December and March. This observation is statistically significant at above the 99 percent level. This pattern is independent of the time interval considered, and emerges whether individual eruptions are counted with equal weight or with weights proportional to event explosivity. Elevated rates of eruption onset in boreal winter months are observed in northern and southern hemispheres alike, as well as in most volcanically-active regions including, most prominently, the 'Ring of Fire' surrounding the Pacific basin. Key contributors to this regional pattern include volcanoes in Central and South America, the volcanic provinces of the northwest Pacific rim, Indonesia and the southwest Pacific basin. On the smallest spatial scales, some individual volcanoes for which detailed histories exist exhibit peak levels in eruption activity during November-January. Seasonality is attributed to one or more mechanisms associated with the annual hydrological cycle, and may correspond to the smallest time-scale over which fluctuations in stress due to the redistribution of water-masses are felt by the Earth's crust. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment, and offer new insight into possible changes in volcanic activity during periods of long-term changes in global sea level.

  19. Stormy season on Saturn?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowollik, S.

    2008-09-01

    Stormy season on Saturn? Amateur astronomers using telescopes with apertures of 8" or larger now are able to document weather phenomena in the atmosphere of the gas giant planet Saturn. To do this, they use highly sensitive black/white CCD cameras and filters in different wavelengths. Hurricanes with diameters of several thousand km can be observed continuously for weeks or months. The position of the storms within the individual cloud bands of Saturn can be determined by precise measuring of the acquired CCD images. In November 2007 a single, small storm area appeared in the Southern Tropical Zone (STrZ) of Saturn. Until the end of January the storm remained constant in brightness and size and its measured drift [rate] of 1 degree per week corresponds to earlier observations of storms on Saturn. However, beginning in the first week of February 2008 the measurement of the position showed surprising results. The storm appeared brighter and brighter along the "Storm Alley" on the southern hemisphere. In the beginning of March 2008 a further hurricane formed at a distance of about 20 degrees, following the first storm. Bad weather over Germany prevented the observation of Saturn, but observers in Spain, America and the Pacific area could do further observations. The observations were published via the internet and Saturn was nearly continuously observed. During the first half of March the first storm reduced its brightness, whereas the new emerged storm increased in brightness and extent. New small storms emerged and merged into one larger storm. During some days in April 2008 all three storms could be observed several times under good viewing conditions on the disc of Saturn. In May occasionally even five storms were observed. At present, Saturn approaches the ring plane crossing position, when the rings are seen edge-on. It is an open question whether the resulting change in flux of sunlight thereby supplies the energy for the accumulated appearance of the

  20. 2007 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  1. 2006 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  2. 2009 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  3. 2010 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  4. 2008 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  5. Seasonal predictability of the North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellinga, Michael; Scaife, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Until recently, long-range forecast systems showed only modest levels of skill in predicting surface winter climate around the Atlantic Basin and associated fluctuations in the North Atlantic Oscillation at seasonal lead times. Here we use a new forecast system to assess seasonal predictability of winter North Atlantic climate. We demonstrate that key aspects of European and North American winter climate and the surface North Atlantic Oscillation are highly predictable months ahead. We demonstrate high levels of prediction skill in retrospective forecasts of the surface North Atlantic Oscillation, winter storminess, near-surface temperature, and wind speed, all of which have high value for planning and adaptation to extreme winter conditions. Analysis of forecast ensembles suggests that while useful levels of seasonal forecast skill have now been achieved, key sources of predictability are still only partially represented and there is further untapped predictability. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License together with an author copyright. This license does not conflict with the regulations of the Crown Copyright.

  6. Unorganized machines for seasonal streamflow series forecasting.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Hugo; Boccato, Levy; Attux, Romis; Lyra, Christiano

    2014-05-01

    Modern unorganized machines--extreme learning machines and echo state networks--provide an elegant balance between processing capability and mathematical simplicity, circumventing the difficulties associated with the conventional training approaches of feedforward/recurrent neural networks (FNNs/RNNs). This work performs a detailed investigation of the applicability of unorganized architectures to the problem of seasonal streamflow series forecasting, considering scenarios associated with four Brazilian hydroelectric plants and four distinct prediction horizons. Experimental results indicate the pertinence of these models to the focused task.

  7. Forecasting Seasonal Water Needs Under Current and Future Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spisni, A.; Pratizzoli, W.; Tomei, F.; Mariani, M. C.; Villani, G.; Pavan, V.; Tomozeiu, R.; Marletto, V.

    2010-12-01

    This work outlines the complex strategy being developed at ARPA-SIMC for the integrated exploitation of remote sensing, soil water modelling, seasonal forecasting and climate projections, in view of better monitoring and management of water in agriculture at the scale of the Emilia-Romagna region, northern Italy. Remote sensing and field surveys are being used to map crops early in the season, a geographical soil water model uses the crop map together with a soil map and weather data to simulate soil water status up to the beginning of the irrigation season. Downscaled seasonal forecasts are then used to assess the summer irrigation needs. This operational framework is also used to evaluate the impacts of climate change for years 2021-2050 relative to current climate conditions. First tests on kiwifruit in the Romagna subregion show a modest increase in irrigation water demand.

  8. Disability access. Open season.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brian

    2003-04-24

    A disability access audit carried out at a trust operating over 50 sites revealed that a 2.3m Pounds programme of work was needed. The audit took four months, with the team spending a day at each of the premises. The audit has been followed by a staff training programme in disability awareness. The trust's information systems now show if a patient did not attend an appointment because of difficulties with physical access. All letters to patients are produced in a minimum 12-point type.

  9. Extended season for northern butterflies.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Bengt

    2014-07-01

    Butterflies are like all insects in that they are temperature sensitive and a changing climate with higher temperatures might effect their phenology. Several studies have found support for earlier flight dates among the investigated species. A comparative study with data from a citizen science project, including 66 species of butterflies in Sweden, was undertaken, and the result confirms that most butterfly species now fly earlier during the season. This is especially evident for butterflies overwintering as adults or as pupae. However, the advancement in phenology is correlated with flight date, and some late season species show no advancement or have even postponed their flight dates and are now flying later in the season. The results also showed that latitude had a strong effect on the adult flight date, and most of the investigated species showed significantly later flights towards the north. Only some late flying species showed an opposite trend, flying earlier in the north. A majority of the investigated species in this study showed a general response to temperature and advanced their flight dates with warmer temperatures (on average they advanced their flight dates by 3.8 days/°C), although not all species showed this response. In essence, a climate with earlier springs and longer growing seasons seems not to change the appearance patterns in a one-way direction. We now see butterflies on the wings both earlier and later in the season and some consequences of these patterns are discussed. So far, studies have concentrated mostly on early season butterfly-plant interactions but also late season studies are needed for a better understanding of long-term population consequences.

  10. Extended season for northern butterflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Bengt

    2014-07-01

    Butterflies are like all insects in that they are temperature sensitive and a changing climate with higher temperatures might effect their phenology. Several studies have found support for earlier flight dates among the investigated species. A comparative study with data from a citizen science project, including 66 species of butterflies in Sweden, was undertaken, and the result confirms that most butterfly species now fly earlier during the season. This is especially evident for butterflies overwintering as adults or as pupae. However, the advancement in phenology is correlated with flight date, and some late season species show no advancement or have even postponed their flight dates and are now flying later in the season. The results also showed that latitude had a strong effect on the adult flight date, and most of the investigated species showed significantly later flights towards the north. Only some late flying species showed an opposite trend, flying earlier in the north. A majority of the investigated species in this study showed a general response to temperature and advanced their flight dates with warmer temperatures (on average they advanced their flight dates by 3.8 days/°C), although not all species showed this response. In essence, a climate with earlier springs and longer growing seasons seems not to change the appearance patterns in a one-way direction. We now see butterflies on the wings both earlier and later in the season and some consequences of these patterns are discussed. So far, studies have concentrated mostly on early season butterfly-plant interactions but also late season studies are needed for a better understanding of long-term population consequences.

  11. Extended season for northern butterflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Bengt

    2013-03-01

    Butterflies are like all insects in that they are temperature sensitive and a changing climate with higher temperatures might effect their phenology. Several studies have found support for earlier flight dates among the investigated species. A comparative study with data from a citizen science project, including 66 species of butterflies in Sweden, was undertaken, and the result confirms that most butterfly species now fly earlier during the season. This is especially evident for butterflies overwintering as adults or as pupae. However, the advancement in phenology is correlated with flight date, and some late season species show no advancement or have even postponed their flight dates and are now flying later in the season. The results also showed that latitude had a strong effect on the adult flight date, and most of the investigated species showed significantly later flights towards the north. Only some late flying species showed an opposite trend, flying earlier in the north. A majority of the investigated species in this study showed a general response to temperature and advanced their flight dates with warmer temperatures (on average they advanced their flight dates by 3.8 days/°C), although not all species showed this response. In essence, a climate with earlier springs and longer growing seasons seems not to change the appearance patterns in a one-way direction. We now see butterflies on the wings both earlier and later in the season and some consequences of these patterns are discussed. So far, studies have concentrated mostly on early season butterfly-plant interactions but also late season studies are needed for a better understanding of long-term population consequences.

  12. Ozone measurements in Amazonia - Dry season versus wet season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Da Silva, I. M. O.; Browell, Edward V.

    1990-01-01

    Recent ozone measurements taken in the Amazonian rain forest environment during the wet season (April-May 1987) are described, revealling new aspects of the regional atmospheric chemistry. The measurements were part of the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2B) mission and utilized UV absorption as a measurement technique to obtain surface ozone data; 20 ozonesondes were launched in order to obtain vertical ozone profiles used to describe the upper troposphere and stratosphere. The major differences in comparison to a previous dry season experiment, which found ozone concentrations to be lower in the whole troposphere by nearly a factor of 2, are stressed.

  13. Root functioning modifies seasonal climate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Eun; Oliveira, Rafael S; Dawson, Todd E; Fung, Inez

    2005-12-06

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR), the nocturnal vertical transfer of soil water from moister to drier regions in the soil profile by roots, has now been observed in Amazonian trees. We have incorporated HR into an atmospheric general circulation model (the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmospheric Model Version 2) to estimate its impact on climate over the Amazon and other parts of the globe where plants displaying HR occur. Model results show that photosynthesis and evapotranspiration increase significantly in the Amazon during the dry season when plants are allowed to redistribute soil water. Plants draw water up and deposit it into the surface layers, and this water subsidy sustains transpiration at rates that deep roots alone cannot accomplish. The water used for dry season transpiration is from the deep storage layers in the soil, recharged during the previous wet season. We estimate that HR increases dry season (July to November) transpiration by approximately 40% over the Amazon. Our model also indicates that such an increase in transpiration over the Amazon and other drought-stressed regions affects the seasonal cycles of temperature through changes in latent heat, thereby establishing a direct link between plant root functioning and climate.

  14. Seasonality of Arctic Mediterranean Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieper, Christoph; Quadfasel, Detlef

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Mediterranean communicates through a number of passages with the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans. Most of the volume exchange happens at the Greenland-Scotland-Ridge: warm and saline Atlantic Water flows in at the surface, cold, dense Overflow Water flows back at the bottom and fresh and cold Polar Water flows out along the East Greenland coast. All surface inflows show a seasonal signal whereas only the outflow through the Faroe Bank Channel exhibits significant seasonality. Here we present a quantification of the seasonal cycle of the exchanges across the Greenland-Scotland ridge based on volume estimates of the in- and outflows within the last 20 years (ADCP and altimetry). Our approach is comparatistic: we compare different properties of the seasonal cycle like the strength or the phase between the different in- and outflows. On the seasonal time scale the in- and outflows across the Greenland-Scotland-Ridge are not balanced. The net flux thus has to be balanced by the other passages on the Canadian Archipelago, Bering Strait as well as runoff from land.

  15. Model-based estimation of changes in air temperature seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Trigo, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    Seasonality is a ubiquitous feature in climate time series. Climate change is expected to involve not only changes in the mean of climate parameters but also changes in the characteristics of the corresponding seasonal cycle. Therefore the identification and quantification of changes in seasonality is a highly relevant topic in climate analysis, particularly in a global warming context. However, the analysis of seasonality is far from a trivial task. A key challenge is the discrimination between long-term changes in the mean and long-term changes in the seasonal pattern itself, which requires the use of appropriate statistical approaches in order to be able to distinguish between overall trends in the mean and trends in the seasons. Model based approaches are particularly suitable for the analysis of seasonality, enabling to assess uncertainties in the amplitude and phase of seasonal patterns within a well defined statistical framework. This work addresses the changes in the seasonality of air temperature over the 20th century. The analysed data are global air temperature values close to surface (2m above ground) and mid-troposphere (500 hPa geopotential height) from the recently developed 20th century reanalysis. This new 3-D Reanalysis dataset is available since 1891, considerably extending all other Reanalyses currently in use (e.g. NCAR, ECWMF), and was obtained with the Ensemble Filter (Compo et al., 2006) by assimilation of pressure observations into a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model that includes the radiative effects of historical time-varying CO2 concentrations, volcanic aerosol emissions and solar output variations. A modeling approach based on autoregression (Barbosa et al, 2008; Barbosa, 2009) is applied within a Bayesian framework for the estimation of a time varying seasonal pattern and further quantification of changes in the amplitude and phase of air temperature over the 20th century. Barbosa, SM, Silva, ME, Fernandes, MJ

  16. 50 CFR 660.510 - Fishing seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fishing seasons. 660.510 Section 660.510... Fishing seasons. All seasons will begin at 0001 hours and terminate at 2400 hours local time. Fishing seasons for the following CPS species are: (a) Pacific sardine. January 1 to December 31, or until...

  17. 50 CFR 660.510 - Fishing seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fishing seasons. 660.510 Section 660.510... Fishing seasons. All seasons will begin at 0001 hours and terminate at 2400 hours local time. Fishing seasons for the following CPS species are: (a) Pacific sardine. January 1 to December 31, or until...

  18. 50 CFR 660.510 - Fishing seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fishing seasons. 660.510 Section 660.510... Fishing seasons. All seasons will begin at 0001 hours and terminate at 2400 hours local time. Fishing seasons for the following CPS species are: (a) Pacific sardine. January 1 to December 31, or until...

  19. 50 CFR 660.510 - Fishing seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fishing seasons. 660.510 Section 660.510... Fishing seasons. All seasons will begin at 0001 hours and terminate at 2400 hours local time. Fishing seasons for the following CPS species are: (a) Pacific sardine. January 1 to December 31, or until...

  20. Color Reveals Translucent Seasonal Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    In a region near the south pole of Mars translucent carbon dioxide ice covers the ground seasonally. For the first time we can 'see' the translucent ice by the affect it has on the appearance of the surface below.

    Dark fans of dust (figure 1) from the surface drape over the top of the seasonal ice. The surface would be the same color as the dust except that the seasonal ice affecting its appearance. Bright bluish streaks are frost that has re-crystallized from the atmosphere.

    Sunlight can penetrate through the seasonal layer of translucent ice to warm the ground below. That causes the seasonal ice layer to sublime (evaporate) from the bottom rather than the top.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_002942_0935 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 13-Mar-2007. The complete image is centered at -86.4 degrees latitude, 99.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 245.4 km (153.4 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.1 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 147 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:41 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 82 degrees, thus the sun was about 8 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 199.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  1. Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program designed to demonstrate the storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis using heat or cold available from waste or other sources during a surplus period is described. Factors considered include reduction of peak period demand and electric utility load problems and establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. The initial thrust of the STES Program toward utilization of ground water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage is emphasized.

  2. Shallow Aquifer Connectivity and Early Season Water Supply of Seasonal Wetlands and Drainages Leading to Regional Drainage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarten, N. F.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers in the Central Valley, California are recognized being seasonally supplied by early season direct surface water runoff and later season snow melt runoff from their tributaries. In addition, early season water supply to these rivers is derived from precipitation (PPT) that has infiltrated into soils underlain by a near surface aquitard, typically at less than 2 m depth. These shallow perched groundwater systems contribute a potentially substantial amount of water from more than 500,000 hectares of landforms associated with geomorphic terraces underlain by these aquitards. Early season water input to seasonal and perennial drainages is regulated by the hydraulic conductivity of the (clay-) loamy soils and by surface and aquitard slope of the local catchments associated with these old alluvial landforms. Research on these landforms and shallow aquifers has identified a complex PPT and evapotranspiration (ET) sensitive system that includes shallow depressions that seasonally produce water table derived wetlands (“vernal pools”). These wetlands have been recognized for a very high level of plant and invertebrate species diversity including endangered species. In addition, these seasonal wetlands provide migratory feeding areas of birds. Our work on these seasonal perched systems shows that as much as 80 percent of the soil column above the aquitard is saturated, during average to high rainfall years, for up to 90 to 120 days. Where the water table of this perched system intercepts the land surface, vernal pools develop. The perched groundwater drains into seasonal surface drainages that ultimately supply the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. At the end of the rainy season, both the vernal pools and the perched aquifer rapidly and synchronously disappear. Once the soil is unsaturated, water flow is vertically upward due to ET. Variably saturated modeling of this system was conducted using HYDRUS 2D/3D. Climate inputs were from

  3. EFFECT OF CHLORAMINATION AND SEASONAL WATER CHANGES ON NANOFILTRATION FOULING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanofiltraton membrane studies conducted with Little Miami Aquifer water from the Indian Hill Water Works (OH) showed tht flux loss was highly seasonal in nature with the greatest fouling occurring during the highest water temperatures during drought conditions. The reason for th...

  4. Seasonal time measurement during reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Most species living outside the tropical zone undergo physiological adaptations to seasonal environmental changes and changing day length (photoperiod); this phenomenon is called photoperiodism. It is well known that the circadian clock is involved in the regulation of photoperiodism such as seasonal reproduction, but the mechanism underlying circadian clock regulation of photoperiodism remains unclear. Recent molecular analysis have revealed that, in mammals and birds, the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland acts as the relay point from light receptors, which receive information about the photoperiod, to the endocrine responses. Long-day (LD)-induced thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in the PT acts as a master regulator of seasonal reproduction in the ependymal cells (ECs) within the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) and activates thyroid hormone (TH) by inducing the expression of type 2 deiodinase in both LD and short-day (SD) breeding animals. Furthermore, the circadian clock has been found to be localized in the PT and ECs as well as in the circadian pacemaker(s). This review purposes to summarize the current knowledge concerning the involvement of the neuroendocrine system and circadian clock in seasonal reproduction.

  5. MECHANIZATION AND THE SEASONAL FARMWORKER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HARPER, ROBERT G.

    MECHANIZATION DOES NOT NECESSARILY DECREASE THE NUMBER OF SEASONAL FARM WORKERS NEEDED. SOME INNOVATIONS MERELY CHANGE THE JOB TO ONE THAT IS LESS UNPLEASANT, AND WORKERS FORMERLY DISINCLINED TO DO THE JOB BECOME AVAILABLE. MECHANIZATION MAY MAKE AN OPERATION SO EFFICIENT THAT ACREAGE AND PRODUCTION ARE INCREASED, AND MORE WORKERS ARE NEEDED. MUCH…

  6. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Paige, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    A thermal model, developed to predict seasonal nitrogen cycles on Triton, has been modified and applied to Pluto. The model is used to calculate the partitioning of nitrogen between surface frost deposits and the atmosphere, as a function of time for various sets of input parameters.

  7. Working Mothers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  8. Working Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  9. Seasonal evolution of Saturn's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvestre, Melody; Fouchet, Thierry; Spiga, Aymeric; Guerlet, Sandrine

    2015-11-01

    The exceptional duration of the Cassini-Huygens mission enables unprecedented study of Saturn's atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. In Saturn's stratosphere (from 20 hPa to 10-4 hPa), photochemical and radiative timescales are in the same order as Saturn's revolution period (29.5 years). Consequently, the large seasonal insolation variations experienced by this planet are expected to influence significantly temperatures and abundances of photochemical by-products in this region. We investigate the seasonal evolution of Saturn's stratosphere by measuring meridional and seasonal variations (from 2005 to 2012) of temperature and C2H6, C2H2, and C3H8 abundances using Cassini/CIRS limb observations. We complete this study with the development of a GCM (Global Climate Model), in order to understand the physical processes behind this seasonal evolution.The analysis of the CIRS limb observations show that the lower and upper stratospheres do not exhibit the same trends in their seasonal variations, especially for temperature. In the lower stratosphere, the seasonal temperature contrast is maximal (at 1 hPa) and can be explained by the radiative contributions included in our GCM. In contrast, upper stratospheric temperatures (at 0.01 hPa) are constant from northern winter to spring, at odds with our GCM predictions. This behavior indicates that other physical processes such as gravity waves breaking may be at play. At 1 hPa, C2H6, C2H2, and C3H8 abundances exhibit a striking seasonal stability, consistently with the predictions of the photochemical models of Moses and Greathouse, 2005 and Hue et al., 2015. However, the meridional distributions of these species do not follow the predicted trends, which gives insight on atmospheric dynamics. We perform numerical simulations with the GCM to better understand dynamical phenomena in Saturn's atmosphere. We investigate how the large insolation variations induced by the shadow of the rings influence temperatures and atmospheric

  10. Work Overload.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, Thomas S.

    1980-01-01

    To investigate managerial use of work (or role) overload to increase productivity, the author studied 77 nonclerical white-collar employees and found that work overload had negative effects on productivity, supervisors' ratings, employee attitudes, job satisfaction, and health. He recommends ways for managers and employees to reduce work overload.…

  11. The role of foreign workers in the seasonal fluctuations of the French economy.

    PubMed

    Verhaeren, R E

    1986-01-01

    The few studies that have been carried out only take into account the annual inflows of seasonal immigrants. This present article covers 2 other aspects of the problem: 1) the seasonal nature of immigration in general and 2) above all the role of permanent immigrant workers in certain sectors influenced by seasonal changes. The number of permanent first-time immigrants is determined, among other causes, by the need for a certain seasonal regulation of overall economic activity. The role of the foreign work force is o fparticular importance in 3 sectors influenced by seasonal changes, and it fulfills a function of seasonal regulation of activity in at least 2 of these sectors: the building trade and agriculture. However, the recognition of the need for seasonal regulation has been used as a pretext for making employment more unstable, in particular for permanent immigrant workers, many of whom cannot find work for the whole year. Seasonal work also plays a key role in agriculture and the hotel trade. Moreover, the part played by illegal immigrants is decisive, not only in these 2 sectors, but throughout the illegal labor market. In the years to come it is likely that seasonal immigration will continue to fall perhaps by half, as a result of mechanization in general, its application in grape-harvesting, and the adoption of new farming techniques. However, it will probably remain sufficiently high to make up for the lack of a national reserve of seasonal labor, especially in vegetable and fruit farming, lumbering, and catering. Seasonal immigration will doubtlessly continue also because it puts a downward pessure on the average wage and makes employment more precarious. It also constitutes a reserve of illegal labor, which can be used in sectors which have a crucial impact on the balance of goods and services in France. These advantages for the French government and employers are above all disadvantages for the seasonal immigrant workers themselves, whose living and

  12. Harvest season, high polluted season in East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Li, Mengmeng; Li, Jianfeng; Zhu, Tong

    2012-12-01

    East China, a major agricultural zone with a dense population, suffers from severe air pollution during June, the agricultural harvest season, every year. Crop burning emits tremendous amounts of combustion products into the atmosphere, not only rapidly degrading the local air quality but also affecting the tropospheric chemistry, threatening public health and affecting climate change. Recently, in mid-June 2012, crop fires left a thick pall of haze over East China. We evaluated the PM10, PM2.5 (particulates less than 10 and 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) and BC (black carbon) emissions by analyzing detailed census data and moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) remote sensing images and then simulated the consequent pollution using meteorological and dispersion models. The results show that the crop fires sweeping from the south to the north are responsible for the intensive air pollution during harvest season. It is necessary for scientists and governments to pay more attention to this issue.

  13. Work transitions.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Nadya A; Bynner, John

    2008-01-01

    Individuals make choices in, and adjust to, a world of work that is often a moving target. Because work is so central to human functioning, and transitions in and out of work can have major mental health repercussions, the authors argue that applied psychologists in health services need to understand those transitions. This article focuses on the different types of transition throughout a person's working life and the resources needed at different stages to ensure the success of these transitions. The authors start by examining the roles of capability and adaptability in supporting and facilitating adjustment to work transitions and their relation to identity development. They then examine the role of social and institutional contexts in shaping work transitions and their outcomes. The authors focus on voluntary versus involuntary transitions and then broaden the lens in discussing the policy implications of research on work transitions.

  14. Contribution of daily and seasonal biorhythms to obesity in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Witowski, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    While the significance of obesity as a serious health problem is well recognized, little is known about whether and how biometerological factors and biorhythms causally contribute to obesity. Obesity is often associated with altered seasonal and daily rhythmicity in food intake, metabolism and adipose tissue function. Environmental stimuli affect both seasonal and daily rhythms, and the latter are under additional control of internal molecular oscillators, or body clocks. Modifications of clock genes in animals and changes to normal daily rhythms in humans (as in shift work and sleep deprivation) result in metabolic dysregulation that favours weight gain. Here, we briefly review the potential links between biorhythms and obesity in humans.

  15. Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013-2014 Influenza Season

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-21

    Naval Health Research Center Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013–2014 Influenza Season Angelia A. Cost...2000–2013 P A G E 1 5 Brief report: mid-season influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates for the 2013–2014 influenza season Angelia A. Cost, PhD...Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013–2014 Influenza Season Angelia A

  16. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turtle, E. P.; DelGenio, A. D.; Barbara, J. M.; Perry, J. E.; Schaller, E. L.; McEwen, A. S.; West, R. A.; Ray, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem has observed Titan for 1/4 Titan year, and we report here the first evidence of seasonal shifts in preferred locations of tropospheric methane clouds. South \\polar convective cloud activity, common in late southern summer, has become rare. North \\polar and northern mid \\latitude clouds appeared during the approach to the northern spring equinox in August 2009. Recent observations have shown extensive cloud systems at low latitudes. In contrast, southern mid \\latitude and subtropical clouds have appeared sporadically throughout the mission, exhibiting little seasonality to date. These differences in behavior suggest that Titan s clouds, and thus its general circulation, are influenced by both the rapid temperature response of a low \\thermal \\inertia surface and the much longer radiative timescale of Titan s cold thick troposphere. North \\polar clouds are often seen near lakes and seas, suggesting that local increases in methane concentration and/or lifting generated by surface roughness gradients may promote cloud formation. Citation

  17. Seasonal variation in a tropical lagoon with submarine groundwater discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenorio, L.; Gómez-Valdés, J.; Enriquez, C.; Treviño, C.; Marino-Tapia, I.; López-Aguiar, K.

    2013-05-01

    The Chelem-Chuburna-Yucalpeten lagoon system is located at 21°17'N and 89°40'W in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. Temperature, conductivity, sea level, atmospheric pressure, solar radiation, and wind speed measurements were recorded in this lagoon, during various oceanographic surveys within 2010-2012. During the experiments, which included diurnal variations during spring and neap tidal cycles, CTD profiles were collected in 35 oceanographic stations and moored instruments were deployed at strategic locations. The aim of this work is to investigate transitions of thermohaline properties in a tropical lagoon with submarine groundwater discharges (SGDs) to increase the knowledge of the principal processes that control circulation and mixing in this kind of bodies of water. Results show that the lagoon is saltier than the ocean in the dry season and the opposite pattern is observed in the rain season. During the rain season could be more freshwater supplied from SGDs.

  18. Seasonal Variability of Saturn's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Simon, Amy; Delcroix, Marc; Orton, Glenn S.; Trinh, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal variability of Saturn's clouds and weather layer, currently displaying a variety of phenomena (convective storms, planetary waves, giant storms and lightning-induced events, etc.) is not yet fully understood. Variations of Saturn's radiance at 5.2 microns, a spectral region dominated by thermal emission in an atmospheric window containing weak gaseous absorption, contain a strong axisymmetric component as well as large discrete features at low and mid-latitudes that are several degrees colder than the planetary average and uncorrelated with features at shorter wavelengths that are dominated by reflected sunlight (Yanamandra-Fisher et al., 2001. Icarus, Vol. 150). The characterization of several fundamental atmospheric properties and processes, however, remains incomplete, namely: How do seasons affect (a) the global distribution of gaseous constituents and aerosols; and (b) temperatures and the stability against convection and large scale-atmospheric transport? Do 5-micron clouds have counterparts at other altitude levels? What changes occur during the emergence of Great White Storms? Data acquired at the NASA/IRTF and NAOJ/Subaru from 1995 - 2011; since 2004, high-resolution multi-spectral and high-spatial imaging data acquired by the NASA/ESA Cassini mission, represents half a Saturnian year or two seasons. With the addition of detailed multi-spectral data sets acquired by amateur observers, we study these dramatic phenomena to better understand the timeline of the evolution of these events. Seasonal (or temporal) trends in the observables such as albedo of the clouds, thermal fields of the atmosphere as function of altitude, development of clouds, hazes and global abundances of various hydrocarbons in the atmosphere can now be modeled. We will present results of our ongoing investigation for the search and characterization of periodicities over half a Saturnian year, based on a non-biased a priori approach and time series techniques (such as

  19. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Paige, David A.

    1996-01-01

    A thermal model, developed to predict seasonal nitrogen cycles on Triton, has been modified and applied to Pluto. The model was used to calculate the partitioning of nitrogen between surface frost deposits and the atmosphere, as a function of time for various sets of input parameters. Volatile transport was confirmed to have a significant effect on Pluto's climate as nitrogen moved around on a seasonal time scale between hemispheres, and sublimed into and condensed out of the atmosphere. Pluto's high obliquity was found to have a significant effect on the distribution of frost on its surface. Conditions that would lead to permanent polar caps on Triton were found to lead to permanent zonal frost bands on Pluto. In some instances, frost sublimed from the middle of a seasonal cap outward, resulting in a "polar bald spot". Frost which was darker than the substrate did not satisfy observables on Pluto, in contrast to our findings for Triton. Bright frost (brighter than the substrate) came closer to matching observables. Atmospheric pressure varied seasonally. The amplitudes, and to a lesser extent the phase, of the variation depended significantly on frost and substrate properties. Atmospheric pressure was found to be determined both by Pluto's distance from the sun and by the subsolar latitude. In most cases two peaks in atmospheric pressure were observed annually: a greater one associated with the sublimation of the north polar cap just as Pluto receded from perihelion, and a lesser one associated with the sublimation of the south polar cap as Pluto approached perihelion. Our model predicted frost-free dark substrate surface temperatures in the 50 to 60 K range, while frost temperatures typically ranged between 30 to 40 K. Temporal changes in frost coverage illustrated by our results, and changes in the viewing geometry of Pluto from the Earth, may be important for interpretation of ground-based measurements of Pluto's thermal emission.

  20. Thyroid Hormone and Seasonal Rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Dardente, Hugues; Hazlerigg, David G.; Ebling, Francis J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms show seasonality in a wide array of functions such as reproduction, fattening, hibernation, and migration. At temperate latitudes, changes in photoperiod maintain the alignment of annual rhythms with predictable changes in the environment. The appropriate physiological response to changing photoperiod in mammals requires retinal detection of light and pineal secretion of melatonin, but extraretinal detection of light occurs in birds. A common mechanism across all vertebrates is that these photoperiod-regulated systems alter hypothalamic thyroid hormone (TH) conversion. Here, we review the evidence that a circadian clock within the pars tuberalis of the adenohypophysis links photoperiod decoding to local changes of TH signaling within the medio-basal hypothalamus (MBH) through a conserved thyrotropin/deiodinase axis. We also focus on recent findings which indicate that, beyond the photoperiodic control of its conversion, TH might also be involved in longer-term timing processes of seasonal programs. Finally, we examine the potential implication of kisspeptin and RFRP3, two RF-amide peptides expressed within the MBH, in seasonal rhythmicity. PMID:24616714

  1. Selecting Viruses for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Newsletters Selecting Viruses for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... influence which viruses are selected for use in vaccine production? The influenza viruses in the seasonal flu ...

  2. Flu Season's Starting to Rear Its Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... the year." Last year's flu season was particularly hard on older people. In a typical flu season, flu complications -- including pneumonia -- send more than 200,000 Americans to the hospital. Death rates linked to flu ...

  3. How to Control Your Seasonal Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Managing Allergies How to Control Your Seasonal Allergies Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Fast ... elder, cottonwood, maple, palm, poplar, or willow trees. Seasonal Allergies: Nuisance or Real Health Threat? For most people, ...

  4. Light Therapy Boxes for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) Light therapy boxes can offer an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder. Features such as light intensity, safety, cost and style are important considerations. ...

  5. Evaluating Downscaling Methods for Seasonal Climate Forecasts over East Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Bosilovich, Michael; Lyon, Bradfield; Funk, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. National Multi-Model Ensemble seasonal forecasting system is providing hindcast and real-time data streams to be used in assessing and improving seasonal predictive capacity. The NASA / USAID SERVIR project, which leverages satellite and modeling-based resources for environmental decision making in developing nations, is focusing on the evaluation of NMME forecasts specifically for use in impact modeling within hub regions including East Africa, the Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region and Mesoamerica. One of the participating models in NMME is the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS5). This work will present an intercomparison of downscaling methods using the GEOS5 seasonal forecasts of temperature and precipitation over East Africa. The current seasonal forecasting system provides monthly averaged forecast anomalies. These anomalies must be spatially downscaled and temporally disaggregated for use in application modeling (e.g. hydrology, agriculture). There are several available downscaling methodologies that can be implemented to accomplish this goal. Selected methods include both a non-homogenous hidden Markov model and an analogue based approach. A particular emphasis will be placed on quantifying the ability of different methods to capture the intermittency of precipitation within both the short and long rain seasons. Further, the ability to capture spatial covariances will be assessed. Both probabilistic and deterministic skill measures will be evaluated over the hindcast period

  6. Evaluating Downscaling Methods for Seasonal Climate Forecasts over East Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Roberts, J. Brent; Bosilovich, Michael; Lyon, Bradfield

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. National Multi-Model Ensemble seasonal forecasting system is providing hindcast and real-time data streams to be used in assessing and improving seasonal predictive capacity. The NASA / USAID SERVIR project, which leverages satellite and modeling-based resources for environmental decision making in developing nations, is focusing on the evaluation of NMME forecasts specifically for use in impact modeling within hub regions including East Africa, the Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region and Mesoamerica. One of the participating models in NMME is the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS5). This work will present an intercomparison of downscaling methods using the GEOS5 seasonal forecasts of temperature and precipitation over East Africa. The current seasonal forecasting system provides monthly averaged forecast anomalies. These anomalies must be spatially downscaled and temporally disaggregated for use in application modeling (e.g. hydrology, agriculture). There are several available downscaling methodologies that can be implemented to accomplish this goal. Selected methods include both a non-homogenous hidden Markov model and an analogue based approach. A particular emphasis will be placed on quantifying the ability of different methods to capture the intermittency of precipitation within both the short and long rain seasons. Further, the ability to capture spatial covariances will be assessed. Both probabilistic and deterministic skill measures will be evaluated over the hindcast period.

  7. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  8. 1971 Post Season Rural Manpower Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Labor, Detroit. Michigan Employment Security Commission.

    The Rural Manpower Service reports on the migrant seasonal labor in Michigan during 1971. Seasonal labor has been declining since it reached its peak of 97,700 in 1962. This report discusses migrant seasonal labor with regard to (1) the wages and earnings of the workers, (2) the recruitment of workers, (3) the agricultural-labor housing, (4) the…

  9. 50 CFR 654.20 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seasons. 654.20 Section 654.20 Wildlife..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Management Measures § 654.20 Seasons. (a) Closed season. No person may possess a stone crab in the management area from 12:01 a.m., local time,...

  10. 7 CFR 916.15 - Marketing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketing season. 916.15 Section 916.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.15 Marketing season. Marketing season means the period beginning...

  11. 7 CFR 916.15 - Marketing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Marketing season. 916.15 Section 916.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.15 Marketing season. Marketing season means the period beginning...

  12. 50 CFR 20.22 - Closed seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Closed seasons. 20.22 Section 20.22... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.22 Closed seasons. No person shall take migratory game birds during the closed season except as provided in part 21 of this chapter....

  13. 50 CFR 20.22 - Closed seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Closed seasons. 20.22 Section 20.22... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.22 Closed seasons. No person shall take migratory game birds during the closed season except as provided in part 21 of this chapter....

  14. 25 CFR 242.6 - Spawning season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Spawning season. 242.6 Section 242.6 Indians BUREAU OF... RESERVATION § 242.6 Spawning season. Walleye and northern pike (or pickerel) shall not be taken during their spawning season except for propagation purposes....

  15. 50 CFR 20.22 - Closed seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Closed seasons. 20.22 Section 20.22... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.22 Closed seasons. No person shall take migratory game birds during the closed season except as provided in part 21 of this chapter....

  16. 25 CFR 242.6 - Spawning season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spawning season. 242.6 Section 242.6 Indians BUREAU OF... RESERVATION § 242.6 Spawning season. Walleye and northern pike (or pickerel) shall not be taken during their spawning season except for propagation purposes....

  17. 25 CFR 242.6 - Spawning season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spawning season. 242.6 Section 242.6 Indians BUREAU OF... RESERVATION § 242.6 Spawning season. Walleye and northern pike (or pickerel) shall not be taken during their spawning season except for propagation purposes....

  18. 50 CFR 20.22 - Closed seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Closed seasons. 20.22 Section 20.22... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.22 Closed seasons. No person shall take migratory game birds during the closed season except as provided in part 21 of this chapter....

  19. 25 CFR 242.6 - Spawning season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Spawning season. 242.6 Section 242.6 Indians BUREAU OF... RESERVATION § 242.6 Spawning season. Walleye and northern pike (or pickerel) shall not be taken during their spawning season except for propagation purposes....

  20. 50 CFR 20.22 - Closed seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Closed seasons. 20.22 Section 20.22... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.22 Closed seasons. No person shall take migratory game birds during the closed season except as provided in part 21 of this chapter....

  1. 5 CFR 340.402 - Seasonal employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....402 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Seasonal and intermittent.... Seasonal employment may not be used as a substitute for full-time employment or as a buffer for the...

  2. 5 CFR 340.402 - Seasonal employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....402 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Seasonal and intermittent.... Seasonal employment may not be used as a substitute for full-time employment or as a buffer for the...

  3. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  4. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  5. Team Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, David

    1999-01-01

    Explains how a team cleaning approach can be cost-effective and efficient means of school maintenance. Assigning staffing responsibilities and work schedules are addressed and the advantages of using a team system are explained. (GR)

  6. Visualization and Modeling Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, S.J.; Dodrill, K.A.

    2007-03-01

    During the 2005 Hurricane season, many consequence predictions were available from 36 to 96 hours before landfalls, via the Department of Energy’s Visualization and Modeling Working Group (VMWG). Real-time data can be tapped by local officials and utilities, and can also be accessed for post-event regulatory audits. An overview of VMWG’s models, results and uses will be presented.

  7. [Palivizumab: four seasons in Russia].

    PubMed

    Baranov, A A; Ivanov, D O; Aliamovskaia, G A; Amirova, V R; Antoniuk, I V; Asmolova, G A; Beliaeva, I A; Bokeria, E L; Briukhanova, O A; Vinogradova, I V; Vlasova, E V; Galustian, A N; Gafarova, G V; Gorev, V V; Davydova, I V; Degtiarev, D N; Degtiareva, E A; Dolgikh, V V; Donits, I M; Zakharova, N I; Zernova, L Iu; Zimina, E P; Zuev, V V; Keshishian, E S; Kovalev, I A; Koltunov, I E; Korsunskiĭ, A A; Krivoshchekov, E V; Krsheminskaia, I V; Kuznetsova, S N; Liubimenko, V A; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Nesterenko, É V; Nikolaev, S V; Ovsiannikov, D Iu; Pavlova, T I; Potapova, M V; Rychkova, L V; Safarov, A A; Safina, A I; Skachkova, M A; Soldatova, I G; Turti, T V; Filatova, N A; Shakirova, R M; Ianulevich, O S

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the Russian Federation (RF) registered palivizumab--innovative drug, based on monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization of seasonal respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in children of disease severe progress risk group, which include primarily premature infants, children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease. Currently, palivizumab is included in the list of recommended medicines and medical care standards of different countries, including Russia. In the review the results of Russian research on the progress of RSV infection, its epidemiology and immunization experience gained over the 2010-2014 period are summarized in relation to the foreign data. During the four epidemic seasons palivizumab immunization covered more than 3,200 children of severe RSV infection risk group with a progressive annual increase in the number of patients who received the drug. Geography of palivizumab immunization is also greatly expanded in our country during this time. If during the first two seasons measures of immunization were taken mainly in Moscow and St. Petersburg, at the present time, thirty one territorial entities of the Russian Federation have the experience in the drug application. Analysis of the results of RSV infection immunization (made in several regions) confirms the high clinical efficacy and palivizumab safety already demonstrated in international studies. In addition, the analysis presents the potential to improve the efficiency of the integrated RSV infection immunization programs, realizing in the establishment of high-risk child group register, adequate counseling for parents, as well as the development of the routing of patients and coordination of interaction between different health institutions during the immunization.

  8. Seasonality and the effectiveness of mass vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dennis L; Dimitrov, Dobromir T

    2016-04-01

    Many infectious diseases have seasonal outbreaks, which may be driven by cyclical environmental conditions (e.g., an annual rainy season) or human behavior (e.g., school calendars or seasonal migration). If a pathogen is only transmissible for a limited period of time each year, then seasonal outbreaks could infect fewer individuals than expected given the pathogen's in-season transmissibility. Influenza, with its short serial interval and long season, probably spreads throughout a population until a substantial fraction of susceptible individuals are infected. Dengue, with a long serial interval and shorter season, may be constrained by its short transmission season rather than the depletion of susceptibles. Using mathematical modeling, we show that mass vaccination is most efficient, in terms of infections prevented per vaccine administered, at high levels of coverage for pathogens that have relatively long epidemic seasons, like influenza, and at low levels of coverage for pathogens with short epidemic seasons, like dengue. Therefore, the length of a pathogen's epidemic season may need to be considered when evaluating the costs and benefits of vaccination programs.

  9. Rainfall variability and seasonality in northern Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Sheikh Hefzul; Hussain, Md. Manjurul; Husna, Noor-E.-Ashmaul

    2016-05-01

    This paper aimed at the analysis of rainfall seasonality and variability for the northern part of South-Asian country, Bangladesh. The coefficient of variability was used to determine the variability of rainfall. While rainfall seasonality index (SI ) and mean individual seasonality index ( overline{SI_i} ) were used to identify seasonal contrast. We also applied Mann-Kendall trend test and sequential Mann-Kendall test to determine the trend in seasonality. The lowest variability was found for monsoon among the four seasons whereas winter has the highest variability. Observed variability has a decreasing tendency from the northwest region towards the northeast region. The mean individual seasonality index (0.815378 to 0.977228) indicates that rainfall in Bangladesh is "markedly seasonal with a long dry season." It was found that the length of the dry period is lower at the northeastern part of northern Bangladesh. Trend analysis results show no significant change in the seasonality of rainfall in this region. Regression analysis of overline{SI_i} and SI, and longitude and mean individual seasonality index show a significant linear correlation for this area.

