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Sample records for post-mortem radiological studies

  1. Human skull translucency: post mortem studies

    PubMed Central

    Sawosz, P.; Wojtkiewicz, S.; Kacprzak, M.; Weigl, W.; Borowska-Solonynko, A.; Krajewski, P.; Bejm, K.; Milej, D.; Ciszek, B.; Maniewski, R.; Liebert, A.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of optical translucency of human skulls were carried out. An incandescent light source and a CCD camera were used to measure the distribution of light transmitted through the skull in 10 subjects post-mortem. We noticed that intra-individual differences in optical translucency may be up to 100 times but inter-individual translucency differences across the skull reach 105 times. Based on the measurement results, a “theoretical” experiment was simulated. Monte-Carlo calculations were used in order to evaluate the influence of the differences in optical translucency of the skull on results of NIRS measurements. In these calculations a functional stimulation was done, in which the oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in the brain cortex change by 5μM and −5μM respectively. The maximal discrepancies between assumed hemoglobin concentration changes and hemoglobin concentration changes estimated with Monte-Carlo simulation may reach 50% depending of the translucency of the skull. PMID:28018721

  2. Radiologic-Histopathologic Correlation of Cerebral Microbleeds Using Pre-Mortem and Post-Mortem MRI

    PubMed Central

    Montandon, Marie-Louise; Lazeyras, François; Scheffler, Max; Meckel, Stephan; Herrmann, Francois R.; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Kövari, Enikö

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral microbleeds (CMB), also known as cerebral microhemorrhages, are small areas of susceptibility on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that are increasingly detected due to the higher availability of high-field MRI systems and dedicated pulse sequences. The prevalence of CMBs increases in cases with cognitive decline. The current investigation assessed the poorly investigated radiologic–histopathologic correlation of CMBs on MRI. Methods The local ethical committee approved the current investigation. We retrospectively assessed a consecutive series of 1303 autopsy cases hospitalized in Geneva University Hospitals between 2000–2014. Of 112 cases with pre-mortem T2* sequences, we included 25 cases (mean age 77.3 ± 9.6, 9 females) with at least one CMB. We compared pre-mortem CMBs with targeted histopathology and post-mortem MRI. Results 25 cases had 31 CMB lesions detected by pre-mortem MRI. 25 additional CMB were detected on histopathology. 4 CMBs on pre-mortem MRI were false positives, resulting in a total of 52 CMBs. 27 CMBs on pre-mortem MRI were confirmed on histopathology, corresponding to a sensitivity or true positive rate of 51.9% (95% CI 37.6–66.0%). The false negative rate of pre-mortem MRI was 48.1% (95% CI 34.0–62.4%). Post-mortem MRI showed only 3 cases with additional CMBs. Overall, pre-mortem MRI significantly underestimated CMBs (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Routine clinical brain MRI underestimates the prevalence of CMBs by approximately 50%, and 12% of radiologic pre-mortem MRI CMBs were false positives. Post-mortem MRI confirmed that this discordance is not explained by microbleeds occurring after the pre-mortem MRI. PMID:27936213

  3. A combined post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histological study of multiple sclerosis pathology.

    PubMed

    Kolasinski, James; Stagg, Charlotte J; Chance, Steven A; Deluca, Gabriele C; Esiri, Margaret M; Chang, Eun-Hyuk; Palace, Jacqueline A; McNab, Jennifer A; Jenkinson, Mark; Miller, Karla L; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2012-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory neurological condition characterized by focal and diffuse neurodegeneration and demyelination throughout the central nervous system. Factors influencing the progression of pathology are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that anatomical connectivity influences the spread of neurodegeneration. This predicts that measures of neurodegeneration will correlate most strongly between interconnected structures. However, such patterns have been difficult to quantify through post-mortem neuropathology or in vivo scanning alone. In this study, we used the complementary approaches of whole brain post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histology to assess patterns of multiple sclerosis pathology. Two thalamo-cortical projection systems were considered based on their distinct neuroanatomy and their documented involvement in multiple sclerosis: lateral geniculate nucleus to primary visual cortex and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to prefrontal cortex. Within the anatomically distinct thalamo-cortical projection systems, magnetic resonance imaging derived cortical thickness was correlated significantly with both a measure of myelination in the connected tract and a measure of connected thalamic nucleus cell density. Such correlations did not exist between these markers of neurodegeneration across different thalamo-cortical systems. Magnetic resonance imaging lesion analysis depicted clearly demarcated subcortical lesions impinging on the white matter tracts of interest; however, quantitation of the extent of lesion-tract overlap failed to demonstrate any appreciable association with the severity of markers of diffuse pathology within each thalamo-cortical projection system. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging metrics in both white matter tracts were correlated significantly with a histologically derived measure of tract myelination. These data demonstrate for the first time the relevance of functional

  4. Post-mortem study of the hip joint. III. Correlations between observations.

    PubMed Central

    Byers, P D; Contepomi, C A; Farkas, T A

    1976-01-01

    Correlations between alterations in hip joints, described in a post-mortem study, have established the independence of limited and progressive alterations, and in addition have shown that there is a weak association between limited alterations and osteophytes and a strong one between progressive alterations and osteophytes. Nevertheless limited alterations may rarely undergo progressive damage. Cysts relate strongly to osteophytes but only moderately with progressive alterations. Limited alterations of both head and acetabulum can be subdivided. Some implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:942267

  5. What can post-mortem studies tell us about the pathoetiology of suicide?

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern; however, its neurobiology is unclear. Post-mortem brain tissue obtained from suicide victims and normal controls offers a useful method for studying the neurobiology of suicide. Despite several limitations, these studies have offered important leads in the neurobiology of suicide. In this article, we discuss some important findings resulting from these studies, focusing on serotonergic mechanisms, signal transduction systems, neuroendocrine studies and immune function abnormalities in suicide. These studies suggest that abnormalities of certain receptor subtypes, components of signaling systems such as protein kinase C and protein kinase A, transcription factors such as cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and neurotrophins may play an important role in the pathophysiology of suicide. These studies also suggest abnormalities of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis system components, feedback mechanisms and cytokines, which are chemical mediators of the immune functions. Post-mortem brain tissue offers an opportunity for future studies, such as genetic and epigenetic studies. PMID:21436961

  6. [Post-mortem microbiology analysis].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Amparo; Alberola, Juan; Cohen, Marta Cecilia

    2013-12-01

    Post-mortem microbiology is useful in both clinical and forensic autopsies, and allows a suspected infection to be confirmed. Indeed, it is routinely applied to donor studies in the clinical setting, as well as in sudden and unexpected death in the forensic field. Implementation of specific sampling techniques in autopsy can minimize the possibility of contamination, making interpretation of the results easier. Specific interpretation criteria for post-mortem cultures, the use of molecular diagnosis, and its fusion with molecular biology and histopathology have led to post-mortem microbiology playing a major role in autopsy. Multidisciplinary work involving microbiologists, pathologists, and forensic physicians will help to improve the achievements of post-mortem microbiology, prevent infectious diseases, and contribute to a healthier population.

  7. Adult post-mortem imaging in traumatic and cardiorespiratory death and its relation to clinical radiological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Adlam, D; Robinson, C; Pakkal, M; Rutty, G N

    2014-01-01

    The use of post-mortem imaging is expanding throughout the world with increasing use of advanced imaging techniques, such as contrast-enhanced CT and MRI. The questions asked of post-mortem imaging are complex and can be very different, for example for natural sudden death investigation will focus on the cause, whereas for trauma the cause of death is often clear, but injury patterns may be very revealing in investigating the background to the incident. Post-mortem imaging is different to clinical imaging regarding both the appearance of pathology and the information required, but there is much to learn from many years of clinical research in the use of these techniques. Furthermore, it is possible that post-mortem imaging research could be used not only for investigating the cause of death but also as a model to conduct clinically relevant research. This article reviews challenges to the development of post-mortem imaging for trauma, identification and cardiorespiratory death, and how they may be influenced by current clinical thinking and practice. PMID:24338941

  8. Multi-phase post-mortem CT-angiography: a pathologic correlation study on cardiovascular sudden death

    PubMed Central

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Frati, Paola; Pascale, Natascha; Pomara, Cristoforo; Grilli, Giampaolo; Viola, Rocco Valerio; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Multi-phase post-mortem CT-angiography (MPMCTA) has the great potential to increase the quality of the post-mortem investigation, especially in the area of sudden death; however, its role as routine complement to the pathology toolbox is still questioned as it needs to be further standardized. The aim of this study is to investigate the contribution of MPMCTA in cases of sudden unexplained death in adults and in particular in sudden cardiovascular death. Sixty-eight sudden unexpected deaths of adults were investigated at our institution between 2012 and 2013. Ten cases underwent MPMCTA and autopsy and were included in the study. Before the angiographic step by complete filling of the vascular system, prior to any manipulation of the body, a non-contrast CT-scan was carried out. Image reconstructions were performed on a CT workstation (Vitrea) and two radiologists experienced with post mortem imaging interpreted the MPMCTA findings. In all 10 cases, we could state a good correlation between combination of post-mortem CT and MPMCTA and autopsy procedures, confirming a high diagnostic sensitivity. With this case series we want to illustrate the advantages offered by performing MPMCTA when facing a sudden death, regardless of specific suspicion for acute coronary syndrome or other vascular or ischemic disease. PMID:27928228

  9. Post-mortem clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ferner, R E

    2008-01-01

    Clinical pharmacology assumes that deductions can be made about the concentrations of drugs from a knowledge of the pharmacokinetic parameters in an individual; and that the effects are related to the measured concentration. Post-mortem changes render the assumptions of clinical pharmacology largely invalid, and make the interpretation of concentrations measured in post-mortem samples difficult or impossible. Qualitative tests can show the presence of substances that were not present in life, and can fail to detect substances that led to death. Quantitative analysis is subject to error in itself, and because post-mortem concentrations vary in largely unpredictable ways with the site and time of sampling, as a result of the phenomenon of post-mortem redistribution. Consequently, compilations of ‘lethal concentrations’ are misleading. There is a lack of adequate studies of the true relationship between fatal events and the concentrations that can be measured subsequently, but without such studies, clinical pharmacologists and others should be wary of interpreting post-mortem measurements. PMID:18637886

  10. [Radiological examination of embryonal and fetal vessels. Technique and method of prenatal, post-mortem angiography in different stages of gestation].

    PubMed

    Stoeter, P; Voigt, K

    1976-06-01

    The development and technique of a x-ray examination for prenatal and post-mortem angiography is presented. After elaboration of an appropriate method for preservation and treatment of the embryos the angiographic procedure was technically evolved and performed on 55 cow-, 40 pig-, and 5 sheep embryos and fetuses with a vertex- breech- length between 11 and 222mm. Selective filling of the arterial and venous system with good opacification of the peripheral vessels and capillary plexus could be regularly achieved by means of thin catheters or extended glass cannulas which were inserted into the umbilical arteries and veins or the vessels of the foetal membrane. By means of this technique the radiological embryology of the vascular development of different species can be studied in great series and investigated with regard to onto- and phylogenetic aspects. This prenatal angiographic technique can also be applied to man as has been proven by angiograms of 4 human embryos and fetuses aged between 6 weeks and 5 months.

  11. Breast density quantification with cone-beam CT: a post-mortem study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Travis; Ding, Huanjun; Le, Huy Q; Ducote, Justin L; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-07

    Forty post-mortem breasts were imaged with a flat-panel based cone-beam x-ray CT system at 50 kVp. The feasibility of breast density quantification has been investigated using standard histogram thresholding and an automatic segmentation method based on the fuzzy c-means algorithm (FCM). The breasts were chemically decomposed into water, lipid, and protein immediately after image acquisition was completed. The per cent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis was used as the gold standard for breast density comparison. Both image-based segmentation techniques showed good precision in breast density quantification with high linear coefficients between the right and left breast of each pair. When comparing with the gold standard using %FGV from chemical analysis, Pearson's r-values were estimated to be 0.983 and 0.968 for the FCM clustering and the histogram thresholding techniques, respectively. The standard error of the estimate was also reduced from 3.92% to 2.45% by applying the automatic clustering technique. The results of the postmortem study suggested that breast tissue can be characterized in terms of water, lipid and protein contents with high accuracy by using chemical analysis, which offers a gold standard for breast density studies comparing different techniques. In the investigated image segmentation techniques, the FCM algorithm had high precision and accuracy in breast density quantification. In comparison to conventional histogram thresholding, it was more efficient and reduced inter-observer variation.

  12. Breast density quantification with cone-beam CT: A post-mortem study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Travis; Ding, Huanjun; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Forty post-mortem breasts were imaged with a flat-panel based cone-beam x-ray CT system at 50 kVp. The feasibility of breast density quantification has been investigated using standard histogram thresholding and an automatic segmentation method based on the fuzzy c-means algorithm (FCM). The breasts were chemically decomposed into water, lipid, and protein immediately after image acquisition was completed. The percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis was used as the gold standard for breast density comparison. Both image-based segmentation techniques showed good precision in breast density quantification with high linear coefficients between the right and left breast of each pair. When comparing with the gold standard using %FGV from chemical analysis, Pearson’s r-values were estimated to be 0.983 and 0.968 for the FCM clustering and the histogram thresholding techniques, respectively. The standard error of the estimate (SEE) was also reduced from 3.92% to 2.45% by applying the automatic clustering technique. The results of the postmortem study suggested that breast tissue can be characterized in terms of water, lipid and protein contents with high accuracy by using chemical analysis, which offers a gold standard for breast density studies comparing different techniques. In the investigated image segmentation techniques, the FCM algorithm had high precision and accuracy in breast density quantification. In comparison to conventional histogram thresholding, it was more efficient and reduced inter-observer variation. PMID:24254317

  13. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) as a means to measure brain iron? A post mortem validation study.

    PubMed

    Langkammer, Christian; Schweser, Ferdinand; Krebs, Nikolaus; Deistung, Andreas; Goessler, Walter; Scheurer, Eva; Sommer, Karsten; Reishofer, Gernot; Yen, Kathrin; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2012-09-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel technique which allows determining the bulk magnetic susceptibility distribution of tissue in vivo from gradient echo magnetic resonance phase images. It is commonly assumed that paramagnetic iron is the predominant source of susceptibility variations in gray matter as many studies have reported a reasonable correlation of magnetic susceptibility with brain iron concentrations in vivo. Instead of performing direct comparisons, however, all these studies used the putative iron concentrations reported in the hallmark study by Hallgren and Sourander (1958) for their analysis. Consequently, the extent to which QSM can serve to reliably assess brain iron levels is not yet fully clear. To provide such information we investigated the relation between bulk tissue magnetic susceptibility and brain iron concentration in unfixed (in situ) post mortem brains of 13 subjects using MRI and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A strong linear correlation between chemically determined iron concentration and bulk magnetic susceptibility was found in gray matter structures (r=0.84, p<0.001), whereas the correlation coefficient was much lower in white matter (r=0.27, p<0.001). The slope of the overall linear correlation was consistent with theoretical considerations of the magnetism of ferritin supporting that most of the iron in the brain is bound to ferritin proteins. In conclusion, iron is the dominant source of magnetic susceptibility in deep gray matter and can be assessed with QSM. In white matter regions the estimation of iron concentrations by QSM is less accurate and more complex because the counteracting contribution from diamagnetic myelinated neuronal fibers confounds the interpretation.

  14. False-positive diatom test: a real challenge? A post-mortem study using standardized protocols.

    PubMed

    Lunetta, Philippe; Miettinen, Arto; Spilling, Kristian; Sajantila, Antti

    2013-09-01

    The main criticism of the validity of the diatom test for the diagnosis of drowning is based on the potential ante- and post-mortem penetration of diatoms and the finding of diatoms in bodies of non-drowned human beings. However, qualitative and quantitative studies on diatoms in organs of the non-drowned have yielded both conflicting and contradictory results. In the present study, we have analysed under standardised methods the diatom content in several organs of 14 non-drowned human bodies. Overall, only 9 diatoms (6 entire, 3 fragmented) were disclosed in 6 of the 14 non-drowned bodies. Each of these 6 cadavers had only a single "positive" organ. Six diatoms were found in the bone marrow, 2 in the lung, and one in the pleural liquid. No diatoms were recovered from the brain, liver, kidney, or blood samples of any of these 14 bodies. Moreover, in five additional cadavers, whose lungs were injected, prior autopsy, with a 3.5L solution containing a bi-cellulate diatom culture (Thalassiosira baltica, Thalassiosira levanderi) via tracheostomy, a few diatoms appeared in the pleural cavity and in the blood from the left heart chamber, but none in any other internal organs investigated. The results of the presented study demonstrate that the issue of the false-positive diatom test should not be a logical impediment to the performance of the diatom method. However, strict and standardized protocols aimed at avoiding contamination during sample preparation must be used, appropriate separation values set and taxonomic analysis of all diatoms performed.

  15. Application of contrast media in post-mortem imaging (CT and MRI).

    PubMed

    Grabherr, Silke; Grimm, Jochen; Baumann, Pia; Mangin, Patrice

    2015-09-01

    The application of contrast media in post-mortem radiology differs from clinical approaches in living patients. Post-mortem changes in the vascular system and the absence of blood flow lead to specific problems that have to be considered for the performance of post-mortem angiography. In addition, interpreting the images is challenging due to technique-related and post-mortem artefacts that have to be known and that are specific for each applied technique. Although the idea of injecting contrast media is old, classic methods are not simply transferable to modern radiological techniques in forensic medicine, as they are mostly dedicated to single-organ studies or applicable only shortly after death. With the introduction of modern imaging techniques, such as post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) and post-mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR), to forensic death investigations, intensive research started to explore their advantages and limitations compared to conventional autopsy. PMCT has already become a routine investigation in several centres, and different techniques have been developed to better visualise the vascular system and organ parenchyma in PMCT. In contrast, the use of PMMR is still limited due to practical issues, and research is now starting in the field of PMMR angiography. This article gives an overview of the problems in post-mortem contrast media application, the various classic and modern techniques, and the issues to consider by using different media.

  16. Post-mortem pathologic and genetic studies in "dead in bed syndrome" cases in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tu, Emily; Bagnall, Richard D; Duflou, Johan; Lynch, Matthew; Twigg, Stephen M; Semsarian, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Dead in bed syndrome is a poorly understood cause of sudden death in young people with type 1 diabetes. The underlying cause remains unknown. One possible explanation may involve prolongation of the QT interval followed by a terminal malignant arrhythmia. Risk factors associated with QT interval prolongation include hypoglycemia and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. We sought to identify myocardial cellular changes and genetic influences that may contribute to the pathogenesis of dead in bed syndrome. Post-mortem reports between 1994 and 2006 from the 2 largest Departments of Forensic Medicine in Australia were reviewed for dead in bed syndrome cases. Post-mortem heart sections were immunohistochemically stained for collagen types I and III and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Genomic DNA was prepared from post-mortem samples, and genetic analysis was performed in the SCN5A, G6PC, PHOX2B, and CTGF genes. Twenty-two dead in bed syndrome cases were identified and staining of heart sections for collagen I and III, and CTGF showed no differences between dead in bed syndrome cases and controls. Genetic screening of SCN5A revealed 3 silent polymorphisms A29A, E1061E, and D1819D and 1 protein-changing variant H558R. No genetic variants were found in G6PC, PHOX2B, and CTGF, and dead in bed syndrome cases were not associated with the G-945C CTGF promoter polymorphism. In conclusion, this study is the first to investigate potential pathogenic mechanisms underlying the dead in bed syndrome in type 1 diabetes with the results substantially adding to knowledge of this condition. Understanding the causes and triggers of dead in bed syndrome will be critical in facilitating the identification of patients with type 1 diabetes at highest risk of developing sudden death.

  17. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  18. Differential nuclear and mitochondrial DNA preservation in post-mortem teeth with implications for forensic and ancient DNA studies.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Furthermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  19. Assessing the relationship between farming practices, laboratory analyses and post-mortem findings: a case study in pig fattening.

    PubMed

    Langkabel, N; Fries, R

    2013-12-01

    European Union legislation on animal production associated with food safety requires the collection and management of information and data about the farm, the herd and the individual animal. This paper describes the technical steps of the generation, collection and interpretation of data from 296 pig-fattening farms, belonging to two farming associations and using indoor production systems (56 management parameters). The paper also describes post-mortem findings and the results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for antibodies to salmonellae, Trichinella spp. and Yersinia spp. A total of nearly 30 million data points were collected and analysed for this study. The results of the ELISA were negative for Trichinella spp.; for salmonellae and Yersinia spp., both negative and positive results were obtained. Analysis of the farm management parameters showed no significant differences; therefore, the cut-off levels for salmonellae and Yersinia spp. were increased, in order to identify farms with a greater hygiene burden. Post-mortem findings, possibly related to 'farm hygiene', were used in the analysis. As a result, three farms with particular management decisions were identified as potentially having contributed to the high burden of pathogens detected using ELISA. A relationship between laboratory results and farm management parameters assessed from yes/no answers could not be established in this study without further work on the available data set.

  20. Temperature dependent ageing mechanisms in Lithium-ion batteries - A Post-Mortem study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas; Wilka, Marcel; Kasper, Michael; Fleischhammer, Meike; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2014-09-01

    The effects of temperatures in the range of -20 °C to 70 °C on the ageing behaviour of cycled Lithium-ion batteries are investigated quantitatively by electrochemical methods and Post-Mortem analysis. Commercial 18650-type high-power cells with a LixNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2/LiyMn2O4 blend cathode and graphite/carbon anode were used as test system. The cells were cycled at a rate of 1 C until the discharge capacity falls below 80% of the initial capacity. Interestingly, an Arrhenius plot indicates two different ageing mechanisms for the ranges of -20 °C to 25 °C and 25 °C to 70 °C. Below 25 °C, the ageing rates increase with decreasing temperature, while above 25 °C ageing is accelerated with increasing temperature. The aged 18650 cells are inspected via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), measurements of electrode thickness and X-ray diffraction (XRD) after disassembly to learn more about the chemical reasons of the degradation. The effect of different temperatures on the electrode polarizations are evaluated by assembling electrodes in pouch cells with reference electrode as a model system. We find that the dominating ageing mechanism for T < 25 °C is Lithium plating, while for T > 25 °C the cathodes show degeneration and the anodes will be increasingly covered by SEI layers.

  1. Post mortem magnetic resonance imaging in the fetus, infant and child: A comparative study with conventional autopsy (MaRIAS Protocol)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive autopsy by post mortem magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been suggested as an alternative for conventional autopsy in view of the declining consented autopsy rates. However, large prospective studies rigorously evaluating the accuracy of such an approach are lacking. We intend to compare the accuracy of a minimally invasive autopsy approach using post mortem MR imaging with that of conventional autopsy in fetuses, newborns and children for detection of the major pathological abnormalities and/or determination of the cause of death. Methods/Design We recruited 400 consecutive fetuses, newborns and children referred for conventional autopsy to one of the two participating hospitals over a three-year period. We acquired whole body post mortem MR imaging using a 1.5 T MR scanner (Avanto, Siemens Medical Solutions, Enlargen, Germany) prior to autopsy. The total scan time varied between 90 to 120 minutes. Each MR image was reported by a team of four specialist radiologists (paediatric neuroradiology, paediatric cardiology, paediatric chest & abdominal imaging and musculoskeletal imaging), blinded to the autopsy data. Conventional autopsy was performed according to the guidelines set down by the Royal College of Pathologists (UK) by experienced paediatric or perinatal pathologists, blinded to the MR data. The MR and autopsy data were recorded using predefined categorical variables by an independent person. Discussion Using conventional post mortem as the gold standard comparator, the MR images will be assessed for accuracy of the anatomical morphology, associated lesions, clinical usefulness of information and determination of the cause of death. The sensitivities, specificities and predictive values of post mortem MR alone and MR imaging along with other minimally invasive post mortem investigations will be presented for the final diagnosis, broad diagnostic categories and for specific diagnosis of each system. Clinical Trial Registration

  2. Brain banks: benefits, limitations and cautions concerning the use of post-mortem brain tissue for molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Isidre; Martinez, Anna; Boluda, Susana; Parchi, Piero; Barrachina, Marta

    2008-09-01

    Brain banks are facilities providing an interface between generous donation of nervous tissues and research laboratories devoted to increase our understanding of the diseases of the nervous system, discover new diagnostic targets, and develop new strategies. Considering this crucial role, it is important to learn about the suitabilities, limitations and proper handling of individual brain samples for particular studies. Several factors may interfere with preservation of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids, and, therefore, special care must be taken first to detect sub-optimally preserved tissues and second to provide adequate material for each specific purpose. Basic aspects related with DNA, RNA and protein preservation include agonal state, post-mortem delay, temperature of storage and procedures of tissue preservation. Examination of DNA and RNA preservation is best done by using bioanalyzer technologies instead of less sensitive methods such as agarose gels. Adequate RNA preservation is mandatory in RNA microarray studies and adequate controls are necessary for proper PCR validation. Like for RNA, the preservation of proteins is not homogeneous since some molecules are more vulnerable than others. This aspect is crucial in the study of proteins including expression levels and possible post-translational modifications. Similarly, the reliability of functional and enzymatic studies in human post-mortem brain largely depends on protein preservation. Much less is known about other aspects, such as the effects of putative deleterious factors on epigenetic events such as methylation of CpGs in gene promoters, nucleosome preservation, histone modifications, and conservation of microRNA species. Most brains are appropriate for morphological approaches but not all brains are useful for certain biochemical and molecular studies.

  3. Post-mortem toxicology: A pilot study to evaluate the use of a Bayesian network to assess the likelihood of fatality.

    PubMed

    Langford, Alan M; Bolton, Jennifer R; Carlin, Michelle G; Palmer, Ray

    2015-07-01

    The challenge of interpreting post-mortem drug concentrations is well documented and relies on appropriate sample collection, knowledge of case circumstances as well as reference to published tables of data, whilst taking into account the known issues of post-mortem drug redistribution and tolerance. Existing published data has evolved from simple data tables to those now including sample origin and single to poly drug use, but additional information tends to be specific to those reported in individual case studies. We have developed a Bayesian network framework to assign a likelihood of fatality based on the contribution of drug concentrations whilst taking into account the pathological findings. This expert system has been tested against casework within the coronial jurisdiction of Sunderland, UK. We demonstrate in this pilot study that the Bayesian network can be used to proffer a degree of confidence in how deaths may be reported in cases when drugs are implicated. It has also highlighted the potential for deaths to be reported according to the pathological states at post-mortem when drugs have a significant contribution that may have an impact on mortality statistics. The Bayesian network could be used as complementary approach to assist in the interpretation of post-mortem drug concentrations.

  4. Using bacterial and necrophagous insect dynamics for post-mortem interval estimation during cold season: Novel case study in Romania.

    PubMed

    Iancu, Lavinia; Carter, David O; Junkins, Emily N; Purcarea, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Considering the biogeographical characteristics of forensic entomology, and the recent development of forensic microbiology as a complementary approach for post-mortem interval estimation, the current study focused on characterizing the succession of necrophagous insect species and bacterial communities inhabiting the rectum and mouth cavities of swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) carcasses during a cold season outdoor experiment in an urban natural environment of Bucharest, Romania. We monitored the decomposition process of three swine carcasses during a 7 month period (November 2012-May 2013) corresponding to winter and spring periods of a temperate climate region. The carcasses, protected by wire cages, were placed on the ground in a park type environment, while the meteorological parameters were constantly recorded. The succession of necrophagous Diptera and Coleoptera taxa was monitored weekly, both the adult and larval stages, and the species were identified both by morphological and genetic characterization. The structure of bacterial communities from swine rectum and mouth tissues was characterized during the same time intervals by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. We observed a shift in the structure of both insect and bacterial communities, primarily due to seasonal effects and the depletion of the carcass. A total of 14 Diptera and 6 Coleoptera species were recorded on the swine carcasses, from which Calliphora vomitoria and C. vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Necrobia violacea (Coleoptera: Cleridae) and Thanatophilus rugosus (Coleoptera: Silphidae) were observed as predominant species. The first colonizing wave, primarily Calliphoridae, was observed after 15 weeks when the temperature increased to 13°C. This was followed by Muscidae, Fanniidae, Anthomyiidae, Sepsidae and Piophilidae. Families belonging to Coleoptera Order were observed at week 18 when temperatures raised above 18°C, starting with

  5. The effect of charging rate on the graphite electrode of commercial lithium-ion cells: A post-mortem study

    DOE PAGES

    Somerville, L.; Bareno, J.; Trask, S.; ...

    2016-10-22

    Increased charging rates negatively affect the lifetime of lithium-ion cells by increasing cell resistance and reducing capacity. This work is a post-mortem study of 18650 cells subjected to charge rates of 0.7-, 2-, 4-, and 6-C. For cells charged at 0.7-C to 4-C, this performance degradation is primarily related to surface film thickness with no observable change in surface film chemical composition. However, at charge rates of 6-C, the chemical composition of the surface film changes significantly, suggesting that this change is the reason for the sharper increase in cell resistance compared to the lower charge rates. In addition, wemore » found that surface film formation was not uniform across the electrode. Surface film was thicker and chemically different along the central band of the electrode “jelly roll”. This result is most likely attributable to an increase in temperature that results from non-uniform electrode wetting during manufacture. As a result, this non-uniform change further resulted in active material delamination from the current collector owing to chemical changes to the binder for the cell charged at 6-C.« less

  6. The effect of charging rate on the graphite electrode of commercial lithium-ion cells: A post-mortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, L.; Bareno, J.; Trask, S.; Jennings, P.; McGordon, A.; Lyness, C.; Bloom, Ira

    2016-10-22

    Increased charging rates negatively affect the lifetime of lithium-ion cells by increasing cell resistance and reducing capacity. This work is a post-mortem study of 18650 cells subjected to charge rates of 0.7-, 2-, 4-, and 6-C. For cells charged at 0.7-C to 4-C, this performance degradation is primarily related to surface film thickness with no observable change in surface film chemical composition. However, at charge rates of 6-C, the chemical composition of the surface film changes significantly, suggesting that this change is the reason for the sharper increase in cell resistance compared to the lower charge rates. In addition, we found that surface film formation was not uniform across the electrode. Surface film was thicker and chemically different along the central band of the electrode “jelly roll”. This result is most likely attributable to an increase in temperature that results from non-uniform electrode wetting during manufacture. As a result, this non-uniform change further resulted in active material delamination from the current collector owing to chemical changes to the binder for the cell charged at 6-C.

  7. The effect of charging rate on the graphite electrode of commercial lithium-ion cells: A post-mortem study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, L.; Bareño, J.; Trask, S.; Jennings, P.; McGordon, A.; Lyness, C.; Bloom, I.

    2016-12-01

    Increased charging rates negatively affect the lifetime of lithium-ion cells by increasing cell resistance and reducing capacity. This work is a post-mortem study of 18650-type cells subjected to charge rates of 0.7-, 2-, 4-, and 6-C. For cells charged at 0.7-C to 4-C, this performance degradation is primarily related to surface film thickness with no observable change in surface film chemical composition. However, at charge rates of 6-C, the chemical composition of the surface film changes significantly, suggesting that this change is the reason for the sharper increase in cell resistance compared to the lower charge rates. In addition, we found that surface film formation was not uniform across the electrode. Surface film was thicker and chemically different along the central band of the electrode "jelly roll". This result is most likely attributable to an increase in temperature that results from non-uniform electrode wetting during manufacture. This non-uniform change further resulted in active material delamination from the current collector owing to chemical changes to the binder for the cell charged at 6-C.

  8. AMPA receptors in post-mortem brains of Cloninger type 1 and 2 alcoholics: a whole-hemisphere autoradiography study.

    PubMed

    Kärkkäinen, Olli; Kupila, Jukka; Häkkinen, Merja; Laukkanen, Virpi; Tupala, Erkki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Tiihonen, Jari; Storvik, Markus

    2013-12-30

    Dysfunction of the brain glutamate system has been associated with alcoholism. Ionotropic glutamatergic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) play an important role in both neurotransmission and post-synaptic plasticity. Alterations in AMPAR densities may also play a role in the neurobiological changes associated with alcoholism. In the present study, [(3)H] AMPA binding density was evaluated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), dentate gyrus and hippocampus of Cloninger type 1 (n=9) and 2 (n=8) alcoholics, and compared with non-alcoholic control subjects (n=10) by post-mortem whole-hemisphere autoradiography. The [(3)H] AMPA binding density was significantly higher in the ACC of early onset type 2 alcoholics when compared with controls (p=0.011). There was also a significant negative correlation between [(3)H] AMPA binding and previously published results of dopamine transporter (DAT) density in the ACC in these same brain samples (R=-0.95, p=0.001). Although preliminary, and from a relatively small diagnostic group, the present results help to further explain the pathology of alcohol dependence and impulsive behaviour in type 2 alcoholics.

  9. [POST MORTEM PATERNITY].

    PubMed

    Marguénaud, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Post mortem paternity, namely the procreation after the death of the man whom is part of the couple, is one of the questions which raised the most hesitations since the first bioethics laws of 1994. The National Assembly, encouraged by several opinions of the CCNE (National advisory committee of ethics) had let itself convince that the transfer had, at least, to be authorized in utero embryos preserved at the regard of which no one could not claim to have rights equal or higher than those of the woman concerned. However, the Senate always ended up obtaining the maintenance of an absolute prohibition of posthumous procreation (starting) from the spermatozoids or frozen embryos. This indifference with the cruelty of the application of the law to the women plunged into mourning--based on a paradoxical appreciation of the interest of the child not to be born orphan, and on a not very glorious taking into account of the interest of the Body of notaries not to change its practices--is particularly debatable. One can, nevertheless, try to understand it according to the obsession of the legalization of surrogate motherhood by application of the principle of nondiscrimination which could justify the requests of the men who, thanks to a surrogate mother, would wish to become fathers starting from gametes or embryos taken or created before the death of their wife or partner.

  10. Detection of hemorrhage source: the diagnostic value of post-mortem CT-angiography.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, C; Binaghi, S; Doenz, F; Bize, P; Chevallier, C; Mangin, P; Grabherr, S

    2012-10-10

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA) to conventional, ante-mortem computed tomography (CT)-scan, CT-angiography (CTA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in the detection and localization of the source of bleeding in cases of acute hemorrhage with fatal outcomes. The medical records and imaging scans of nine individuals who underwent a conventional, ante-mortem CT-scan, CTA or DSA and later died in the hospital as a result of an acute hemorrhage were reviewed. Post-mortem computed tomography angiography, using multi-phase post-mortem CTA, as well as medico-legal autopsies were performed. Localization accuracy of the bleeding was assessed by comparing the diagnostic findings of the different techniques. The results revealed that data from ante-mortem and post-mortem radiological examinations were similar, though the PMCTA showed a higher sensitivity for detecting the hemorrhage source than did ante-mortem radiological investigations. By comparing the results of PMCTA and conventional autopsy, much higher sensitivity was noted in PMCTA in identifying the source of the bleeding. In fact, the vessels involved were identified in eight out of nine cases using PMCTA and only in three cases through conventional autopsy. Our study showed that PMCTA, similar to clinical radiological investigations, is able to precisely identify lesions of arterial and/or venous vessels and thus determine the source of bleeding in cases of acute hemorrhages with fatal outcomes.

  11. Studies on time of death estimation in the early post mortem period -- application of a method based on eyeball temperature measurement to human bodies.

    PubMed

    Kaliszan, Michał

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a verification of the thermodynamic model allowing an estimation of the time of death (TOD) by calculating the post mortem interval (PMI) based on a single eyeball temperature measurement at the death scene. The study was performed on 30 cases with known PMI, ranging from 1h 35min to 5h 15min, using pin probes connected to a high precision electronic thermometer (Dostmann-electronic). The measured eye temperatures ranged from 20.2 to 33.1°C. Rectal temperature was measured at the same time and ranged from 32.8 to 37.4°C. Ambient temperatures which ranged from -1 to 24°C, environmental conditions (still air to light wind) and the amount of hair on the head were also recorded every time. PMI was calculated using a formula based on Newton's law of cooling, previously derived and successfully tested in comprehensive studies on pigs and a few human cases. Thanks to both the significantly faster post mortem decrease of eye temperature and a residual or nonexistent plateau effect in the eye, as well as practically no influence of body mass, TOD in the human death cases could be estimated with good accuracy. The highest TOD estimation error during the post mortem intervals up to around 5h was 1h 16min, 1h 14min and 1h 03min, respectively in three cases among 30, while for the remaining 27 cases it was not more than 47min. The mean error for all 30 cases was ±31min. All that indicates that the proposed method is of quite good precision in the early post mortem period, with an accuracy of ±1h for a 95% confidence interval. On the basis of the presented method, TOD can be also calculated at the death scene with the use of a proposed portable electronic device (TOD-meter).

  12. One small scan for radiology, one giant leap for forensic medicine - Post-mortem imaging replaces forensic autopsy in a case of traumatic aortic laceration.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Thomas D; Hatch, Gary M; Thali, Michael J; Fischer, Nadja

    2011-01-01

    The questions of cause and manner of death are the most pressing ones in any forensic investigation. Traditionally, autopsy is the means to provide answers to these questions and despite the increasing use of CT and MR in the post-mortem setting, imaging has usually been an adjunct to forensic autopsy. Here we describe a case where post-mortem CT and MR were performed instead of autopsy, at the request of the responsible public prosecutor. The forensic conclusions derived from imaging, including cause and manner of death were accepted by the legal authorities, thereby setting precedence for future cases. This case represents a landmark in forensic medicine and is another step toward the full realization of minimally invasive forensic autopsy.

  13. Post-mortem CT and MRI: appropriate post-mortem imaging appearances and changes related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Post-mortem cross-sectional imaging in the form of CT and, less frequently, MRI is an emerging facility in the evaluation of cause-of-death and human identification for the coronial service as well as in assisting the forensic investigation of suspicious deaths and homicide. There are marked differences between the radiological evaluation and interpretation of the CT and MRI features of the live patient (i.e. antemortem imaging) and the evaluation and interpretation of post-mortem CT and MRI appearances. In addition to the absence of frequently utilized tissue enhancement following intravenous contrast administration in antemortem imaging, there are a number of variable changes which occur in the tissues and organs of the body as a normal process following death, some of which are, in addition, affected significantly by environmental factors. Many patients and victims will also have undergone aggressive attempts at cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the perimortem period which will also significantly alter post-mortem CT and MRI appearances. It is paramount that the radiologist and pathologist engaged in the interpretation of such post-mortem imaging are familiar with the appropriate non-pathological imaging changes germane to death, the post-mortem interval and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in order to avoid erroneously attributing such changes to trauma or pathology. Some of the more frequently encountered radiological imaging considerations of this nature will be reviewed. PMID:26562099

  14. Topography of Cortical Microbleeds in Alzheimer's Disease with and without Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: A Post-Mortem 7.0-Tesla MRI Study.

    PubMed

    De Reuck, J; Auger, F; Durieux, N; Deramecourt, V; Cordonnier, C; Pasquier, F; Maurage, C A; Leys, D; Bordet, R

    2015-11-01

    Cortical microbleeds (CMBs) detected on T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered as a possible hallmark of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla MRI study investigates whether topographic differences exist in Alzheimer's brains without (AD) and with CAA (AD-CAA). The distribution of CMBs in thirty-two post-mortem brains, consisting of 12 AD, 8 AD-CAA and 12 controls, was mutually compared on T2*-GRE MRI of six coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere. The mean numbers of CMBs were determined in twenty-two different gyri. As a whole there was a trend of more CMBs on GRE MRI in the prefrontal section of the AD, the AD-CAA as well as of the control brains. Compared to controls AD brains had significantly more CMBs in the superior frontal, the inferior temporal, the rectus and the cinguli gyrus, and in the insular cortex. In AD-CAA brains CMBs were increased in all gyri with exception of the medial parietal gyrus and the hippocampus. AD-CAA brains showed a highly significant increase of CMBs in the inferior parietal gyrus (p value: 0.001) and a significant increase in the precuneus and the cuneus (p value: 0.01) compared to the AD brains. The differences in topographic distribution of CMBs between AD and AD-CAA brains should be further investigated on MRI in clinically suspected patients.

  15. Freshwater drowning in a child: A case study demonstrating the role of post-mortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Filograna, Laura; Tartaglione, Tommaso; Vetrugno, Giuseppe; Guerra, Claudio; Fileni, Adriano; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, modern imaging techniques have gained ground in forensics. A crucial question is whether virtual autopsy is capable of replacing traditional autopsy. Forensic diagnosis of freshwater drowning (FWD) is based on the evidence of findings from external inspection (e.g. frothy fluid exuding from the mouth and nostrils), internal examination (e.g. pulmonary congestion, enlargement of heart chambers) and biochemical analysis (haemodilution), findings which are non-specific. The detection of diatoms in organs of the systemic circulation may be of some assistance, but this analysis is rarely performed and is of debatable validity. An 18-month-old child was found dead at home in a swimming pool. Considering the family's wishes to avoid autopsy, the district attorney authorised a whole-body post-mortem computed tomography scan (PMCT). The main imaging findings were frothy fluid in the upper airways, fluid in the trachea and main bronchi, many pulmonary nodular ground glass opacities (GGO) in non-dependent regions and haemodilution. CT imaging did not show any other forensically relevant abnormality.A high concordance was found between the CT findings reported in the literature in cases of FWD and the imaging results. Thus, after the exclusion of other causes of death, advised by the forensic pathologist, the district attorney closed the case and the death was attributed to FWD. This case report demonstrates that PMCT imaging in cases of suspected FWD can provide some important findings for the diagnosis of FWD as the cause of death.

  16. Advances in post-mortem CT-angiography

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, J; Dominguez, A; Vanhaebost, J; Mangin, P

    2014-01-01

    Performing a post-mortem multidetector CT (MDCT) scan has already become routine in some institutes of forensic medicine. To better visualize the vascular system, different techniques of post-mortem CT-angiography have been explored, which can essentially be divided into partial- and whole-body angiography techniques. Probably the most frequently applied technique today is the so-called multiphase post-mortem CT-angiography (MPMCTA) a standardized method for investigating the vessels of the head, thorax and abdomen. Different studies exist, describing its use for medicolegal investigations, and its advantages as well as its artefacts and pitfalls. With the aim to investigate the performance of PMCTA and to develop and validate techniques, an international working group was created in 2012 called the “Technical Working Group Post-mortem Angiography Methods” (TWGPAM). Beyond its primary perspective, the goals of this group include creating recommendations for the indication of the investigation and for the interpretation of the images and to distribute knowledge about PMCTA. This article provides an overview about the different approaches that have been developed and tested in recent years and an update about ongoing research in this field. It will explain the technique of MPMCTA in detail and give an outline of its indications, application, advantages and limitations. PMID:24234582

  17. The course and the anatomo-functional relationships of the optic radiation: a combined study with 'post mortem' dissections and 'in vivo' direct electrical mapping.

    PubMed

    Sarubbo, Silvio; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Milani, Paola; Paradiso, Beatrice; Barbareschi, Mattia; Rozzanigo, Umbero; Colarusso, Enzo; Tugnoli, Valeria; Farneti, Marco; Granieri, Enrico; Duffau, Hugues; Chioffi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Even if different dissection, tractographic and connectivity studies provided pure anatomical evidences about the optic radiations (ORs), descriptions of both the anatomical structure and the anatomo-functional relationships of the ORs with the adjacent bundles were not reported. We propose a detailed anatomical and functional study with 'post mortem' dissections and 'in vivo' direct electrical stimulation (DES) of the OR, demonstrating also the relationships with the adjacent eloquent bundles in a neurosurgical 'connectomic' perspective. Six human hemispheres (three left, three right) were dissected after a modified Klingler's preparation. The anatomy of the white matter was analysed according to systematic and topographical surgical perspectives. The anatomical results were correlated to the functional responses collected during three resections of tumours guided by cortico-subcortical DES during awake procedures. We identified two groups of fibres forming the OR. The superior component runs along the lateral wall of the occipital horn, the trigone and the supero-medial wall of the temporal horn. The inferior component covers inferiorly the occipital horn and the trigone, the lateral wall of the temporal horn and arches antero-medially to form the Meyer's Loop. The inferior fronto-occipital fascicle (IFOF) covers completely the superior OR along its entire course, as confirmed by the subcortical DES. The inferior longitudinal fascicle runs in a postero-anterior and inferior direction, covering the superior OR posteriorly and the inferior OR anteriorly. The IFOF identification allows the preservation of the superior OR in the anterior temporal resection, avoiding post-operative complete hemianopia. The identification of the superior OR during the posterior temporal, inferior parietal and occipital resections leads to the preservation of the IFOF and of the eloquent functions it subserves. The accurate knowledge of the OR course and the relationships with the

  18. A post mortem study on neurochemical markers of dopaminergic, GABA-ergic and glutamatergic neurons in basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits in Parkinson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, M; Gsell, W; Kornhuber, J; Jellinger, K; Krieger, V; Pantucek, F; Vock, R; Riederer, P

    1996-11-25

    Functional models of the circuitry of the basal ganglia have recently been proposed to account for the vast spectrum of motor disorders associated with the loss of anatomical or neurochemical integrity within the basal ganglia. On the basis of these hypothetical models, hypokinetic disorders such as Parkinson's disease, are thought to be associated with excessive tonic and phasic inhibition of the output from the basal ganglia to the thalamus. In the present study we have attempted to determine the validity of the proposed model by measuring neurochemical markers of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in post mortem human brain tissue. We have determined the concentrations of the excitatory neurotransmitters aspartate/glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in 18 relevant regions of the thalamocortical circuits of the basal ganglia of patients who had manifested Parkinsonian symptoms, and compared them with controls of individuals who had died without any history of neurological or psychiatric disorders and had no neuropathological abnormalities. Additionally, the receptor subtype for the excitatory amino acid N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) was studied in the same brain tissue in which neurotransmitter concentrations had been analysed as neurochemical markers of post-synaptic excitatory neurotransmission. In patients who had manifested Parkinsonian symptoms, glutamate and aspartate levels were found to be unchanged in all examined brain regions. In contrast, the binding of [3H]MK-801, which identifies the NMDA receptor, was reduced in the head (-42%) and body (-38%) of the caudate nucleus. In parkinsonian patients, GABA levels were diminished by 36% in the centromedial thalamus, compared to control values. These results do not confirm the changes in neurotransmitter concentrations predicted according to the model, although we cannot rule out that the predicted changes might have been observed if the Parkinsonian group had been further subdivided

  19. Sperm harvesting and post-mortem fatherhood.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    1995-10-01

    The motives and consequences of harvesting sperm from brain dead males for the purpose of effecting post mortem fatherhood are examined. I argue that sperm harvesting and post mortem fatherhood raise no harms of a magnitude that would justify forbidding the practice outright. Dead men are not obviously harmed by the practice; children need not be harmed by this kind of birth; and the practice enlarges rather than diminishes the reproductive choices of surviving partners. Certain ethical and legal issues nevertheless require attention. As a matter of consistency with other harvesting protocols, there ought to be a mechanism for respecting the wishes of men who when alive do not wish to become fathers post mortem. Mechanisms governing entitlement to harvest and use sperm will also be required. I note that the law is unlikely to recognize the paternity of children born from harvested sperm, though there may be reasons to recognize that paternity in some instances.

  20. In vivo quantitative imaging of point-like bioluminescent and fluorescent sources: Validation studies in phantoms and small animals post mortem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comsa, Daria Craita

    2008-10-01

    source strength within 20 %. For sources 14mm deep, the inaccuracy in determining the relative source strength increased to 30 %. Measurements on small animals post mortem showed that the use of measured in situ optical properties to characterize heterogeneous tissue resulted in a superior estimation of the source strength and depth compared to when literature optical properties for organs or tissues were used. Moreover, it was found that regardless of the heterogeneity of the implant location or depth, our algorithm consistently showed an advantage over the simple assessment of the source strength based on the signal strength in the emission image. Our bioluminescence algorithm was generally able to predict the source strength within a factor of 2 of the true strength, but the performance varied with the implant location and depth. In fluorescence imaging a more complex technique is required, including knowledge of tissue optical properties at both the excitation and emission wavelengths. A theoretical study using simulated fluorescence data showed that, for example, for a source 5 mm deep in tissue, errors of up to 15 % in the optical properties would give rise to errors of +/-0.7 mm in the retrieved depth and the source strength would be over- or under-estimated by a factor ranging from 1.25 to 2. Fluorescent sources implanted in rats post mortem at the same depth were localized with an error just slightly higher than predicted theoretically: a root-mean-square value of 0.8 mm was obtained for all implants 5 mm deep. However, for this source depth, the source strength was assessed within a factor ranging from 1.3 to 4.2 from the value estimated in a controlled medium. Nonetheless, similarly to the bioluminescence study, the fluorescence quantification algorithm consistently showed an advantage over the simple assessment of the source strength based on the signal strength in the fluorescence image. Few studies have been reported in the literature that reconstruct known

  1. The post-mortem pink teeth phenomenon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Evelyne-Pessoa; Carvalho, Marcus-Vitor-Diniz de; Santos, Francisco-Bernardo Dos; Mendoza, Clóvis-César de; Araújo, Maria-do Socorro-Dantas de; Campello, Reginaldo-Inojosa-Carneiro

    2009-07-01

    This study presents the case of the post-mortem pink teeth phenomenon observed during an autopsy procedure performed on the body of a man who was kidnapped and murdered approximately 30 days before the examination. The corpse was in an advanced stage of decomposition and putrefaction. Both maxillary and jaw bones were intact, as well as the permanent teeth which presented the "pink teeth phenomenon", probably due to a haemorrhage in the pulp chambers. The pink discolouration was most pronounced at the neck of the teeth. The cause of death was asphyxia. Although the examiners stressed that post-mortem pink teeth must not be considered as a reliable odontological parameter for determining the cause of death, the results of other studies have shown that the pink teeth phenomenon is a common finding related to cases of asphyxia such as strangulation, drowning or suffocation. Thus, the pink teeth phenomenon must be studied in order to determine its role as a post-mortem finding. As of now, an exact relationship between the cause of death and this phenomenon remains unknown.

  2. Post mortem changes in relation to different types of clothing.

    PubMed

    Teo, C H; Pawita, A H; Khairul, O; Atiah Ayunni, A G; Noor Hazfalinda, H

    2013-06-01

    Post mortem changes are important in estimating post mortem interval (PMI). This project's aim was to study the effect of burial and type of clothing on rate of decomposition, which can contribute to estimating PMI for victims. 12 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) carcasses were separated into 3 groups: no clothing, light clothing and heavy clothing. Control subjects were placed on the ground surface while test subjects were buried at 30 cm depth graves. Soil samples prior and after decomposition were collected for soil pH and moisture analysis. Post mortem change was assessed using a Total Body Score system. The head, neck and limb regions were found to decay faster than the body trunk region. Mummifi cation occurred on body parts that were exposed directly to the atmosphere while adipocere formed on some buried subjects. Burial delayed decomposition due to lower insect activity and lower soil temperature. The soil layer also blocked the accessibility of majority of the arthropods, causing further delay in decomposition. Clothing enhanced decay for bodies on ground surface because it provided protection for maggots and retained moisture on tissues. However, clothing delayed decomposition in buried bodies because it physically separated the bodies from soil and arthropods. Higher sun exposure and repetitive exhumation showed acceleration of decomposition. The decomposition process increased soil pH and moisture percentage values. Soil pH initially increased until pH 8.0-8.4 followed by a slight decrease while soil moisture percentage changed inconsistently. Burial was significant in affecting post mortem change, F(1,11)=12.991, p<0.05 while type of clothing was not significant, F(2,9)=0.022, p=0.978 and combination of both type of clothing and burial factors were also not significant, F(2,3)=0.429, p=0.686. For validation, an accuracy of 83.33% was achieved based on soil pH and soil moisture percentage analysis.

  3. [Post-mortem examination prior to cremation--an instrument to verify the quality of medical post-mortems and uncover non-natural deaths?].

    PubMed

    Germerott, Tanja; Todt, Melanie; Bode-Jänisch, Stefanie; Albrecht, Knut; Breitmeier, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The external post-mortem examination, its deficient quality and possible causes have been the subject of numerous political and professional discussions. The external post-mortem examination is the basis for the decision whether further criminal investigations are required to clarify the cause of death. It is thus an essential instrument to ensure legal certainty. Before cremation, a second external post-mortem examination is performed by a public medical officer to make sure that errors of the first post-mortem are corrected. In the present study, cases were retrospectively analyzed in which a forensic autopsy had been ordered on the basis of the results of the post-mortem examination performed before cremation. The entries on the death certificate regarding the manner and cause of death were compared with the autopsy results. Between 1998 and 2007, 387 autopsies were ordered after external examination before cremation. In 55 cases (14.2%), the autopsy revealed a non-natural death, although a natural death had been attested on the death certificate. In descending order, a wrong manner of death was attested by clinicians, general practitioners and emergency physicians. With regard to the place where the first external post-mortem had been performed the lowest error rate was seen in nursing homes. Concerning the cause of death, discrepancies between the first post-mortem and autopsy were found in 59.4% of the cases. In this respect, general practitioners and clinicians were ranking first, whereas in nursing homes the cause of death was wrongly assessed in over 70% of cases. At present, the medical post-mortem does not meet the required quality standards, especially with regard to legal certainty. Determination of the cause of death on the basis of the external post-mortem examination is a challenging task even for the experienced medical examiner. As to the categorization of the manner of death it has to be stated that non-natural deaths are often not recognized or

  4. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging in live vs. post mortem rat brains.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Ipek; Yaxley, Richard; Budin, Francois; Hoogstoel, Marion; Lee, Joohwi; Maltbie, Eric; Liu, Wen; Crews, Fulton T

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an increasingly popular technique for examining neurobiology in rodents because it is both noninvasive and nondestructive. MRI scans can be acquired from either live or post mortem specimens. In vivo scans have a key advantage in that subjects can be scanned at multiple time-points in longitudinal studies. However, repeated exposure to anesthesia and stress may confound studies. In contrast, post mortem scans offer improved image quality and increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to several key advantages: First, the images are not disrupted by motion and pulsation artifacts. Second, they allow the brain tissue to be perfused with contrast agents, enhancing tissue contrast. Third, they allow longer image acquisition times, yielding higher resolution and/or improved SNR. Fourth, they allow assessment of groups of animals at the same age without scheduling complications. Despite these advantages, researchers are often skeptical of post mortem MRI scans because of uncertainty about whether the fixation process alters the MRI measurements. To address these concerns, we present a thorough comparative study of in vivo and post mortem MRI scans in healthy male Wistar rats at three age points throughout adolescence (postnatal days 28 through 80). For each subject, an in vivo scan was acquired, followed by perfusion and two post mortem scans at two different MRI facilities. The goal was to assess robustness of measurements, to detect any changes in volumetric measurements after fixation, and to investigate any differential bias that may exist between image acquisition techniques. We present this volumetric analysis for comparison of 22 anatomical structures between in vivo and post mortem scans. No significant changes in volumetric measurements were detected; however, as hypothesized, the image quality is dramatically improved in post mortem scans. These findings illustrate the validity and utility of using post mortem scans in

  5. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Live vs. Post Mortem Rat Brains

    PubMed Central

    Oguz, Ipek; Yaxley, Richard; Budin, Francois; Hoogstoel, Marion; Lee, Joohwi; Maltbie, Eric; Liu, Wen; Crews, Fulton T.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an increasingly popular technique for examining neurobiology in rodents because it is both noninvasive and nondestructive. MRI scans can be acquired from either live or post mortem specimens. In vivo scans have a key advantage in that subjects can be scanned at multiple time-points in longitudinal studies. However, repeated exposure to anesthesia and stress may confound studies. In contrast, post mortem scans offer improved image quality and increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to several key advantages: First, the images are not disrupted by motion and pulsation artifacts. Second, they allow the brain tissue to be perfused with contrast agents, enhancing tissue contrast. Third, they allow longer image acquisition times, yielding higher resolution and/or improved SNR. Fourth, they allow assessment of groups of animals at the same age without scheduling complications. Despite these advantages, researchers are often skeptical of post mortem MRI scans because of uncertainty about whether the fixation process alters the MRI measurements. To address these concerns, we present a thorough comparative study of in vivo and post mortem MRI scans in healthy male Wistar rats at three age points throughout adolescence (postnatal days 28 through 80). For each subject, an in vivo scan was acquired, followed by perfusion and two post mortem scans at two different MRI facilities. The goal was to assess robustness of measurements, to detect any changes in volumetric measurements after fixation, and to investigate any differential bias that may exist between image acquisition techniques. We present this volumetric analysis for comparison of 22 anatomical structures between in vivo and post mortem scans. No significant changes in volumetric measurements were detected; however, as hypothesized, the image quality is dramatically improved in post mortem scans. These findings illustrate the validity and utility of using post mortem scans in

  6. Differentiation of ante-mortem and post-mortem fractures with MRI: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ruder, T D; Germerott, T; Thali, M J; Hatch, G M

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of a fatal speed flying accident in which the victim was electrocuted, burned and fell from a great height. Post-mortem imaging revealed acute appearing fractures on CT, without bone marrow oedema on MRI. Based on the known clinical imaging findings of bone marrow oedema in acute fractures, we concluded that the speed flyer died from electrocution rather than the fall and that the fractures occurred post-mortem. Radiological imaging augmented the reconstruction of the peri-mortem events. Further research is needed to assess whether bone marrow oedema in acute fractures is a reliable vital sign. PMID:21415297

  7. Effect of different post mortem temperatures on carcass quality of suckling lamb.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Begoña; Vieira, Ceferina; Martínez, Beatriz; Fernández, Ana M

    2013-08-01

    The effect of post mortem treatment on microbiological lamb carcass quality was studied. Suckling lambs carcasses were assigned to three different post mortem treatments: conventional (2  for 24 h), ultra-rapid (-20  for 3.5 h then 2  until 24 h post mortem) and slow (12   for 7 h then 2  until 24 h post mortem). Carcass pH and temperature were measured at 0, 3.5, 7 and 24 h post slaughter. Lamb carcasses were sampled for total aerobic viable and Enterobacteriaceae counts just after dressing and 24 h post mortem. A significant effect (p < 0.05) of post mortem treatment on carcasses temperature and pH was found corresponding the faster pH fall to slowly chilled muscles. However, no differences were found at 24 h post mortem among treatments in both parameters. Regarding microbiological results, carcasses of ultra-rapid treatment had the lowest total aerobic viable and Enterobacteriaceae counts and those belonging to conventional treatment had the highest total aerobic viable counts. From 0 to 24 h post mortem, an increase of total aerobic viable was observed in conventional and slow treatments whilst Enterobacteriaceae counts remained constant in all cases. From a microbiological point of view, the ultra-rapid treatment was the only one allowed to maintain the hygienic carcasses quality. However, according to pH and temperature results the carcasses subjected to this treatment may be susceptible to cold shortening.

  8. Pitfalls in post-mortem CT-angiography--intravascular contrast induces post-mortem pericardial effusion.

    PubMed

    Berger, Nicole; Martinez, Rosita; Winklhofer, Sebastian; Flach, Patricia M; Ross, Steffen; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Gascho, Dominic; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D

    2013-11-01

    We present a case where multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA) induced a hemorrhagic pericardial effusion during the venous phase of angiography. Post-mortem non-contrast CT (PMCT) suggested the presence of a ruptured aortic dissection. This diagnosis was confirmed by PMCTA after pressure controlled arterial injection of contrast. During the second phase of multi-phase PMCTA the presence of contrast leakage from the inferior cava vein into the pericardial sac was noted. Autopsy confirmed the post-mortem nature of this vascular tear. This case teaches us an important lesson: it underlines the necessity to critically analyze PMCT and PMCTA images in order to distinguish between artifacts, true pathologies and iatrogenic findings. In cases with ambiguous findings such as the case reported here, correlation of imaging findings with autopsy is elementary.

  9. Impact of cycling at low temperatures on the safety behavior of 18650-type lithium ion cells: Combined study of mechanical and thermal abuse testing accompanied by post-mortem analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Alex; Horsthemke, Fabian; Mönnighoff, Xaver; Brunklaus, Gunther; Krafft, Roman; Börner, Markus; Risthaus, Tim; Winter, Martin; Schappacher, Falko M.

    2016-12-01

    The impact of cycling at low temperatures on the thermal and mechanical abuse behavior of commercial 18650-type lithium ion cells was compared to fresh cells. Post-mortem analyses revealed a deposition of high surface area lithium (HSAL) metal on the graphite surface accompanied by severe electrolyte decomposition. Heat wait search (HWS) tests in an accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) were performed to investigate the thermal abuse behavior of aged and fresh cells under quasi-adiabatic conditions, showing a strong shift of the onset temperature for exothermic reactions. HSAL deposition promotes the reduction of the carbonate based electrolyte due to the high reactivity of lithium metal with high surface area, leading to a thermally induced decomposition of the electrolyte to produce volatile gaseous products. Nail penetration tests showed a change in the thermal runaway (TR) behavior affected by the decomposition reaction. This study indicates a greater thermal hazard for LIB cells at higher SOC and experiencing aging at low temperature.

  10. Isolation of primary microglia from the human post-mortem brain: effects of ante- and post-mortem variables.

    PubMed

    Mizee, Mark R; Miedema, Suzanne S M; van der Poel, Marlijn; Adelia; Schuurman, Karianne G; van Strien, Miriam E; Melief, Jeroen; Smolders, Joost; Hendrickx, Debbie A; Heutinck, Kirstin M; Hamann, Jörg; Huitinga, Inge

    2017-02-17

    Microglia are key players in the central nervous system in health and disease. Much pioneering research on microglia function has been carried out in vivo with the use of genetic animal models. However, to fully understand the role of microglia in neurological and psychiatric disorders, it is crucial to study primary human microglia from brain donors. We have developed a rapid procedure for the isolation of pure human microglia from autopsy tissue using density gradient centrifugation followed by CD11b-specific cell selection. The protocol can be completed in 4 h, with an average yield of 450,000 and 145,000 viable cells per gram of white and grey matter tissue respectively. This method allows for the immediate phenotyping of microglia in relation to brain donor clinical variables, and shows the microglia population to be distinguishable from autologous choroid plexus macrophages. This protocol has been applied to samples from over 100 brain donors from the Netherlands Brain Bank, providing a robust dataset to analyze the effects of age, post-mortem delay, brain acidity, and neurological diagnosis on microglia yield and phenotype. Our data show that cerebrospinal fluid pH is positively correlated to microglial cell yield, but donor age and post-mortem delay do not negatively affect viable microglia yield. Analysis of CD45 and CD11b expression showed that changes in microglia phenotype can be attributed to a neurological diagnosis, and are not influenced by variation in ante- and post-mortem parameters. Cryogenic storage of primary microglia was shown to be possible, albeit with variable levels of recovery and effects on phenotype and RNA quality. Microglial gene expression substantially changed due to culture, including the loss of the microglia-specific markers, showing the importance of immediate microglia phenotyping. We conclude that primary microglia can be isolated effectively and rapidly from human post-mortem brain tissue, allowing for the study of the

  11. Essentials of forensic post-mortem MR imaging in adults

    PubMed Central

    Ruder, T D; Thali, M J; Hatch, G M

    2014-01-01

    Post-mortem MR (PMMR) imaging is a powerful diagnostic tool with a wide scope in forensic radiology. In the past 20 years, PMMR has been used as both an adjunct and an alternative to autopsy. The role of PMMR in forensic death investigations largely depends on the rules and habits of local jurisdictions, availability of experts, financial resources, and individual case circumstances. PMMR images are affected by post-mortem changes, including position-dependent sedimentation, variable body temperature and decomposition. Investigators must be familiar with the appearance of normal findings on PMMR to distinguish them from disease or injury. Coronal whole-body images provide a comprehensive overview. Notably, short tau inversion–recovery (STIR) images enable investigators to screen for pathological fluid accumulation, to which we refer as “forensic sentinel sign”. If scan time is short, subsequent PMMR imaging may be focussed on regions with a positive forensic sentinel sign. PMMR offers excellent anatomical detail and is especially useful to visualize pathologies of the brain, heart, subcutaneous fat tissue and abdominal organs. PMMR may also be used to document skeletal injury. Cardiovascular imaging is a core area of PMMR imaging and growing evidence indicates that PMMR is able to detect ischaemic injury at an earlier stage than traditional autopsy and routine histology. The aim of this review is to present an overview of normal findings on forensic PMMR, provide general advice on the application of PMMR and summarise the current literature on PMMR imaging of the head and neck, cardiovascular system, abdomen and musculoskeletal system. PMID:24191122

  12. Essentials of forensic post-mortem MR imaging in adults.

    PubMed

    Ruder, T D; Thali, M J; Hatch, G M

    2014-04-01

    Post-mortem MR (PMMR) imaging is a powerful diagnostic tool with a wide scope in forensic radiology. In the past 20 years, PMMR has been used as both an adjunct and an alternative to autopsy. The role of PMMR in forensic death investigations largely depends on the rules and habits of local jurisdictions, availability of experts, financial resources, and individual case circumstances. PMMR images are affected by post-mortem changes, including position-dependent sedimentation, variable body temperature and decomposition. Investigators must be familiar with the appearance of normal findings on PMMR to distinguish them from disease or injury. Coronal whole-body images provide a comprehensive overview. Notably, short tau inversion-recovery (STIR) images enable investigators to screen for pathological fluid accumulation, to which we refer as "forensic sentinel sign". If scan time is short, subsequent PMMR imaging may be focussed on regions with a positive forensic sentinel sign. PMMR offers excellent anatomical detail and is especially useful to visualize pathologies of the brain, heart, subcutaneous fat tissue and abdominal organs. PMMR may also be used to document skeletal injury. Cardiovascular imaging is a core area of PMMR imaging and growing evidence indicates that PMMR is able to detect ischaemic injury at an earlier stage than traditional autopsy and routine histology. The aim of this review is to present an overview of normal findings on forensic PMMR, provide general advice on the application of PMMR and summarise the current literature on PMMR imaging of the head and neck, cardiovascular system, abdomen and musculoskeletal system.

  13. Investigation of Post-mortem Tissue Effects Using Long-time Decorrelation Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csány, Gergely; Balogh, Lajos; Gyöngy, Miklós

    Decorrelation ultrasound is being increasingly used to investigate long-term biological phenomena. In the current work, ultrasound image sequences of mice who did not survive anesthesia (in a separate investigation) were analyzed and post-mortem tissue effects were observed via decorrelation calculation. A method was developed to obtain a quantitative parameter characterizing the rate of decorrelation. The results show that ultrasound decorrelation imaging is an effective method of observing post-mortem tissue effects and point to further studies elucidating the mechanism behind these effects.

  14. Distribution and binding of 18F-labeled and 125I-labeled analogues of ACI-80, a prospective molecular imaging biomarker of disease: a whole hemisphere post mortem autoradiography study in human brains obtained from Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Spenger, Christian; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Gulya, Károly; Kása, Péter; Jahan, Mahabuba; Jia, Zhisheng; Weber, Urs; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas; Willbold, Dieter; Halldin, Christer

    2012-01-01

    One of the major pathological landmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases is the presence of amyloid deposits in the brain. The early non-invasive visualization of amyloid is a major objective of recent diagnostic neuroimaging approaches, including positron emission tomography (PET), with an eye on follow-up of disease progression and/or therapy efficacy. The development of molecular imaging biomarkers with binding affinity to amyloid in the brain is therefore in the forefront of imaging biomarker and radiochemistry research. Recently, a dodecamer peptide (amino acid sequence=QSHYRHISPAQV; denominated D1 or ACI-80) was identified as a prospective ligand candidate, binding with high ex vivo affinity to L-Aβ-amyloid (K(d): 0.4 μM). In order to assess the ligand's capacity to visualize amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD), two (125)I labeled and three (18)F labeled analogues of the peptide were synthesized and tested in post mortem human autoradiography experiments using whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from deceased AD patients and age matched control subjects. The (18)F-labeled radioligands showed more promising visualization capacity of amyloid that the (125)I-labeled radioligands. In the case of each (18)F radioligands the grey matter uptake in the AD brains was significantly higher than that in control brains. Furthermore, the grey matter: white matter uptake ratio was over ~2, the difference being significant for each (18)F-radioligands. The regional distribution of the uptake of the various radioligands systematically shows a congruent pattern between the high uptake regions and spots in the autoradiographic images and the disease specific signals obtained in adjacent or identical brain slices labeled with histological, immunohistochemical or autoradiographic stains for amyloid deposits or activated astrocytes. The present data, using post mortem human brain autoradiography in whole hemisphere human brains obtained from deceased

  15. The Elusive Universal Post-Mortem Interval Formula

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Arpad Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The following manuscript details our initial attempt at developing universal post-mortem interval formulas describing human decomposition. These formulas are empirically derived from data collected over the last 20 years from the University of Tennessee's Anthropology Research Facility, in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Two formulas were developed (surface decomposition and burial decomposition) based on temperature, moisture, and the partial pressure of oxygen, as being three of the four primary drivers for human decomposition. It is hoped that worldwide application of these formulas to environments and situations not readily studied in Tennessee will result in interdisciplinary cooperation between scientists and law enforcement personnel that will allow for future refinements of these models leading to increased accuracy.

  16. Understanding fast macroscale fracture from microcrack post mortem patterns

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Claudia; Scheibert, Julien; Bonamy, Daniel; Dalmas, Davy

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic crack propagation drives catastrophic solid failures. In many amorphous brittle materials, sufficiently fast crack growth involves small-scale, high-frequency microcracking damage localized near the crack tip. The ultrafast dynamics of microcrack nucleation, growth, and coalescence is inaccessible experimentally and fast crack propagation was therefore studied only as a macroscale average. Here, we overcome this limitation in polymethylmethacrylate, the archetype of brittle amorphous materials: We reconstruct the complete spatiotemporal microcracking dynamics, with micrometer/nanosecond resolution, through post mortem analysis of the fracture surfaces. We find that all individual microcracks propagate at the same low, load-independent velocity. Collectively, the main effect of microcracks is not to slow down fracture by increasing the energy required for crack propagation, as commonly believed, but on the contrary to boost the macroscale velocity through an acceleration factor selected on geometric grounds. Our results emphasize the key role of damage-related internal variables in the selection of macroscale fracture dynamics. PMID:22203962

  17. The time-dependant post-mortem redistribution of antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Saar, Eva; Beyer, Jochen; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Drummer, Olaf H

    2012-10-10

    The post mortem redistribution of ten commonly prescribed antipsychotic drugs (APs) was investigated. Femoral blood was collected from 273 cases at admission to mortuary (AD) and at post-mortem (PM). The PM samples were collected at various times up to nine days after admission and the sample pairs analysed using LC-MS/MS. The drugs included in this study were 9OH-risperidone (paliperidone), amisulpride, chlorpromazine, clozapine, haloperidol, olanzapine, promethazine, quetiapine, risperidone, and zuclopenthixol. Haloperidol, quetiapine and risperidone showed minimal changes between AD and PM specimens, whereas the majority of drugs showed significant changes between the sample pairs collected at different time points post mortem (p<0.01) in addition to an average concentration change greater than the uncertainty of measurement of the applied method. Average increases in blood concentrations after admission to the mortuary ranged up to 112% (chlorpromazine and olanzapine) but also decreases up to -43% (9OH-risperidone) were seen. There were large standard deviations between sample pairs and substantial day-to-day unpredictable changes that highlight the difficulty in the interpretation of drug concentrations post-mortem. Based on the presented data, we recommend that specimens for toxicological analysis should to be taken as soon as possible after admission of a deceased person to the mortuary in order to minimise the effects of the PM interval on the drug concentration in blood.

  18. Fusion Technology related studies at JET: Post-mortem tile analysis with MKII-HD geometry, In situ laser detritiation and Molecular Sieve Bed detritiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekris, N.; Coad, J. P.; Grisolia, C.; Likonen, J.; Semerok, A.; Dylst, K.; Widdowson, A.; JET-EFDA Contributor

    2011-10-01

    The JET Task Force Fusion Technology (TF-FT) has been launched with the aim of addressing issues related to JET and ITER. In this regard, studies related to the plasma-wall interactions identified erosion and deposition areas of the first wall of the vacuum vessel and provided the basis of our current knowledge on plasma-wall interaction processes at JET. In addition, characterisation of the properties of co-deposited layers covering the plasma exposed tiles have also been investigated and several detritiation techniques such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, or photon-cleaning have been successfully tested not only ex situ but also in situ. In the field of waste management, TF-FT also launched a series of tasks aiming at the detritiation of any kind of waste produced by a Fusion facility. Based on such studies it is now possible to scale up the developed detritiation facilities in order to be able to reach dimensions used at JET or ITER.

  19. A minimum data set approach to post-mortem computed tomography reporting for anthropological biological profiling.

    PubMed

    Brough, Alison L; Morgan, Bruno; Robinson, Claire; Black, Sue; Cunningham, Craig; Adams, Catherine; Rutty, Guy N

    2014-12-01

    Anthropological examination of bones is routinely undertaken in medico-legal investigations to establish an individual's biological profile, particularly their age. This often requires the removal of soft tissue from bone (de-fleshing), which, especially when dealing with the recently deceased, is a time consuming and invasive procedure. Recent advances in multi-detector computed tomography have made it practical to rapidly acquire high-resolution morphological skeletal information from images of "fleshed" remains. The aim of this study was to develop a short standard form, created from post-mortem computed tomography images, that contains the minimum image-set required to anthropologically assess an individual. The proposed standard forms were created for 31 juvenile forensic cases with known age-at-death, spanning the full age range of the developing human. Five observers independently used this form to estimate age-at-death. All observers estimated age in all cases, and all estimations were within the accepted ranges for traditional anthropological and odontological assessment. This study supports the implementation of this approach in forensic radiological practice.

  20. Pattern of Head Injuries (Cranio-cerebral) due to Homicide in Association with Other Injuries: A Retrospective Post-mortem Study Autopsied at Dhaka Medical College Morgue House.

    PubMed

    Akber, E B; Alam, M T; Rahman, K M; Jahan, I; Musa, S A

    2016-04-01

    Annually, homicide contributes to a greater number of the total head injury cases. This retrospective study was conducted from 1(st) January 2009 to 31(st)December 2011 at Dhaka Medical College Mortuary. During this study period of three years a total of 15300 autopsies were done of which 5649 cases (36.84%) were of head injuries. Of them 747(13.22%) were of homicidal, 4080(72.22%) road-traffic accidents, 502(8.88%) accidental and 320(5.66%) cases of fall from heights. Three hundred ninety eight (398) urban cases (53.27%) out numbered 307 rural cases (41.09%) followed by 42 unknown cases (5.62%). Most cases belong to the younger age group i.e. 21-40 years (43.34%) with male preponderance 470(63.10%). Defense wounds were present in 281 cases (37.82%) out of the total 747 homicidal head injuries. There were 206(27.57%) upper limb, 176(23.56%) spinal, 139(18.60%) abdominal, 135(18.07%) thoracic, 58(7.76%) lower limb and 33(4.41%) pelvic injuries found as associated injury. There were 258(34.53%) fractures of occipital followed by 209(28.29%) parietal, 113(15.01%) frontal, 104(13.75%) temporal, 24(3.21%) ant. Cranial fossa, 23(3.07%) post. Cranial fossa and 16(2.08%) of middle cranial fossa fractures. Extradural haemorrhage was more i.e. 434 cases (58.43%) followed by subdural, combination of all, subarachnoid and intra-cerebral haemorrhages. Cases of concussion were more common i.e. 445(59.75%) than lacerated and combination of them. Blunt weapon tops the list of causative weapons i.e. 669(89.22%) than firearms 59(8.07%) and sharp pointed weapons 19(2.68%).

  1. [³H]Ifenprodil binding in post-mortem brains of Cloninger type 1 and 2 alcoholics: a whole-hemisphere autoradiography study.

    PubMed

    Kupila, Jukka; Kärkkäinen, Olli; Laukkanen, Virpi; Häkkinen, Merja; Kautiainen, Hannu; Tiihonen, Jari; Storvik, Markus

    2015-03-30

    The glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR2B subunits are sensitive to ethanol and are found in brain areas related to ethanol addiction, dependence, development of alcohol tolerance, and alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Previous studies indicate that early-onset Cloninger type 2 alcoholics have an intact, responsive, dopaminergic system in the nucleus accumbens (NAC), whereas type 1 alcoholics have dopaminergic defects. NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in the NAC are involved in both non-opioid and opioid receptor-mediated reward. Our aim was to evaluate the putative [(3)H]ifenprodil binding alterations of NR2B receptors in limbic, hippocampal, and cortical brain areas of type 1 alcoholics (n=8), type 2 alcoholics (n=8), and control subjects (n=10) by postmortem whole hemisphere autoradiography. We found significantly different binding levels among these three subject groups, and the main difference was localized in the decreased binding in type 2 alcoholics and controls in the nucleus accumbens. Although preliminary and from relatively small diagnostic groups, these results suggest pathological alterations in the NR2B-mediated reward system of type 2 alcoholics.

  2. 9 CFR 352.11 - Post-mortem inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Post-mortem inspection. 352.11 Section 352.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND...

  3. 9 CFR 352.11 - Post-mortem inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Post-mortem inspection. 352.11 Section 352.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND...

  4. 9 CFR 352.11 - Post-mortem inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Post-mortem inspection. 352.11 Section 352.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND...

  5. 9 CFR 352.11 - Post-mortem inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Post-mortem inspection. 352.11 Section 352.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND...

  6. 9 CFR 352.11 - Post-mortem inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Post-mortem inspection. 352.11 Section 352.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND...

  7. Post-mortem forensic neuroimaging: correlation of MSCT and MRI findings with autopsy results.

    PubMed

    Yen, Kathrin; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Scheurer, Eva; Ozdoba, Christoph; Thali, Michael J; Aghayev, Emin; Jackowski, Christian; Anon, Javier; Frickey, Nathalie; Zwygart, Karin; Weis, Joachim; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2007-11-15

    Multislice-computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are increasingly used for forensic purposes. Based on broad experience in clinical neuroimaging, post-mortem MSCT and MRI were performed in 57 forensic cases with the goal to evaluate the radiological methods concerning their usability for forensic head and brain examination. An experienced clinical radiologist evaluated the imaging data. The results were compared to the autopsy findings that served as the gold standard with regard to common forensic neurotrauma findings such as skull fractures, soft tissue lesions of the scalp, various forms of intracranial hemorrhage or signs of increased brain pressure. The sensitivity of the imaging methods ranged from 100% (e.g., heat-induced alterations, intracranial gas) to zero (e.g., mediobasal impression marks as a sign of increased brain pressure, plaques jaunes). The agreement between MRI and CT was 69%. The radiological methods prevalently failed in the detection of lesions smaller than 3mm of size, whereas they were generally satisfactory concerning the evaluation of intracranial hemorrhage. Due to its advanced 2D and 3D post-processing possibilities, CT in particular possessed certain advantages in comparison with autopsy with regard to forensic reconstruction. MRI showed forensically relevant findings not seen during autopsy in several cases. The partly limited sensitivity of imaging that was observed in this retrospective study was based on several factors: besides general technical limitations it became apparent that clinical radiologists require a sound basic forensic background in order to detect specific signs. Focused teaching sessions will be essential to improve the outcome in future examinations. On the other hand, the autopsy protocols should be further standardized to allow an exact comparison of imaging and autopsy data. In consideration of these facts, MRI and CT have the power to play an important role in future forensic

  8. Effect of epididymis handling conditions on the quality of ram spermatozoa recovered post-mortem.

    PubMed

    Kaabi, M; Paz, P; Alvarez, M; Anel, E; Boixo, J C; Rouissi, H; Herraez, P; Anel, L

    2003-10-15

    Post-mortem spermatozoa recovery is an important technique for obtaining germplasm reserves from genetically valuable animals or endangered species. However, there are many factors that influence the outcome of this technique. We have studied the effect of the interval between animal's death and sperm recovery (0, 24 or 48 h) on the quality and freezability of ram spermatozoa from cauda epididymidis. Storage temperature of epididymis (room temperature or 5 degrees C) was also analysed. Spermatozoa were diluted with Tes-Tris-Fructose solution supplemented with egg yolk (10%) and glycerol (4%), and frozen using a programmable biofreezer (-20 degrees C/min). Pre-freeze and post-thaw sperm samples showed viable spermatozoa up to 48 h after the animal's death, although their quality declined significantly as post-mortem storage time increased. Epididymis sperm stored at 5 degrees C showed better motility and a lower percentage of abnormal forms than epididymis stored at room temperature after 24 and 48 h. The fertilizing ability of cauda epididymis ram spermatozoa obtained at 0 and 24h after the animal's death is similar to that of ejaculated spermatozoa. Therefore, a good protocol for post-mortem semen collection in rams when epididymal spermatozoa cannot be collected immediately, is to preserve the epididymis at 5 degrees C and process the samples in the first 24h after the animal's death.

  9. Combined Determination of Glucose and Fructosamine in Vitreous Humor as a Post-Mortem Tool to Identify Antemortem Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Vivero, Guillermo; Vivero-Salmerón, Guillermo; Pérez Cárceles, Maria D.; Bedate, Andrés; Luna, Aurelio; Osuna, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    In clinical practice, serum glucose levels are used to diagnose diabetes mellitus. In post-mortem diagnosis, however, biochemical markers in vitreous humor are more useful because of the difficulty involved in interpreting blood glucose levels and relatively non-specific pathological features. The aim of this study was to analyze the usefulness of post-mortem determination of glucose and fructosamine combined and to compare the results with those obtained for fructosamine and combined glucose and lactate levels in two diagnostic groups (one diabetic and the other non-diabetic). We studied 377 cadavers (mean age 57.6 yr, SD 20.4, range 15 to 98 yr) with a mean post-mortem interval of 14.9 h. (SD 6.0; range 2 to 24 h). The highest levels were obtained in cases where diabetes mellitus had previously been diagnosed. In relation to diagnostic performance, the most reliable values were those in which glucose and fructosamine were determined jointly. The findings provide information concerning the usefulness of measuring glucose and fructosamine levels as a post-mortem tool for identifying antemortem glycemic control in diabetics. PMID:19290382

  10. Factors impacting the success of post-mortem sperm rescue in the rhinoceros.

    PubMed

    Roth, T L; Stoops, M A; Robeck, T R; O'Brien, J K

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to identify factors that influenced the ability to successfully rescue sperm post-mortem from rhinoceroses maintained in North American zoos. Factors considered included procedural technicalities, individual rhinoceros characteristics and timing. Gross testicular pathology was noted in 17.4% of males (4/23) but did not impact sperm recovery except in one case of azoospermia (4.3%). Of the males in which sperm recovery was attempted (n=21), 62% yielded quality samples considered adequate for cryopreservation (≥ 30% motility with ≥ 2.0 forward progressive status). A high percentage of males (70.6%; 12/17) from which reproductive tissue was removed an d cooled ≤ 4 h after death yielded quality sperm samples, whereas only 25% (1/4) of males from which tissue was removed>4h after death yielded quality samples. Quality samples were recovered 1-51 h post-mortem from rhinoceroses 8 to 36 years old. Neither type of illness (prolonged or acute), or method of death (euthanasia or natural) affected the ability to harvest quality samples (P > 0.05). The Indian rhinoceros yielded significantly more sperm on average (40 × 10(9)) than the African black rhinoceros (3.6 × 10(9); P < 0.01) and the African white rhinoceros (3.2 × 10(9); P < 0.05). Across all species and samples assessed (n = 11), mean post-thaw sperm motility (41%), was only 15% less than pre-freeze motility (56%) and only decreased to 22% during the 6h post-thaw assessment period. Rhinoceros sperm rescue post-mortem is relatively successful across a wide range of variables, especially when tissues are removed and cooled promptly after death, and should be considered standard practice among zoos.

  11. Post-mortem detection of gasoline residues in lung tissue and heart blood of fire victims.

    PubMed

    Pahor, Kevin; Olson, Greg; Forbes, Shari L

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether gasoline residues could be detected post-mortem in lung tissue and heart blood of fire victims. The lungs and heart blood were investigated to determine whether they were suitable samples for collection and could be collected without contamination during an autopsy. Three sets of test subjects (pig carcasses) were investigated under two different fire scenarios. Test subjects 1 were anaesthetized following animal ethics approval, inhaled gasoline vapours for a short period and then euthanized. The carcasses were clothed and placed in a house where additional gasoline was poured onto the carcass post-mortem in one fire, but not in the other. Test subjects 2 did not inhale gasoline, were clothed and placed in the house and had gasoline poured onto them in both fires. Test subjects 3 were clothed but had no exposure to gasoline either ante- or post-mortem. Following controlled burns and suppression with water, the carcasses were collected, and their lungs and heart blood were excised at a necropsy. The headspace from the samples was analysed using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Gasoline was identified in the lungs and heart blood from the subjects that were exposed to gasoline vapours prior to death (test subjects 1). All other samples were negative for gasoline residues. These results suggest that it is useful to analyse for volatile ignitable liquids in lung tissue and blood as it may help to determine whether a victim was alive and inhaling gases at the time of a fire.

  12. Post mortem results of laser-optical system packaged for use in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, Michelle R.

    2008-08-28

    In this study, the design and packaging of laser-optical system was tested to harsh environments outside lab conditions and post mortem activities will be discussed. Previously, custom mounts and bonded optical assemblies were environmentally tested to ensure their survivability. The results verified the sub-assemblies would enable the design of a laser-optical initiation system that could be fielded for use in extreme conditions. The design package, which utilized the proven opto-mechanical sub-assemblies, was then tested to the same levels as the sub-assemblies. The test regiment encompassed the harshest environments currently utilized. Temperature tests were performed ranging from a maximum of +75 degrees C to a minimum of -55 degrees C, allowing for two hour soak at each temperature set point. Vibration tests were performed to a maximum level of 15.5 grms for forty seconds in each of three critical axes. Shock tests were performed to a maximum impulse level of 5700 G's for the sub-assemblies with a 1.1 millisecond long pulse; whereas the packaged laser system maximum level reached was 3700 G's at 1.1 millisecond long pulse. The laser-optical assembly was visually inspected and functionally tested before and after each test to verify survival. As designed, the system covers were laser welded shut for hermetic seal. The only open port was the laser output for testing and verification of laser performance. No optical cables were utilized. Therefore the visual inspection of the interior was performed post mortem. Finally, the post mortem results will be discussed as will the potential of redesigns on future packaging strategies.