  10. Assessment of optimal strategies in a two-patch dengue transmission model with seasonality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hyeong; Lee, Sunmi

    2017-01-01

    Emerging and re-emerging dengue fever has posed serious problems to public health officials in many tropical and subtropical countries. Continuous traveling in seasonally varying areas makes it more difficult to control the spread of dengue fever. In this work, we consider a two-patch dengue model that can capture the movement of host individuals between and within patches using a residence-time matrix. A previous two-patch dengue model without seasonality is extended by adding host demographics and seasonal forcing in the transmission rates. We investigate the effects of human movement and seasonality on the two-patch dengue transmission dynamics. Motivated by the recent Peruvian dengue data in jungle/rural areas and coast/urban areas, our model mimics the seasonal patterns of dengue outbreaks in two patches. The roles of seasonality and residence-time configurations are highlighted in terms of the seasonal reproduction number and cumulative incidence. Moreover, optimal control theory is employed to identify and evaluate patch-specific control measures aimed at reducing dengue prevalence in the presence of seasonality. Our findings demonstrate that optimal patch-specific control strategies are sensitive to seasonality and residence-time scenarios. Targeting only the jungle (or endemic) is as effective as controlling both patches under weak coupling or symmetric mobility. However, focusing on intervention for the city (or high density areas) turns out to be optimal when two patches are strongly coupled with asymmetric mobility. PMID:28301523

  11. Stars and Seasons in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedegar, K. V.

    Although the indigenous people of Southern Africa traditionally viewed the sky as a place quite apart from the Earth, they believed celestial phenomena to be natural signs united with those of the Earth in a harmonious synchronicity. There is no substantial evidence that the precolonial Africans imagined a casual relationship between celestial bodies and the seasonal patterns of life on Earth. They did, however, recognize a coincidental relationship. The traditional African cosmos, then, worked as a noetic principle unifying the observed motions of celestial bodies, the sequence of seasons, and the behavior of plants and animals. Such a cosmos, with local peculiarities, was widely understood in Southern Africa before the end of the last century. By the early 20th century European colonial paradigms had largely obliterated this African worldview. This paper will offer a partial reconstruction. Pre-colonial South African people viewed time as a sequence of discrete natural events; through annual repetition these events served as a guide for proper human action. The South Africans analyzed the passage of time in terms of the motions of celestial bodies, the maturation of beneficial plants, and the mating patterns of animals. The rightful course of human life was seen to fit within the seasonal context of these natural phenomena. The visibility of conspicuous stars and asterisms marked significant times of year. For instance, the Lovedu people greeted the dawn rising of Canopus with joy: "The boy has come out." The star was a signal for rainmaking and boys' initiation ceremonies to proceed. The Venda constellation Thutlwa, the giraffes, comprises α and β Crucis and α and β Centauri. In October Thutlwa skims the trees of the evening horizon. The Venda Thutlwa literally means 'rising above the trees,' an allusion to the majestic vegetarian creatures and the stars advising the people to be done with their spring planting. This paper will describe stellar associations

  12. Seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alex H C; Barg, Stefani S N; Leung, Alexander K C

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis are IgE-mediated, hypersensitivity conditions characterized by ocular pruritus, epiphora, and hyperemia. Proper diagnosis is usually made clinically based on history and physical examination. Diagnostic procedures are rarely necessary. Non-pharmacological measures, such as environmental modification and proper eye care, should be considered for all patients with allergic conjunctivitis. Pharmacological interventions may also be required. Milder cases can be treated with short-term topical ophthalmic therapy such as a decongestant/ antihistamine combination, a mast cell stabilizer, or a multi-action agent. Moderate to severe cases may require longer usage of the above agents and/or the addition of an oral antihistamine. Refractory cases may necessitate the use of topical ophthalmic corticosteroids and topical NSAIDs. Immunotherapy, whether via the subcutaneous route or the intranasal route, should be considered in the treatment of persistent severe cases refractory to conventional treatment. Despite all the available therapeutic agents, there continues to be a constant need to discover more effective ways to treat seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis. This article also discusses recent patents related to the field.

  13. Seasonality and predictability shape temporal species diversity.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Jonathan D; Bogan, Michael T; Bonada, Núria; Rios-Touma, Blanca; Lytle, David A

    2017-01-31

    Temporal environmental fluctuations, such as seasonality, exert strong controls on biodiversity. While the effects of seasonality are well known, the predictability of fluctuations across years may influence seasonality in ways that are less well understood. The ability of a habitat to support unique, non-nested assemblages of species at different times of the year should depend on both seasonality (occurrence of events at specific periods of the year) and predictability (the reliability of event recurrence) of characteristic ecological conditions. Drawing on tools from wavelet analysis and information theory, we develop a framework for quantifying both seasonality and predictability of habitats, and applied this using global long-term rainfall data. Our analysis predicted that temporal beta diversity should be maximized in highly-predictable and highly-seasonal climates, and that low degrees of seasonality, predictability, or both would lower diversity in characteristic ways. Using stream invertebrate communities as a case study, we demonstrated that temporal species diversity, as exhibited by community turnover, was determined by a balance between temporal environmental variability (seasonality) and the reliability of this variability (predictability). Communities in highly-seasonal Mediterranean environments exhibited strong oscillations in community structure, with turnover from one unique community type to another across seasons, whereas communities in aseasonal New Zealand environments fluctuated randomly. Understanding the influence of seasonal and other temporal scales of environmental oscillations on diversity is not complete without a clear understanding of their predictability, and our framework provides tools for examining these trends at a variety of temporal scales, seasonal and beyond. Given the uncertainty of future climates, seasonality and predictability are critical considerations for both basic science and management of ecosystems (e.g. dam

  14. Biotechnology Works!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby G.; Spenciner, Loraine

    There have been few initiatives addressing the improvement of science education for students with disabilities. Funded by the National Science Foundation, Biotechnology Works is a summer institute in immunology and genetics for students with disabilities, high school science teachers, and high school counselors. During the 1998 summer session,…

  15. Working Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Students need space to gather, share ideas, talk, develop common understanding and work to create greater knowledge. This focus on collaboration has put a strain on group study spaces. Students need to collaborate spontaneously, and scheduling time in a study room is not conducive to spur-of-the-moment collaboration. At many education…

  16. Working Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, David

    The resurgence of "lifelong learning" has renewed consideration of the nature of "working knowledge." Lifelong learning has many aspects, including construction and distribution of individuals' very self-hood, educational institutions' role in capturing informal experiences, and the juggling required between family and…

  17. Wetlands Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messina, Linda; Blanchard, Pamela Borne

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how a biology teacher's search for a cross-curricular project in science, math, history, and environmental science, that would help her students connect what they were learning in the classroom to their everyday life, resulted in an ongoing stewardship project. Working together with the Louisiana Sea Grant College Program…

  18. Work Simplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Lynne

    1970-01-01

    Excerpts from a talk by Mrs. Ross at the 23rd annual convention of the American School Food Service Association in Detroit, August 5, 1969. A book on work simplification by Mrs. Ross will be available in June from the Iowa State University Press, Ames, Iowa. (Editor)

  19. [Temporary work].

    PubMed

    Del Forno, E; Candura, F

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, labour market has really changed in Italy: in addition to traditional categories of workers, self-governing or subordinate, a "tertium genus" was born, that of "temporary workers". This new modality allows firms which need to introduce temporary workers in production processes, to find them through the activity of skilled intermediary agencies. This type of agencies, regularly authorized by the Ministry of Labour, was born to select subordinates, who will work in other firms, without engagement. (The low which regulates temporary work in Italy is the Act n. 196 of 1997). The subject analysed the most closely in the text, is the really interesting question of responsibility for prevention, safety and health in work places: in fact, temporary work creates a complex system of bilateral relations, but the only real work contract is between provider firms and temporary workers. The Act n. 196 states that the provider firm must fulfill its duties of contribution, security, aid and insurance against industrial accidents and occupational diseases. Therefore, according to a series of argumentations developed in the text, only the occupational health consultant designated by the temporary agency is reasonably responsible for medical supervision, but he has to coordinate and collaborate with the occupational health consultant of third firms (Directive 383 of 1991 and article 7 of Legislative Decree n. 626 of 1994). On the contrary, firms which need temporary workers, must fulfill duties of information and training for workers. As a consequence, to draw a conclusion, on the ground of principles of European Union and national laws (in force since '50s in this field), the responsibility for medical supervision falls on temporary agencies; on the contrary, economic responsibility falls on firms which request workers, in order to achieve protection of workers' health.

  20. Hydrological niche separation explains seasonal and inter-annual variations of vegetation dynamics in seasonally dry tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Medvigy, D.; Powers, J. S.; Becknell, J. M.; Guan, K.

    2015-12-01

    seasonality? (iii) Whether the new hydrological niche separation scheme also works in different precipitation regimes? And (iv) how important is functional diversity in plants' responses to water stress in predicting vegetation dynamics in SDTFs.

  1. A seasonal analysis of Chinese births.

    PubMed

    Abeysinghe, T

    1991-01-01

    Chinese cultural patterns of birthing tend to follow a long cycle of a year or more and an annual seasonal cycle. Data on seasonality of births by month of occurrence are modeled with a Box/Jenkins seasonal model with a deterministic seasonality and a stochastic seasonality for Chinese populations in Singapore (1961-86), Malaysia (1966-85), Hong Kong (1971-86), and Taiwan (1964-86). The seasonality of marriages by month of registration was also estimated with least squares regressions. The effect of economic development on seasonality was examined by modeling Chinese birth data for 2 periods: 1961-69 and 1974-86. The Chinese lunar calendar is 12 moons lasting 29-30 days, and a new moon, embolism, is added every 2-3 years to accommodate the Western calendar. In the modeling of births, the deterministic seasonal component is represented by a sin/cos function while the stochastic seasonality is represented as a seasonal autoregressive moving average (ARMA). Methodology is explained. An ARMA model and a subset of ARMA models for the residuals are generated as well as the full model using the maximum likelihood method for all the subsets and choosing a model that minimizes Akaike's information criterion or Schwarz's Bayesian criterion. Data were checked with the Ljung/Box/Pierce Q statistic. The null hypothesis was tested. Data series were adjusted for the length of the month. Unlike double differencing used in ARMA modeling, the subtraction of seasonal means was used because double differencing increased the standard deviations. The results for Malaysia and Hong Kong show deterministic seasonality. A Taiwanese, model, which uses month of registration not occurrence, was more difficult to model, and deterministic seasonality is assumed. The 4 countries were similar: birth peaks in October in Singapore, Malaysia, and Hong Kong and in November in Taiwan. The birth troughs were more variable. Malaysia and Hong Kong models showed a stochastic component as well. Economic

  2. The suprachiasmatic nuclei as a seasonal clock.

    PubMed

    Coomans, Claudia P; Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) contains a central clock that synchronizes daily (i.e., 24-h) rhythms in physiology and behavior. SCN neurons are cell-autonomous oscillators that act synchronously to produce a coherent circadian rhythm. In addition, the SCN helps regulate seasonal rhythmicity. Photic information is perceived by the SCN and transmitted to the pineal gland, where it regulates melatonin production. Within the SCN, adaptations to changing photoperiod are reflected in changes in neurotransmitters and clock gene expression, resulting in waveform changes in rhythmic electrical activity, a major output of the SCN. Efferent pathways regulate the seasonal timing of breeding and hibernation. In humans, seasonal physiology and behavioral rhythms are also present, and the human SCN has seasonally rhythmic neurotransmitter levels and morphology. In summary, the SCN perceives and encodes changes in day length and drives seasonal changes in downstream pathways and structures in order to adapt to the changing seasons.

  3. Trophic mismatch requires seasonal heterogeneity of warming.

    PubMed

    Straile, Dietmar; Kerimoglu, Onur; Peeters, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Climate warming has been shown to advance the phenology of species. Asynchronous changes in phenology between interacting species may disrupt feeding interactions (phenological mismatch), which could have tremendous consequences for ecosystem functioning. Long-term field observations have suggested asynchronous shifts in phenology with warming, whereas experimental studies have not been conclusive. Using proxy-based modeling of three trophic levels (algae, herbivores, and fish), we .show that asynchronous changes in phenology only occur if warming is seasonally heterogeneous, but not if warming is constant throughout the year. If warming is seasonally heterogeneous, the degree and even direction of asynchrony depends on the specific seasonality of the warming. Conclusions about phenological mismatches in food web interactions may therefore produce controversial results if the analyses do not distinguish between seasonally constant and seasonal specific warming. Furthermore, our results suggest that predicting asynchrony between interacting species requires reliable warming predictions that resolve sub-seasonal time scales.

  4. Marathon works

    PubMed Central

    Orrantia, Eliseo

    2005-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Medical care in rural Canada has long been hampered by insufficient numbers of physicians. How can a rural community’s physicians change the local medical culture and create a new approach to sustaining their practice? OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To create a sustainable, collegial family practice group and address one rural community’s chronically underserviced health care needs. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Elements important to physicians’ well-being were incorporated into the health care group’s functioning to enhance retention and recruitment. The intentional development of a consensus-based approach to decision making has created a supportive team of physicians. Ongoing communication is kept up through regular meetings, retreats, and a Web-based discussion board. Individual physicians retain control of their hours worked each year and their schedules. A novel obstetric call system was introduced to help make schedules more predictable. An internal governance agreement on an alternative payment plan supports varied work schedules, recognizes and funds non-clinical medical work, and pays group members for undertaking health-related projects. CONCLUSION This approach has helped maintain a stable number of physicians in Marathon, Ont, and has increased the number of health care services delivered to the community. PMID:16190174

  5. Seasonal dimensions to rural porverty: analysis and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Chambers, R; Longhurst, R; Bradley, D; Feachem, R

    1979-08-01

    This paper reports on a conference on seasonal dimensions to rural poverty. Presentations included specialised papers on climate, energy balance, vital events, individual tropical diseases, nutrition, rural economy, and women, and also multi-disciplinary case studies of tropical rural areas from the Gambia, Nigeria, Mali, Kenya, Tanzania, India and Bangladesh. While care is needed in generalising, the evidence suggested that for agriculturalists in the tropics, the worst times of year are the wet seasons, typically marked by a concurrence of food shortages, high demands for agricultural work, high exposure to infection especially diarrhoeas, malaria, and skin diseases, loss of body weight, low birth weights, high neonatal mortality, poor child care, malnutrition, sickness and indebtedness. In this season, poor and weak people, especially women, are vulnerable to deprivation and to becoming poorer and weaker. Seasonal analysis is easily left out in rural planning. When applied, it suggests priorities in research, and indicates practical policy measures for health, for the family, for agriculture, and for government planning and administration.

  6. COLT: seasonal prediction of crop irrigation needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Giulia; Spisni, Andrea; Mariani, Maria Cristina; Pratizzoli, William; Pavan, Valentina; Tomei, Fausto; Botarelli, Lucio; Marletto, Vittorio

    2013-04-01

    COLT is an operational chain to predict summer (June, July, August) crop irrigation needs in Emilia-Romagna (Northern Italy) at the regional and lower scales. Set up by ARPA-SIMC in 2010, it has been applied since with good results. COLT predicts summer irrigation needs in May, i.e. at the beginning of the irrigation season in Emilia-Romagna. COLT is based on the production of yearly updated land use maps, observed daily weather data, a regional soil map and ensemble probabilistic seasonal weather forecasts obtained from the EUROSIP multi-model operational system and a geographical soil water balance model (CRITERIA). The first step of the operational scheme is the supervised classification of crops through field surveys and a set of multitemporal satellite images acquired during the first months of the growing period. As the identification of all crop species during the satellite working windows is not feasible, they are grouped in six classes: summer field crops (including corn, sorghum, tomato, sugar beet, potato and others), winter crops (wheat, barley, oat, etc.), perennial grasses (alfa-alfa and meadows), rice, vineyards and orchards, on the whole regional plain, covering about 775000 ha. The second step involves the statistical downscaling of the EUROSIP ensemble predictions over Emilia-Romagna and the use of a weather generator to synthetically produce a number (usually 50) replicated meteorological summer daily data series, consistent with the predicted and downscaled summer anomalies of temperature, rainfall and other related indices. During the final step the CRITERIA model computes crop development and soil water balance on the crop classification map using observed meteorological daily data up to the end of May. Afterword forecasts are used up to the end of the summer irrigation season, i.e. August 31st. The statistical distribution projections of summer irrigation needs at the regional and reclamation consortia scale are then issued and disseminated

  7. Role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Sharma, P K; Garg, V K; Singh, A K; Mondal, S C

    2013-01-01

    This review was prepared with an aim to show role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder, which is also called as winter depression or winter blues, is mood disorder in which persons with normal mental health throughout most of the year will show depressive symptoms in the winter or, less commonly, in the summer. Serotonin is an important endogenous neurotransmitter which also acts as neuromodulator. The least invasive, natural, and researched treatment of seasonal affective disorder is natural or otherwise is light therapy. Negative air ionization, which acts by liberating charged particles on the sleep environment, has also become effective in treatment of seasonal affective disorder.  

  8. Seasonal variations of selected cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Gregory S

    2005-12-01

    This article reviews research on selected biomarkers of cardiovascular risk - cholesterol and other lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, homocysteine - in the attempt to determine the existence of a predictable seasonal chronobiological pattern of variation. Studies dating as far back as the 1930s have reported seasonal variations in cholesterol levels. Statistically significant seasonal changes in lipid levels have been found in individuals irrespective of the country where the research has been conducted, and irrespective of the age, sex, ethnicity, and baseline lipid levels of the study subjects. While not all studies have been in complete agreement on either the amplitude (degree of seasonal change) or month/s of highest lipid levels, a strong winter/summer difference has been found in most studies. Existing evidence for an independent effect of season in variation of CRP is weak. Studies have consistently reported significant seasonal variations in fibrinogen levels. While other biological factors clearly interact to affect fibrinogen variability, seasonality appears to be an independent source of variability. Evidence from several studies points to a lack of seasonal variability in homocysteine levels. Although seasonal variability is just one source of periodicity influencing biological function and assessments in clinical practice, for some biomarkers, including lipids and fibrinogen, it is a source of variability that warrants consideration prior to a decision to treat and in assessing response to interventions.

  9. Within-season flowering interruptions are common in the water-limited Sky Islands.

    PubMed

    Crimmins, Theresa M; Bertelsen, David C; Crimmins, Michael A

    2014-05-01

    Within-season breaks in flowering have been reported in a wide range of highly variable ecosystems including deserts, tropical forests and high-elevation meadows. A tendency for interruptions in flowering has also been documented in southwestern US "Sky Island" plant communities, which encompass xeric to mesic conditions. Seasonal breaks in flowering have implications for plant reproductive success, population structure, and gene flow as well as resource availability for pollinators and dependent animals. Most reports of multiple within-season flowering events describe only two distinct flowering episodes. In this study, we set out to better quantify distinct within-season flowering events in highly variable Sky Islands plant communities. Across a >1,200 m elevation gradient, we documented a strong tendency for multiple within-season flowering events. In both distinct spring and summer seasons, we observed greater than two distinct within-season flowering in more than 10 % of instances. Patterns were clearly mediated by the different climate factors at work in the two seasons. The spring season, which is influenced by both temperature and precipitation, showed a mixed response, with the greatest tendency for multiple flowering events occurring at mid-elevations and functional types varying in their responses across the gradient. In the summer season, during which flowering across the gradient is limited by localized precipitation, annual plants exhibited the fewest within-season flowering events and herbaceous perennial plants showed the greatest. Additionally, more distinct events occurred at lower elevations. The patterns documented here provide a baseline for comparison of system responses to changing climate conditions.

  10. Within-season flowering interruptions are common in the water-limited Sky Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crimmins, Theresa M.; Bertelsen, C. David; Crimmins, Michael A.

    2014-05-01

    Within-season breaks in flowering have been reported in a wide range of highly variable ecosystems including deserts, tropical forests and high-elevation meadows. A tendency for interruptions in flowering has also been documented in southwestern US "Sky Island" plant communities, which encompass xeric to mesic conditions. Seasonal breaks in flowering have implications for plant reproductive success, population structure, and gene flow as well as resource availability for pollinators and dependent animals. Most reports of multiple within-season flowering events describe only two distinct flowering episodes. In this study, we set out to better quantify distinct within-season flowering events in highly variable Sky Islands plant communities. Across a >1,200 m elevation gradient, we documented a strong tendency for multiple within-season flowering events. In both distinct spring and summer seasons, we observed greater than two distinct within-season flowering in more than 10 % of instances. Patterns were clearly mediated by the different climate factors at work in the two seasons. The spring season, which is influenced by both temperature and precipitation, showed a mixed response, with the greatest tendency for multiple flowering events occurring at mid-elevations and functional types varying in their responses across the gradient. In the summer season, during which flowering across the gradient is limited by localized precipitation, annual plants exhibited the fewest within-season flowering events and herbaceous perennial plants showed the greatest. Additionally, more distinct events occurred at lower elevations. The patterns documented here provide a baseline for comparison of system responses to changing climate conditions.

  11. The "working" of working memory.

    PubMed

    Miller, Earl K

    2013-12-01

    This review examines the evidence for a neurobiological explanation of executive functions of working memory. We suggest that executive control stems from information about task rules acquired by mixed selective, adaptive coding, multifunctional neurons in the prefrontal cortex. The output of these neurons dynamically links the cortex-wide networks needed to complete the task. The linking may occur via synchronizing of neural rhythms, which may explain why we have a limited capacity for simultaneous thought.

  12. Seasonal Frost in Terra Sirenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Terra Sirenum region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0918 UTC (4:18 a.m. EST) on Nov. 25, 2006, near 38.9 degrees south latitude, 195.9 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across.

    At this time, Mars' southern hemisphere was experiencing mid-winter. During Martian southern winter, the southern polar cap is covered and surrounded by carbon dioxide frost and water frost. This is unlike Earth, whose frozen winter precipitation is made up of only one volatile -- water. The carbon dioxide frost evaporates, or sublimates, at a lower temperature than water frost. So, during spring, the carbon dioxide ice evaporates first and leaves a residue of water frost, which later sublimates as well.

    The image shown here covers part of a crater rim, which is illuminated from the upper left. North is at the top. The topography creates a cold microenvironment on the south side of the rim that is partially protected from solar illumination. That cold surface contains an outlier of the southern seasonal frost about 15 degrees of latitude closer to the equator than the average edge of the frost at this season.

    The top image was constructed from three infrared wavelengths that highlight the bluer color of frost than the background rock and soil. Note that the frost occurs both on sunlit and shaded surfaces on the south side of the rim. The shaded areas are still visible because they are illuminated indirectly by the Martian sky.

    The bottom image was constructed by measuring the depths of spectral absorption bands due to water frost and carbon dioxide frost, and displaying the results in image form. Blue shows strength of an absorption due to water frost near 1.50 micrometers, and green shows strength of an absorption due to carbon dioxide frost near 1.45 micrometers. Red shows

  13. Regional Similarities in Seasonal Mortality across the United States: An Examination of 28 Metropolitan Statistical Areas

    PubMed Central

    Kalkstein, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Human mortality exhibits a strong seasonal pattern with deaths in winter far exceeding those in the summer. While the pattern itself is clear, there have been very few studies examining whether the magnitude or timing of seasonal mortality varies considerably across space. Thus, the goal of this study is to conduct a comprehensive geographic analysis of seasonal mortality across the United States and to uncover systematic regional differences in such mortality. Unique seasonal mortality curves were created for 28 metropolitan statistical areas across the United States, and the amplitude and timing of mortality peaks were determined. The findings here indicate that the seasonality of mortality exhibits strong spatial variation with the largest seasonal mortality amplitudes found in the southwestern United States and the smallest in the North, along with South Florida. In addition, there were strong intra-regional similarities that exist among the examined cities, implying that environmental factors are more important than social factors in determining seasonal mortality response. This work begins to fill a large gap within the scientific literature concerning the geographic variation and underlying causes of seasonal mortality across the United States. PMID:23734179

  14. How does the seasonality influence utilitarian walking behaviour in different urbanization settings in Scotland?

    PubMed

    Hong, Jinhyun

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the built environment and walking has been analyzed for decades. However, the seasonality effects on the relationship between the built environment and walking have not been well examined even though weather is one of the key determinants of walking. Therefore, this study used 2007-8 Scottish Household Survey data collected over two years and estimated the interaction effects between the urbanization setting (i.e., residential locations: urban, town and rural areas) and seasons (i.e., spring, summer, autumn and winter) on walking. Scottish Urban-rural classification scheme is measured based on the population and access to large cities, and used as a key independent variable. The number of walking days for specific purposes such as work or shopping (utilitarian walking) during the past 7 days is used as a dependent variable. The results show that there are significant geographical variations of seasonality effect on utilitarian walking. That is, people living in rural areas are more sensitive to seasonality impacts than those living in urban areas. In addition, we found that the association between urbanization setting and utilitarian walking varies across seasons, indicating that their relationship can be miss-estimated if we ignore the seasonality effects. Therefore, policy makers and practitioners should consider the seasonality effects to evaluate the effectiveness of land use policy correctly. Finally, we still find the significant association between the urbanization setting and utilitarian walking behaviour with the consideration of seasonality effects, supporting the claim of New Urbanism.

  15. The effects of two different types of clothing on seasonal warm acclimatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Tokura, H.; Midorikawa, T.

    1995-09-01

    The work described in this paper investigates the effects of two types of clothing leaving the legs covered or uncovered, on seasonal warm acclimatization in women. Experiments were carried out to observe the differences in thermal responses between two groups of subjects who dressed themselves in trousers or kneelength skirts during the daytime for 3 months from April to June. Rectal temperatures in the subjects wearing skirts were found to be shifted to higher levels when the season gradually became warmer from spring to summer. The results suggest that the clothing type worn in daily life may play an important role in the seasonal warm acclimatization of thermal responses in humans.

  16. Health needs of migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Maureen; Williams, Judith M; Avery, Ann M

    2008-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFW) are a vital component of the U.S. agricultural industry. Despite their important contributions, MSFW are known to be a marginalized population who live in poverty and have poor health indicators. The purpose of this study was to gain a fuller understanding of family composition, employment, migration patterns, health issues and service needs of MSFW in 3 counties in northwest Michigan. The participants were mainly migrant (63%), and men (55%) with an average age of 34.4 years. Educational levels of the sample were low, with 56% reporting 6th grade or below, and an additional 7% reporting no formal education. The majority was originally from Mexico (75%), and Spanish was the first language of 79% of the farmworkers represented in the survey. Work-related health problems and chronic illness were the most commonly perceived health problems and the most commonly requested service was dental. This study adds to the body of knowledge related to farm worker health needs and provides direction for the provision of appropriate health care to this population.

  17. 25 CFR 242.6 - Spawning season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spawning season. 242.6 Section 242.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMERCIAL FISHING ON RED LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION § 242.6 Spawning season. Walleye and northern pike (or pickerel) shall not be taken during...

  18. 50 CFR 654.20 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seasons. 654.20 Section 654.20 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Management Measures § 654.20 Seasons....

  19. 50 CFR 665.468 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Seasons. 665.468 Section 665.468 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  20. 50 CFR 665.267 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Seasons. 665.267 Section 665.267 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.267 Seasons....

  1. 50 CFR 665.168 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Seasons. 665.168 Section 665.168 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  2. 50 CFR 665.668 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Seasons. 665.668 Section 665.668 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... § 665.668 Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30...

  3. 50 CFR 665.267 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Seasons. 665.267 Section 665.267 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.267 Seasons....

  4. 50 CFR 665.267 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Seasons. 665.267 Section 665.267 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.267 Seasons....

  5. 50 CFR 665.668 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Seasons. 665.668 Section 665.668 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... § 665.668 Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30...

  6. 50 CFR 665.468 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Seasons. 665.468 Section 665.468 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  7. 50 CFR 665.168 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Seasons. 665.168 Section 665.168 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  8. 50 CFR 665.168 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Seasons. 665.168 Section 665.168 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  9. 50 CFR 665.468 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Seasons. 665.468 Section 665.468 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  10. 50 CFR 665.668 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Seasons. 665.668 Section 665.668 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... § 665.668 Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30...

  11. 50 CFR 640.20 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Management Measures... lobster or on the possession of traps. (b) EEZ off Florida and off the Gulf states, other than Florida—(1) Commercial and recreational fishing season. The commercial and recreational fishing season for spiny...

  12. 50 CFR 622.403 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery... seasonal restrictions on the harvest of spiny lobster or on the possession of traps. (b) EEZ off Florida... commercial and recreational fishing season for spiny lobster in the EEZ off Florida and the EEZ off the...

  13. 50 CFR 640.20 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Management Measures... lobster or on the possession of traps. (b) EEZ off Florida and off the Gulf states, other than Florida—(1) Commercial and recreational fishing season. The commercial and recreational fishing season for spiny...

  14. 50 CFR 622.403 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery... seasonal restrictions on the harvest of spiny lobster or on the possession of traps. (b) EEZ off Florida... commercial and recreational fishing season for spiny lobster in the EEZ off Florida and the EEZ off the...

  15. 50 CFR 640.20 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Management Measures... lobster or on the possession of traps. (b) EEZ off Florida and off the Gulf states, other than Florida—(1) Commercial and recreational fishing season. The commercial and recreational fishing season for spiny...

  16. 50 CFR 665.668 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seasons. 665.668 Section 665.668 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... § 665.668 Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30...

  17. 50 CFR 665.468 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seasons. 665.468 Section 665.468 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  18. 50 CFR 665.267 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seasons. 665.267 Section 665.267 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.267 Seasons....

  19. 50 CFR 665.267 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seasons. 665.267 Section 665.267 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.267 Seasons....

  20. 50 CFR 665.668 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seasons. 665.668 Section 665.668 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... § 665.668 Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30...

  1. 50 CFR 665.468 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seasons. 665.468 Section 665.468 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  2. 50 CFR 665.168 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seasons. 665.168 Section 665.168 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  3. 50 CFR 665.168 - Seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seasons. 665.168 Section 665.168 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Seasons. The fishing year for precious coral begins on July 1 and ends on June 30 the following year....

  4. Seasonal variations of cardiac output in rats.

    PubMed

    Back, G; Strubelt, O

    1975-11-15

    Cardiac output of rats shows seasonal variations with low values in spring and summer and high ones in autumn and winter. The stroke volume was much more implicated in these changes than the heart rate. The seasonal changes of cardiac output are probably due to changes of thyroid function.

  5. Five Tips for a Smooth Ginning Season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton ginners need to be nearly finished with the preparation of their ginning plant for the coming season but there are a few things they can do now in other aspects of the business. They should have a program to record down time during the coming season so they can make plans to address problems...

  6. Markov Chain Estimation of Avian Seasonal Fecundity

    EPA Science Inventory

    To explore the consequences of modeling decisions on inference about avian seasonal fecundity we generalize previous Markov chain (MC) models of avian nest success to formulate two different MC models of avian seasonal fecundity that represent two different ways to model renestin...

  7. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  8. Gearing up for the Ginning Season: Things Ginners Need to do Before the Modules Arrive on the Yard

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starting up a gin after the dormant season is always a difficult day or sometimes week before all the components start to work together in an efficient and productive fashion. There are several important things a ginner should remember when gearing up for the ginning season. First and foremost, all...

  9. Seasonal storage of energy in solar heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, J. E.; Klein, S. A.; Mitchell, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper focuses on several aspects of seasonal storage for space heating using water as the storage medium. The interrelationships between collector area, storage volume, and system performance are investigated using the transient simulation program TRNSYS. The situations for which seasonal storage is most promising are presented. Particular emphasis is placed upon design of seasonal storage systems. A design method is presented which is applicable for storage capacities ranging from a few days to seasonal storage. This design method, coupled with cost information, should be useful in assessing the economic viability of seasonal storage systems. Also investigated are the importance of the load heat exchanger size, tank insulation, collector slope, and year-to-year weather variations in system design.

  10. Air Pollution Simulation based on different seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhaimin

    2017-01-01

    Simulation distribution of pollutants (SOx and NOx) emitted from Cirebon power plant activities have been carried out. Gaussian models and scenarios are used to predict the concentration of pollutant gasses. The purposes of this study were to determine the distribution of the flue gas from the power plant activity and differences pollutant gas concentrations in the wet and dry seasons. The result showed that the concentration of pollutant gasses in the dry season was higher than the wet season. The difference of pollutant concentration because of wind speed, gas flow rate, and temperature of the gas that flows out of the chimney. The maximum concentration of pollutant gasses in wet season for SOx is 30.14 µg/m3, while NOx is 26.35 µg/m3. Then, The simulation of air pollution in the dry season for SOx is 42.38 µg/m3, while NOx is 34.78 µg/m3.

  11. Seasonal forecasts of drought indices in African basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Emanuel; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Pappenberge, Florian

    2013-04-01

    Vast parts of Africa rely on the rainy season for livestock and agriculture. Droughts can have a severe impact in these areas which often have a very low resilience and limited capabilities to mitigate drought impacts. In this work we assess the predictive capabilities of an integrated drought monitoring and seasonal forecasting system (up to 5 months lead time) based on the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). The system is constructed by extending near real-time monthly precipitation fields (ERA-Interim reanalysis and the Climate Anomaly Monitoring System-Outgoing Longwave Radiation Precipitation Index, CAMS-OPI) with monthly forecasted fields as provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) seasonal forecasting system. This new seamless approach to merge monitoring and forecasting fields of precipitation to generate SPI at different time-scales is evaluated within the framework of the EU project DEWFORA. In particular, the evaluation was preformed over four basins in Africa: the Blue Nile, Limpopo, Upper Niger, and Upper Zambezi. There are significant differences in the quality of the precipitation between the datasets depending on the catchments, and a general statement regarding the best product is difficult to make. All the datasets show similar spatial and temporal patterns in the South and North West Africa, while there is a low correlation in the equatorial area which makes it difficult to define ground truth and choose an adequate product for monitoring. The Seasonal forecasts have a higher reliability and skill in the Blue Nile, Limpopo and Upper Niger in comparison with the Zambezi. This skill and reliability depends strongly on the SPI time-scale, and more skill is observed at longer time-scales. The ECMWF seasonal forecasts have predictive skill which is higher than using climatology for most regions. In regions where no reliable near real-time data is available, the seasonal forecast can be used for monitoring (first

  12. Photosynthetic Control of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide during the Growing Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. Elliott; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Chai, T.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Tang, Y.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Vay, Stephanie A.; Collatz, G. James; Baker, I.; Berry, J. A.; Montzka, S. A.; Sweeney, C.; Schnoor, J. L.; Stanier, Charles O.

    2008-01-01

    Climate models incorporate photosynthesis-climate feedbacks, yet we lack robust tools for large-scale assessments of these processes. Recent work suggests that carbonyl sulfide (COS), a trace gas consumed by plants, could provide a valuable constraint on photosynthesis. Here we analyze airborne observations of COS and carbon dioxide concentrations during the growing season over North America with a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model. We successfully modeled the persistent vertical drawdown of atmospheric COS using the quantitative relation between COS and photosynthesis that has been measured in plant chamber experiments. Furthermore, this drawdown is driven by plant uptake rather than other continental and oceanic fluxes in the model. These results provide quantitative evidence that COS gradients in the continental growing season may have broad use as a measurement-based photosynthesis tracer.

  13. Therapeutic Alliance: A Concept for the Childbearing Season

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Mary Ellen

    2009-01-01

    This analysis was conducted to describe the concept of therapeutic alliance and its appropriateness for health-care provider-client interactions during the childbearing season. The concept has been defined in other disciplines. A universal definition suggested a merging of efforts directed toward health. A simple and concise definition evolved, which is applicable to the childbearing season as well as to health-care encounters across the life span. This definition states: Therapeutic alliance is a process within a health-care provider-client interaction that is initiated by an identified need for positive client health-care behaviors, whereby both parties work together toward this goal with consideration of the client's current health status and developmental stage within the life span. PMID:20514120

  14. Monitoring and seasonal forecasting of meteorological droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Emanuel; Pozzi, Will; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Magnusson, Linus; Naumann, Gustavo; Barbosa, Paulo; Vogt, Jurgen; Pappenberger, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Near-real time drought monitoring can provide decision makers valuable information for use in several areas, such as water resources management, or international aid. Unfortunately, a major constraint in current drought outlooks is the lack of reliable monitoring capability for observed precipitation globally in near-real time. Furthermore, drought monitoring systems requires a long record of past observations to provide mean climatological conditions. We address these constraints by developing a novel drought monitoring approach in which monthly mean precipitation is derived from short-range using ECMWF probabilistic forecasts and then merged with the long term precipitation climatology of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) dataset. Merging the two makes available a real-time global precipitation product out of which the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) can be estimated and used for global or regional drought monitoring work. This approach provides stability in that by-passes problems of latency (lags) in having local rain-gauge measurements available in real time or lags in satellite precipitation products. Seasonal drought forecasts can also be prepared using the common methodology and based upon two data sources used to provide initial conditions (GPCC and the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis (ERAI) combined with either the current ECMWF seasonal forecast or a climatology based upon ensemble forecasts. Verification of the forecasts as a function of lead time revealed a reduced impact on skill for: (i) long lead times using different initial conditions, and (ii) short lead times using different precipitation forecasts. The memory effect of initial conditions was found to be 1 month lead time for the SPI-3, 3 to 4 months for the SPI-6 and 5 months for the SPI-12. Results show that dynamical forecasts of precipitation provide added value, a skill similar to or better than climatological forecasts. In some cases, particularly for long SPI time

  15. Lay Outreach Workers and the Ohio Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Health Education Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Olga L.

    The Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Project sought to determine the health education needs of this indigent population in Ohio using the help of lay outreach workers. A bilingual needs assessment survey was developed containing questions on demographics, place of permanent residence, points of travel after working in Ohio, and type of work and…

  16. Seasonal Predictability of the Regional Climate of the Mississippi River Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tribbia, Joseph; Giorgi, Filippo

    2002-01-01

    This is a report on our accomplishments during the previous year and our wrap-up plans for the coming months for our work in studying the seasonal predictability of precipitation over the Mississippi River Basin. The work accomplished during the grant falls into two broad catagories: (1) diagnosis of regional skill of CCM3; and (2) regional and global model development.

  17. The breed and season effects on scrotal circumference and semen characteristics of hair sheep rams under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Gallegos, M A; Aké-López, J R; Centurión-Castro, F; Magaña-Monforte, J G

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the breed and season effects on scrotal circumference (SC) and semen characteristics of 28 mature hair sheep rams kept under tropical conditions. SCs, sperm concentration (SPC) and abnormal sperm were significantly affected by breed effect (p < 0.001). The season effect was significant in SPC (p < 0.0001) while ejaculate volume, mass motility and SPC were affected by breed × season interaction effect (p < 0.001). It can be concluded that the magnitude of the breed and season effects were not sufficient to affect the reproductive capacity of hair sheep rams throughout the year.

  18. Preparing Students for Early Work Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Laura L.; Larson, R. Sam

    2005-01-01

    To improve college students' skills in resolving workplace conflict, the authors studied the types of workplace conflicts that students encounter with peers or supervisors in part-time or seasonal work and with whom they discuss these conflicts. The authors found that most students report conflicts that are process or relational in nature, with…

  19. Cardiovascular disease risk factors among Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Rosenbaum, René P; Holscher, Jessica T; Madanat, Hala; Talavera, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal (MS) farmworkers are an important component of the US economy. Their unique occupational health concerns have garnered research, but chronic disease research in this population is lacking. It is unclear whether health differences exist between migrant (those who migrate to and travel a distance from the home environment and thus live in temporary housing for the purpose of employment) and seasonal workers (those who work in the agricultural industry on a seasonal basis, whose long-term home environments are often near work locations and thus may be considered more "settled"), since most research presents MS farmworkers as a homogenous group. This study explored potential differences in cardiovascular disease risk factors, (i.e., diabetes, current smoking, obesity, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia) by sex and MS status among a sample of 282 English- and Spanish- speaking Latino MS farmworkers in the Midwest using cross-sectional survey and clinical laboratory data. Results showed that in multivariate logistic regression analyses, migrant workers (odds ratio [OR] = 2.15) had a higher likelihood of being obese compared with seasonal workers (P < .05). MS farmworkers did not differ in likelihood of smoking, diabetes, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia. In adjusted analyses, females were more likely to be obese (OR = 3.29) and have diabetes (OR = 4.74) compared with males (P < .05); and males were more likely to be current smokers (OR = 7.50) as compared with females (P < .05). This study provides insight into chronic health concerns among this predominantly Latino farmworker population and suggests that future prevention and intervention research may need to focus on sex differences rather than MS farmworker status.

  20. Epidemic seasonal infertility — a hypothesis for the cause of seasonal variation of births

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, T.; Shimura, M.

    1980-03-01

    A hypothesis is proposed to explain the seasonality of births and its variations, that some unrecognized epidemic infertile factors have existed seasonally. In that case, certain women born in a particular low birth rate season must be those who survived these infertile factors in very early stage of their fetal lives. Then in later years, when they become pregnant, they may possibly be immune or different in their susceptibility to these infertile factors. Therefore, mothers born in a particular low birth rate season would tend to bear babies more frequently in that season than the others. To examine this hypothesis, birth records in 1930 of two maternity hospitals in Tokyo were investigated. These years were chosen for a period when seasonality of birth was most prominent in Japan. First babies were excluded to eliminate disturbances by season of marriages and other possible non-biological factors. The results show that among 1038 mothers born in a low birthrate season, May July, 245 (23.6%) had babies in May July, while the other mothers had significantly less babies (19.0%, 819/4302, P<0.001) in the same season. This may imply that seasonality of birth may have been influenced by some immunogenic infertile factors epidemic in a particular season.

  1. An objective method for partitioning the entire flood season into multiple sub-seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Singh, Vijay P.; Guo, Shenglian; Zhou, Jianzhong; Zhang, Junhong; Liu, Pan

    2015-09-01

    Information on flood seasonality is required in many practical applications, such as seasonal frequency analysis and reservoir operation. Several statistical methods for identifying flood seasonality have been widely used, such as directional method (DS) and relative frequency (RF) method. However, using these methods, flood seasons are identified subjectively by visually assessing the temporal distribution of flood occurrences. In this study, a new method is proposed to identify flood seasonality and partition the entire flood season into multiple sub-seasons objectively. A statistical experiment was carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Results demonstrated that the proposed method performed satisfactorily. Then the proposed approach was applied to the Geheyan and Baishan Reservoirs, China, having different flood regimes. It is shown that the proposed method performs extremely well for the observed data, and is more objective than the traditional methods.