  13. Evaluation of post-mortem oxymetry in fire victims.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Fukita, K; Oritani, S; Nagai, K; Zhu, B L

    1996-08-15

    In order to investigate the pathophysiology of death due to fires, we examined blood samples of 48 fire victims on CO-oximeter systems and evaluated the oxymetric differences between arterial and venous blood as well as those between the heart and peripheral blood. Post-mortem carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) levels in the left and right heart blood, respectively, ranged from 1.2 to 94.7% and from 0.4 to 90.5%. Marked arterio-venous and centro-peripheral differences were observed in the cases of high CO-Hb (above ca. 70%), suggesting an immediate effect of fatal carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning probably accompanied with acute heart failure. A relatively high oxyhemoglobin level was observed in the cases of low CO-Hb (below ca. 30%). In some cases, reduced hemoglobin levels in the left heart blood were paradoxically somewhat higher than those in the right. These oxymetric profiles may assist to consider the final balance of blood gas in fire victims depending on increased CO, carbon dioxide, and reduction of oxygen in the ambient atmosphere due to combustion, although post-mortem interference should be taken into consideration.

  14. Method for modeling post-mortem biometric 3D fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, Srijith; Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite the advancements of fingerprint recognition in 2-D and 3-D domain, authenticating deformed/post-mortem fingerprints continue to be an important challenge. Prior cleansing and reconditioning of the deceased finger is required before acquisition of the fingerprint. The victim's finger needs to be precisely and carefully operated by a medium to record the fingerprint impression. This process may damage the structure of the finger, which subsequently leads to higher false rejection rates. This paper proposes a non-invasive method to perform 3-D deformed/post-mortem finger modeling, which produces a 2-D rolled equivalent fingerprint for automated verification. The presented novel modeling method involves masking, filtering, and unrolling. Computer simulations were conducted on finger models with different depth variations obtained from Flashscan3D LLC. Results illustrate that the modeling scheme provides a viable 2-D fingerprint of deformed models for automated verification. The quality and adaptability of the obtained unrolled 2-D fingerprints were analyzed using NIST fingerprint software. Eventually, the presented method could be extended to other biometric traits such as palm, foot, tongue etc. for security and administrative applications.

  15. Post Mortem DNA Degradation of Human Tissue Experimentally Mummified in Salt

    PubMed Central

    Shved, Natallia; Haas, Cordula; Papageorgopoulou, Christina; Akguel, Guelfirde; Paulsen, Katja; Bouwman, Abigail; Warinner, Christina; Rühli, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Mummified human tissues are of great interest in forensics and biomolecular archaeology. The aim of this study was to analyse post mortem DNA alterations in soft tissues in order to improve our knowledge of the patterns of DNA degradation that occur during salt mummification. In this study, the lower limb of a female human donor was amputated within 24 h post mortem and mummified using a process designed to simulate the salt dehydration phase of natural or artificial mummification. Skin and skeletal muscle were sampled at multiple time points over a period of 322 days and subjected to genetic analysis. Patterns of genomic fragmentation, miscoding lesions, and overall DNA degradation in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA was assessed by different methods: gel electrophoresis, multiplex comparative autosomal STR length amplification, cloning and sequence analysis, and PCR amplification of different fragment sizes using a damage sensitive recombinant polymerase. The study outcome reveals a very good level of DNA preservation in salt mummified tissues over the course of the experiment, with an overall slower rate of DNA fragmentation in skin compared to muscle. PMID:25337822

  16. Genetic analysis in post-mortem samples with micro-ischemic alterations.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Sanchez-Molero, Olallo; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Coll, Monica; Allegue, Catarina; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Mates, Jesus; Perez-Serra, Alexandra; Del Olmo, Bernat; Iglesias, Anna; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Brugada, Josep; Borondo, Juan Carlos; Castella, Josep; Medallo, Jordi; Brugada, Ramon

    2017-02-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death worldwide. Most cardiac arrests happen in patients who have previously suffered a myocardial infarct. The risk of sudden death after infarction may increase in people who carry a pathogenic genetic alteration in cardiac ion channels. We hypothesized that micro-ischemia could trigger lethal arrhythmogenesis, thus we sought to identify genetic alterations in cardiac ion channels in patients with micro-ischemic disease. We studied a cohort of 56 post-mortem samples. Autopsy studies identified myocardial infarction as the cause of death in each case. We used both Sanger sequencing and next-generation sequencing to screen candidate genes associated with sudden cardiac death. We identified six rare missense genetic variations in five unrelated patients. Two variants have been previously reported; one is associated with atrial fibrillation (SCN5A_p.H445D), and the other is predicted to be benign (ANK2_p.T2059M). The novel variants were predicted in silico as benign, except for one (RyR2_p.M4019T), which was classified as deleterious. Our post-mortem, micro-infarction cohort displayed a rate of nearly 10% non-common genetic variants. However, the clinical significance of most of the identified variants remains unknown due to lack of family assessment. Further analyses should be performed in large cohorts to clarify the role of ion-channel gene analysis in samples showing microscopic ischemic alterations.

  17. Experimental taphonomy: post-mortem microstructural modifications in Sus scrofa domesticus bone.

    PubMed

    Kontopoulos, Ioannis; Nystrom, Pia; White, Lorraine

    2016-09-01

    Bone is a highly specialised form of hard and rigid connective tissue whose histological structure undergoes post-mortem modifications. In taphonomic research, histological examination of bone thin sections is used to investigate these post-mortem microstructural changes in skeletal tissues. In this study, diagenetic modifications in pig skeletal remains (Sus scrofa domesticus) which were exposed to different taphonomic conditions as part of a long-term, real-time experiment were examined under light microscope (i.e. plain and cross polarized light). This experiment demonstrated that macroscopic appearance and microscopic preservation of bone may significantly differ. Early microbial attack was identified as enlarged osteocyte lacunae that later coalesce to constitute larger foci. Additionally, microscopic preservation of different skeletal elements varied intra-individually, while within bone differential preservation (i.e. proximal versus distal ends) was also observed. However, no specific patterns of early histological attack (e.g. endosteal and periosteal destruction) and no clear relationship between histological preservation and proximity to the abdominal area were detected. Lastly, the presence and composition of protective textiles had a clear effect on bone preservation. This research project, therefore, provided important evidence for the better understanding of the diagenetic processes that occur within bones whilst buried or exposed on the ground surface.

  18. Post-mortem pH decline in different ostrich muscles.

    PubMed

    Sales, J; Mellett, F D

    1996-01-01

    Post-mortem glycolysis, as described by muscle pH decline, was investigated in several ostrich muscles. While the gastrocnemius pars interna, femorotibialis medius, iliotibialis lateralis and iliofemoralis showed the normal descending pH decline pattern, the ambiens as well as the iliofibularis showed a very rapid pH decline until 2 hr post mortem whereafter pH increased.

  19. Comparison of endogenous GHB concentrations in blood and hair in death cases with emphasis on the post mortem interval.

    PubMed

    Castro, André L; Tarelho, Sónia; Dias, Mário; Reis, Flávio; Teixeira, Helena M

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound which has a story of clinical use and illicit abuse since the 1960's. The possibility to use a multi-sample approach for GHB evaluation, including whole blood and hair, to better characterize a forensic toxicology case and evaluate a possible causal association with the death is an exciting up-to-date issue. In addition, its post-mortem behaviour, namely regarding degradation and metabolism, has been increasingly investigated as a putative biomarker for post-mortem interval (PMI) estimation. Thus, in order to contribute to clarification of this specific aspect, whole blood and hair post-mortem GHB levels were evaluated in 32 real cases with previous information on death and autopsy data. The results obtained suggest that the PMI (until 5 days between death and sampling) influences GHB whole blood concentration, but not GHB levels in hair samples. No differences were encountered for the other parameters evaluated, including age, gender, cause of death and presence or absence of substances. This study brings new insights regarding the usefulness of GHB levels in forensic toxicology, which might be further strengthened with larger, but comparable, studies from other laboratories and institutions in the context of legal medicine.

  20. Effect of South African beef production systems on post-mortem muscle energy status and meat quality.

    PubMed

    Frylinck, L; Strydom, P E; Webb, E C; du Toit, E

    2013-04-01

    Post-slaughter muscle energy metabolism meat colour of South African production systems were compared; steers (n=182) of Nguni, Simmental Brahman crossbreds were reared on pasture until A-, AB-, or B-age, in feedlot until A-AB-age. After exsanguination carcasses were electrically stimulated (400 V for 15 s). M. longissimus dorsi muscle energy samples were taken at 1, 2, 4 and 20 h. Post-mortem samples for meat quality studies were taken at 1, 7 and 14 days post-mortem. Production systems affected muscle glycogen, glucose, glucose-6-P, lactic acid, ATP, creatine-P glycolytic potential (P<0.05), with the muscles of feedlot carcasses having a faster glycolysis rate than pasture carcasses. Energy metabolites correlated (0.40.5) water holding capacity, drip loss, and Warner Bratzler shear force. Muscle energy only affected muscle contraction of the A-age-pasture system (shortest sarcomere length of 1.66 μm vs 1.75 μm highest WBS of 6 kg vs 5 kg 7 days post-mortem).

  1. A New Insight into the Role of Calpains in Post-mortem Meat Tenderization in Domestic Animals: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Ting; Wang, Linjie; Liu, Yiping

    2013-01-01

    Tenderness is the most important meat quality trait, which is determined by intracellular environment and extracellular matrix. Particularly, specific protein degradation and protein modification can disrupt the architecture and integrity of muscle cells so that improves the meat tenderness. Endogenous proteolytic systems are responsible for modifying proteinases as well as the meat tenderization. Abundant evidence has testified that calpains (CAPNs) including calpain I (CAPN1) and calpastatin (CAST) have the closest relationship with tenderness in livestock. They are involved in a wide range of physiological processes including muscle growth and differentiation, pathological conditions and post-mortem meat aging. Whereas, Calpain3 (CAPN3) has been established as an important activating enzyme specifically expressed in livestock’s skeletal muscle, but its role in domestic animals meat tenderization remains controversial. In this review, we summarize the role of CAPN1, calpain II (CAPN2) and CAST in post-mortem meat tenderization, and analyse the relationship between CAPN3 and tenderness in domestic animals. Besides, the possible mechanism affecting post-mortem meat aging and improving meat tenderization, and current possible causes responsible for divergence (whether CAPN3 contributes to animal meat tenderization or not) are inferred. Only the possible mechanism of CAPN3 in meat tenderization has been confirmed, while its exact role still needs to be studied further. PMID:25049808

  2. Endogenous gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) concentrations in post-mortem specimens and further recommendation for interpretative cut-offs.

    PubMed

    Andresen-Streichert, Hilke; Jensen, P; Kietzerow, J; Schrot, M; Wilke, N; Vettorazzi, E; Mueller, A; Iwersen-Bergmann, S

    2015-01-01

    When interpreting gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) concentrations in post-mortem specimens, a possible increase in GHB concentrations because of post-mortem generation must be considered. In this study, endogenous GHB concentrations in post-mortem biological fluids were investigated. Additionally, we review post-mortem GHB concentrations already published in the literature. Heart and peripheral blood samples, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and vitreous humor were collected from 64 autopsies in subjects where the cause of death excluded GHB exposure. Sample analysis was carried out either on the day of autopsy or later after immediate freezing and storage at -20 °C. GHB concentrations in venous blood samples (n = 61) were <0.6-28.7 mg/L (mean 11.9 mg/L; median 10.6 mg/L), <0.6-65.3 mg/L (mean 15.2 mg/L; median 12.8 mg/L) in heart blood (n = 56), <0.6-25.1 mg/L (mean 6.0 mg/L; median 3.8 mg/L) in urine (n = 50), <0.6-39.0 mg/L (mean 9.6 mg/L; median 7.5 mg/L), in vitreous humor (n = 54), and <0.6-24.0 mg/L (mean 4.2 mg/L; median 3.2 mg/L) in cerebrospinal fluid (n = 52). There was no significant difference between GHB concentrations in cases where there were signs of beginning putrefaction at the time of autopsy (n = 9) and cases without obvious signs of putrefaction. In one case with advanced putrefaction, the GHB concentration in venous blood was 32.7 mg/L. In conclusion, for post-mortem venous blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid, an interpretative cut-off of 30 mg/L for GHB concentrations is suggested in cases where GHB analysis is conducted on the day of sample collection at autopsy or if samples have been stored at -20 °C immediately after collection.

  3. The Role of Post-Mortem MRI in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Leadbetter, Kristen; Vesoulis, Zachary A.; White, Frances V.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Khanna, Geetika; Shimony, Joshua S.; Mathur, Amit M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Post-mortem examination can provide important information about the cause of death and play a significant role in the bereavement process. Autopsies reveal previous unknown medical problems approximately 20–30% of the time. A non-invasive MRI-based post-mortem examination (PM-MRI) may provide an alternative for families who do not consent to an autopsy. Study Design This study was a prospective observational study of recently expired neonates and infants. Subjects underwent a full body MRI scan (brain, chest, abdomen and pelvis) followed by conventional autopsy if the family desired to have one. MRI results were compared to autopsy findings and the ante mortem clinical diagnosis. A follow-up survey was conducted to investigate family perceptions of the PM-MRI process. Result Thirty-one infants underwent full PM-MRI. 19/31 (61%) of infants had complete agreement between the clinician’s impression and PM-MRI. Twenty-four infants also had conventional autopsy, with 14/24 (58%) infants having PM-MRI results consistent with autopsy findings. PM-MRI was superior at detection of free intraperitoneal/intrathoracic air and hepatic iron overload. Whole body PM-MRI did not have the resolution to detect focal/microscopic injury, vascular remodeling and some forms of brain injury. Of those families who remembered the PM-MRI findings, the majority felt that the information was useful. Conclusion PM-MRI studies may provide an important adjunct to conventional autopsy and a substitute when the latter is not possible for personal or religious reasons. Clinicians should be aware of, and communicate with the family, the resolution limits of the whole body PM-MRI to detect certain types of injury. PMID:27654494

  4. Metabolomics and neuroanatomical evaluation of post-mortem changes in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Riano, Carolina; Tapia-González, Silvia; García, Antonia; Muñoz, Alberto; DeFelipe, Javier; Barbas, Coral

    2017-03-11

    Understanding the human brain is the ultimate goal in neuroscience, but this is extremely challenging in part due to the fact that brain tissue obtained from autopsy is practically the only source of normal brain tissue and also since changes at different levels of biological organization (genetic, molecular, biochemical, anatomical) occur after death due to multiple mechanisms. Here we used metabolomic and anatomical techniques to study the possible relationship between post-mortem time (PT)-induced changes that may occur at both the metabolomics and anatomical levels in the same brains. Our experiments have mainly focused on the hippocampus of the mouse. We found significant metabolomic changes at 2 h PT, whereas the integrity of neurons and glia, at the anatomical/ neurochemical level, was not significantly altered during the first 5 h PT for the majority of histological markers.

  5. Best-practices approach to determination of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at specific time points: Combination of ante-mortem alcohol pharmacokinetic modeling and post-mortem alcohol generation and transport considerations.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Dallas M; Maskrey, Joshua R; Fung, Ernest S; Woods, Tyler A; Stabryla, Lisa M; Scott, Paul K; Finley, Brent L

    2016-07-01

    Alcohol concentrations in biological matrices offer information regarding an individual's intoxication level at a given time. In forensic cases, the alcohol concentration in the blood (BAC) at the time of death is sometimes used interchangeably with the BAC measured post-mortem, without consideration for alcohol concentration changes in the body after death. However, post-mortem factors must be taken into account for accurate forensic determination of BAC prior to death to avoid incorrect conclusions. The main objective of this work was to describe best practices for relating ante-mortem and post-mortem alcohol concentrations, using a combination of modeling, empirical data and other qualitative considerations. The Widmark modeling approach is a best practices method for superimposing multiple alcohol doses ingested at various times with alcohol elimination rate adjustments based on individual body factors. We combined the selected ante-mortem model with a suggestion for an approach used to roughly estimate changes in BAC post-mortem, and then analyzed the available data on post-mortem alcohol production in human bodies and potential markers for alcohol production through decomposition and putrefaction. Hypothetical cases provide best practice approaches as an example for determining alcohol concentration in biological matrices ante-mortem, as well as potential issues encountered with quantitative post-mortem approaches. This study provides information for standardizing BAC determination in forensic toxicology, while minimizing real world case uncertainties.

  6. Post-mortem urinary myoglobin levels with reference to the causes of death.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B L; Ishida, K; Quan, L; Taniguchi, M; Oritani, S; Kamikodai, Y; Fujita, M Q; Maeda, H

    2001-01-15

    To evaluate pathophysiological significance of post-mortem urinary myoglobin levels in determining the cause of death, we investigated 210 forensic autopsy cases, partially in comparison with serum levels. Post-mortem serum myoglobin levels were extraordinary high in most cases possibly due to post-mortem change. Urinary myoglobin levels did not correlate with the serum levels, showing possible post-mortem elevation in cases of a prolonged post-mortem period over 48h. A high (>1000 ng/ml), moderate (100-1000 ng/ml), slight (50-100 ng/ml) and not significant (<50 ng/ml) elevation of urinary myoglobin were observed in 26, 43, 31 and 110 cases, respectively. Half the highly elevated cases were those with a survival time over 24h. In cases of minor muscle injury such as head trauma, elevation of urinary myoglobin level was closely related to longer survival. In acute/subacute deaths with a post-mortem interval within 48h, a significant difference was observed in relation to the blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels of fire victims: myoglobinuria over 100 ng/ml was more frequently and markedly observed in cases with COHb below 60% than over 60%, suggesting muscle damage in fatal burns. Similar elevation was observed in heat stroke victims, and also in some cases of acute and subacute death from polytrauma, asphyxiation, drowning, electricity and spontaneous cerebral bleeding, but not in myocardial infarction. Thus, it was suggested that high post-mortem urinary myoglobin levels in acute and subacute death cases may be a possible indicator of antemortem massive skeletal muscle damage as well as exertional muscle hyperactivity or convulsive disorders associated with hypoxia.

  7. Sequenom MassARRAY approach in the arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy post-mortem setting: clinical and forensic implications.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, M; Campuzano, O; Allegue, C; Torres, M; Arbelo, E; Partemi, S; Iglesias, A; Brugada, J; Oliva, A; Carracedo, A; Brugada, R

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a rare cardiac disease characterized by myocardial fibrofatty replacement, which can lead to sudden death. Previous studies have described a reduction of plakoglobin (PKG) protein at the level of intercalated disks as the hallmark of ARVC. The main objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of desmosome mutations in the histological phenotype of ARVC. We performed a genetic analysis of ARVC cases, and histological characterization of ARVC heart tissue samples. We genetically analyzed 48 ARVC cases distributed into two groups: 42 human tissue heart samples with conclusive diagnoses of ARVC after post-mortem examination; and six DNA samples from peripheral blood of living patients who were clinically diagnosed. Sequenom MassARRAY analysis revealed three ARVC-associated variants in three patients in 42 tissue samples (7.14 %). Three individuals carried one single pathogenic mutation, p.R811S _PKP2, p.S824L_DSC2, and p.T526M_PKP2 in postmortem samples. In the living patients group, Sequenom MassARRAY revealed no mutation, however, later Sanger sequencing analysis identified three ARVC mutations in 2/6 patients not included in the Sequenom design. In post-mortem tissue samples we performed immunohistochemical labeling for desmosomal proteins and Connexin 43. This study revealed that PKP2 carriers present either absent or clearly reduced PKG immunolabeling, while the DSC2 carrier showed PKG immunolabeling similar to control samples. Immunolabeling for Cx43 did not show any differences compared to controls. The present Sequenom MassARRAY design is a useful tool for post-mortem genetic diagnosis of ARVC. Plakoglobin reduction occurs at intercalated disks, while other desmosome proteins and Cx43 remain unaltered.

  8. The degradation of proteins in pinniped skeletal muscle: viability of post-mortem tissue in physiological research

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Colby D.; Fahlman, Andreas; Crocker, Daniel E.; Robbins, Kathleen A.; Trumble, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    As marine divers, pinnipeds have a high capacity for exercise at depth while holding their breath. With finite access to oxygen, these species need to be capable of extended aerobic exercise and conservation of energy. Pinnipeds must deal with common physiological hurdles, such as hypoxia, exhaustion and acidosis, that are common to all exercising mammals. The physiological mechanisms in marine mammals used for managing oxygen and carbon dioxide have sparked much research, but access to animals and tissues is difficult and requires permits. Deceased animals that are either bycaught or stranded provide one potential source for tissues, but the validity of biochemical data from post-mortem samples has not been rigorously assessed. Tissues collected from stranded diving mammals may be a crucial source to add to our limited knowledge on the physiology of some of these animals and important to the conservation and management of these species. We aim to determine the reliability of biochemical assays derived from post-mortem tissue and to promote the immediate sampling of stranded animals for the purpose of physiological research. In this study, we mapped the temporal degradation of muscle enzymes from biopsied Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) and highlight recommendations for storage protocols for the best preservation of tissue. We also compared the enzymatic activity of different muscle groups (pectoral and latissimus dorsi) in relation to locomotion and measured the effects of four freeze–thaw cycles on muscle tissue enzyme function. Results indicate that enzymatic activity fluctuates greatly, especially with varying storage temperature, storage time, species and muscle group being assayed. In contrast, proteins, such as myoglobin, remain relatively continuous in their increase at 4°C for 48 h. Stranded animals can be a valuable source of biochemical data, but enzyme assays should be used only with great caution in post-mortem tissues. PMID

  9. Severe malaria - a case of fatal Plasmodium knowlesi infection with post-mortem findings: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zoonotic malaria caused by Plasmodium knowlesi is an important, but newly recognized, human pathogen. For the first time, post-mortem findings from a fatal case of knowlesi malaria are reported here. Case presentation A formerly healthy 40 year-old male became symptomatic 10 days after spending time in the jungle of North Borneo. Four days later, he presented to hospital in a state of collapse and died within two hours. He was hyponatraemic and had elevated blood urea, potassium, lactate dehydrogenase and amino transferase values; he was also thrombocytopenic and eosinophilic. Dengue haemorrhagic shock was suspected and a post-mortem examination performed. Investigations for dengue virus were negative. Blood for malaria parasites indicated hyperparasitaemia and single species P. knowlesi infection was confirmed by nested-PCR. Macroscopic pathology of the brain and endocardium showed multiple petechial haemorrhages, the liver and spleen were enlarged and lungs had features consistent with ARDS. Microscopic pathology showed sequestration of pigmented parasitized red blood cells in the vessels of the cerebrum, cerebellum, heart and kidney without evidence of chronic inflammatory reaction in the brain or any other organ examined. Brain sections were negative for intracellular adhesion molecule-1. The spleen and liver had abundant pigment containing macrophages and parasitized red blood cells. The kidney had evidence of acute tubular necrosis and endothelial cells in heart sections were prominent. Conclusions The overall picture in this case was one of systemic malaria infection that fit the WHO classification for severe malaria. Post-mortem findings in this case were unexpectedly similar to those that define fatal falciparum malaria, including cerebral pathology. There were important differences including the absence of coma despite petechial haemorrhages and parasite sequestration in the brain. These results suggest that further study of knowlesi malaria

  10. Post-mortem interval estimation of human skeletal remains by micro-computed tomography, mid-infrared microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hatzer-Grubwieser, P.; Bauer, C.; Parson, W.; Unterberger, S. H.; Kuhn, V.; Pemberger, N.; Pallua, Anton K.; Recheis, W.; Lackner, R.; Stalder, R.; Pallua, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study different state-of-the-art visualization methods such as micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), mid-infrared (MIR) microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) mapping were evaluated to study human skeletal remains for the determination of the post-mortem interval (PMI). PMI specific features were identified and visualized by overlaying molecular imaging data and morphological tissue structures generated by radiological techniques and microscopic images gained from confocal microscopy (Infinite Focus (IFM)). In this way, a more distinct picture concerning processes during the PMI as well as a more realistic approximation of the PMI were achieved. It could be demonstrated that the gained result in combination with multivariate data analysis can be used to predict the Ca/C ratio and bone volume (BV) over total volume (TV) for PMI estimation. Statistical limitation of this study is the small sample size, and future work will be based on more specimens to develop a screening tool for PMI based on the outcome of this multidimensional approach. PMID:25878731

  11. Post-mortem interval estimation of human skeletal remains by micro-computed tomography, mid-infrared microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray mapping.

    PubMed

    Longato, S; Wöss, C; Hatzer-Grubwieser, P; Bauer, C; Parson, W; Unterberger, S H; Kuhn, V; Pemberger, N; Pallua, Anton K; Recheis, W; Lackner, R; Stalder, R; Pallua, J D

    2015-04-07

    In this study different state-of-the-art visualization methods such as micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), mid-infrared (MIR) microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) mapping were evaluated to study human skeletal remains for the determination of the post-mortem interval (PMI). PMI specific features were identified and visualized by overlaying molecular imaging data and morphological tissue structures generated by radiological techniques and microscopic images gained from confocal microscopy (Infinite Focus (IFM)). In this way, a more distinct picture concerning processes during the PMI as well as a more realistic approximation of the PMI were achieved. It could be demonstrated that the gained result in combination with multivariate data analysis can be used to predict the Ca/C ratio and bone volume (BV) over total volume (TV) for PMI estimation. Statistical limitation of this study is the small sample size, and future work will be based on more specimens to develop a screening tool for PMI based on the outcome of this multidimensional approach.

  12. A novel approach to determine post mortem interval using neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Bilheux, Hassina Z; Cekanova, Maria; Vass, Arpad A; Nichols, Trent L; Bilheux, Jean C; Donnell, Robert L; Finochiarro, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    One of the most difficult challenges in forensic research is to objectively determine the post-mortem interval (PMI). The accuracy of PMI is critical for determining the timeline of events surrounding a death. Most PMI techniques rely on gross morphological changes of cadavers that are highly sensitive to taphonomic factors. Recent studies have demonstrated that even exhumed individuals exposed to the same environmental conditions with similar PMIs can present different stages of decomposition. After death, tissue undergoes sequential changes consisting of organic and inorganic phase variations, as well as a gradual reduction of tissue water content. Hydrogen (H) is the primary contributor to neutron radiography (NR) contrast in biological specimens because (1) it is the most abundant element in biological tissues and (2) its nucleus scatters thermal and cold neutrons more strongly than any other atomic nucleus. These contrast differences can be advantageous in a forensic context to determine small changes in hydrogen concentrations. Neutron radiography of decaying canine tissues was performed to evaluate the PMI by measuring the changes in H content. In this study, dog cadavers were used as a model for human cadavers. Canine tissues and cadavers were exposed to controlled (laboratory settings, at the University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine) and uncontrolled (University of Tennessee Anthropology Research Facility) environmental conditions, respectively. Neutron radiographs were supplemented with photographs and histology data to assess the decompositional stages of cadavers. Results demonstrated that the increase in neutron transmission likely corresponded to a decrease in hydrogen content in the tissue, which was correlated with the decay time of the tissue. Tissues depleted in hydrogen were brighter in the neutron transmission radiographs of skeletal muscles, lung, and bone, under controlled conditions. Over a period of 10 days, changes in neutron

  13. [Post-mortem animal predation of the genital region caused by a half-breed dog].

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Claas T; Wrobel, Detlev; Tsokos, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe and discuss the case of a 51-year-old man, who was lying mummified in his apartment. Beside the corpse, the well-fed half-breed dog of the deceased was found. Only the penis and testicles of the corpse were destroyed by post-mortem animal scavenging, whereas the face and the rest of the body were intact. There was plenty of dog food in the apartment. In contrast to wild animals, with domestic dogs hunger is the cause for post-mortem scavenging only in the minority of cases. It is rather a displacement activity. Frequently, the face and hands are destroyed by post-mortem animal predation, as these body regions are usually unclothed and thus easily accessible. Lesions in other localizations are seldom seen and injuries in the genital region are a rarity.

  14. Edema is a sign of early acute myocardial infarction on post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Thomas D; Ebert, Lars C; Khattab, Ahmed A; Rieben, Robert; Thali, Michael J; Kamat, Pranitha

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if acute myocardial infarction can be detected by post-mortem cardiac magnetic resonance (PMMR) at an earlier stage than by traditional autopsy, i.e., within less than 4 h after onset of ischemia; and if so, to determine the characteristics of PMMR findings in early acute infarcts. Twenty-one ex vivo porcine hearts with acute myocardial infarction underwent T2-weighted cardiac PMMR imaging within 3 h of onset of iatrogenic ischemia. PMMR imaging findings were compared to macroscopic findings. Myocardial edema induced by ischemia and reperfusion was visible on PMMR in all cases. Typical findings of early acute ischemic injury on PMMR consist of a central zone of intermediate signal intensity bordered by a rim of increased signal intensity. Myocardial edema can be detected on cardiac PMMR within the first 3 h after the onset of ischemia in porcine hearts. The size of myocardial edema reflects the area of ischemic injury in early acute (per-acute) myocardial infarction. This study provides evidence that cardiac PMMR is able to detect acute myocardial infarcts at an earlier stage than traditional autopsy and routine histology.

  15. Deuterium Inventory in Tore Supra: status of post-mortem analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, T.; Roubin, P.; Tsitrone, E.; Gauthier, E.; Hakola, A.; Likonen, J.; Linez, F.; Martin, C.; Mayer, M.; Pardanaud, C.; Pascal, J. Y.; Pasquet, B.; Pégourié, B.; Roth, J.; Roure, I.; Ruffe, R.

    2009-12-01

    A dedicated study on fuel retention has been launched in Tore Supra which included a D wall-loading campaign and the dismantling of the main limiter (Deuterium Inventory in Tore Supra, DITS project). This paper presents new results of post-mortem analyses performed on selected limiter tiles. Scanning electron microscopy shows thick layers with poloidally oriented tip-shaped structures in deposition zones. In the erosion zone deposits inside the open porosities of the bulk material of the tiles were found. Raman microscopy indicates that hard deuterated amorphous carbon layers are deposited on the limiter tiles and on their gap sides. Secondary ion mass spectrometry D depth profiles show an increase of the D content near the bottom of the gap, in agreement with previous results. The campaign markers (13C and 11B) are found in only 2 out of 7 measurements in the deposited layers. Finally, the agreement of the SIMS data with previous nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) measurements is discussed, especially discrepancies possibly due to the non-uniformity of the samples.

  16. Characterization of 5-HT1D receptor binding sites in post-mortem human brain cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Martial, J; de Montigny, C; Cecyre, D; Quirion, R

    1991-01-01

    The present study provides further evidence for the presence of serotonin1D (5-HT1D) receptors in post-mortem human brain. Receptor binding parameters in temporal cortex homogenates were assessed using [3H]5-HT in the presence of 100 nM 8-OH-DPAT, 1 microM propranolol and 1 microM mesulergine to prevent labelling of the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1C sites, respectively. Under these conditions, [3H]5-HT apparently bound to a class of high affinity (Kd = 5.0 +/- 1.0 nM) low capacity (Bmax = 96 +/- 23 fmol/mg protein) sites. In competition experiments, 5-HT and 5-carboxyamidotryptamine (5-CT), as well as ergotamine, lysergic acid, sumatriptan and RU-24969 exhibited high affinity for these sites. This pharmacological profile is concordant with the ligand selectivity pattern reported for 5-HT1D receptors in other species and thus provides further evidence for its existence in human temporal cortex. In addition, the competition profile of some ligands, particularly of unlabelled 5-HT, 5-CT and ergotamine, revealed the existence of a lower affinity binding site. The latter suggests receptor heterogeneity or the presence of a lower affinity state of 5-HT1D receptors. PMID:1911737

  17. Partial autolysis of μ/m-calpain during post mortem aging of chicken muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Jiang, Nanqi; Li, Miaozhen; Huang, Ming; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate changes occurring in μ/m-calpain in post mortem chicken muscles and to determine the origin of the unknown bands found in calpain casein zymography. The unknown bands were reported with slightly greater mobility compared to conventional μ/m-calpain bands in casein zymography. Identification of these bands was accomplished using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and with protein phosphatase treatment. Results showed that the unknown bands were corresponding to μ/m-calpain, and dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase did not change their appearance. The calpain samples were then incubated with various concentrations of Ca(2+) to determine the relationship between changes in μ/m-calpain and the appearance of the unknown bands. The products of μ/m-calpain partial autolysis were found to be consistent with the appearance of the unknown bands. Therefore, the appearance of these bands did not result from phosphorylation of μ/m-calpain as previously hypothesized, but from partial autolysis of μ/m-calpain. Also their presence suggests that μ/m-calpain undergoes partial autolysis during aging which may play certain roles in meat quality improvement.

  18. Post mortem sampling of the bladder for the identification of victims of fire related deaths.

    PubMed

    Owen, Rebecca; Bedford, Paul; Leditschke, Jodie; Schlenker, Andrew; Hartman, Dadna

    2013-12-10

    In a coronial setting a deceased person must be formally identified. It is difficult to identify a deceased person when their physical features are disrupted and identification by visual means cannot occur. In the absence of visual identification, the confirmation of identity of a deceased person relies on the scientific comparison of information obtained post mortem with ante mortem information. The ante mortem information may include dental and medical records, fingerprints, and DNA profiling. For cases involving incinerated remains, this traditionally requires the collection of blood, muscle or bone samples from the deceased (depending on the severity of the burns) for DNA analysis and subsequent comparison to a reference sample for kinship determination. Following on from work conducted during the DVI response to a plane crash in Papua New Guinea in 2011, a study has been performed examining the viability of utilising material obtained from bladder swabs in deaths associated with fires. Twenty-eight cases were analysed during 2012 with deaths occurring in motor vehicle and aviation accidents, as well as house fires, homicides and from self-immolation. Bladder and conventional (blood, muscle or bone) samples were subjected to DNA analysis and compared. Our findings demonstrate that the bladder samples all gave DNA of sufficient quality for DNA profiling. This easily obtained sample (when available) can be now recommended in the scientific identification process of fire affected deceased persons.

  19. The Design and Development of a Post-Mortem Room Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a post-mortem room complex to serve the needs of three separate organizations on the campus of the University of Bristol's Veterinary Field Station is described. Comments are made on disadvantages that have become apparent during eight years of use. (Author/LBH)

  20. 42 CFR 35.16 - Autopsies and other post-mortem operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Autopsies and other post-mortem operations. 35.16 Section 35.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.16 Autopsies and other...

  1. 42 CFR 35.16 - Autopsies and other post-mortem operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Autopsies and other post-mortem operations. 35.16 Section 35.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.16 Autopsies and other...

  2. 42 CFR 35.16 - Autopsies and other post-mortem operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Autopsies and other post-mortem operations. 35.16 Section 35.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.16 Autopsies and other...

  3. 42 CFR 35.16 - Autopsies and other post-mortem operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... performed on the body of a deceased patient only by direction of the officer in charge and only if consented... death involved. Restrictions or limitations imposed by the person consenting thereto on the extent of the autopsy or other post-mortem operation shall be observed. Documents embodying consent shall...

  4. 42 CFR 35.16 - Autopsies and other post-mortem operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... performed on the body of a deceased patient only by direction of the officer in charge and only if consented... death involved. Restrictions or limitations imposed by the person consenting thereto on the extent of the autopsy or other post-mortem operation shall be observed. Documents embodying consent shall...

  5. Meat quality of broiler breast meat following post-mortem electrical stimulation at the neck.

    PubMed

    Owens, C M; Sams, A R

    1998-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on breast fillets harvested at 1 h post-mortem and individually quick frozen (IQF) or aged on ice (ICE). Twelve birds were electrically stimulated (450 V, 750 mA, 2 s on/1 s off for 15 s) at the neck in a saline bath. Twenty-four unstimulated birds were used as controls. Breast fillets were harvested at 1 h post-mortem from ES and control carcasses or at 4 h post-mortem from control carcasses and were either IQF or ICE until 24 h post-mortem. Fillets were then analyzed for shear value, pH, R value, and color. Electrical stimulation significantly reduced shear values compared to the 1 h controls for both IQF and ICE treatments. The ICE fillets deboned at 1 h from ES-treated carcasses had shear values similar to those of ICE fillets deboned from the 4 h controls. Electrical stimulation increased the percentage of shear values at or below 8 kg/g for the fillets from ES-treated carcasses compared to the 1 h controls. Electrical stimulation accelerated the normal post-mortem decline in pH and increase in R value. There was no significant difference in L* or a* values between the fillets held for 1 or 24 h. The results suggest that by electrically stimulating carcasses at the neck using a saline bath, the aging period could be eliminated by removing fillets immediately after chilling at 1 h, decreasing the costs associated with aging whole carcasses or front halves.

  6. Cases of fatal poisoning in post-mortem examinations at the Institute of Forensic Medicine in Greifswald--analysis of five decades of post-mortems.

    PubMed

    Below, Elke; Lignitz, Eberhard

    2003-04-23

    Apparently, fatal poisoning as cause of death are still rarely found in unnatural deaths investigated in the institutes of forensic medicine. In the Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Greifswald, 10-15% of the post-mortem autopsies displayed an intoxication during the last several decades with a possible decreasing tendency. Thirteen thousand eight hundred and nineteen autopsies were carried out in our institute-situated in a low populated rural area-during the last 50 years with the confirmed death cause intoxication in 1,589 times. In this study, especially the intoxication causes and the substance classes of the poisonous agents have been investigated. In addition, we analyzed the frequency of intoxications as well as sex and age of the deceased. Surprisingly, CO-intoxications were found most frequently with an incidence of 49% followed by alcohol intoxications with 21%. The latter was not unexpected taking into account the habits of the local population. Medical drugs and narcotics take only the third place, although the abuse of modern narcotics drugs is already visible even in the far east of Germany. The spectrum of substances which are abused, taken accidentally or deliberately is continuously changing, reflecting scientific progress in the pharmaceutical industry as well as fashion tendencies. Therapeutic use is almost always followed by abuse. Our results confirm prior experience concentrating mostly on other poisons like heavy metals or herbicides, etc. In addition, we could demonstrate the influence of political conditions on use and distribution of illegal drugs in Germany. Our study clearly demonstrates that insufficient equipment or analytical methods are no longer the reason for any problems uncovering lethal intoxications. They are rather due to insufficient investigations of the corpses (without considering the possibility of an intoxication as differential diagnosis) and to frequent mistakes of the prosecutor's office in death

  7. Effect of muscle and post-mortem rate of pH and temperature fall on antioxidant enzyme activities in beef.

    PubMed

    Pastsart, Umaporn; De Boever, Maarten; Claeys, Erik; De Smet, Stefaan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle, inner and outer Musculus biceps femoris (IBF and OBF respectively) and Musculus longissimus dorsi (LD), on the post-mortem rate of pH and temperature fall, and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) during simulated retail display. At day 0 of display (2 days post-mortem), the CAT and GSH-Px activities were lower in IBF than in OBF and LD (P<0.001), and the SOD activity was lower in OBF compared to IBF and LD (P<0.001). At day 10 of display, SOD and CAT activities had decreased in all three muscles compared to day 0 (P<0.001), whereas the GSH-Px activity did increase with time of display. Across muscles, there were significant relationships between temperature fall, colour, lipid and colour stability and antioxidant enzyme activities.

  8. Investigation of Pelvic Injuries on Eighteen Post Mortem Human Subjects Submitted to Oblique Lateral Impacts.

    PubMed

    Lebarbé, Matthieu; Baudrit, Pascal; Potier, Pascal; Petit, Philippe; Trosseille, Xavier; Compigne, Sabine; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Fujii, Takumi; Douard, Richard

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the sacroiliac joint injury mechanism. Two test configurations were selected from full scale car crashes conducted with the WorldSID 50(th) dummy resulting in high sacroiliac joint loads and low pubic symphysis force, i.e. severe conditions for the sacroiliac joint. The two test conditions were reproduced in laboratory using a 150-155 kg guided probe propelled respectively at 8 m/s and 7.5 m/s and with different shapes and orientations for the plate impacting the pelvis. Nine Post Mortem Human Subject (PMHS) were tested in each of the two configurations (eighteen PMHS in total). In order to get information on the time of fracture, eleven strain gauges were glued on the pelvic bone of each PMHS. Results - In the first configuration, five PMHS out of nine sustained AIS2+ pelvic injuries. All five presented sacroiliac joint injuries associated with pubic area injuries. In the second configuration, four specimens out of nine sustained AIS2+ pelvic injuries. Two of them presented sacroiliac joint fractures associated with pubic area injuries. The other two presented injuries at the pubic area and acetabulum only. The strain gauges signals suggested that the pubic fractures occurred before the sacroiliac joint fractures in the great majority of the cases (five cases out of seven). Conclusions - Even in the oblique impact conditions of the present study, the pubic symphysis area was observed to be the weakest zone of the pelvis and its failure the predominant cause of sacroiliac joint injuries. It was hypothesized that the failure of the pubic rami allowed the hemi-pelvis to rotate inward, and that this closing-book motion induced the failure of the sacroiliac joint.

  9. A novel approach to determine post mortem interval using neutron radiography

    DOE PAGES

    Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Cekanova, Maria; Vass, Arpad Alexander; ...

    2015-03-06

    In this study, neutron radiography (NR) is used non-destructively to measure changes in hydrogen (H) content in decaying tissues as a mean to estimate post-mortem invertal (PMI). After death, tissue undergoes sequential changes consisting of organic and inorganic phase variations, as well as a gradual reduction of tissue water content. H is the primary contributor to NR contrast in biological specimens because (1) it is the most abundant element in biological tissues and (2) its nucleus scatter thermal and cold neutrons more strongly than any other atomic nucleus. These contrast differences can be advantageous in a forensic context to determinemore » small changes in hydrogen concentrations. Dog cadavers were used as a model for human cadavers. Canine tissues and cadavers were exposed to controlled (laboratory settings) and uncontrolled (University of Tennessee Anthropology Research Facility) environmental conditions during putefraction, respectively. Neutron radiographs were supplemented with photographs and histology data to assess the decomposition stage of cadavers. Results demonstrated that the increase in neutron transmission likely corresponded to a decrease in hydrogen content in the tissue, which was correlated with the time of decay of the tissue. Tissues depleted in hydrogen are brighter in the neutron transmission radiographs of skeletal muscles, lung, and bone, under controlled conditions. Over a period of 10 days, changes in neutron transmission through lung and muscle were found to be higher than bone by 8.3%, 7.0 %, and 2.0 %, respectively. Estimation of the PMI was calculated from a natural logarithmic fitting of the NR data. Under controlled conditions, estimation of the PMI was 70% and 63.9 % accurate for bone and lung tissues, while being 1.4% accurate for muscle tissue. All results underestimated the true PMI. In conclusion, neutron radiography can be used for detection of hydrogen changes in decaying tissues to estimate PMI.« less

  10. A novel approach to determine post mortem interval using neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Cekanova, Maria; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Nichols, Trent L.; Bilheux, Jean -Christophe; Donnell, Robert; Finocchiaro, Vincenzo

    2015-03-06

    In this study, neutron radiography (NR) is used non-destructively to measure changes in hydrogen (H) content in decaying tissues as a mean to estimate post-mortem invertal (PMI). After death, tissue undergoes sequential changes consisting of organic and inorganic phase variations, as well as a gradual reduction of tissue water content. H is the primary contributor to NR contrast in biological specimens because (1) it is the most abundant element in biological tissues and (2) its nucleus scatter thermal and cold neutrons more strongly than any other atomic nucleus. These contrast differences can be advantageous in a forensic context to determine small changes in hydrogen concentrations. Dog cadavers were used as a model for human cadavers. Canine tissues and cadavers were exposed to controlled (laboratory settings) and uncontrolled (University of Tennessee Anthropology Research Facility) environmental conditions during putefraction, respectively. Neutron radiographs were supplemented with photographs and histology data to assess the decomposition stage of cadavers. Results demonstrated that the increase in neutron transmission likely corresponded to a decrease in hydrogen content in the tissue, which was correlated with the time of decay of the tissue. Tissues depleted in hydrogen are brighter in the neutron transmission radiographs of skeletal muscles, lung, and bone, under controlled conditions. Over a period of 10 days, changes in neutron transmission through lung and muscle were found to be higher than bone by 8.3%, 7.0 %, and 2.0 %, respectively. Estimation of the PMI was calculated from a natural logarithmic fitting of the NR data. Under controlled conditions, estimation of the PMI was 70% and 63.9 % accurate for bone and lung tissues, while being 1.4% accurate for muscle tissue. All results underestimated the true PMI. In conclusion, neutron radiography can be used for detection of hydrogen changes in decaying tissues to estimate PMI.

  11. Ventilated post-mortem computed tomography through the use of a definitive airway.

    PubMed

    Rutty, Guy N; Biggs, Mike J P; Brough, Alison; Robinson, Claire; Mistry, Reena; Amoroso, Jasmin; Deshpande, Aparna; Morgan, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Ventilated post-mortem computed tomography (VPMCT) has been shown to achieve lung expansion in cadavers and has been proposed to enhance the diagnosis of lung pathology. Two key problems of the method of ventilation have been identified: firstly, the presence of head and neck rigor making airway insertion challenging and, secondly, air leak, if there is not a good seal around the airway, which diminishes lung expansion and causes inflation of the stomach. Simple procedures to insert a 'definitive' cuffed airway, which has a balloon inflated within the trachea, are therefore desirable. This study aims to test different procedures for inserting cuffed airways in cadavers and compare their ventilation efficacy and to propose a decision algorithm to select the most appropriate method. We prospectively tested variations on two ways of inserting a cuffed airway into the trachea: firstly, using an endotracheal tube (ET) approach, either blind or by direct visualisation, and, secondly, using a tracheostomy incision, either using a standard tracheostomy tube or shortened ET tube. We compare these approaches with a retrospective analysis of a previously reported series using supraglottic airways. All techniques, except 'blind' insertion of ET tubes, were possible with adequate placement of the airway in most cases. However, achieving both adequate insertion and a complete tracheal seal was better for definitive airways with 56 successful cases from 59 (95 %), compared with 9 cases from 18 (50 %) using supraglottic airways (p < 0.0001). Good lung expansion was achieved using all techniques if the airway was adequately positioned and achieved a good seal, and there was no significant chest pathology. We prefer inserting a shortened ET tube via a tracheostomy incision, as we find this the easiest technique to perform and train. Based on our experience, we have developed a decision algorithm to select the most appropriate method for VPMCT.

  12. Characterization and short-term storage of Tasmanian devil sperm collected post-mortem.

    PubMed

    Keeley, T; McGreevy, P D; O'Brien, J K

    2011-09-01

    The Tasmanian devil is suffering from a severe population decline due to the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). The development of assisted reproductive technologies such as AI and long-term sperm storage could facilitate genetic management of captive insurance populations. The aim of this study was to characterise semen samples collected post-mortem, and to develop a suitable diluent for short-term preservation of devil sperm. Low numbers of sperm (1.33 ± 0.85 × 10(6) sperm per male) were extracted from the epididymides of 17 males. Devil sperm sample characteristics such as concentration and morphology were similar to other dasyurids. The most commonly observed morphological abnormalities were midpiece separation, tail curling, and tail twisting (on the axial plane). Changes in motility occurred throughout the regions of the epididymis with (mean ± SD) 29.4 ± 16.8, 46.8 ± 13.6 and 29.4 ± 18.1% of sperm exhibiting motility, and 88.9 ± 11.4, 32.0 ± 24.3 and 0.1 ± 0.2% of motile sperm exhibiting forward progressive motility in the cauda, corpus and caput, respectively. Sperm from the cauda and corpus epididymis maintained 31.7 ± 26.6 and 80.6 ± 85.9%, respectively, of initial motility after 12 h at 15 °C in a TEST yolk buffer diluent. These findings provided new information regarding devil sperm biology and short-term sperm storage; such information is necessary for future development of long-term sperm preservation methods in the Tasmanian devil.

  13. Oblique lateral impact biofidelity deflection corridors from Post Mortem Human Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Humm, John R; Arun, Mike W J W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2013-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the thorax and abdomen deflection-time corridors in oblique side impacts. Data were analyzed from Post Mortem Human Surrogate (PMHS) sled tests, certain aspects of which were previously published. A modular and scalable anthropometry-specific segmented load-wall system was fixed to the platform of the sled. Region-specific forces were recorded from load cells attached to the load-wall plates. The thorax and abdomen regions were instrumented with chestbands, and deflection contours were obtained. Biomechanical responses were processed using the impulse-momentum normalization method and scaled to the mid-size male mass, 76-kg. The individual effective masses of the thorax and abdomen were used to determine the scale factors in each sled test, thus using the response from each experiment. The maximum deflections and their times of attainments were obtained, and mean and plus minus one standard deviation corridors were derived. Test-by-test thorax and abdomen force-time histories are given. Deflection-time histories for each specimen for the two body regions and corridors are presented. The mean maximum deflections for the thorax and abdomen body regions were 68.41 ± 16.1 and 68.98 ± 12.69 mm, respectively. Deflections were greater in oblique than pure lateral loading tests for both body regions, indicating the increased sensitivity of oblique side impact vector to the human response. The mean and one standard deviation responses of the thorax and abdomen serve as biofidelity corridors under oblique loading. Because modern instrumentation techniques can accommodate deflection sensors in the thorax and abdomen in devices such as WorldSID, and computer finite element models are flexible enough to extract regional and local deformation fields, the present data can be used to evaluate dummy biofidelity and validate and verify numerical models. They can be used to advance injury assessment reference values in oblique impacts.

  14. Effects of post-mortem and physical degradation on RNA integrity and quality

    PubMed Central

    Sidova, Monika; Tomankova, Silvie; Abaffy, Pavel; Kubista, Mikael; Sindelka, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The precision and reliability of quantitative nucleic acid analysis depends on the quality of the sample analyzed and the integrity of the nucleic acids. The integrity of RNA is currently primarily assessed by the analysis of ribosomal RNA, which is the by far dominant species. The extrapolation of these results to mRNAs and microRNAs, which are structurally quite different, is questionable. Here we show that ribosomal and some nucleolar and mitochondrial RNAs, are highly resistant to naturally occurring post-mortem degradation, while mRNAs, although showing substantial internal variability, are generally much more prone to nucleolytic degradation. In contrast, all types of RNA show the same sensitivity to heat. Using qPCR assays targeting different regions of mRNA molecules, we find no support for 5′ or 3′ preferentiality upon post-mortem degradation. PMID:27077037

  15. Post-mortem genetic testing in a family with long-QT syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kane, David A; Triedman, John

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric sudden unexplained deaths are rare and tragic events that should be evaluated with all the tools available to the medical community. The current state of genetic testing is an excellent resource that improves our ability to diagnose cardiovascular disorders that can lead to sudden cardiac arrest. Post-mortem genetic testing is not typically a covered benefit of health insurance and may not be offered to families in the setting of a negative autopsy. This unusual case includes two separate cardiovascular disorders that highlight the use of genetic testing and its role in diagnosis, screening, and risk stratification. The insurance company's decision to cover post-mortem testing demonstrated both compassion as well as an understanding of the long-term cost effectiveness.

  16. Viability and infectivity of Ichthyophonus sp. in post-mortem Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, Richard M.; Hart, Lucas M.; Lewandowski, Naomi; Hershberger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyophonus-infected Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, were allowed to decompose in ambient seawater then serially sampled for 29 days to evaluate parasite viability and infectivity for Pacific staghorn sculpin, Leptocottus armatus. Ichthyophonus sp. was viable in decomposing herring tissues for at least 29 days post-mortem and could be transmitted via ingestion to sculpin for up to 5 days. The parasite underwent morphologic changes during the first 48 hr following death of the host that were similar to those previously reported, but as host tissue decomposition progressed, several previously un-described forms of the parasite were observed. The significance of long-term survival and continued morphologic transformation in the post-mortem host is unknown, but it could represent a saprozoic phase of the parasite life cycle that has survival value for Ichthyophonus sp.

  17. [Inheritance rights fo the child born from post-mortem fertilization].

    PubMed

    Iniesta Delgado, Juan José

    2008-01-01

    Spanish Law allows in the possibility of post mortem fertilization, recognizing the paternity of the deceased male. The most prominent legal effects of this fact have to do with the succession of his father. The way of fixing the child's portion in the forced succession and its protection, the question of determining his share in the inheritance and the necessity of defending his rights until the verification of the birth are some of the issues that are discussed in this article.

  18. Deuterium Inventory in Tore Supra (DITS): 2nd post-mortem analysis campaign and fuel retention in the gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, T.; Tsitrone, E.; Pégourié, B.; Čadež, I.; Pelicon, P.; Gauthier, E.; Languille, P.; Likonen, J.; Litnovsky, A.; Markelj, S.; Martin, C.; Mayer, M.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Pardanaud, C.; Philipps, V.; Roth, J.; Roubin, P.; Vavpetič, P.

    2011-08-01

    A dedicated study on fuel retention has been launched in Tore Supra, which includes a D wall-loading campaign and the dismantling of the main limiter (Deuterium Inventory in Tore Supra, DITS project). This paper presents new results from a second post-mortem analysis campaign on 40 tiles with special emphasis on the D retention in the gaps. SIMS analysis reveals that only 1/3 of the thickness of deposits in the plasma shadowed zones are due to the DITS wall-loading campaign. As pre-DITS deposits contain less D than DITS deposits, the contribution of DITS to the D inventory is about 30-50%. The new estimate for the total amount of D retained in the Tore Supra limiter is 1.7 × 1024 atoms, close to the previous estimate, with the gap surfaces contributing about 33%. NRA measurements show a stepped decrease of D along the gap with strong asymmetries between different gap orientations.

  19. Effects of post-mortem aging time and type of aging on palatability of low marbled beef loins.

    PubMed

    Lepper-Blilie, A N; Berg, E P; Buchanan, D S; Berg, P T

    2016-02-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the effect of post-mortem aging period (14 to 49days), dry vs. wet (D vs W) type of aging on the palatability of bone-in (BI) beef short loins (n=96) and boneless (BL) strip loins (n=96) possessing United States Department of Agriculture marbling scores between Slight and Small. Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) scores decreased linearly over time (P=0.0001). WBSF was not influenced by aging method or loin type. Aged flavor was higher for DBL than for DBI with WBL and WBI intermediate. Dry aging strip loins increase aged flavor yet did not improve beefy flavor compared to wet aging. Based on objective data and panelist's scores for tenderness, juiciness and aged flavor, a boneless, 28days wet aged strip steak, cooked to 71°C would provide the best combination of eating satisfaction and value.

  20. Genomic Convergence Analysis of Schizophrenia: mRNA Sequencing Reveals Altered Synaptic Vesicular Transport in Post-Mortem Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Mudge, Joann; Miller, Neil A.; Khrebtukova, Irina; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; May, Gregory D.; Huntley, Jim J.; Luo, Shujun; Zhang, Lu; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Lewis, Sharon; Beavis, William D.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Virk, Selene M.; Black, C. Forrest; Myers, M. Kathy; Mader, Lar C.; Langley, Ray J.; Utsey, John P.; Kim, Ryan W.; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Khalsa, Sat Kirpal; Garcia, Meredith; Ambriz-Griffith, Victoria; Harlan, Richard; Czika, Wendy; Martin, Stanton; Wolfinger, Russell D.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Schroth, Gary P.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a common, disabling mental illness with high heritability but complex, poorly understood genetic etiology. As the first phase of a genomic convergence analysis of SCZ, we generated 16.7 billion nucleotides of short read, shotgun sequences of cDNA from post-mortem cerebellar cortices of 14 patients and six, matched controls. A rigorous analysis pipeline was developed for analysis of digital gene expression studies. Sequences aligned to approximately 33,200 transcripts in each sample, with average coverage of 450 reads per gene. Following adjustments for confounding clinical, sample and experimental sources of variation, 215 genes differed significantly in expression between cases and controls. Golgi apparatus, vesicular transport, membrane association, Zinc binding and regulation of transcription were over-represented among differentially expressed genes. Twenty three genes with altered expression and involvement in presynaptic vesicular transport, Golgi function and GABAergic neurotransmission define a unifying molecular hypothesis for dysfunction in cerebellar cortex in SCZ. PMID:18985160

  1. Overview of JET post-mortem results following the 2007-9 operational period, and comparisons with previous campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coad, J. P.; Gruenhagen, S.; Hole, D. E.; Hakola, A.; Koivuranta, S.; Likonen, J.; Rubel, M.; Widdowson, A.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2011-12-01

    In 2010, all the plasma-facing components were removed from JET so that the carbon-based surfaces could be replaced with beryllium (Be) or tungsten as part of the ITER-like wall (ILW) project. This gives unprecedented opportunities for post-mortem analyses of these plasma-facing surfaces; this paper reviews the data obtained so far and relates the information to studies of tiles removed during previous JET shutdowns. The general pattern of erosion/deposition at the JET divertor has been maintained, with deposition of impurities in the scrape-off layer (SOL) at the inner divertor and preferential removal of carbon and transport into the corner. However, the remaining films in the SOL contain very high Be/C ratios at the surface. The first measurements of erosion using a tile profiler have been completed, with up to 200 microns erosion being recorded at points on the inner wall guard limiters.

  2. [Determination of death and post-mortem examination on the high seas].

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Claas T; Tsokos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Usually death has to be determined by a physician. Deaths on board of ocean-going vessels confront the crew with special challenges, as on the high seas--especially in the container and cargo ship business--often no physician will be available and death has to be determined by medical laymen such as the captain or the medical officer. To document the determination of death, a "Provisional Certificate of Death on the High Seas" is presented. Moreover, an algorithm "Provisional Post-Mortem Examination on the High Seas" is presented to document the results and the practical performance of the external post-mortem examination by medical laymen on a ship. With the help of concrete procedural instructions medical laymen on board of sea-going vessels are to be enabled to determine the death of a human being beyond doubt, to perform a preliminary external post-mortem examination and to store the corpse according to forensic requirements until the ship reaches a port and the body is delivered to the harbour physician.

  3. Biochemical pathways generating post-mortem volatile compounds co-detected during forensic ethanol analyses.

    PubMed

    Boumba, Vassiliki A; Ziavrou, Kallirroe S; Vougiouklakis, Theodore

    2008-01-30

    In this contribution are presented the fermentations of the main substrates present in a decaying corpse, namely carbohydrates, amino acids, glycerol and fatty acids, generating the post-mortem volatile compounds that could be detected along with ethanol during the forensic ethanol analysis. The available literature (preferably reviews) on microbial metabolic pathways (enzymes, substrates, conditions) that are implicated in the formation of these volatiles has been reviewed. The microbial formation of the following volatiles is supported by the presented biochemical data: ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-propanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol, d-amyl alcohol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and ethyl esters (mainly ethyl acetate). The extracted information was correlated with the existing forensic literature on the post-mortem detected volatiles. The significance of the microbial produced volatiles on the selection of an appropriate internal standard for the ethanol analysis has been considered. Finally, the possible contribution of the presence of volatiles in the interpretation of ethanol analysis results in post-mortem cases is discussed.

  4. Post mortem function of AtMC9 in xylem vessel elements.

    PubMed

    Bollhöner, Benjamin; Zhang, Bo; Stael, Simon; Denancé, Nicolas; Overmyer, Kirk; Goffner, Deborah; Van Breusegem, Frank; Tuominen, Hannele

    2013-10-01

    Cell death of xylem elements is manifested by rupture of the tonoplast and subsequent autolysis of the cellular contents. Metacaspases have been implicated in various forms of plant cell death but regulation and execution of xylem cell death by metacaspases remains unknown. Analysis of the type II metacaspase gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana supported the function of METACASPASE 9 (AtMC9) in xylem cell death. Progression of xylem cell death was analysed in protoxylem vessel elements of 3-d-old atmc9 mutant roots using reporter gene analysis and electron microscopy. Protoxylem cell death was normally initiated in atmc9 mutant lines, but detailed electron microscopic analyses revealed a role for AtMC9 in clearance of the cell contents post mortem, that is after tonoplast rupture. Subcellular localization of fluorescent AtMC9 reporter fusions supported a post mortem role for AtMC9. Further, probe-based activity profiling suggested a function of AtMC9 on activities of papain-like cysteine proteases. Our data demonstrate that the function of AtMC9 in xylem cell death is to degrade vessel cell contents after vacuolar rupture. We further provide evidence on a proteolytic cascade in post mortem autolysis of xylem vessel elements and suggest that AtMC9 is part of this cascade.

  5. Is post-mortem harm possible? Understanding death harm and grief.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, Floris

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this article is not to affirm or deny particular philosophical positions, but to explore the limits of intelligibility about what post-mortem harm means, especially in the light of improper post-mortem procedures at Bristol and Alder Hey hospitals in the late 1990s. The parental claims of post-mortem harm to dead children at Alder Hey Hospital are reviewed from five different philosophical perspectives, eventually settling on a crucial difference of perspective about how we understand harm to the dead. On the one hand there is the broadly 'analytical' tradition(1) of thinking that predicates the notion of harm on the basis of an existing subject. Since the dead are non-existent persons, it makes little sense to view the dead as being harmed. On the other hand, there is a phenomenological perspective, where the dead, in respect to the experience of grief, are existentially absent. This forms the basis that it is possible to harm grieving parent's experiences of how their dead are treated. The article ends with a short examination of what harming the dead implies for traditional bioethical concerns, namely, obtaining informed consent from significant others when planning medical research on the newly dead.

  6. Ultra-High Field MRI Post Mortem Structural Connectivity of the Human Subthalamic Nucleus, Substantia Nigra, and Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Birgit R.; Roebroeck, Alard; Kemper, Valentin G.; Uludağ, Kâmil; Melse, Maartje; Mai, Jürgen; Kuijf, Mark L.; Herrler, Andreas; Jahanshahi, Ali; ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Temel, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus, three nuclei of the human basal ganglia, play an important role in motor, associative, and limbic processing. The network of the basal ganglia is generally characterized by a direct, indirect, and hyperdirect pathway. This study aims to investigate the mesoscopic nature of these connections between the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus and their surrounding structures. Methods: A human post mortem brain specimen including the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus was scanned on a 7 T MRI scanner. High resolution diffusion weighted images were used to reconstruct the fibers intersecting the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus. The course and density of these tracks was analyzed. Results: Most of the commonly established projections of the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus were successfully reconstructed. However, some of the reconstructed fiber tracks such as the connections of the substantia nigra pars compacta to the other included nuclei and the connections with the anterior commissure have not been shown previously. In addition, the quantitative tractography approach showed a typical degree of connectivity previously not documented. An example is the relatively larger projections of the subthalamic nucleus to the substantia nigra pars reticulata when compared to the projections to the globus pallidus internus. Discussion: This study shows that ultra-high field post mortem tractography allows for detailed 3D reconstruction of the projections of deep brain structures in humans. Although the results should be interpreted carefully, the newly identified connections contribute to our understanding of the basal ganglia. PMID:27378864

  7. Effects of time on feed and post-mortem aging on palatability and lipid composition of crossbred Wagyu beef.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y R; Busboom, J R; Cornforth, D P; Shenton, H T; Gaskins, C T; Johnson, K A; Reeves, J J; Wright, R W; Cronrath, J D

    1996-06-01

    Twenty-seven Wagyu-sired steers were fed for 90 (14 steers) or 170 (13 steers) days to study the effects of time on feed on palatability and fatty acid composition, and the effects of post-mortem aging time (2, 4 or 10 days) on palatability. Hot carcass weight, fat thickness, longissimus dorsi muscle area, yield grade, estimated kidney, pelvic and heart fat and maturity score were increased (p < 0.05) by an additional 80 days on the high concentrate feed, but marbling was not changed (p > 0.05). Feeding the high concentrate diet for 170 days increased Warner-Bratzler shear force values (p < 0.05) and tended to decrease tenderness (p > 0.05), flavor intensity and connective tissue scores. For the 90 day feeding group, 4 days of aging improved connective tissue score (p < 0.05) and tended to increase (p > 0.05) tenderness scores and decrease shear force, compared with 2 days of aging. For the 170 day feeding group, 10 days of aging improved (p < 0.05) shear force and all sensory attributes except flavor intensity, compared to 2 days of aging. An additional 80 days on feed decreased (p < 0.05) stearic acid and total saturated fatty acids (SFA) and generally increased (p < 0.05) monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), MUFA:SFA, and PUFA:SFA in subcutaneous fat and longissimus dorsi muscle. The cholesterol content of fat and muscle increased (p < 0.05) as time on feed increased. Ninety days on a high concentrate diet was adequate for yearling crossbred Wagyu steers to produce highly acceptable carcasses. The additional 80 days on feed produced little or no overall benefit and the steers became overfinished and less tender. Ten days post-mortem aging improved (p < 0.05) all palatability attributes except flavor intensity.

  8. Mass spectrometric measurement of [beta]-endorphin and methionine enkephalin in human pituitaries. Tumors and post-mortem controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierz, Jozef J.; Dass, Chhabil; Robertson, James T.; Desiderio, Dominic M.

    1991-12-01

    Two opioid neuropeptides, [beta]-endorphin (BE), which derives from the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) precursor, and methionine enkephalin (DE), which derives from proenkephalin A, were quantified with fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) in individual human pituitaries (post-mortem) and in tumor pituitaries (post-surgery) in a study to clarify the molecular processes that occur in tumor formation. FAB-MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode linked the precursor ion (the MH+ ion) of the peptide with a fragment ion that was unique to each neuropeptide to increase significantly the molecular specificity of these quantitative analytical measurements. The ME was quantified as the intact pentapeptide, whereas BE1-31 was quantified via its tryptic fragment BE20-24 (NAIIK). Two corresponding stable isotope-incorporated peptides, [2H5-4Phe]-ME and [2H4-22Ile]-BE1-31,human respectively, were used as the internal standards. The amount of each neuropeptide quantified in control post-mortem pituitaries (n = 8) was 75.2 ± 29.6(s.e.m.) pmol ME mg-1 protein, and in the pituitary tumor samples (n = 5), 25.0 ± 7.6 pmol ME mg-1 protein and 36.0 ± 14.8 pmol BE mg-1 protein. The difference in the BE content between the control and tumor pituitaries was significant (p = 0.004), and reflected an aberrant metabolism of the POMC system in those human pituitary tumor tissues.

  9. Evaluation of post-mortem oxymetry with reference to the causes of death.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Fukita, K; Oritani, S; Ishida, K; Zhu, B L

    1997-06-23

    We examined blood samples of 214 forensic autopsy cases, excluding fire victims, on a CO-oximeter system in order to evaluate post-mortem oxymetric profiles with reference to the causes of death. Oxyhemoglobin (O2-Hb) levels in the left and right heart blood, respectively, ranged from 0 to 97.7% and from 0 to 92.1%, showing no apparent correlation with the post-mortem intervals or rectal temperatures. In nearly 60% of the cases, O2-Hb was lower than 10%. A high O2-Hb level (over 50%) in the left heart blood was most frequently observed in death from cold exposure and occasionally in fatalities from blunt injuries and stab/incised wounds with or without medical care. O2-Hb in the heart blood was usually very low (under 10%) in fatalities from asphyxiation, drowning, poisoning and natural diseases. A greatest oxymetric variation was observed in death from injuries, probably due to varied causal mechanisms of death. In most cases, the differences between blood O2-Hb levels in the heart and iliac vessels were within 15%; whereas O2-Hb in the cerebral venous blood was usually evidently higher than that in the right heart blood. An inverse relation of O2-Hb levels to total hemoglobin contents was observed slightly for the blood in the heart and iliac vessels, and more obviously for the cerebral venous blood. The above post-mortem oxymetric profiles were considered to at least partially reflect the final balance of oxygen uptake and consumption in dying process, possibly also affected by the circulatory status, giving an objective index to the color of cadaveric blood (hypostasis), although it should be assessed in consideration of post-mortem interference and total hemoglobin contents. In any case, however, post-mortem oxymetry seemed to have a limited value owing to severe systemic hypoxia which would be a common final state before death from various fatal traumas and diseases, maybe except for those with extremely short agony.

  10. Human decomposition and the reliability of a 'Universal' model for post mortem interval estimations.

    PubMed

    Cockle, Diane L; Bell, Lynne S

    2015-08-01

    Human decomposition is a complex biological process driven by an array of variables which are not clearly understood. The medico-legal community have long been searching for a reliable method to establish the post-mortem interval (PMI) for those whose deaths have either been hidden, or gone un-noticed. To date, attempts to develop a PMI estimation method based on the state of the body either at the scene or at autopsy have been unsuccessful. One recent study has proposed that two simple formulae, based on the level of decomposition humidity and temperature, could be used to accurately calculate the PMI for bodies outside, on or under the surface worldwide. This study attempted to validate 'Formula I' [1] (for bodies on the surface) using 42 Canadian cases with known PMIs. The results indicated that bodies exposed to warm temperatures consistently overestimated the known PMI by a large and inconsistent margin for Formula I estimations. And for bodies exposed to cold and freezing temperatures (less than 4°C), then the PMI was dramatically under estimated. The ability of 'Formulae II' to estimate the PMI for buried bodies was also examined using a set of 22 known Canadian burial cases. As these cases used in this study are retrospective, some of the data needed for Formula II was not available. The 4.6 value used in Formula II to represent the standard ratio of time that burial decelerates the rate of decomposition was examined. The average time taken to achieve each stage of decomposition both on, and under the surface was compared for the 118 known cases. It was found that the rate of decomposition was not consistent throughout all stages of decomposition. The rates of autolysis above and below the ground were equivalent with the buried cases staying in a state of putrefaction for a prolonged period of time. It is suggested that differences in temperature extremes and humidity levels between geographic regions may make it impractical to apply formulas developed in

  11. Technical note: early post-mortem changes of human bone in taphonomy with μCT.

    PubMed

    Le Garff, Erwan; Mesli, Vadim; Delannoy, Yann; Colard, Thomas; Demondion, Xavier; Becart, Anne; Hedouin, Valéry

    2016-12-29

    Post-mortem interval (PMI) estimation is an important issue in forensic medicine, particularly for criminal purposes and legal limitation periods. The goal of the present study is to examine the evolution of the trabecular cranial vault bone after 4 weeks of conservation in a controlled environment with micro-tomography (μCT) analyses.Four bone samples were extracted from a fresh human cranial vault (a donation to science according to the French law) and conserved in an air-controlled environment. The samples were weighed and μCT scanned at a 10-μm resolution every week after death for a month. The μCT features were identical for every sample. Each set of data from the μCTs was reconstructed, registered, and analyzed in terms of the total volume, bone volume, bone surface, number of trabeculae, trabeculae thickness, and mean distance of the trabeculae. The samples were conserved in a glass box in 20 °C air with 60% humidity in a laboratory hood between each μCT acquisition. Descriptive statistics were determined. Each sample was observed and compared to itself over time.After 1 month of conservation, the mean bone volume (-1.9%), bone surface (-5.1%), and trabecular number (-12.35%) decreased, whereas the mean trabecular separation (+5.55%) and trabecular thickness (+12.7%) increased. Many variations (i.e., increases and decreases) were observed between the extraction of the sample and the end of the 4 weeks of conservation. The present observations may be explained by bone diagenesis. Previous observations have indicated that protein and lipid losses occur with bone weight and volume losses. These diagenesis effects may explain the trabecular modifications observed in the present work. We observed many bone variations with the μCT scans between the beginning and the end of the conservation that had no explanations. Additional studies, particularly studies involving statistics, need to be performed to confirm our observations and explain these results

  12. Compressive rib fracture: peri-mortem and post-mortem trauma patterns in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Kieser, Jules A; Weller, Sarah; Swain, Michael V; Neil Waddell, J; Das, Raj

    2013-07-01

    Despite numerous studies on high impact fractures of ribs, little is known about compressive rib injuries. We studied rib fractures from a biomechanical and morphological perspective using 15, 5th ribs of domestic pigs Sus scrofa, divided into two groups, desiccated (representing post-mortem trauma) and fresh ribs with intact periosteum (representing peri-mortem trauma). Ribs were axially compressed and subjected to four-point bending in an Instron 3339 fitted with custom jigs. Morphoscopic analysis of resultant fractures consisted of standard optical methods, micro-CT (μCT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). During axial compression, fresh ribs had slightly higher strength because of energy absorption capabilities of their soft and fluidic components. In flexure tests, dry ribs showed typical elastic-brittle behaviour with long linear load-extension curves, followed by relatively short non-linear elastic (hyperelastic) behaviour and brittle fracture. Fresh ribs showed initial linear-elastic behaviour, followed by strain softening, visco-plastic responses. During the course of loading, dry bone showed minimal observable damage prior to the onset of unstable fracture. In contrast, fresh bone showed buckling-like damage features on the compressive surface and cracking parallel to the axis of the bone. Morphologically, all dry ribs fractured precipitously, whereas all but one of the fresh ribs showed incomplete fracture. The mode of fracture, however, was remarkably similar for both groups, with butterfly fractures predominating (7/15, 46.6% dry and wet). Our study highlights the fact that under controlled loading, despite seemingly similar butterfly fracture morphology, fresh ribs (representing perimortem trauma) show a non-catastrophic response. While extensive strain softening observed for the fresh bone does show some additional micro-cracking damage, it appears that the periosteum may play a key role in imparting the observed pseudo-ductility to the ribs

  13. [Unusual questions of evidence in a case of offensive post-mortem dismemberment].

    PubMed

    Madea, Burkhard; Schmidt, Peter; Preuss, Johanna; Dietmar, Elenz

    2010-01-01

    In cases of post-mortem dismemberment, the main medicolegal task apart from the identification and assignment of body parts to one or several individuals is the determination of the cause of death and the course of events. Notably in cases of offensive postmortem dismemberment, the medicolegal findings on the victim may be of special importance also for the psychiatric evaluation of the suspect. In a case of offensive post-mortem dismemberment, parts of the body were found in a stone quarry and in the apartment where the victim and the suspect had lived together. Since the suspect refused to make a statement, the medicolegal findings were of great relevance for the psychiatric evaluation. In the first trial, in which the psychiatric expert was not present when the forensic pathologist gave his opinion, the Regional Court acquitted the suspect of murder and committed him to a psychiatric hospital. The accused successfully appealed on points of law, as the form and content of the psychiatric expert opinion did not comply with the requirements of procedural law and the forensic psychiatric state of the art. In a second trial, additional psychiatric experts were summoned. In that hearing, the task of the medicolegal expert was to reconstruct the course of events as far as possible to create a reliable basis for the psychiatric evaluation, as the suspect refused to make a statement both with regard to his personal circumstances and the facts of the case and did not agree to a psychiatric exploration either. The motivational and morphological criteria of the medicolegal classification as offensive post-mortem dismemberment with a cannibalistic background are discussed. In addition, some issues to be answered such as the detection of bloodstains on nonporous surfaces by means of leucocrystalviolet and the time of heat exposure of burned body parts are dealt with.

  14. Post mortem results of laser-optical system packaged for use in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Michelle R.

    2008-08-01

    The design and packaging of laser-optical system was tested to harsh environments outside lab conditions and post mortem activities will be discussed. Previously, custom mounts and bonded optical assemblies were environmentally tested to ensure their survivability. The results verified the sub-assemblies would enable the design of a laser-optical initiation system that could be fielded for use in extreme conditions. The design package, which utilized the proven opto-mechanical sub-assemblies, was then tested to the same levels as the sub-assemblies. The test regiment encompassed the harshest environments currently utilized. Temperature tests were performed ranging from a maximum of +75 degrees C to a minimum of -55 degrees C, allowing for two hour soak at each temperature set point. Vibration tests were performed to a maximum level of 15.5 grms for forty seconds in each of three critical axes. Shock tests were performed to a maximum impulse level of 5700 G's for the sub-assemblies with a 1.1 millisecond long pulse; whereas the packaged laser system maximum level reached was 3700 G's at 1.1 millisecond long pulse. The laser-optical assembly was visually inspected and functionally tested before and after each test to verify survival. As designed, the system covers were laser welded shut for hermetic seal. The only open port was the laser output for testing and verification of laser performance. No optical cables were utilized. Therefore the visual inspection of the interior was performed post mortem. The post mortem results will be discussed as will the potential of redesigns on future packaging strategies.

  15. Post-mortem histopathology underlying β-amyloid PET imaging following flutemetamol F 18 injection.

    PubMed

    Ikonomovic, Milos D; Buckley, Chris J; Heurling, Kerstin; Sherwin, Paul; Jones, Paul A; Zanette, Michelle; Mathis, Chester A; Klunk, William E; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Ironside, James; Ismail, Azzam; Smith, Colin; Thal, Dietmar R; Beach, Thomas G; Farrar, Gill; Smith, Adrian P L

    2016-12-12

    In vivo imaging of fibrillar β-amyloid deposits may assist clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), aid treatment selection for patients, assist clinical trials of therapeutic drugs through subject selection, and be used as an outcome measure. A recent phase III trial of [(18)F]flutemetamol positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in 106 end-of-life subjects demonstrated the ability to identify fibrillar β-amyloid by comparing in vivo PET to post-mortem histopathology. Post-mortem analyses demonstrated a broad and continuous spectrum of β-amyloid pathology in AD and other dementing and non-dementing disease groups. The GE067-026 trial demonstrated 91% sensitivity and 90% specificity of [(18)F]flutemetamol PET by majority read for the presence of moderate or frequent plaques. The probability of an abnormal [(18)F]flutemetamol scan increased with neocortical plaque density and AD diagnosis. All dementia cases with non-AD neurodegenerative diseases and those without histopathological features of β-amyloid deposits were [(18)F]flutemetamol negative. Majority PET assessments accurately reflected the amyloid plaque burden in 90% of cases. However, ten cases demonstrated a mismatch between PET image interpretations and post-mortem findings. Although tracer retention was best associated with amyloid in neuritic plaques, amyloid in diffuse plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy best explain three [(18)F]flutemetamol positive cases with mismatched (sparse) neuritic plaque burden. Advanced cortical atrophy was associated with the seven false negative [(18)F]flutemetamol images. The interpretation of images from pathologically equivocal cases was associated with low reader confidence and inter-reader agreement. Our results support that amyloid in neuritic plaque burden is the primary form of β-amyloid pathology detectable with [(18)F]flutemetamol PET imaging. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01165554. Registered June 21, 2010; NCT02090855. Registered March 11, 2014.

  16. Post-mortem re-cloning of a transgenic red fluorescent protein dog.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Koo, Ok Jae; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Geon-A; Park, Eun Jung; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong-Chun

    2011-12-01

    Recently, the world's first transgenic dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, cellular senescence is a major limiting factor for producing more advanced transgenic dogs. To overcome this obstacle, we rejuvenated transgenic cells using a re-cloning technique. Fibroblasts from post-mortem red fluorescent protein (RFP) dog were reconstructed with in vivo matured oocytes and transferred into 10 surrogate dogs. One puppy was produced and confirmed as a re-cloned dog. Although the puppy was lost during birth, we successfully established a rejuvenated fibroblast cell line from this animal. The cell line was found to stably express RFP and is ready for additional genetic modification.

  17. Determination of medicinal and illicit drugs in post mortem dental hard tissues and comparison with analytical results for body fluids and hair samples.

    PubMed

    Klima, Miriam; Altenburger, Markus J; Kempf, Jürgen; Auwärter, Volker; Neukamm, Merja A

    2016-08-01

    In burnt or skeletonized bodies dental hard tissue sometimes is the only remaining specimen available. Therefore, it could be used as an alternative matrix in post mortem toxicology. Additionally, analysis of dental tissues could provide a unique retrospective window of detection. For forensic interpretation, routes and rates of incorporation of different drugs as well as physicochemical differences between tooth root, tooth crown and carious material have to be taken into account. In a pilot study, one post mortem tooth each from three drug users was analyzed for medicinal and illicit drugs. The pulp was removed in two cases; in one case the tooth was root canal treated. The teeth were separated into root, crown and carious material and drugs were extracted from the powdered material with methanol under ultrasonication. The extracts were screened for drugs by LC-MS(n) (ToxTyper™) and quantitatively analyzed with LC-ESI-MS/MS in MRM mode. The findings were compared to the analytical results for cardiac blood, femoral blood, urine, stomach content and hair. In dental hard tissues, 11 drugs (amphetamine, MDMA, morphine, codeine, norcodeine, methadone, EDDP, fentanyl, tramadol, diazepam, nordazepam, and promethazine) could be detected and concentrations ranged from approximately 0.13pg/mg to 2,400pg/mg. The concentrations declined in the following order: carious material>root>crown. Only the root canal treated tooth showed higher concentrations in the crown than in the root. In post mortem toxicology, dental hard tissue could be a useful alternative matrix facilitating a more differentiated consideration of drug consumption patterns, as the window of detection seems to overlap those for body fluids and hair.

  18. Antipsychotic drugs attenuate aberrant DNA methylation of DTNBP1 (dysbindin) promoter in saliva and post-mortem brain of patients with schizophrenia and Psychotic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Abdolmaleky, Hamid M; Pajouhanfar, Sara; Faghankhani, Masoomeh; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Mostafavi, Ashraf; Thiagalingam, Sam

    2015-12-01

    Due to the lack of genetic association between individual genes and schizophrenia (SCZ) pathogenesis, the current consensus is to consider both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Here, we report the examination of DNA methylation status of DTNBP1 promoter region, one of the most credible candidate genes affected in SCZ, assayed in saliva and post-mortem brain samples. The Illumina DNA methylation profiling and bisulfite sequencing of representative samples were used to identify methylation status of the DTNBP1 promoter region. Quantitative methylation specific PCR (qMSP) was employed to assess methylation of DTNBP1 promoter CpGs flanking a SP1 binding site in the saliva of SCZ patients, their first-degree relatives and control subjects (30, 15, and 30/group, respectively) as well as in post-mortem brains of patients with SCZ and bipolar disorder (BD) versus controls (35/group). qRT-PCR was used to assess DTNBP1 expression. We found DNA hypermethylation of DTNBP1 promoter in the saliva of SCZ patients (∼12.5%, P = 0.036), particularly in drug-naïve patients (∼20%, P = 0.011), and a trend toward hypermethylation in their first-degree relatives (P = 0.085) versus controls. Analysis of post-mortem brain samples revealed an inverse correlation between DTNBP1 methylation and expression, and normalization of this epigenetic change by classic antipsychotic drugs. Additionally, BD patients with psychotic depression exhibited higher degree of methylation versus other BD patients (∼80%, P = 0.025). DTNBP1 promoter DNA methylation may become a key element in a panel of biomarkers for diagnosis, prevention, or therapy in SCZ and at risk individuals pending confirmatory studies with larger sample sizes to attain a higher degree of significance.

  19. Performance of immunoassays in screening for opiates, cannabinoids and amphetamines in post-mortem blood.

    PubMed

    Hino, Yukiko; Ojanperä, Ilkka; Rasanen, Ilpo; Vuori, Erkki

    2003-01-28

    Several immunoassay methods for screening of abused drugs in whole blood were evaluated in post-mortem forensic toxicology. Blood samples known to be positive or negative for opiates, cannabinoids or amphetamines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were analysed by EMIT II Plus and EMIT d.a.u., Syva RapidTest and Triage 8 after acetone precipitation. In these experiments, the EMIT immunoassay method was modified by using the Dade Behring VIVA analyser to detect substances more sensitively. Low concentrations of abused drugs were detected in blood samples. The sensitivities of the modified EMIT method for opiates, cannabinoids and amphetamines were 100, 86 and 98%, respectively, whereas the values were below 86% with the other methods. The specificities of all immunoassay methods for opiates and cannabinoids were 83% or above but 51-85% for amphetamines. Sample rejection occurred in a few cases with the EMIT amphetamine assays. The modified EMIT immunoassay system presented here seems to be useful for screening of drugs of abuse in post-mortem blood samples, especially when urine is not available.

  20. The post-mortem relationship between beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), acetone and ethanol in ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Simon; Smith, Christopher; Cassidy, Diane

    2010-05-20

    A reduced blood pH (ketoacidosis) from the production of beta-oxidative ketone bodies as a result of alcoholism (alcoholic ketoacidosis, AKA) or diabetes (diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) can feature in many fatalities and analytical evidence can be used to support a pathological diagnosis, or provide a possible cause of death in the absence of other pathologically significant findings. Existing beliefs concerning the relationship of BHB concentrations, acetone and ethanol have been re-examined by analysis of BHB, acetone and ethanol in over 350 fatalities grouped into alcoholics, diabetics, alcoholic diabetics, coupled with speculative cases and those with an alternative cause of death. Uniquely, the concentrations of BHB were measured in post-mortem blood, urine and vitreous humour using selective GC-MS. The results showed that existing beliefs need to be re-evaluated. Ethanol is not always low (<10mg/dL) or absent in cases of AKA. Also, the absence of acetone precludes [corrected] a high BHB (>250mg/L), therefore acetone can be used as an initial marker pathologically significant ketoacidosis. For blood and urine BHB concentrations the following interpretative ranges can be used (in mg/L); normal (<50mg/L), raised (51-249mg/L), high and pathologically significant (>250mg/L). Initial data suggest vitreous humour BHB could be a useful alternative in the absence of blood (same interpretative ranges may also apply). Analytical recommendation for investigation of post-mortem ketoacidosis is also presented.