  2. Occupational health problems among migrant and seasonal farm workers.

    PubMed Central

    Mobed, K; Gold, E B; Schenker, M B

    1992-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal farm workers are one of the most underserved and understudied populations in the United States. The total US population of such farm workers has been estimated at 5 million, of whom about 20% live or work in California. Farm workers perform strenuous tasks and are exposed to a wide variety of occupational risks and hazards. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to health care also contribute to existing health problems in this population. Potential farm work-related health problems include accidents, pesticide-related illnesses, musculoskeletal and soft-tissue disorders, dermatitis, noninfectious respiratory conditions, reproductive health problems, health problems of children of farm workers, climate-caused illnesses, communicable diseases, bladder and kidney disorders, and eye and ear problems. Few epidemiologic studies exist of these occupational health problems. No comprehensive epidemiologic studies have assessed the magnitude of occupational health problems among migrant and seasonal farm workers and their dependents. Although the migratory nature of this population makes long-term studies difficult, the development of standardized data collection instruments for health consequences and scientific assessment of farm work exposures and working conditions are vital to characterize and reduce the occupational health risks in farm workers. PMID:1413786

  3. [Seasonal and perennial allergic rhinoconjunctivitis].

    PubMed

    Schröder, K; Finis, D; Meller, S; Buhren, B A; Wagenmann, M; Geerling, G

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC) and perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC) as well as intermittent and persistent allergic rhinitis are widespread diseases. Because a combined occurrence of ocular and nasal symptoms is very common the summarising term allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is frequently used. SAC and PAC representing the two acute forms of allergic conjunctivitis account for more than 90 % of all cases of allergic conjunctivitis. Compared to the chronic forms of allergic conjunctivitis their course of disease is milder. Nevertheless because of their high prevalence and the proven influence on patients' quality of life they possess clinical and socioeconomic relevance. Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is caused by a type 1 IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction that is provoked by aeroallergens in the majority of cases. The pathognomonic sign is itching. Besides, typical ocular findings are chemosis, conjunctival injection, watery secretion and lid swelling. Otorhinolaryngologists' findings include rhinorrhea, postnasal drip and sneezing. Problems in breathing through the nose resulting from nasal obstruction can cause impaired nighttime sleep and daytime somnolence. In addition to a reduction of allergen exposure by modification of environment and life style factors, in mild forms of SAC and PAC artificial tears are recommended. Topical antihistamines can generate rapid relief from acute symptoms and itching. Topical mast cell stabilisers however provide long-term effects. Dual action drugs that combine antihistamines and mast cell stabilisers show increased patient compliance due to reduced application frequency. Use of topical steroids should be cautious and only temporary. For prolonged treatment periods unpreserved anti-allergic eye-drops should be preferred. Combined topical antihistamines and new-generation topical nasal steroids often used by otorhinolaryngologists demonstrate a good safety profile without systemic side effects. In summary

  4. Seasonal adaptations in arctic insects.

    PubMed

    Danks, Hugh V

    2004-04-01

    Many insect species live in the arctic and show a wide range of adaptations to its extreme severity and seasonality. Long, cold winters are met, for example, by cold hardiness and choice of protected sites. Cold hardiness includes both widespread tolerance to freezing and extreme supercooling ability, as well as unusual responses in a few species, such as lack of typical cryoprotectants. Adaptations to short, cool summers include activity at low temperatures, selection of warm habitats and microhabitats, melanism and hairiness coupled with basking behaviour, and prolonged or abbreviated life cycles. Diapause ensures that many species emerge early in summer, with brief synchronized reproduction that maximizes the time for offspring development before winter returns. Some species overwinter in sites that thaw earliest in spring, even if they are relatively exposed in winter. Other adaptations respond to year-to-year variability: for example, prolonged diapause can provide insurance against unsuitable summers. All of these adaptations are co-ordinated. For example, cold hardiness relies on physiological and biochemical adaptations but also on habitat choice and timing. Because the adaptations are complex, predicted climatic warming probably will have unexpected effects. In particular, an increase in temperature that increases summer cloud when sea ice melts would likely reduce temperatures for insect development and activity, because sunshine provides critical warmth to insects and their microhabitats. Changes in moisture will also be important. Moreover, responses differ among species, depending especially on their microhabitats. The complexity of the responses of insects to arctic conditions reinforces the need for research that is sufficiently detailed.

  5. Chronotype and sleep duration: the influence of season of assessment.

    PubMed

    Allebrandt, Karla V; Teder-Laving, Maris; Kantermann, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Wilson, James F; Metspalu, Andres; Roenneberg, Till

    2014-06-01

    between the mid sleep on free and work days - which varied with age and sex) contributed to a greater extent to the variation in sleep duration than chronotype (after taking into account factors that are known to influence sleep duration, i.e. age, sex and body mass index). Variation in chronotype was also dependent on age, sex, season of assessment and SJl (which is highly correlated with chronotype - SJl was larger among later chronotypes). In summary, subjective assessments of sleep/wake times are very reliable to assess internal time and sleep duration (e.g. reproducing sleep duration and timing tendencies related to age and sex across the investigated populations), but season of assessment should be regarded as a potential confounder. We identified in this study photoperiod (seasonal adaptation) and SJl as two main factors influencing seasonal variation in chronotype and sleep duration. In conclusion, season of assessment, sex and age have an effect on epidemiological variation in sleep duration, chronotype and SJl, and should be included in studies investigating associations between these phenotypes and health parameters, and on the development of optimal prevention strategies.

  6. Contrasting patterns of litterfall seasonality and seasonal changes in litter decomposability in a tropical rainforest region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. A.; Valdez-Ramirez, V.; Congdon, R. A.; Williams, S. E.

    2014-09-01

    The seasonality of litter inputs in forests has important implications for understanding ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. We quantified the drivers of seasonality in litterfall and leaf decomposability using plots throughout the Australian wet tropical region. Litter fell mostly in the summer (wet, warm) months in the region, but other peaks occurred throughout the year. Litterfall seasonality was modelled well with the level of deciduousness of the site (plots with more deciduous species had lower seasonality than evergreen plots), temperature (higher seasonality in the uplands), disturbance (lower seasonality with more early secondary species) and soil fertility (higher seasonality with higher N : P/P limitation) (SL total litterfall model 1 = deciduousness + soil N : P + early secondary sp.: r2 = 0.63, n = 30; model 2 = temperature + early secondary sp. + soil N : P: r2 = 0.54, n = 30; SL leaf = temperature + early secondary sp. + rainfall seasonality: r2 = 0.39, n = 30). Leaf litter decomposability was lower in the dry season than in the wet season, driven by higher phenolic concentrations in the dry, with the difference exacerbated particularly by lower dry season moisture. Our results are contrary to the global trend for tropical rainforests; in that seasonality of litterfall input was generally higher in wetter, cooler, evergreen forests, compared to generally drier, warmer, semi-deciduous sites that had more uniform monthly inputs. We consider this due to more diverse litter shedding patterns in semi-deciduous and raingreen rainforest sites, and an important consideration for ecosystem modellers. Seasonal changes in litter quality are likely to have impacts on decomposition and biogeochemical cycles in these forests due to the litter that falls in the dry season being more recalcitrant to decay.

  7. Beneficial Effects of Traditional Seasonings on Quality Characteristics of Fermented Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Pil-Nam; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Sun-Moon; Kim, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Hoa, Van-Ba

    2016-01-01

    Though traditional seasonings are widely used in many dishes, however, no attention has been paid to the investigation of their effects on quality characteristics of food products. The present investigation was undertaken to study the effects of incorporating several traditional seasonings including doenjang (fermented soybean paste), gochu-jang (red pepper paste), fresh medium-hot, and hot peppers, and fresh garlic on the lipid oxidation, cholesterol content and sensory characteristics of fermented sausages. Six fermented sausage treatments (5 with 1% (w/w) each test seasoning and 1 without added test seasoning (control) were prepared. The addition of seasonings generally had beneficial effects on the improvement of fermented sausage’s quality however the effects differed depending on the each type of seasonings added. Significant lower pH values were found in all fermented sausages made with the seasonings while, lower levels of lipid oxidation were found in the treatments with hot peppers and garlic as compared with the control (p<0.05). The treatment with seasonings did not cause color or texture defects in the products whereas the sausages made with gochu-jang had significantly higher Commission International de l’Eclairagea* (redness) value in comparison with the control. Noticeably, incorporating doenjang, medium-hot peppers, hot peppers and garlic resulted in reduction of 26.50, 32.54, 47.04, and 48.54 mg cholesterol/100 g samples, respectively (p<0.05). Higher scores for the sensory traits such as aroma, taste, color and acceptability were also given for the sausages made with seasonings. The current work demonstrates that the test seasonings represent potentially natural ingredients to be used for producing healthier fermented sausages. PMID:26954136

  8. Beneficial Effects of Traditional Seasonings on Quality Characteristics of Fermented Sausages.

    PubMed

    Seong, Pil-Nam; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Sun-Moon; Kim, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Hoa, Van-Ba

    2016-08-01

    Though traditional seasonings are widely used in many dishes, however, no attention has been paid to the investigation of their effects on quality characteristics of food products. The present investigation was undertaken to study the effects of incorporating several traditional seasonings including doenjang (fermented soybean paste), gochu-jang (red pepper paste), fresh medium-hot, and hot peppers, and fresh garlic on the lipid oxidation, cholesterol content and sensory characteristics of fermented sausages. Six fermented sausage treatments (5 with 1% (w/w) each test seasoning and 1 without added test seasoning (control) were prepared. The addition of seasonings generally had beneficial effects on the improvement of fermented sausage's quality however the effects differed depending on the each type of seasonings added. Significant lower pH values were found in all fermented sausages made with the seasonings while, lower levels of lipid oxidation were found in the treatments with hot peppers and garlic as compared with the control (p<0.05). The treatment with seasonings did not cause color or texture defects in the products whereas the sausages made with gochu-jang had significantly higher Commission International de l'Eclairagea* (redness) value in comparison with the control. Noticeably, incorporating doenjang, medium-hot peppers, hot peppers and garlic resulted in reduction of 26.50, 32.54, 47.04, and 48.54 mg cholesterol/100 g samples, respectively (p<0.05). Higher scores for the sensory traits such as aroma, taste, color and acceptability were also given for the sausages made with seasonings. The current work demonstrates that the test seasonings represent potentially natural ingredients to be used for producing healthier fermented sausages.

  9. Recent Changes in the Arctic Melt Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Markus, Thorsten; Meier, Walter N.; Miller, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Melt-season duration, melt-onset and freeze-up dates are derived from satellite passive microwave data and analyzed from 1979 to 2005 over Arctic sea ice. Results indicate a shift towards a longer melt season, particularly north of Alaska and Siberia, corresponding to large retreats of sea ice observed in these regions. Although there is large interannual and regional variability in the length of the melt season, the Arctic is experiencing an overall lengthening of the melt season at a rate of about 2 weeks decade(sup -1). In fact, all regions in the Arctic (except for the central Arctic) have statistically significant (at the 99% level or higher) longer melt seasons by greater than 1 week decade(sup -1). The central Arctic shows a statistically significant trend (at the 98% level) of 5.4 days decade(sup -1). In 2005 the Arctic experienced its longest melt season, corresponding with the least amount of sea ice since 1979 and the warmest temperatures since the 1880s. Overall, the length of the melt season is inversely correlated with the lack of sea ice seen in September north of Alaska and Siberia, with a mean correlation of -0.8.

  10. Melioidosis and Aboriginal seasons in northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Jacups, Susan P; Ward, Linda; Currie, Bart J

    2008-12-01

    Melioidosis, an infection due to the environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia, with cases strongly correlated with the monsoonal wet season. We hypothesized that seasonal variation in the mode of acquisition, informed by traditional knowledge, would result in variations in disease characteristics as well as disease incidence. We explored the seasonal variation in acute, culture-confirmed melioidosis using local Aboriginal definitions of seasons in presentations to the Royal Darwin Hospital, the referral centre for the Top End of the Northern Territory, Australia. In 387 patients, we observed an increased proportion of patients with pneumonia (60%) and severe sepsis (25%) associated with presentations in the wet seasons Gunumeleng (October-December) and Gudjewg (January-March) compared with the drier seasons Wurrgeng (June August) and Gurrung (August-October) (pneumonia 26%, severe sepsis 13%). This observation supports the hypothesis that in the wet seasons there may be changes in the mode and/or magnitude of exposure to B. pseudomallei, with a shift from percutaneous inoculation to aerosol inhalation, for instance.

  11. Global Seasonal Influenza Epidemics and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamerius, James

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that low specific humidity conditions facilitate the transmission of the influenza virus in temperate regions and result in annual winter epidemics. However, this relationship does not account for the epidemiology of influenza in tropical and subtropical regions where epidemics often occur during the rainy season or transmit year-round without a well-defined season. We assessed the role of specific humidity and other local climatic variables on influenza virus seasonality by modeling epidemiological and climatic information from 78 study sites sampled globally. We substantiated that there are two types of environmental conditions associated with seasonal influenza epidemics: "cold-dry" and "humid-rainy". For sites where monthly average specific humidity or temperature decreases below thresholds of approximately 11-12 g/kg and 18-21 °C during the year, influenza activity peaks during the cold-dry season (i.e., winter) when specific humidity and temperature are at minimal levels. For sites where specific humidity and temperature do not decrease below these thresholds, seasonal influenza activity is more likely to peak in months when average precipitation totals are maximal and greater than 150 mm per month. Based on these findings, we develop Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered-Susceptible (SEIRS) models forced by daily weather observations of specific humidity and precipitation that simulate the diversity of seasonal influenza signals worldwide.

  12. Lengthening Spring Season in Southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutzler, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Climate is changing rapidly in southwestern North America during the Spring season, a critically important transition season in terms of hydrology, ecosystem dynamics, and water resource management. Major rivers are snow-fed in mountainous headwaters but then flow through a monsoonal region with a Summer precipitation maximum; Spring is the dry season in between snowmelt and monsoon onset and is the principal wildfire season in the Southwest. Evaporation during the warm, dry Spring represents a major hydrologic loss in the surface water budget and is a principal cause of projections of significant decreases in post-snowmelt streamflow, during the first half of the growing season when demand for surface water for irrigated agriculture is highest. As temperatures increase, snowpack is expected to decrease and melt earlier, leading to a smaller and earlier peak in snowmelt runoff. Recent climate model projections suggest that monsoon onset should occur later in the year, delaying the summer rainy season. Each of these effects contributes to projections of a lengthening Spring season, at both the beginning and end of Spring. A longer, warmer Spring season is associated with significant surface drying and increased wildfire risk in the 21st Century across the Southwest. So far changes are observed at the beginning of spring in terms of temperature (increasing) and snowpack (decreasing). Detection of other changes, including metrics of the end of spring, has not been easy, in part due to the huge natural variability of precipitation that affects hydrologic variables in conjunction with temperature. This presentation describes efforts to diagnose and document observed changes in the transitions into and out of the Spring dry season in the Southwest, in variables such as temperature, snowmelt date, timing and magnitude of streamflow, and monsoon onset date.

  13. Seasonality of Kawasaki Disease: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jane C.; Herzog, Lauren; Fabri, Olivia; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Rodó, Xavier; Uehara, Ritei; Burgner, David; Bainto, Emelia; Pierce, David; Tyree, Mary; Cayan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding global seasonal patterns of Kawasaki disease (KD) may provide insight into the etiology of this vasculitis that is now the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in developed countries worldwide. Methods Data from 1970-2012 from 25 countries distributed over the globe were analyzed for seasonality. The number of KD cases from each location was normalized to minimize the influence of greater numbers from certain locations. The presence of seasonal variation of KD at the individual locations was evaluated using three different tests: time series modeling, spectral analysis, and a Monte Carlo technique. Results A defined seasonal structure emerged demonstrating broad coherence in fluctuations in KD cases across the Northern Hemisphere extra-tropical latitudes. In the extra-tropical latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, KD case numbers were highest in January through March and approximately 40% higher than in the months of lowest case numbers from August through October. Datasets were much sparser in the tropics and the Southern Hemisphere extra-tropics and statistical significance of the seasonality tests was weak, but suggested a maximum in May through June, with approximately 30% higher number of cases than in the least active months of February, March and October. The seasonal pattern in the Northern Hemisphere extra-tropics was consistent across the first and second halves of the sample period. Conclusion Using the first global KD time series, analysis of sites located in the Northern Hemisphere extra-tropics revealed statistically significant and consistent seasonal fluctuations in KD case numbers with high numbers in winter and low numbers in late summer and fall. Neither the tropics nor the Southern Hemisphere extra-tropics registered a statistically significant aggregate seasonal cycle. These data suggest a seasonal exposure to a KD agent that operates over large geographic regions and is concentrated during winter

  14. Cultural Health Practices of Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Marjorie C.; Sanon, Marie-Ann; Foley, Josephine G.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored culturally related health practices among Hispanic migrant seasonal farmworkers. In this cross-sectional qualitative study, six Hispanic migrant seasonal farmworkers from southeastern Michigan farms were interviewed. Four major themes emerged from the study. Financial and employment limitations, rather than folk health care practices, were more likely to influence use of professional care systems. There was limited use of folk healers and culturally-related practices, primarily due to lack of access. Results may be used to identify needs and develop culturally appropriate programs and services to improve the health of Hispanic migrant seasonal farmworkers. PMID:26245012

  15. Seasonal buffering of atmospheric pressure on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzurisin, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    An isothermal reservoir of carbon dioxide in gaseous contact with the Martian atmosphere would reduce the amplitude and advance the phase of global atmospheric pressure fluctuations caused by seasonal growth and decline of polar CO2 frost caps. Adsorbed carbon dioxide in the upper roughly 10 m of Martian regolith is sufficient to buffer the present atmosphere on a seasonal basis. Available observations and related polar cap models do not confirm or refute the operation of such a mechanism. Implications for the amplitude and phase of seasonal pressure fluctuations are subject to direct test by the upcoming Viking mission to Mars.

  16. PATTERNS AND CONTROLS OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER EXPORT BY MAJOR RIVERS: A NEW SEASONAL, SPATIALLY EXPLICIT, GLOBAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    River-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences metabolism, light attenuation, and bioavailability of metals and nutrients in coastal ecosystems. Recent work suggests that DOM concentrations in surface waters vary seasonally because different organic matter pools are mobi...

  17. Contrasting patterns of litterfall seasonality and seasonal changes in litter decomposability in a tropical rainforest region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. A.; Valdez-Ramirez, V.; Congdon, R. A.; Williams, S. E.

    2014-06-01

    The seasonality of litter inputs in forests has important implications for understanding ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. We quantified the drivers of seasonality in litterfall and leaf decomposability, using plots throughout the Australian wet tropical region. Litter fell mostly in the summer (wet, warm) months in the region, but other peaks occurred throughout the year. Litterfall seasonality was modelled well with the level of deciduousness of the site (plots with more deciduous species had lower seasonality than evergreen plots), temperature (higher seasonality in the uplands), disturbance (lower seasonality with more early secondary species) and soil fertility (higher seasonality with higher N : P/P limitation) (SL total litterfall model 1 = deciduousness + soil N : P + early secondary sp: r2 = 0.63, n = 30 plots; model 2 = temperature + early secondary sp. + soil N : P: r2 = 0.54, n = 30; SL leaf = temperature + early secondary sp. + rainfall seasonality: r2 = 0.39, n = 30). Leaf litter decomposability was lower in the dry season than in the wet season, driven by higher phenolic concentrations in the dry, with the difference exacerbated particularly by lower dry season moisture. Our results are contrary to the global trend for tropical rainforests; in that seasonality of litterfall inputs were generally higher in wetter, cooler, evergreen forests, compared to generally drier, warmer, semi-deciduous sites that had more uniform monthly inputs. We consider this due to more diverse litter shedding patterns in semi-deciduous and raingreen rainforest sites, and an important consideration for ecosystem modellers. Seasonal changes in litter quality are likely to have impacts on decomposition and biogeochemical cycles in these forests due to the litter that falls in the dry being more recalcitrant to decay.

  18. Physics Parameterization for Seasonal Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    mixing processes, including interactions with clouds , within the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) suitable for extended range prediction...that includes not only boundary layer mixing, but mixing by shallow to mid- level convective clouds , as well as deep convection. The project will...prognostic cloud scheme and separate treatments of deep and shallow convection. We continue to work towards improved fidelity of our physics codes to

  19. Physics Parameterization for Seasonal Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    PI of this project. In a separate development, a modification was made through this work to the Slingo cumulus cloud fraction scheme used...in NOGAPS for over 20 years. The change is a scaling of the cloud fractions by the convective cloud base mass flux to ensure that the cumulus cloud ...release of NAVGEM, the effect of this change in limiting a severe overprediction of shallow cumulus cloud cover in this context was also very

  20. Feature: Controlling Seasonal Allergies | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Seasonal Allergies Controlling Seasonal Allergies Past Issues / Spring 2012 Table of Contents In ... response to allergens, helping to prevent allergic reactions. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Allergen and T-Cell Reagent ...

  1. Managing the Sneezing Season | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Season Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents Seasonal allergies, and what to do about them Allergic reactions ... Source: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Seasonal Allergies: Nuisance or Real Health Threat? For most people, ...

  2. How Does Seasonal Flu Differ From Pandemic Flu?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues How Does Seasonal Flu Differ From Pandemic Flu? Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Seasonal Flu Pandemic Flu Outbreaks follow predictable seasonal patterns; occurs ...

  3. Seasonal variation of heavy metals in oysters from Darwin Harbor, Northern Territory, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Peerzada, N.; Kozlik, E. )

    1992-01-01

    In this study the authors report the seasonal variation in the concentrations of zinc, lead, cadmium, copper, and iron in oysters over a period of eight months from five different sites in Darwin Harbor. The site selection was based on previous work, with the exception of Darwin Wharf. Seasonal variation of heavy metals in marine organisms, especially bivalves, has been reported by many workers. The highest concentrations of zinc and copper were found in the summer month of January and the lowest at the end of winter month of October. Darwin Harbor lies well within the tropics and is subjected to two weather systems. The dry season extends from April to October approximately, when southeast trade winds prevail, and the wet season extends from November to April, when the northwest monsoon prevails. Sea-surface temperatures of Darwin Harbor show no great variation between wet and dry seasons. It is virtually constant during the wet season (about 28-29C) and only a few degrees lower during the dry season (25-28C). Salinity ranges from 27.8 to 35.5 ppt between the months of February and September.

  4. RISK EQUIVALENT SEASONAL WASTE LOAD ALLOCATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal wastewater discharge programs employ different effluent standards during different times of the year to take advantage of the variation in a receiving water's susceptibility to adverse impacts. These programs should try to achieve the maximum economic benefits possible w...

  5. Highlights of the 2009 Hurricane Season

    NASA Video Gallery

    Picture yourself sitting in space watching the highlights of the 2009's Atlantic Ocean hurricane season in fast-forward. This latest animation from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adm...

  6. Natural Resources: There Is a Season

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    You'll gain plenty of weather resources from this month's issue (temperature concepts, weather instruments, the water cycle/evaporation). You can use that information with these outdoor seasonal connections.

  7. Photoperiodic time measurement and seasonal immunological plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Tyler J.; Prendergast, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal variations in immunity are common in nature, and changes in day length are sufficient to trigger enhancement and suppression of immune function in many vertebrates. Drawing primarily on data from Siberian hamsters, this review describes formal and physiological aspects of the neuroendocrine regulation of seasonal changes in mammalian immunity. Photoperiod regulates immunity in a trait-specific manner, and seasonal changes in gonadal hormone secretion and thyroid hormone signaling all participate in seasonal immunomodulation. Photoperiod-driven changes in the hamster reproductive and immune systems are associated with changes in iodothyronine deiodinase-mediated thyroid hormone signaling, but photoperiod exerts opposite effects on the epigenetic regulation of reproductive neuroendocrine and lymphoid tissues. Photoperiodic changes in immunocompetence may explain a proportion of the annual variance in disease incidence and severity in nature, and provide a useful framework to help understand brain-immune interactions. PMID:25456046

  8. Seasonal changes in Saturn's stratosphere from Cassini/CIRS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvestre, Melody; Fouchet, T.; Guerlet, S.; Spiga, A.; Flasar, F. M.; Hesman, B. E.; Bjoraker, G. L.

    2013-10-01

    atmospheric dynamics. Following this work, we will study its seasonal variations between 2005 and 2012 in order to provide constraints on Saturn's stratospheric seasonal circulation.

  9. Late Cretaceous seasonal ocean variability from the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew; Kemp, Alan E S; Pike, Jennifer

    2009-07-09

    The modern Arctic Ocean is regarded as a barometer of global change and amplifier of global warming and therefore records of past Arctic change are critical for palaeoclimate reconstruction. Little is known of the state of the Arctic Ocean in the greenhouse period of the Late Cretaceous epoch (65-99 million years ago), yet records from such times may yield important clues to Arctic Ocean behaviour in near-future warmer climates. Here we present a seasonally resolved Cretaceous sedimentary record from the Alpha ridge of the Arctic Ocean. This palaeo-sediment trap provides new insight into the workings of the Cretaceous marine biological carbon pump. Seasonal primary production was dominated by diatom algae but was not related to upwelling as was previously hypothesized. Rather, production occurred within a stratified water column, involving specially adapted species in blooms resembling those of the modern North Pacific subtropical gyre, or those indicated for the Mediterranean sapropels. With increased CO(2) levels and warming currently driving increased stratification in the global ocean, this style of production that is adapted to stratification may become more widespread. Our evidence for seasonal diatom production and flux testify to an ice-free summer, but thin accumulations of terrigenous sediment within the diatom ooze are consistent with the presence of intermittent sea ice in the winter, supporting a wide body of evidence for low temperatures in the Late Cretaceous Arctic Ocean, rather than recent suggestions of a 15 degrees C mean annual temperature at this time.

  10. The oceanic contribution to the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Marcus, S. L.; Johns, C. M.; Hide, R.; Thompson, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal variations in the speed of the Earth's rotation manifest themselves as fluctuations in the length of the day (LOD) with an amplitude of about 1000 microseconds. We know from previous work that at least 95% of these variations can be accounted for in terms of angular momentum exchanged between the atmosphere and the solid Earth. Here we examine the respective contributions of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and the global oceans to the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget, using in situ data from the Drake Passage and results from both the oceanic regional model (Fine Resolution Antarctic Model -- FRAM) of Webb et al. (1991) and the global ocanic model of Maier-Reimer et al. (1993) as analyzed by Brosche et al. (1990). The estimated annual contribution of the ACC (2-4 microsec) is much smaller than the total variation in the oceanic models or the existing LOD-AAM residual (both approximately 15-20 microsec). The estimated semi-annual ACC contribution (3-8 microsec) is offset by counter-current further north in both oceanic models, which exhibit larger semi-annual variations in planetary angular momentum. Further refinements in the Earth's seasonal angular momentum budget, therefore, will require the full (planetary plus relative) contribution of the global oceans in addition to that of the ACC.

  11. Early and Real-Time Detection of Seasonal Influenza Onset

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Pita, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Every year, influenza epidemics affect millions of people and place a strong burden on health care services. A timely knowledge of the onset of the epidemic could allow these services to prepare for the peak. We present a method that can reliably identify and signal the influenza outbreak. By combining official Influenza-Like Illness (ILI) incidence rates, searches for ILI-related terms on Google, and an on-call triage phone service, Saúde 24, we were able to identify the beginning of the flu season in 8 European countries, anticipating current official alerts by several weeks. This work shows that it is possible to detect and consistently anticipate the onset of the flu season, in real-time, regardless of the amplitude of the epidemic, with obvious advantages for health care authorities. We also show that the method is not limited to one country, specific region or language, and that it provides a simple and reliable signal that can be used in early detection of other seasonal diseases. PMID:28158192

  12. Early and Real-Time Detection of Seasonal Influenza Onset.

    PubMed

    Won, Miguel; Marques-Pita, Manuel; Louro, Carlota; Gonçalves-Sá, Joana

    2017-02-01

    Every year, influenza epidemics affect millions of people and place a strong burden on health care services. A timely knowledge of the onset of the epidemic could allow these services to prepare for the peak. We present a method that can reliably identify and signal the influenza outbreak. By combining official Influenza-Like Illness (ILI) incidence rates, searches for ILI-related terms on Google, and an on-call triage phone service, Saúde 24, we were able to identify the beginning of the flu season in 8 European countries, anticipating current official alerts by several weeks. This work shows that it is possible to detect and consistently anticipate the onset of the flu season, in real-time, regardless of the amplitude of the epidemic, with obvious advantages for health care authorities. We also show that the method is not limited to one country, specific region or language, and that it provides a simple and reliable signal that can be used in early detection of other seasonal diseases.

  13. Seasonal Fluctuation of Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytaemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    carriers has been noted in northern annual cycle that reflected the seasonal abundance of Nigeria (MOLINEAUX & GRAMICCIA, 1980) and a infective Anopheles ...of infective Anopheles 2 weeks, but thereafter they are relatively rare and dirus, the predominant vector, was seasonal (ROSEN- show no marked p...those contributing at least 8 Mosqsito infectomn specimens per year, 176 people fo the first year and Man-biting Anopheles were collected outdoors from

  14. The Arctic Ocean's seasonal cycle must change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, James; Ding, Yanni

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses anticipated changes to the seasonal cycle of the Arctic Ocean along with Arctic surface climate due to the reduction of seasonal sea ice cover expected in the 21st century. Net surface shortwave radiation is a function of surface reflectivity and atmospheric transparency as well as solar declination. Recent observational studies and modeling results presented here strongly suggest that this excess heat in the summer is currently being stored locally in the form of ocean warming and sea ice melt. This heat is lost in winter/spring through surface loss through longwave and turbulent processes causing ocean cooling and the refreezing of sea ice. A striking feature of Arctic climate during the 20th century has been the enhanced warming experienced during winter in response to increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gasses. The amplitude of the seasonal cycle of surface air temperature is declining by gradually warming winter temperatures relative to summer temperatures. Bintanja and van der Linden (2013) show this process will eventually cause the 30C seasonal change in air temperature to reduce by half as seasonal sea ice disappears. The much weaker seasonal cycle of ocean temperature, which is controlled by the need to store excess surface heat seasonally, is also going to be affected by the loss of sea ice but in quite different ways. In particular the ocean will need to compensate for the loss of seasonal heat storage by the ice pack. This study examines consequences for the Arctic Ocean stratification and circulation in a suite of CMIP5 models under future emissions scenarios relative to their performance during the 20th century and to explore a range of model ocean responses to declining sea ice cover on the Arctic Ocean.

  15. Neuronal plasticity and seasonal reproduction in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Michael N.; Ladha, Zamin; Coolen, Lique M.; Hileman, Stanley M.; Connors, John M.; Goodman, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal reproduction represents a naturally occurring example of functional plasticity in the adult brain since it reflects changes in neuroendocrine pathways controlling GnRH secretion and, in particular, the responsiveness of GnRH neurons to estradiol negative feedback. Structural plasticity within this neural circuitry may, in part, be responsible for seasonal switches in the negative feedback control of GnRH secretion that underlies annual reproductive transitions. In this paper, we review evidence for structural changes in the circuitry responsible for seasonal inhibition of GnRH secretion in sheep. These include changes in synaptic inputs onto GnRH neurons, as well as onto dopamine neurons in the A15 cell group, a nucleus that play a key role in estradiol negative feedback. We also present preliminary data suggesting a role for neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors as an early mechanistic step in the plasticity that accompanies seasonal reproductive transitions in the sheep. Finally, we review recent evidence suggesting that kisspeptin cells of the arcuate nucleus constitute a critical intermediary in the control of seasonal reproduction. While a majority of the data for a role of neuronal plasticity in seasonal reproduction has come from the sheep model, the players and principles are likely to have relevance for reproduction in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans, and in both health and disease. PMID:21143669

  16. Seasonal evapotranspiration patterns in mangrove forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Jordan G.; DeLonge, Marcia S.; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2014-04-01

    Diurnal and seasonal controls on water vapor fluxes were investigated in a subtropical mangrove forest in Everglades National Park, Florida. Energy partitioning between sensible and latent heat fluxes was highly variable during the 2004-2005 study period. During the dry season, the mangrove forest behaved akin to a semiarid ecosystem as most of the available energy was partitioned into sensible heat, which gave Bowen ratio values exceeding 1.0 and minimum latent heat fluxes of 5 MJ d-1. In contrast, during the wet season the mangrove forest acted as a well-watered, broadleaved deciduous forest, with Bowen ratio values of 0.25 and latent heat fluxes reaching 18 MJ d-1. During the dry season, high salinity levels (> 30 parts per thousand, ppt) caused evapotranspiration to decline and correspondingly resulted in reduced canopy conductance. From multiple linear regression, daily average canopy conductance to water vapor declined with increasing salinity, vapor pressure deficit, and daily sums of solar irradiance but increased with air temperature and friction velocity. Using these relationships, appropriately modified Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor models reliably reproduced seasonal trends in daily evapotranspiration. Such numerical models, using site-specific parameters, are crucial for constructing seasonal water budgets, constraining hydrological models, and driving regional climate models over mangrove forests.

  17. Distinct patterns of seasonal Greenland glacier velocity

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Twila; Joughin, Ian; Smith, Ben; van den Broeke, Michiel R; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Noël, Brice; Usher, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Predicting Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss due to ice dynamics requires a complete understanding of spatiotemporal velocity fluctuations and related control mechanisms. We present a 5 year record of seasonal velocity measurements for 55 marine-terminating glaciers distributed around the ice sheet margin, along with ice-front position and runoff data sets for each glacier. Among glaciers with substantial speed variations, we find three distinct seasonal velocity patterns. One pattern indicates relatively high glacier sensitivity to ice-front position. The other two patterns are more prevalent and appear to be meltwater controlled. These patterns reveal differences in which some subglacial systems likely transition seasonally from inefficient, distributed hydrologic networks to efficient, channelized drainage, while others do not. The difference may be determined by meltwater availability, which in some regions may be influenced by perennial firn aquifers. Our results highlight the need to understand subglacial meltwater availability on an ice sheet-wide scale to predict future dynamic changes. Key Points First multi-region seasonal velocity measurements show regional differences Seasonal velocity fluctuations on most glaciers appear meltwater controlled Seasonal development of efficient subglacial drainage geographically divided PMID:25821275

  18. Neuronal plasticity and seasonal reproduction in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Michael N; Ladha, Zamin; Coolen, Lique M; Hileman, Stanley M; Connors, John M; Goodman, Robert L

    2010-12-01

    Seasonal reproduction represents a naturally occurring example of functional plasticity in the adult brain as it reflects changes in neuroendocrine pathways controlling gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and, in particular, the responsiveness of GnRH neurons to estradiol negative feedback. Structural plasticity within this neural circuitry may, in part, be responsible for seasonal switches in the negative feedback control of GnRH secretion that underlie annual reproductive transitions. We review evidence for structural changes in the circuitry responsible for seasonal inhibition of GnRH secretion in sheep. These include changes in synaptic inputs onto GnRH neurons, as well as onto dopamine neurons in the A15 cell group, a nucleus that plays a key role in estradiol negative feedback. We also present preliminary data suggesting a role for neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors as an early mechanistic step in the plasticity that accompanies seasonal reproductive transitions in sheep. Finally, we review recent evidence suggesting that kisspeptin cells of the arcuate nucleus constitute a critical intermediary in the control of seasonal reproduction. Although a majority of the data for a role of neuronal plasticity in seasonal reproduction has come from the sheep model, the players and principles are likely to have relevance for reproduction in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans, and in both health and disease.

  19. The seasonal cycle of water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the behavior of water in the Mars atmosphere and subsurface is appropriate now that data from the Mariner and Viking spacecraft have been analyzed and discussed for several years following completion of those missions. Observations and analyses pertinent to the seasonal cycle of water vapor in the atmosphere of Mars are reviewed, with attention toward transport of water and the seasonal exchange of water between the atmosphere and various non-atmospheric reservoirs. Possible seasonally-accessible sources and sinks for water include water ice on or within the seasonal and residual polar caps; surface or subsurface ice in the high-latitude regions of the planet; adsorbed or chemically-bound water within the near-surface regolith; or surface or subsurface liquid water. The stability of water within each of these reservoirs is discussed, as are the mechanisms for driving exchange of the water with the atmosphere and the timescales for exchange. Specific conclusions are reached about the distribution of water and the viability of each mechanism as a seasonal reservoir. Discussion is also included of the behavior of water on longer timescales, driven by the variations in solar forcing due to the quasi-periodic variations of the orbital obliquity. Finally, specific suggestions are made for future observations from spacecraft which would further define or constrain the seasonal cycle of water.

  20. A study of weekly and seasonal variation of stroke onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongbing; Sekine, Michikazu; Chen, Xiaoli; Kagamimori, Sadanobu

    2002-10-01

    A registry based study was conducted to assess the variation in first-onset stroke with weekdays and seasons, in relation to the effects of age. Between 1 December 1991 and 30 November 1998, 10,729 first-onset stroke patients aged 25 or more were registered in Toyama Prefecture, Japan. We compared the weekly and seasonal variation in first-onset stroke by a one-way goodness-of-fit χ2-test. The relationship between seasonal variation in stroke onset and age was also evaluated by the method of Kendall's τ-b R × C tables with ordered categories. The frequency of onset of all strokes and cerebral infarctions (CI) was significantly higher on weekdays than at weekends (P < 0.01). More men had strokes and CI on a Monday (P < 0.01), and more women had cerebral hemorrhage (CH) on a Monday and CI at the end of the week. Stroke incidence was higher in patients aged less than 60 years (20.6%) than in those aged 60 years or over (18.7%) on a Monday compared to the weekend. By χ2-test, comparing observed with expected numbers of stroke onsets, weighted by the number of days in each 3-month period, the incidence of all strokes, CI and CH was significantly higher in winter and spring than in summer. The seasonal variation in the onset of stroke declined with age: all strokes (P < 0.001) and CH (P < 0.001) in both genders; subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.001) only in men. Our study shows that the onset of stroke is more frequent on weekdays than on weekends, and may be associated with changes in psychophysiological stresses between working days and the weekend. We also observed a clear negative dose response relationship between seasonal variations in occurrence and age. It may be speculated that younger people have more change to work outdoors, exposing themselves to the winter environment. Their lifestyle and physiological condition may be different from those of older people.

  1. Can we predict solar radiation at seasonal time-scale over Europe? A renewable energy perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Matteo; Alessandri, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Surface solar radiation can be an important variable for the activities related to renewable energies (photovoltaic) and agriculture. Having accurate forecast may be of potential use for planning and operational tasks. This study examines the predictability of seasonal surface solar radiation comparing ECMWF System4 Seasonal operational forecasts with reanalyses (ERA-INTERIM, MERRA) and other datasets (NASA/GEWEX SRB, WFDEI). This work is focused on the period 1984-2007 and it tries to answer the following questions: 1) How similar are the chosen datasets looking at average and interannual variability? 2) What is the skill of seasonal forecasts in predicting solar radiation? 3) Is it useful for solar power operations and planning the seasonal prediction of solar radiation? It is important to assess the capability of climate datasets in describing surface solar radiation but at the same time it is critical to understand the needs of solar power industry in order to find the right problems to tackle.

  2. Effect on atmospheric CO2 from seasonal variations in the high latitude ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler

    1989-01-01

    Data from the North Pacific gyre, Bering Sea, and North Atlantic show large seasonal fluctuations in the pCO2 of surface waters. The seasonal variation in these latitudes apparently has a generic pattern: higher surface water pCO2 in winter and lower in summer. Satellite data will eventually help decipher the relative effects of temperature and biological production in the seasonal carbon cycle, but as yet little work has been done on what possible role the seasonality of pCO2 in the high latitudes might have on the average value of atmospheric pCO2. A model is developed that shows the average value for atmospheric pCO2 depends upon the ratio of the rates at which the ocean/atmosphere system moves toward equilibrium values during the summer and winter conditions of the high latitude ocean.

  3. The impact of climate variability and seasonal characteristics on flood occurrence in north-eastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccatelli, Davide; Borga, Marco

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to analyse the impact of climate variability and seasonal characteristics in the long-term regimes of extreme precipitation and floods in catchments located in north-eastern Italy. We use seasonality indices, climate variability indexes (NOA and WMO) and atmospheric circulation patterns to isolate the sources of variability on flood-inducing processes. This is supported by cluster analyses to identify areas of similar flood processes, both in terms of precipitation forcing and catchment processes. The results allow to isolate regions of similar flood generation processes, effects of soil moisture seasonality due to evaporation and effects of soil moisture seasonality due to snow melt. It is argued that the synoptic approach proposed here is valuable in both flood analysis and flood estimation.

  4. NOVA making stuff: Season 2

    SciTech Connect

    Leombruni, Lisa; Paulsen, Christine Andrews

    2014-12-12

    Over the course of four weeks in fall 2013, 11.7 million Americans tuned in to PBS to follow host David Pogue as he led them in search of engineering and scientific breakthroughs poised to change our world. Levitating trains, quantum computers, robotic bees, and bomb-detecting plants—these were just a few of the cutting-edge innovations brought into the living rooms of families across the country in NOVA’s four-part series, Making Stuff: Faster, Wilder, Colder, and Safer. Each of the four one-hour programs gave viewers a behind-the-scenes look at novel technologies poised to change our world—showing them how basic research and scientific discovery can hold the keys to transforming how we live. Making Stuff Season 2 (MS2) combined true entertainment with educational value, creating a popular and engaging series that brought accessible science into the homes of millions. NOVA’s goal to engage the public with such technological innovation and basic research extended beyond the broadcast series, including a variety of online, educational, and promotional activities: original online science reporting, web-only short-form videos, a new online quiz-game, social media engagement and promotion, an educational outreach “toolkit” for science educators to create their own “makerspaces,” an online community of practice, a series of nationwide Innovation Cafés, educator professional development, a suite of teacher resources, an “Idealab,” participation in national conferences, and specialized station relation and marketing. A summative evaluation of the MS2 project indicates that overall, these activities helped make a significant impact on the viewers, users, and participants that NOVA reached. The final evaluation conducted by Concord Evaluation Group (CEG) confidently concluded that the broadcast, website, and outreach activities were successful at achieving the project’s intended impacts. CEG reported that the MS2 series and website content were

  5. 1984-1985 ANSMET Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, Scott

    The Antarctic Search for Meteorites program (ANSMET), under the overall direction of W. A. Cassidy (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa.), continued its work of past years by conducting an expedition to southern Victoria Land during the 1984-1985 austral summer. Party members included Cassidy, Catherine King-Frazier (James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Va.), Scott Sandford (Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.), John Schutt (University of Pittsburgh), Roberta Score (National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Johnson Space Center, Houston, Tex.), Carl Thompson (a freelance mountaineer from Canterbury, New Zealand), and Robert Walker (Washington University).