  1. Alteration of fatty acid profile and nucleotide-related substances in post-mortem breast meat of α-lipoic acid-fed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Y

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of α-lipoic acid supplementation on post-mortem changes in the fatty acid profile and concentrations of nucleotide-related substances, especially those of a taste-active compound, inosine 5'-monophosphate, in chicken meat. Mixed-sex broiler chicks aged 14 d were divided into three groups of 16 birds each and were fed on diets supplemented with α-lipoic acid at levels of 0, 100 or 200 mg/kg for 4 weeks. Blood and breast muscle samples were taken at 42 d of age under the fed condition and then after fasting for 18 h. The breast muscle obtained from fasted chickens was subsequently refrigerated at 2°C for one and 3 d. α-Lipoic acid supplementation did not affect any plasma metabolite concentration independently of feeding condition, while a slight increase in plasma glucose concentration was shown with both administration levels of α-lipoic acid. In early post-mortem breast muscle under the fed condition, α-lipoic acid had no effect on concentrations of fatty acids or nucleotides of ATP, ADP, and AMP. In post-mortem breast tissues obtained from fasted chickens, total fatty acid concentrations were markedly increased by α-lipoic acid feeding at 200 mg/kg irrespective of length of refrigeration. This effect was dependent on stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid. However, among fatty acids, the only predominantly increased unsaturated fatty acid was oleic acid. Dietary supplementation with α-lipoic acid at 200 mg/kg increased the inosine 5'-monophosphate concentration in breast meat and, in contrast, reduced the subsequent catabolites, inosine and xanthine, regardless of the length of refrigeration. Therefore, the present study suggests that α-lipoic acid administration altered the fatty acid profile and improved meat quality by increasing taste-active substances in the post-mortem meat obtained from fasted chickens.

  2. Assessing various Infrared (IR) microscopic imaging techniques for post-mortem interval evaluation of human skeletal remains

    PubMed Central

    Roider, Clemens; Ritsch-Marte, Monika; Pemberger, Nadin; Cemper-Kiesslich, Jan; Hatzer-Grubwieser, Petra; Parson, Walther; Pallua, Johannes Dominikus

    2017-01-01

    Due to the influence of many environmental processes, a precise determination of the post-mortem interval (PMI) of skeletal remains is known to be very complicated. Although methods for the investigation of the PMI exist, there still remains much room for improvement. In this study the applicability of infrared (IR) microscopic imaging techniques such as reflection-, ATR- and Raman- microscopic imaging for the estimation of the PMI of human skeletal remains was tested. PMI specific features were identified and visualized by overlaying IR imaging data with morphological tissue structures obtained using light microscopy to differentiate between forensic and archaeological bone samples. ATR and reflection spectra revealed that a more prominent peak at 1042 cm-1 (an indicator for bone mineralization) was observable in archeological bone material when compared with forensic samples. Moreover, in the case of the archaeological bone material, a reduction in the levels of phospholipids, proteins, nucleic acid sugars, complex carbohydrates as well as amorphous or fully hydrated sugars was detectable at (reciprocal wavelengths/energies) between 3000 cm-1 to 2800 cm-1. Raman spectra illustrated a similar picture with less ν2PO43−at 450 cm-1 and ν4PO43− from 590 cm-1 to 584 cm-1, amide III at 1272 cm-1 and protein CH2 deformation at 1446 cm-1 in archeological bone material/samples/sources. A semi-quantitative determination of various distributions of biomolecules by chemi-maps of reflection- and ATR- methods revealed that there were less carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates as well as amorphous or fully hydrated sugars in archaeological samples compared with forensic bone samples. Raman- microscopic imaging data showed a reduction in B-type carbonate and protein α-helices after a PMI of 3 years. The calculated mineral content ratio and the organic to mineral ratio displayed that the mineral content ratio increases, while the organic to mineral ratio decreases with

  3. Assessing various Infrared (IR) microscopic imaging techniques for post-mortem interval evaluation of human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Woess, Claudia; Unterberger, Seraphin Hubert; Roider, Clemens; Ritsch-Marte, Monika; Pemberger, Nadin; Cemper-Kiesslich, Jan; Hatzer-Grubwieser, Petra; Parson, Walther; Pallua, Johannes Dominikus

    2017-01-01

    Due to the influence of many environmental processes, a precise determination of the post-mortem interval (PMI) of skeletal remains is known to be very complicated. Although methods for the investigation of the PMI exist, there still remains much room for improvement. In this study the applicability of infrared (IR) microscopic imaging techniques such as reflection-, ATR- and Raman- microscopic imaging for the estimation of the PMI of human skeletal remains was tested. PMI specific features were identified and visualized by overlaying IR imaging data with morphological tissue structures obtained using light microscopy to differentiate between forensic and archaeological bone samples. ATR and reflection spectra revealed that a more prominent peak at 1042 cm-1 (an indicator for bone mineralization) was observable in archeological bone material when compared with forensic samples. Moreover, in the case of the archaeological bone material, a reduction in the levels of phospholipids, proteins, nucleic acid sugars, complex carbohydrates as well as amorphous or fully hydrated sugars was detectable at (reciprocal wavelengths/energies) between 3000 cm-1 to 2800 cm-1. Raman spectra illustrated a similar picture with less ν2PO43-at 450 cm-1 and ν4PO43- from 590 cm-1 to 584 cm-1, amide III at 1272 cm-1 and protein CH2 deformation at 1446 cm-1 in archeological bone material/samples/sources. A semi-quantitative determination of various distributions of biomolecules by chemi-maps of reflection- and ATR- methods revealed that there were less carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates as well as amorphous or fully hydrated sugars in archaeological samples compared with forensic bone samples. Raman- microscopic imaging data showed a reduction in B-type carbonate and protein α-helices after a PMI of 3 years. The calculated mineral content ratio and the organic to mineral ratio displayed that the mineral content ratio increases, while the organic to mineral ratio decreases with time

  4. [Forensic radiology].

    PubMed

    Stein, K M; Grünberg, K

    2009-01-01

    Forensic radiology includes both clinical and postmortem forensic radiology. Clinical forensic radiology deals with imaging of healthy people from a legal point of view, such as for determining age or to prove and document injuries in victims of crime. Postmortem forensic radiology deals with the application of modern radiological methods in order to optimise post-mortem diagnosis. X-ray examination has for decades been routinely used in postmortem diagnosis. Newer developments include the application of postmortem computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging; these are the methods with the greatest information potential but also with the greatest deviations from diagnostics in living persons. Application of radiological methods for securing evidence in criminal procedures is still in its infancy. Radiologists' technical understanding and forensic doctors' knowledge of postmortem changes in a corpse must be synergised.

  5. Longitudinal assessment of short-term memory deterioration in a logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia with post-mortem confirmed Alzheimer's Disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Tree, Jeremy; Kay, Janice

    2015-09-01

    In the field of dementia research, there are reports of neurodegenerative cases with a focal loss of language, termed primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Currently, this condition has been further sub-classified, with the most recent sub-type dubbed logopenic variant (PPA-LV). As yet, there remains somewhat limited evaluation of the characteristics of this condition, with no studies providing longitudinal assessment accompanied by post-mortem examination. Moreover, a key characteristic of the PPA-LV case is a deterioration of phonological short-term memory, but again little work has scrutinized the nature of this impairment over time. The current study seeks to redress these oversights and presents detailed longitudinal examination of language and memory function in a case of PPA-LV, with special focus on tests linked to components of phonological short-term memory function. Our findings are then considered with reference to a contemporary model of the neuropsychology of phonological short-term memory. Additionally, post-mortem examinations indicated Alzheimer's disease type pathology, providing further evidence that the PPA-LV presentation may reflect an atypical presentation of this condition.

  6. Post-mortem investigations on a leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea stranded along the Northern Adriatic coastline.

    PubMed

    Poppi, Lisa; Zaccaroni, Annalisa; Pasotto, Daniela; Dotto, Giorgia; Marcer, Federica; Scaravelli, Dino; Mazzariol, Sandro

    2012-08-13

    Leatherback sea turtles Dermochelys coriacea are regularly reported in the Mediterranean Sea but rarely reach the northern Adriatic Sea. In the summer of 2009, a well-preserved carcass of an adult female of this species was found dead along the coast of Lido di Venezia. A complete necropsy was carried out, along with evaluation of levels of tissue trace elements. The the post-mortem revealed acute severe bacterial gastroenteritis caused by Photobacterium damselae ssp. piscicida, an opportunistic agent that infected an apparently debilitated animal weakened by ingested plastic debris. High levels of heavy metals (Hg, Pb, Cd and As) found in the liver and kidneys might have contributed to the animal's demise. These findings support previous indications that marine debris is one of the major threats to marine animals, particularly for critically endangered species such as the leatherback turtle.

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing in Post-mortem Genetic Testing of Young Sudden Cardiac Death Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lahrouchi, Najim; Behr, Elijah R.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young (<40 years) occurs in the setting of a variety of rare inherited cardiac disorders and is a disastrous event for family members. Establishing the cause of SCD is important as it permits the pre-symptomatic identification of relatives at risk of SCD. Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) is defined as SCD in the setting of negative autopsy findings and toxicological analysis. In such cases, reaching a diagnosis is even more challenging and post-mortem genetic testing can crucially contribute to the identification of the underlying cause of death. In this review, we will discuss the current achievements of “the molecular autopsy” in young SADS cases and provide an overview of key challenges in assessing pathogenicity (i.e., causality) of genetic variants identified through next-generation sequencing. PMID:27303672

  8. [Application of the hexagon-OBTI test and the RSID blood test for the determination of the post-mortem interval of bone samples].

    PubMed

    Ebach, Sarah C; Ramsthaler, Frank; Birngruber, Christoph G; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2011-01-01

    In this serial experiment, five human bones with known post-mortem intervals (PMI) in a soil environment from five different epochs (0.2 to approximately 2000 years) were tested in a blind setup with two established rapid tests for the identification of human blood traces (Hexagon-OBTI test and RSID blood test). Based on previous study results concerning the usability of the Luminol test for the first assessment of the PMI of osseous remains, the question arising was whether those test procedures, which are highly sensitive for the detection of human blood components, could also be used to narrow down the post-mortem interval. Five test series were conducted applying modified standard protocols of the manufactures. The aim was to find out whether with prior reaction steps or a prolonged time of incubation hemoglobin or its metabolites can be dissolved from the bone and positive test results can be achieved dependent on the PMI. Four test series yielded negative results for all bone samples and one test series a uniformly weak positive result. The results indicate that rapid tests based on the detection of blood are not suitable for the determination of the PMI of bone samples despite the modification of the standard protocols. Further thorough research is required to clarify the postmortem degradation of hemoglobin in bones.

  9. Matching simulated antemortem and post-mortem dental radiographs from human skulls by dental students and experts: testing skills for pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, A; Richards, A; Heidmann, J

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of undergraduate dental students to match simulated ante- and post-mortem radiographs in human skulls with experts as controls for the 1)number of post-mortem images needed for a match, 2)accuracy of the matches, and 3)time spent for a match. A film bitewing was recorded in each side of 51 dentate dry human skulls (a.m.-images) and digital images of the teeth were recorded using a sensor (p.m.-images). 102 correctly matching and 102 non-matching image pairs were constructed. Ten students and three experts scored the image pairs as: certain match, certain non-match, or uncertain. None of the experts but half of the students made false positive scores. Half of the students performed just as accurately as the experts. All students (except one who made 8 FPs) asked for more p.m.-images than did the experts before deciding on a match, however, all students, but one, also spent less time per image pair than did the experts before deciding on a match (P<0.001). This simulated test sample may identify dental students and dentists with abilities for pattern recognition and thus help in the decision on who might be included as part of a forensic dental team when extra help is needed.

  10. Post-mortem culture of Balamuthia mandrillaris from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of a case of granulomatous amoebic meningoencephalitis, using human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Samantha; Sissons, James; Tucker, Julie; Rogers, Claire; Nolder, Debbie; Warhurst, David; Alsam, Selwa; White, Jonathan M L; Higgins, E M; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-10-01

    The first isolation in the UK of Balamuthia mandrillaris amoebae from a fatal case of granulomatous amoebic meningoencephalitis is reported. Using primary cultures of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), amoebae were isolated from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The cultures showed a cytopathic effect at 20-28 days, but morphologically identifiable B. mandrillaris amoebae were seen in cleared plaques in subcultures at 45 days. The identification of the organism was later confirmed using PCR on Chelex-treated extracts. Serum taken while the patient was still alive reacted strongly with slide antigen prepared from cultures of the post-mortem isolate, and also with those from a baboon B. mandrillaris strain at 1:10,000 in indirect immunofluorescence, but with Acanthamoeba castellanii (Neff) at 1:160, supporting B. mandrillaris to be the causative agent. If the presence of amoebae in the post-mortem CSF reflects the condition in life, PCR studies on CSF and on biopsies of cutaneous lesions may also be a valuable tool. The role of HBMECs in understanding the interactions of B. mandrillaris with the blood-brain barrier is discussed.

  11. Identification of different domains of calpain and calpastatin from chicken blood and their role in post-mortem aging of meat during holding at refrigeration temperatures.

    PubMed

    Biswas, A K; Tandon, S; Beura, C K

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple, specific and rapid analytical method for accurate identification of calpain and calpastatin from chicken blood and muscle samples. The method is based on liquid-liquid extraction technique followed by casein Zymography detection. The target compounds were extracted from blood and meat samples by tris buffer, and purified and separated on anion exchange chromatography. It has been observed that buffer (pH 6.7) containing 50 mM tris-base appears to be excellent extractant as activity of analytes was maximum for all samples. The concentrations of μ-, m-calpain and calpastatin detected in the extracts of blood, breast and thigh samples were 0.28-0.55, 1.91-2.05 and 1.38-1.52 Unit/g, respectively. For robustness, the analytical method was applied to determine the activity of calpains (μ and m) in eighty postmortem muscle samples. It has been observed that μ-calpain activity in breast and thigh muscles declined very rapidly at 48 h and 24 h, respectively while activity of m-calpain remained stable. Shear force values were also declined with the increase of post-mortem aging showing the presence of ample tenderness of breast and thigh muscles. Finally, it is concluded that the method standardized for the detection of calpain and calpastatin has the potential to be applied to identify post-mortem aging of chicken meat samples.

  12. Ablation of fast-spiking interneurons in the dorsal striatum, recapitulating abnormalities seen post-mortem in Tourette syndrome, produces anxiety and elevated grooming.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Li, L; Pittenger, C

    2016-06-02

    Tic disorders, including Tourette syndrome (TS), are thought to involve pathology of cortico-basal ganglia loops, but their pathology is not well understood. Post-mortem studies have shown a reduced number of several populations of striatal interneurons, including the parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), in individuals with severe, refractory TS. We tested the causal role of this interneuronal deficit by recapitulating it in an otherwise normal adult mouse using a combination transgenic-viral cell ablation approach. FSIs were reduced bilaterally by ∼40%, paralleling the deficit found post-mortem. This did not produce spontaneous stereotypies or tic-like movements, but there was increased stereotypic grooming after acute stress in two validated paradigms. Stereotypy after amphetamine, in contrast, was not elevated. FSI ablation also led to increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze, but not to alterations in motor learning on the rotorod or to alterations in prepulse inhibition, a measure of sensorimotor gating. These findings indicate that a striatal FSI deficit can produce stress-triggered repetitive movements and anxiety. These repetitive movements may recapitulate aspects of the pathophysiology of tic disorders.

  13. Capillary zone electrophoresis and artificial neural networks for estimation of the post-mortem interval (PMI) using electrolytes measurements in human vitreous humour.

    PubMed

    Bocaz-Beneventi, G; Tagliaro, F; Bortolotti, F; Manetto, G; Havel, J

    2002-02-01

    Determination of electrolyte concentrations (mainly potassium) in vitreous humour has long been considered an important tool in human death investigations for the estimation of the post-mortem interval (PMI). On the basis of its well known potential in ion analysis, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) has recently been applied to achieve a rapid and simultaneous determination of inorganic ions in this extracellular fluid. In the present work, artificial neural networks (ANN) were applied for modelling of the relationship of multicomponent CZE analysis of K+, NH4+, Na+, and Ba2+ ions in vitreous humour with PMI. In a study based on 61 cases with different causes of death and a known PMI ranging from 3 to 144 h, the use of ANNs considering all inorganic ion data from the human vitreous humour, achieved a substantial improvement of post-mortem interval prediction. Good linear correlation was observed (r2 = 0.98) and in comparison to the traditional linear least squares (LLS) method applied only to K+ levels in the vitreous humour, the prediction of PMI with ANN was improved by a factor of 5 from approximately +/- 15 h to less than 3 h.

  14. Potential use of bacterial community succession for estimating post-mortem interval as revealed by high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Juanjuan; Fu, Xiaoliang; Liao, Huidan; Hu, Zhenyu; Long, Lingling; Yan, Weitao; Ding, Yanjun; Zha, Lagabaiyila; Guo, Yadong; Yan, Jie; Chang, Yunfeng; Cai, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition is a complex process involving the interaction of both biotic and abiotic factors. Microbes play a critical role in the process of carrion decomposition. In this study, we analysed bacterial communities from live rats and rat remains decomposed under natural conditions, or excluding sarcosaphagous insect interference, in China using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. A total of 1,394,842 high-quality sequences and 1,938 singleton operational taxonomic units were obtained. Bacterial communities showed notable variation in relative abundance and became more similar to each other across body sites during the decomposition process. As decomposition progressed, Proteobacteria (mostly Gammaproteobacteria) became the predominant phylum in both the buccal cavity and rectum, while Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in the mouth and rectum, respectively, gradually decreased. In particular, the arrival and oviposition of sarcosaphagous insects had no obvious influence on bacterial taxa composition, but accelerated the loss of biomass. In contrast to the rectum, the microbial community structure in the buccal cavity of live rats differed considerably from that of rats immediately after death. Although this research indicates that bacterial communities can be used as a “microbial clock” for the estimation of post-mortem interval, further work is required to better understand this concept. PMID:27052375

  15. Post-mortem prediction of primal and selected retail cut weights of New Zealand lamb from carcass and animal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ngo, L; Ho, H; Hunter, P; Quinn, K; Thomson, A; Pearson, G

    2016-02-01

    Post-mortem measurements (cold weight, grade and external carcass linear dimensions) as well as live animal data (age, breed, sex) were used to predict ovine primal and retail cut weights for 792 lamb carcases. Significant levels of variance could be explained using these predictors. The predictive power of those measurements on primal and retail cut weights was studied by using the results from principal component analysis and the absolute value of the t-statistics of the linear regression model. High prediction accuracy for primal cut weight was achieved (adjusted R(2) up to 0.95), as well as moderate accuracy for key retail cut weight: tenderloins (adj-R(2)=0.60), loin (adj-R(2)=0.62), French rack (adj-R(2)=0.76) and rump (adj-R(2)=0.75). The carcass cold weight had the best predictive power, with the accuracy increasing by around 10% after including the next three most significant variables.

  16. COB231 targets amyloid plaques in post-mortem human brain tissue and in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Garin, Dominique; Virgone-Carlotta, Angélique; Gözel, Bülent; Oukhatar, Fatima; Perret, Pascale; Marti-Battle, Danièle; Touret, Monique; Millet, Philippe; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Meyronet, David; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Laferla, Frank M; Demeunynck, Martine; Chierici, Sabine; Sallanon Moulin, Marcelle; Ghezzi, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Previous works have shown the interest of naturally fluorescent proflavine derivatives to label Abeta deposits in vitro. This study aimed to further characterize the properties of the proflavine 3-acetylamino-6-[3-(propargylamino)propanoyl]aminoacridine (COB231) derivative as a probe. This compound was therefore evaluated on human post-mortem and mice brain slices and in vivo in 18-month-old triple transgenic mice APPswe, PS1M146V and tauP301L (3xTgAD) mice presenting the main characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD). COB231 labelled amyloid plaques on brain slices of AD patients, and 3xTgAD mice at 10 and 0.1 μM respectively. However, no labelling of the neurofibrillary tangle-rich areas was observed either at high concentration or in the brain of fronto-temporal dementia patients. The specificity of this mapping was attested in mice using Thioflavin S and IMPY as positive controls of amyloid deposits. After intravenous injection of COB231 in old 3xTgAD mice, fluorescent amyloid plaques were detected in the cortex and hippocampus, demonstrating COB231 blood–brain barrier permeability. We also controlled the cellular localization of COB231 on primary neuronal cultures and showed that COB231 accumulates into the cytoplasm and not into the nucleus. Finally, using a viability assay, we only detected a slight cytotoxic effect of COB231 (< 10%) for the highest concentration (100 μM).

  17. Endogenous cannabinoids in amygdala and hippocampus in post-mortem brains of Cloninger type 1 and 2 alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Kärkkäinen, Olli K; Lehtonen, Marko; Laukkanen, Virpi; Tupala, Erkki; Hyytiä, Petri; Kautiainen, Hannu; Tiihonen, Jari; Callaway, J C; Storvik, Markus

    2013-08-01

    Accumulating evidence continues to link certain aspects of the endogenous cannabinoid (EC) system with alcohol dependence, negative-reinforcement learning, and the modulation of stress responses. Specific alterations in brain regions that are related to stress and negative-reinforcement learning have been reported to exist in Cloninger type 1 and type 2 alcoholics. To study possible differences in profiles of EC systems between Cloninger type 1 (n = 9) and type 2 (n = 8) alcoholics and non-alcoholic control subjects (n = 10), we analyzed post-mortem amygdala and hippocampus brain samples for several ECs by quantitative liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass-spectrometric detection. A significant difference was found between these 3 groups in terms of EC profiles in the amygdala (p = 0.037). In particular, this difference was prominent for variations in docosahexaenoylethanolamide levels, which were significantly higher in type 1 alcoholics (p = 0.022) when compared to controls. There was also a large negative correlation between anandamide concentration and mGlu1/5 receptor density in the hippocampi of Cloninger type 1 alcoholics (R = -0.88, p = 0.002), which was not seen in Cloninger type 2 alcoholics or in controls. Although preliminary, and from relatively small diagnostic groups, these results suggest that the EC system profile may be altered in the hippocampus and amygdala of Cloninger type 1 alcoholics.

  18. [Medicolegal experiences in external post-mortem examinations before cremation--a retrospective analysis of the years 1998-2008].

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Philipp; Schyma, Christian; Madea, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a retrospective analysis of 16,541 external post-mortem examinations carried out before cremation by the Institute of Forensic Medicine of the University of Bonn between 1998 and 2008 with regard to different variables (age, sex, place of death, cause of death etc.). In more than 50 % of cases, the individuals had died in a hospital followed by their apartment or a nursing home. The first post-mortem examination was mainly performed by hospital doctors followed by emergency doctors and office practitioners. As to the age distribution, the 6th to 8th decade of life was prevalent. In 99.8 %, a natural death was certified in the first external post-mortem and only in 0.2 % the manner of death was determined to be non-natural or unclear. In more than half of the cases, the non-natural deaths were determined by emergency doctors. Deaths wrongly classified in the first external post-mortem were mostly accidents and deaths associated with medical procedures. Although the second external examination before cremation is very useful in detecting previously overlooked signs of homicide, it is only of limited value in homicides with few external traces or for detecting underlying diseases and causes of death. In this respect, the second external examination before cremation can only check the plausibility of the cause of death given by the attending physician. The gold standard for a reliable certification of the manner and cause of death remains the autopsy.

  19. Can we infer post mortem interval on the basis of decomposition rate? A case from a Portuguese cemetery.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M Teresa; Cunha, Eugénia

    2013-03-10

    Post mortem interval estimation is crucial in forensic sciences for both positive identification and reconstruction of perimortem events. However, reliable dating of skeletonized remains poses a scientific challenge since human remains decomposition involves a set of complex and highly variable processes. Many of the difficulties in determining post mortem interval and/or the permanence of a body in a specific environment relates with the lack of systematic observations and research in human body decomposition modalities in different environments. In March 2006, in order to solve a problem of misidentification, a team of the South Branch of Portuguese National Institute of Legal Medicine carried out the exhumation of 25 identified individuals buried for almost five years in the same cemetery plot. Even though all individuals shared similar post mortem intervals, they presented different stages of decomposition. In order to analyze the post mortem factors associated with the different stages of decomposition displayed by the 25 exhumed individuals, the stages of decomposition were scored. Information regarding age at death and sex of the individuals were gathered and recorded as well as data in the cause of death and grave and coffin characteristics. Although the observed distinct decay stages may be explained by the burial conditions, namely by the micro taphonomic environments, individual endogenous factors also play an important role on differential decomposition as witnessed by the present case.

  20. Post-mortem evidence of idiopathic left ventricular hypertrophy and idiopathic interstitial myocardial fibrosis: is exercise the cause?

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Gregory; Sheppard, Mary; George, Keith; Shave, Robert; Prasad, Sanjay; O’Hanlon, Rory; Sharma, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of an experienced, highly trained marathon runner who died suddenly while running. On post-mortem examination, left ventricle hypertrophy and idiopathic interstitial myocardial fibrosis was found. We believe that life-long, repetitive bouts of arduous physical activity resulted in fibrous replacement of the myocardium, causing a pathological substrate for the propagation of fatal arrhythmias. PMID:21686644

  1. Changes of microbial spoilage, lipid-protein oxidation and physicochemical properties during post mortem refrigerated storage of goat meat.

    PubMed

    Sabow, Azad Behnan; Sazili, Awis Qurni; Aghwan, Zeiad Amjad; Zulkifli, Idrus; Goh, Yong Meng; Ab Kadir, Mohd Zainal Abidin; Nakyinsige, Khadijah; Kaka, Ubedullah; Adeyemi, Kazeem Dauda

    2016-06-01

    Examined was the effect of post mortem refrigerated storage on microbial spoilage, lipid-protein oxidation and physicochemical traits of goat meat. Seven Boer bucks were slaughtered, eviscerated and aged for 24 h. The Longissimus lumborum (LL) and Semitendinosus (ST) muscles were excised and subjected to 13 days post mortem refrigerated storage. The pH, lipid and protein oxidation, tenderness, color and drip loss were determined in LL while microbiological analysis was performed on ST. Bacterial counts generally increased with increasing aging time and the limit for fresh meat was reached at day 14 post mortem. Significant differences were observed in malondialdehyde (MDA) content at day 7 of storage. The thiol concentration significantly reduced as aging time increased. The band intensities of myosin heavy chain (MHC) and troponin-T significantly decreased as storage progressed, while actin remained relatively stable. After 14 days of aging, tenderness showed significant improvement while muscle pH and drip loss reduced with increase in storage time. Samples aged for 14 days had higher lightness (P < 0.05) and lower (P < 0.05) yellowness and redness. Post mortem refrigerated storage influenced oxidative and microbial stability and physico-chemical properties of goat meat.

  2. Forensic relevance of post-mortem CT imaging of the haemopericardium in determining the cause of death.

    PubMed

    Filograna, Laura; Thali, Michael J; Marchetti, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    The post-mortem diagnosis of pericardial tamponade is associated with several medical legal problems. Thus, we explored whether post-mortem computed tomography might provide useful and reliable information for the diagnosis of this relevant disease in combination with autopsy data. We retrospectively reviewed the post-mortem computed tomography and autopsy reports of 15 autopsy cases with haemopericardium detected at the Institute of Forensic Medicine in Berne from July 2005 to February 2010. Two computer tomography findings were examined in combination with autopsy results. The first was the "hyperdense armoured heart," which has been previously described as post-mortem evidence of heart beating for a time after the initiation of intrapericardial bleeding. The second was the "flattening of the anterior surface" of the heart which has been previously observed in vivo as a sign of the compression effect of the haemopericardium on the heart. Our retrospective analysis showed the combined presence of both of these findings in all cases of autopsy evidence of pericardial tamponade with the exception of one case. In contrast, the concomitance of both of them was never observed in cases of autopsy death due to haemorrhage in which neither the flattening of the anterior surface of the heart was detected except for one case. In conclusion, these results should be considered a first step toward the potentially using post-mortem computed tomography in combination with autopsy data in the diagnosis of pericardial tamponade especially considering the possibility to detect sign as the flattened heart signal which cannot be assessed after opening the pericardium at autopsy.

  3. Post mortem CT scans as a supplementary teaching method in gross anatomy.

    PubMed

    Buenting, Mara; Mueller, Tjark; Raupach, Tobias; Luers, Georg; Wehrenberg, Uwe; Gehl, Axel; Anders, Sven

    2016-11-01

    Despite increasing the integration of radiologic imaging teaching in anatomy dissection courses, studies on learning outcome of these interventions are rare or have certain shortcomings in study design. In this study, students were randomly allocated to an intervention group (n=53) receiving five weekly CT-courses of 30min duration during a 6-week gross anatomy course. Students in the control group (n=329) received no additional teaching. Total teaching time did not differ among groups. All students were asked to participate in a pre- and post-course self-assessment (comparative self-assessment; CSA) of learning objectives related to anatomical spatial relationships and a post-course formative assessment on radiologic anatomy. Items of both assessments were matched. Moreover, students of the intervention group were asked to evaluate the CT-courses. Most participants of the intervention group classified the CT-courses as "good" or "very good". Nevertheless, results of the CSA and formative assessment did not differ among study and control groups. These findings indicate that the teaching intervention (CT-courses) did not have an impact on recognition of anatomical structures in radiological images beyond the knowledge acquired in the anatomical dissection course. As a consequence, interventions integrating radiology imaging into dissection courses should be based on psychological considerations of how to best foster student learning. Learning outcome has to be monitored, as results of evaluation surveys can be misleading. Further research on curricular concepts is needed considering both short- and long-term effects.

  4. Practical experience in post-mortem tissue donation in consideration of the European tissue law.

    PubMed

    Karbe, Thomas; Braun, Christian; Wulff, Birgit; Schröder, Ann Sophie; Püschel, Klaus; Bratzke, Hansjürgen; Parzeller, Markus

    2010-03-01

    In consequence of the European guidelines of safety and quality standards for the donation, retrieval, storing and distribution of human tissues and cells the purpose of tissue transplantation was implemented into German legislation in May 2007. The law came into effect on August 1st 2007 considering of the European rules. The Institutes for Legal Medicine of the University of Frankfurt/Main and the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf developed a model for tissue retrieval. The Institute of Legal Medicine (I.f.R.) at the University Medical Center Hamburg cooperates with the German Institute of Cell and Tissue Replacement (Deutsches Institut für Zell--und Gewebeersatz DIZG). Potential post-mortem tissue donors (PMTD) among the deceased are selected by standardized sets of defined criteria. The procedure is guided by the intended exclusion criteria of the tissue regulation draft (German Transplant Law TPG GewV) in accordance with the European Guideline (2006/17/EC). Following the identification of the donor and subsequent removal of tissue, the retrieved samples were sent to the DIZG, a non-profit tissue bank according to the tissue regulation. Here the final processing into transplantable tissue grafts takes place, which then results in the allocation of tissue to hospitals in Germany and other European countries. The Center of Legal Medicine at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Medical Center Frankfurt/Main cooperates since 2000 with Tutogen, a pharmaceutical company. Harvesting of musculoskeletal tissues follows corresponding regulations. To verify the outcome of PMTD at the I.f.R. Hamburg, two-statistic analysis over 12 and 4 months have been implemented. Our results have shown an increasing number of potential appropriate PMTD within the second inquiry interval but a relatively small and unvaryingly rate of successful post-mortem tissue retrievals similar to the first examination period. Thus, the aim of the model developed by the I.f.R. is to

  5. Increased acetyl and total histone levels in post-mortem Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Pritika J; Lill, Claire; Faull, Richard; Curtis, Maurice A; Dragunow, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Histone acetylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a critical role in chromatin remodelling and transcriptional regulation. There is increasing evidence that epigenetic modifications may become compromised in aging and increase susceptibility to the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Immunohistochemical labelling of free-floating sections from the inferior temporal gyrus (Alzheimer's disease, n=14; control, n=17) and paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays containing tissue from the middle temporal gyrus (Alzheimer's disease, n=29; control, n=28) demonstrated that acetyl histone H3 and acetyl histone H4 levels, as well as total histone H3 and total histone H4 protein levels, were significantly increased in post-mortem Alzheimer's disease brain tissue compared to age- and sex-matched neurologically normal control brain tissue. Changes in acetyl histone levels were proportional to changes in total histone levels. The increase in acetyl histone H3 and H4 was observed in Neuronal N immunopositive pyramidal neurons in Alzheimer's disease brain. Using immunolabelling, histone markers correlated significantly with the level of glial fibrillary acidic protein and HLA-DP, -DQ and -DR immunopositive cells and with the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (hyperphosphorylated tau load and β-amyloid plaques). Given that histone acetylation changes were correlated with changes in total histone protein, it was important to evaluate if protein degradation pathways may be compromised in Alzheimer's disease. Consequently, significant positive correlations were also found between ubiquitin load and histone modifications. The relationship between histone acetylation and ubiquitin levels was further investigated in an in vitro model of SK-N-SH cells treated with the proteasome inhibitor Mg132 and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. In this model, compromised protein degradation caused by Mg132 lead to elevated histone

  6. [Obligation to report occupational diseases. Importance of external post-mortem examinations before cremation].

    PubMed

    Verhoff, M A; Risse, M; Alles, J-U; Müller, K-M; Stachetzki, U

    2004-05-01

    The practical use of the legally required documentation of occupational diseases is demonstrated by a case of asbestos-related pleural mesothelioma. During the mandatory inquest before cremation, information of manifest pleural mesothelioma had been relayed to the widow of the patient, and an investigation for a possible occupational disease was performed. Reconstruction of the case showed that in the course of 3 months at least 13 physicians had been involved in in-hospital as well as ambulatory therapeutic measures. Until death, none of them informed the trade association about a suspected occupational disease in accordance with BK 4105 of the codex of occupational diseases, although the diagnosis of manifest pleural mesothelioma had been histologically confirmed already 10 weeks prior to the death of the patient. This case demonstrates obvious and evident deficiencies in applying the Code of Social Law VII, which requires physicians to report occupational diseases. In addition, it shows the importance of the post-mortem examination as a control function before cremation.

  7. Intermittent fasting modulation of the diabetic syndrome in sand rats. III. Post-mortem investigations.

    PubMed

    Belkacemi, Louiza; Selselet-Attou, Ghalem; Bulur, Nurdan; Louchami, Karim; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J

    2011-01-01

    The present report concerns several post-mortem variables examined in sand rats that were either maintained on a vegetal diet (control animals) or exposed first during a 20-day transition period to a mixed diet consisting of a fixed amount of a hypercaloric food and decreasing amounts of the vegetal food and then to a 30-day experimental period of exposure to the hypercaloric food. During the latter period, all animals were either given free access to food or fasting daily for 15 h, i.e. from 5.00 p.m. to 8.00 a.m. The body weight, liver wet weight, pancreas wet weight, plasma glucose and haemoglobin A1c concentration, plasma insulin concentration, insulinogenic index, insulin resistance HOMA, plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentration, liver triglyceride and phospholipid content were all measured. Pancreatic islet (insulin, GLUT2) and liver (lipid droplets) histology were also examined. The main findings consisted in a lower body weight of fasting than non-fasting animals, a higher liver weight in non-diabetic and diabetic rats than in control non-fasting (but not so in fasting) animals, a decrease of pancreas weight in non-diabetic and diabetic as distinct from control animals, a fasting-induced decrease in plasma glucose, plasma insulin and insulin resistance HOMA, plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentration and triglyceride liver content.

  8. Stability of ethyl glucuronide in urine, post-mortem tissue and blood samples.

    PubMed

    Schloegl, Haiko; Dresen, Sebastian; Spaczynski, Karin; Stoertzel, Mylène; Wurst, Friedrich Martin; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    The stability of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) under conditions of degradation was examined in urine samples of nine volunteers and in post-mortem tissue (liver, skeletal muscle) and blood taken from seven corpses at autopsies. Analysis was performed via LC-MS/MS. EtG concentrations in urine samples ranged from 2.5 to 296.5 mg/l. When stored at 4 degrees C in airtight test tubes, EtG concentrations remained relatively constant; when stored at room temperature (RT) for 5 weeks in ventilated vials, variations of EtG concentrations ranged from a 30% decrease to an 80% increase, with an average of 37.5% increase. Liver and skeletal muscle tissue of three corpses with positive blood alcohol concentrations (BAC; ranging from 0.106 to 0.183 g%) were stored for 4 weeks and analysed periodically. EtG concentrations decreased 27.7% on average in 4 weeks storage at RT but EtG was still detectable in all samples with initial EtG concentrations higher than 1 mug/g. Blood and liver samples of four corpses with negative BACs were stored at RT after addition of 0.1 g% ethanol, and no new formation of EtG was observed.

  9. Sudden unexpected death related to enterovirus myocarditis: histopathology, immunohistochemistry and molecular pathology diagnosis at post-mortem

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Viral myocarditis is a major cause of sudden unexpected death in children and young adults. Until recently, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) has been the most commonly implicated virus in myocarditis. At present, no standard diagnosis is generally accepted due to the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic tests. This has prompted health professionals to seek new diagnostic approaches, which resulted in the emergence of new molecular pathological tests and a more detailed immunohistochemical and histopathological analysis. When supplemented with immunohistochemistry and molecular pathology, conventional histopathology may provide important clues regarding myocarditis underlying etiology. Methods This study is based on post-mortem samples from sudden unexpected death victims and controls who were investigated prospectively. Immunohistochemical investigations for the detection of the enteroviral capsid protein VP1 and the characterization and quantification of myocardial inflammatory reactions as well as molecular pathological methods for enteroviral genome detection were performed. Results Overall, 48 sudden unexpected death victims were enrolled. As for controls, 37 cases of unnatural traffic accident victims were studied. Enterovirus was detected in 6 sudden unexpected death cases (12.5 %). The control samples were completely enterovirus negative. Furthermore, the enteroviral capsid protein VP1 in the myocardium was detected in enterovirus-positive cases revealed by means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Unlike control samples, immunohistochemical investigations showed a significant presence of T and B lymphocytes in sudden unexpected death victims. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate clearly a higher prevalence of viral myocarditis in cases of sudden unexpected death compared to control subjects, suggesting that coxsackie B enterovirus may contribute to myocarditis pathogenesis significantly. PMID:22966951

  10. Distinct proteomic profiles in post-mortem pituitary glands from bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Stelzhammer, Viktoria; Alsaif, Murtada; Chan, Man K; Rahmoune, Hassan; Steeb, Hannah; Guest, Paul C; Bahn, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). To examine this further, we carried out proteomic profiling of post-mortem pituitaries from 13 BD and 14 MDD patients, in comparison to 15 controls. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)) analysis showed that BD patients had significantly increased levels of the major pituitary hormones pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and galanin. BD patients also showed changes in proteins associated with gene transcription, stress response, lipid metabolism and growth signalling. In contrast, LC-MS(E) profiling revealed that MDD patients had significantly decreased levels of the prohormone-converting enzyme carboxypeptidease E and follow-up enzymatic analysis showed decreased activity of prolyl-oligopeptidase convertase. This suggested that altered prohormone processing may occur in pituitaries of MDD patients. In addition, MDD patients had significant changes in proteins involved in intracellular transport and cytoskeletal signalling. Finally, we carried out selective reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry profiling for validation of protein changes in key biological pathways. This confirmed increased POMC levels in BD patients with no change in the levels of this prohormone in MDD. This study demonstrates that proteomic profiling analysis of the pituitary can lead to new insights into the pathophysiology of BD and MDD. Also, given that the pituitary directly releases a variety of bioactive molecules into the bloodstream, many of the proteins identified here could serve as focal points in the search for peripheral biomarkers in clinical or drug treatment studies of BD and MDD patients.

  11. Dynamic Responses of Intact Post Mortem Human Surrogates from Inferior-to-Superior Loading at the Pelvis.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Moore, Jason; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-11-01

    During certain events such as underbody blasts due to improvised explosive devices, occupants in military vehicles are exposed to inferior-to-superior loading from the pelvis. Injuries to the pelvis-sacrum-lumbar spine complex have been reported from these events. The mechanism of load transmission and potential variables defining the migration of injuries between pelvis and or spinal structures are not defined. This study applied inferior-to-superior impacts to the tuberosities of the ischium of supine-positioned five post mortem human subjects (PMHS) using different acceleration profiles, defined using shape, magnitude and duration parameters. Seventeen tests were conducted. Overlay temporal plots were presented for normalized (impulse momentum approach) forces and accelerations of the sacrum and spine. Scatter plots showing injury and non-injury data as a function of peak normalized forces, pulse characteristics, impulse and power, loading rate and sacrum and spine accelerations were evaluated as potential metrics related to pathological outcomes with the focus of examining the role of the pulse characteristics from inferior-to-superior loading of the pelvis-sacrum-lumbar spine complex. Interrelationships were explored between non-fracture and fracture outcomes, and fracture patterns with a focus on migration of injuries from the hip-only to hip and spine to spine-only regions. Observations indicate that injury to the pelvis and or spine from inferior-to-superior loading is associated with pulse and not just peak velocity. The role of the effect of mass recruitment and injury migration parallel knee-thigh-hip complex studies, suggest a wider application of the recruitment concept and the role of the pulse characteristics.

  12. A comparative analysis of the pedestrian injury risk predicted by mechanical impactors and post mortem human surrogates.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Jason R; Crandall, Jeff R; Deng, Bing

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the risk of injury to pedestrians involved in vehicle-pedestrian impacts as predicted by two different types of risk assessment tools: the pedestrian subsystem impactors recommended by the European Enhanced Vehicle-Safety Committee (EEVC) and post-mortem human surrogates (PMHS). Seven replicate full-scale vehicle-pedestrian impact tests were performed with PMHS and a mid-sized sedan travelling at 40 km/h. The PMHS were instrumented with six-degree-of-freedom sensor cubes and sensor data were transformed and translated to predict impact kinematics at the head center of gravity, proximal tibiae, and knee joints. Single EEVC WG 17/EuroNCAP adult headform, upper legform and lower legform impactor tests of the same vehicle were selected for comparison based on the proximity of their impact locations to that of the PMHS. The PMHS experienced higher HIC values (1830/2160) and lower impact velocities (8.5/7.5 m/s) than the impactor (1532 and 11.1 m/s) in impacts at the lower fourth of the windshield. The lower legform impactor (31 degrees) and PMHS (right: 25-40 degrees, and left: 24-39 degrees) predicted similar maximum knee bending angles. Some PMHS tibial accelerations (114-613 g) exceeded the proposed acceptance criteria (150-200 g) in both the absence and presence of distal tibial fracture, with the impactor predicting a similar result (335 g). The upper legform impactor test resulted in bending moments (361 Nm) and forces (6.3 kN) exceeding the acceptance criteria, while PMHS sustained pelvic injuries in 6 out of 7 tests.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase B receptor signalling in post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Conley, Robert R; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2008-12-01

    Teenage suicide is a major public health concern, but its neurobiology is not very well understood. Stress and major mental disorders are major risk factors for suicidal behaviour, and it has been shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) are not only regulated by stress but are also altered in these illnesses. We therefore examined if BDNF/TrkB signalling is altered in the post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims. Protein and mRNA expression of BDNF and of TrkB receptors were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), Brodmann's Area 9 (BA 9), and hippocampus obtained from 29 teenage suicide victims and 25 matched normal control subjects. Protein expression was determined using the Western blot technique; mRNA levels by a quantitative RT-PCR technique. The protein expression of BDNF was significantly decreased in the PFC of teenage suicide victims compared with normal control subjects, whereas no change was observed in the hippocampus. Protein expression of TrkB full-length receptors was significantly decreased in both PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims without any significant changes in the truncated form of TrkB receptors. mRNA expression of both BDNF and TrkB was significantly decreased in the PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims compared with normal control subjects. These studies indicate a down-regulation of both BDNF and its receptor TrkB in the PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims, which suggests that stress and altered BDNF may represent a major vulnerability factor in teenage suicidal behaviour.

  14. Post-mortem examination and laboratory-based analysis for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis among dairy cattle in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Proaño-Pérez, Freddy; Benitez-Ortiz, Washington; Desmecht, Daniel; Coral, Marco; Ortiz, Julio; Ron, Lenin; Portaels, Françoise; Rigouts, Leen; Linden, Annick

    2011-08-01

    Veterinary inspection in slaughterhouses allows for the detection of macroscopic lesions reminiscent of bovine tuberculosis, but the presence of Mycobacterium bovis must be confirmed by laboratory methods. This study aimed at comparing the performances of the standard diagnostic tools used to identify M. bovis in tissue specimens sampled from suspicious animals. During a two years period, 1390 cattle were inspected at the Machachi abattoir in the Mejia canton - Ecuador. A total of 33 animals with granulomatous lesions were detected, representing 2.33% (16/687) and 2.42% (17/703) animals examined in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Ninety-four tissue specimens were sampled and screened for the presence of mycobacteria. Acid-fast bacilli were identified in one third of the suspicious cattle (11/33) and suggestive microscopic lesions in 27.3% (9/33) of the samples examined by direct microscopy and histopathology, respectively. Culturing on Stonebrink medium and 16S-rRNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) yielded 36.4% (12/33) and 27.3% (9/33) of positives, respectively. Compared to culture, other diagnostic procedures displayed a lower sensitivity, with 56.5% for PCR, and 43.5% for direct microscopy and histopathology; however, the specificity was higher (94.4% for PCR and microscopy, and 97.2% for histopathology). We conclude that reliable post-mortem laboratory testing either requires the combination of a set of available diagnostic tools or necessitates the development of improved new-generation tools with better sensitivity and specificity characteristics.

  15. How is post-mortem microbiology appraised by pathologists? Results from a practice survey conducted by ESGFOR.

    PubMed

    Saegeman, V; Cohen, M C; Alberola, J; Ziyade, N; Farina, C; Cornaglia, G; Fernández-Rodríguez, A

    2017-02-24

    Post-mortem microbiology (PMM) is an important tool in forensic pathology, assisting to determine the cause and manner of death. However, there is a lack of standardisation of PMM sampling. In order to get a better insight into the methods used, the available technical options and developmental needs, ESCMID Study Group for Forensic and Postmortem Microbiology (ESGFOR) members designed a survey aimed at pathologists regarding common practices of PMM in clinical and forensic autopsies. Multiple choice questions were developed based on Cumulative Techniques and Procedures in Clinical Microbiology (Cumitech). The questionnaire was sent to pathologists mainly across Europe and Turkey using SurveyMonkey. The survey had 147 respondents. Although all pathologists were aware of the existence of PMM, 39% (19/49) of the participants were not using it. The three main indications for PMM were: (i) clinical suspicion of an infection not confirmed antemortem (83%), (ii) infectious signs at autopsy (83%) and (iii) as part of a standard protocol for foetal/perinatal or paediatric death (67%). Almost 80% of the participants using PMM stated taking 1-10 samples per case. Of the requested examinations, a general bacteriological culture (96%) and a specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for a particular infectious agent (34%) were most popular. The most frequent samples were: heart blood (66%), peripheral femoral blood (49%), spleen (64%) and lung (56%). Eighty-nine percent of the participants considered PMM a useful resource when investigating the cause of death. Although there are some common uses, this survey indicates that there is a need for improvement towards standardising sampling procedures in PMM.

  16. Post-mortem in the Victorian asylum: practice, purpose and findings at the Littlemore County Lunatic Asylum, 1886-7.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Lynsey T

    2017-04-01

    This article examines the purpose of the post-mortem in the late Victorian asylum and discusses what the findings reveal about contemporary understanding of mental health. By examining the practice at the Littlemore Asylum of Oxford, the definition of the asylum post-mortem will be questioned and issues of consent and ownership of the dead body explored. It will be argued that the purpose of the examination was partly to appease the demands of the Commissioners in Lunacy, to protect the asylum against accusations of malpractice, and to appease the resident assistant medical officer's own morbid curiosity. The examinations would therefore be better defined as dissections. This article will challenge understanding of institutional death, the legal processes required for dissection, and mental healthcare.

  17. Extraction and analysis of chlorpromazine and its major metabolites in post mortem material by enzymic digestion and HPLC.

    PubMed

    Allender, W J; Archer, A W; Dawson, A G

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of chlorpromazine and some of its major metabolites in post mortem specimens by enzymic digestion of the tissues with ethyl acetate using a simple, single micro-extraction method, followed by HPLC of the extracts using a 10 micron silica column packing and a mobile phase consisting of ethanolamine:methanol:water. Separation and quantitation of 7-hydroxy-chlorpromazine, chlorpromazine, chlorpromazine sulfoxide, norchlorpromazine and norchlorpromazine sulfoxide was achieved employing mesoridazine as an internal standard.

  18. Post-mortem changes in the concentration of lactic acid, phosphates and pH in the muscles of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) according to the perimortal situation.

    PubMed

    Mačanga, Ján; Koréneková, Beáta; Nagy, Jozef; Marcinčák, Slavomir; Popelka, Peter; Kožárová, Ivona; Korének, Marián

    2011-08-01

    In this study changes in the concentrations of lactate, phosphates, and pH values of water extracts of muscles of transported and hunted rabbits during ripening were determined. Concentrations of lactate were higher in the muscles of hunted rabbits. The highest differences were obtained 24h after kill/hunt. Concentrations of lactate in the muscles of hunted rabbits were decreasing, while in the muscles of transported rabbits we observed it to increase in the 7th day and then decrease in the 14th day. Higher concentrations of phosphates were found in the muscles of transported wild rabbits. During the ripening process concentrations of phosphates were decreasing in muscles of both groups. Muscles of hunted rabbits had lower pH values during the whole ripening process. Our research showed that concentrations of lactate, phosphates and pH value post-mortem depended on the perimortal situations.

  19. Effect of stress-induced high post-mortem pH on protease activity and tenderness of beef.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, J A; Jaime, I; Santolaria, P; Sañudo, C; Albertí, P; Roncalés, P

    1997-02-01

    Forty-four Swiss Brown young bulls were stressed by regrouping unfamiliar animals before slaughter. M. longissimus thoracis (6-9th ribs) of carcasses were analysed for post-mortem pH, protease activities (m- and α-calpain, calpastatin and cathepsin B + L), Warner-Bratzler shear force and sensory tenderness and juiciness. Muscles were classified into three groups, according to ultimate pH values: > 6.3, 6.3-5.8 and < 5.8. The most significant difference related to high pH was a higher activity of m-calpain at 7th day post mortem. It was also found that meat showing the highest pH was significantly more tender and juicy. Sensory tenderness was highly correlated with activity of m-calpain at 7th day post mortem (r = 0.776) and with ultimate pH (r = 0.708). It is concluded that high ultimate pH induced by stress significantly increases m-calpain activity, and this results in a greatly enhanced tenderisation of beef meat.

  20. SU-E-T-481: In Vivo and Post Mortem Animal Irradiation: Measured Vs. Calculated Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, P; Heintz, B; Sandoval, D; Weber, W; Melo, D; Guilmette, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Computerized radiation therapy treatment planning is performed on almost all patients today. However it is seldom used for laboratory irradiations. The first objective is to assess whether modern radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP) systems accurately predict the subject dose by comparing in vivo and decedent dose measurements to calculated doses. The other objective is determine the importance of using a RTP system for laboratory irradiations. Methods: 5 MOSFET radiation dosimeters were placed enterically in each subject (2 sedated Rhesus Macaques) to measure the absorbed dose at 5 levels (carina, lung, heart, liver and rectum) during whole body irradiation. The subjects were treated with large opposed lateral fields and extended distances to cover the entire subject using a Varian 600C linac. CT simulation was performed ante-mortem (AM) and post-mortem (PM). To compare AM and PM doses, calculation points were placed at the location of each dosimeter in the treatment plan. The measured results were compared to the results using Varian Eclipse and Prowess Panther RTP systems. Results: The Varian and Prowess treatment planning system agreed to within in +1.5% for both subjects. However there were significant differences between the measured and calculated doses. For both animals the calculated central axis dose was higher than prescribed by 3–5%. This was caused in part by inaccurate measurement of animal thickness at the time of irradiation. For one subject the doses ranged from 4% to 7% high and the other subject the doses ranged 7% to 14% high when compared to the RTP doses. Conclusions: Our results suggest that using proper CT RTP system can more accurately deliver the prescribed dose to laboratory subjects. It also shows that there is significant dose variation in such subjects when inhomogeneities are not considered in the planning process.

  1. Post-mortem findings in southern right whales Eubalaena australis at Península Valdés, Argentina, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    McAloose, Denise; Rago, M Virginia; Di Martino, Matías; Chirife, Andrea; Olson, Sarah H; Beltramino, Lucas; Pozzi, Luciana M; Musmeci, Luciana; La Sala, Luciano; Mohamed, Nadia; Sala, Juan Emilio; Bandieri, Lucas; Andrejuk, Julian; Tomaszewicz, Ania; Seimon, Tracie; Sironi, Mariano; Samartino, Luis E; Rowntree, Victoria; Uhart, Marcela M

    2016-04-12

    Between 2003 and 2012, 605 southern right whales (SRW; Eubalaena australis) were found dead along the shores of Península Valdés (PV), Argentina. These deaths included alarmingly high annual losses between 2007 and 2012, a peak number of deaths (116) in 2012, and a significant number of deaths across years in calves-of-the-year (544 of 605 [89.9%]; average = 60.4 yr(-1)). Post-mortem examination and pathogen testing were performed on 212 whales; 208 (98.1%) were calves-of-the-year and 48.0% of these were newborns or neonates. A known or probable cause of death was established in only a small number (6.6%) of cases. These included ship strike in a juvenile and blunt trauma or lacerations (n = 5), pneumonia (n = 4), myocarditis (n = 2), meningitis (n = 1), or myocarditis and meningitis (n = 1) in calves. Ante-mortem gull parasitism was the most common gross finding. It was associated with systemic disease in a single 1-2 mo old calf. Immunohistochemical labeling for canine distemper virus, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp., and PCR for cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV), influenza A, and apicomplexan protozoa were negative on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung and brain samples from a subset of whales; PCR for Brucella spp. was positive in a newborn/neonate with pneumonia. Skin samples from whales with gull parasitism were PCR negative for CeMV, poxvirus, and papillomavirus. This is the first long-term study to investigate and summarize notable post-mortem findings in the PV SRW population. Consistent, significant findings within or between years to explain the majority of deaths and those in high-mortality years remain to be identified.

  2. Comparing different post-mortem human samples as DNA sources for downstream genotyping and identification.

    PubMed

    Calacal, Gayvelline C; Apaga, Dame Loveliness T; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Jimenez, Joseph Andrew D; Lagat, Ludivino J; Villacorta, Renato Pio F; Lim, Maria Cecilia F; Fortun, Raquel D R; Datar, Francisco A; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A

    2015-11-01

    The capability of DNA laboratories to perform genotyping procedures from post-mortem remains, including those that had undergone putrefaction, continues to be a challenge in the Philippines, a country characterized by very humid and warm conditions all year round. These environmental conditions accelerate the decomposition of human remains that were recovered after a disaster and those that were left abandoned after a crime. When considerable tissue decomposition of human remains has taken place, there is no other option but to extract DNA from bone and/or teeth samples. Routinely, femur shafts are obtained from recovered bodies for human identification because the calcium matrix protects the DNA contained in the osteocytes. In the Philippines, there is difficulty in collecting femur samples after natural disasters or even human-made disasters, because these events are usually characterized by a large number of fatalities. Identification of casualties is further delayed by limitation in human and material resources. Hence, it is imperative to test other types of biological samples that are easier to collect, transport, process and store. We analyzed DNA that were obtained from body fluid, bone marrow, muscle tissue, clavicle, femur, metatarsal, patella, rib and vertebral samples from five recently deceased untreated male cadavers and seven male human remains that were embalmed, buried for ∼ 1 month and then exhumed. The bodies had undergone different environmental conditions and were in various stages of putrefaction. A DNA extraction method utilizing a detergent-washing step followed by an organic procedure was used. The utility of bone marrow and vitreous fluid including bone marrow and vitreous fluid that was transferred on FTA(®) cards and subjected to autosomal STR and Y-STR DNA typing were also evaluated. DNA yield was measured and the presence or absence of PCR inhibitors in DNA extracts was assessed using Plexor(®)HY. All samples were amplified using

  3. Post-mortem assessment of hypoperfusion of cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Taya; Miners, Scott; Love, Seth

    2015-04-01

    Perfusion is reduced in the cerebral neocortex in Alzheimer's disease. We have explored some of the mechanisms, by measurement of perfusion-sensitive and disease-related proteins in post-mortem tissue from Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and age-matched control brains. To distinguish physiological from pathological reduction in perfusion (i.e. reduction exceeding the decline in metabolic demand), we measured the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein induced under conditions of tissue hypoxia through the actions of hypoxia-inducible factors, and the myelin associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 (MAG:PLP1) ratio, which declines in chronically hypoperfused brain tissue. To evaluate possible mechanisms of hypoperfusion, we also measured the levels of amyloid-β40, amyloid-β42, von Willebrand factor (VWF; a measure of microvascular density) and the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin 1 (EDN1); we assayed the activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), which catalyses the production of another potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II; and we scored the severity of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and determined the Braak tangle stage. VEGF was markedly increased in frontal and parahippocampal cortex in Alzheimer's disease but only slightly and not significantly in vascular dementia. In frontal cortex the MAG:PLP1 ratio was significantly reduced in Alzheimer's disease and even more so in vascular dementia. VEGF but not MAG:PLP1 increased with Alzheimer's disease severity, as measured by Braak tangle stage, and correlated with amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β42: amyloid-β40 but not amyloid-β40. Although MAG:PLP1 tended to be lowest in cortex from patients with severe small vessel disease or cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neither VEGF nor MAG:PLP1 correlated significantly with the severity of structural vascular pathology (small vessel disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy or VWF

  4. Anterior-posterior thoracic force-deflection characteristics measured during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: comparison to post-mortem human subject data.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Maltese, Matthew R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Steen, Petter Andreas; Nysaether, Jon B

    2006-11-01

    Comparative data of thoracic compression response between live vs. post mortem human subjects (PMHS) has been reported, but the live subject tests are often at low deflections and include the effects of muscle tensing. Novel technology has been developed that overcomes several of these limitations. Specifically, a load cell and accelerometer has been integrated into a clinical monitor-defibrillator to measure chest compression and applied force during live human cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The sensor is interposed between the hands of the person administering CPR and the sternum of the patient. The objective of this study was to compare the thoracic force-deflection measured during adult CPR to that measured during hub-based loading of adult PMHS. CPR represents a unique setting in which to study the mechanics of the chest as the thorax is loaded to a maximum chest deflection similar to that seen in a frontal crash environment and the effects of muscle tensing are minimized. PMHS and CPR data were modeled with a progressive spring in parallel with a viscous damper. Statistical comparison of the model parameters used to describe the compliance of the thorax during large compressions revealed that under the specific loading conditions tested, chest compressions during CPR generated less force at equivalent deflections than the PMHS. Specifically, the spring force at 40 mm deflection was 286 N for the CPR data and 588 N for the PMHS. Differences in area of load application and thoracic structures engaged, however, may partially explain these differences. In addition, the chest response during CPR demonstrated more hysteresis than the PMHS suggesting that the viscoelastic nature of the thorax is more pronounced when tissues are naturally perfused and substantial tissue autolysis has not begun. This study presents fundamental biomechanical data on the mechanical response of the adult thorax that increases our understanding of any potential differences between

  5. MRI visual rating scales in the diagnosis of dementia: evaluation in 184 post-mortem confirmed cases

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Lorna; Fumagalli, Giorgio G.; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; O’Brien, John T.; Bouwman, Femke; Burton, Emma J.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Fox, Nick C.; Ridgway, Gerard R.

    2016-01-01

    Accurately distinguishing between different degenerative dementias during life is challenging but increasingly important with the prospect of disease-modifying therapies. Molecular biomarkers of dementia pathology are becoming available, but are not widely used in clinical practice. Conversely, structural neuroimaging is recommended in the evaluation of cognitive impairment. Visual assessment remains the primary method of scan interpretation, but in the absence of a structured approach, diagnostically relevant information may be under-utilized. This definitive, multi-centre study uses post-mortem confirmed cases as the gold standard to: (i) assess the reliability of six visual rating scales; (ii) determine their associated pattern of atrophy; (iii) compare their diagnostic value with expert scan assessment; and (iv) assess the accuracy of a machine learning approach based on multiple rating scales to predict underlying pathology. The study includes T1-weighted images acquired in three European centres from 184 individuals with histopathologically confirmed dementia (101 patients with Alzheimer’s disease, 28 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, 55 patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration), and scans from 73 healthy controls. Six visual rating scales (medial temporal, posterior, anterior temporal, orbito-frontal, anterior cingulate and fronto-insula) were applied to 257 scans (two raters), and to a subset of 80 scans (three raters). Six experts also provided a diagnosis based on unstructured assessment of the 80-scan subset. The reliability and time taken to apply each scale was evaluated. Voxel-based morphometry was used to explore the relationship between each rating scale and the pattern of grey matter volume loss. Additionally, the performance of each scale to predict dementia pathology both individually and in combination was evaluated using a support vector classifier, which was compared with expert scan assessment to estimate clinical value

  6. Effects of Dietary Energy Sources on Post Mortem Glycolysis, Meat Quality and Muscle Fibre Type Transformation of Finishing Pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjiao; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Changning; Lin, Meng; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong; Zhang, Yu; Fan, Yuanfang; Nuldnali, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Dietary energy source can influence muscle glycogen storage at slaughter. However, few studies have demonstrated whether the diet-induced change of muscle glycogen is achieved by the transformation of muscle fibre type. This study investigated the effects of dietary energy sources on meat quality, post mortem glycolysis and muscle fibre type transformation of finishing pigs. Seventy-two barrows with an average body weight of 65.0 ± 2.0 kg were selected and were allotted to three iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous diets A, B or C, and each treatment consisted of three replicates (pens) of eight pigs each. Diet A contained 44.1% starch, 5.9% crude fat and 12.6% neutral detergent fiber (NDF); diet B contained 37.6% starch, 9.5% crude fat and 15.4% NDF; and diet C contained 30.9% starch, 14.3% crude fat and 17.8% NDF. The duration of the experiment was 28 days. After feed withdrawal 12 h, 24 pigs (eight per treatment) were slaughtered, samples from M. longissimus lumborum (LL) were collected for subsequent analysis. The results showed that pigs fed diet C had lesser average daily gain, average daily feed intake and back fat depth than those fed diet A (P<0.05). Diet C increased pH45min (P<0.05) and decreased drip loss (P<0.05) in LL muscles compared with diet A. Meat from pigs fed diet A showed increased contents of lactate and greater glycolytic potential (GP) compared with those fed diet C (P<0.05). Greater mRNA expression of myosin heavy-chain (MyHC)-I and IIa and lesser expression of MyHC-IIx and IIb (P<0.05) in LL muscles were found in pigs fed diet C, than in pigs fed diet A. In addition, pigs fed diet C resulted in downregulation of miR23a and upregulation of miR409 and miR208b (P<0.05), associated with conserved changes of their corresponding targets. These findings indicated that diets containing low starch and high fibre were beneficial in reducing muscle glycolysis, improving meat quality of finishing pigs. This reduction of GP may be partially associated

  7. Effects of Dietary Energy Sources on Post Mortem Glycolysis, Meat Quality and Muscle Fibre Type Transformation of Finishing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjiao; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Changning; Lin, Meng; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong; Zhang, Yu; Fan, Yuanfang; Nuldnali, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Dietary energy source can influence muscle glycogen storage at slaughter. However, few studies have demonstrated whether the diet-induced change of muscle glycogen is achieved by the transformation of muscle fibre type. This study investigated the effects of dietary energy sources on meat quality, post mortem glycolysis and muscle fibre type transformation of finishing pigs. Seventy-two barrows with an average body weight of 65.0 ± 2.0 kg were selected and were allotted to three iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous diets A, B or C, and each treatment consisted of three replicates (pens) of eight pigs each. Diet A contained 44.1% starch, 5.9% crude fat and 12.6% neutral detergent fiber (NDF); diet B contained 37.6% starch, 9.5% crude fat and 15.4% NDF; and diet C contained 30.9% starch, 14.3% crude fat and 17.8% NDF. The duration of the experiment was 28 days. After feed withdrawal 12 h, 24 pigs (eight per treatment) were slaughtered, samples from M. longissimus lumborum (LL) were collected for subsequent analysis. The results showed that pigs fed diet C had lesser average daily gain, average daily feed intake and back fat depth than those fed diet A (P<0.05). Diet C increased pH45min (P<0.05) and decreased drip loss (P<0.05) in LL muscles compared with diet A. Meat from pigs fed diet A showed increased contents of lactate and greater glycolytic potential (GP) compared with those fed diet C (P<0.05). Greater mRNA expression of myosin heavy-chain (MyHC)-I and IIa and lesser expression of MyHC-IIx and IIb (P<0.05) in LL muscles were found in pigs fed diet C, than in pigs fed diet A. In addition, pigs fed diet C resulted in downregulation of miR23a and upregulation of miR409 and miR208b (P<0.05), associated with conserved changes of their corresponding targets. These findings indicated that diets containing low starch and high fibre were beneficial in reducing muscle glycolysis, improving meat quality of finishing pigs. This reduction of GP may be partially associated

  8. Causes of mortality and pathological lesions observed post-mortem in red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in Great Britain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The red squirrel population in Great Britain has declined dramatically in recent decades, principally due to squirrelpox. Concern exists that red squirrels may become extinct nationally and, as there has been limited research in to diseases other than squirrelpox, this study aimed to identify additional causes of mortality. Results Post-mortem examinations on 163 red squirrels found dead on Isle of Wight (IoW) England, in Scotland and at other locations in Great Britain showed that 41.7% (n = 68) were killed by road traffic and 9.2% (n = 15) by predators, principally domestic cats and dogs. The overall male/female ratio was 1.08/1. Fleas were recorded on 34.9% of IoW squirrels and on 43.8% of Scottish squirrels but sucking lice and ixodid ticks were only seen on Scottish squirrels. Bacterial infections were significant, particularly in association with respiratory disease (n = 16); two squirrels died of Bordetella bronchiseptica bronchopneumonia. Cases of fatal exudative dermatitis (n = 5) associated with a lukM-positive clone of Staphylococcus aureus occurred only on the IoW. Toxoplasmosis (n = 12) was also confined to IoW where it was responsible for almost one tenth (9.5%) of all deaths. Hepatozoonosis was common, especially in IoW squirrels, but was not considered a primary cause of mortality. Hepatic capillariasis affected four IoW squirrels and one from Scotland. Fungal infections included oral candidiasis, adiaspiromycosis and pulmonary phaeohyphomycosis. Neoplastic conditions diagnosed were: pulmonary carcinoma, gastric spindle cell tumour, renal papillary adenoma and trichoepithelioma. Epidermal hyperplasia of unknown aetiology was seen in squirrels showing crusty lesions of the ear pinnae on IoW (n = 3) and Brownsea Island (n = 1), associated in two cases with cutaneous wart-like growths. Miscellaneous diagnoses included chylothorax, electrocution, intussusception, suspected cholecalciferol rodenticide poisoning and

  9. The post mortem diagnosis of fatal hypoglycaemia using the fatty liver and kidney syndrome of chicks as a model.

    PubMed

    Bannister, D W; O'Neill, I E; Whitehead, C C

    1982-03-01

    1. The concentrations of vitreous humour and plasma glucose were closely correlated in both healthy and fatty liver and kidney syndrome-affected chicks at time of death. 2. The values of vitreous humour glucose and lactate decreased rapidly after death, such that they were not reliable indicators of the presence of hypoglycaemia immediately ante mortem. 3. Hepatic glycogen was extremely low in fatty liver and kidney syndrome-affected birds, whereas significant quantities remained in healthy birds up to at least 24 h post mortem.

  10. The importance of post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in confrontation with conventional forensic autopsy of victims of motorcycle accidents.

    PubMed

    Moskała, Artur; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Kluza, Piotr; Romaszko, Karol; Lopatin, Oleksij

    2016-01-01

    Since traffic accidents are an important problem in forensic medicine, there is a constant search for new solutions to help with an investigation process in such cases. In recent years there was a rapid development of post-mortem imaging techniques, especially post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT). In our work we concentrated on a potential advantage of PMCT in cases of motorcycle accident fatalities. The results of forensic autopsy were compared with combined results of the autopsy and PMCT to check in which areas use of these two techniques gives statistically important increase in number of findings. The hypothesis was confirmed in case of pneumothorax and fractures of skull, spine, clavicle, scapula, lower leg bones. As for majority of other bone fractures locations and brain injures there were single cases with pathologies visible only in PMCT, but too few to reach expected level of p-value. In case of injuries of solid organs and soft tissues statistical analysis did not confirmed any advantage of unenhanced PMCT use. On the whole it has been shown that PMCT used as an adjunct to forensic autopsy can cause an increase in information about vitally important regions in case of motorcycle accident fatalities.

  11. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Divergent Phenotypes for Water Holding Capacity across the Post Mortem Ageing Period in Porcine Muscle Exudate

    PubMed Central

    Di Luca, Alessio; Hamill, Ruth M.; Mullen, Anne Maria; Slavov, Nikolai; Elia, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and mass spectrometry were applied to investigate the changes in metabolic proteins that occur over a seven day (day 1, 3 and 7) post mortem ageing period in porcine centrifugal exudate from divergent meat quality phenotypes. The objectives of the research were to enhance our understanding of the phenotype (water holding capacity) and search for biomarkers of this economically significant pork quality attribute. Major changes in protein abundance across nine phenotype-by-time conditions were observed. Proteomic patterns were dominated by post mortem ageing timepoint. Using a machine learning algorithm (l1-regularized logistic regression), a model was derived with the ability to discriminate between high drip and low drip phenotypes using a subset of 25 proteins with an accuracy of 63%. Models discriminating between divergent phenotypes with accuracy of 72% and 73% were also derived comparing respectively, high drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus low drip and comparing low drip plus intermediate phenotype (considered as one phenotype) versus high drip. In all comparisons, the general classes of discriminatory proteins identified include metabolic enzymes, stress response, transport and structural proteins. In this research we have enhanced our understanding of the protein related processes underpinning this phenotype and provided strong data to work toward development of protein biomarkers for water holding capacity. PMID:26950297

  12. Teaching post-mortem external examination in undergraduate medical education--the formal and the informal curriculum.

    PubMed

    Anders, Sven; Fischer-Bruegge, Dorothee; Fabian, Merle; Raupach, Tobias; Petersen-Ewert, Corinna; Harendza, Sigrid

    2011-07-15

    In undergraduate medical education, the training of post-mortem external examination on dead bodies might evoke strong emotional reactions in medical students that could counteract the intended learning goals. We evaluated student perception of a forensic medicine course, their perceived learning outcome (via self-assessment) and possible tutor-dependent influences on the overall evaluation of the course by a questionnaire-based survey among 150 medical students in Hamburg, Germany. The majority of students identified post-mortem external examination as an important learning objective in undergraduate medical education and did not feel that the dignity of the deceased was offended by the course procedures. After the course, more than 70% of the students felt able to perform an external examination and to fill in a death certificate. Respectful behavior of course tutors towards the deceased entailed better overall course ratings by students (p<0.001). Our findings highlight the importance of factors such as clearly defined learning goals and course standardization (formal curriculum) as well as tutor behavior (informal curriculum) in undergraduate education in forensic medicine. Furthermore, we suggest embedding teaching in forensic medicine in longitudinal curricula on death and dying and on the health consequences of interpersonal violence.

  13. Altered post-mortem metabolism identified in very fast chilled lamb M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum using metabolomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Warner, Robyn D; Jacob, Robin H; Rosenvold, Katja; Rochfort, Simone; Trenerry, Craige; Plozza, Tim; McDonagh, Matthew B

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this experiment was to use metabolomic techniques to investigate the energy metabolism in lamb M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum subjected to very fast chilling (VFC) post-mortem. The tissue was prepared by 2 different operators and subjected to very fast chilling (less than 0°C within 1.5h of slaughter) or typical chilling regimes (Control; 0°C within 22h of slaughter). Non-targeted metabolomic analysis ((1)H NMR) and targeted analysis ((31)P NMR, HPLC-PDA and HPLC-MS/MS) were used to examine the change in muscle metabolites post-mortem. One VFC treatment, which resulted in a colder core temperature and more tender meat, had higher levels of glycolytic intermediate metabolites pre-rigor as well as more of the end-products of adenosine and nicotine nucleotide metabolism pre-rigor, relative to conventionally chilled treatments. In conclusion, VFC to less than 0°C within 1.5h of slaughter causes considerable changes in metabolism and rigor onset, which are associated with tender meat.

  14. Post mortem concentrations of endogenous gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and in vitro formation in stored blood and urine samples.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Bertol, Elisabetta; Vaiano, Fabio; Baglio, Giovanni; Montana, Angelo; Barbera, Nunziata; Zaami, Simona; Romano, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a central nervous system depressant, primarily used as a recreational drug of abuse with numerous names. It has also been involved in various instances of drug-facilitated sexual assault due to its potential incapacitating effects. The first aim of this paper is to measure the post-mortem concentration of endogenous GHB in whole blood and urine samples of 30 GHB free-users, who have been divided according to the post-mortem interval (PMI) in three groups (first group: 24-36h; second group: 37-72h; third group: 73-192h), trying to evaluate the role of PMI in affecting post mortem levels. Second, the Authors have evaluated the new formation of GHB in vitro in blood and urine samples of the three groups, which have been stored at -20°C, 4°C and 20°C over a period of one month. The concentrations were measured by GC-MS after liquid-liquid extraction according to the method validated and published by Elliot (For. Sci. Int., 2003). For urine samples, GHB concentrations were creatinine-normalized. In the first group the GHB mean concentration measured after autopsy was: 2.14mg/L (range 0.54-3.21mg/L) in blood and 3.90mg/g (range 0.60-4.81mg/g) in urine; in the second group it was: 5.13mg/L (range 1.11-9.60mg/L) in blood and 3.93mg/g (range 0.91-7.25mg/g) in urine; in the third group it was: 11.8mg/L (range 3.95-24.12mg/L) in blood and 9.83mg/g (range 3.67-21.90mg/g) in urine. The results obtained in blood and urine samples showed a statistically significant difference among groups (p<0.001) in the first analysis performed immediately after autopsy. Throughout the period of investigation up to 4 weeks, the comparison of storage temperatures within each group showed in blood and urine samples a mean difference at 20°C compared to -20°C not statistically significant at the 10% level. These findings allow us to affirm that the PMI strongly affects the post mortem production of GHB in blood and urine samples. Regarding the new formation of

  15. Post-mortem erosion of fine-scale spatial structure of epibenthic megafauna on the outer Grand Bank of Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. C.; Haedrich, R. L.

    1991-08-01

    Marine organisms exhibit spatial variability at scales ranging from thousands of kilometres (biogeographic variability) to a few body lengths. Physical processes can increase spatial variability through selective sorting, or decrease it through mixing. We examine the effects of post-mortem processes on the spatial structure of empty shells and tests left by populations of molluscs and echinoderms on outer Grand Bank. Analysis of data from five photographic transects showed that spatial variability of shells and tests decreased relative to live organisms of the same species at scales greater than 140 m. Spatial variability did not increase relative to live specimens, with the exception of urchin tests at a scale of 20-30 m on two of five transects. We postulate that selective transport of shells does not occur in this environment at scales from 15 to 1500 m.

  16. Post-mortem alcohol analysis in synovial fluid: an alternative method for estimation of blood alcohol level in medico-legal autopsies?

    PubMed

    Büyük, Yalçin; Eke, Murat; Cagdir, A Sadi; Karaaslan, Hicran K

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of synovial fluid alcohol concentration in prediction of blood alcohol concentration, synovial fluid and blood was studied of 50 autopsy cases and the alcohol levels determined by using Head Space Gas Chromatography method. To exclude the effect of decomposition on alcohol levels, corpses with post-mortem intervals less than 24 hours and not showing signs of decomposition were selected. Of 50 cases, alcohol was detected in 15 cases both in blood and in synovial fluid. In 35 cases alcohol analysis was negative both in blood and synovial fluid. No false positive results were seen in terms of synovial fluid. In two of the 15 cases, the alcohol determined was methyl alcohol and in others the alcohol was ethyl alcohol. In these 15 cases, only in one case was SAC level lower than the BAC level, and in 14 cases; SAC levels were higher than those of BAC. BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentration)/SAC (Synovial Fluid Alcohol Concentration) ratios were determined, and in 13 ethanol cases the mean ratio was determined to be 0.95 (0.90 +/- 0.07). The regression analysis showed a fairly linear relationship between the BAC and SAC, with a correlation coefficient of 0.984 (y = 0.86x + 10.4). The present study demonstrates that the synovial fluid is a valuable body fluid that can be used in prediction of blood alcohol concentration in forensic autopsy cases in which blood can not be properly obtained.

  17. Network analysis of human post-mortem microarrays reveals novel genes, microRNAs, and mechanistic scenarios of potential importance in fighting huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sreedevi; Bonchev, Danail

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor disturbances, cognitive decline, and neuropsychiatric symptoms. In this study, we utilized network-based analysis in an attempt to explore and understand the underlying molecular mechanism and to identify critical molecular players of this disease condition. Using human post-mortem microarrays from three brain regions (cerebellum, frontal cortex and caudate nucleus) we selected in a four-step procedure a seed set of highly modulated genes. Several protein-protein interaction networks, as well as microRNA-mRNA networks were constructed for these gene sets with the Elsevier Pathway Studio software and its associated ResNet database. We applied a gene prioritizing procedure based on vital network topological measures, such as high node connectivity and centrality. Adding to these criteria the guilt-by-association rule and exploring their innate biomolecular functions, we propose 19 novel genes from the analyzed microarrays, from which CEBPA, CDK1, CX3CL1, EGR1, E2F1, ERBB2, LRP1, HSP90AA1 and ZNF148 might be of particular interest for experimental validation. A possibility is discussed for dual-level gene regulation by both transcription factors and microRNAs in Huntington's disease mechanism. We propose several possible scenarios for experimental studies initiated via the extra-cellular ligands TGFB1, FGF2 and TNF aiming at restoring the cellular homeostasis in Huntington's disease.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation as a Possible Damage Mechanism in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Post-Mortem Human Subject Heads.

    PubMed

    Salzar, Robert S; Treichler, Derrick; Wardlaw, Andrew; Weiss, Greg; Goeller, Jacques

    2017-01-13

    The potential of blast-induced traumatic brain injury from the mechanism of localized cavitation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is investigated. While the mechanism and criteria for non-impact blast-induced traumatic brain injury is still unknown, this study demonstrates that local cavitation in the CSF layer of the cranial volume could contribute to these injuries. The cranial contents of three post-mortem human subject (PMHS) heads were replaced with both a normal saline solution and a ballistic gel mixture with a simulated CSF layer. Each were instrumented with multiple pressure transducers and placed inside identical shock tubes at two different research facilities. Sensor data indicates that cavitation may have occurred in the PMHS models at pressure levels below those for a 50% risk of blast lung injury. This study points to skull flexion, the result of the shock wave on the front of the skull leading to a negative pressure in the contrecoup, as a possible mechanism that contributes to the onset of cavitation. Based on observation of intracranial pressure transducer data from the PMHS model, cavitation onset is thought to occur from approximately a 140 kPa head-on incident blast.

  19. Identification of Arcanobacterium pyogenes isolated by post mortem examinations of a bearded dragon and a gecko by phenotypic and genotypic properties

    PubMed Central

    Ülbegi-Mohyla, H.; Hijazin, M.; Alber, J.; Hassan, A. A.; Abdulmawjood, A.; Prenger-Berninghoff, E.; Weiß, R.; Zschöck, M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to identify phenotypically and genotypically two Arcanobacterium (A.) pyogenes strains isolated by post mortem examinations of a bearded dragon and a gecko. The A. pyogenes strains showed the typical biochemical properties and displayed CAMP-like synergistic hemolytic activities with various indicator strains. The species identity could be confirmed genotypically by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene and, as novel target gene, by sequencing of the beta subunit of RNA polymerase encoding gene rpoB, of both strains and of reference strains representing nine species of the genus Arcanobacterium. The species identity of the two A. pyogenes strains could additionally be confirmed by PCR mediated amplification of species specific parts of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region, the pyolysin encoding gene plo and by amplification of the collagen-binding protein encoding gene cbpA. All these molecular targets might help to improve the future identification and further characterization of A. pyogenes which, as demonstrated in the present study, could also be isolated from reptile specimens. PMID:20706035

  20. Identification of Arcanobacterium pyogenes isolated by post mortem examinations of a bearded dragon and a gecko by phenotypic and genotypic properties.

    PubMed

    Ulbegi-Mohyla, H; Hijazin, M; Alber, J; Lämmler, C; Hassan, A A; Abdulmawjood, A; Prenger-Berninghoff, E; Weiss, R; Zschöck, M

    2010-09-01

    The present study was designed to identify phenotypically and genotypically two Arcanobacterium (A.) pyogenes strains isolated by post mortem examinations of a bearded dragon and a gecko. The A. pyogenes strains showed the typical biochemical properties and displayed CAMP-like synergistic hemolytic activities with various indicator strains. The species identity could be confirmed genotypically by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene and, as novel target gene, by sequencing of the beta subunit of RNA polymerase encoding gene rpoB, of both strains and of reference strains representing nine species of the genus Arcanobacterium. The species identity of the two A. pyogenes strains could additionally be confirmed by PCR mediated amplification of species specific parts of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region, the pyolysin encoding gene plo and by amplification of the collagen-binding protein encoding gene cbpA. All these molecular targets might help to improve the future identification and further characterization of A. pyogenes which, as demonstrated in the present study, could also be isolated from reptile specimens.

  1. The prevalence and distribution of Mycobacterium bovis infection in European badgers (Meles meles) as determined by enhanced post mortem examination and bacteriological culture.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D; Gormley, E; Costello, E; O'Meara, D; Corner, L A L

    2010-02-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection in badgers is key to understanding the epidemiology of tuberculosis in this species and has significant implications for devising strategies to limit spread of the disease. In this study, badgers (n=215) in the Republic of Ireland were examined at post mortem and tissues were collected from a range of anatomical locations and pooled into groups for bacterial culture of M. bovis. By assessing confirmed gross visible lesions (VL) alone, infection was detected in 12.1% of badgers. However, by including the results of all culture positive pooled samples, the overall infection prevalence increased significantly to 36.3%. Two-thirds (66.7%) of infected animals had no visible lesions (NVL). While the thoracic cavity (lungs and pulmonary lymph nodes) was found to be the most common site of infection, in a proportion of animals infection was absent from the lungs and draining lymph nodes and was confined to the lymph nodes of the carcase or the head. This may indicate an early extrapulmonary dissemination of infection or alternatively, in the case of the head lymph nodes, a secondary pathogenic pathway involving the lymphoid tissues of the upper respiratory tract (URT).

  2. Toward Identification of the Sexual Killer: A Comparison of Sexual Killers Engaging in Post-Mortem Sexual Interference and Non-Homicide Sexual Aggressors.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Tamsin; Carter, Adam J; Stefanska, Ewa B; Glorney, Emily

    2015-10-14

    Establishing a model of sexual assault reflecting psychosocial and behavioral characteristics of perpetrators of sexual killing and rape is necessary for development in risk assessment and intervention. Methodological variations in defining sexual killing have amalgamated serial and non-serial offenders and perpetrators with direct and indirect associations between killing and sexual arousal. This study defined sexual killing specifying that killing should be directly linked to sexual arousal, and sampled 48 sexual killers, operationalized to include only those engaging in post-mortem sexual interference, with one or two known female victims (non-serial), from prison service national (England and Wales) databases. These sexual killers were compared with 48 non-homicide, life or indeterminately sentenced sexual aggressors on psychological and crime scene characteristics. Contrary to previous research, fatal outcomes were associated with neither stranger victims nor weapon presence; sexual killing was characterized by severity of violence less so than non-fatal assault. Sexual killers more often reported problems with emotional loneliness, empathic concern, and sexual entitlement than the sexual aggressors. Theoretical and applied implications are discussed.

  3. Prolyl oligopeptidase colocalizes with α-synuclein, β-amyloid, tau protein and astroglia in the post-mortem brain samples with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    PubMed

    Hannula, M J; Myöhänen, T T; Tenorio-Laranga, J; Männistö, P T; Garcia-Horsman, J A

    2013-07-09

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.21.26, PREP) is a serine protease that hydrolyzes proline-containing peptides shorter than 30-mer but it has also nonhydrolytic functions. PREP has been shown to accelerate aggregation of wild-type α-synuclein (α-syn) under cell-free conditions, and PREP inhibitors can block this aggregation both in vitro and in vivo. α-syn is the main component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. To clarify the possible interaction of PREP with other markers of neurodegenerative diseases, we studied colocalizations of PREP and (1) α-syn, (2) β-amyloid, (3) tau protein and (4) astroglial and microglial cells in human post-mortem brain samples from PD, Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and in healthy control brain samples. In the substantia nigra of PD brains, an intense colocalization with PREP and α-syn was evident. PREP colocalized also with β-amyloid plaques in AD brains and with tau protein in AD and in healthy brains. PREP was also found in astroglial cells in PD, AD and control brains, but not in the microglia. Our findings are the first ones to demonstrate colocalization of PREP and pathological proteins in the human brain and support the view that, at least in spatial terms, PREP could be associated with pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Further study on spectrophotometric determination of CO--Hb in post-mortem blood.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, T; Nanikawa, R

    1978-01-01

    The method for spectrophotometric determination of CO--Hb in blood on the basis of difference in absorbancies of deoxy- and carboxy-hemoglobin reported previously [1] was further improved. The total blood hemoglobin content was determined by the azide-methemoglobin method instead of the well-known cyanmethemoglobin method. This method was found to be useful even if applied to old or putrefied blood samples.

  5. Effects of water-misting sprays with forced ventilation on post mortem glycolysis, AMP-activated protein kinase and meat quality of broilers after transport during summer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nannan; Xing, Tong; Han, Minyi; Deng, Shaolin; Xu, Xinglian

    2016-05-01

    Effects of water-misting sprays with forced ventilation on post mortem glycolysis, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and meat quality of broilers after transport during summer were investigated in the present paper. A total of 105 mixed-sex Arbor Acres broilers were divided into three treatment groups: (i) 45 min transport without rest (T); (ii) 45 min transport with 1 h rest (TR); and (iii) 45 min transport with 15 min water-misting sprays with forced ventilation and 45 min rest (TWFR). Each treatment consisted of five replicates with seven birds each. The results indicated that the water-misting sprays with forced ventilation could mitigate the stress caused by transport under high temperature conditions during summer, which reduced the energy depletion in post mortem Pectoralis major (PM) muscle. This resulted in a higher energy status compared to the T group, which would decrease the expression of phosphorylation of AMPK (p-AMPK). Furthermore, decreased the expression of p-AMPK then slowed down the rate of glycolysis in post mortem PM muscle during the early post mortem period, which in turn lessened the negative effects caused by transport on meat quality. In conclusion, water-misting sprays with forced ventilation may be a better method to control the incidence of the pale, soft and exudative meat in broilers.