  6. Ensemble forecasting of sub-seasonal to seasonal streamflow by a Bayesian joint probability modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Schepen, Andrew; Wang, Q. J.

    2016-10-01

    The Bayesian joint probability (BJP) modelling approach is used operationally to produce seasonal (three-month-total) ensemble streamflow forecasts in Australia. However, water resource managers are calling for more informative sub-seasonal forecasts. Taking advantage of BJP's capability of handling multiple predictands, ensemble forecasting of sub-seasonal to seasonal streamflows is investigated for 23 catchments around Australia. Using antecedent streamflow and climate indices as predictors, monthly forecasts are developed for the three-month period ahead. Forecast reliability and skill are evaluated for the period 1982-2011 using a rigorous leave-five-years-out cross validation strategy. BJP ensemble forecasts of monthly streamflow volumes are generally reliable in ensemble spread. Forecast skill, relative to climatology, is positive in 74% of cases in the first month, decreasing to 57% and 46% respectively for streamflow forecasts for the final two months of the season. As forecast skill diminishes with increasing lead time, the monthly forecasts approach climatology. Seasonal forecasts accumulated from monthly forecasts are found to be similarly skilful to forecasts from BJP models based on seasonal totals directly. The BJP modelling approach is demonstrated to be a viable option for producing ensemble time-series sub-seasonal to seasonal streamflow forecasts.

  7. Habitat of the corn leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) during the dry (winter) season in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Moya-Raygoza, Gustavo; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Nault, Lowell R

    2007-10-01

    Although the corn leafhopper Dalbulus maidis (DeLong and Wolcott) is the most important vector of maize pathogens in Latin America, little is known about how and where it overwinters (passes the dry season), particularly in Mexico. The objectives of this study were (1) to monitor the abundance of D. maidis adults throughout the dry season in maize and maize-free habitats and (2) to determine where and how D. maidis adults, exposed or nonexposed to the maize pathogen Spiroplasma kunkelii Whitcomb, overwinter in a maize-free habitat. Work for the first objective was done during the two consecutive dry seasons of 1999-2000 and 2000-2001; the second objective was done during the dry seasons of 2003-2004 and 2005-2006. During the dry winter seasons, D. maidis was prevalent as long as maize was present in irrigated areas. The leafhopper was found in 52 of the 58 irrigated maize fields sampled in Mexico at the end of the dry seasons of 1999-2000 and 2000-2001. However, leafhopper adults were not found in nonirrigated maize-free habitats at high elevation during the dry winter season (February, March, and April), although leafhopper adults were prevalent on perennial wild grasses in January after maize harvest. Additional experiments revealed, however, that corn leafhopper adults, although few in number, survived the entire dry season in these nonirrigated maize-free fields. Also, no detectable difference in survival existed between leafhoppers exposed and those not exposed to S. kunkelli during the two dry seasons in the maize-free habitat.

  8. Seasonal heat acclimatization in wildland firefighters.

    PubMed

    Lui, Brianna; Cuddy, John S; Hailes, Walter S; Ruby, Brent C

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine changes in physiological markers of heat acclimatization across a 4-month wildland fire season. Wildland firefighters (WLFF) (n=12) and non-WLFF (n=14) were assessed pre- and post-season for body mass, percent body fat, and peak VO₂. Both groups completed a 60-min heat stress trial (walking at 50% of peak VO₂) in a climate controlled chamber (43.3 °C, 33% RH) pre and post-fire season (May through September). During the trials, core (Tc) and skin (Tsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), physiological strain index (PSI), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured. There were no differences pre or post-season between the WLFF and non-WLFF groups in body mass, percent body fat, or peak V.O2. During the 73 days where the WLFF were involved in direct wildland fire suppression, daily high temperature for the WLFF was higher compared to the non-WLFF, 30.6 ± 5.4 °C and 26.9 ± 6.1 °C, respectively, p<0.05. Tc was lower at post-season compared to pre-season (p<0.05) for the WLFF at 30, 45, and 60 min (pre 30, 45, and 60: 37.9 ± 0.3, 38.3 ± 0.3 and 38.5 ± 0.3 °C, respectively; post 30, 45, and 60: 37.8 ± 0.3, 38.1 ± 0.3 and 38.2 ± 0.4 °C, respectively). For WLFF, PSI was lower (p<0.05) at 15, 30, 45, and 60 min at post-season compared to pre-season (4.2 ± 0.7, 5.6 ± 0.9, 6.5 ± 0.9, and 7.1 ± 1.1 for 15, 30, 45, and 60 min pre-season, respectively; 3.6 ± 0.8, 4.9 ± 1.0, 5.7 ± 1.2, 6.3 ± 1.3 for 15, 30, 45, and 60 min post-season, respectively). For WLFF, RPE was lower during the post-season trial at 30, 45, and 60 min (pre 30, 45, and 60: 11.7 ± 1.4, 12.3 ± 1.2, and 13.5 ± 1.4, respectively; post 30, 45, and 60: 10.7 ± 1.2, 11.3 ± 1.3, and 11.9 ± 1.5, respectively), p<0.05. There were no differences between pre and post-season for the non-WLFF for Tc and PSI, but RPE was lower at 15 min during the pre-season trial. WLFFs demonstrated significant decreases in Tc, PSI, and RPE during controlled heat

  9. Influenza Vaccination Coverage During Pregnancy - Selected Sites, United States, 2005-06 Through 2013-14 Influenza Vaccine Seasons.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Stephen; Van Bennekom, Carla M; Mitchell, Allen A

    2016-12-09

    Seasonal influenza vaccine is recommended for all pregnant women because of their increased risk for influenza-associated complications. In addition, receipt of influenza vaccine by women during pregnancy has been shown to protect their infants for several months after birth (1). As part of its case-control surveillance study of medications and birth defects, the Birth Defects Study of the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University has recorded data on vaccinations received during pregnancy since the 2005-06 influenza vaccination season. Among the 5,318 mothers of infants without major structural birth defects (control newborns) in this population, seasonal influenza vaccination coverage was approximately 20% in the seasons preceding the 2009-10 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza season. During the 2009-10 influenza vaccination season, influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women increased to 33%, and has increased modestly since then, to 41% during the 2013-14 season. Among pregnant women who received influenza vaccine during the 2013-14 season, 80% reported receiving their vaccine in a traditional health care setting, (e.g., the office of their obstetrician or primary care physician or their prenatal clinic) and 20% received it in a work/school, pharmacy/supermarket, or government setting. Incorporating routine administration of seasonal influenza vaccination into the management of pregnant women by their health care providers might increase coverage with this important public health intervention.

  10. Seasonal hydrological ensemble forecasts over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Louise; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Stephens, Elisabeth; Cloke, Hannah; Pappenberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the limits of predictability in dynamical seasonal discharge forecasting, in both space and time, over Europe. Seasonal forecasts have an important socioeconomic value. Applications are numerous and cover hydropower management, spring flood prediction, low flow prediction for navigation and agricultural water demands. Additionally, the constant increase in NWP skill for longer lead times and the predicted increase in the intensity and frequency of hydro-meteorological extremes, have amplified the incentive to promote and further improve hydrological forecasts on sub-seasonal to seasonal timescales. In this study, seasonal hydrological forecasts (SEA), driven by the ECMWF's System 4 in hindcast mode, were analysed against an Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) benchmark. The ESP was forced with an ensemble of resampled historical meteorological observations and started with perfect initial conditions. Both forecasts were produced by the LISFLOOD model, run on the pan-European scale with a spatial resolution of 5 by 5 km. The forecasts were issued monthly on a daily time step, from 1990 until the current time, up to a lead time of 7 months. The seasonal discharge forecasts were analysed against the ESP on a catchment scale in terms of their accuracy, skill and sharpness, using a diverse set of verification metrics (e.g. KGE, CRPSS and ROC). Additionally, a reverse-ESP was constructed by forcing the LISFLOOD model with a single perfect meteorological set of observations and initiated from an ensemble of resampled historical initial conditions. The comparison of the ESP with the reverse-ESP approach enabled the identification of the respective contribution of meteorological forcings and hydrologic initial conditions errors to seasonal discharge forecasting uncertainties in Europe. These results could help pinpoint target elements of the forecasting chain which, after being improved, could lead to substantial increase in discharge predictability

  11. Diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in rectal temperature, respiration and heart rate of pack donkeys in a tropical savannah zone.

    PubMed

    Ayo, Joseph O; Dzenda, Tavershima; Olaifa, Folashade; Ake, Stephen A; Sani, Ismaila

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine diurnal and seasonal changes in basic physiologic responses of donkeys adapted to the tropical Savannah. The rectal temperature (RT), respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate (HR) of six male Nubian pack donkeys, and the dry-bulb temperature (DBT), relative humidity and heat index of the experimental site were concurrently recorded hourly, from 06:00 h to 18:00 h (GMT +1), for three days, spread 1 week apart, during the cold-dry (harmattan), hot-dry and humid (rainy) seasons, in an open grazing field. Values of the physiologic parameters recorded during the morning (06:00 h-11:00 h) were lower (P<0.001) than those obtained in the afternoon (12:00 h-15:00 h) and evening (16:00 h-18:00 h) hours in all seasons, but the robustness of the diurnal rhythm differed (P<0.05) between seasons. Many diurnal hourly DBT mean values recorded during the harmattan and hot-dry seasons fell outside the established thermoneutral zone for tropically-adapted donkeys, while those obtained during the rainy season were within the zone, indicating that the dry seasons were more thermally stressful to the donkeys than the humid season. Overall mean RT dropped (P<0.05) during the harmattan season. The RR rose, while HR dropped (P<0.001) during the hot-dry season. In conclusion, daytime and season had profound influence on RT, RR and HR of the donkeys, therefore, diurnal and seasonal variations should be taken into account during clinical evaluation before reaching conclusion on health status and fitness for work in donkeys.

  12. [Seasonal affective syndrome and phototherapy: theoretical concepts and clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Sartori, S; Poirrier, R

    1996-01-01

    Since 1984, there has been a great interest in the phenomenon of a particular seasonally recurrent mood disorder called seasonal affective disorder (SAD) or winter depression and its treatment: the phototherapy. Seasonal affective disorder is a syndrome described by Rosenthal in 1984. This mood disorder is characterized by depression with onset recurrent in autumn or winter and spontaneous spring or summer remission. It is associated with hypersomnia, anergia, increased appetite, weight gain and carbohydrate craving. The population prevalence in the north of the USA is estimated between 3 and 5%, but it changes with sex, age and also latitude. A long time ago, we know that animals are photoperiod sensitive and that the melatonin secretion in mammals is suppressed by the light. In 1980, Czeiler reported for the first time that human melatonin secretion can be suppressed by high light exposure (+/- 1500 lux). In 1982, Rosenthal, Lewy and al. reported an antidepressant effect of light exposure of a manic-depressive patient. The phototherapy was born. To treat the SAD, the most common procedure of phototherapy is to expose the subject during 2 hours early in the morning, between 06:00 and 09:00 AM. The subject is sitting before a light screen, he can work and has to fix the screen one time every minute. The most common side effects are headache, eyestrain, muscle pain. The ocular phototoxicity is controversed and it seems to be potentially dangerous if phototherapy is associated with tricyclic antidepressants, neuroleptics and other medication containing a tricyclic, heterocyclic or porphyrin ring system. Since this finding, many questions are asked about photoperiod and its effects in the human being. Lewy proposes for the winter depression the hypothesis of a phase delayed circadian rhythm, that can be treated by a morning light exposure. At the present time, many trials are going on to study the effects of phototherapy in other problems like insomnia, maladaptation

  13. Identifying and Mapping Seasonal Surface Water Frost with MGS TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapst, J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Wood, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    in the southern hemisphere are ~5-10 K lower for the corresponding season and latitude in the north [Smith, 2004]. This inhibits the stability of water frost on the surface in the southern hemisphere and also lowers the maximum thickness of a water frost layer, potentially limiting its effect on surface albedo. Our work here shows that the seasonal progression in the northern hemisphere of Mars involves extensive deposition of water frost, similar in progression to the carbon dioxide seasonal ice cap. This behavior results in variation of surface albedo and therefore affects surface and subsurface temperatures, which could impact the distribution of ground ice. Surface frost and subsequent mixing of vapor back into the atmosphere likely plays an important role in the global water cycle. Mapping of water frost's geographical extent, timing, and impact on surface albedo can provide insight into the processes controlling the present Martian climate. References: Cull, S. et al. (2010) JGR, 115, E00E19. Smith, M. D. (2004) Icarus, 167, 148-165. Svitek, T. and Murray, B. (1990) JGR, 95(B2), 1495-1510.

  14. Seasonal variations of haematological parameters in athletes.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Lundby, Carsten; Robach, Paul; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The influence of training and competition workloads is crucial for evaluation of longitudinal haematological data in athletes. There are only a few papers on the variation of haematological parameters during long-lasting periods and, especially, during an entire competitive season. We summarized that some haematological parameters can be influenced by long-term training and competition periods. Haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Ht) are decreased during the more intense periods of training, throughout the season. In different sport disciplines, the decline of Hb ranges from 3 to 8% during the competition season, while the range of reticulocytes (Ret%) varies from 5 to 21%. Reticulocytes are also decreased after long periods of training and competitions, but their variation is not necessarily associated with that of Hb. The qualitative variations (trend of modifications) of haematological parameters are roughly independent of the sport discipline, but quantitatively (amount of modifications) dependent on sport discipline. The modifications are more evident in cycling, running, swimming than they are in football and rugby. The variations of haematological parameters within the same sport discipline are qualitatively concordant and quantitatively different among separate but consecutive competitive seasons. These findings are described in aerobic and team sports sportsmen. The definition of reliable reference ranges in sportsmen would only be possible by following the best laboratory practices. For antidoping purposes more studies investigating haematological modifications during the season are advisable.

  15. Climate change and seasonal reproduction in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bronson, F H

    2009-11-27

    Seasonal reproduction is common among mammals at all latitudes, even in the deep tropics. This paper (i) discusses the neuroendocrine pathways via which foraging conditions and predictive cues such as photoperiod enforce seasonality, (ii) considers the kinds of seasonal challenges mammals actually face in natural habitats, and (iii) uses the information thus generated to suggest how seasonal reproduction might be influenced by global climate change. Food availability and ambient temperature determine energy balance, and variation in energy balance is the ultimate cause of seasonal breeding in all mammals and the proximate cause in many. Photoperiodic cueing is common among long-lived mammals from the highest latitudes down to the mid-tropics. It is much less common in shorter lived mammals at all latitudes. An unknown predictive cue triggers reproduction in some desert and dry grassland species when it rains. The available information suggests that as our climate changes the small rodents of the world may adapt rather easily but the longer lived mammals whose reproduction is regulated by photoperiod may not do so well. A major gap in our knowledge concerns the tropics; that is where most species live and where we have the least understanding of how reproduction is regulated by environmental factors.

  16. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jill C.; Sandve, Simen R.

    2013-01-01

    Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve. PMID:23761798

  17. Estimating seasonal evapotranspiration from temporal satellite images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Liu, Shu-Guang; Tieszen, Larry L.; Suyker, Andrew E.; Verma, Shashi B.

    2012-01-01

    Estimating seasonal evapotranspiration (ET) has many applications in water resources planning and management, including hydrological and ecological modeling. Availability of satellite remote sensing images is limited due to repeat cycle of satellite or cloud cover. This study was conducted to determine the suitability of different methods namely cubic spline, fixed, and linear for estimating seasonal ET from temporal remotely sensed images. Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model in conjunction with the wet METRIC (wMETRIC), a modified version of the METRIC model, was used to estimate ET on the days of satellite overpass using eight Landsat images during the 2001 crop growing season in Midwest USA. The model-estimated daily ET was in good agreement (R2 = 0.91) with the eddy covariance tower-measured daily ET. The standard error of daily ET was 0.6 mm (20%) at three validation sites in Nebraska, USA. There was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) among the cubic spline, fixed, and linear methods for computing seasonal (July–December) ET from temporal ET estimates. Overall, the cubic spline resulted in the lowest standard error of 6 mm (1.67%) for seasonal ET. However, further testing of this method for multiple years is necessary to determine its suitability.

  18. Voice change in seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Millqvist, Eva; Bende, Mats; Brynnel, Moa; Johansson, Inger; Kappel, Sofi; Ohlsson, Ann-Christine

    2008-07-01

    Voice problems are seldom reported in pollen allergy, although the allergic reaction involves the entire airways. The objective of this study was to investigate voice dysfunction during the pollen season in patients with allergic rhinitis. Thirty patients with verified birch pollen allergy and 30 controls were investigated twice, during the pollen season and outside the pollen season. Both times they scored respiratory and voice symptoms, the latter with the validated questionnaire Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and performed standardized voice recordings. These recordings were analyzed in a controlled manner by a professional voice therapist. During the allergy season, patients reported more respiratory and voice symptoms compared with controls. Those with blinded scored voice dysfunction scored their voice quality during springtime as 31 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] 20-42 mm), compared with 13 mm (95% CI 6-21 mm for participants without voice dysfunction (P<0.01). Furthermore, the group with experienced voice dysfunction scored significantly higher on the VHI in the functional and physical domains and in the total VHI score. Although voice problems during the pollen season are rarely discussed, in allergic rhinitis the larynx may also be involved. These findings support that some patients experience voice change, an experience which can be objectively confirmed.

  19. Modeling Results on the Seasonal Influence at the Martian Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Dolon; Clarke, John; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Mayyasi, Majd

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of HST ACS/SBC images of Mars in the far-ultraviolet taken in Oct-Nov 2007 and May-November 2014 indicate seasonal influence as a driving factor of the hydrogen corona, as has been reported earlier. To derive the changes in number density and temperature, the data must be compared to a radiative transfer model to simulate the resonantly scattered optically thick Lyman α emission from the exosphere of Mars. This work presents details on the modeling process used to analyze the data and the corresponding uncertainties. The escape flux is highly dependent on the characteristics of the martian exosphere like the exobase temperature and number density of H atoms as well as the presence or absence of a superthermal population of hydrogen atoms. Detailed studies on the workings of the radiative transfer model indicate degeneracy between temperature and number density values that can fit the data. Therefore it is difficult to accurately determine the characteristics of the martian hydrogen exosphere without independent measurement of at least one of the variables. However, HST observations have the advantage of observing a large portion of the dayside exosphere with intensity profiles extending from altitudes of 700 - 30,000 km giving a better estimate of the best-fit temperature and density values which characterize the martian exosphere under different seasonal conditions. Comparisons of the latitudinal symmetry from the HST images indicate the exosphere to be symmetric beyond 2.5 martian radii due to the broad trajectories of atoms at high altitudes.

  20. Seasonal cues in tropical organisms. Rainfall? Not necessarily!

    PubMed

    Wolda, Henk

    1989-09-01

    Activity seasons of tropical organisms often start, on the average, at or about the beginning of the rainy or dry seasons. The hypothesis that the onset or cessation of the wet season provides the seasonal cues necessary of the initiation of the activity season of some tropical organisms is tested with data on Panamanian cicadas. Seasonal adult activity patterns are described for cicada species in Panama, mostly from Barro Colorado Island (BCI), some from Las Cumbres. In all species the correlation between the timing of the beginning and the end of the cicada season was low and not significant, so that the actual beginning data of a cicada season in a particular year had little or no predictive value for the end date. Seven out of eleven species on BCI started their average activity season at the average beginning of the dry season (one species) or rainy season (six species). Nevertheless, in 13 years, correlations between the start or end of the cicada seasons and that of the meteorological seasons were low and not significant. At best, the beginning and end of the rains played a minor role as seasonal cues governing cicada emergence or the termination of the cicada season. It is speculated that photoperiod might be a major seasonal cue governing emergence, through its effects on the host plants.

  1. 46 CFR 42.30-10 - Southern Winter Seasonal Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BY SEA Zones, Areas, and Seasonal Periods § 42.30-10 Southern Winter Seasonal Zone. (a) The northern boundary of the Southern Winter Seasonal Zone is the rhumb line from the east coast of the American...) Valparaiso is to be considered as being on the boundary line of the Summer and the Winter Seasonal Zones....

  2. 46 CFR 42.30-10 - Southern Winter Seasonal Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BY SEA Zones, Areas, and Seasonal Periods § 42.30-10 Southern Winter Seasonal Zone. (a) The northern boundary of the Southern Winter Seasonal Zone is the rhumb line from the east coast of the American...) Valparaiso is to be considered as being on the boundary line of the Summer and the Winter Seasonal Zones....

  3. Human platelet sulfotransferase shows seasonal rhythms.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, D; Palego, L; Mazzanti, C; Silvestri, S; Cassano, G B

    1995-04-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the possible presence of seasonal changes in platelet phenolsulfotransferase (ST) in a group of 20 healthy, drug-free subjects of both sexes between 24 and 37 years of age. Blood samples were taken four times a year in the period immediately following the equinoxes and the solstices. The results showed that both Sts underwent seasonal changes: the lowest values were found in autumn and in winter, and the highest in the summer. A positive correlation between the two STs and the length of the photoperiod was observed in winter whereas in the spring we detected a negative correlation between the TL ST and the photoperiod length. Future studies should clarify whether platelet ST of patients with mood disorders shows a similar seasonality.

  4. Seasonal constraints on inferred planetary heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Karen A.; Huybers, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Planetary heating can be quantified using top of the atmosphere energy fluxes or through monitoring the heat content of the Earth system. It has been difficult, however, to compare the two methods with each other because of biases in satellite measurements and incomplete spatial coverage of ocean observations. Here we focus on the the seasonal cycle whose amplitude is large relative to satellite biases and observational errors. The seasonal budget can be closed through inferring contributions from high-latitude oceans and marginal seas using the covariance structure of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Earth System Model (CESM1). In contrast, if these regions are approximated as the average across well-observed regions, the amplitude of the seasonal cycle is overestimated relative to satellite constraints. Analysis of the same CESM1 simulation indicates that complete measurement of the upper ocean would increase the magnitude and precision of interannual trend estimates in ocean heating more than fully measuring the deep ocean.

  5. Seasonal variations in menarche in Oslo.

    PubMed

    Brundtland, G H; Liestøl, K

    1982-01-01

    Data from about 11,000 girls aged 10-18 years were used to study seasonal variations in menarche in Oslo, Norway. A statistical method which takes into account the changes over time in the age-structure of the sample is used to show that throughout the period 1965-1970, the menarche incidence varied according to a stable bimodal seasonal pattern with peaks in December-January and July-August. This pattern corresponds to those observed in Sweden and Finland, but deviates from other reported patterns, i.e. from the variations found in Copenhagen. It is argued that a possible cause of general lack of well supported hypotheses for seasonal variations is that an environmental factor may cause marked cyclic variations, without having a marked effect on the process determining maturation.

  6. Seasonal phytoplanktonic diversity of Kitham lake, Agra.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Ashesh; Chauhan, S V S

    2006-01-01

    Two years (Jan. 2000 - Dec. 2001) data on the seasonal studies of phytoplanktonic diversity of Kitham lake (Sur Sarovar) Agra revealed the presence of 73 algal species. A limited number of these were recorded throughout the year, while others were distributed in different seasons mainly in winter and summer seasons. During winters, Chlorophyceae was the most dominant group followed by Bacillariophyceae. On the other hand, Cyanophyceae and Euglenophyceae were the most dominant during summers. Certain species e.g. Pandorina morum, Pediastrum tetras, Gonium sp., Chlorella vulgaris, Scendesmus quadricauda, Oedogonium cardiocum, Synedra ulna, Oscillatoria agardhii and Euglena gracillis were recorded throughout the year. Chlorella, Stigeoclonium, Pandorina, Micratinium, Oscillatoria, Anacystis, Nitzschia and Cymbella were found to be good indicators of water pollution.

  7. [Seasonality in asthma: Impact and treatments].

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, L; Just, J; Humbert, M; Leroyer, C; Epaud, R

    2016-11-01

    The role of seasons should be taken into account in the management of asthma. The environment varies between seasons and it is well documented that asthma is modulated by environment. Viruses cause asthma exacerbations peak, in winter, in adults while the peak is present in September in children. Allergens are probably a less powerful source of asthma exacerbation than viruses but pollen involvement in spring and summer and dust mites in autumn are indisputable. Air pollutants, present in summer during the hottest periods, are also highly involved in asthma exacerbations. Indoor air pollution, in winter, is also implicated in asthma disease. All these environmental factors are synergistic and increase the risk of asthma exacerbation. Therapies should be adapted to each season depending on environmental factors potentially involved in the asthma disease.

  8. Thyroid hormone and seasonal regulation of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Organisms living outside the tropics use changes in photoperiod to adapt to seasonal changes in the environment. Several models have contributed to an understanding of this mechanism at the molecular and endocrine levels. Subtropical birds are excellent models for the study of these mechanisms because of their rapid and dramatic response to changes in photoperiod. Studies of birds have demonstrated that light is perceived by a deep brain photoreceptor and long day-induced thyrotropin (TSH) from the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland causes local thyroid hormone activation within the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). The locally generated bioactive thyroid hormone, T₃, regulates seasonal gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, and hence gonadotropin secretion. In mammals, the eyes are the only photoreceptor involved in photoperiodic time perception and nocturnal melatonin secretion provides an endocrine signal of photoperiod to the PT to regulate TSH. Here, I review the current understanding of the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling seasonal reproduction in mammals and birds.

  9. Distinct patterns of seasonal Greenland glacier velocity.

    PubMed

    Moon, Twila; Joughin, Ian; Smith, Ben; van den Broeke, Michiel R; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Noël, Brice; Usher, Mika

    2014-10-28

    Predicting Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss due to ice dynamics requires a complete understanding of spatiotemporal velocity fluctuations and related control mechanisms. We present a 5 year record of seasonal velocity measurements for 55 marine-terminating glaciers distributed around the ice sheet margin, along with ice-front position and runoff data sets for each glacier. Among glaciers with substantial speed variations, we find three distinct seasonal velocity patterns. One pattern indicates relatively high glacier sensitivity to ice-front position. The other two patterns are more prevalent and appear to be meltwater controlled. These patterns reveal differences in which some subglacial systems likely transition seasonally from inefficient, distributed hydrologic networks to efficient, channelized drainage, while others do not. The difference may be determined by meltwater availability, which in some regions may be influenced by perennial firn aquifers. Our results highlight the need to understand subglacial meltwater availability on an ice sheet-wide scale to predict future dynamic changes.

  10. The seasonally changing cloud feedbacks contribution to the ENSO seasonal phase-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommenget, Dietmar; Yu, Yanshan

    2016-12-01

    ENSO variability has a seasonal phase-locking, with SST anomalies on average decreasing during the beginning of the year and SST anomalies increasing during the second half of the year. As a result of this, the ENSO SST variability is smallest in April and the so call `spring barrier' exists in the predictability of ENSO. In this study we analysis how the seasonal phase-locking of surface short wave radiation associated with cloud cover feedbacks contribute to this phenomenon. We base our analysis on observations and simplified climate model simulations. At the beginning of the year, the warmer mean SST in the eastern equatorial Pacific leads to deeper clouds whose anomalous variability are positively correlated with the underlying SST anomalies. These observations highlight a strong negative surface short wave radiation feedback at the beginning of the year in the eastern Pacific (NINO3 region). This supports the observed seasonal phase-locking of ENSO SST variability. This relation also exists in model simulations of the linear recharge oscillator and in the slab ocean model coupled to a fully complex atmospheric GCM. The Slab ocean simulation has seasonal phase-locking similar to observed mostly caused by similar seasonal changing cloud feedbacks as observed. In the linear recharge oscillator simulations seasonal phase-locking is also similar to observed, but is not just related to seasonal changing cloud feedbacks, but is also related to changes in the sensitivity of the zonal wind stress and to a lesser extent to seasonally change sensitivities to the thermocline depth. In summary this study has shown that the seasonal phase-locking, as observed and simulated, is linked to seasonally changing cloud feedbacks.

  11. Seasonality and dietary requirements: will eating seasonal food contribute to health and environmental sustainability?

    PubMed

    Macdiarmid, Jennie I

    2014-08-01

    Eating more seasonal food is one proposal for moving towards more sustainable consumption patterns, based on the assumption that it could reduce the environmental impact of the diet. The aim of the present paper is to consider the implications of eating seasonal food on the different elements of sustainability (i.e. health, economics, society), not just the environment. Seasonality can be defined as either globally seasonal (i.e. produced in the natural production season but consumed anywhere in the world) or locally seasonal (i.e. produced in the natural production season and consumed within the same climatic zone). The environmental, health, economic and societal impact varies by the definition used. Global seasonality has the nutritional benefit of providing a more varied and consistent supply of fresh produce year round, but this increases demand for foods that in turn can have a high environmental cost in the country of production (e.g. water stress, land use change with loss of biodiversity). Greenhouse gas emissions of globally seasonal food are not necessarily higher than food produced locally as it depends more on the production system used than transportation. Eating more seasonal food, however, is only one element of a sustainable diet and should not overshadow some of the potentially more difficult dietary behaviours to change that could have greater environmental and health benefits (e.g. reducing overconsumption or meat consumption). For future guidelines for sustainable diets to be realistic they will need to take into account modern lifestyles, cultural and social expectations in the current food environment.

  12. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B; Madsen, Martin K; Hjordt, Liv V; Hageman, Ida; Dam, Henrik; Svarer, Claus; da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Baaré, William; Madsen, Jacob; Hasholt, Lis; Holst, Klaus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies in non-depressed individuals have demonstrated an inverse relationship between daylight minutes and cerebral serotonin transporter; this relationship is modified by serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region short allele carrier status. We here present data from the first longitudinal investigation of seasonal serotonin transporter fluctuations in both patients with seasonal affective disorder and in healthy individuals. Eighty (11)C-DASB positron emission tomography scans were conducted to quantify cerebral serotonin transporter binding; 23 healthy controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding in the summer but in their symptomatic phase during winter, patients with seasonal affective disorder had higher serotonin transporter than the healthy control subjects (P = 0.01). Compared to the healthy controls, patients with seasonal affective disorder changed their serotonin transporter significantly less between summer and winter (P < 0.001). Further, the change in serotonin transporter was sex- (P = 0.02) and genotype- (P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom severity, as indexed by Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - Seasonal Affective Disorder version scores (P = 0.01). Our findings suggest that the development of depressive symptoms in winter is associated with a failure to downregulate serotonin transporter levels appropriately during exposure to the environmental stress of winter, especially in individuals with high predisposition to affective disorders.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww043_video_abstractaww043_video_abstract.

  13. Seasonality of Aerosols the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, B. J.; Heald, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have suggested that increases in atmospheric aerosols of biogenic origin may have caused regional cooling over the southeastern United States in recent decades. Understanding the sources and behaviors of these aerosols is important for determining their role in a changing climate and managing their air quality impacts. In this study, we investigate the strong seasonality in aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed by MODIS, MISR, and CALIOP instruments over the southeastern United States and show that this is not simulated by a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). However, the model does reproduce surface PM 2.5 concentrations in the region as reported by the IMPROVE and Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) networks, as well as the muted seasonality of these concentrations. In addition, these surface measurements show that organic aerosol makes up a small fraction of total PM 2.5 and has relatively little seasonality, which calls into question the importance of biogenic aerosol as a driver for climate change in the region. Sounding profiles and ground observations of relative humidity suggest that the magnitude of seasonality in AOD cannot be explained by seasonal differences in the hygroscopic growth of aerosols. CALIOP measurements of the vertical profile of aerosol extinction confirm that the likely reconciliation of the differences in seasonality between the surface PM 2.5 and AOD observations is the formation of aerosol aloft, a process not captured by the model. These findings provide initial insights for the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in 2013 which aims to investigate the anthropogenic influence on biogenic aerosol formation in the Southeastern US and elucidate the impact on regional climate and air quality.

  14. Seasonal Shifts in Diet and Gut Microbiota of the American Bison (Bison bison)

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Gaddy T.; Craine, Joseph M.; Robeson, Michael S.; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    North American bison (Bison bison) are becoming increasingly important to both grassland management and commercial ranching. However, a lack of quantitative data on their diet constrains conservation efforts and the ability to predict bison effects on grasslands. In particular, we know little about the seasonality of the bison diet, the degree to which bison supplement their diet with eudicots, and how changes in diet influence gut microbial communities, all of which play important roles in ungulate performance. To address these knowledge gaps, we quantified seasonal patterns in bison diet and gut microbial community composition for a bison herd in Kansas using DNA sequencing-based analyses of both chloroplast and microbial DNA contained in fecal matter. Across the 11 sampling dates that spanned 166 days, we found that diet shifted continuously over the growing season, allowing bison to take advantage of the seasonal availability of high-protein plant species. Bison consumed more woody shrubs in spring and fall than in summer, when forb and grass intake predominated. In examining gut microbiota, the bacterial phylum Tenericutes shifted significantly in relative abundance over the growing season. This work suggests that North American bison can continuously adjust their diet with a high reliance on non-grasses throughout the year. In addition, we find evidence for seasonal patterns in gut community composition that are likely driven by the observed dietary changes. PMID:26562019

  15. Seasonal acclimatization determined by non-invasive measurements of coat insulation.

    PubMed

    Langman, Vaughan A; Langman, Sarah L; Ellifrit, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal acclimatization in terrestrial mammals in the Northern Hemisphere involves changes in coat insulation. It is more economical to provide increased insulation than increased heat production for protection against the cold. This study was done to test a technique for the non-invasive measurement of mammal coat insulation and to measure coat insulation over several seasons on captive exotics. The working hypothesis was that species that have no coat or have a coat that does not change seasonally do not acclimatize seasonally. Three surface temperature readings were measured from the torso area. The insulation was calculated using measured metabolic rates and body temperature when possible. The African elephants, giraffe and okapi did not acclimatize with average maximum insulation values of 0.256°Cm(2)  W(-1) . The Amur tigers and mountain goats acclimatized to seasonal ambient conditions by increasing the insulation values of the hair coats in the cold with an average maximum insulation values of 0.811°Cm(2)  W(-1) . The cold adapted species are more than three times more insulated in the cold than the equatorial species. The husbandry implications of exotics that have no ability to acclimatize to Northern Hemisphere seasonal ambient changes are profound. Giraffe, African elephants, and okapi when exposed to cold conditions with ambient air temperatures below 21°C will use body energy reserves to maintain a heat balance and will require housing that provides ambient conditions of 21°C.

  16. Within-mother analysis of seasonal patterns in health at birth.

    PubMed

    Currie, Janet; Schwandt, Hannes

    2013-07-23

    A large literature describes relationships between month of birth, birth weight, and gestation. These relationships are hypothesized to reflect the causal impact of seasonal environmental factors. However, recent work casts doubt on this interpretation by showing that mothers with lower socioeconomic status are more likely to give birth in months that are associated with poorer birth outcomes. Seasonality in the numbers of conceptions in different months can also induce a mechanical correlation between preterm birth and month of birth. This paper analyzes the seasonality of health at birth using a large sample of 647,050 groups of US siblings representing 1,435,213 children. By following the same mother over time, we eliminate differences in fixed maternal characteristics as an explanation for seasonal differences in health at birth. We find a sharp trough in gestation length among babies conceived in May, which corresponds to an increase in prematurity of more than 10%. Birth weight conditional on gestation length, however, is found to be strongly hump-shaped over the year, with 8-9 additional g for summer conceptions. We examine several potential mechanisms for explaining seasonality in birth outcomes that have generally been dismissed in the literature on seasonality in rich countries, notably disease prevalence and nutrition. The May trough in gestation length coincides with a higher influenza prevalence in January and February, when these babies are nearing full term, whereas the hump shape in birth weight is associated with a similar pattern in pregnancy weight gain.

  17. Seasonal Shifts in Diet and Gut Microbiota of the American Bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Gaddy T; Craine, Joseph M; Robeson, Michael S; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    North American bison (Bison bison) are becoming increasingly important to both grassland management and commercial ranching. However, a lack of quantitative data on their diet constrains conservation efforts and the ability to predict bison effects on grasslands. In particular, we know little about the seasonality of the bison diet, the degree to which bison supplement their diet with eudicots, and how changes in diet influence gut microbial communities, all of which play important roles in ungulate performance. To address these knowledge gaps, we quantified seasonal patterns in bison diet and gut microbial community composition for a bison herd in Kansas using DNA sequencing-based analyses of both chloroplast and microbial DNA contained in fecal matter. Across the 11 sampling dates that spanned 166 days, we found that diet shifted continuously over the growing season, allowing bison to take advantage of the seasonal availability of high-protein plant species. Bison consumed more woody shrubs in spring and fall than in summer, when forb and grass intake predominated. In examining gut microbiota, the bacterial phylum Tenericutes shifted significantly in relative abundance over the growing season. This work suggests that North American bison can continuously adjust their diet with a high reliance on non-grasses throughout the year. In addition, we find evidence for seasonal patterns in gut community composition that are likely driven by the observed dietary changes.

  18. Uncertainties of seasonal surface climate predictions induced by soil moisture biases in the La Plata Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensson, Anna; Berbery, E. Hugo

    2015-04-01

    This work examines the evolution of soil moisture initialization biases and their effects on seasonal forecasts depending on the season and vegetation type for a regional model over the La Plata Basin in South America. WRF/Noah model simulations covering multiple cases during a two-year period are designed to emphasize the conceptual nature of the simulations at the expense of statistical significance of the results. Analysis of the surface climate shows that the seasonal predictive skill is higher when the model is initialized during the wet season and the initial soil moisture differences are small. Large soil moisture biases introduce large surface temperature biases, particularly for Savanna, Grassland and Cropland vegetation covers at any time of the year, thus introducing uncertainty in the surface climate. Regions with Evergreen Broadleaf Forest have roots that extend to the deep layer whose moisture content affects the surface temperature through changes in the partitioning of the surface fluxes. The uncertainties of monthly maximum temperature can reach several degrees during the dry season in cases when: (a) the soil is much wetter in the reanalysis than in the WRF/Noah equilibrium soil moisture, and (b) the memory of the initial value is long due to scarce rainfall and low temperatures. This study suggests that responses of the atmosphere to soil moisture initialization depend on how the initial wet and dry conditions are defined, stressing the need to take into account the characteristics of a particular region and season when defining soil moisture initialization experiments.

  19. Seasonal Variation of Cistus ladanifer L. Diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Alías, Juan Carlos; Sosa, Teresa; Valares, Cristina; Escudero, José Carlos; Chaves, Natividad

    2012-07-26

    The exudate of Cistus ladanifer L. consists mainly of two families of secondary metabolites: flavonoids and diterpenes. The amount of flavonoids present in the leaves has a marked seasonal variation, being maximum in summer and minimum in winter. In the present study, we demonstrate that the amount of diterpenes varies seasonally, but with a different pattern: maximum concentration in winter and minimum in spring-summer. The experiments under controlled conditions have shown that temperature influences diterpene production, and in particular, low temperatures. Given this pattern, the functions that these compounds perform in C. ladanifer are probably different.

  20. Seasonal Variation of Cistus ladanifer L. Diterpenes

    PubMed Central

    Alías, Juan Carlos; Sosa, Teresa; Valares, Cristina; Escudero, José Carlos; Chaves, Natividad

    2012-01-01

    The exudate of Cistus ladanifer L. consists mainly of two families of secondary metabolites: flavonoids and diterpenes. The amount of flavonoids present in the leaves has a marked seasonal variation, being maximum in summer and minimum in winter. In the present study, we demonstrate that the amount of diterpenes varies seasonally, but with a different pattern: maximum concentration in winter and minimum in spring-summer. The experiments under controlled conditions have shown that temperature influences diterpene production, and in particular, low temperatures. Given this pattern, the functions that these compounds perform in C. ladanifer are probably different. PMID:27137636

  1. Early season spring small grains proportion estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, D. E.; Trichel, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    An accurate, automated method for estimating early season spring small grains from Landsat MSS data is discussed. The method is summarized and the results of its application to 100 sample segment-years of data from the US Northern Great Plains in 1976, 1977, 1978, and 1979 are summarized. The results show that this estimator provides accurate estimates earlier in the growing season than previous methods. Ground truth is required only in the estimator development, and data storage, transmission, preprocessing, and processing requirements are minimal.

  2. Seasonal cycle of the Canary Current.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez-Belchí, P.; Hernandez-Guerra, A.; Pérez-Hernández, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is recognized as an important component of the climate system, contributing to the relatively mild climate of northwest Europe. Due to its importance, the strength of the AMOC is continually monitored along 26ºN with several moorings east of the Bahamas, in the Middle Atlantic Ridge and south of the Canary islands, known as the RAPID array. The measurements of the RAPID array show a 6 Sv seasonal cycle for the AMOC, and recent studies have pointed out the dynamics of the eastern Atlantic as the main driver for this seasonal cycle, specifically, rossby waves excited south of the Canary Islands. Due to the important role of the eastern Atlantic, in this study we describe the seasonal cycle of the Canary Current (CC) and the Canary Upwelling Current (CUC) using hydrographic data from two cruises carried out in a box around the Canary Islands, the region where the eastern component of the RAPID array is placed. CTD, VMADCP and LADCP data were combined with inverse modeling in order to determine absolute geostrophic transports in the Canary Islands region in fall and spring. During spring, the overall transport of Canary Current and the CUC was southward. In the Lanzarote Passage (LP), between the Canary Islands and Africa, the CUC transported 0.6±0.20 Sv southward, while the Canary Current transported 1.0±0.40 Sv in the oceanic waters of the Canary Islands Archipelago. During fall, the CUC transported 2.8±0.4Sv northward, while the CC transported 2.9±0.60 Sv southward in the oceanic waters of the Canary Islands Archipelago. The seasonal cycle observed has an amplitude of 3.4Sv for the CUC and 1.9Sv for the CC. Data from a mooring in the LP and the hydrographic data was used to calibrate geostrophic transport estimated using altimetry data. The amplitude of the seasonal cycle of the geostrophic transport obtained using the calibrated altimetry data (Figure 1) was quite similar to the seasonal cycle of the

  3. Extreme Seasonality During Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plink-Bjorklund, P.; Birgenheier, L.

    2012-12-01

    An outcrop multi-proxy dataset from the Uinta Basin, Utah, US indicates that extreme seasonality occurred repeatedly during the Early Eocene transient global warming events (hyperthermals), during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) as well as during the six consequent younger hyperthermals. In this multi-proxy analysis we have investigated the precipitation distribution and peakedness changes during Early Eocene hyperthermals. This dataset is different from previously published terrestrial climate proxy analyses, in that we fully utilize the sedimentary record itself, and especially the hydrodynamic indicators within the river strata. We combine these high-resolution sedimentologic-stratigraphic analyses, with analyses of terrestrial burrowing traces, and the conventional palaeosol and stable carbon isotope analyses. With this approach, we are able to better document hydroclimatologic changes, and identify climate seasonality changes, rather than just long-term mean humidity/aridity and temperature trends. For this study we analyzed over 1000 m of Palaeocene and Early Eocene river and lake strata in the Uinta Basin, Utah, US (Figs. 1 and 2). The sedimentologic-stratigraphic analyses of outcrops included measuring detailed stratigraphic sections, analyzing photopanels, a spatial GPS survey, and lateral walk-out of stratigraphic packages across an area of 300 km2, with additional data across an area of ca 6000 km2 (Fig. 2). Continental burrowing traces and palaeosols were analyzed along the measured sections. For geochemical analysis 196 samples of mudrock facies were collected along the measured sections and analyzed for total organic carbon (Corg), total nitrogen (Ntot), and δ13C values of bulk organic matter. Biostratigraphy (25), radiometric dates, and carbon isotope stratigraphy, using bulk δ13C of organic matter in floodplain siltstones confirm the position of the PETM and the 6-8 post-PETM hyperthermals in the studied strata The seasonality

  4. Tracking Retreat of the North Seasonal Ice Cap on Mars: Results from the THEMIS Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, A. B.; Wagstaff, K. L.; Ttus, T. N.