  6. Post-mortem computed tomography and 3D imaging: anthropological applications for juvenile remains.

    PubMed

    Brough, Alison L; Rutty, Guy N; Black, Sue; Morgan, Bruno

    2012-09-01

    Anthropological examination of defleshed bones is routinely used in medico-legal investigations to establish an individual's biological profile. However, when dealing with the recently deceased, the removal of soft tissue from bone can be an extremely time consuming procedure that requires the presence of a trained anthropologist. In addition, due to its invasive nature, in some disaster victim identification scenarios the maceration of bones is discouraged by religious practices and beliefs, or even prohibited by national laws and regulations. Currently, three different radiological techniques may be used in the investigative process; plain X-ray, dental X-ray and fluoroscopy. However, recent advances in multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) mean that it is now possible to acquire morphological skeletal information from high resolution images, reducing the necessity for invasive procedures. This review paper considers the possible applications of a virtual anthropological examination by reviewing the main juvenile age determination methods used by anthropologists at present and their possible adaption to MDCT.

  7. Cerebellar oxidative DNA damage and altered DNA methylation in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model of autism and similarities with human post mortem cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Shpyleva, Svitlana; Ivanovsky, Samuil; de Conti, Aline; Melnyk, Stepan; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Beland, Frederick A; James, S Jill; Pogribny, Igor P

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of autism is complex and involves numerous genomic, epigenomic, proteomic, metabolic, and physiological alterations. Elucidating and understanding the molecular processes underlying the pathogenesis of autism is critical for effective clinical management and prevention of this disorder. The goal of this study is to investigate key molecular alterations postulated to play a role in autism and their role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study we demonstrate that DNA isolated from the cerebellum of BTBR T+tf/J mice, a relevant mouse model of autism, and from human post-mortem cerebellum of individuals with autism, are both characterized by an increased levels of 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), 5-methylcytosine (5mC), and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). The increase in 8-oxodG and 5mC content was associated with a markedly reduced expression of the 8-oxoguanine DNA-glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) and increased expression of de novo DNA methyltransferases 3a and 3b (Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b). Interestingly, a rise in the level of 5hmC occurred without changes in the expression of ten-eleven translocation expression 1 (Tet1) and Tet2 genes, but significantly correlated with the presence of 8-oxodG in DNA. This finding and similar elevation in 8-oxodG in cerebellum of individuals with autism and in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model warrant future large-scale studies to specifically address the role of OGG1 alterations in pathogenesis of autism.

  8. Cerebellar Oxidative DNA Damage and Altered DNA Methylation in the BTBR T+tf/J Mouse Model of Autism and Similarities with Human Post Mortem Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Shpyleva, Svitlana; Ivanovsky, Samuil; de Conti, Aline; Melnyk, Stepan; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Beland, Frederick A.; James, S. Jill; Pogribny, Igor P.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of autism is complex and involves numerous genomic, epigenomic, proteomic, metabolic, and physiological alterations. Elucidating and understanding the molecular processes underlying the pathogenesis of autism is critical for effective clinical management and prevention of this disorder. The goal of this study is to investigate key molecular alterations postulated to play a role in autism and their role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study we demonstrate that DNA isolated from the cerebellum of BTBR T+tf/J mice, a relevant mouse model of autism, and from human post-mortem cerebellum of individuals with autism, are both characterized by an increased levels of 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), 5-methylcytosine (5mC), and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). The increase in 8-oxodG and 5mC content was associated with a markedly reduced expression of the 8-oxoguanine DNA-glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) and increased expression of de novo DNA methyltransferases 3a and 3b (Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b). Interestingly, a rise in the level of 5hmC occurred without changes in the expression of ten-eleven translocation expression 1 (Tet1) and Tet2 genes, but significantly correlated with the presence of 8-oxodG in DNA. This finding and similar elevation in 8-oxodG in cerebellum of individuals with autism and in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model warrant future large-scale studies to specifically address the role of OGG1 alterations in pathogenesis of autism. PMID:25423485

  9. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)4 receptors in post mortem human brain tissue: distribution, pharmacology and effects of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, G P; Mason, S L; Meldrum, A; De Keczer, S; Parnes, H; Eglen, R M; Wong, E H

    1995-01-01

    1. The distribution, pharmacology and effects of neurodegenerative diseases on 5-HT4 receptors in human brain have been characterized in vitro. 2. The 5-HT4 receptor in post mortem human brain tissue was specifically labelled with [3H]-GR 113808. In human putamen, this ligand labelled a homogeneous population of sites, with an apparent affinity (-log Kd) of 10.1 and a density (Bmax) of 5.73 fmol mg-1 tissue. The pharmacology of this site was characterized by use of a series of displacing ligands, and the following rank order of apparent affinities (with mean +/- s.d. -log Ki values in parentheses) was generated: GR113808 (10.05 +/- 0.04) > SDZ 205,557 (8.65 +/- 0.08) > DAU 6285 (7.95 +/- 0.04) > BIMU-1 (7.81 +/- 0.06) > DAU 6215 (7.42 +/- 0.23) > tropisetron (7.39 +/- 0.23) > 5-HT (7.32 +/- 1.00) > BIMU-8 (7.25 +/- 0.04) > (R)-zacopride (5.82 +/- 0.04). The Hill coefficients were not significantly different from unity, consistent with an interaction at a single site. A comparison of the affinities of these compounds with those obtained from guinea-pig striatum indicated no evidence of species differences. 3. The regional distribution of 5-HT4 receptors was assessed by determining the density of binding sites for [3H]-GR 113808.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7780656

  10. [Infanticide in the light of post-mortem findings and court files from the period 1990-2000 (selected problems)].

    PubMed

    Kołowski, Janusz; Nowak, Klaudia Magdalena

    2005-01-01

    Drawing upon 28 court files of the District Court in Poznań and 30 post-mortem protocols--from the Department of Forensic Medicine at Poznań Medical Academy. This article tackles the issue of infanticide in the period from 1990 to 2000. The aim of this paper was to find answers to the following questions: what was the social background and mental state of female offenders? How was infanticide committed? In order to solve certain research problems, a document examination technique was employed to analyse the contents of the documents available. Female offenders were aged between 17 to 42 years. In the majority of cases (56.7%), perpetrators were occupationally active, single young women with a low level of education and having a working-class background. In the majority of cases (80%), active infanticide was committed. Most frequently, infanticide was committed by shutting a child into a tight space, and tamponade of throat and larynx. Passive infanticide was committed in 20% of cases, with infants left without care at the place of birth. No case of psychosis was determined in the examined material.

  11. Virtual forensic entomology: improving estimates of minimum post-mortem interval with 3D micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Richards, Cameron S; Simonsen, Thomas J; Abel, Richard L; Hall, Martin J R; Schwyn, Daniel A; Wicklein, Martina

    2012-07-10

    We demonstrate how micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) can be a powerful tool for describing internal and external morphological changes in Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) during metamorphosis. Pupae were sampled during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th quarter of development after the onset of pupariation at 23 °C, and placed directly into 80% ethanol for preservation. In order to find the optimal contrast, four batches of pupae were treated differently: batch one was stained in 0.5M aqueous iodine for 1 day; two for 7 days; three was tagged with a radiopaque dye; four was left unstained (control). Pupae stained for 7d in iodine resulted in the best contrast micro-CT scans. The scans were of sufficiently high spatial resolution (17.2 μm) to visualise the internal morphology of developing pharate adults at all four ages. A combination of external and internal morphological characters was shown to have the potential to estimate the age of blowfly pupae with a higher degree of accuracy and precision than using external morphological characters alone. Age specific developmental characters are described. The technique could be used as a measure to estimate a minimum post-mortem interval in cases of suspicious death where pupae are the oldest stages of insect evidence collected.

  12. Is it health or the burial environment: differentiating between hypomineralised and post-mortem stained enamel in an archaeological context.

    PubMed

    McKay, Samantha; Farah, Rami; Broadbent, Jonathan M; Tayles, Nancy; Halcrow, Sian E

    2013-01-01

    Developmental enamel defects are often used as indicators of general health in past archaeological populations. However, it can be difficult to macroscopically distinguish subtle hypomineralised opacities from post-mortem staining, unrelated to developmental defects. To overcome this difficulty, we have used non-destructive x-ray microtomography to estimate the mineral density of enamel. Using a sample of deciduous teeth from a prehistoric burial site in Northeast Thailand, we demonstrate that it is possible to determine whether observed enamel discolourations were more likely to be true hypomineralised lesions or artefacts occurring as the result of taphonomic effects. The analyses of our sample showed no evidence of hypomineralised areas in teeth with macroscopic discolouration, which had previously been thought, on the basis of macroscopic observation, to be hypomineralisations indicative of growth disruption. Our results demonstrate that x-ray microtomography can be a powerful, non-destructive method for the investigation of the presence and severity of hypomineralisation, and that diagnosis of enamel hypomineralisation based on macroscopic observation of buried teeth should be made with caution. This method makes it possible to identify true dental defects that are indicative of growth disruptions.

  13. Is It Health or the Burial Environment: Differentiating between Hypomineralised and Post-Mortem Stained Enamel in an Archaeological Context

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Samantha; Farah, Rami; Broadbent, Jonathan M.; Tayles, Nancy; Halcrow, Sian E.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental enamel defects are often used as indicators of general health in past archaeological populations. However, it can be difficult to macroscopically distinguish subtle hypomineralised opacities from post-mortem staining, unrelated to developmental defects. To overcome this difficulty, we have used non-destructive x-ray microtomography to estimate the mineral density of enamel. Using a sample of deciduous teeth from a prehistoric burial site in Northeast Thailand, we demonstrate that it is possible to determine whether observed enamel discolourations were more likely to be true hypomineralised lesions or artefacts occurring as the result of taphonomic effects. The analyses of our sample showed no evidence of hypomineralised areas in teeth with macroscopic discolouration, which had previously been thought, on the basis of macroscopic observation, to be hypomineralisations indicative of growth disruption. Our results demonstrate that x-ray microtomography can be a powerful, non-destructive method for the investigation of the presence and severity of hypomineralisation, and that diagnosis of enamel hypomineralisation based on macroscopic observation of buried teeth should be made with caution. This method makes it possible to identify true dental defects that are indicative of growth disruptions. PMID:23734206

  14. Outdoor post-mortem bite injuries by Tapinoma nigerrimum (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) on a human corpse: Case report.

    PubMed

    Bonacci, Teresa; Vercillo, Vannio

    2015-07-01

    Ants are among the insects that colonize exposed human and animal corpses during the early stage of decomposition. In Calabria, Italy (as well as in other countries), Formicidae have been observed preying on immature stages of Diptera and other insects, as well as causing irregular scalloped areas of superficial skin loss on human corpses and animal carcasses. We present a case of injuries on a human corpse caused by ant feeding. The macroscopic appearance is described and the results of a histochemical investigation of the skin lesions caused by worker ants are reported for the first time. The investigation was carried out on the fresh corpse of a 53-year-old man discovered in a rural area of Cosenza province (Calabria, southern Italy). Numerous irregular areas of superficial skin loss caused by the ant Tapinoma nigerrimum (Nylander 1856) (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) were observed on the body surface, inflicted very early in the post-mortem period. Because the classification of lesions is of crucial importance for forensic investigations, the macroscopic appearance and distribution pattern of the lesions on the corpse are illustrated. The histochemical investigation of the damaged skin explains, for the first time, the mechanism of production of the lesions.

  15. A comparison of post-mortem findings in broilers dead-on-farm and broilers dead-on-arrival at the abattoir.

    PubMed

    Kittelsen, K E; Granquist, E G; Kolbjørnsen, Ø; Nafstad, O; Moe, R O

    2015-11-01

    Broiler mortality during transport to abattoirs (dead-on-arrival/DOA) evokes concern due to compromised animal welfare and associated economic losses. The general aim of this study was to characterize pathological lesions associated with mortality in broilers close to slaughter. The specific aim was to investigate whether disease at the end of the growth period may be a predisposing factor for DOA by describing and comparing the pathological findings in broilers dead-on-farm (DOF) in the final days of the production cycle and in broilers DOA from the same flocks. Gross post-mortem examinations were performed on 607 broilers from 32 flocks, either DOF (371) or DOA (236). In DOF broilers, the most common pathological lesions were lung congestion (37.7%), endocarditis (29.4%), and ascites (24.0%), whereas the most common findings in broilers DOA were lung congestion (57.2%) and trauma (24.6%). Lung congestion was more prevalent among DOA broilers compared to DOF broilers (P-value of > 0.001). A possible cause behind the pathological finding lung congestion is sudden death syndrome (SDS). The study indicates that steps in the transportation process per se cause the majority of pathological lesions such as lung congestion and trauma that may have led to the mortalities registered. Pre-existing diseases such as ascites and osteomyelitis may also predispose for DOA. Thus, factors relating to on-farm health, catching, and transportation are all areas of future investigation in order to reduce transport mortalities and to enhance welfare in broilers.

  16. Evaluation of rapid post-mortem test kits for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) screening in Japan: Their analytical sensitivity to atypical BSE prions.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Ken'ichi; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Tabeta, Naoko; Yokoyama, Takashi; Tobiume, Minoru

    2017-03-30

    A classical type of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (C-BSE), recognized in 1987, had a large impact on public health due to its zoonotic link to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by the human consumption of dietary products contaminated with the C-BSE prion. Thus, a number of countries implemented BSE surveillance using rapid post-mortem test kits that were approved for detection of the C-BSE prion in the cattle brain. However, as atypical BSE (L- and H-BSE) cases emerged in subsequent years, the efficacy of the kits for the detection of atypical BSE prions became a matter of concern. In response to this, laboratories in the European Union and Canada evaluated the kits used in their countries. Here, we carried out an evaluation study of NippiBL®, a kit currently used for BSE screening in Japan. By applying the kit to cattle brains of field cases of C-BSE and L-BSE, and an experimental case of H-BSE, we showed its comparable sensitivities to C, L-, and H-BSE prions, and satisfactory performance required by the European Food Safety Authority. In addition to NippiBL®, two kits (TeSeE® and FRELISA®) formerly used in Japan were effective for detection of the L-BSE prion, although the two kits were unable to be tested for the H-BSE prion due to the discontinuation of domestic sales during this study. These results indicate that BSE screening in Japan is as effective as those in other countries, and it is unlikely that cases of atypical BSE have been overlooked.

  17. Brain region specific alterations in the protein and mRNA levels of protein kinase A subunits in the post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Mondal, Amal C; Shukla, Pradeep K; Conley, Robert R

    2005-08-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA), a critical component of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system, phosphorylates crucial proteins and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. The objective of the study was to examine if changes in PKA activity or in the protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of any of its subunits are related to the pathophysiology of teenage suicide. We determined PKA activity and the protein and mRNA expression of different subunits of PKA in cytosol and membrane fractions obtained from the prefrontal cortex, (PFC) hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens (NA) of post-mortem brain from 17 teenage suicide victims and 17 nonpsychiatric control subjects. PKA activity was significantly decreased in the PFC but not the hippocampus of teenage suicide victims as compared with controls. However, the protein and mRNA expression of only two PKA subunits, that is, PKA RIalpha and PKA RIbeta, but not any other subunits were significantly decreased in both membrane and cytosol fractions of the PFC and protein expression of RIalpha and RIbeta in the NA of teenage suicide victims as compared to controls. A decrease in protein and mRNA expression of two specific PKA subunits may be associated with the pathogenesis of teenage suicide, and this decrease may be brain region specific, which may be related to the specific behavioral functions associated with these brain areas. Whether these changes in PKA subunits are related to suicidal behavior or are a result of suicide or are specific to suicide is not clear at this point.

  18. Metabolomics of Neurotransmitters and Related Metabolites in Post-Mortem Tissue from the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum of Alcoholic Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Mohammed Abul; Ahmed, Selina; Sultana, Nilufa; Ahmed, Eakhlas U; Pickford, Russell; Rae, Caroline; Šerý, Omar; McGregor, Iain S; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2016-02-01

    We report on changes in neurotransmitter metabolome and protein expression in the striatum of humans exposed to heavy long-term consumption of alcohol. Extracts from post mortem striatal tissue (dorsal striatum; DS comprising caudate nucleus; CN and putamen; P and ventral striatum; VS constituted by nucleus accumbens; NAc) were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomics was studied in CN by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry. Proteomics identified 25 unique molecules expressed differently by the alcohol-affected tissue. Two were dopamine-related proteins and one a GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD65. Two proteins that are related to apoptosis and/or neuronal loss (BiD and amyloid-β A4 precursor protein-binding family B member 3) were increased. There were no differences in the levels of dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC), serotonin (5HT), homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (HIAA), histamine, L-glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Tryp) between the DS (CN and P) and VS (NAc) in control brains. Choline (Ch) and acetylcholine (Ach) were higher and norepinephrine (NE) lower, in the VS. Alcoholic striata had lower levels of neurotransmitters except for Glu (30 % higher in the alcoholic ventral striatum). Ratios of DOPAC/DA and HIAA/5HT were higher in alcoholic striatum indicating an increase in the DA and 5HT turnover. Glutathione was significantly reduced in all three regions of alcohol-affected striatum. We conclude that neurotransmitter systems in both the DS (CN and P) and the VS (NAc) were significantly influenced by long-term heavy alcohol intake associated with alcoholism.

  19. Erratum: Development, appraisal, validation and implementation of a consensus protocol for the assessment of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in post-mortem brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Chalmers, Katy; Ince, Paul; Esiri, Margaret; Attems, Johannes; Kalaria, Raj; Jellinger, Kurt; Yamada, Masahito; McCarron, Mark; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona; Greenberg, Steven; Mann, David; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin

    2015-01-01

    In a collaboration involving 11 groups with research interests in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), we used a two-stage process to develop and in turn validate a new consensus protocol and scoring scheme for the assessment of CAA and associated vasculopathic abnormalities in post-mortem brain tissue. Stage one used an iterative Delphi-style survey to develop the consensus protocol. The resultant scoring scheme was tested on a series of digital images and paraffin sections that were circulated blind to a number of scorers. The scoring scheme and choice of staining methods were refined by open-forum discussion. The agreed protocol scored parenchymal and meningeal CAA on a 0-3 scale, capillary CAA as present/absent and vasculopathy on 0-2 scale, in the 4 cortical lobes that were scored separately. A further assessment involving three centres was then undertaken. Neuropathologists in three centres (Bristol, Oxford and Sheffield) independently scored sections from 75 cases (25 from each centre) and high inter-rater reliability was demonstrated. Stage two used the results of the three-centre assessment to validate the protocol by investigating previously described associations between APOE genotype (previously determined), and both CAA and vasculopathy. Association of capillary CAA with or without arteriolar CAA with APOE ε4 was confirmed. However APOE ε2 was also found to be a strong risk factor for the development of CAA, not only in AD but also in elderly non-demented controls. Further validation of this protocol and scoring scheme is encouraged, to aid its wider adoption to facilitate collaborative and replication studies of CAA.[This corrects the article on p. 19 in vol. 3, PMID: 24754000.].

  20. Development, appraisal, validation and implementation of a consensus protocol for the assessment of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in post-mortem brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Chalmers, Katy; Ince, Paul; Esiri, Margaret; Attems, Johannes; Jellinger, Kurt; Yamada, Masahito; McCarron, Mark; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona; Greenberg, Steven; Mann, David; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin

    2014-01-01

    In a collaboration involving 11 groups with research interests in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), we used a two-stage process to develop and in turn validate a new consensus protocol and scoring scheme for the assessment of CAA and associated vasculopathic abnormalities in post-mortem brain tissue. Stage one used an iterative Delphi-style survey to develop the consensus protocol. The resultant scoring scheme was tested on a series of digital images and paraffin sections that were circulated blind to a number of scorers. The scoring scheme and choice of staining methods were refined by open-forum discussion. The agreed protocol scored parenchymal and meningeal CAA on a 0-3 scale, capillary CAA as present/absent and vasculopathy on 0-2 scale, in the 4 cortical lobes that were scored separately. A further assessment involving three centres was then undertaken. Neuropathologists in three centres (Bristol, Oxford and Sheffield) independently scored sections from 75 cases (25 from each centre) and high inter-rater reliability was demonstrated. Stage two used the results of the three-centre assessment to validate the protocol by investigating previously described associations between APOE genotype (previously determined), and both CAA and vasculopathy. Association of capillary CAA with or without arteriolar CAA with APOE ε4 was confirmed. However APOE ε2 was also found to be a strong risk factor for the development of CAA, not only in AD but also in elderly non-demented controls. Further validation of this protocol and scoring scheme is encouraged, to aid its wider adoption to facilitate collaborative and replication studies of CAA.

  1. A highly selective molecularly imprinted sorbent for extraction of 2-aminothiazoline-4-carboxylic acid--Synthesis, characterization and application in post-mortem whole blood analysis.

    PubMed

    Luliński, Piotr; Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Wroczyński, Piotr; Maciejewska, Dorota

    2015-11-13

    In this paper, the optimized synthesis and detailed characterization of novel imprinted material for selective extraction of 2-aminothiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATCA) were described. The prepolymeric system contained 1-allyl-2-thiourea and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in methanol, tetrahydrofuran and dimethyl sulfoxide porogenic mixture and 2-aminothiazole-4-carboxylic acid which was used as the template for ATCA. This structural analog of the target analyte was found to provide the imprinted polymer with sufficient binding capacity (60.7 ± 0.9 μg g(-1)) and high selectivity (imprinting factor equal to 18.4) toward ATCA. The adsorption of ATCA was analyzed by the Langmuir model. The heterogeneous population of binding sites on the imprinted polymer was characterized by dissociation constants equal to 3.72 μg L(-1) and 435 μg L(-1) for high and low affinity binding sites, respectively. The morphology of the polymer was studied employing SEM and BET analyses and the composition was confirmed by EDS and (13)C CP/MAS NMR analyses. Adsorption of amino acids on the imprinted material was tested to analyze the impact of the sample components. The superiority of the imprinted sorbent was proved in a novel dispersive solid phase extraction procedure of ATCA from post-mortem whole blood with respect to the extraction efficacy on the commercial ion-exchange sorbents. The limit of quantification and limit of detection of ATCA in the new analytical method were 12 μg L(-1) and 3.5 μg L(-1), respectively. The recovery of ATCA was in the range of 81-89% and the precision of the method ranged from 1.5 to 2.7%.

  2. A validated method for the analysis of cannabinoids in post-mortem blood using liquid-liquid extraction and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Rebecca; Paterson, Sue

    2012-10-10

    A validated method for the identification and quantification of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in post-mortem blood specimens is described. Liquid-liquid extraction was used to extract the cannabinoids from 1 mL of post-mortem blood. The extracts were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide. The final derivatized extracts were analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The limit of detection was 0.25 ng/mL for all analytes and the limit of quantification of the assay was 0.25 ng/mL for THC, CBN, 11-OH-THC and 0.5 ng/mL for CBD and THC-COOH. The assay was linear across the concentration range 0.25-50 ng/mL (determined with a low and a high calibration range) with correlation coefficients ≥0.992 for all analytes. Inter-day and intra-day accuracy was within ±15% of the target concentration for all analytes. The co-efficients of variation (%CV) for inter-day and intra-day precision were ≤12% for all analytes. The extraction efficiency was >73% for all analytes. The method has successfully been applied to 54 post-mortem blood specimens to date. To the authors knowledge this is the first validated 2D GC-MS method for the analysis of THC, CBD, CBN, 11-OH-THC and THC-COOH following LLE and its application to post-mortem specimens.

  3. Changes in CB1 and CB2 receptors in the post-mortem cerebellum of humans affected by spinocerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cueto, Carmen; Benito, Cristina; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Romero, Julián; Hernández-Gálvez, Mariluz; Gómez-Ruiz, María

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeSpinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a family of chronic progressive neurodegenerative diseases, clinically and genetically heterogeneous, characterized by loss of balance and motor coordination due to degeneration of the cerebellum and its afferent and efferent connections. Unlike other motor disorders, the possible role of changes in the endocannabinoid system in the pathogenesis of SCAs has not been investigated. Experimental ApproachThe status of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) receptors in the post-mortem cerebellum of SCA patients and controls was investigated using immunohistochemical procedures. Key ResultsImmunoreactivity for the CB1 receptor, and also for the CB2 receptor, was found in the granular layer, Purkinje cells, neurons of the dentate nucleus and areas of white matter in the cerebellum of SCA patients at levels notably higher than controls. Double-labelling procedures demonstrated co-localization of CB1 and, in particular, CB2 receptors with calbindin, supporting the presence of these receptors in Purkinje neurons. Both receptors also co-localized with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the granular layer and white matter areas, indicating that they are present in microglia and astrocytes respectively. Conclusions and ImplicationsOur results demonstrate that CB1 and CB2 receptor levels are significantly altered in the cerebellum of SCA patients. Their identification in Purkinje neurons, which are the main cells affected in SCAs, as well as the changes they experienced, suggest that alterations in endocannabinoid receptors may be related to the pathogenesis of SCAs. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system could provide potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of SCAs and its progression. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:23808969

  4. Utility of urinary ethyl glucuronide analysis in post-mortem toxicology when investigating alcohol-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Sundström, M; Jones, A W; Ojanperä, I

    2014-08-01

    Use and abuse of alcohol are common findings when unnatural deaths are investigated as evidenced by high blood- and urine- alcohol concentrations (BAC and UAC) at autopsy. Because ethanol is metabolized in the liver until the time of death, the autopsy BAC or UAC might be negative even though the deceased had consumed alcohol in the immediate ante-mortem period. Analysis of the non-oxidative metabolite of ethanol [ethyl glucuronide (EtG)] offers a more sensitive test of recent drinking. In this paper, we determined the concentrations of ethanol and EtG in urine samples from 972 consecutive forensic autopsies. In 425 cases (44%) both EtG and ethanol were positive, which supports ante-mortem drinking. In 342 cases (35%), both EtG and ethanol was negative, which speaks against any consumption of alcohol just before death. In 181 cases, ethanol was negative in urine (<0.2 g/kg), whereas EtG was positive (>0.5 mg/L), which points towards ingestion of alcohol some time before death. In these cases, mean and median concentrations of EtG were 53.2 mg/L and 23.7 mg/L, respectively, although there was no mention of alcohol on 131 of the death certificates. Alcohol was mentioned on death certificates as an underlying or immediate cause of death or a contributing factor in 435 (45%) cases, which rose to 566 (58%) cases when positive EtG results were included. This article demonstrates the usefulness of EtG analysis in routine post-mortem toxicology when ante-mortem drinking and alcohol-related deaths are investigated.

  5. Post-mortem imaging of the infant and perinatal dura mater and superior sagittal sinus using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, Emma C; Malcomson, Roger D G; Joseph, Shiju; Adnan, Asif; Adlam, David; Rutty, Guy N

    2017-04-07

    Infants and young children are likely to present with subdural haemorrhage (SDH) if they are the victims of abusive head trauma. In these cases, the most accepted theory for the source of bleeding is the bridging veins traversing from the surface of the brain to the dura mater. However, some have suggested that SDH may result from leakage of blood from a dural vascular plexus. As post-mortem examination of the bridging veins and dura is challenging, and imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance and computed tomography do not have the resolution capabilities to image small blood vessels, we have trialled the use of intravascular and benchtop optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems for imaging from within the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and through the dura during five infant/perinatal autopsies. Numerous vessel-like structures were identified using both OCT systems. Measurements taken with the intravascular rotational system indicate that the approximate median diameters of blood vessels entering anterior and posterior segments of the SSS were 110 μm (range 70 to 670 μm, n = 21) and 125 μm (range 70 to 740 μm, n = 23), respectively. For blood vessels close to the wall of the SSS, the median diameters for anterior and posterior segments of the SSS were 80 μm (range 40 to 170 μm, n = 25) and 90 μm (range 30 to 150 μm), respectively. Detailed characterisation of the dural vasculature is important to aid understanding of the source of SDH. High resolution 3-dimensional reconstructions of the infant dural vasculature may be possible with further development of OCT systems.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of volatile hydrocarbons in post-mortem blood in forensic autopsy cases of fire-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Yonemitsu, Kosei; Sasao, Ako; Oshima, Toru; Mimasaka, Sohtaro; Ohtsu, Yuki; Nishitani, Yoko

    2012-04-10

    Volatile hydrocarbons in post-mortem blood from victims of fires were analyzed quantitatively by headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The benzene and styrene concentrations in the blood were positively correlated with the carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) concentration, which is evidence that the deceased inhaled the hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide simultaneously. By contrast, the concentrations of toluene and CO-Hb in the blood were not significantly correlated. This lack of correlation could be explained by two different sources of toluene, with low blood concentrations of toluene arising when the deceased inhaled smoke and high blood concentrations of toluene arising when the deceased inhaled petroleum vapor or other unknown vapors. The quantity of soot deposited in the respiratory tract was classified into four grades (-, 1+, 2+, 3+). The mean CO-Hb concentration in the 1+ soot group was significantly lower than those in the 2+ (p<0.05) and 3+ (p<0.01) soot groups. The blood CO-Hb concentrations in the 1+ soot group were all below 30%. Those indicated that the deceased aspirated smoke that contained both soot and carbon monoxide. The wide variation in CO-Hb concentrations for each soot classification could be caused by the different types of smoke produced by different materials. For example, petroleum combustion with a limited supply of oxygen, like in a compartment fire, may produce a large volume of dense black smoke that contains a large quantity of soot. Soot deposits in the airways and the blood CO-Hb concentration are basic and essential autopsy findings that are used to investigate fire-related deaths. The quantitative GC-MS analysis of blood volatile hydrocarbons can provide additional useful information on the cause of the fire and the circumstances surrounding the death. In combination, these three findings are useful for the reconstruction of cases.

  7. Post-mortem surface features in larger foraminiferan Archaias angulatus as paleoenvironmental indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Cottey, T.L.

    1986-05-01

    Larger foraminifera are major contributors to sand-sized carbonate sediments. Archaias angulatus (Fichtel and Moll) is the dominant larger foraminiferan in the Caribbean region. A taphonomic study of this species revealed several stages of preservation from newly unaltered tests to complete destruction of outer calcite layers. Tests collected from contrasting environments in Key Largo, Florida, show different paths of degradation. Impact features and secondary growths predominate on tests collected from well-sorted sediments of the open platform, whereas dissolution features are most common on tests from the calm, muddy environment of Largo Sound. Tests from the open platform show major breakage, abundant scratches, and small, randomly spaced holes. Tests from Largo Sound show little breakage, few scratches, and loss of entire sections of the outer wall. Microborings are present on tests from both environments. This study shows that postmortem alterations of surface textures of larger foraminifera may be useful indicators of paleoenvironments of deposition.

  8. Progressive damage, fracture predictions and post mortem correlations for fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Lewis Research Center is involved in the development of computational mechanics methods for predicting the structural behavior and response of composite structures. In conjunction with the analytical methods development, experimental programs including post failure examination are conducted to study various factors affecting composite fracture such as laminate thickness effects, ply configuration, and notch sensitivity. Results indicate that the analytical capabilities incorporated in the CODSTRAN computer code are effective in predicting the progressive damage and fracture of composite structures. In addition, the results being generated are establishing a data base which will aid in the characterization of composite fracture.

  9. 'Post-mortem examination of the reproductive organs of female wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Sweden'.

    PubMed

    Malmsten, Anna; Jansson, Gunnar; Dalin, Anne-Marie

    2017-03-13

    In recent decades, wild boars (Sus scrofa) have increased in numbers and distribution in Europe. Compared to other wild ungulates of similar body size, wild boars have a high reproductive capacity. To increase the knowledge of wild boar reproduction, the objective of this study was to investigate characteristics of reproductive organs, and to provide information on the occurrence of abnormalities in reproductive organs from free-ranging female wild boars. Between December 2011 and December 2015, reproductive organs from female wild boars (>30 kg body weight), were collected during hunting in four Swedish counties at estates where supplementary feeding was applied. The organs were macroscopically examined and measured. The stage of the reproductive cycle was defined according to the ovarian structures and in relation to uterus characteristics. Observed abnormalities were noted. The results from 569 animals that met the requirements to be included in this study showed significant differences in weight and length of the uterus between the various reproductive stages. Sampling region had significant effect on these differences. Abnormalities in the reproductive organs were present in approximately 10% of the examined animals. The prevalence of abnormalities increased significantly with age and was significantly affected by sampling region.

  10. Optimized lower leg injury probability curves from post-mortem human subject tests under axial impacts

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W.J.; Pintar, Frank A.; Szabo, Aniko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Derive optimum injury probability curves to describe human tolerance of the lower leg using parametric survival analysis. Methods The study re-examined lower leg PMHS data from a large group of specimens. Briefly, axial loading experiments were conducted by impacting the plantar surface of the foot. Both injury and non-injury tests were included in the testing process. They were identified by pre- and posttest radiographic images and detailed dissection following the impact test. Fractures included injuries to the calcaneus and distal tibia-fibula complex (including pylon), representing severities at the Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS) level 2+. For the statistical analysis, peak force was chosen as the main explanatory variable and the age was chosen as the co-variable. Censoring statuses depended on experimental outcomes. Parameters from the parametric survival analysis were estimated using the maximum likelihood approach and the dfbetas statistic was used to identify overly influential samples. The best fit from the Weibull, log-normal and log-logistic distributions was based on the Akaike Information Criterion. Plus and minus 95% confidence intervals were obtained for the optimum injury probability distribution. The relative sizes of the interval were determined at predetermined risk levels. Quality indices were described at each of the selected probability levels. Results The mean age, stature and weight: 58.2 ± 15.1 years, 1.74 ± 0.08 m and 74.9 ± 13.8 kg. Excluding all overly influential tests resulted in the tightest confidence intervals. The Weibull distribution was the most optimum function compared to the other two distributions. A majority of quality indices were in the good category for this optimum distribution when results were extracted for 25-, 45- and 65-year-old at five, 25 and 50% risk levels age groups for lower leg fracture. For 25, 45 and 65 years, peak forces were 8.1, 6.5, and 5.1 kN at 5% risk; 9.6, 7.7, and 6.1 kN at 25% risk

  11. Gender-specific gene expression in post-mortem human brain: localization to sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Vawter, Marquis P; Evans, Simon; Choudary, Prabhakara; Tomita, Hiroaki; Meador-Woodruff, Jim; Molnar, Margherita; Li, Jun; Lopez, Juan F; Myers, Rick; Cox, David; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E

    2004-02-01

    Gender differences in brain development and in the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression have been reported. Gender differences in human brain might be related to patterns of gene expression. Microarray technology is one useful method for investigation of gene expression in brain. We investigated gene expression, cell types, and regional expression patterns of differentially expressed sex chromosome genes in brain. We profiled gene expression in male and female dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and cerebellum using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platform. Differentially expressed genes between males and females on the Y chromosome (DBY, SMCY, UTY, RPS4Y, and USP9Y) and X chromosome (XIST) were confirmed using real-time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of gender-specific genes and neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY in three brain regions examined. The XIST gene, which silences gene expression on regions of the X chromosome, is expressed in a subset of neurons. Since a subset of neurons express gender-specific genes, neural subpopulations may exhibit a subtle sexual dimorphism at the level of differences in gene regulation and function. The distinctive pattern of neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY and other sex chromosome genes in neuronal subpopulations may possibly contribute to gender differences in prevalence noted for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of the protein expression of these sex-chromosome-linked genes in brain tissue are required to address the functional consequences of the observed gene expression differences.

  12. Natural and Undetermined Sudden Death: Value of Post-Mortem Genetic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Falgueras, Anna; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Cesar, Sergi; Mademont, Irene; Mates, Jesus; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll, Monica; Pico, Ferran; Iglesias, Anna; Tirón, Coloma; Allegue, Catarina; Carro, Esther; Gallego, María Ángeles; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Hospital, Anna; Bardalet, Narcís; Borondo, Juan Carlos; Vingut, Albert; Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Castellà, Josep; Medallo, Jordi; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Background Sudden unexplained death may be the first manifestation of an unknown inherited cardiac disease. Current genetic technologies may enable the unraveling of an etiology and the identification of relatives at risk. The aim of our study was to define the etiology of natural deaths, younger than 50 years of age, and to investigate whether genetic defects associated with cardiac diseases could provide a potential etiology for the unexplained cases. Methods and Findings Our cohort included a total of 789 consecutive cases (77.19% males) <50 years old (average 38.6±12.2 years old) who died suddenly from non-violent causes. A comprehensive autopsy was performed according to current forensic guidelines. During autopsy a cause of death was identified in most cases (81.1%), mainly due to cardiac alterations (56.87%). In unexplained cases, genetic analysis of the main genes associated with sudden cardiac death was performed using Next Generation Sequencing technology. Genetic analysis was performed in suspected inherited diseases (cardiomyopathy) and in unexplained death, with identification of potentially pathogenic variants in nearly 50% and 40% of samples, respectively. Conclusions Cardiac disease is the most important cause of sudden death, especially after the age of 40. Close to 10% of cases may remain unexplained after a complete autopsy investigation. Molecular autopsy may provide an explanation for a significant part of these unexplained cases. Identification of genetic variations enables genetic counseling and undertaking of preventive measures in relatives at risk. PMID:27930701

  13. Post-mortem investigations on stranded dolphins and porpoises from Hong Kong waters.

    PubMed

    Parsons, E C; Jefferson, T A

    2000-04-01

    Stranded cetaceans reported from the territorial waters of Hong Kong during the period May 1993 to March 1998 were examined to establish factors that may have contributed to their death. During the current study, 28 Indo-Pacific hump-backed dolphins (Sousa chinensis), 32 finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides), and four bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were necropsied. Bacteria (15 species) were isolated from nine animals. Of these bacteria, 47% were of possible fecal origin reflecting the high level of sewage contamination in Hong Kong's waters. One finless porpoise displayed wounds caused by a shark attack, and two female finless porpoises presented prolapsed uteri. At least 10 finless porpoises showed evidence of moderate to heavy lungworm infections (Halocercus pingi), and this appears to have been a factor contributing to death in at least six animals. Evidence suggesting blunt traumatic injury (probably caused by boat collisions) was found in six cetaceans (three finless porpoises and three hump-backed dolphins). Signs of fishery-related mortality were detected in at least nine animals (six hump-backed dolphins, two finless porpoises, and one bottlenose dolphin). Of these two human-caused mortality types, pre-existing disease or bacterial infection were detected in 29% of cases. Results indicate that human factors may have played a significant role in the death of at least 15 animals (32% of hump-backed dolphins, 15% of finless porpoises, and 25% of bottlenose dolphins).

  14. Potentially Treatable Disorder Diagnosed Post Mortem by Exome Analysis in a Boy with Respiratory Distress

    PubMed Central

    Imperatore, Valentina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Fallerini, Chiara; Bianciardi, Laura; Ariani, Francesca; Furini, Simone; Renieri, Alessandra; Mari, Francesca; Frullanti, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the importance of exome sequencing in solving a clinical case of a child who died at 14 months after a series of respiratory crises. He was the half-brother of a girl diagnosed at 7 years with the early-onset seizure variant of Rett syndrome due to CDKL5 mutation. We performed a test for CDKL5 in the boy, which came back negative. Driven by the mother’s compelling need for a diagnosis, we moved forward performing whole exome sequencing analysis. Surprisingly, two missense mutations in compound heterozygosity were identified in the RAPSN gene encoding a receptor-associated protein with a key role in clustering and anchoring nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at synaptic sites. This gene is responsible for a congenital form of myasthenic syndrome, a disease potentially treatable with cholinesterase inhibitors. Therefore, an earlier diagnosis in this boy would have led to a better clinical management and prognosis. Our study supports the key role of exome sequencing in achieving a definite diagnosis in severe perinatal diseases, an essential step especially when a specific therapy is available. PMID:26927095

  15. [Post mortem diffusion of carbon monoxide to muscles and blood--preliminary examinations].

    PubMed

    Teresiński, Grzegorz; Buszewicz, Grzegorz; Madro, Roman

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether the postmortem diffusion of carbon monoxide (CO) significantly affected the results of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and carboxymyoglobin (COMb) determinations. The musculocutaneous and muscular specimens collected from adult cadavers were used. The specimens were treated with CO for 24 h at room temperature. COHb and COMb were determined using gas chromatography. It was demonstrated that the skin substantially limited the diffusion of CO which slightly penetrated only the superficial layers of the muscle and did not change the blood level of COHb in the 4.5-cm layer of the muscle located underneath. The CO diffusion through the superficially charred and thermally coagulated muscle did not differ from that observed in the intact integuments. On the other hand, the membrane of the skin completely deprived of the adipose layer was not the barrier to moderate diffusion into the blood layer situated below. Thus, in charred corpses the results pf COHb and COMb determinations in the material collected under the layer of charred and coagulated tissues enable us to determine whether the victim was alive at the moment of the outbreak.