    2005-01-01

    The CO2 ice caps on Mars advance and retreat with the seasons. This phenomenon was first observed by Cassini and then confirmed by numerous ground based observations in 19th and 20th centuries. With the advent of the space age observations of the seasonal ice cap were done by all orbiting spacecraft starting with Mariner 7. Viking Orbiters and more recently the Mars Global Surveyor (particularly Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instruments) have accumulated significant data on the retreat of the CO2 seasonal cap. During Mars year 2 of THEMIS operations at Mars, we planned an observational campaign in which the THEMIS instrument (onboard the Mars Odyssey spacecraft) repeatedly observed the north seasonal polar cap from midwinter to late spring. THEMIS allows simultaneous observations in both Thermal IR (12.57 m) and Visible wavelengths (0.65 m). One of the goals for this work is to initiate an interannual program for observations of the seasonal ice caps using the THEMIS instrument. The most efficient way to detect the edge between frost and bare ground is directly onboard of the spacecraft. Prior to onboard software design effort, we have developed two groundbased algorithms for automatically finding the edge of the seasonal polar cap in THEMIS IR data. The first algorithm relies on fully calibrated data and can be used for highly reliable groundbased analyses. The second method was specifically developed for processing raw, uncalibrated data in a highly efficient way. It has the potential to enable automatic, onboard detections of the seasonal cap retreat. We have experimentally confirmed that both methods produce similar results, and we have validated both methods against a model constructed from the MGS TES data from the same season.

  5. Small mammal use of native warm-season and non-native cool-season grass forage fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan L Klimstra,; Christopher E Moorman,; Converse, Sarah J.; Royle, J. Andrew; Craig A Harper,

    2015-01-01

    Recent emphasis has been put on establishing native warm-season grasses for forage production because it is thought native warm-season grasses provide higher quality wildlife habitat than do non-native cool-season grasses. However, it is not clear whether native warm-season grass fields provide better resources for small mammals than currently are available in non-native cool-season grass forage production fields. We developed a hierarchical spatially explicit capture-recapture model to compare abundance of hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), and house mice (Mus musculus) among 4 hayed non-native cool-season grass fields, 4 hayed native warm-season grass fields, and 4 native warm-season grass-forb ("wildlife") fields managed for wildlife during 2 summer trapping periods in 2009 and 2010 of the western piedmont of North Carolina, USA. Cotton rat abundance estimates were greater in wildlife fields than in native warm-season grass and non-native cool-season grass fields and greater in native warm-season grass fields than in non-native cool-season grass fields. Abundances of white-footed mouse and house mouse populations were lower in wildlife fields than in native warm-season grass and non-native cool-season grass fields, but the abundances were not different between the native warm-season grass and non-native cool-season grass fields. Lack of cover following haying in non-native cool-season grass and native warm-season grass fields likely was the key factor limiting small mammal abundance, especially cotton rats, in forage fields. Retention of vegetation structure in managed forage production systems, either by alternately resting cool-season and warm-season grass forage fields or by leaving unharvested field borders, should provide refugia for small mammals during haying events.

  6. The pollen season dynamics and the relationship among some season parameters (start, end, annual total, season phases) in Kraków, Poland, 1991-2008.

    PubMed

    Myszkowska, D; Jenner, B; Stępalska, D; Czarnobilska, E

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics of 15 taxa pollen seasons in Kraków, in 1991-2008 was monitored using a Burkard volumetric spore trap of the Hirst design. The highest daily pollen concentrations were achieved in the first half of May, and they were caused mainly by Betula and Pinus pollen. The second period of the high concentrations took place from the middle of July to the end of August (mainly Urtica pollen). Tree pollen seasons were shorter (18-24 days) in comparison with the most herbaceous pollen seasons (73-89 days), except at Artemisia and Ambrosia seasons (30 and 24 days, respectively). The season phases (percentyles) of the spring and late-summer taxa were the most variable in the consecutive years. The highest annual sums were noted for Urtica, Poaceae (herbaceous pollen seasons) and for Betula, Pinus, Alnus (tree pollen seasons), and the highest variability of annual totals was stated for Urtica, Populus, Fraxinus and the lowest for Ambrosia, Corylus, Poaceae. For the plants that pollinate in the middle of the pollen season (Quercus, Pinus and Rumex), the date of the season start seems not to be related to the season end, while for late pollen seasons, especially for Ambrosia and Artemisia, the statistically negative correlation between the start and the end season dates was found. Additionally, for the most studied taxa, the increase in annual pollen totals was observed. The presented results could be useful for the allergological practice and general botanical knowledge.

  7. Profile Survey VII, 1976-1977 Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamoto, Kent

    This study of the professional touring performing arts during the 1976-77 season sought to determine how the performing arts are programmed and funded by college and community organizations. The questionnaire, which is appended, was mailed to all institutional members of the Association of College, University, and Community Arts Administrators.…

  8. Geometry and the Physics of Seasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khavrus, Vyacheslav; Shelevytsky, Ihor

    2012-01-01

    By means of a simple mathematical model recently developed by the authors (2010 "Phys. Educ." 45 641), the passage of the seasons on the Earth is simulated for arbitrary latitudes, taking into account sunlight attenuation in the atmosphere. The method developed can be used to predict a realistic value of the solar energy input (insolation) that…

  9. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  10. Seasonal indoor radon concentration in Eskisehir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sogukpinar, H; Algin, E; Asici, C; Altinsoz, M; Cetinkaya, H

    2014-12-01

    Indoor radon concentrations are subject to seasonal variation, which directly depends on weather conditions. The seasonal indoor radon concentrations were measured and the annual effective dose was estimated for the city centre of Eskisehir, Turkey. In order to reflect annual averages measurements were performed over all seasons (winter, spring, summer and autumn) including also the entire year. Measurements were carried out using Kodak-Pathe LR 115 Type II passive alpha track detectors in 220 different houses. A total of 534 measurements including measurements of different seasons were taken between 2010 and 2011. The radon concentrations for winter ranged from 34 to 531 Bq m(-3), for spring ranged from 22 to 424 Bq m(-3), for summer ranged from 25 to 320 Bq m(-3), and for autumn ranged from 19 to 412 Bq m(-3). Yearly measurements ranged from 19 to 338 Bq m(-3). In this study the average annual effective total dose from radon and its decay products was calculated to be 3.398 mSv y(-1).

  11. Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers: A Forgotten Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez, Loida C.

    Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are the most educationally disadvantaged group in society, with over 70% high school dropouts and 15% functionally illiterate. Mobility, language barriers, and cultural differences combined with health and nutrition problems have a negative effect on school achievement. The constant interruption of the educational…

  12. Seasonal acclimation of prairie deer mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R. V.; Belknap, R. W.

    1993-12-01

    Prairie deer mice responded to long nights by reducing their metabolic rates, core temperatures, thermal conductances and incremental metabolic responses to cold stimulus, while increasing their capacities for nonshivering thermogenesis. Some winter animals spontaneously entered daily torpor in the mornings and thereby further reduced their metabolic rates and core temperatures. Provision of exogenous melatonin (by subdermal implants) mimiced short photoperiod effects on metabolic rates and core temperatures of wild-caught, laboratory maintained animals. Provision of supplemental dietary tryptophan to laboratory animals conditioned to natural light cycles mimiced metabolic effects of long nights in summer animals, and further reduced metabolic rates of winter mice, but did not affect their core temperature levels. Newly caught, laboratory maintained deer mice responded to natural seasonal clues of shortphotoperiod and increased dietary tryptophan by reducing their resting energy requirements through both lower metabolic and lower core temperature levels. Short photoperiod and seasonal change also promoted gonadal involution, and resulted in more socially tolerant huddling by mice with reduced core temperature. Reduced 24-hour LH excretion rates were also observed in winter animals which were exposed to seasonal light cycles at warm (25°C) room temperatures. We propose that seasonal acclimatization involves pineal effects on sex hormone-influenced social behaviors and on resting metabolism. These effects serve to conserve resting energy expenditure and promote hypothermic insulation by wild prairie deer mice.

  13. Seasonal variations of storm zones on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J.

    1997-05-01

    Using the NASA Ames Mars general circulation model, an annual cycle simulation has been performed corresponding to a low atmospheric dust loading. Surface pressure time series near the Viking Lander 2 location have been analyzed using singular spectrum analysis (SSA) and autoregressive models to isolate statistically significant spectral power. Also, circulation statistics have been separated using band-pass time filtering and analyzed for coherent spatial patterns. During northern autumn, winter and spring seasons, localized `storm zones' can occur which are particularly strong within the lowlands of Arcadia, Acidalia and Utopia. During early northern spring, the transient eddy activity is stronger than that found during any other season. With weakening baroclinicity accompanying seasonal transition toward midspring, the eddies become less vigorous and the associated storm `belt' shifts into higher latitudes. Since transient baroclinic eddies are active agents in the transport of heat, momentum and moisture in middle latitudes, variations in the storm zones during the seasonal cycle will have important implications for Mars' regional climate.

  14. Seasonal Variations in Mars Atmospheric Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greybush, S. J.; Hoffman, M. J.; Kalnay, E.; Wilson, R.; Hoffman, R. N.; Miyoshi, T.; Ide, K.

    2011-12-01

    The seasonal dependence of the predictability of the Martian atmosphere is examined using a Numerical Weather Prediction system, spacecraft observations, and the bred vector technique. Mars atmosphere analyses, created by assimilating Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) temperature profiles, provide the initial conditions for forecasts generated by the GFDL Mars Global Circulation Model (MGCM). Comparing longer term (1-10 sol) forecasts with observations and the latest analyses from data assimilation reveal the duration of time where Martian numerical weather prediction forecasts initialized with observations provide superior guidance than freely running model simulations; initial results in the northern hemisphere autumn indicate a predictability horizon of more than 5 sols (Greybush, 2011). In this study we examine the seasonal variation in predictability at several different times of year, which exhibit significant differences in circulation patterns, dust opacities, and the strength and location of traveling waves. The impacts of using a fixed dust distribution versus a seasonally varying dust distribution based on Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations, as well as the role of empirical bias correction, are assessed. The bred vector technique explores the locations, seasonality, and physical origins of dynamical instabilities that result in the growth of forecast errors. The application of a kinetic energy equation illuminates the role of barotropic and baroclinic processes.

  15. Global distribution of ozone for various seasons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koprova, L. I.

    1979-01-01

    A technique which was used to obtain a catalog of the seasonal global distribution of ozone is presented. The technique is based on the simultaneous use of 1964-1975 data on the total ozone content from a worldwide network of ozonometric stations and on the vertical ozone profile from ozone sounding stations.

  16. Profile Survey 6. 1974-1975 Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spray, Thomas

    The programming and funding of the professional touring performing arts by college, university and community arts organizations during the 1974-75 season was surveyed in a sixth report since 1965. The study seeks to provide national benchmarks from which the individual arts administrator can make local comparisons. From the 174 responding…

  17. Seasonal Streamflow Forecasts for African Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Valdes, J. B.; Wi, S.; Roy, T.; Roberts, J. B.; Robertson, F. R.; Demaria, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Using high resolution downscaled seasonal meteorological forecasts we present the development and evaluation of seasonal hydrologic forecasts with Stakeholder Agencies for selected African basins. The meteorological forecasts are produced using the Bias Correction and Spatial Disaggregation (BCSD) methodology applied to NMME hindcasts (North American Multi-Model Ensemble prediction system) to generate a bootstrap resampling of plausible weather forecasts from historical observational data. This set of downscaled forecasts is then used to drive hydrologic models to produce a range of forecasts with uncertainty estimates suitable for water resources planning in African pilot basins (i.e. Upper Zambezi, Mara Basin). In an effort to characterize the utility of these forecasts, we will present an evaluation of these forecast ensembles over the pilot basins, and discuss insights as to their operational applicability by regional actors. Further, these forecasts will be contrasted with those from a standard Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) approach to seasonal forecasting. The case studies presented here have been developed in the setting of the NASA SERVIR Applied Sciences Team and within the broader context of operational seasonal forecasting in Africa. These efforts are part of a dialogue with relevant planning and management agencies and institutions in Africa, which are in turn exploring how to best use uncertain forecasts for decision making.

  18. Use of the Four Seasonal Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Teresa Chi-ching

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the cultural features of "Spring" and "Autumn" in Chinese. Their meanings range from references to happiness and love to seasons, crops and farming, to the representation of a year's time and one's age. They are used in poetry and as noun compounds for titles of history books. (SC)

  19. Seasonal Change on Titan. Chapter 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Brown, Michael E.; Flasar, F. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Titan displays seasonal changes in the distribution of gas and hazes in its atmosphere, in the character of its methane clouds, and in its temperatures and winds. While Cassini has observed some of these cha rges in detail, some are observable from Earth, and the period of mos t rapid change may be just about to begin in the years after equinox,

  20. Off-season greenhouse strawberry production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strawberry production in the mid-South is mostly done in the field with harvest from April to June. There is year-round demand for fruit with the highest prices from November through February. Our research is ongoing to evaluate off-season strawberry production in polyethylene-covered greenhouses....

  1. Shifting seasons, climate change and ecosystem consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackeray, Stephen; Henrys, Peter; Hemming, Deborah; Huntingford, Chris; Bell, James; Leech, David; Wanless, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, the seasonal timing of many biological events (e.g. flowering, breeding, migration) has shifted. These phenological changes are believed to be one of the most conspicuous biological indicators of climate change. Rates and directions of phenological change have differed markedly among species, potentially threatening the seasonal synchrony of key species interactions and ultimately ecosystem functioning. Differences in phenological change among-species at different trophic levels, and with respect to other broad species traits, are likely to be driven by variations in the climatic sensitivity of phenological events. However, as yet, inconsistencies in analytical methods have hampered broad-scale assessments of variation in climate sensitivity among taxonomic and functional groups of organisms. In this presentation, results will be presented from a current collaborative project (http://www.ceh.ac.uk/sci_programmes/shifting-seasons-uk.html) in which many UK long-term data sets are being integrated in order to assess relationships between temperature/precipitation, and the timing of seasonal events for a wide range of plants and animals. Our aim is to assess which organism groups (in which locations/habitats) are most sensitive to climate. Furthermore, the role of anthropogenic climate change as a driver of phenological change is being assessed.

  2. Operational seasonal forecasting of crop performance

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Roger C; Meinke, Holger

    2005-01-01

    Integrated, interdisciplinary crop performance forecasting systems, linked with appropriate decision and discussion support tools, could substantially improve operational decision making in agricultural management. Recent developments in connecting numerical weather prediction models and general circulation models with quantitative crop growth models offer the potential for development of integrated systems that incorporate components of long-term climate change. However, operational seasonal forecasting systems have little or no value unless they are able to change key management decisions. Changed decision making through incorporation of seasonal forecasting ultimately has to demonstrate improved long-term performance of the cropping enterprise. Simulation analyses conducted on specific production scenarios are especially useful in improving decisions, particularly if this is done in conjunction with development of decision-support systems and associated facilitated discussion groups. Improved management of the overall crop production system requires an interdisciplinary approach, where climate scientists, agricultural scientists and extension specialists are intimately linked with crop production managers in the development of targeted seasonal forecast systems. The same principle applies in developing improved operational management systems for commodity trading organizations, milling companies and agricultural marketing organizations. Application of seasonal forecast systems across the whole value chain in agricultural production offers considerable benefits in improving overall operational management of agricultural production. PMID:16433097

  3. NEWTON'S APPLE 14th Season Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichmann, Sue, Ed.

    This guide was developed to help teachers use the 14th season of NEWTON'S APPLE in their classrooms and contains lessons formatted to follow the National Science Education Standards. The "Overview,""Main Activity," and "Try-This" sections were created with inquiry-based learning in mind. Each lesson page begins with…

  4. Operational seasonal forecasting of crop performance.

    PubMed

    Stone, Roger C; Meinke, Holger

    2005-11-29

    Integrated, interdisciplinary crop performance forecasting systems, linked with appropriate decision and discussion support tools, could substantially improve operational decision making in agricultural management. Recent developments in connecting numerical weather prediction models and general circulation models with quantitative crop growth models offer the potential for development of integrated systems that incorporate components of long-term climate change. However, operational seasonal forecasting systems have little or no value unless they are able to change key management decisions. Changed decision making through incorporation of seasonal forecasting ultimately has to demonstrate improved long-term performance of the cropping enterprise. Simulation analyses conducted on specific production scenarios are especially useful in improving decisions, particularly if this is done in conjunction with development of decision-support systems and associated facilitated discussion groups. Improved management of the overall crop production system requires an interdisciplinary approach, where climate scientists, agricultural scientists and extension specialists are intimately linked with crop production managers in the development of targeted seasonal forecast systems. The same principle applies in developing improved operational management systems for commodity trading organizations, milling companies and agricultural marketing organizations. Application of seasonal forecast systems across the whole value chain in agricultural production offers considerable benefits in improving overall operational management of agricultural production.

  5. Potential animal models of seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Workman, Joanna L; Nelson, Randy J

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by depressive episodes during winter that are alleviated during summer and by morning bright light treatment. Currently, there is no animal model of SAD. However, it may be possible to use rodents that respond to day length (photoperiod) to understand how photoperiod can shape the brain and behavior in humans. As nights lengthen in the autumn, the duration of the nightly elevation of melatonin increase; seasonally breeding animals use this information to orchestrate seasonal changes in physiology and behavior. SAD may originate from the extended duration of nightly melatonin secretion during fall and winter. These similarities between humans and rodents in melatonin secretion allows for comparisons with rodents that express more depressive-like responses when exposed to short day lengths. For instance, Siberian hamsters, fat sand rats, Nile grass rats, and Wistar rats display a depressive-like phenotype when exposed to short days. Current research in depression and animal models of depression suggests that hippocampal plasticity may underlie the symptoms of depression and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. It is also possible that day length induces structural changes in human brains. Many seasonally breeding rodents undergo changes in whole brain and hippocampal volume in short days. Based on strict validity criteria, there is no animal model of SAD, but rodents that respond to reduced day lengths may be useful to approximate the neurobiological phenomena that occur in people with SAD, leading to greater understanding of the etiology of the disorder as well as novel therapeutic interventions.

  6. Implementing a Discovery Layer: A Rookie's Season

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Noah; Leach-Murray, Susan; Parker, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    The year 2011 was the PALNI (Private Academic Library Network of Indiana) consortium's "rookie season" for the implementation of Primo, the 2010 Discovery Layer 500 race winner. In this article, the authors report on their transition to the cloud within Ex Libris Ltd.'s Primo TotalCare environment: their preparation, the steps involved…

  7. The Seasons Explained by Refutational Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frede, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the principles and investigation of a small-group laboratory activity based on refutational modeling to teach the concept of seasons to preservice elementary teachers. The results show that these teachers improved significantly when they had to refute their initial misconceptions practically. (Contains 8 figures and 1 table.)

  8. 50 CFR 660.510 - Fishing seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fishing seasons. 660.510 Section 660.510 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Coastal Pelagics Fisheries §...

  9. Seasonal greenness variations in Amazon transitional forests in response to light, moisture, and land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratana, P.; Huete, A. R.; Davies, K.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.

    2014-12-01

    mixed seasonal response to light and moisture controls was observed, partly due to mixed tree functional types. This work offers an improved understanding of forest vegetation dynamics and phenology along the forest-ecotone-savanna, important information for predicting climate change and anthropogenic impacts at the Amazon basin.

  10. Seasonal Influenza Infections and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Wan; Ito, Kazuhiko; Matte, Thomas D.; Shaman, Jeffrey; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cardiovascular deaths and influenza epidemics peak during winter in temperate regions. OBJECTIVES To quantify the temporal association between population increases in seasonal influenza infections and mortality due to cardiovascular causes and to test if influenza incidence indicators are predictive of cardiovascular mortality during the influenza season. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Time-series analysis of vital statistics records and emergency department visits in New York City, among cardiovascular deaths that occurred during influenza seasons between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012. The 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic period was excluded from temporal analyses. EXPOSURES Emergency department visits for influenza-like illness, grouped by age (≥0 years and ≥65 years) and scaled by laboratory surveillance data for viral types and subtypes, in the previous 28 days. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mortality due to cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction. RESULTS Among adults 65 years and older, who accounted for 83.0% (73 363 deaths) of nonpandemic cardiovascular mortality during influenza seasons, seasonal average influenza incidence was correlated year to year with excess cardiovascular mortality (Pearson correlation coefficients ≥0.75, P≤.05 for 4 different influenza indicators). In daily time-series analyses using 4 different influenza metrics, interquartile range increases in influenza incidence during the previous 21 days were associated with an increase between 2.3% (95% CI, 0.7%–3.9%) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.7%–8.9%) for cardiovascular disease mortality and between 2.4% (95% CI, 1.1%–3.6%) and 6.9% (95% CI, 4.0%–9.9%) for ischemic heart disease mortality among adults 65 years and older. The associations were most acute and strongest for myocardial infarction mortality, with each interquartile range increase in influenza incidence during the previous 14 days associated with mortality

  11. Seasonal Variation in Female Mate Choice and Operational Sex Ratio in Wild Populations of an Annual Fish, Austrolebias reicherti

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Carlos; Tassino, Bettina; Reyes, Federico; Rosenthal, Gil G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of mating competition and the potential benefits for female of mating with certain males can be influenced by several extrinsic factors, such that behavioral decisions can be highly context-dependent. Short-lived species with a single reproductive season are a unique model to study context-sensitive mating decisions. Through exhaustive sampling in the field and simultaneous choice tests in the laboratory, we evaluated operational sex ratio (OSR) and female mate choice at the beginning and end of the reproductive season in the annual killifish Austrolebias reicherti. We found seasonal change in both OSR and female mate choice. At the start of the reproductive season the OSR did not deviate from parity, and females preferred larger males. Later in the reproductive season, while the proportion of males in the ponds decreased, females became unselective with respect to male size. The particular biological cycle of annual killifish, where both life expectancy and mating opportunities decline sharply over a short timescale, could account for the seasonal change in female choice. Reduction in choosiness could arise from diminished reproductive prospects due to a decline in male availability. Moreover, as the end of the season approaches, any benefits of choosiness are presumably reduced: a female’s fitness will be higher if she mates with any male than if she forgoes reproduction and dies. Future work will disentangle the mechanisms underlying seasonal changes in mating preferences, notably direct responses to demographic factors, environmental cues, or intrinsic changes during development. PMID:25029019

  12. Seasonal variation in female mate choice and operational sex ratio in wild populations of an annual fish, Austrolebias reicherti.

    PubMed

    Passos, Carlos; Tassino, Bettina; Reyes, Federico; Rosenthal, Gil G

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of mating competition and the potential benefits for female of mating with certain males can be influenced by several extrinsic factors, such that behavioral decisions can be highly context-dependent. Short-lived species with a single reproductive season are a unique model to study context-sensitive mating decisions. Through exhaustive sampling in the field and simultaneous choice tests in the laboratory, we evaluated operational sex ratio (OSR) and female mate choice at the beginning and end of the reproductive season in the annual killifish Austrolebias reicherti. We found seasonal change in both OSR and female mate choice. At the start of the reproductive season the OSR did not deviate from parity, and females preferred larger males. Later in the reproductive season, while the proportion of males in the ponds decreased, females became unselective with respect to male size. The particular biological cycle of annual killifish, where both life expectancy and mating opportunities decline sharply over a short timescale, could account for the seasonal change in female choice. Reduction in choosiness could arise from diminished reproductive prospects due to a decline in male availability. Moreover, as the end of the season approaches, any benefits of choosiness are presumably reduced: a female's fitness will be higher if she mates with any male than if she forgoes reproduction and dies. Future work will disentangle the mechanisms underlying seasonal changes in mating preferences, notably direct responses to demographic factors, environmental cues, or intrinsic changes during development.

  13. Paraguay river basin response to seasonal rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krepper, Carlos M.; García, Norberto O.; Jones, Phil D.

    2006-07-01

    The use of river flow as a surrogate to study climatic variability implies the assumption that changes in rainfall are mirrored and likely amplified in streamflow. This is probably not completely true in large basins, particularly those that encompass different climatic regions, like the Paraguay river basin. Not all the signals present in precipitation are reflected in river flow and vice versa. The complex relationship between precipitation and streamflow could filter some signals and introduce new oscillatory modes in the discharge series. In this study the whole basin (1 095 000 km2) was divided into two sub-basins. The upper basin is upstream of the confluence with the River Apa and the lower basin is between the Apa river confluence and the Puerto Bermejo measuring station. The rainfall contribution shows a clear wet season from October to March and a dry season from April to September. A singular spectrum analysis (SSA) shows that there are trends in rainfall contributions over the upper and lower basins. Meanwhile, the lower basin only presents a near-decadal cycle (T 10 years). To determine the flow response to seasonal rainfall contributions, an SSA was applied to seasonal flow discharges at Puerto Bermejo. The seasonal flows, Q(t)O-M and Q(t)A-S, present high significant modes in the low-frequency band, like positive trends. In addition, Q(t)O-M presents a near-decadal mode, but only significant at the 77% level for short window lengths (M ≤ 15 years). Really, the Paraguay river flow is not a good surrogate to study precipitation variation. The low-frequency signals play an important role in the flow behaviour, especially during extreme events from the second half of the last century onwards.

  14. NMME Monthly / Seasonal Forecasts for NASA SERVIR Applications Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Roberts, Jason B.

    2014-01-01

    This work details use of the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) experimental forecasts as drivers for Decision Support Systems (DSSs) in the NASA / USAID initiative, SERVIR (a Spanish acronym meaning "to serve"). SERVIR integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor and forecast environmental changes and to improve response to natural disasters. Through the use of DSSs whose "front ends" are physically based models, the SERVIR activity provides a natural testbed to determine the extent to which NMME monthly to seasonal projections enable scientists, educators, project managers and policy implementers in developing countries to better use probabilistic outlooks of seasonal hydrologic anomalies in assessing agricultural / food security impacts, water availability, and risk to societal infrastructure. The multi-model NMME framework provides a "best practices" approach to probabilistic forecasting. The NMME forecasts are generated at resolution more coarse than that required to support DSS models; downscaling in both space and time is necessary. The methodology adopted here applied model output statistics where we use NMME ensemble monthly projections of sea-surface temperature (SST) and precipitation from 30 years of hindcasts with observations of precipitation and temperature for target regions. Since raw model forecasts are well-known to have structural biases, a cross-validated multivariate regression methodology (CCA) is used to link the model projected states as predictors to the predictands of the target region. The target regions include a number of basins in East and South Africa as well as the Ganges / Baramaputra / Meghna basin complex. The MOS approach used address spatial downscaling. Temporal disaggregation of monthly seasonal forecasts is achieved through use of a tercile bootstrapping approach. We interpret the results of these studies, the levels of skill by several metrics, and key uncertainties.

  15. NMME Monthly / Seasonal Forecasts for NASA SERVIR Applications Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Roberts, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    This work details use of the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) experimental forecasts as drivers for Decision Support Systems (DSSs) in the NASA / USAID initiative, SERVIR (a Spanish acronym meaning "to serve"). SERVIR integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor and forecast environmental changes and to improve response to natural disasters. Through the use of DSSs whose "front ends" are physically based models, the SERVIR activity provides a natural testbed to determine the extent to which NMME monthly to seasonal projections enable scientists, educators, project managers and policy implementers in developing countries to better use probabilistic outlooks of seasonal hydrologic anomalies in assessing agricultural / food security impacts, water availability, and risk to societal infrastructure. The multi-model NMME framework provides a "best practices" approach to probabilistic forecasting. The NMME forecasts are generated at resolution more coarse than that required to support DSS models; downscaling in both space and time is necessary. The methodology adopted here applied model output statistics where we use NMME ensemble monthly projections of sea-surface temperature (SST) and precipitation from 30 years of hindcasts with observations of precipitation and temperature for target regions. Since raw model forecasts are well-known to have structural biases, a cross-validated multivariate regression methodology (CCA) is used to link the model projected states as predictors to the predictands of the target region. The target regions include a number of basins in East and South Africa as well as the Ganges / Baramaputra / Meghna basin complex. The MOS approach used address spatial downscaling. Temporal disaggregation of monthly seasonal forecasts is achieved through use of a tercile bootstrapping approach. We interpret the results of these studies, the levels of skill by several metrics, and key uncertainties.

  16. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health Care Personnel - United States, 2015-16 Influenza Season.

    PubMed

    Black, Carla L; Yue, Xin; Ball, Sarah W; Donahue, Sara M A; Izrael, David; de Perio, Marie A; Laney, A Scott; Williams, Walter W; Lindley, Megan C; Graitcer, Samuel B; Lu, Peng-Jun; DiSogra, Charles; Devlin, Rebecca; Walker, Deborah K; Greby, Stacie M

    2016-09-30

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends annual influenza vaccination for all health care personnel to reduce influenza-related morbidity and mortality among both health care personnel and their patients (1-4). To estimate influenza vaccination coverage among U.S. health care personnel for the 2015-16 influenza season, CDC conducted an opt-in Internet panel survey of 2,258 health care personnel during March 28-April 14, 2016. Overall, 79.0% of survey participants reported receiving an influenza vaccination during the 2015-16 season, similar to the 77.3% coverage reported for the 2014-15 season (5). Coverage in long-term care settings increased by 5.3 percentage points compared with the previous season. Vaccination coverage continued to be higher among health care personnel working in hospitals (91.2%) and lower among health care personnel working in ambulatory (79.8%) and long-term care settings (69.2%). Coverage continued to be highest among physicians (95.6%) and lowest among assistants and aides (64.1%), and highest overall among health care personnel who were required by their employer to be vaccinated (96.5%). Among health care personnel working in settings where vaccination was neither required, promoted, nor offered onsite, vaccination coverage continued to be low (44.9%). An increased percentage of health care personnel reporting a vaccination requirement or onsite vaccination availability compared with earlier influenza seasons might have contributed to the overall increase in vaccination coverage during the past 6 influenza seasons.

  17. Sperm quality differences between the rainy and dry seasons in captive black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Hernández-López, Leonor; Parra, Gerardo Cerezo; Cerda-Molina, Ana Lilia; Pérez-Bolaños, Stephanella C; Díaz Sánchez, Vicente; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2002-05-01

    The present work provides an assessment of sperm measures (concentration, motility, viability, etc.) of three black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) during the rainy and dry seasons in Mexico City, as well as an evaluation of the between-subjects variability of sperm quality. Twenty samples obtained by rectal electroejaculation and digested with trypsin were evaluated. The results showed that during the dry season (n = 9) the semen samples were of better quality than those obtained during the rainy season (n = 11). The individual animals showed differences in sperm concentration, although there were no differences in sperm quality.

  18. Oceanic influence on seasonal malaria outbreaks over Senegal and Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diouf, Ibrahima; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Belen; Deme, Abdoulaye; Cisse Cisse, Moustapha; Ndione Ndione, Jaques-Andre; Gaye, Amadou T.; Suarez, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Beyond assessment and analysis of observed and simulated malaria parameters, this study is furthermore undertaken in the framework of predictability of malaria outbreaks in Senegal and remote regions in Sahel, which are found to take place two months after the rainy season. The predictors are the sea surface temperature anomalous patterns at different ocean basins mainly over the Pacific and Atlantic as they are related to changes in air temperature, humidity, rainfall and wind. A relationship between El Niño and anomalous malaria parameters is found. The malaria parameters are calculated with the Liverpool Malaria Model (LMM) using meteorological datasets from different reanalysis products. A hindcast of these parameters is performed using the Sea Surface temperature based Statistical Seasonal ForeCAST (S4CAST) model developed at UCM in order to predict malaria parameters some months in advance. The results of this work will be useful for decision makers to better access to climate forecasts and application on malaria transmission risk.

  19. Snow: A New Model Diagnostic and Seasonal Forecast Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, A. G.; Lawrence, D. M.; Koven, C.

    2015-12-01

    Snow is the most variable of terrestrial surface condition on the planet with the seasonal extent of snow cover varying by about 48% of land area in the Northern Hemisphere. Physical properties of snow such as high albedo, high insulation along with its ability to store moisture make it an integral component of mid- and high-latitude climates and it is therefore important that models capture these properties and associated processes. In this work we explore two items associated with snow and their role in the climate system. Firstly, a diagnostic measure of snow insulation that is rooted in the physics of heat transfer is introduced. Insulation of the ground during cold Arctic winters heavily influences the rate and depth of ground freezing (or thawing), which can then influence hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes. The ability of models to simulate snow insulation varies widely. Secondly, the role of snow upon seasonal forecasts is demonstrated within a currently operational modeling system. Due to model system biases, mass and longevity of snow can vary with forecasts. In turn, a longer lasting and greater moisture store can have impacts upon the surface temperature. These impacts can linger for over two months after all snow has melted. The cause of the biases is identified and a solution posed.

  20. Seasonal microbiological quality of air in veterinary practices in Poland.

    PubMed

    Sitkowska, Jolanta; Sitkowski, Wiesław; Sitkowski, Łukasz; Lutnicki, Krzysztof; Adamek, Łukasz; Wilkołek, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies focused on the bioaerosols in the areas of industry, agriculture and animal husbandry, concerning both residential and public buildings, have been conducted continuously for many years. The aim of the present work was to determine the concentration and composition of mesophilic bacterial flora in the air of selected medical and veterinary clinics located in the cities and in the countryside. Air sampling was carried out in 2011-2013 in 44 veterinary practices in autumn-winter and spring-summer seasons. The concentration of bacteria ranged from 39 - 5,034 cfu/m(3) , with higher values recorded in offices operating in the cities. In the examined medical and veterinary offices, Gram-positive bacteria comprised the largest group of microorganisms, among which Gram-positive cocci of the genus Staphylococcus prevailed, with the highest average of 1,074.40 cfu/m(3) in urban offices during the autumn season. The smallest group was represented by Gram-negative bacteria, with a concentration of 0.0 - 215 cfu/m(3). In total, 93 kinds/species of bacteria were identified. A 12-month series of studies showed the highest mean concentrations of microorganisms in autumn for offices located in the city, while the lowest in winter for rural centres. The environment of veterinary offices is a habitat of pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria, which may pose health problems not only for residents, but also for the animals.

  1. Distress Seasonal Migration and Its Impact on Children's Education. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smita

    2008-01-01

    Seasonal migration for work by poor rural families is a phenomenon that is escalating as the agrarian crisis mounts. Millions of families that migrate are compelled to take their children along, leaving school and a normal childhood behind. They spend several months every year at work sites such as brick kilns, salt pans, plantations and stone…

  2. Ageing, working hours and work ability.

    PubMed

    Costa, G; Sartori, S

    2007-11-01

    The current paper reports the main results of several studies carried out on Italian workers using the work ability index as a complementary tool for workers' periodical health surveillance. The work ability index shows a general decreasing trend over the years, but it changes differently according to working conditions and personal health status. In jobs with higher mental involvement and autonomy, but lower physical constraint, it remains quite constant and high over the years, while it significantly decreases with a steeper trend the higher the physical work load and the lower the job control are. Sex and working hours appear to act concurrently in influencing work ability, particularly in association with more physically demanding jobs. It is therefore necessary to adopt flexible interventions, able to give ageing shift workers a proper support for maintaining a satisfactory work ability, by means of actions addressed both to work organization and psycho-physical conditions.

  3. Seasonal flows on warm Martian slopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, Alfred S.; Ojha, Lujendra; Dundas, Colin M.; Mattson, Sarah S.; Byrne, Shane; Wray, James J.; Cull, Selby C.; Murchie, Scott L.; Thomas, Nicolas; Gulick, Virginia C.

    2011-01-01

    Water probably flowed across ancient Mars, but whether it ever exists as a liquid on the surface today remains debatable. Recurring slope lineae (RSL) are narrow (0.5 to 5 meters), relatively dark markings on steep (25° to 40°) slopes; repeat images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment show them to appear and incrementally grow during warm seasons and fade in cold seasons. They extend downslope from bedrock outcrops, often associated with small channels, and hundreds of them form in some rare locations. RSL appear and lengthen in the late southern spring and summer from 48°S to 32°S latitudes favoring equator-facing slopes, which are times and places with peak surface temperatures from ~250 to 300 kelvin. Liquid brines near the surface might explain this activity, but the exact mechanism and source of water are not understood.

  4. Seasonal flows on warm Martian slopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Ojha, L.; Dundas, C.M.; Mattson, S.S.; Byrne, S.; Wray, J.J.; Cull, S.C.; Murchie, S.L.; Thomas, N.; Gulick, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Water probably flowed across ancient Mars, but whether it ever exists as a liquid on the surface today remains debatable. Recurring slope lineae (RSL) are narrow (0.5 to 5 meters), relatively dark markings on steep (25?? to 40??) slopes; repeat images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment show them to appear and incrementally grow during warm seasons and fade in cold seasons. They extend downslope from bedrock outcrops, often associated with small channels, and hundreds of them form in some rare locations. RSL appear and lengthen in the late southern spring and summer from 48??S to 32??S latitudes favoring equator-facing slopes, which are times and places with peak surface temperatures from ???250 to 300 kelvin. Liquid brines near the surface might explain this activity, but the exact mechanism and source of water are not understood.

  5. Seasonal issues can chill powerplant profits

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, R.

    1996-07-01

    Profitable operation requires minimizing the seasonal constraints imposed by weather. This article describes how forward-thinking operators review their plans for winterization and hot-weather operation--before the thermometer darts toward either extreme. new cooling towers (CTs) are no longer oversized, leaving little room for fouling that can shoot up in hot weather. Also, powerplants are no longer being designed with surplus heat exchangers and redundant pumps--features that can help a plant get through extreme temperatures. And at a growing list of plants, the CTs are eliminated altogether, in favor of air-cooled (AC) condensers--which can have their own trouble holding condenser vacuum when the outdoor thermometer skyrockets; and, like their CT cousins, can suffer serious failures if improperly operated in winter`s freeze. Although design margins are being stretched thin, seasoned operations and maintenance (O and M) teams can minimize the constraints imposed by mother nature.

  6. The seasonal-cycle climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marx, L.; Randall, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The seasonal cycle run which will become the control run for the comparison with runs utilizing codes and parameterizations developed by outside investigators is discussed. The climate model currently exists in two parallel versions: one running on the Amdahl and the other running on the CYBER 203. These two versions are as nearly identical as machine capability and the requirement for high speed performance will allow. Developmental changes are made on the Amdahl/CMS version for ease of testing and rapidity of turnaround. The changes are subsequently incorporated into the CYBER 203 version using vectorization techniques where speed improvement can be realized. The 400 day seasonal cycle run serves as a control run for both medium and long range climate forecasts alsensitivity studies.

  7. Cost effective seasonal storage of wind energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, A.J.; Keck, M.B.

    1995-09-01

    Seasonal variation of the wind electric potential on the Great Plains could be a significant obstacle to the large scale utilization of wind generated electricity. Wind power densities usually are greatest during the spring, and decrease by at least 30 percent relative to the annual average in many areas during the summer months, when demand is highest. This problem can be overcome by using an oversized wind farm and a compressed air energy storage system (a baseload wind energy system). A minimum volume storage reservoir is needed to transform intermittent wind energy to baseload power, while a larger reservoir can be used to store excess power produced during the spring for either peak power or baseload output during the summer. The yearly average cost of energy increases by about 3 percent for the largest storage reservoir, indicating the seasonal storage of wind energy is economically as well as technically feasible.

  8. Seasonal variability of the OH Meinel bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Texier, H.; Solomon, S.; Garcia, R. R.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of seasonal and latitudinal changes in the distribution of mesospheric components on the OH Meinel-band nightglow is investigated by means of numerical simulations using the two-dimensional dynamical/chemical model of Garcia and Solomon (1985). The processes responsible for the formation and destruction of vibrationally excited OH in the mesosphere are described; the seasonal/latitudinal evolution for the higher (v greater than 6) and lower (v = 1-6) levels is shown in graphs and maps and characterized in detail; and the theoretical results are compared with published observational data. The lower-level emission is shown to depend on both O and H, suggesting that the variation of the Meinel-band nightglow can provide important information on the roles of advection and diffusion in the transport of water vapor and odd oxygen near the mesopause.

  9. Seasonal variations of snow depth on Mars.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Zuber, M T; Neumann, G A

    2001-12-07

    Using topography collected over one martian year from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, we have measured temporal changes in the elevation of the martian surface that correlate with the seasonal cycle of carbon dioxide exchange between the surface and atmosphere. The greatest elevation change (1.5 to 2 meters) occurs at high latitudes ( above 80 degrees ), whereas the bulk of the mass exchange occurs at lower latitudes (below 75 degrees N and below 73 degrees S). An unexpected period of sublimation was observed during northern hemisphere autumn, coincident with dust storms in the southern hemisphere. Analysis of MGS Doppler tracking residuals revealed temporal variations in the flattening of Mars that correlate with elevation changes. The combined changes in gravity and elevation constrain the average density of seasonally deposited carbon dioxide to be 910 +/- 230 kilograms per cubic meter, which is considerably denser than terrestrial snow.

  10. Seasonal programming of adult longevity in Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaiserman, A. M.; Collinson, A. C.; Koshel, N. M.; Belaja, I. I.; Voitenko, V. P.

    2002-09-01

    Longevity was significantly associated with season of birth in 101,634 individuals who died in Kiev during the period 1990-2000. The relationship between age at death and month of birth showed a very similar pattern for both men and women. Mean values for the age at death were lowest for subjects born in April-July, and highest for individuals born at the beginning and end of the year. Minimum and maximum ages at death, analysed according to month of birth, differed by 2.6 years in men and 2.3 years in women. For all major causes of death causes, the mean age at death for persons born in the fourth quarter was the highest. These results suggest that, in this population, longevity is affected by prenatal or early postnatal seasonal factors. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the rate of ageing may be programmed in response to environmental influences at critical periods of early development.

  11. The source of the Leeuwin Current seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, K. R.; Godfrey, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    The seasonal circulation around the southwestern boundary of Australia is documented using sea level anomalies from satellite altimetry. Results extrapolated to the coast agree closely with tide gauge observations indicating that seasonal altimeter fields are realistic. Monthly sea level maps identify an annual propagating wave along a waveguide extending along the shelf edge, from the Gulf of Carpentaria to southern Tasmania. The annual sea level pulse does not originate from the Pacific Ocean, as annual Pacific sea level variations are completely out of phase with signals south of the Indonesian archipelago. The presence of a phase discontinuity is demonstrated in annual sea level, temperature, and salinity observations. The origin of the Leeuwin Current seasonality is in the Gulf of Carpentaria where monsoonal winds drive a massive buildup of sea level from November to December. During December-February, a sea level "pulse" emerges from the region, and rapidly propagates poleward along the western and southern Australian boundary. In the broad shelf region centered at 19°S, an independent process forms a high sea level feature when a positive heat flux anomaly induces an annual increase in sea surface temperature which is rapidly mixed through the water column by the strong regional tides. In March, the winds relax and switch to a downwelling favorable alongshore component. In this period, the sea level pulse is essentially in a quasi-static equilibrium with the annual propagating wind systems. The change in cross-shelf sea level gradient along the 8000 km path length at the western and southern boundaries, drives the seasonal changes in the Leeuwin Current flow.

  12. Seasonal profiles of melatonin in adult rams.

    PubMed

    Sheikheldin, M A; Howland, B E; Palmer, W M

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the seasonal changes in melatonin profiles based on frequently collected samples in adult rams maintained under simulated natural photoperiod. In a group of six rams, the seasonal changes of melatonin were characterized in samples collected at 10-min intervals for an equal period before and after the median of the scotophase during the spring (March) and the autumn (September) equinoxes, and also during the summer (June) and the winter (December) solstices. In an additional two rams, the rapid changes in melatonin concentrations were investigated in samples drawn at 2-min intervals for a 2-hr period before and after the median of the scotophase, but only during the summer and the winter solstices. The results show that in adult rams there is a distinct seasonal variation in the nightly rise of melatonin (P less than 0.01). Mean concentrations in June and September were higher than in March or December (P less than 0.05). There was no difference between the means in June or September. However, the means in March were lower than in December (P less than 0.05). Rapid changes in melatonin concentrations occurred in samples collected either at 10-min or 2-min intervals. In rams sampled at 2-min intervals, mean melatonin values in June were also higher than in December (P less than 0.01). The results suggest that there are distinct seasonal changes in melatonin concentrations in the ram and that rapid changes in melatonin concentrations reflect pulsatile secretion.

  13. Varying alpha: New constraints from seasonal variations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-09-15

    We analyze the constraints obtained from new atomic clock data on the possible time variation of the fine structure 'constant' and the electron-proton mass ratio, and show how they are strengthened when the seasonal variation of the Sun's gravitational field at the Earth's surface is taken into account. We compare these bounds with those obtainable from tests of the weak equivalence principle and high redshift observations of quasar absorption spectra.

  14. Seasonal Solar Thermal Absorption Energy Storage Development.

    PubMed

    Daguenet-Frick, Xavier; Gantenbein, Paul; Rommel, Mathias; Fumey, Benjamin; Weber, Robert; Gooneseker, Kanishka; Williamson, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a thermochemical seasonal storage with emphasis on the development of a reaction zone for an absorption/desorption unit. The heat and mass exchanges are modelled and the design of a suitable reaction zone is explained. A tube bundle concept is retained for the heat and mass exchangers and the units are manufactured and commissioned. Furthermore, experimental results of both absorption and desorption processes are presented and the exchanged power is compared to the results of the simulations.

  15. Estimating Viscoelastic Deformation Due to Seasonal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have been making summer-­-time geodetic measurements in south central Alaska for decades to estimate the rate at which a continental-­-ocean terrane is accreting to the North American continent. Southern Alaska has big earthquakes every century and large, rapidly changing glaciers. In the last decade, primarily as part of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory project, continuous GPS measurements have recorded the response of sites such as the near-­-coastal geodetic site, AB35 to competing processes: uplift and movement to the northwest due to tectonic forces and the response of the solid Earth to seasonal and longer-­-term changes in the cryosphere (snow and ice) surrounding the site. Which process causes the largest displacements of the site? Figure 1 (Blewitt, Nevada Geodetic Lab, 2015) shows the Northward, Eastward, and Upward motion of AB35 between 2007 and 2015. The site is moving rapidly to the north and west reflecting the tectonic convergence of site toward interior Alaska but there is small wiggle on the North component reflecting seasonal displacements of the site associated with snow loading and unloading. However, the Up component, shows a large seasonal signal due to snow loading in the winter (down) and ice and snow melting in the warmer months (site goes up). Between 2007 and the present, the site position is slowly moving upward, due to tectonic forcing but probably associated with longer-­- term ice melting as well. We are using the CIG finite element modeling (FEM) program Pylith to estimate the surface displacements and stresses associated with seasonal loading changes (top figure and Figure 2 far right) for water year 2012, 2011.8 - 2012.8) and the longer-­-term retreat of the surrounding glaciers.

  16. Neutrino decay and solar neutrino seasonal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoreti, R.; Guzzo, M. M.; de Holanda, P. C.; Peres, O. L. G.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the possibility of solar neutrino decay as a sub-leading effect on their propagation between production and detection. Using current oscillation data, we set a new lower bound to the ν2 neutrino lifetime at τ2 /m2 ≥ 7.2 ×10-4s .eV-1 at 99% C.L. Also, we show how seasonal variations in the solar neutrino data can give interesting additional information about neutrino lifetime.

  17. The Making of National Seasonal Wildfire Outlooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfin, G. M.; Brown, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Bridging the gap between research-based experiments and fully operational products has been likened to crossing the valley of death. In this talk, we document the development of pre-season fire potential outlooks, informed by seasonal climate predictions, through a long-term collaboration between NOAA RISA teams, the Program for Climate, Ecosystem and Fire Applications (Desert Research Institute), the National Interagency Fire Center's Predictive Services program and multiple collaborators. To transition experimental outlooks into a sustained, monthly operational product, we co-developed a temporary institution, the National Seasonal Assessment Workshops, as a platform for cross-disciplinary knowledge exchange, training, and experimentation in consensus forecast processes and product development. In our retrospective evaluation of the process, we identified several factors that supported the transition from research to operations. These include: the development of new institutions; focus on a geographic scale commensurate with the needs of federal and state land management agencies; participatory and deliberative engagements; cooperation by many partners with perspectives on the connections between climate and wildland fire management; and iterative engagement sustained by funding and human resource commitments from the key partners. Through co-production of the outlooks and the institution, we created a cross-disciplinary community of practice, thus, increasing the capacity of fire management practitioners to use climate information in decision making. This experiment in developing a collaborative climate service was not an unqualified success. For example, while practitioners almost always *consult* official probabilistic climate forecasts, based on the output from dynamical and statistical models, they sometimes *act* on information from self-constructed forecasts, based on analysis of analogue years. We recommend research to further examine the distribution and

  18. Effects of Rainfall on the Seasonal Thermocline.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    PROGRAMA PRO,E[T" ’’ TASK WO 11K jNiT ELEMNT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO ii r (irCI.u C Secul-’ty CIUf,(ct,Ofvl EFF’ELS OF RL’AllAII, ON UIE SEASONAL...Alaska mainland. The North Pacific 10igh, on the other hand, lies generally about 2000 km west of the Pacific coast 01 tre United States and is

  19. Quantifying the influence of CO2 seasonality on future aragonite undersaturation onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasse, T. P.; McNeil, B. I.; Matear, R. J.; Lenton, A.

    2015-10-01

    Ocean acidification is a predictable consequence of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), and is highly likely to impact the entire marine ecosystem - from plankton at the base of the food chain to fish at the top. Factors which are expected to be impacted include reproductive health, organism growth and species composition and distribution. Predicting when critical threshold values will be reached is crucial for projecting the future health of marine ecosystems and for marine resources planning and management. The impacts of ocean acidification will be first felt at the seasonal scale, however our understanding how seasonal variability will influence rates of future ocean acidification remains poorly constrained due to current model and data limitations. To address this issue, we first quantified the seasonal cycle of aragonite saturation state utilizing new data-based estimates of global ocean-surface dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity. This seasonality was then combined with earth system model projections under different emissions scenarios (representative concentration pathways; RCPs 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5) to provide new insights into future aragonite undersaturation onset. Under a high emissions scenario (RCP 8.5), our results suggest accounting for seasonality will bring forward the initial onset of month-long undersaturation by 17 ± 10 years compared to annual-mean estimates, with differences extending up to 35 ± 16 years in the North Pacific due to strong regional seasonality. This earlier onset will result in large-scale undersaturation once atmospheric CO2 reaches 496 ppm in the North Pacific and 511 ppm in the Southern Ocean, independent of emission scenario. This work suggests accounting for seasonality is critical to projecting the future impacts of ocean acidification on the marine environment.

  20. Hemispheric asymmetry in martian seasonal surface water ice from MGS TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapst, Jonathan; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Wood, Stephen E.

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bolometers measured planetary broadband albedo and temperature for more than three Mars years. As seasons progress on Mars, surface temperatures may fall below the frost point of volatiles in the atmosphere (namely, carbon dioxide and water). Systematic mapping of the spatial and temporal occurrence of these volatiles in the martian atmosphere, on the surface, and in the subsurface has shown their importance in understanding the climate of Mars. We examine TES daytime albedo, temperature, and atmospheric opacity data to map the latitudinal and temporal occurrence of seasonal surface water frost on Mars. We expand on previous work by looking at the behavior of water frost over the entire martian year, made possible with comprehensive, multi-year data. Interpretations of frost are based on albedo changes and the corresponding daytime temperature range. Data is considered consistent with water frost when there are significant albedo increases (>0.05 relative to frost-free seasons) and the observed temperatures are ∼170-200 K. We argue the presence of extensive water frost in the northern hemisphere, extending from the pole to ∼40°N, following seasonal temperature trends. In the north, water frost first appears near the pole at Ls = ∼160° and is last observed at Ls = ∼90°. Extensive water frost is less evident in southern hemisphere data, though both hemispheres show data that are consistent with the presence of a water ice annulus during seasonal cap retreat. Hemispherical asymmetry in the occurrence of seasonal water frost is due in part to the lower (∼40%) atmospheric water vapor abundances observed in the southern hemisphere. Our results are consistent with net transport of water vapor to the northern hemisphere. The deposition and sublimation of seasonal water frost may significantly increase the near-surface water vapor density that could

  1. Interpretant Levels Presented by Higher Education Students about the Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzovo, Daniel Trevisan; Laburú, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the initial interpretant levels of the seasons of the year presented by students in a physics discipline of undergraduate course of a biological sciences degree at a state university of the south of Brazil. This study is qualitative, it analyzes textual oral representations and images about that astronomical phenomenon. It found that all students showed similar interpretant levels than those without any instruction, focusing their explanation of this concept in the variation of the distance between Earth and the Sun and indeterminate/confused representations. Another important result was the absence of a scientifically correct conception of the subject. The data from this study are in agreement with several studies on the weak training of science teachers in astronomy, and emphasizes the importance of both a re-structuration of the initial training of these future teachers, as well as the continuous teacher training of the working professional ones.

  2. Operational seasonal and interannual predictions of ocean conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leetmaa, Ants

    1992-01-01

    Dr. Leetmaa described current work at the U.S. National Meteorological Center (NMC) on coupled systems leading to a seasonal prediction system. He described the way in which ocean thermal data is quality controlled and used in a four dimensional data assimilation system. This consists of a statistical interpolation scheme, a primitive equation ocean general circulation model, and the atmospheric fluxes that are required to force this. This whole process generated dynamically consist thermohaline and velocity fields for the ocean. Currently routine weekly analyses are performed for the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. These analyses are used for ocean climate diagnostics and as initial conditions for coupled forecast models. Specific examples of output products were shown both in the Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean.

  3. Seasonal Variation in Human Gut Microbiome Composition

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Mizrahi-Man, Orna; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the human gut microbiome is influenced by many environmental factors. Diet is thought to be one of the most important determinants, though we have limited understanding of the extent to which dietary fluctuations alter variation in the gut microbiome between individuals. In this study, we examined variation in gut microbiome composition between winter and summer over the course of one year in 60 members of a founder population, the Hutterites. Because of their communal lifestyle, Hutterite diets are similar across individuals and remarkably stable throughout the year, with the exception that fresh produce is primarily served during the summer and autumn months. Our data indicate that despite overall gut microbiome stability within individuals over time, there are consistent and significant population-wide shifts in microbiome composition across seasons. We found seasonal differences in both (i) the abundance of particular taxa (false discovery rate <0.05), including highly abundant phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and (ii) overall gut microbiome diversity (by Shannon diversity; P = 0.001). It is likely that the dietary fluctuations between seasons with respect to produce availability explain, at least in part, these differences in microbiome composition. For example, high levels of produce containing complex carbohydrates consumed during the summer months might explain increased abundance of Bacteroidetes, which contain complex carbohydrate digesters, and decreased levels of Actinobacteria, which have been negatively correlated to fiber content in food questionnaires. Our observations demonstrate the plastic nature of the human gut microbiome in response to variation in diet. PMID:24618913

  4. Seasonal radiative modeling of Titan's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bézard, Bruno; Vinatier, Sandrine; Achterberg, Richard

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a seasonal radiative model of Titan's stratosphere to investigate the time variation of stratospheric temperatures in the 10-3 - 5 mbar range as observed by the Cassini/CIRS spectrometer. The model incorporates gas and aerosol vertical profiles derived from Cassini/CIRS spectra to calculate the heating and cooling rate profiles as a function of time and latitude. In the equatorial region, the radiative equilibrium profile is warmer than the observed one. Adding adiabatic cooling in the energy equation, with a vertical velocity profile decreasing with depth and having w ≈ 0.4 mm sec-1 at 1 mbar, allows us to reproduce the observed profile. The model predicts a 5 K decrease at 1 mbar between 2008 and 2016 as a result of orbit eccentricity, in relatively good agreement with the observations. At other latitudes, as expected, the radiative model predicts seasonal variations of temperature larger than observed, pointing to latitudinal redistribution of heat by dynamics. Vertical velocities seasonally varying between -0.4 and 1.2 mm sec-1 at 1 mbar provide adiabatic cooling and heating adequate to reproduce the time variation of 1-mbar temperatures from 2005 to 2016 at 30°N and S. The model is also used to investigate the role of the strong compositional changes observed at high southern latitudes after equinox in the concomitant rapid cooling of the stratosphere.

  5. The Seasonality of Antarctic Sea Ice Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, P.

    2014-12-01

    Unlike the strong decline in Arctic sea ice, Antarctic sea ice is experiencing a weak overall increase in area that is the residual of opposing regional trends. This study considers the seasonal pattern of these trends. In addition to traditional ice concentration and ice area, temporal rates of change of these quantities are investigated ("intensification" and "expansion," respectively). This is crucial to the attribution of the Antarctic sea ice trends, since changes in wind or thermal forcing directly affect ice areal change, rather than ice area itself. The study shows that diverse regional trends all contribute significantly to the overall Antarctic sea-ice increase. In contrast to the widely-held view of a 'south Pacific dipole', trends in the Weddell and Amundsen-Bellingshausen regions are found to best compensate in magnitude and seasonality. Perhaps most importantly, the largest concentration trends, in autumn, are actually caused by intensification trends during spring. Autumn intensification trends directly oppose autumn concentration trends in most places, seemingly as a result of ice and ocean feedbacks. Further study of changes during the spring melting season is therefore required to unravel the Antarctic sea ice increase.

  6. Seasonal Stratospheric Chemistry on Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Orton, Glenn S.; Hue, Vincent; Poppe, Andrew R.; Luszcz-Cook, Statia H.; Moullet, Arielle

    2016-10-01

    We use a time-variable photochemical model to study the change in stratospheric constituent abundances as a function of altitude, latitude, and season on Uranus and Neptune. In the absence of meridional transport, the results for Neptune are similar to those predicted for Saturn: seasonal variations in the abundances of observable hydrocarbons such as C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H4, C3H8, and C4H2 are large in the upper stratosphere but become increasingly damped with depth due to increased dynamical and chemical time scales. We also find that latitude gradients in hydrocarbon abundances would be maintained on Neptune in the absence of atmospheric circulation. On Uranus, however, the more stagnant, poorly mixed stratosphere leads to a lower-altitude homopause, with methane being photolyzed relatively deep in the stratosphere, at which point both diffusion and chemical time constants have become longer than a Uranian year. Seasonal variations in stratospheric constituents on Uranus are therefore muted, despite the planet's large obliquity. We compare our model results to global-average observations from Spitzer and to spatially-resolved infrared observations from the ground. The model-data comparisons have implications with respect to the importance and strength of meridional transport, the origin of stratospheric oxygen-bearing species, and the dust and cometary influx rates on Uranus and Neptune.

  7. Seasonal variations in the rotation of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maistre, Sebastien; Karatekin, Özgür; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Dehant, Veronique

    2010-05-01

    Seasonal variations in the rotation of Mars are primarily driven by its atmosphere and involve an exchange of mass and/or momentum between the atmosphere and the solid body. In this study, we investigate the determination of seasonal variations of the Length-of-Day (LOD) and of the polar motion (PM). PM corresponds to the motion of the rotation axis in a reference frame tied to the planet. Mars' polar motion contains seasonal effects of the atmosphere as well as a resonance with a rotational normal mode of the planet, the Chandler Wobble (CW), which is the natural wobbling of an oblate planet that does not rotate around its principal moment of inertia. The period and damping of this mode are very interesting since they are linked to the interior structure of the planet. LOD variations are deviations from the uniform rotation speed of the planet. They are mostly related to the dynamics of the geophysical fluids of the system such as the core and atmosphere of Mars. The amplitudes of the PM and LOD variations calculated from the outputs of the General Circulation Models will be compared with the observed amplitudes from the tracking of Martian landers and orbiters. The improvements with the future missions and their implications for the Martian atmospheric dynamics and interior structure will be discussed.

  8. Analogue Downscaling of Seasonal Rainfall Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A. N.; Timbal, B.; Hendon, H.

    2010-12-01

    We have taken an existing statistical downscaling model (SDM), based on meteorological analogues that was developed for downscaling climate change projections (Timbal et al 2009), and applied it in the seasonal forecasting context to produce downscaled rainfall hindcasts from a coupled model seasonal forecast system (POAMA). Downscaling of POAMA forecasts is required to provide seasonal climate information at local scales of interest. Analogue downscaling is a simple technique to generate rainfall forecasts appropriate to the local scale by conditioning on the large scale predicted GCM circulation and the local topography and climate. Analogue methods are flexible and have been shown to produce good results when downscaling 20th century South Eastern Australian rainfall output from climate models. A set of re-forecasts for three month rainfall at 170 observing stations in the South Murray Darling region of Australia were generated using predictors from the POAMA re-forecasts as input for the analogue SDM. The predictors were optimised over a number of different GCMS in previous climate change downscaling studies. Downscaling with the analogue SDM results in predicted rainfall with realistic variance while maintaining the modest predictive skill of the dynamical model. Evaluation of the consistency between the large scale mean of downscaled and direct GCM output precipitation is encouraging.

  9. Seasonal forecasting of fire over Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spessa, A. C.; Field, R. D.; Pappenberger, F.; Langner, A.; Englhart, S.; Weber, U.; Stockdale, T.; Siegert, F.; Kaiser, J. W.; Moore, J.

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale fires occur frequently across Indonesia, particularly in the southern region of Kalimantan and eastern Sumatra. They have considerable impacts on carbon emissions, haze production, biodiversity, health, and economic activities. In this study, we demonstrate that severe fire and haze events in Indonesia can generally be predicted months in advance using predictions of seasonal rainfall from the ECMWF System 4 coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Based on analyses of long, up-to-date series observations on burnt area, rainfall, and tree cover, we demonstrate that fire activity is negatively correlated with rainfall and is positively associated with deforestation in Indonesia. There is a contrast between the southern region of Kalimantan (high fire activity, high tree cover loss, and strong non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire) and the central region of Kalimantan (low fire activity, low tree cover loss, and weak, non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire). The ECMWF seasonal forecast provides skilled forecasts of burnt and fire-affected area with several months lead time explaining at least 70% of the variance between rainfall and burnt and fire-affected area. Results are strongly influenced by El Niño years which show a consistent positive bias. Overall, our findings point to a high potential for using a more physical-based method for predicting fires with several months lead time in the tropics rather than one based on indexes only. We argue that seasonal precipitation forecasts should be central to Indonesia's evolving fire management policy.

  10. Statistical Seasonal Sea Surface based Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Roberto; Rodriguez-Fonseca, Belen; Diouf, Ibrahima

    2014-05-01

    The interannual variability of the sea surface temperature (SST) plays a key role in the strongly seasonal rainfall regime on the West African region. The predictability of the seasonal cycle of rainfall is a field widely discussed by the scientific community, with results that fail to be satisfactory due to the difficulty of dynamical models to reproduce the behavior of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). To tackle this problem, a statistical model based on oceanic predictors has been developed at the Universidad Complutense of Madrid (UCM) with the aim to complement and enhance the predictability of the West African Monsoon (WAM) as an alternative to the coupled models. The model, called S4CAST (SST-based Statistical Seasonal Forecast) is based on discriminant analysis techniques, specifically the Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). Beyond the application of the model to the prediciton of rainfall in West Africa, its use extends to a range of different oceanic, atmospheric and helth related parameters influenced by the temperature of the sea surface as a defining factor of variability.

  11. Estimating the seasonal maximum light use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Kanako; Furumi, Shinobu; Soyama, Noriko; Daigo, Motomasa

    2014-11-01

    Light use efficiency (LUE) is a key parameter in estimating gross primary production (GPP) based on global Earth-observation satellite data and model calculations. In current LUE-based GPP estimation models, the maximum LUE is treated as a constant for each biome type. However, the maximum LUE varies seasonally. In this study, seasonal maximum LUE values were estimated from the maximum incident LUE versus the incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the fraction of absorbed PAR. First, an algorithm to estimate maximum incident LUE was developed to estimate GPP capacity using a light response curve. One of the parameters required for the light response curve was estimated from the linear relationship of the chlorophyll index and the GPP capacity at a high PAR level of 2000 (µmolm-2s-1), and was referred to as" the maximum GPP capacity at 2000". The relationship was determined for six plant functional types: needleleaf deciduous trees, broadleaf deciduous trees, needleleaf evergreen trees, broadleaf evergreen trees, C3 grass, and crops. The maximum LUE values estimated in this study displayed seasonal variation, especially those for deciduous broadleaf forest, but also those for evergreen needleleaf forest.

  12. The seasonal cycle of low stratiform clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Stephen A.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    1993-01-01

    The seasonal cycle of low stratiform clouds is studied using data from surface-based cloud climatologies. The impact of low clouds on the radiation budget is illustrated by comparison of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment with the cloud climatologies. Ten regions of active stratocumulus convection are identified. These regions fall into four categories: subtropical marine, midlatitude marine, Arctic stratus, and Chinese stratus. With the exception of the Chinese region, all the regions with high amounts of stratus clouds are over the oceans. In all regions except the Arctic, the season of maximum stratus corresponds to the season of greatest lower-troposphere static stability. Interannual variations in stratus cloud amount also are related to changes in static stability. A linear analysis indicates that a 6 percent increase in stratus fractional area coverage is associated with each 1 C increase in static stability. Over midlatitude oceans, sky-obscuring fog is a large component of the summertime stratus amount. The amount of fog appears to be related to warm advection across sharp gradients of SST.

  13. [The neuroendocrine regulatory mechanisms of mammalian seasonal reproduction].

    PubMed

    Lai, Ping; Wang, Ping-Qing; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Chu, Ming-Xing; Liu, Chong-Xu; Tan, Ying; Fan, Qi

    2012-03-01

    The seasonal reproduction of mammal means the reproduction experiences an annual period from quiescence to renaissance. Studies have shown that kisspeptin and RFRP play an important role in the reproductive seasonality. The non-breeding season is characterized by an increase in the negative feedback effect of estrogen on GnRH, and this effect is transmitted by kisspeptin neurons, which may be an important factor affecting the reproduction activities. The expression of RFRP depends on melatonin secretion, and shows an apparent inhibition on reproduction in non-breeding season. In addition, thyroid hormones influence termination of the breeding season. Dopaminergic neuron A14/A15 also contributes to the seasonal changes in estrogen negative feedback. These neural systems may synergistically modulate the seasonal changes of reproductive function with the photoperiod. This review makes a systematic expatiation on the relationship between seasonal reproduction and these neural systems.

  14. SEASONAL VARIATION IN PLASMA SEX STEROID CONCENTRATION IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variation in plasma sex steroid concentrations is common in mature vertebrates, and is occasionally seen in juvenile animals. In this study, we examine the seasonal pattern of sex hormone concentration in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and make...

  15. Modellig the Foliage Seasonal Carbon Cycle in Tropical Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Weirdt, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Maignan, F.; Peylin, P.; Ciais, P.; Moreau, I.; Hanert, E.; Defourny, P.; Steppe, K.

    2011-01-01

    Phenological modeling for tropical forests remains poorly developed and many global ecosystem models, like ORCHIDEE, assume that canopy dynamics of evergreen tropical forests show no seasonality. The current ORCHIDEE scheme fails to adequately model the seasonal variability of carbon fluxes observed in tropical evergreen forests. A better description of the underlying mechanisms that drive tropical forest canopy seasonal photosynthesis dynamics and phenology could possibly overcome this problem. To address this issue, seasonal variations in leaf phenology and photosynthesis dynamics for evergreen tropical forests were introduced and validated against in-situ carbon flux measurements. Both a seasonal photosynthetic capacity and a litterfall seasonality were introduced in ORCHIDEE and the resulting increased dry season photosynthesis and changed seasonal Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) patterns for flux tower sites in the Amazon were evaluated.

  16. 50 CFR 622.435 - Seasonal and area closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... (a) Seasonal closures—(1) Seasonal closures applicable to specific species only—(i) Red, black, tiger... for or possess red, black, tiger, yellowfin, or yellowedge grouper in or from the Caribbean EEZ....

  17. 50 CFR 622.435 - Seasonal and area closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... (a) Seasonal closures—(1) Seasonal closures applicable to specific species only—(i) Red, black, tiger... for or possess red, black, tiger, yellowfin, or yellowedge grouper in or from the Caribbean EEZ....

  18. Markov Chain Estimation of Avian Seasonal Fecundity, Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Avian seasonal fecundity is of interest from evolutionary, ecological, and conservation perspectives. However, direct estimation of seasonal fecundity is difficult, especially with multibrooded birds, and models representing the renesting and quitting processes are usually requi...

  19. 46 CFR 42.07-15 - Zones and seasonal areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BY SEA Control, Enforcement, and Rights of Appeal § 42.07-15 Zones and seasonal areas. (a) A vessel... regarding the zones and seasonal areas described in subpart 42.30. (b) A port located on the boundary...

  20. 46 CFR 42.07-15 - Zones and seasonal areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BY SEA Control, Enforcement, and Rights of Appeal § 42.07-15 Zones and seasonal areas. (a) A vessel... regarding the zones and seasonal areas described in subpart 42.30. (b) A port located on the boundary...

  1. Pregnancy and work

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnant can keep working during their pregnancy. Some women are able to work right up until they are ready to deliver. Others may need to cut back on their hours or stop working before their due date. Whether you can work or ... to stop working or reduce your work hours. Most women are advised to only lift things that weigh ...

  2. Seasonal Forecasting of Fires across Southern Borneo, 1997-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spessa, Allan; Field, Robert; Kaiser, Johannes; Langner, Andreas; Moore, Jonathan; Pappenberger, Florian; Siegert, Florian; Weber, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    several studies using historical data have established negative relationships between fires and antecedent rainfall, and/or positive relationships between fires and deforestation in regions affected by El Nino, comparatively little work has attempted to predict fires and emissions in such regions. Ensemble seasonal climate forecasts issued with several months lead-time have been applied to support risk assessment systems in many fields, notably agricultural production and natural disaster management of flooding, heat waves, drought and fire. The USA, for example, has a long-standing seasonal fire danger prediction system. Fire danger monitoring systems have been operating in Indonesia for over a decade, but, as of yet, no fire danger prediction systems exist. Given the effort required to mobilise suppression and prevention measures in Indonesia, one could argue that high fire danger periods must be anticipated months in advance for mitigation and response measures to be effective. To address this need, the goal of our work was to examine the utility of seasonal rainfall forecasts in predicting severe fires in Indonesia more than one month in advance, using southern Borneo (comprising the bulk of Kalimantan) as a case study. Here we present the results of comparing seasonal forecasts of monthly rainfall from ECMWF's System 4 against i) observed rainfall (GPCP), and ii) burnt area and deforestation (MODIS, AVHRR and Landsat) across southern Borneo for the period 1997-2010. Our results demonstrate the utility of using ECMWF's seasonal climate forecasts for predicting fire activity in the region. Potential applications include improved fire mitigation and responsiveness, and improved risk assessments of biodiversity and carbon losses through fire. These are important considerations for forest protection programmes (e.g. REDD+), forest carbon markets and forest (re)insurance enterprises.

  3. Gusev Crater, Mars: Observations of three dust devil seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Waller, Devin A.; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Lemmon, Mark T.; Neakrase, Lynn D. V.; Pendleton Hoffer, Mary; Thompson, Shane D.; Whelley, Patrick L.

    2010-09-01

    Spirit began operations in Gusev Crater in January 2004 and has returned data on three seasons of dust devil (DD) activity. Total DDs observed were 533 in season one, 101 in season two, and 127 in season three. Their general characteristics are the same within factors of 2 among the seasons, with median diameters of 19 m in season one, 24 m in season two, and 39 m in season three, and dust flux values for individual vortices ranging from 4.0 × 10-9 to 4.6 × 10-4 kg m-2 s-1 in season one, 5.2 × 10-7 to 6.2 × 10-5 kg m-2 s-1 in season two, and 1.5 × 10-7 to 1.6 × 10-4 kg m-2 s-1 in season three. All three seasons were initiated with the onset of southern Martian spring within 14 sols of the same Ls (181°) and their frequency increased to the period corresponding to late southern spring. The occurrences decreased monotonically in seasons one and three but apparently ended abruptly in season two when a large dust storm occurred; although the dusty atmosphere might have precluded the detection of active DDs, the abrupt cessation could result from conditions such as thermal stability of the atmosphere due to the presence of dust which could halt DD formation. Dust devils can contribute significant quantities of dust to the atmosphere, although it is unclear as to whether this dust stays locally or is injected into higher-altitude winds and is distributed elsewhere. In the three DD seasons observed through Spirit, DDs in Gusev Crater injected a minimum average of ˜18 × 106 kg of material into the atmosphere each season.

  4. Cascading effects of early-season herbivory on late-season herbivores and their parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Cumplido, Johnattran; Glauser, Gaetan; Benrey, Betty

    2016-05-01

    There is an increasing awareness that herbivory by one insect species induces changes in a plant that affect the performance of other herbivore species that feed on the same plant. However, previous studies of interspecies interactions mediated by plant defense responses have rarely taken into account different insect guilds or the third trophic level. Using a combination of field and laboratory experiments, we examined how early-season herbivory in lima bean plants (Phaseolus lunatus) by the leaf-chewing herbivore Cerotoma ruficornis and the bean pod weevil Apion godmani affects the abundance and performance of the seed beetle Zabrotes subfasciatus and that of its parasitoid Stenocorse bruchivora, which occurs on the plants at the end of the growing season. In addition, we determined the consequences of early-season herbivore-induced defenses on plant performance. We hypothesized that early-season induction would affect plant reproduction and, hence, would alter the suitability of seeds for late-season seed-eating beetles, and that this would in turn alter the vulnerability of these seed beetles to parasitoids. We found strong support for these hypotheses. In the field, early-season herbivory negatively affected plant reproduction and seeds of these plants suffered lower levels of infestation by seed-eating beetles, which in turn suffered less parasitism. Laboratory assays with field-collected seeds confirmed that the performance of beetles and parasitoids was lower on seeds from plants that had been subjected to early-season herbivory. Further analyses revealed that seeds produced by control plants were larger, heavier, and had a higher concentration of cyanogenic glycosides and total protein content than seeds from plants subjected to herbivory. Our results provide insight into how direct and indirect interactions between and within different trophic levels affect the dynamics and structure of complex communities.

  5. Development of a wind energy climate service based on seasonal climate prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torralba, Veronica; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.; Cortesi, Nicola; Christel, Isadora; González-Reviriego, Nube; Turco, Marco; Soret, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Climate predictions tailored to the wind energy sector represent an innovation to better understand the future variability of wind energy resources. At seasonal time scales current energy practices employ a simple approach based on a retrospective climatology. Instead, probabilistic climate forecasting can better address specific decisions that affect energy demand and supply, as well as decisions relative to the planning of maintenance work. Here we illustrate the advantages that seasonal climate predictions might offer to a wide range of users and discuss the best way to provide them with this information. We use the predictions of 10-meter wind speed from the ECMWF seasonal forecast System 4 (S4). S4, as every operational seasonal forecast system, is affected by a range of biases. Hence, to produce usable climate information from the predictions, different bias-adjustment techniques and downscaling methods should be applied, their choice depending on the user requirements. An ensemble of post-processing methods is described, and their relative merit evaluated as a function of their impact of the characteristics of the forecast error and the usability of the resulting forecasts. Both reanalyses (ERA-Interim, JRA-55, MERRA) and in-situ observations are used as observational references. As an illustration of the downstream impact of the forecasts as a source of climate information, the post-processed seasonal predictions of wind speed will be used as input in a transfer model that translates climate information into generated power at different spatial scales.

  6. Seasonal species interactions minimize the impact of species turnover on the likelihood of community persistence.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Serguei; Rohr, Rudolf P; Fortuna, Miguel A; Selva, Nuria; Bascompte, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Many of the observed species interactions embedded in ecological communities are not permanent, but are characterized by temporal changes that are observed along with abiotic and biotic variations. While work has been done describing and quantifying these changes, little is known about their consequences for species coexistence. Here, we investigate the extent to which changes of species composition impact the likelihood of persistence of the predator-prey community in the highly seasonal Białowieza Primeval Forest (northeast Poland), and the extent to which seasonal changes of species interactions (predator diet) modulate the expected impact. This likelihood is estimated extending recent developments on the study of structural stability in ecological communities. We find that the observed species turnover strongly varies the likelihood of community persistence between summer and winter. Importantly, we demonstrate that the observed seasonal interaction changes minimize the variation in the likelihood of persistence associated with species turnover across the year. We find that these community dynamics can be explained as the coupling of individual species to their environment by minimizing both the variation in persistence conditions and the interaction changes between seasons. Our results provide a homeostatic explanation for seasonal species interactions and suggest that monitoring the association of interactions changes with the level of variation in community dynamics can provide a good indicator of the response of species to environmental pressures.

  7. Plasticity of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) wood-forming tissues during a growing season.

    PubMed

    Paiva, J A P; Garnier-Géré, P H; Rodrigues, J C; Alves, A; Santos, S; Graça, J; Le Provost, G; Chaumeil, G; Da Silva-Perez, D; Bosc, A; Fevereiro, P; Plomion, C

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal effect is the most significant external source of variation affecting vascular cambial activity and the development of newly divided cells, and hence wood properties. Here, the effect of edapho-climatic conditions on the phenotypic and molecular plasticity of differentiating secondary xylem during a growing season was investigated. Wood-forming tissues of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) were collected from the beginning to the end of the growing season in 2003. Data from examination of fibre morphology, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), analytical pyrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were combined to characterize the samples. Strong variation was observed in response to changes in edapho-climatic conditions. A genomic approach was used to identify genes differentially expressed during this growing season. Out of 3512 studied genes, 19% showed a significant seasonal effect. These genes were clustered into five distinct groups, the largest two representing genes over-expressed in the early- or late-wood-forming tissues, respectively. The other three clusters were characterized by responses to specific edapho-climatic conditions. This work provides new insights into the plasticity of the molecular machinery involved in wood formation, and reveals candidate genes potentially responsible for the phenotypic differences found between early- and late-wood.

  8. Improving Groundwater Predictions using Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanaseer, N.; Arumugam, S.; Bales, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    This research aims to evaluate the utility of precipitation forecasts in improving groundwater and streamflow predictions at seasonal and monthly time scales using statistical modeling techniques. For this purpose, we select ten groundwater wells from the Groundwater Climate Response Network (GCRN) and nine streamgauges from the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN) to represent groundwater and surface water variability with minimal anthropogenic influences over Flint River Basin (FRB) in Georgia, U.S. Preliminary analysis shows significant correlation between precipitation forecasts over FRB with observed precipitation (P), streamflow discharges (Q) and depth to groundwater (G). Three statistical models are developed using principle component regression (PCR) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) with leave-5-out cross-validation to predict winter (JFM) and spring (AMJ) as well as monthly (Jan through Jun) groundwater and streamflow for the selected sites. The three models starts at the end of Dec and uses Oct, Nov and Dec (OND) observed records to predict 2-seasons and 6-months ahead. Model-1 is the "null model" that does not include precipitation forecasts as predictors. It is developed using PCR to predict seasonal and monthly Q and G independently based on previous (Oct. Nov. and Dec; OND) observations of Q or G at a given site without using climate information. Model predictands are JFM, AMJ for seasonal and Jan. through Jun for monthly. Model-2 is also developed using PCR, but it uses the issued at January precipitation forecasts from nine ECHAM 4.5 grid points as additional predictors. Model-3 is developed using CCA and it aims to integrate additional information on the predictands (i.e., groundwater) from adjacent basins to improve the prediction. Model-3 is designed to evaluate the role of climate versus the role groundwater and surface water flows in the selected basins. Finally, comparisons between the three models for each site and across the sites

  9. The Seasonality Of The Loop Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Cody Alan

    A total of 20 Loop Current eddy separation event dates were derived from Seasat and ERS-1 satellite altimetry, Coastal Zone Color Scanner chlorophyll-a images, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sea surface temperature images, Horizon Marine, Inc. EddyWatch(TM) reports, and Climatology and Simulation of Eddies Eddy Joint Industry Project Gulf Eddy Model analyses spanning mid-1978 - 1992. There were many inconsistencies between the new "pre-altimetry" reanalysis dates derived from mostly non-altimeter data and dates published in past literature based on earlier versions of the pre-altimetry record. The reanalysis dates were derived from a larger compilation of data types and, consequently, were not as affected by intermittent and seasonal data outages common with past records. Therefore, the reanalysis dates are likely more accurate. About 30 Loop Current eddy separation dates were derived from altimetry data spanning 1993 -- 2012. The pre-altimetry and altimetry reanalysis dates along with similar altimetry dates published in other literature exhibit statistically significant seasonality. Eddy separation events are more likely in the months March, August, and September, and less likely in December. Reanalysis event dates were objectively divided into "spring" and "fall" seasons using a k-means clustering algorithm. The estimated spring and fall season centers are March 2nd and August 23 rd, respectively, with seasonal boundaries on May 22nd and December 3rd. The altimetry data suggest that Loop Current intrusion/retreat is dominantly an annual process. Loop Current metrics such as maximum northern boundary latitude and area are relatively high from January through about July and low in September and October. February metrics are statistically different than metrics in either October or November or both. This annual process is primarily driven by and dynamically linked to geostrophic currents seaward of the Campeche Bank shelf break forced by Kelvin waves

  10. Scope on the Skies: Changing of the Seasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Learn the astronomy behind the changing of the seasons. Students know that we mark the change of seasons with the position of the Sun over certain parts of the Earth. The specific time and date for the change of seasons is determined by the position of the Sun, not above the horizon necessarily, nor geographically, but rather where the Sun is…

  11. 1969 Post Season Farm Labor and Rural Manpower Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Labor, Detroit. Michigan Employment Security Commission.

    Employment of seasonal labor in Michigan during 1969 reached a peak in July, with an estimated 60,400 seasonal workers employed. Approximately 113,500 workers were employed at some time in cultivation and harvest of Michigan's crops during the 1969 season. Many workers were employed in only 1 activity or quit before its completion, but most…

  12. Seasonality in Children's Pedometer-Measured Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Alderman, Brandon; Morgan, Charles F.; Le Masurier, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Seasonality appears to have an impact on children's physical activity levels, but equivocal findings demand more study in this area. With the increased use of pedometers in both research and practice, collecting descriptive data in various seasons to examine the impact of seasonality on pedometer-measured physical activity among children is…

  13. 50 CFR 660.509 - Accountability measures (season closures).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accountability measures (season closures... Coastal Pelagics Fisheries § 660.509 Accountability measures (season closures). (a) General rule. When the... until the beginning of the next fishing period or season. Regional Administrator shall announce in...

  14. 50 CFR 660.509 - Accountability measures (season closures).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accountability measures (season closures... Coastal Pelagics Fisheries § 660.509 Accountability measures (season closures). (a) General rule. When the... until the beginning of the next fishing period or season. Regional Administrator shall announce in...

  15. Seasonal and cryopreservation impacts on semen quality in boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonal boar infertility occurs worldwide and contributes to economic loss to the pork industry. The current study evaluated cooled vs cryopreserved semen quality of 11 Duroc boars collected in June (cool season) and August 2014 (warm season). Semen was cooled to 16°C (cooled) or frozen over liquid...

  16. 50 CFR 20.131 - Extension of seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extension of seasons. 20.131 Section 20... Extension of seasons. Whenever the Secretary shall find that emergency State action to prevent forest fires in any extensive area has resulted in the shortening of the season during which the hunting of...

  17. 18 CFR 157.33 - Requirement for open season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... season. 157.33 Section 157.33 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... GAS ACT Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects § 157.33 Requirement for open season. (a) Any application for a certificate of public convenience and necessity or other...

  18. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127... Measures for the Scup Fishery § 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are... possession limit specified in § 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

  19. 18 CFR 157.33 - Requirement for open season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... season. 157.33 Section 157.33 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... GAS ACT Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects § 157.33 Requirement for open season. (a) Any application for a certificate of public convenience and necessity or other...

  20. 50 CFR 20.32 - During closed season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false During closed season. 20.32 Section 20.32... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.32 During closed season. No person shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds during the closed season....

  1. 50 CFR 20.32 - During closed season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false During closed season. 20.32 Section 20.32... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.32 During closed season. No person shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds during the closed season....

  2. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127... Measures for the Scup Fishery § 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are... possession limit specified in § 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

  3. 50 CFR 20.131 - Extension of seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extension of seasons. 20.131 Section 20... Extension of seasons. Whenever the Secretary shall find that emergency State action to prevent forest fires in any extensive area has resulted in the shortening of the season during which the hunting of...

  4. 50 CFR 20.131 - Extension of seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Extension of seasons. 20.131 Section 20... Extension of seasons. Whenever the Secretary shall find that emergency State action to prevent forest fires in any extensive area has resulted in the shortening of the season during which the hunting of...

  5. 50 CFR 20.32 - During closed season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false During closed season. 20.32 Section 20.32... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.32 During closed season. No person shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds during the closed season....

  6. 18 CFR 157.33 - Requirement for open season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... season. 157.33 Section 157.33 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... GAS ACT Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects § 157.33 Requirement for open season. (a) Any application for a certificate of public convenience and necessity or other...

  7. 50 CFR 20.32 - During closed season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false During closed season. 20.32 Section 20.32... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.32 During closed season. No person shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds during the closed season....

  8. 50 CFR 20.131 - Extension of seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Extension of seasons. 20.131 Section 20... Extension of seasons. Whenever the Secretary shall find that emergency State action to prevent forest fires in any extensive area has resulted in the shortening of the season during which the hunting of...

  9. 50 CFR 648.127 - Scup recreational fishing season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scup recreational fishing season. 648.127... Measures for the Scup Fishery § 648.127 Scup recreational fishing season. Fishermen and vessels that are... possession limit specified in § 648.128(a). The recreational fishing season may be adjusted pursuant to...

  10. 50 CFR 20.32 - During closed season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false During closed season. 20.32 Section 20.32... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.32 During closed season. No person shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds during the closed season....

  11. 18 CFR 157.33 - Requirement for open season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... season. 157.33 Section 157.33 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... GAS ACT Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects § 157.33 Requirement for open season. (a) Any application for a certificate of public convenience and necessity or other...

  12. 50 CFR 20.131 - Extension of seasons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Extension of seasons. 20.131 Section 20... Extension of seasons. Whenever the Secretary shall find that emergency State action to prevent forest fires in any extensive area has resulted in the shortening of the season during which the hunting of...

  13. 50 CFR 20.34 - Opening day of a season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Opening day of a season. 20.34 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.34 Opening day of a season. No person on the opening day of the season shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds in...

  14. 50 CFR 20.34 - Opening day of a season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Opening day of a season. 20.34 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.34 Opening day of a season. No person on the opening day of the season shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds in...

  15. 50 CFR 20.34 - Opening day of a season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Opening day of a season. 20.34 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.34 Opening day of a season. No person on the opening day of the season shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds in...

  16. 50 CFR 20.34 - Opening day of a season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Opening day of a season. 20.34 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.34 Opening day of a season. No person on the opening day of the season shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds in...

  17. 50 CFR 20.34 - Opening day of a season.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Opening day of a season. 20.34 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.34 Opening day of a season. No person on the opening day of the season shall possess any freshly killed migratory game birds in...

  18. Central Amazon Forest Enhanced Vegetation Index Seasonality Driven by Strongly Seasonal Leaf Flush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Nelson, B. W.; Lopes, A. P.; Graca, P. M. L. D. A.; Tavares, J. V.; Prohaska, N.; Martins, G.; Saleska, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    We used an RGB camera mounted 50m above an upland forest canopy to quantify leaf phenology during 12 months for 267 upper canopy tree crowns at the Amazon Tall Tower site (59.0005ºW, 2.1433ºS). Daily images under overcast sky were selected and radiometrically intercalibrated to remove any seasonal bias from incoming radiant color balance. Seasonality of crown color was then recovered for each individual crown by plotting its greenness timeline (green chromatic coordinate). We detected rapid large-amplitude positive and negative changes in greenness. Rapid increase was attributed to leaf flush and occurred in 85% of all crowns, with 80% showing a single flush per year. The theory of photoperiod control of equatorial tropical forest leaf phenology predicts two annual peaks of leaf flush, so is not supported. Rapid negative change occurred in 42% of individuals and was caused by massive pre-flush leaf abscission (31% of all trees) or other non-green pre-flushing states (11%). Crown flushing was concentrated in the five driest months (55% of trees) compared to the five wettest months (10%). Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) for each of three crown phenostages was obtained from a single high spatial resolution QuickBird satellite image.These phenostages were identified using only the visible bands of QuickBird so they could be related to the same crown stages seen in the RGB tower camera images. Relative frequencies of the three crown level phenostages were monitored with the tower camera, allowing a monthly estimate of landscape-scale EVI. Free of the seasonal effects on orbital sensors from clouds, cloud shadows, aerosols or solar illumination angle and corrected for seasonal change in light quality, the camera- and QuickBird derived EVI served as an independent verification of MODIS EVI seasonality. Camera-based EVI was highly consistent with view- and solar-angle corrected MAIAC-EVI of a 3x3 km footprint centered on the tower (R = 0.95 between the two monthly curves

  19. Seasonal variation in chemistry, but not morphology, in roots of Quercus robur growing in different soil types.

    PubMed

    Zadworny, Marcin; McCormack, M Luke; Rawlik, Katarzyna; Jagodziński, Andrzej M

    2015-06-01

    Patterns of root traits among different root orders and their variation across seasons are of considerable importance for soil resource acquisition and partitioning in forest ecosystems. We evaluated whether morphological, anatomical and biochemical traits varied among root orders of Quercus robur (L.) sampled across spring, summer and fall seasons and growing in two different soil types with contrasting site fertility. We found no consistent differences in root diameter and specific root length in relation to soil type or growing season. There was, however, a strong seasonal variation in patterns of nitrogen (N) concentration among root orders. During spring and summer, N concentration was highest in the most distal, absorptive portion of the root system. At the end of the growing season, we observed a sharp decline in the N concentration of these lower-order, absorptive roots and an increase in N concentration of the higher-order, transport roots. The specific mechanisms driving the seasonally changing N concentration remain unclear but are likely related to different functions of lower-order roots for absorption and higher-order roots for structure and storage. Future work should identify how common the observed seasonal changes in N concentration are across species and determine what specific environmental cues plants or roots use to trigger shifts in resource allocation within the root branching hierarchy.

  20. Recognize sex work as legitimate work.

    PubMed

    Reynaga, Elena

    2008-12-01

    It is not sex work per se that makes sex workers vulnerable to HIV, but rather the policies that repress them. In this article, based on her presentation at a plenary session at the conference, Elena Reynaga, who is a sex worker, describes how these policies deprive sex workers of their rights and subject them to physical and sexual violence. The author concludes that at the heart of the problem lies the fact that sex work is not recognized as legitimate work.

  1. Establishing native warm season grasses on Eastern Kentucky strip mines

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T.G.; Larkin, J.L.; Arnett, M.B.

    1998-12-31

    The authors evaluated various methods of establishing native warm season grasses on two reclaimed Eastern Kentucky mines from 1994--1997. Most current reclamation practices incorporate the use of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and other cool-season grasses/legumes that provide little wildlife habitats. The use of native warm season grasses will likely improve wildlife habitat on reclaimed strip mines. Objectives of this study were to compare the feasibility of establishing these grasses during fall, winter, or spring using a native rangeland seeder or hydroseeding; a fertilizer application at planting; or cold-moist stratification prior to hydroseeding. Vegetative cover, bare ground, species richness, and biomass samples were collected at the end of each growing season. Native warm season grass plantings had higher plant species richness compared to cool-season reclamation mixtures. There was no difference in establishment of native warm season grasses as a result of fertilization or seeding technique. Winter native warm season grass plantings were failures and cold-moist stratification did not increase plant establishment during any season. As a result of a drought during 1997, both cool-season and warm season plantings were failures. Cool-season reclamation mixtures had significantly more vegetative cover and biomass compared to native warm season grass mixtures and the native warm season grass plantings did not meet vegetative cover requirements for bond release. Forbs and legumes that established well included pale purple coneflower (Echinacea pallida), lance-leaf coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata), round-headed lespedeza (Lespedeza capitata), partridge pea (Cassia fasiculata), black-eyed susan (Rudbeckia hirta), butterfly milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa), and bergamot (Monarda fistulosa). Results from two demonstration plots next to research plots indicate it is possible to establish native warm season grasses on Eastern Kentucky strip mines for wildlife habitat.

  2. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  3. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  4. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  5. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  6. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  7. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  8. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  9. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  10. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  11. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  12. "Creative" Work Schedules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris

    Many creative or flexible work scheduling options are becoming available to the many working parents, students, handicapped persons, elderly individuals, and others who are either unable or unwilling to work a customary 40-hour work week. These options may be broadly categorized as either restructured or reduced work time options. The three main…

  13. Seasonal Variability in European Radon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves-Kirkby, C. J.; Denman, A. R.; Phillips, P. S.; Crockett, R. G. M.; Sinclair, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    In temperate climates, domestic radon concentration levels are generally seasonally dependent, the level in the home reflecting the convolution of two time-dependent functions. These are the source soil-gas radon concentration itself, and the principal force driving radon into the building from the soil, namely the pressure-difference between interior and exterior environment. While the meteorological influence can be regarded as relatively uniform on a European scale, its variability being defined largely by the influence of North-Atlantic weather systems, soil-gas radon is generally more variable as it is essentially geologically dependent. Seasonal variability of domestic radon concentration can therefore be expected to exhibit geographical variability, as is indeed the case. To compensate for the variability of domestic radon levels when assessing the long term radon health risks, the results of individual short-term measurements are generally converted to equivalent mean annual levels by application of a Seasonal Correction Factor (SCF). This is a multiplying factor, typically derived from measurements of a large number of homes, applied to the measured short-term radon concentration to provide a meaningful annual mean concentration for dose-estimation purposes. Following concern as to the universal applicability of a single SCF set, detailed studies in both the UK and France have reported location-specific SCF sets for different regions of each country. Further results indicate that SCFs applicable to the UK differ significantly from those applicable elsewhere in Europe and North America in both amplitude and phase, supporting the thesis that seasonal variability in indoor radon concentration cannot realistically be compensated for by a single national or international SCF scheme. Published data characterising the seasonal variability of European national domestic radon concentrations, has been collated and analysed, with the objective of identifying

  14. Detecting changes in rainfall pattern and seasonality index vis-à-vis increasing water scarcity in Maharashtra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Pulak; Saji, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge of mean rainfall and its variability of smaller spatial scale are important for the planners in various sectors including water and agriculture. In the present work, long rainfall data series (1901-2006) of districts of Maharashtra in monthly and seasonal scales are constructed and then mean rainfall and coefficient of variability are analyzed to get the spatial pattern and variability. Significant long term changes in monthly rainfall in the district scale are identified by trend analysis of rainfall time series. The seasonality index which is the measure of distribution of precipitation throughout the seasonal cycle is used to classify the different rainfall regime. Also long term changes of the seasonality index are identified by the trend analysis. The state Maharashtra which is to the northwest of peninsular India is highly influenced by the southwest monsoon and the state is facing water scarcity almost every year. This study will help to find out possible reason for the increasing water scarcity in Maharashtra.

  15. Immunogenicity of inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine in adult and pediatric liver transplant recipients over two seasons.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Torii, Yuka; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kamei, Hideya; Onishi, Yasuharu; Kaneko, Kenitiro; Ando, Hisami; Kiuchi, Tetsuya; Ito, Yoshinori

    2013-10-01

    Immunological responses to influenza vaccination administered to liver transplantation recipients are not fully elucidated. To compare inactivated influenza vaccine's immunogenicity between adult and pediatric recipients, 16 adult and 15 pediatric living donor liver transplantation recipients in the 2010-11 influenza season, and 53 adult and 21 pediatric recipients in the 2011-12 season, were investigated. Seroprotection rates (hemagglutinin-inhibition [HI] antibody titer 1:40) were 50-94% to all three antigens among adults and 27-80% among children in both seasons. Seroconversion rates (fourfold or more HI antibody rise) were 32-56% among adults and 13-67% among children in both seasons. No significant differences were observed between the two groups. In addition, 20/53 adult and 13/21 pediatric recipients received a vaccine containing identical antigens in both of these seasons. Geometric mean titer fold increases of all three antigens in adult recipients were significantly lower than those in recipients who had not received a preceding vaccination. In contrast, in pediatric recipients, there were no significant differences between the groups who had and had not received preceding vaccinations. The number of patients with rejection did not differ significantly between the two groups (0/53 vs. 1/21) in the 2011-12 season. The incidence of influenza after vaccination was significantly different between adult and pediatric recipients (0/16 vs. 5/15 in 2010-11 and 0/53 vs. 3/21 in 2011-12, respectively). Overall, there were no significant differences in antibody responses between adult and pediatric groups. Influenza infection was more frequent in pediatric recipients. Long-term response to preceding vaccinations appeared to be insufficient in both groups.

  16. Survival during the Breeding Season: Nest Stage, Parental Sex, and Season Advancement Affect Reed Warbler Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wierucka, Kaja; Halupka, Lucyna; Klimczuk, Ewelina; Sztwiertnia, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Avian annual survival has received much attention, yet little is known about seasonal patterns in survival, especially of migratory passerines. In order to evaluate survival rates and timing of mortality within the breeding season of adult reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus), mark-recapture data were collected in southwest Poland, between 2006 and 2012. A total of 612 individuals (304 females and 308 males) were monitored throughout the entire breeding season, and their capture-recapture histories were used to model survival rates. Males showed higher survival during the breeding season (0.985, 95% CI: 0.941–0.996) than females (0.869, 95% CI: 0.727–0.937). Survival rates of females declined with the progression of the breeding season (from May to August), while males showed constant survival during this period. We also found a clear pattern within the female (but not male) nesting cycle: survival was significantly lower during the laying, incubation, and nestling periods (0.934, 95% CI: 0.898–0.958), when birds spent much time on the nest, compared to the nest building and fledgling periods (1.000, 95% CI: 1.00–1.000), when we did not record any female mortality. These data (coupled with some direct evidence, like bird corpses or blood remains found next to/on the nest) may suggest that the main cause of adult mortality was on-nest predation. The calculated survival rates for both sexes during the breeding season were high compared to annual rates reported for this species, suggesting that a majority of mortality occurs at other times of the year, during migration or wintering. These results have implications for understanding survival variation within the reproductive period as well as general trends of avian mortality. PMID:26934086

  17. Biological and environmental variables tracking seasonality of CO2 exchange in boreal forests and links to modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum, T.; Aalto, T.; Laurila, T.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Lindroth, A.; Vesala, T.

    2011-12-01

    The CO2 exchange of boreal forests is characterized by a strong seasonal cycle, including strong winter dormancy, active summer season and transition periods between these two. In order to estimate changes imposed by the future climate on the boreal forests' carbon balance it is important to understand the dynamics and controls of this seasonal variation. In this work we studied proxies that were used in tracking the seasonal cycle of the boreal forests and how the seasonal cycle can be taken into account in modeling. We studied different biological and meteorological variables to track beginning and ending of the growing season. We used data from four coniferous sites located in Finland and Sweden. Micrometeorological CO2 flux measurements were used as a determinant for the growing season that other methods were referenced to. The variables used included different indices based on air temperature, the chlorophyll fluorescence Fv/Fm (i.e., the maximal photochemical efficiency), surface albedo, and the CO2 tropospheric concentration. One year was used as a reference to set a threshold values to these variables in the start and end of the growing season and these threshold values were used in estimation of the growing season during other years. Air temperature indices and Fv/Fm were useful in estimation of both start and end of the growing season. Decrease of surface albedo indicated the start of the snow melt and this coincided with the beginning of the growing season. The CO2 concentration was studied in two aspects, using threshold method as well as derivative estimation method. The first one was successful in prediction of the growing season. The latter enabled also capturing larger-scale spring recovery. The use of temperature indices was more feasible in the northern sites. In addition to the coniferous sites, one deciduous forest in Finnish Lapland was studied. The transition period from winter to summer creates a challenge for the biochemical models. A canopy

  18. Seasonal changes in ambulatory blood pressure in employees under different indoor temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Kristal-Boneh, E; Harari, G; Green, M S; Ribak, J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The effect of indoor temperature control on summer and winter ambulatory blood pressure levels at work was studied. METHOD--Ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were monitored once in summer and once in winter in 101 healthy normotensive subjects aged 28-63 years, engaged in similar physical work, from two plants with and three without air conditioning. Subjects were interviewed about health related habits, and measurements of environmental and occupational conditions were obtained. RESULTS--After controlling for possible confounders, mean SBP and DBP during work were significantly higher in winter than in summer (delta SBP = 3.4 mm Hg, P = 0.035; delta DBP = 3.3 mm Hg, P < 0.003). The seasonal change in SBP and DBP showed an independent association with the presence or absence of air conditioning of the industrial plants (SBP: beta = 0.194, P < 0.0001; DBP: beta = 0.054, P = 0.038). The percentage of subjects with increases of more than 10 mm Hg from summer to winter was higher in plants without than with air conditioning. CONCLUSIONS--(1) In normotensive subjects ambulatory working BP varies by season, with higher values in winter. If validated for hypertensive subjects, it may be necessary to tailor drug treatment to these variations. (2) The findings make it clear that drawing valid conclusions from comparisons of BPs between groups requires controlling for several factors, particularly season of the year. (3) Climatic conditions in the industrial plant influence the magnitude of seasonal variations in BP. Work in plants without air conditioning places a considerable added load on the employee's cardiovascular system. PMID:8535490

  19. A data-based method to determine the regional impact of agriculture on fire seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magi, B. I.; Rabin, S.; Shevliakova, E.; Pacala, S.

    2012-04-01

    Anthropological work and studies of satellite-observed fire occurrence have shown that the timing of human burning practices in many regions does not correspond with what would be expected based on indices of fire weather and fuel load alone. To date, large-scale observed differences in fire seasonality between agricultural land (i.e., cropland or pasture) and non-agricultural land have not been fully quantified. This will be necessary if fire modules in the next generation of dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are to take advantage of those models' ability to keep track of different types of land cover and land use. The work described in this paper compares observed fire seasonality on agricultural and non-agricultural land in 14 world regions, using a statistical method to separate burning on the two different land types. Active fire detections from the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors and burned area estimates from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED, version 3.1) serve as observations of fire activity for the years 2000-2009. Global estimates of the areal extent of cropland and pasture are provided by the History Database of the Global Environment (HYDE) database (version 3). We use the TIMESAT analysis program, which is designed to estimate seasonality in remote-sensed data, to determine the length and timing of the fire season. We find quantitative differences in fire seasonality between agricultural and non-agricultural land in many regions. The agricultural fire season in northern hemisphere Africa, for example, begins 1-2 months before the fire season on non-agricultural land. Attributable to a preference for early-season burning on managed land, this pattern is not captured by current global fire models that do not consider land use. Qualitative differences in the number of peaks in fire occurrence are also apparent in several regions - for example, South America north of the equator shows two peaks in non

  20. Monitoring Seasons Through Global Learning Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Robin, J. H.; Jeffries, M. O.; Gordon, L. S.; Verbyla, D. L.; Levine, E. R.

    2006-12-01

    Monitoring Seasons through Global Learning Communities (MSTGLC) is an inquiry- and project-based project that monitors seasons, specifically their interannual variability, in order to increase K-12 students' understanding of the Earth system by providing teacher professional development in Earth system science and inquiry, and engaging K-12 students in Earth system science research relevant to their local communities that connect globally. MSTGLC connects GLOBE students, teachers, and communities, with educators and scientists from three integrated Earth systems science programs: the International Arctic Research Center, and NASA Landsat Data Continuity and Terra Satellite Missions. The project organizes GLOBE schools by biomes into eight Global Learning Communities (GLCs) and students monitor their seasons through regional based field campaigns. The project expands the current GLOBE phenology network by adapting current protocols and making them biome-specific. In addition, ice and mosquito phenology protocols will be developed for Arctic and Tropical regions, respectively. Initially the project will focus on Tundra and Taiga biomes as phenological changes are so pronounced in these regions. However, our long-term goal is to determine similar changes in other biomes (Deciduous Forest, Desert, Grasslands, Rain Forest, Savannah and Shrubland) based upon what we learn from these two biomes. This project will also contribute to critically needed Earth system science data such as in situ ice, mosquito, and vegetation phenology measurements for ground validations of remotely sensed data, which are essential for regional climate change impact assessments. Additionally it will contribute environmental data critical to prevention and management of diseases such as malaria in Asian, African, and other countries. Furthermore, this project will enable students to participate in the International Polar Year (IPY) (2007-2009) through field campaigns conducted by students in

  1. Seasonality constraints to livestock grazing intensity.

    PubMed

    Fetzel, Tamara; Havlik, Petr; Herrero, Mario; Erb, Karl-Heinz

    2017-04-01

    Increasing food production is essential to meet the future food demand of a growing world population. In light of pressing sustainability challenges such as climate change and the importance of the global livestock system for food security as well as GHG emissions, finding ways to increasing food production sustainably and without increasing competition for food crops is essential. Yet, many unknowns relate to livestock grazing, in particular grazing intensity, an essential variable to assess the sustainability of livestock systems. Here, we explore ecological limits to grazing intensity (GI; i.e. the fraction of net primary production consumed by grazing animals) by analysing the role of seasonality in natural grasslands. We estimate seasonal limitations to GI by combining monthly net primary production data and a map of global livestock distribution with assumptions on the length of nonfavourable periods that can be bridged by livestock (e.g. by browsing dead standing biomass, storage systems or biomass conservation). This allows us to derive a seasonality-limited potential GI, which we compare with the GI prevailing in 2000. We find that GI in 2000 lies below its potential on 39% of the total global natural grasslands, which has a potential for increasing biomass extraction of up to 181 MtC/yr. In contrast, on 61% of the area GI exceeds the potential, made possible by management. Mobilizing this potential could increase milk production by 5%, meat production by 4% or contribute to free up to 2.8 Mio km² of grassland area at the global scale if the numerous socio-ecological constraints can be overcome. We discuss socio-ecological trade-offs, which may reduce the estimated potential considerably and require the establishment of sound monitoring systems and an improved understanding of livestock system's role in the Earth system.

  2. Forecasting fluctuating outbreaks in seasonally driven epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Lewi

    2009-03-01

    Seasonality is a driving force that has major impact on the spatio-temporal dynamics of natural systems and their populations. This is especially true for the transmission of common infectious diseases such as influenza, measles, chickenpox, and pertussis. Here we gain new insights into the nonlinear dynamics of recurrent diseases through the analysis of the classical seasonally forced SIR epidemic model. Despite many efforts over the last decades, it has been difficult to gain general analytical insights because of the complex synchronization effects that can evolve between the external forcing and the model's natural oscillations. The analysis advanced here attempts to make progress in this direction by focusing on the dynamics of ``skips'' where we identify and predict years in which the epidemic is absent rather than outbreak years. Skipping events are intrinsic to the forced SIR model when parameterised in the chaotic regime. In fact, it is difficult if not impossible to locate realistic chaotic parameter regimes in which outbreaks occur regularly each year. This contrasts with the well known Rossler oscillator whose outbreaks recur regularly but whose amplitude vary chaotically in time (Uniform Phase Chaotic Amplitude oscillations). The goal of the present study is to develop a ``language of skips'' that makes it possible to predict under what conditions the next outbreak is likely to occur, and how many ``skips'' might be expected after any given outbreak. We identify a new threshold effect and give clear analytical conditions that allow accurate predictions. Moreover, the time of occurrence (i.e., phase) of an outbreak proves to be a useful new parameter that carries important epidemiological information. In forced systems, seasonal changes can prevent late-initiating outbreaks (i.e., having high phase) from running to completion. These principles yield forecasting tools that should have relevance for the study of newly emerging and reemerging diseases.

  3. Riding Third: Social Work in Ambulance Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Hilary; Rasmussen, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This research explored the possible role of social work alongside emergency ambulance services. An ethnographic study included semistructured interviews and direct observations collected over 300 hours while riding in ambulances in an urban setting. The data suggest that social work could play a role by providing needed psychosocial care during…

  4. [Do weather and seasons influence our heart?].

    PubMed

    Gibelin, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous publications about impact of meteo, seasons and pollution on cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases, in particular myocardial infarction and heart failure, have been consistently more frequent during winter in the northern and southern hemisphere. Chronic exposure to air pollution influences the development of atherosclerosis and increases the risk for coronary artery disease. There is a positive association between short-term increase in gaseous components with the risk of hospitalization or death from congestive heart failure. The considerable impact on health care service warrants a comprehensive approach to cardiovascular disease management.

  5. Normal and seasonally amplified indoor radon levels

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; King, D.

    1995-01-01

    Winter and summer indoor radon measurements are reported for 121 houses in Freehold, New Jersey. When presented as winter:summer ratios of indoor radon, the data closely approximate a lognormal distribution. The geometric mean is 1.49. Freehold is located on the fairly flat coastal plain. The winter:summer ratios are believed to represent the norm for regions of the U.S. with cold winters and hot summers. The Freehold data set can be compared to corresponding data sets from other locations to suggest seasonal perturbations of indoor radon arising from unusual causes.

  6. Modeling seasonal measles transmission in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhenguo; Liu, Dan

    2015-08-01

    A discrete-time deterministic measles model with periodic transmission rate is formulated and studied. The basic reproduction number R0 is defined and used as the threshold parameter in determining the dynamics of the model. It is shown that the disease will die out if R0 < 1 , and the disease will persist in the population if R0 > 1 . Parameters in the model are estimated on the basis of demographic and epidemiological data. Numerical simulations are presented to describe the seasonal fluctuation of measles infection in China.

  7. Working at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Adam

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the author's educational and work background prior to working at NASA. It then presents an overview of NASA Dryden, a brief review of the author's projects while working at NASA, and some closing thoughts.

  8. Seasonal variability in aerosol, CCN and their relationship observed at a high altitude site in Western Ghats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leena, P. P.; Pandithurai, G.; Anilkumar, V.; Murugavel, P.; Sonbawne, S. M.; Dani, K. K.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are key elements of the hydrological cycle and climate. In the present work, aerosol-CCN variability and their relationship have been studied for the first time at Mahabaleshwar, a high altitude (1348 m AMSL) site in Western Ghats, using one year (June 2012-May 2013) of observations. Present study has been done in two sections in which first temporal variability (diurnal and seasonal) of aerosol and CCN has been analyzed. Later CCN to aerosol ratio and other microphysical properties have been investigated along with detail discussion on possible sources of aerosol. First part, i.e., diurnal variation in aerosol and CCN concentration has shown relatively higher values during early morning hours in monsoon season whereas in winter and pre-monsoon it was higher in the evening hours. Seasonal mean variation in aerosol and CCN (SS above 0.6 %) has shown higher (less) in monsoon (winter) season. Temporal variation reveals dominance of fine-mode aerosol during monsoon season over the study region. In the second part temporal variation of activation ratio, k value (exponent of CCN super-saturation spectra) and geometric mean aerosol diameter have been analyzed. Variation of activation ratio showed the ratio is higher in monsoon especially for SS 0.6-1 %. The analysis also showed high k value during monsoon season as compared to other seasons (pre-monsoon and winter) which may be due to dominance of hygroscopic aerosols in the maritime air masses from Arabian Sea and biogenic aerosol emissions from the wet forest. Analyzed mean aerosol diameter is much smaller during monsoon season with less variability compared to other seasons. Overall analysis showed that aerosol and CCN concentration was higher over this high altitude site despite of dominant sink processes such as cloud scavenging and washout mechanisms indicating local emissions and biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) emissions from wet forest

  9. Seasonality in song behaviour revisited: seasonal and annual variants and invariants in the song of the domesticated canary (Serinus canaria).

    PubMed

    Voigt, Cornelia; Leitner, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    The song of the domesticated canary (Serinus canaria) is one of the most widely used models to study the neural correlates of behavioural plasticity and the mechanisms of female mate choice. However, only few studies have described the song behaviour in detail and monitored their changes throughout the year, and these data are restricted to the "Waterslager" strain. Here, we studied the song characteristics of the male common domesticated canary at different times of the year, the spring breeding and autumnal non-breeding season, and monitored the birds' songs up to the following breeding season. During breeding, males have increased plasma levels of testosterone, and songs are on average longer and consist of fewer non-repeated syllable types compared to the non-breeding season. When subsequent seasons are compared, song duration and the proportion of non-repeated syllable types change seasonally but not across years. Repertoire size remains constant throughout seasons although syllable types are exchanged. Syllable carry-over is significantly higher from one breeding season to the next than between the breeding and non-breeding season. Further, the repertoire of the breeding season contains more potentially sexually attractive syllable types than that of the non-breeding season. These data show that overall song structure is retained throughout the year while seasonality occurs in the temporal pattern and in repertoire composition.

  10. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennins, Donald E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E.; Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) measured surface radiances at 19 micron in two time periods: one in late northern winter (Ls = 335d eg) and another centered on northern spring equinox (Ls = 0 deg). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between late northern winter and northern spring equinox a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of approximately 0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of delta Ls approximately 9 in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65 deg S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  11. Increased Accuracy in Statistical Seasonal Hurricane Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nateghi, R.; Quiring, S. M.; Guikema, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Hurricanes are among the costliest and most destructive natural hazards in the U.S. Accurate hurricane forecasts are crucial to optimal preparedness and mitigation decisions in the U.S. where 50 percent of the population lives within 50 miles of the coast. We developed a flexible statistical approach to forecast annual number of hurricanes in the Atlantic region during the hurricane season. Our model is based on the method of Random Forest and captures the complex relationship between hurricane activity and climatic conditions through careful variable selection, model testing and validation. We used the National Hurricane Center's Best Track hurricane data from 1949-2011 and sixty-one candidate climate descriptors to develop our model. The model includes information prior to the hurricane season, i.e., from the last three months of the previous year (Oct. through Dec.) and the first five months of the current year (January through May). Our forecast errors are substantially lower than other leading forecasts such as that of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  12. Canadian system extends Arctic drilling season

    SciTech Connect

    Park, D.A.

    1984-06-18

    Faced with the possibility of insufficient drilling equipment to meet accelerated exploration programs in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, Gulf Canada Resources Inc. of Calgary, Alta., undertook in 1981 to build a major new drilling system that would be capable of operating in Arctic water depths ranging from 50 to 180 ft. The company decided to design the system to extend the drilling season beyond that achieved with modified conventional drillships. The new system is operated by BeauDril Ltd., the Arctic offshore drilling subsidiary of Gulf Canada Resources. It consists of a mobile, bottomfounded, shallow-water drilling unit named Molikpaq; a conically shaped, deeper-water unit called Kulluk; two ice-breakers and two icebreaking supply vessels (all Ice Class IV); a large operations base at Tuktoyaktuk; and a floating marine base. With the exception of Molikpaq (delivered mid-April this year), the system became operational in the summer of 1983. In addition to discussing engineering and construction challenges resulting from the extension of the drilling season to mid-December, this article describes the mobilization of Kulluk and her supporting fleet to the Beaufort Sea, highlighting vessel positioning, and drilling operations at the first well locations.

  13. Modeling the seasonal circulation in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Jenter, Harry L.; Blumberg, Alan F.; ,

    1994-01-01

    An 18 month simulation of circulation was conducted in Massachusetts Bay, a roughly 35 m deep, 100??50 km embayment on the northeastern shelf of the United States. Using a variant of the Blumberg-Mellor (1987) model, it was found that a continuous 18 month run was only possible if the velocity field was Shapiro filtered to remove two grid length energy that developed along the open boundary due to mismatch in locally generated and climatologically forced water properties. The seasonal development of temperature and salinity stratification was well-represented by the model once ??-coordinate errors were reduced by subtracting domain averaged vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and density before horizontal differencing was performed. Comparison of modeled and observed subtidal currents at fixed locations revealed that the model performance varies strongly with season and distance from the open boundaries. The model performs best during unstratified conditions, and in the interior of the bay. The model performs poorest during stratified conditions and in the regions where the bay is driven predominantly by remote fluctuations from the Gulf of Maine.

  14. Seasonal diarrhoeal mortality among Mexican children.

    PubMed Central

    Villa, S.; Guiscafré, H.; Martínez, H.; Muñoz, O.; Gutiérrez, G.

    1999-01-01

    The study investigated the effects on diarrhoeal deaths among under-5-year-old Mexican children of the following variables: season (summer or winter), region (north versus south), age group, and place of death. Examination of death certificates indicated that the distribution of deaths in 1989-90 was bimodal, with one peak during the winter and a more pronounced one during the summer. In 1993-94, however, the winter peak was higher than that in the summer (odds ratio (OR) = 2.04). These findings were due mostly to deaths among children aged 1-23 months (OR = 1.86). Diarrhoeal mortality was highest among children aged 6-11 months (OR = 2.23). During the winter, there was a significant increase in the number of deaths that occurred in medical care units and among children who had been seen by a physician before they died, but deaths occurring at home showed no seasonal variation. In the northern states, the reduction in diarrhoeal mortality was less in winter than in summer (OR = 2.62). In the southern states, the proportional reduction during the winter was similar to that in the summer. PMID:10361753

  15. Determinants of southeast Ethiopia seasonal rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Mark R.

    2016-12-01

    The bi-modal climate of SE Ethiopia shares attributes with East Africa, notably that El Niño enhances rainfall, particularly in Sep-Nov season. In this study SE Ethiopia's continuous and seasonal rainfall relationships to global climate are studied to extend our knowledge of its determinants and predictability. A statistical forecast algorithm for the Sep-Nov short rains accounts for 54% of variance in 1980-2010. The Apr-Jun predictors include South Atlantic sea surface temperature, east Indian Ocean sea level air pressure and China upper zonal wind. Cooling in the South Atlantic coincides with a strengthened sub-tropical anticyclone, and later to changes in low level winds that bring orographic convection to SE Ethiopia. The slower El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) interacts with the faster Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), but both signals mature too late for direct use in statistical prediction of Sep-Nov rainfall. Composite differences of the upper divergent circulation exhibit a global wave-2 pattern consistent with satellite-observed convection. One key feature is a zonal gradient in upper velocity potential over the Indian Ocean corresponding with a zonal atmospheric circulation. One outcome of this research is useful forecasts of SE Ethiopia Sep-Nov rainfall that will assist in agricultural planning.

  16. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Southern Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Achterberg, R. K.; Teanby, N. A.; Coustenis, A.; Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Irwin, P. G.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    In August 2009 Titan passed through northern spring equinox, and the southern hemisphere passed into fall. Since then, the moon's atmosphere has been closely watched for evidence of the expected seasonal reversal of stratospheric circulation, with increased northern insolation leading to upwelling, and consequent downwelling at southern high latitudes. If the southern winter mirrors the northern winter, this circulation will be traced by increases in short-lived gas species advected downwards from the upper atmosphere to the stratosphere. The Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn carries on board the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), which has been actively monitoring the trace gas populations through measurement of the intensity of their infrared emission bands (7-1000 micron). In this presentation we will show fresh evidence from recent CIRS measurements in June 2012, that the shortest-lived and least abundant minor species (C3H4, C4H2, C6H6, HC3N) are indeed increasing dramatically southwards of 50S in the lower stratosphere. Intriguingly, the more stable gases (C2H2, HCN, CO2) have yet to show this trend, and continue to exhibit their 'summer' abundances, decreasing towards the south pole. Possible chemical and dynamical explanations of these results will be discussed , along with the potential of future CIRS measurements to monitor and elucidate these seasonal changes.

  17. Seasonal PM 10 dynamics in Kathmandu Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Rupak Kumar; Lee, Byeong-Kyu; Karki, Rahul; Gurung, Anup; Kandasamy, Jaya; Pathak, Bipin Kumar; Sharma, Suman; Giri, Nirita

    Data on ambient PM 10 levels from six locations in the Kathmandu Valley recorded by means of continuous sampling using low volume air samplers from October 2002 to March 2007 were used to investigate PM 10 concentration dynamics in the valley. Monthly average data of the urban areas, which have much higher concentrations than the rural areas, even exceeded the daily standard level of PM 10, in Nepal, 120 μm m -3. Repetitive peaks and troughs each year indicated annual patterns. Monthly average showed seasonal patterns are different between rural area and urban sites. The highest monthly average concentration was observed in February, the end of winter in urban areas where as in rural found in spring, and the lowest concentration was observed in July (monsoon period). The continuous increase in PM 10 concentration from December to February in urban areas showed accumulation of PM 10 in the ambient air during the wintertime. Rainfall in June and September, during the monsoon period, caused a PM 10 concentration decrease, demonstrating that precipitation is effective in removing PM 10 from the valley. Cross correlation analyses among the PM 10 levels measured simultaneously at the sampling stations showed a poor relationship in winter; however, there were good relationships in the monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. Both the PM 10 concentration and the air-mixing environment in the valley were closely associated with the temperature and wind speed.

  18. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S SURFACE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E.; Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2011-08-10

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer measured surface radiances at 19 {mu}m in two time periods: one in late northern winter (LNW; L{sub s} = 335 deg.) and another centered on northern spring equinox (NSE; L{sub s} = 0 deg.). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between LNW and NSE a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of {approx}0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was at 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of {Delta}L{sub S} {approx} 9{sup 0} in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65{sup 0} S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  19. Florida Current: seasonal and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, F.; Zantopp, R.

    1985-01-18

    Annual and interannual variations in the Florida Current, Caribbean and subtropical Atlantic are investigated with the use of historical sea level differences and wind field data. Observational and model evidence suggests that the seasonal transport cycle of the Florida Current is locally forced, either upstream in the Caribbean or downstream over topography. Although at seasonal and shorter periods sea level or bottom pressure fluctuations on the left side of the Florida Current contribute almost all of the variance of sea level difference across the Florida Straits and hence transport, this relation does not seem to apply at interannual time scales. Using results from the Subtropical Atlantic Climate Studies, it is estimated from historical sea level data that interannual transport fluctuations of the Florida Current are only of order 1 x 10/sup 6/ cubic meters per second. Interannual fluctuations in the 2- to 3-year period range in the Florida Straits seem to be correlated with sea level differences across the Caribbean and the subtropical Atlantic but not with Sverdrup transport fluctuations in the subtropical Atlantic. 26 references, 2 figures.

  20. Two cold-season derechoes in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzen, Christoph; Púčik, Tomas; Ryva, David

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we apply for the first time the definition of a derecho (Johns and Hirt, 1987) to European cold-season convective storm systems. These occurred on 18 January 2007 and 1 March 2008, respectively, and they are shown to fulfill the criteria of a derecho. Damaging winds were reported over a distance of 1500 km and locally reached F3 intensity. Synoptic analysis for the events reveal strongly forced situations that have been described for cold-season derechoes in the United States. A comparison of swaths of damaging winds, radar structures, detected lightning, cold pool development, and cloud-top temperatures indicates that both derechoes formed along cold fronts that were affected by strong quasi-geostrophic forcing. It seems that the overlap of the cold front position with the strong differential cyclonic vorticity advection at the cyclonic flank of mid-level jet streaks favoured intense convection and high winds. The movement and path width of the two derechoes seemed to be related to this overlap. The wind gust intensity that was also different for both events is discussed and could be related to the component of the mid-level winds perpendicular to the gust fronts.

  1. Seasonal prevailing surface winds in Northern Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Ivana; Gavrilov, Milivoj B.; Marković, Slobodan B.; Ruman, Albert; Putniković, Suzana

    2017-02-01

    Seasonal prevailing surface winds are analyzed in the territory of Northern Serbia, using observational data from 12 meteorological stations over several decades. In accordance with the general definition of prevailing wind, two special definitions of this term are used. The seasonal wind roses in 16 directions at each station are analyzed. This study shows that the prevailing winds in Northern Serbia have northwestern and southeastern directions. Circulation weather types over Serbia are presented in order to determine the connections between the synoptic circulations and prevailing surface winds. Three controlling pressure centers, i.e., the Mediterranean cyclone, Siberian high, and the Azores anticyclone, appear as the most important large-scale factors that influence the creation of the prevailing winds over Northern Serbia. Beside the synoptic cause of the prevailing winds, it is noted that the orography of the eastern Balkans has a major influence on the winds from the second quadrant. It was found that the frequencies of circulation weather types are in agreement with those of the prevailing winds over Northern Serbia.

  2. Interdisciplinary medical social work: a working taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Maramaldi, Peter; Sobran, Alexandra; Scheck, Lisa; Cusato, Natalie; Lee, Irene; White, Erina; Cadet, Tamara J

    2014-01-01

    Findings from a year-long exploratory study aimed at describing universal functions of medical social work with interdisciplinary teams in acute care settings are reported here. A universal taxonomy of interdisciplinary social work skills and competencies was empirically identified through a participatory action research framework. Findings support previous conceptual descriptions of medical social work's overarching and historical role to help interdisciplinary teams in acute care to consider patients' home environment, knowledge, beliefs, culture, and resources during assessment, treatment, and discharge planning. The empirically determined taxonomy reported is intended to provide social workers a framework with which to articulate and evaluate their core competencies on interdisciplinary medical teams.

  3. Spatiotemporal investigation of long-term seasonal temperature variability in Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsharkawy, S. G.; Elmallah, E. S.

    2016-09-01

    Throughout this work, spatial and temporal variations of seasonal surface air temperature have been investigated. Moreover, the effects of relative internal (teleconnection) and external (solar) forcing on surface air temperature variability have been examined. Seasonal temperature time series covering 30 different meteorological locations and lasting over the last century are considered. These locations are classified into two groups based on their spatial distribution. One represents Coast Libya Surface Air Temperature (CLSAT), contains 19 locations, and the other represents Desert Libya Surface Air Temperature (DLSAT), contains 11 locations. Average temperature departure test is applied to investigate the nature of temperature variations. Temperature trends are analyzed using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test and their coefficients are calculated using Sen's slope estimate. Cross-correlation and spectral analysis techniques are also applied. Our results showed temperature deviation from average within a band of ± 2°C at coast region, while ± 4°C at desert region. Extreme behavior intensions between summer and winter temperatures at coast region are noticed. Segmentation process declared reversal cooling/warming behavior within temperature records for all seasons. Desert region shows warming trend for all seasons with higher coefficients than obtained at coast region. Results obtained for spectral analysis show different short and medium signals and concluded that not only the spectral properties are different for different geographical regions but also different for different climatic seasons on regional scale as well. Cross-correlation results showed that highest influence for Rz upon coastal temperature is always in conjunction with highest influence of NAO upon coastal temperature during the period 1981-2010. Desert region does not obey this phenomenon, where highest temperature-NAO correlations at desert during autumn and winter seasons are not

  4. Seasonal Variation of Carbon Metabolism in the Cambial Zone of Eucalyptus grandis

    PubMed Central

    Budzinski, Ilara G. F.; Moon, David H.; Lindén, Pernilla; Moritz, Thomas; Labate, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus species are the most widely hardwood planted in the world. It is one of the successful examples of commercial forestry plantation in Brazil and other tropical and subtropical countries. The tree is valued for its rapid growth, adaptability and wood quality. Wood formation is the result of cumulative annual activity of the vascular cambium. This cambial activity is generally related to the alternation of cold and warm, and/or dry and rainy seasons. Efforts have focused on analysis of cambial zone in response to seasonal variations in trees from temperate zones. However, little is known about the molecular changes triggered by seasonal variations in trees from tropical countries. In this work we attempted to establish a global view of seasonal alterations in the cambial zone of Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden, emphasizing changes occurring in the carbon metabolism. Using transcripts, proteomics and metabolomics we analyzed the tissues harvested in summer-wet and winter-dry seasons. Based on proteomics analysis, 70 proteins that changed in abundance were successfully identified. Transcripts for some of these proteins were analyzed and similar expression patterns were observed. We identified 19 metabolites differentially abundant. Our results suggest a differential reconfiguration of carbon partioning in E. grandis cambial zone. During summer, pyruvate is primarily metabolized via ethanolic fermentation, possibly to regenerate NAD+ for glycolytic ATP production and cellular maintenance. However, in winter there seems to be a metabolic change and we found that some sugars were highly abundant. Our results revealed a dynamic change in E. grandis cambial zone due to seasonality and highlight the importance of glycolysis and ethanolic fermentation for energy generation and maintenance in Eucalyptus, a fast growing tree. PMID:27446160

  5. Numerical simulation of seasonal groundwater pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, Elena; Baldenkov, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    Increasing scarcity and contamination of water recourses require innovative water management strategies such as combined water system. The combined water system is a complex technology comprising two separate wells, major catchment-zone well and compensation pumping well, located inside a single stream basin. The major well is supplied by the well's catchment zone or surface flow, thus depleting the stream flow. The pumping rate of a major well is determined by the difference between the current stream flow and the minimum permissible stream flow. The deficiency of the stream flow in dry seasons can be compensated for by the short-term pumping of groundwater. The compensation pumping rate is determined by the difference between water demand and the permissible water withdrawal of the major well. The source for the compensation well is the aquifer storage. The estimation of streamflow depletion caused by compensation pumping is major question to evaluate the efficiency of the combined water system. Short-term groundwater pumping can use aquifer storage instead of catchment-zone water until the drawdown reaches the edge of the stream. Traditionally pumping simulation calculates in two-step procedure. Natural conditions, an aquifer system is in an approximate dynamic equilibrium, describe by steady-state model. A steady-state solution provides an initial heads, a set of flows through boundaries, and used as initial state for transient solutions, when pumping is imposed on an aquifer system. The transient solutions provide the total change in flows through the boundaries. A difference between the transient and steady-state solutions estimates the capture and the streamflow depletion. Numerical modeling of cyclical compensation pumping has special features: the periodic solution, the seasonal changes through the boundaries and the importance even small drawdown of stream level. When seasonality is a modeling feature, traditional approach leads to mistaken values of

  6. Seasonal BMI Changes of Rural Women Living in Anatolia

    PubMed Central

    Sabbağ, Çiğdem

    2012-01-01

    Today, obesity is one of the most evident public health problems in many parts of the World and it is more common among women. Several factors are affecting women’s obesity, among these short term weight fluctuations, either gain or loss, cause severe health disorders, particularly in rural areas where seasonal activity differs significantly throughout the year. Since this case has not been studied in detail, our research focused on prevalence and probable causes of seasonal rural obesity among women in two rural areas of Turkey. The study was undertaken with 100 participants. One-way ANOVA and one-way repeated ANOVA tests were utilized for categorical, continuous and repeated variables as study contains groups with more than one and repeated variables. Overweight is more common in the 18–30 years and 50+ years groups, whereas the absence of obesity, except during winter of 2010 in the 50+ years of age group, is most probably due to the widespread occurrence of diabetes for this age group. The highest BMI values for all groups, which were 25.2 ± 3.39 for 2009 and 26.1 ± 3.40 for 2010, were determined in winter, because of minimum physical activity, while summer BMIs were 24.1 ± 3.39 in 2009 and 25.1 ± 3.35 in 2010. This decrease was most probably due to intense agricultural field work in both regions. The majority of the women claimed that their weight is balanced in summer but results revealed that participants did not lose all the weight which was gained during winter months although BMI showed a significant fall from spring to autumn. PMID:22690188

  7. Occupational injury and treatment patterns of migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Brower, Melissa A; Earle-Richardson, Giulia B; May, John J; Jenkins, Paul L

    2009-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are thought to be at increased risk for occupational injury and illness. Past surveillance efforts that employed medical chart review may not be representative of all farmworkers, since the proportion of farmworkers using migrant health centers (MHCs) and area hospital emergency rooms (ERs) was unknown. The purpose of the current study was to determine the proportion of workers using MHCs versus other sources of occupational health care, and to use these data to correct previous occupational injury and illness rate estimates. Researchers conducted a survey of migrant and seasonal farmworkers in two sites: the Finger Lakes Region of New York and the apple, broccoli, and blueberry regions of Maine. Researchers also conducted MHC and ER medical chart reviews in these regions for comparison purposes. Proportions of occupational morbidity by treatment location were calculated from the survey, and a correction factor was computed to adjust chart review morbidity estimates for Maine and New York State. Among 1103 subjects, 56 work-related injuries were reported: 30 (53.6%) were treated at a MHC, 8 (14.3%) at an ER, 9 (16.1%) at some other location (e.g., home, relative, chiropractor), and 9 (16.1%) were untreated. Mechanisms of injuries treated at MHCs versus all other sources did not differ significantly. The survey-based multiplier (1.87) was applied to previous statewide MHC chart review injury counts from Maine and New York. The corrected injury rates were 7.9 per 100 full-time equivalents (FTE) per year in Maine, and 11.7 per 100 FTE in New York. A chart-review based surveillance system, combined with a correction factor, may provide an effective method of estimating occupational illness and injury rates in this population.

  8. Reproductive Seasonality in Nesticus (Araneae: Nesticidae) Cave Spiders.

    PubMed

    Carver, Linnea M; Perlaky, Patricia; Cressler, Alan; Zigler, Kirk S

    2016-01-01

    Spiders of the family Nesticidae are members of cave communities around the world with cave-obligate (troglobiotic) species known from North America, Europe, Asia and the Indo-Pacific. A radiation of Nesticus (Araneae: Nesticidae) in the southern Appalachians includes ten troglobiotic species. Many of these species are of conservation interest due to their small ranges, with four species being single-cave endemics. Despite conservation concerns and their important role as predators in cave communities, we know little about reproduction and feeding in this group. We addressed this knowledge gap by examining populations of two species on a monthly basis for one year. We made further observations on several other species and populations, totaling 671 individual spider observations. This more than doubled the reported observations of reproduction and feeding in troglobiotic Nesticus. Female Nesticus carry egg sacs, facilitating the determination of the timing and frequency of reproduction. We found that Nesticus exhibit reproductive seasonality. Females carried egg sacs from May through October, with a peak in frequency in June. These spiders were rarely observed with prey; only 3.3% (22/671) of individuals were observed with prey items. The frequency at which prey items were observed did not vary by season. Common prey items were flies, beetles and millipedes. Troglobiotic species constituted approximately half of all prey items observed. This result represents a greater proportion of troglobiotic prey than has been reported for various troglophilic spiders. Although our findings shed light on the life history of troglobiotic Nesticus and on their role in cave ecosystems, further work is necessary to support effective conservation planning for many of these rare species.

  9. Modeling the biogeochemical seasonal cycle in the Strait of Gibraltar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Romero, E.; Vichi, M.; Castro, M.; Macías, J.; Macías, D.; García, C. M.; Bruno, M.

    2014-11-01

    A physical-biological coupled model was used to estimate the effect of the physical processes at the Strait of Gibraltar over the biogeochemical features of the Atlantic Inflow (AI) towards the Mediterranean Sea. This work was focused on the seasonal variation of the biogeochemical patterns in the AI and the role of the Strait; including primary production and phytoplankton features. As the physical model is 1D (horizontal) and two-layer, different integration methods for the primary production in the Biogeochemical Fluxes Model (BFM) have been evaluated. An approach based on the integration of a production-irradiance function was the chosen method. Using this Plankton Functional Type model (BFM), a simplified phytoplankton seasonal cycle in the AI was simulated. Main results included a principal bloom in spring dominated by nanoflagellates, whereas minimum biomass (mostly picophytoplankton) was simulated during summer. Physical processes occurring in the Strait could trigger primary production and raise phytoplankton biomass (during spring and autumn), mainly due to two combined effects. First, in the Strait a strong interfacial mixing (causing nutrient supply to the upper layer) is produced, and, second, a shoaling of the surface Atlantic layer occurs eastward. Our results show that these phenomena caused an integrated production of 105 g C m- 2 year- 1 in the eastern side of the Strait, and would also modify the proportion of the different phytoplankton groups. Nanoflagellates were favored during spring/autumn while picophytoplankton is more abundant in summer. Finally, AI could represent a relevant source of nutrients and biomass to Alboran Sea, fertilizing the upper layer of this area with 4.95 megatons nitrate year- 1 (79.83 gigamol year- 1) and 0.44 megatons C year- 1. A main advantage of this coupled model is the capability of solving relevant high-resolution processes as the tidal forcing without expensive computing requirements, allowing to assess the

  10. Reproductive Seasonality in Nesticus (Araneae: Nesticidae) Cave Spiders

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Linnea M.; Perlaky, Patricia; Cressler, Alan; Zigler, Kirk S.

    2016-01-01

    Spiders of the family Nesticidae are members of cave communities around the world with cave-obligate (troglobiotic) species known from North America, Europe, Asia and the Indo-Pacific. A radiation of Nesticus (Araneae: Nesticidae) in the southern Appalachians includes ten troglobiotic species. Many of these species are of conservation interest due to their small ranges, with four species being single-cave endemics. Despite conservation concerns and their important role as predators in cave communities, we know little about reproduction and feeding in this group. We addressed this knowledge gap by examining populations of two species on a monthly basis for one year. We made further observations on several other species and populations, totaling 671 individual spider observations. This more than doubled the reported observations of reproduction and feeding in troglobiotic Nesticus. Female Nesticus carry egg sacs, facilitating the determination of the timing and frequency of reproduction. We found that Nesticus exhibit reproductive seasonality. Females carried egg sacs from May through October, with a peak in frequency in June. These spiders were rarely observed with prey; only 3.3% (22/671) of individuals were observed with prey items. The frequency at which prey items were observed did not vary by season. Common prey items were flies, beetles and millipedes. Troglobiotic species constituted approximately half of all prey items observed. This result represents a greater proportion of troglobiotic prey than has been reported for various troglophilic spiders. Although our findings shed light on the life history of troglobiotic Nesticus and on their role in cave ecosystems, further work is necessary to support effective conservation planning for many of these rare species. PMID:27280416

  11. Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in Texas. Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker Population Survey. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Governor's Office of Migrant Affairs, Austin.

    A comprehensive study of migrant and seasonal farmworkers in Texas was conducted to provide an accurate estimate of this farmworker population, to obtain data about their demographic characteristics, and to determine the extent of use of social service agencies, especially those delivering services under the Comprehensive Employment and Training…

  12. Impact of land-surface initialization on sub-seasonal to seasonal forecasts over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodhomme, Chloé; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; Bellprat, Omar; Dutra, Emanuel

    2016-08-01

    Land surfaces and soil conditions are key sources of climate predictability at the seasonal time scale. In order to estimate how the initialization of the land surface affects the predictability at seasonal time scale, we run two sets of seasonal hindcasts with the general circulation model EC-Earth2.3. The initialization of those hindcasts is done either with climatological or realistic land initialization in May using the ERA-Land re-analysis. Results show significant improvements in the initialized run occurring up to the last forecast month. The prediction of near-surface summer temperatures and precipitation at the global scale and over Europe are improved, as well as the warm extremes prediction. As an illustration, we show that the 2010 Russian heat wave is only predicted when soil moisture is initialized. No significant improvement is found for the retrospective prediction of the 2003 European heat wave, suggesting this event to be mainly large-scale driven. Thus, we confirm that late-spring soil moisture conditions can be decisive in triggering high-impact events in the following summer in Europe. Accordingly, accurate land-surface initial conditions are essential for seasonal predictions.

  13. Seasonal differences in leaf-level physiology give lianas a competitive advantage over trees in a tropical seasonal forest.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhi-Quan; Schnitzer, Stefan A; Bongers, Frans

    2009-08-01

    Lianas are an important component of most tropical forests, where they vary in abundance from high in seasonal forests to low in seasonal forests. We tested the hypothesis that the physiological ability of lianas to fix carbon (and thus grow) during seasonal drought may confer a distinct advantage in seasonal tropical forests, which may explain pan-tropical liana distributions. We compared a range of leaf-level physiological attributes of 18 co-occurring liana and 16 tree species during the wet and dry seasons in a tropical seasonal forest in Xishuangbanna, China. We found that, during the wet season, lianas had significantly higher CO(2) assimilation per unit mass (A(mass)), nitrogen concentration (N(mass)), and delta(13)C values, and lower leaf mass per unit area (LMA) than trees, indicating that lianas have higher assimilation rates per unit leaf mass and higher integrated water-use efficiency (WUE), but lower leaf structural investments. Seasonal variation in CO(2) assimilation per unit area (A(area)), phosphorus concentration per unit mass (P(mass)), and photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE), however, was significantly lower in lianas than in trees. For instance, mean tree A(area) decreased by 30.1% from wet to dry season, compared with only 12.8% for lianas. In contrast, from the wet to dry season mean liana delta(13)C increased four times more than tree delta(13)C, with no reduction in PNUE, whereas trees had a significant reduction in PNUE. Lianas had higher A(mass) than trees throughout the year, regardless of season. Collectively, our findings indicate that lianas fix more carbon and use water and nitrogen more efficiently than trees, particularly during seasonal drought, which may confer a competitive advantage to lianas during the dry season, and thus may explain their high relative abundance in seasonal tropical forests.

  14. Seasonal variation in life history traits in two Drosophila species.

    PubMed

    Behrman, E L; Watson, S S; O'Brien, K R; Heschel, M S; Schmidt, P S

    2015-09-01

    Seasonal environmental heterogeneity is cyclic, persistent and geographically widespread. In species that reproduce multiple times annually, environmental changes across seasonal time may create different selection regimes that may shape the population ecology and life history adaptation in these species. Here, we investigate how two closely related species of Drosophila in a temperate orchard respond to environmental changes across seasonal time. Natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans were sampled at four timepoints from June through November to assess seasonal change in fundamental aspects of population dynamics as well as life history traits. D. melanogaster exhibit pronounced change across seasonal time: early in the season, the population is inferred to be uniformly young and potentially represents the early generation following overwintering survivorship. D. melanogaster isofemale lines derived from the early population and reared in a common garden are characterized by high tolerance to a variety of stressors as well as a fast rate of development in the laboratory environment that declines across seasonal time. In contrast, wild D. simulans populations were inferred to be consistently heterogeneous in age distribution across seasonal collections; only starvation tolerance changed predictably over seasonal time in a parallel manner as in D. melanogaster. These results suggest fundamental differences in population and evolutionary dynamics between these two taxa associated with seasonal heterogeneity in environmental parameters and associated selection pressures.

  15. Seasonal association between ambient ozone and mortality in Zhengzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lijie; Gu, Jianqin; Liang, Shijie; Fang, Fang; Bai, Weimin; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Tao; Walline, Joseph; Zhang, Shenglong; Cui, Yingjie; Xu, Yaxin; Lin, Hualiang

    2016-12-01

    Different seasonal health effects of ambient ozone (O3) have been reported in previous studies. This might be due to inappropriate adjustment of temperature in different seasons. We used daily data on non-accidental mortality and ambient air pollution in Zhengzhou from January 19, 2013 to June 30, 2015. Season-stratified analyses using generalized additive models were conducted to evaluate the seasonal associations with adjustment of temperature with different lagged days (lag0-1 for warm season, lag0-14 for cold season). We recorded a total of 70,443 non-accidental deaths in Zhengzhou during the study period. Significant associations were observed between ambient O3 and mortality in cold season. Every 10-μg/m3 increment of 24-h O3 of 1-day lagged time was associated with a 1.38% (95% CI 0.60, 2.16%) increase in all cause mortality, 1.35% (95% CI 0.41, 2.30%) increase in cardiovascular mortality, and 1.78% (95% CI 0.43, 3.14%) increase in respiratory mortality. Similar associations were observed when using daily 1- and 8-h maximum concentrations of O3. No significant association was found during warm season. This study suggests a more pronounced ozone-mortality association in cold season in Zhengzhou, and we suggest that different lagged temperatures should be considered when examining the seasonal health effects of ambient ozone.

  16. Seasonal first flush phenomenon of urban stormwater discharges.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejin; Lau, Sim-Lin; Kayhanian, Masoud; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2004-11-01

    California's climate, typified by winter and spring precipitation and summer drought, is often called a Mediterranean climate, and creates a long period for pollutant build-up. The initial storms of the winter season usually have higher pollutant concentrations, which is called a seasonal first flush. To investigate the existence of a seasonal first flush, we analyzed four major data sets, collected over the 1999-2000 to 2002-2003 wet seasons. Trends in seasonal loads were quantified by plotting pollutant concentrations or cumulative pollutant load versus cumulative rainfall or cumulative runoff volume. Pollutant concentrations in the first part of the wet season were ranged from 1.2 to 20 times higher than concentrations near the end of the season, and mass emission rates were similarly higher at the beginning of the season. A seasonal first flush existed for most cases and was strongest for organics, minerals and heavy metals except lead. This result suggests that applying treatment Best Management Practices (BMPs) early in the season could remove several times more pollutant mass than randomly timed or uniformly applied BMPs.

  17. Seasonal variation in life history traits in two Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    BEHRMAN, E. L.; WATSON, S. S.; O'BRIEN, K. R.; HESCHEL, M. S.; SCHMIDT, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal environmental heterogeneity is cyclic, persistent and geographically widespread. In species that reproduce multiple times annually, environmental changes across seasonal time may create different selection regimes that may shape the population ecology and life history adaptation in these species. Here, we investigate how two closely related species of Drosophila in a temperate orchard respond to environmental changes across seasonal time. Natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans were sampled at four timepoints from June through November to assess seasonal change in fundamental aspects of population dynamics as well as life history traits. D. melanogaster exhibit pronounced change across seasonal time: early in the season, the population is inferred to be uniformly young and potentially represents the early generation following overwintering survivorship. D. melanogaster isofemale lines derived from the early population and reared in a common garden are characterized by high tolerance to a variety of stressors as well as a fast rate of development in the laboratory environment that declines across seasonal time. In contrast, wild D. simulans populations were inferred to be consistently heterogeneous in age distribution across seasonal collections; only starvation tolerance changed predictably over seasonal time in a parallel manner as in D. melanogaster. These results suggest fundamental differences in population and evolutionary dynamics between these two taxa associated with seasonal heterogeneity in environmental parameters and associated selection pressures. PMID:26174167

  18. Work Keys USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work Keys USA, 1998

    1998-01-01

    "Work Keys" is a comprehensive program for assessing and teaching workplace skills. This serial "special issue" features 18 first-hand reports on Work Keys projects in action in states across North America. They show how the Work Keys is helping businesses and educators solve the challenge of building a world-class work force.…

  19. Second Thoughts on Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Johnson, Clifford M.

    This book examines the forces which are changing work in the 1980s and offers a concise analysis of the challenges for social policy which lie ahead. The first of nine chapters looks at changes affecting Americans' concept of work, including expectations, commitment to work, satisfaction, and work reform. Discussion in chapter 2 focuses on…

  20. On the spatial coherence of sub-seasonal to seasonal Indian rainfall anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moron, Vincent; Robertson, Andrew W.; Pai, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    The spatial coherence of interannual variations of sub-seasonal to seasonal anomalies in Indian summer monsoon rainfall is investigated at 0.25° spatial resolution using various metrics, including estimates of the number of degrees of freedom, the spatial scale of daily wet "patches", as well as relationships between local and regional-scale rainfall anomalies and the monsoon circulation. Spatial coherence of interannual rainfall variations is generally found to peak near monsoon onset, in late May-June over Monsoonal India, and again during the withdrawal stage in September-October. However, the spatial coherence and correlations between local rainfall and the regional-scale monsoon circulation decrease during the core phase of the monsoon between early July and late August, when the interannual variability of local-scale amounts tend to be more tightly related to mean daily intensity rather than to the frequency of wet days. The drop in spatial coherence during the core phase is related to increases in the number and intensity of wet "patches" of daily rainfall while their mean spatial extent remains similar throughout the monsoon season. The core phase, with large values of precipitable water, is characterized by very variable daily rainfall amounts across gridpoints, as a consequence of the near exponential distribution of daily rainfall. The interannual variations of sub-seasonal amounts are then dominated by very wet days, which tend to be rather randomly distributed. This contrasts with the onset and withdrawal phases where the mean of the exponential is smaller, and where interannual variations in the timing of regional-scale onset and end of the monsoon predominate. The early and late phases may thus be more potentially predictable than the core of the monsoon season.

  1. Seasonal precipitation extreme indices in mainland Portugal: trends and variability in the period 1941-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Fátima E.; Ramos, Alexandre M.; de Lima, M. Isabel P.; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2013-04-01

    Changes in the precipitation regimes are expected to be accompanied by variations in the occurrence of extreme events, which in turn could be related to low frequency variability. The impact on the society and environment requires that the regional specificities are understood. For mainland Portugal, this work reports the results of the analysis of trends in selected precipitation indices calculated from daily precipitation data from 57 meteorological stations, recorded in the period 1941-2007; additionally we have also investigated the correlations between these indices and several modes of low frequency variability over the area. We focus on exploring regional differences and seasonal variations in the intensity, frequency and duration of extreme precipitation events. The precipitation indices were assessed at the seasonal scale and calculated at both the station and regional scales. Results sometimes highlight marked changes in seasonal precipitation and show that: i) trends in spring and autumn have opposite signals: statistically significant drying trends in the spring are accompanied by a reduction in precipitation extremes; in autumn, wetting trends are detected for all precipitation indices, although overall they are not significant at the 5% level; ii) there seems to be a tendency for a reduction in the duration of the rainy season; iii) the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is the mode of variability that has the highest influence on precipitation extremes over mainland Portugal, particularly in the winter and autumn, and is one of the most important teleconnection patterns in all seasons. This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) through project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).

  2. Moving to a Seasonally Ice Covered Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postlethwaite, Clare; Luneva, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The area of seasonal sea ice that forms each year is increasing. This study investigates how this will affect the brine that subsequently enters the ocean and how it contributes to the formation of the halocline or is transported from the Arctic Shelf Seas to the deep Arctic Ocean. Two idealised experiments were carried out using ocean/sea ice models NEMO-SHELF/LIM2 on a 3km resolution domain of a section of the Arctic continental shelf and slope, where dense water cascades have been observed. The model used hybrid vertical coordinates that are able to resolve dense flows down the continental slope, temperature and salinity from climatology for initial conditions and liquid boundary conditions. The model was forced with surface fluxes according to the CORE formulation using the DFS4 database. When ice forms and brine is rejected, a passive tracer, with concentration proportional to the brine was introduced in the surface layer. This brine tracer allows us to track the penetration of newly formed waters and their pathways. The heavy, salty and cold water mixes with adjacent waters and penetrates to different layers, depending on the density of the newly formed water masses. Each model idealised run was initialised with an ice cover to approximate summer ice conditions in: (a) the early 1980's when the region was nearly 100% ice covered and (b) the late 2000's when the region was ice free. All the other forcing fields were identical between runs. The experiments initialised with no summer ice cover formed more ice over the freezing season and 40% more entered the model ocean. The concentration of brine tracer was 6-fold higher to a depth of 840m. The locations where brine can cascade off the continental shelf correspond well to the locations, where cascades have been observed. A 40% increased salt flux from increased seasonal sea ice leads to more brine reaching the sea bed in these model simulations. More brine is also transported down the continental slope and into

  3. Seasonal variability of tropospheric aerosols in Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardini, Virginia; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Di Liberto, Luca; Tirelli, Cecilia; Casasanta, Giampietro; di Sarra, Alcide; Fiocco, Giorgio; Fuà, Daniele; Cacciani, Marco

    2012-11-01

    The seasonal evolution of the tropospheric aerosol vertical distribution and of its optical properties is investigated using lidar and multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (MFRSR) measurements collected throughout the period 2006-2009 in the urban environment of Rome. The evolution of the aerosol distribution is studied also in relation to long range transport of dust. Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model backward trajectories are used to identify possible aerosol sources in remote regions. Aerosol optical depth at 500 nm, τ, and Ångström exponent, α, are derived from MFRSR measurements. The Ångström exponent generally displays relatively high values, indicating the predominance of fine particle over the entire column. The average optical depth at 500 nm and Ångström exponent over the whole period are 0.18 ± 0.09 and 1.12 ± 0.39, respectively. Cases affected by Saharan dust (class 1) are separated from those not influenced by dust (class 0) by using backward trajectories. The average values of τ and α are 0.17 ± 0.08 and 1.17 ± 0.36 for class 0, respectively, and 0.22 ± 0.09 and 0.95 ± 0.46 for class 1. About 214 days of lidar measurements are selected for the analysis. The aerosol vertical distribution is influenced by dust events that induce a marked seasonal behaviour. Desert dust generally reaches higher altitudes than other aerosol types; the maxima altitudes are observed during Spring and Summer, when the monthly average altitude exceeds 5 km. The annual average occurrence of desert dust is 27%, with maxima in Spring and in the first part of Summer. The decrease in the dust event frequency observed in winter months is mainly linked to the seasonal behaviour of the synoptic circulation in the Mediterranean. According to the back-trajectories aerosols are primarily observed below 3 km altitude throughout the year when classified as not affected by desert dust. The extinction coefficient vertical profiles for the

  4. Seasonal variations in the onset of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Moum, B; Aadland, E; Ekbom, A; Vatn, M H

    1996-01-01

    Several retrospective studies have reported seasonal variations in the relapse of ulcerative colitis, and two studies have found seasonality in the onset of ulcerative colitis, with a peak from August to January. This study was designed to investigate possible seasonal variations of onset of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Patients with symptoms of one year or less were recruited from a prospective study of the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease, and the onset of symptoms was recorded month by month for four consecutive years. A total of 420 patients with UC and 142 patients with CD were included. There was monthly seasonality (p = 0.028) in symptomatic onset in December and January for UC but not for CD. It was found that environmental agents with known seasonality can be of importance for the seasonal variations of disease onset in UC. PMID:8675089

  5. Effect of season on estrous cycle of Yankasa sheep.

    PubMed

    Igono, M O; Molokwu, E C; Aliu, Y O

    1982-09-01

    An investigation was conducted to establish the effects of harmattan and hot-dry season on estrous cycle length, onset, and duration of estrus in Yankasa sheep indigenous to the Nigerian guinea savanna zone. Mean cycle lengths were 16.8 +/- 0.58 and 16.4 +/- 0.53 days during harmattan and hot-dry seasons, respectively; short cycles, 5-13 days, and long cycles, 21 to 30 days, were observed during both seasons. During the harmattan season, 57.1% of estrus began at night while 70% started at night during the hot-dry season. The duration of normal estrus observed during the harmattan, 33.6 +/- 5.87h, significantly decreased (P0.05) during the hot-dry season (24.0 +/- 5.45h). It is suggested that twice daily observation at 12-hour intervals will suffice to detect estrus in this breed of sheep.

  6. Stress reactivity and coping in seasonal and nonseasonal depression.

    PubMed

    Sigmon, Sandra T; Pells, Jennifer J; Schartel, Janell G; Hermann, Barbara A; Edenfield, Teresa M; LaMattina, Stephanie M; Boulard, Nina E; Whitcomb-Smith, Stacy R

    2007-05-01

    Stress, stress reactivity, and coping skill use were examined in individuals with seasonal depression, nonseasonal depression, and nondepressed controls. Although participants in the two depressed groups reported using more avoidance coping strategies than controls, only participants in the seasonal depressed group reported using more season-specific coping (i.e., light-related strategies) than participants in the nonseasonal depressed and control groups. Individuals in the seasonal depressed group also reporting using acceptance coping strategies less frequently than individuals in the control group. Only participants in the nonseasonal depressed group, however, exhibited greater psychophysiological arousal in reaction to a laboratory stressor (i.e., unsolvable anagram task) when compared to participants in the seasonal and nondepressed control groups. Participants in both depressed groups reported greater impact of negative life events during the past 6 months than did controls. Similarities and differences in the two types of depression may have implications for the conceptualization and treatment of seasonal depression.

  7. Seasonal groundwater contribution to crop-water use assessed with lysimeter observations and model simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Sophocleous, M.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater evaporation can play an important role in crop-water use where the water table is shallow. Lysimeters are often used to quantify the groundwater evaporation contribution influenced by a broad range of environmental factors. However, it is difficult for such field facilities, which are operated under limited conditions within limited time, to capture the whole spectrum of capillary upflow with regard to the inter-seasonal variability of climate, especially rainfall. Therefore, in this work, the method of combining lysimeter and numerical experiments was implemented to investigate seasonal groundwater contribution to crop-water use. Groundwater evaporation experiments were conducted through a weighing lysimeter at an agricultural experiment station located within an irrigation district in the lower Yellow River Basin for two winter wheat growth seasons. A HYDRUS-1D model was first calibrated and validated with weighing lysimeter data, and then was employed to perform scenario simulations of groundwater evaporation under different depths to water table (DTW) and water input (rainfall plus irrigation) driven by long term meteorological data. The scenario simulations revealed that the seasonally averaged groundwater evaporation amount was linearly correlated to water input for different values of DTW. The linear regression could explain more than 70% of the variability. The seasonally averaged ratio of the groundwater contribution to crop-water use varied with the seasonal water input and DTW. The ratio reached as high as 75% in the case of DTW=1.0. m and no irrigation, and as low as 3% in the case of DTW=3.0. m and three irrigation applications. The results also revealed that the ratio of seasonal groundwater evaporation to potential evapotranspiration could be fitted to an exponential function of the DTW that may be applied to estimate seasonal groundwater evaporation. In this case study of multilayered soil profile, the depth at which groundwater may

  8. Changing seasonality of Arctic hydrology disrupts key biotic linkages in Arctic aquatic ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deegan, L.; MacKenzie, C.; Peterson, B. J.; Fishscape Project

    2011-12-01

    Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) is an important circumpolar species that provide a model system for understanding the impacts of changing seasonality on arctic ecosystem function. Grayling serve as food for other biota, including lake trout, birds and humans, and act as top-down controls in stream ecosystems. In Arctic tundra streams, grayling spend their summers in streams but are obligated to move back into deep overwintering lakes in the fall. Climatic change that affects the seasonality of river hydrology could have a significant impact on grayling populations: grayling may leave overwintering lakes sooner in the spring and return later in the fall due to a longer open water season, but the migration could be disrupted by drought due to increased variability in discharge. In turn, a shorter overwintering season may impact lake trout dynamics in the lakes, which may rely on the seasonal inputs of stream nutrients in the form of migrating grayling into these oligotrophic lakes. To assess how shifting seasonality of Arctic river hydrology may disrupt key trophic linkages within and between lake and stream components of watersheds on the North Slope of the Brooks Mountain Range, Alaska, we have undertaken new work on grayling and lake trout population and food web dynamics. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags coupled with stream-width antenna units to monitor grayling movement across Arctic tundra watersheds during the summer, and into overwintering habitat in the fall. Results indicate that day length may prime grayling migration readiness, but that flooding events are likely the cue grayling use to initiate migration in to overwintering lakes. Many fish used high discharge events in the stream as an opportunity to move into lakes. Stream and lake derived stable isotopes also indicate that lake trout rely on these seasonally transported inputs of stream nutrients for growth. Thus, changes in the seasonality of river hydrology may have broader

  9. Seasonal variations of volcanic eruption frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Do volcanic eruptions have a tendency to occur more frequently in the months of May and June? Some past evidence suggests that they do. The present study, based on the new eruption catalog of Simkin et al.(1981), investigates the monthly statistics of the largest eruptions, grouped according to explosive magnitude, geographical latitude, and year. At the 2-delta level, no month-to-month variations in eruption frequency are found to be statistically significant. Examination of previously published month-to-month variations suggests that they, too, are not statistically significant. It is concluded that volcanism, at least averaged over large portions of the globe, is probably not periodic on a seasonal or annual time scale.

  10. Seasonal variation in the solar spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, D.W.; Healey, J.

    1980-01-01

    One minute data from 423 consecutive days is used to measure the seasonal solar spectrum variations. The parameters measured are horizontal global irradiation with WG7, OG1, RG2, RG8 and uv filters and direct normal radiation. An average ratio of each filtered horizontal global to the clear filter is computed for each day using a least square correlation. The correlation coefficient adds information about the variability of the ratio during the day. The variability of these ratios is much higher in winter than summer, for cloudy vs. sunny days, and humid days vs. dry days. The effects of optical air mass is inferred by the study of two very clear days. The effect of water vapor is inferred from the summer relative increase in the OG1-RG2 band. The uv radiation is much lower for the 1979-80 winter than the 1978-79 winter.

  11. Modeling nearshore morphological evolution at seasonal scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walstra, D.-J.R.; Ruggiero, P.; Lesser, G.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2006-01-01

    A process-based model is compared with field measurements to test and improve our ability to predict nearshore morphological change at seasonal time scales. The field experiment, along the dissipative beaches adjacent to Grays Harbor, Washington USA, successfully captured the transition between the high-energy erosive conditions of winter and the low-energy beach-building conditions typical of summer. The experiment documented shoreline progradation on the order of 20 m and as much as 175 m of onshore bar migration. Significant alongshore variability was observed in the morphological response of the sandbars over a 4 km reach of coast. A detailed sensitivity analysis suggests that the model results are more sensitive to adjusting the sediment transport associated with asymmetric oscillatory wave motions than to adjusting the transport due to mean currents. Initial results suggest that alongshore variations in the initial bathymetry are partially responsible for the observed alongshore variable morphological response during the experiment. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  12. Observed changes in seasons: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T. H.; Menzel, A.

    2002-11-01

    Within the last decade the study of phenology has taken on a new legitimacy in the area of climate change research. A growing literature reveals that a change in the timing of natural events is occurring in a wide range of locations and affecting a wide range of species. Changes in spring have been those most commonly reported, with the emphasis on an advance in spring linked to an increase in temperature. Detection of change in autumn is hampered by a smaller pool of available data, events that are harder to define (such as leaf coloration), and various influencing environmental factors triggering autumnal phases. Despite this, the general pattern may be towards a delay in autumn. Plant, animal and abiotic responses, especially in spring, are quite similar. Thus, it would appear that winter is being squeezed at both ends, and this effect, of increasing the growing season, should become more pronounced in the face of predicted global warming.

  13. Climate induces seasonality in pneumococcal transmission.

    PubMed

    Numminen, Elina; Chewapreecha, Claire; Turner, Claudia; Goldblatt, David; Nosten, Francois; Bentley, Stephen D; Turner, Paul; Corander, Jukka

    2015-06-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a significant human pathogen and a leading cause of infant mortality in developing countries. Considerable global variation in the pneumococcal carriage prevalence has been observed and the ecological factors contributing to it are not yet fully understood. We use data from a cohort of infants in Asia to study the effects of climatic conditions on both acquisition and clearance rates of the bacterium, finding significantly higher transmissibility during the cooler and drier months. Conversely, the length of a colonization period is unaffected by the season. Independent carriage data from studies conducted on the African and North American continents suggest similar effects of the climate on the prevalence of this bacterium, which further validates the obtained results. Further studies could be important to replicate the findings and explain the mechanistic role of cooler and dry air in the physiological response to nasopharyngeal acquisition of the pneumococcus.

  14. Seasonal Variations in Mercury's Dayside Calcium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer on the MESSENGER spacecraft has observed calcium emission in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis since March 2011. During MESSENGER's primary and first extended missions (March 2011 - March 2013) the dayside calcium exosphere was measured over eight Mercury years. We have simulated these data with a Monte Carlo model of exospheric source processes to show that (a) there is a persistent source of energetic calcium located in the dawn equatorial region, (b) there is a seasonal dependence in the calcium source rate, and (c) there are no obvious year-to-year variations in the near-surface dayside calcium exosphere. Although the precise mechanism responsible for ejecting the calcium has not yet been determined, the most likely process is the dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules produced in micrometeoroid impact plumes to form energetic, escaping calcium atoms.

  15. The changing seasonal climate in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Bintanja, R; van der Linden, E C

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing and projected greenhouse warming clearly manifests itself in the Arctic regions, which warm faster than any other part of the world. One of the key features of amplified Arctic warming concerns Arctic winter warming (AWW), which exceeds summer warming by at least a factor of 4. Here we use observation-driven reanalyses and state-of-the-art climate models in a variety of standardised climate change simulations to show that AWW is strongly linked to winter sea ice retreat through the associated release of surplus ocean heat gained in summer through the ice-albedo feedback (~25%), and to infrared radiation feedbacks (~75%). Arctic summer warming is surprisingly modest, even after summer sea ice has completely disappeared. Quantifying the seasonally varying changes in Arctic temperature and sea ice and the associated feedbacks helps to more accurately quantify the likelihood of Arctic's climate changes, and to assess their impact on local ecosystems and socio-economic activities.

  16. Seasonal dating of Sappho's 'Midnight Poem' revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; George, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Sappho was a Greek lyric poet who composed a significant array of pristine poetry. Although much of it has been lost, her reputation has endured thanks to numerous surviving fragments. One of her contributions includes the so-called 'Midnight Poem', which contains a line about the Pleiades, setting sometime before midnight, and supposedly observed from the island of Lesbos. This poem also refers to the setting of the Moon. Sappho's Midnight Poem thus represents a prime example of where ancient poetry and astronomy merge, and it also offers the possibility of seasonal dating. Previously, Herschberg and Mebius (1990) estimated that the poem was composed in late winter/early spring, a time frame that is not unusual for lyrics of an amorous nature. The aim of our paper is to revisit this earlier finding by using modern-day software. Our study confirms Herschberg and Mebius' result, but also conveys further information.

  17. Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza: Therapeutic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Memoli, Matthew J.; Morens, David M.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality annually, and the threat of a pandemic underscores the need for new therapeutic strategies. Here we briefly discuss novel antiviral agents under investigation, the limitations of current antiviral therapy and stress the importance of secondary bacterial infections in seasonal and pandemic influenza. Additionally, the lack of new antibiotics available to treat increasingly drug resistant organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, pneumococci, Acinetobacter, extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing gram negative bacteria and Clostridium difficile is highlighted as an important component of influenza treatment and pandemic preparedness. Addressing these problems will require a multidisciplinary approach, which includes the development of novel antivirals and new antibiotics, as well as a better understanding of the role secondary infections play on the morbidity and mortality due to influenza infection. PMID:18598914

  18. Seasonal and interannual changes in cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wylie, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    Statistics on cirrus clouds using the multispectral data from the GOES/VAS satellite have been collected since 1985. The method used to diagnose cirrus clouds and a summary of the first two years of data was given in Wylie and Menzel (1989) and at the 1988 FIRE meeting in Vail, CO. This study was expanded to three years of data which allows a more detailed discussion of the geographical and seasonal changes in cloud cover. Interannual changes in cloud cover also were studied. GOES/VAS cloud retrievals also were compared to atmospheric dynamic parameters and to radiative attenuation data taken by a lidar. Some of the highlights of these studies are discussed.

  19. Seasonal energetics of northern phocid seals.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Acuña, Hugo G; McNab, Brian K; Miller, Edward H

    2009-03-01

    The metabolic rate of harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus), harbor (Phoca vitulina), and ringed seals (Pusa hispida) was measured at various temperatures in air and water to estimate basal metabolic rates (BMRs) in these species. The basal rate and body composition of three harp seals were also measured throughout the year to examine the extent to which they vary seasonally. Marine mammalian carnivores generally have BMRs that are over three times the rates expected from body mass in mammals generally, both as a response to a cold-water distribution and to carnivorous food habits with the basal rates of terrestrial carnivores averaging about 1.8 times the mean of mammals. Phocid seals, however, have basal rates of metabolism that are 30% lower than other marine carnivores. Captive seals undergo profound changes in body mass and food consumption throughout the year, and after accounting for changes in body mass, the lowest rate of food intake occurs in summer. Contrary to earlier observations, harp seals also have lower basal rates during summer than during winter, but the variation in BMR, relative to mass expectations, was not associated with changes in the size of fat deposits. The summer reduction in energy expenditure and food consumption correlated with a reduction in BMR. That is, changes in BMR account for a significant portion of the seasonal variation in energy expenditure in the harp seal. Changes in body mass of harp seals throughout the year were due not only to changes in the size of body fat deposits, but also to changes in lean body mass. These results suggest that bioenergetics models used to predict prey consumption by seals should include time-variant energy requirements.

  20. Seasons on Venus - cloud cover signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Sanjay; Markiewicz, Wojciech; Krauss, Robert

    2015-04-01

    With the smallest obliquity and orbital eccentricity of any planet around the Sun, Venus is not generally expected to show any seasonal variations in its atmosphere. Careful analysis of the global images obtained by the Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) on board European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter from 12 June 2006 orbit 24) till 15 September 2014 (orbit 3043) reveal short term variations and a detectable periodic variation in the normalized intensity (reflectance) as well as in unit optical depth at a fixed local time at low latitudes as well as at high latitudes. VMC ultraviolet images were brightness normalized using Minnaert Law and the brightness at the sub-solar meridian at different latitudes in the southern hemisphere. The unit optical dept was inferred by precision location of the limb location in images acquired during the apoapsis portion of the orbit at range greater than ~ 30,000 km from Venus center. The temporal changes of the unit optical depth was monitored at fixed solar zenith angles and latitude. The seasonal signature is more pronounced at high latitudes compared to low latitudes. The data suggest that the variations in insolation due to heliocentric range and the small obliquity are responsible for the periodic changes in the Venus cloud cover. Concurrent changes in the cloud changes are also observed at other three wavelengths (550, 950 and 1050 nm) at which VMC obtained images, but the number of images at these wavelengths is much smaller. A secular decrease in the image brightness is observed over the life of the Venus Express mission, most likely due to the degradation of the some of the optical/sensor elements.