  16. Histological validation of high-resolution DTI in human post mortem tissue

    PubMed Central

    Seehaus, Arne; Roebroeck, Alard; Bastiani, Matteo; Fonseca, Lúcia; Bratzke, Hansjürgen; Lori, Nicolás; Vilanova, Anna; Goebel, Rainer; Galuske, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is amongst the simplest mathematical models available for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, yet still by far the most used one. Despite the success of DTI as an imaging tool for white matter fibers, its anatomical underpinnings on a microstructural basis remain unclear. In this study, we used 65 myelin-stained sections of human premotor cortex to validate modeled fiber orientations and oft used microstructure-sensitive scalar measures of DTI on the level of individual voxels. We performed this validation on high spatial resolution diffusion MRI acquisitions investigating both white and gray matter. We found a very good agreement between DTI and myelin orientations with the majority of voxels showing angular differences less than 10°. The agreement was strongest in white matter, particularly in unidirectional fiber pathways. In gray matter, the agreement was good in the deeper layers highlighting radial fiber directions even at lower fractional anisotropy (FA) compared to white matter. This result has potentially important implications for tractography algorithms applied to high resolution diffusion MRI data if the aim is to move across the gray/white matter boundary. We found strong relationships between myelin microstructure and DTI-based microstructure-sensitive measures. High FA values were linked to high myelin density and a sharply tuned histological orientation profile. Conversely, high values of mean diffusivity (MD) were linked to bimodal or diffuse orientation distributions and low myelin density. At high spatial resolution, DTI-based measures can be highly sensitive to white and gray matter microstructure despite being relatively unspecific to concrete microarchitectural aspects. PMID:26257612

  17. A post-mortem survey on end-of-life decisions using a representative sample of death certificates in Flanders, Belgium: research protocol

    PubMed Central

    Chambaere, Kenneth; Bilsen, Johan; Cohen, Joachim; Pousset, Geert; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje; Mortier, Freddy; Deliens, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Background Reliable studies of the incidence and characteristics of medical end-of-life decisions with a certain or possible life shortening effect (ELDs) are indispensable for an evidence-based medical and societal debate on this issue. This article presents the protocol drafted for the 2007 ELD Study in Flanders, Belgium, and outlines how the main aims and challenges of the study (i.e. making reliable incidence estimates of end-of-life decisions, even rare ones, and describing their characteristics; allowing comparability with past ELD studies; guaranteeing strict anonymity given the sensitive nature of the research topic; and attaining a sufficient response rate) are addressed in a post-mortem survey using a representative sample of death certificates. Study design Reliable incidence estimates are achievable by using large at random samples of death certificates of deceased persons in Flanders (aged one year or older). This entails the cooperation of the appropriate administrative authorities. To further ensure the reliability of the estimates and descriptions, especially of less prevalent end-of-life decisions (e.g. euthanasia), a stratified sample is drawn. A questionnaire is sent out to the certifying physician of each death sampled. The questionnaire, tested thoroughly and avoiding emotionally charged terms is based largely on questions that have been validated in previous national and European ELD studies. Anonymity of both patient and physician is guaranteed through a rigorous procedure, involving a lawyer as intermediary between responding physicians and researchers. To increase response we follow the Total Design Method (TDM) with a maximum of three follow-up mailings. Also, a non-response survey is conducted to gain insight into the reasons for lack of response. Discussion The protocol of the 2007 ELD Study in Flanders, Belgium, is appropriate for achieving the objectives of the study; as past studies in Belgium, the Netherlands, and other European

  18. Investigation on occupant ejection in high severity rear impact based on post mortem human subject sled tests.

    PubMed

    Petit, Philippe; Luet, Carole; Potier, Pascal; Vallancien, Guy

    2011-11-01

    Occupant protection in rear impact involves two competing challenges. On one hand, allowing a deformation of the seat would act as an energy absorber in low severity impacts and would consequently decrease the risk of neck injuries. However, on the other hand, large deformations of the seat may increase the likelihood of occupant ejection in high severity cases. Green et al. 1987 analyzed a total of 919 accidents in Great Britain. They found that occupant ejection resulted in a risk of severe injuries and fatalities between 3.6 and 4.5 times higher than those cases where no ejection was observed. The sample included single front, side and rear impacts as well as multiple impacts and rollover. The rate of belt use in the sample was 50%. While this analysis included all forms of impact scenarios, nevertheless, it highlights the relative injury severity of occupant ejection. Extensive literature search has found no full-scale rear impact tests involving Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS) conducted in a laboratory environment and resulting in ejection. This paper describes a total of 10 sled tests conducted on 3 belted PMHS using a simplified seat design composed of rigid plates assembled such that the angular and linear stiffness of the seatback (including the foam) was modeled. The initial angular position and the range of motion of the seatback, the size of the PMHS, the slack length of the seatbelt, the angular stiffness of the seatback, and the use of headrest were varied in the test matrix while the pulse was kept constant (triangular acceleration with a peak of 17 G at 30 ms and a duration of 95 ms). In the test series, the tests were not run randomly but the likelihood of occupant ejection was increased systematically until ejection occurred. PMHS seat ejection was observed only for the 95th percentile, initially positioned with a seatback angle relative to the vertical equal to 22°, a range of seatback angular motion equal to 44° and no headrest. Repeating

  19. Meta-analyses of the sensitivity and specificity of ante-mortem and post-mortem diagnostic tests for bovine tuberculosis in the UK and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Garcia, Javier; Downs, Sara H; Parry, Jessica E; Abernethy, Darrell A; Broughan, Jennifer M; Cameron, Angus R; Cook, Alasdair J; de la Rua-Domenech, Ricardo; Goodchild, Anthony V; Gunn, Jane; More, Simon J; Rhodes, Shelley; Rolfe, Simon; Sharp, Michael; Upton, Paul A; Vordermeier, H Martin; Watson, Eamon; Welsh, Michael; Whelan, Adam O; Woolliams, John A; Clifton-Hadley, Richard S; Greiner, Matthias

    2017-03-06

    Bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle is a global health problem and eradication of the disease requires accurate estimates of diagnostic test performance to optimize their efficiency. The objective of this study was, through statistical meta-analyses, to obtain estimates of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp), for 14 different ante-mortem and post-mortem diagnostic tests for bTB in cattle. Using data from a systematic review of the scientific literature (published 1934-2009) diagnostic Se and Sp were estimated using Bayesian logistic regression models adjusting for confounding factors. Random effect terms were used to account for unexplained heterogeneity. Parameters in the models were implemented using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), and posterior distributions for the diagnostic parameters with adjustment for covariates (confounding factors) were obtained using the inverse logit function. Estimates for Se and/or Sp of the tuberculin skin tests and the IFN-γ blood test were compared with estimates published 2010-2015. Median Se for the single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin skin (SICCT) test (standard interpretation) was 0.50 and Bayesian credible intervals (CrI) were wide (95% CrI 0.26, 0.78). Median Sp for the SICCT test was 1.00 (95% CrI 0.99, 1.00). Estimates for the IFN-γ blood test Bovine Purified Protein Derivative (PPD)-Avian PPD and Early Secreted Antigen target 6 and Culture Filtrate Protein 10 (ESAT-6/CFP10) ESAT6/CFP10 were 0.67 (95% CrI 0.49, 0.82) and 0.78 (95% CrI 0.60, 0.90) respectively for Se, and 0.98 (95% CrI 0.96, 0.99) and 0.99 (95% CrI 0.99, 1.00) for Sp. The study provides an overview of the accuracy of a range of contemporary diagnostic tests for bTB in cattle. Better understanding of diagnostic test performance is essential for the design of effective control strategies and their evaluation.

  20. Post mortem identification of deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) gene mutations combined with impaired glucose homeostasis and iron overload features in four infants with severe progressive liver failure.

    PubMed

    Pronicka, Ewa; Węglewska-Jurkiewicz, Anna; Taybert, Joanna; Pronicki, Maciej; Szymańska-Dębińska, Tamara; Karkucińska-Więckowska, Agnieszka; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Kowalski, Paweł; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, Dorota; Pajdowska, Magdalena; Socha, Piotr; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2011-02-01

    Deoxyguanosine kinase deficiency (dGK) is a frequent cause of the hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial depletion syndrome (MDS). A group of 28 infants with severe progressive liver failure of unknown cause was recruited for post mortem search for deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) gene mutations. Four affected patients (14% of the studied group), two homozygotes, one compound heterozygote, and one heterozygote, with DGUOK mutation found on only one allele, were identified. Three known pathogenic mutations in the DGUOK gene were detected, c.3G>A (p.Met1Ile), c.494A>T (p.Glu165Val), and c.766_767insGATT (p.Phe256X), and one novel molecular variant of unknown pathogenicity, c.813_814insTTT (p.Asn271_Thr272insPhe). Profound mitochondrial DNA depletion was confirmed in available specimens of the liver (4%, 15%, and 10% of the normal value) and in the muscle (4%, 23%, 45%, and 6%, respectively). The patients were born with low weights for gestational age and they presented adaptation trouble during the first days of life. Subsequently, liver failure developed, leading to death at the ages of 18, 6, 5.5, and 2.25 months, respectively. Mild neurological involvement was observed in all children (hypotonia, psychomotor retardation, and ptosis). Hypoglycemia (hypoketotic) and lactic acidosis were the constant laboratory findings. Elevated transferrin saturation, high ferritin, and alpha-fetoprotein levels resembled, in two cases, a neonatal hemochromatosis. Liver histopathology showed severe hepatic damage ranging from micronodular formation and cirrhosis to the total loss of liver architecture with diffuse fibrosis and neocholangiolar proliferation. Pancreatic islet cell hyperplasia with numerous confluent giant islets was found in both autopsied infants. Analysis of the natural history of the disease in our patients and the literature data led us to the following observations: (i) islet cell hyperplasia (and hyperinsulinism) may contribute to MDS-associated hypoglycemia; (ii

  1. Regional correlations between [(11)C]PIB PET and post-mortem burden of amyloid-beta pathology in a diverse neuropathological cohort.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Won; Ayakta, Nagehan; Grinberg, Lea T; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Lehmann, Manja; Reed, Bruce; DeCarli, Charles; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J; Boxer, Adam L; O'Neil, James P; Jin, Lee-Way; Seeley, William W; Jagust, William J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2017-01-01

    Imaging-pathological correlation studies show that in vivo amyloid-β (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) strongly predicts the presence of significant Aβ pathology at autopsy. We sought to determine whether regional PiB-PET uptake would improve sensitivity for amyloid detection in comparison with global measures (experiment 1), and to estimate the relative contributions of different Aβ aggregates to in vivo PET signal (experiment 2). In experiment 1, 54 subjects with [(11)C] PiB-PET during life and postmortem neuropathologic examination (85.2% with dementia, interval from PET to autopsy 3.1 ± 1.9 years) were included. We assessed Thal amyloid phase (N = 36) and CERAD score (N = 54) versus both global and regional PiB SUVRs. In experiment 2 (N = 42), PiB SUVR and post-mortem amyloid β burden was analyzed in five customized regions of interest matching regions sampled at autopsy. We assessed the relative contribution of neuritic plaques (NPs), diffuse plaques (DPs) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to regional PIB SUVR using multi-linear regression. In experiment 1, there were no differences in Area Under the Curve for amyloid phase ≥ A2 and CERAD score ≥ C2 between global and highest regional PiB SUVR (p = 0.186 and 0.230). In experiment 2, when NPs, DPs, and/or CAA were included in the same model, moderate to severe NPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in all regions except for the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.414-0.804, p < 0.05), whereas DPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in the angular gyrus ROI (β = 0.446, p = 0.010). CAA was also associated with PiB SUVR in the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.222-0.355, p < 0.05). In conclusion, global PiB-PET SUVR performed as well as regional values for amyloid detection in our cohort. The substrate-specific binding of PiB might differ among the brain specific regions.

  2. Degradation of Kidney and Psoas Muscle Proteins as Indicators of Post-Mortem Interval in a Rat Model, with Use of Lateral Flow Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Gi; Yang, Kyeong Eun; Hwang, Jeong Won; Kang, Hwan-Soo; Lee, Seung-Yeul; Choi, Seoyeon; Shin, Joonchul; Jang, Ik-Soon; An, Hyun Joo; Chung, Heesun; Jung, Hyo-Il; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated potential protein markers of post-mortem interval (PMI) using rat kidney and psoas muscle. Tissue samples were taken at 12 h intervals for up to 96 h after death by suffocation. Expression levels of eight soluble proteins were analyzed by Western blotting. Degradation patterns of selected proteins were clearly divided into three groups: short-term, mid-term, and long-term PMI markers based on the half maximum intensity of intact protein expression. In kidney, glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β were degraded completely within 48 h making them short-term PMI markers. AMP-activated protein kinase α, caspase 3 and GS were short-term PMI markers in psoas muscle. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was a mid-term PMI marker in both tissues. Expression levels of the typical long-term PMI markers, p53 and β-catenin, were constant for at least 96 h post-mortem in both tissues. The degradation patterns of GS and caspase-3 were verified by immunohistochemistry in both tissues. GAPDH was chosen as a test PMI protein to perform a lateral flow assay (LFA). The presence of recombinant GAPDH was clearly detected in LFA and quantified in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that LFA might be used to estimate PMI at a crime scene. PMID:27552165

  3. Original implementation of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in symmetric cells: Evaluation of post-mortem protocols applied to characterize electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Isabel Jiménez; Genies, Sylvie; Si Larbi, Gregory; Boulineau, Adrien; Daniel, Lise; Alias, Mélanie

    2016-03-01

    Understanding ageing mechanisms of Li-ion batteries is essential for further optimizations. To determine performance loss causes, post-mortem analyses are commonly applied. For each type of post-mortem test, different sample preparation protocols are adopted. However, reports on the reliability of these protocols are rare. Herein, Li-ion pouch cells with LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 - polyvinylidene fluoride positive electrode, graphite-carboxymethyl cellulose-styrene rubber negative electrode and LiPF6 - carbonate solvents mixture electrolyte, are opened and electrodes are recovered following a specified protocol. Negative and positive symmetric cells are assembled and their impedances are recorded. A signal analysis is applied to reconstruct the Li-ion pouch cell impedance from the symmetric cells, then comparison against the pouch cell true impedance allows the evaluation of the sample preparation protocols. The results are endorsed by Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) and Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses. Carbonate solvents used to remove the salt impacts slightly the surface properties of both electrodes. Drying electrodes under vacuum at 25 °C produces an impedance increase, particularly very marked for the positive electrode. Drying at 50 °C under vacuum or/and exposition to the anhydrous room atmosphere is very detrimental.

  4. Quantification of aconitine in post-mortem specimens by validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method: three case reports on fatal 'monkshood' poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bicker, Wolfgang; Monticelli, Fabio; Bauer, Andreas; Roider, Gabriele; Keller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The diester-diterpene alkaloid aconitine was quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in post-mortem specimens of three cases where suicidal ingestion of Aconitum napellus L. ('monkshood') was supposed. In an attempt at rationalization, sample preparation and chromatographic conditions of plasma/serum drug analysis routine were utilized. Linearity was established from 0.5 to 20 µg L⁻¹ using newborn calf serum (NCS) as a surrogate calibration matrix for all sample types and mesaconitine as an internal standard. Validation (selectivity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy, recovery of the extraction procedure, matrix effect, processed sample stability) confirmed the applicability of the analytical method to various post-mortem matrices. Internal standard selection was based on multi-matrix process efficiency data. In human post-mortem peripheral blood a lower limit of quantification of 0.51 µg L⁻¹ and a limit of detection of 0.13 µg L⁻¹ were accomplished (0.1 ml sample aliquots). Aconitine was degraded to a large extent in different sample types when being stored at +20 °C for 30 days, while at -20 °C and for some matrices also at +4 °C no appreciable degradation occurred. Aconitine concentrations in real samples were 10.3-17.9 µg L⁻¹ (peripheral blood, n = 3), 14.9-87.9 µg L⁻¹ (heart blood, n = 3), 317-481 µg L⁻¹ (urine, n = 2), 609-4040 µg L⁻¹ (stomach content, n = 3), 139-240 µg L⁻¹ (bile, n = 2), 8.4 µg L⁻¹ (vitreous humor, n = 1), 54.7 µg L⁻¹ (pericardial fluid, n = 1), 492 µg kg⁻¹ (liver, n = 1), 15.2-19.7 mg L⁻¹ (unknown liquids secured onsite, n = 3). Together with concomitant circumstances the analytical data provided compelling evidence for acute Aconitum poisoning as being the cause of death.

  5. Post-mortem computed tomography coaxial cutting needle biopsy to facilitate the detection of bacterioplankton using PCR probes as a diagnostic indicator for drowning.

    PubMed

    Rutty, Guy N; Johnson, Christopher; Amoroso, Jasmin; Robinson, Claire; Bradley, Carina J; Morgan, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    We report for the first time the use of coaxial cutting needle biopsy, guided by post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT), to sample internal body tissues for bacterioplankton PCR analysis to investigate drowning. This technical report describes the biopsy technique, the comparison of the needle biopsy and the invasive autopsy sampling results, as well as the PMCT and autopsy findings. By using this new biopsy sampling approach for bacterioplankton PCR, we have developed on previous papers describing the minimally invasive PMCT approach for the diagnosis of drowning. When such a system is used, the operator must take all precautions to avoid contamination of the core biopsy samples due to the sensitivity of PCR-based analytic systems.

  6. PMICALC: an R code-based software for estimating post-mortem interval (PMI) compatible with Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Barús, José I; Rodríguez-Calvo, María Sol; Suárez-Peñaranda, José M; Vieira, Duarte N; Cadarso-Suárez, Carmen; Febrero-Bande, Manuel

    2010-01-30

    In legal medicine the correct determination of the time of death is of utmost importance. Recent advances in estimating post-mortem interval (PMI) have made use of vitreous humour chemistry in conjunction with Linear Regression, but the results are questionable. In this paper we present PMICALC, an R code-based freeware package which estimates PMI in cadavers of recent death by measuring the concentrations of potassium ([K+]), hypoxanthine ([Hx]) and urea ([U]) in the vitreous humor using two different regression models: Additive Models (AM) and Support Vector Machine (SVM), which offer more flexibility than the previously used Linear Regression. The results from both models are better than those published to date and can give numerical expression of PMI with confidence intervals and graphic support within 20 min. The program also takes into account the cause of death.

  7. Complex suicide by ethanol intoxication and inhalation of fire fumes in an old lady: interdisciplinary elucidation including post-mortem analysis of congener alcohols.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, L; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Bohnert, M; Auwärter, V; Pollak, S

    2011-06-15

    An 88-year-old woman committed suicide by drinking a toxic amount of highly concentrated alcohol and setting two rooms of her flat on fire. As there was not enough oxygen, the fire went out, however. At autopsy, no thermal lesions were found on the body, but soot depositions in the airways and a COHb value of 14% pointed to the inhalation of fire fumes. The ethanol concentration in femoral blood was 6.62 per mille. The gastric mucosa was fixed by the ingested alcohol and showed hardly any autolytic changes despite a post-mortem interval of five days. Congener analysis of the gastric contents and the femoral blood indicated the uptake of a fruit distillate or its foreshot.

  8. How to optimise the yield of forensic and clinical post-mortem microbiology with an adequate sampling: a proposal for standardisation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, A; Cohen, M C; Lucena, J; Van de Voorde, W; Angelini, A; Ziyade, N; Saegeman, V

    2015-05-01

    Post-mortem microbiology (PMM) is an important tool in forensic pathology, helping to determine the cause and manner of death, especially in difficult scenarios such as sudden unexpected death (SD). Currently, there is a lack of standardization of PMM sampling throughout Europe. We present recommendations elaborated by a panel of European experts aimed to standardize microbiological sampling in the most frequent forensic and clinical post-mortem situations. A network of forensic microbiologists, pathologists and physicians from Spain, England, Belgium, Italy and Turkey shaped a flexible protocol providing minimal requirements for PMM sampling at four practical scenarios: SD, bioterrorism, tissue and cell transplantation (TCT) and paleomicrobiology. Biosafety recommendations were also included. SD was categorized into four subgroups according to the age of the deceased and circumstances at autopsy: (1) included SD in infancy and childhood (0-16 years); (2) corresponded to SD in the young (17-35 years); (3) comprised SD at any age with clinical symptoms; and (4) included traumatic/iatrogenic SD. For each subgroup, a minimum set of samples and general recommendations for microbiological analyses were established. Sampling recommendations for main bioterrorism scenarios were provided. In the TCT setting, the Belgian sampling protocol was presented as an example. Finally, regarding paleomicrobiology, the sampling selection for different types of human remains was reviewed. This proposal for standardization in the sampling constitutes the first step towards a consensus in PMM procedures. In addition, the protocol flexibility to adapt the sampling to the clinical scenario and specific forensic findings adds a cost-benefit value.

  9. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein in post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims: specific decrease in the prefrontal cortex but not the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Conley, Robert R

    2007-10-01

    Abnormalities in both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phosphoinositide (PI) signalling systems have been observed in the post-mortem brain of suicide victims. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a transcription factor that is activated by phosphorylating enzymes such as protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC), which suggests that both AC and PI signalling systems converge at the level of CREB. CREB is involved in the transcription of many neuronally expressed genes that have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. Since we observed abnormalities of both PKA and PKC in the post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims, we examined if these abnormalities are also associated with abnormalities of CREB, which is activated by these phosphorylating enzymes. We determined CRE-DNA binding using the gel shift assay, as well as protein expression of CREB using the Western blot technique, and the mRNA expression of CREB using a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus obtained from 17 teenage suicide victims and 17 matched normal control subjects. We observed that the CRE-DNA binding and the protein expression of CREB were significantly decreased in the PFC of teenage suicide victims compared with controls. There was also a significant decrease in mRNA expression of CREB in the PFC of teenage suicide victims compared with control subjects. However, there were no significant differences in CRE-DNA binding or the protein and mRNA expression of CREB in the hippocampus of teenage suicide victims compared with control subjects. These results suggest that the abnormalities of PKA, and of PKC, observed in teenage suicide victims are also associated with abnormalities of the transcription factor CREB, and that this may also cause alterations of important neuronally expressed genes, and provide further support of the signal transduction of abnormalities

  10. When Is the Brain Dead? Living-Like Electrophysiological Responses and Photon Emissions from Applications of Neurotransmitters in Fixed Post-Mortem Human Brains

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Nicolas; Murugan, Nirosha J.; Tessaro, Lucas W. E.; Costa, Justin N.; Persinger, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the post-mortem human brain can be preserved by immersing the organ within a fixative solution. Once the brain is perfused, cellular and histological features are maintained over extended periods of time. However, functions of the human brain are not assumed to be preserved beyond death and subsequent chemical fixation. Here we present a series of experiments which, together, refute this assumption. Instead, we suggest that chemical preservation of brain structure results in some retained functional capacity. Patterns similar to the living condition were elicited by chemical and electrical probes within coronal and sagittal sections of human temporal lobe structures that had been maintained in ethanol-formalin-acetic acid. This was inferred by a reliable modulation of frequency-dependent microvolt fluctuations. These weak microvolt fluctuations were enhanced by receptor-specific agonists and their precursors (i.e., nicotine, 5-HTP, and L-glutamic acid) as well as attenuated by receptor-antagonists (i.e., ketamine). Surface injections of 10 nM nicotine enhanced theta power within the right parahippocampal gyrus without any effect upon the ipsilateral hippocampus. Glutamate-induced high-frequency power densities within the left parahippocampal gyrus were correlated with increased photon counts over the surface of the tissue. Heschl’s gyrus, a transverse convexity on which the primary auditory cortex is tonotopically represented, retained frequency-discrimination capacities in response to sweeps of weak (2μV) square-wave electrical pulses between 20 Hz and 20 kHz. Together, these results suggest that portions of the post-mortem human brain may retain latent capacities to respond with potential life-like and virtual properties. PMID:27907050

  11. Evaluation of the efficiency of nested q-PCR in the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex directly from tuberculosis-suspected lesions in post-mortem macroscopic inspections of bovine carcasses slaughtered in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ricardo César Tavares; Furlanetto, Leone Vinícius; Maruyama, Fernanda Harumy; Araújo, Cristina Pires de; Barros, Sílvia Letícia Bomfim; Ramos, Carlos Alberto do Nascimento; Dutra, Valéria; Araújo, Flábio Ribeiro de; Paschoalin, Vânia Margaret Flosi; Nakazato, Luciano; Figueiredo, Eduardo Eustáquio de Souza

    2015-08-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a zoonotic disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). The quick and specific detection of this species is of extreme importance, since BTB may cause economic impacts, in addition to presenting imminent risks to human health. In the present study a nested real-time PCR test (nested q-PCR) was used in post-mortem evaluations to assess cattle carcasses with BTB-suspected lesions. A total of 41,193 cattle slaughtered in slaughterhouses located in the state of Mato Grosso, were examined. Of the examined animals, 198 (0.48%) showed BTB-suspected lesions. M. bovis was isolated in 1.5% (3/198) of the samples. Multiplex-PCR detected MTC in 7% (14/198) of the samples. The nested q-PCR test detected MTC in 28% (56/198) of the BTB-suspected lesions, demonstrating higher efficiency when compared to the multiplex-PCR and conventional microbiology. Nested q-PCR can therefore be used as a complementary test in the national program for control and eradication of bovine tuberculosis.

  12. Muscle pH and temperature changes in hot- and cold-deboned ostrich (Struthio camelus var. domesticus) Muscularis gastrocnemius, pars interna and Muscularis iliofibularis during the first 23h post-mortem.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, L C; Botha, Suné St C; Britz, T J

    2007-02-01

    Cold-shortening is the response when muscles are exposed to temperatures below 10°C with a pH>6.20. The course of pH within hot-deboned and intact ostrich M. gastrocnemius, pars interna and M. iliofibularis were followed for the first 23-24h post-mortem to investigate the changes in pH as well as to determine the point of minimum pH for ostrich muscles post-mortem. The hot-deboned muscles took longer to reach the point of minimum pH than the intact muscles. There was no significant (P=0.4508) difference in the minimum pH (5.91±0.26) between the hot-deboned and the intact muscles. It was concluded that both the M. gastrocnemius, pars interna and the M. iliofibularis reached a pH<6.20 early post-mortem with muscle temperatures above 10°C; and therefore showed no risk of cold-shortening if these muscles were to be hot-deboned 2-4h post-mortem.

  13. Radiological investigation of phosphate fertilizers: Leaching studies.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Miklós; Tóth-Bodrogi, Edit; Németh, Szabolcs; Somlai, János; Kovács, Tibor

    2016-10-19

    The raw materials of the phosphate fertilizer industry are the various apatite minerals. Some of these have high levels of natural radionuclides, and thus phosphate fertilizers contain significant amounts of U-238, K-40 and Ra-226. These can leach out of the fertilizers used in large quantities for resupplying essential nutrients in the soil and can then enter the food chain through plants, thereby increasing the internal dose of the affected population. In the current study, the radiological risk of eight commercially available phosphate fertilizers (superphosphate, NPK, PK) and their leaching behaviours were investigated using different techniques (gamma and alpha spectrometry), and the dose contributions of using these fertilizers were estimated. To characterize the leaching behaviour, two leaching procedures were applied and compared -the MSZ 21470-50 (Hungarian standard) and the Tessier five-step sequential extraction method. Based on the evaluation of the gamma-spectra, it is found that the level of Th-232 in the samples was low (max.7 ± 6 Bq kg(-1)), the average Ra-226 activity concentration was 309 ± 39 Bq kg(-1) (min. 10 ± 8 Bq kg(-1), max. 570 ± 46 Bq kg(-1)), while the K-40 concentrations (average 3139 ± 188 Bq kg(-1), min. 51 ± 36 Bq kg(-1)) could be as high as 7057 ± 427 Bq kg(-1). The high K-40 can be explained by reference to the composition of the investigated fertilizers (NPK, PK). U concentrations were between 15 and 361 Bq kg(-1), with the average of 254 Bq kg(-1), measured using alpha spectrometry. The good correlation between P2O5 content and radioactivity reported previously is not found in our data. The leaching studies reveal that the mobility of the fertilizer's uranium content is greatly influenced by the parameters of the leaching methods. The availability of U to water ranged between 3 and 28 m/m%, while the Lakanen-Erviö solution mobilized between 10 and 100% of the U content.

  14. Study on the effects of heat on blood and on the post-mortem estimation of carboxyhaemoglobin and methaemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Fechner, G G; Gee, D J

    1989-01-01

    Blood samples of different carboxyhaemoglobin (CoHb) content (0%, 50%, 100%) were analysed, after short exposure to heat, for determination of the change of CoHb and methaemoglobin (MetHb) during the succeeding 14 days. Untreated blood showed an initial increase of MetHb after heating followed by a decrease during this period. There was no formation of CoHb in the untreated blood. When CoHb was already present in the blood the amount of MetHb was smaller in amount and was formed at a slower rate. In these samples the concentration of CoHb slowly decreased.

  15. Post-mortem levels and tissue distribution of codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide, norcodeine, morphine and morphine glucuronides in a series of codeine-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Frost, Joachim; Løkken, Trine Nordgård; Helland, Arne; Nordrum, Ivar Skjåk; Slørdal, Lars

    2016-05-01

    This article presents levels and tissue distribution of codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide (C6G), norcodeine, morphine and the morphine metabolites morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) in post-mortem blood (peripheral and heart blood), vitreous fluid, muscle, fat and brain tissue in a series of 23 codeine-related fatalities. CYP2D6 genotype is also determined and taken into account. Quantification of codeine, C6G, norcodeine, morphine, M3G and M6G was performed with a validated solid phase extraction LC-MS method. The series comprise 19 deaths (83%) attributed to mixed drug intoxication, 4 deaths (17%) attributed to other causes of death, and no cases of unambiguous monointoxication with codeine. The typical peripheral blood concentration pattern in individual cases was C6G≫codeine≫norcodeine>morphine, and M3G>M6G>morphine. In matrices other than blood, the concentration pattern was similar, although in a less systematic fashion. Measured concentrations were generally lower in matrices other than blood, especially in brain and fat, and in particular for the glucuronides (C6G, M3G and M6G) and, to some extent, morphine. In brain tissue, the presumed active moieties morphine and M6G were both below the LLOQ (0.0080mg/L and 0.058mg/L, respectively) in a majority of cases. In general, there was a large variability in both measured concentrations and calculated blood/tissue concentration ratios. There was also a large variability in calculated ratios of morphine to codeine, C6G to codeine and norcodeine to codeine in all matrices, and CYP2D6 genotype was not a reliable predictor of these ratios. The different blood/tissue concentration ratios showed no systematic relationship with the post-mortem interval. No coherent degradation or formation patterns for codeine, morphine, M3G and M6G were observed upon reanalysis in peripheral blood after storage.

  16. Isolation and determination of ivermectin in post-mortem and in vivo tissues of dung beetles using a continuous solid phase extraction method followed by LC-ESI+-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Antonio J; Cortez, Vieyle; Azzouz, Abdelmonaim; Verdú, José R

    2017-01-01

    A new analytical method based on solvent extraction, followed by continuous solid-phase extraction (SPE) clean-up using a polymeric sorbent, was demonstrated to be applicable for the detection of ivermectin in complex biological matrices of dung beetles (hemolymph, excreta or dry tissues) using liquid chromatography combined with positive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI+-MS/MS). Using a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1, the limit of detection (LOD) in the insect matrices at trace levels was 0.01 ng g-1 and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.1 ng g-1. The proposed method was successfully used to quantitatively determine the levels of ivermectin in the analysis of small samples in in vivo and post mortem samples, demonstrating the usefulness for quantitative analyses that are focused on future pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies in insects and the establishment of a new protocol to study the impact of ivermectin on non-target arthropods such as dung beetles and other insects that are related with the "dung community". Because satisfactory precision and accuracy values were obtained in both in vivo matrices, we suggest that the method can be consistently used for quantitative determinations that are focused on future pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies in insects. Furthermore, this new analytical method was successfully applied to biological samples of dead dung beetles from the field suggesting that the method can be used to establish a new routine analysis of ivermectin residues in insect carcasses that is applied to complement typical mortality tests.

  17. Isolation and determination of ivermectin in post-mortem and in vivo tissues of dung beetles using a continuous solid phase extraction method followed by LC-ESI+-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Antonio J.; Cortez, Vieyle; Azzouz, Abdelmonaim

    2017-01-01

    A new analytical method based on solvent extraction, followed by continuous solid-phase extraction (SPE) clean-up using a polymeric sorbent, was demonstrated to be applicable for the detection of ivermectin in complex biological matrices of dung beetles (hemolymph, excreta or dry tissues) using liquid chromatography combined with positive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI+–MS/MS). Using a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1, the limit of detection (LOD) in the insect matrices at trace levels was 0.01 ng g–1 and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.1 ng g–1. The proposed method was successfully used to quantitatively determine the levels of ivermectin in the analysis of small samples in in vivo and post mortem samples, demonstrating the usefulness for quantitative analyses that are focused on future pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies in insects and the establishment of a new protocol to study the impact of ivermectin on non-target arthropods such as dung beetles and other insects that are related with the “dung community”. Because satisfactory precision and accuracy values were obtained in both in vivo matrices, we suggest that the method can be consistently used for quantitative determinations that are focused on future pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies in insects. Furthermore, this new analytical method was successfully applied to biological samples of dead dung beetles from the field suggesting that the method can be used to establish a new routine analysis of ivermectin residues in insect carcasses that is applied to complement typical mortality tests. PMID:28207908

  18. Influence of temperature on the aging behavior of 18650-type lithium ion cells: A comprehensive approach combining electrochemical characterization and post-mortem analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Alex; Mönnighoff, Xaver; Börner, Markus; Haetge, Jan; Schappacher, Falko M.; Winter, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The understanding of the aging behavior of lithium ion batteries in automotive and energy storage applications is essential for the acceptance of the technology. Therefore, aging experiments were conducted on commercial 18650-type state-of-the-art cells to determine the influence of the temperature during electrochemical cycling on the aging behavior of the different cell components. The cells, based on Li(Ni0.5Co0.2Mn0.3)O2 (NCM532)/graphite, were aged at 20 °C and 45 °C to different states of health. The electrochemical performance of the investigated cells shows remarkable differences depending on the cycling temperature. At contrast to the expected behavior, the cells cycled at 45 °C show a better electrochemical performance over lifetime than the cells cycled at 20 °C. Comprehensive post-mortem analyses revealed the main aging mechanisms, showing a complex interaction between electrodes and electrolyte. The main aging mechanisms of the cells cycled at 45 °C differ strongly at contrast to cells cycled at 20 °C. A strong correlation between the formed SEI, the electrolyte composition and the electrochemical performance over lifetime was observed.

  19. Post-mortem analysis of a long-term tested proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under low cathode humidification conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-In; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Ki Buem; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Song, Inseob; Choi, Hanshin; Park, Jun-Young

    2014-05-01

    During continuous power operation for 2740 h, the major mechanisms and patterns of performance degradation in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack are investigated under low cathode humidification with simulated reformate fuel gases through the use of various physicochemical and electrochemical analysis tools. As operating time increases, the operating voltages and open-circuit voltages (OCVs) of the stack decrease with the large voltage distributions. In the post-mortem analysis of the stack, the delamination of the catalyst layer (CL) of unstable operating membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is significant near the cathode gas inlets. This observation is in agreement with the results of OCV, hydrogen crossover current, and anode off-gas measurements. This phenomenon may be due to the acceleration of carbon corrosion in the cathode during the frequent start-up and shut-down process, because the local cathode potential can reach more than 1.5 V in the air/fuel boundary. Additionally, the frequent membrane hydration and dehydration by the accumulation of excess water (through electrochemical reaction) and faster water evaporation (under dry-air cathode conditions and high operating temperatures) may accelerate the interface delamination between the membrane and cathode CL with a substantially uneven distribution of water.

  20. Feasibility of salvaging genetic potential of post-mortem fawns: production of sperm in testis tissue xenografts from immature donor white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in recipient mice.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Sepideh; Honaramooz, Ali

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of testis tissue xenografting from immature deer. Testis tissue was collected post-mortem from a 2-mo-old white-tailed deer fawn (Odocoileus virginianus) and small fragments of the tissue were grafted under the back skin of immunodeficient recipient mice (n = 7 mice; 8 fragments/mouse). Single xenograft samples were removed from representative recipient mice every 2 mo from grafting for up to 14 mo post-grafting. The retrieved xenografts were evaluated for seminiferous tubular density (per mm(2)) and tubular diameter, as well as for seminiferous tubular morphology and identification of the most advanced germ cell type present in each tubule cross section. Overall, 63% of the grafted testis fragments were recovered as xenografts. Testis tissue xenografts showed a gradual testicular development starting with tubular expansion by 2 mo, presence of spermatocytes by 6 mo post-grafting, round and elongated spermatids by 8 mo, followed by fully-formed sperm by 12 mo post-grafting. The timing of complete spermatogenesis generally corresponded to the reported timing of sexual maturation in white-tailed deer. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that testis tissue xenografting from immature deer donors into recipient mice can successfully result in testicular maturation and development of spermatogenesis in the grafts up to the stage of sperm production. These results may therefore provide a model for salvaging genetic material from immature male white-tailed deer that die before reaching sexual maturity.

  1. SU-C-12A-04: Diagnostic Imaging Research Using Decedents as a Proxy for the Living: Are Radiation Dosimetry and Tissue Property Measurements Affected by Post-Mortem Changes?

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D; Heintz, P; Weber, W; Melo, D; Adolphi, N; Hatch, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose (RD) from diagnostic imaging is a growing public health concern. Implanting dosimeters is a more accurate way to assess organ dose, relative to commonly used mathematical estimations. However, performing accurate dosimetry using live subjects is hindered by patient motion and safety considerations, which limit the RD and placement of implanted dosimeters. Performing multiple scans on the same subject would be the ideal way to assess the impact of dose reduction on image quality; however, performing multiple non-standard-of-care scans on live subjects for dosimetry and image quality measurements is generally prohibited by IRB committees. Our objective is to assess whether RD and tissue property (TP) measurements in post-mortem (PM) subjects are sufficiently similar to those in live subjects to justify the use of deceased subjects in future dosimetry and image quality studies. Methods: 4 MOSFET radiation dosimeters were placed enterically in each subject (2 sedated Rhesus Macaques) to measure the RD at 4 levels (carina, lung, heart, and liver) during CT scanning. The CT protocol was performed ante-mortem (AM) and 2 and 3 hours PM. For TP analysis, additional scans were taken at 24 hours PM. To compare AM and PM TP, regions-of-interest were drawn on selected organs and the average CT density with standard deviation (in units of HU) were taken; additionally, visual comparisons of images were made at each PM interval. Results: No significant difference was observed in 8 of 9 measurements comparing AM and PM RD. Only one measurement (liver of the first subject) showed a significant difference (7% lower on PM measurement), possibly due to subject re-positioning. Initial TP visual and quantitative analyses show little to no change PM. Conclusion: Our results suggest that realistic radiation dosimetry and image quality measurements based on tissue properties can be performed reliably on recently deceased subjects.

  2. When is pneumonia not pneumonia: a clinicopathologic study of the utility of lung tissue biopsies in determining the suitability of cadaveric tissue for donation.

    PubMed

    Kubilay, Zeynep; Layon, A Joseph; Baer, Herman; Archibald, Lennox K

    2016-06-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) represents a major diagnostic challenge because of the relatively low sensitivity and specificity of clinical criteria, radiological findings, and microbiologic culture results. It is often difficult to distinguish between pneumonia, underlying pulmonary disease, or conditions with pulmonary complications; this is compounded by the often-subjective clinical diagnosis of pneumonia. We conducted this study to determine the utility of post-mortem lung biopsies for diagnosing pneumonia in tissue donors diagnosed with pneumonia prior to death. Subjects were deceased patients who had been hospitalized at death and diagnosed with pneumonia. Post-mortem lung biopsies were obtained from the anatomic portion of the cadaveric lung corresponding to chest radiograph abnormalities. Specimens were fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and read by a single board-certified pathologist. Histological criteria for acute pneumonia included intense neutrophilic infiltration, fibrinous exudates, cellular debris, necrosis, or bacteria in the interstitium and intra-alveolar spaces. Of 143 subjects with a diagnosis of pneumonia at time of death, 14 (9.8 %) had histological evidence consistent with acute pneumonia. The most common histological diagnoses were emphysema (53 %), interstitial fibrosis (40 %), chronic atelectasis (36 %), acute and chronic passive congestion consistent with underlying cardiomyopathy (25 %), fibro-bullous disease (12 %), and acute bronchitis (11 %). HCAP represents a major diagnostic challenge because of the relatively low sensitivity and specificity of clinical criteria, radiological findings, and microbiologic testing. We found that attending physician-diagnosed pneumonia did not correlate with post-mortem pathological diagnosis. We conclude that histological examination of cadaveric lung tissue biopsies enables ascertainment or rule out of underlying pneumonia and prevents erroneous donor deferrals.

  3. Comparison between drug screening by immunoassay and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry in post-mortem urine.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Mira; Pelander, Anna; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2015-05-01

    Immunoassay is currently the most common approach for urine drug screening. However, the continuous emergence of new psychoactive substances (NPS) and their low urinary concentrations have challenged the scope and sensitivity of immunoassays. Consequently, specialized toxicology laboratories rely more and more on mass spectrometry (MS) based techniques. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-TOF-MS) is an especially attractive technique for comprehensive drug screening. The objective was to compare the performances of immunoassay and UHPLC-HR-TOF-MS in terms of scope, flexibility, sensitivity, and reliability of substance identification. A total of 279 post-mortem urine samples were analyzed using a method representative of each technique. The immunoassay method was an Emit II Plus enzyme immunoassay for the following drug groups: amphetamines, benzodiazepines, buprenorphine, cannabis, and opiates. The UHPLC-HR-TOF-MS method was a recently published method covering hundreds of drugs: conventional drugs of abuse, abused prescription drugs, and NPS of various classes. UHPLC-HR-TOF-MS produced a lower number of false positive (FP) results for the drug groups covered by immunoassay. Many of the false negative (FN, n = 40) and FP (n = 22) immunoassay results were obviously due to the higher cut-off concentrations and interfering matrix, respectively. Moreover, the wider scope of UHPLC-HR-TOF-MS allowed detection of NPS and prescription drugs. UHPLC-HR-TOF-MS gave FP results related to a few particular substances. The future option of adjusting all compound-specific reporting parameters individually would allow the method's sensitivity and specificity to be fully exploited.

  4. Decreased 16:0/20:4-phosphatidylinositol level in the post-mortem prefrontal cortex of elderly patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Junya; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Kunii, Yasuto; Sugiura, Yuki; Yuki, Dai; Wada, Akira; Hino, Mizuki; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Kondo, Takeshi; Waki, Michihiko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Masaki, Noritaka; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Sakon; Sato, Shinji; Sasaki, Takehiko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Yabe, Hirooki

    2017-01-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia includes phospholipid abnormalities. Phospholipids are bioactive substances essential for brain function. To analyze differences in the quantity and types of phospholipids present in the brain tissue of patients with schizophrenia, we performed a global analysis of phospholipids in multiple brain samples using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass/mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS/MS) and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). We found significantly decreased 16:0/20:4-phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the brains from patients with schizophrenia in the LC-ESI/MS/MS, and that the 16:0/20:4-PI in grey matter was most prominently diminished according to the IMS experiments. Previous reports investigating PI pathology of schizophrenia did not identify differences in the sn-1 and sn-2 fatty acyl chains. This study is the first to clear the fatty acid composition of PI in brains from patients with schizophrenia. Alteration in the characteristic fatty acid composition of PI may also affect neuronal function, and could play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Although further studies are necessary to understand the role of reduced 16:0/20:4-PI levels within the prefrontal cortex in the etiology of schizophrenia, our results provide insight into the development of a novel therapy for the clinical treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:28332626

  5. Decreased 16:0/20:4-phosphatidylinositol level in the post-mortem prefrontal cortex of elderly patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Junya; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Kunii, Yasuto; Sugiura, Yuki; Yuki, Dai; Wada, Akira; Hino, Mizuki; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Kondo, Takeshi; Waki, Michihiko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Masaki, Noritaka; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Sakon; Sato, Shinji; Sasaki, Takehiko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Yabe, Hirooki

    2017-03-23

    The etiology of schizophrenia includes phospholipid abnormalities. Phospholipids are bioactive substances essential for brain function. To analyze differences in the quantity and types of phospholipids present in the brain tissue of patients with schizophrenia, we performed a global analysis of phospholipids in multiple brain samples using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass/mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS/MS) and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). We found significantly decreased 16:0/20:4-phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the brains from patients with schizophrenia in the LC-ESI/MS/MS, and that the 16:0/20:4-PI in grey matter was most prominently diminished according to the IMS experiments. Previous reports investigating PI pathology of schizophrenia did not identify differences in the sn-1 and sn-2 fatty acyl chains. This study is the first to clear the fatty acid composition of PI in brains from patients with schizophrenia. Alteration in the characteristic fatty acid composition of PI may also affect neuronal function, and could play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Although further studies are necessary to understand the role of reduced 16:0/20:4-PI levels within the prefrontal cortex in the etiology of schizophrenia, our results provide insight into the development of a novel therapy for the clinical treatment of schizophrenia.

  6. Serum chemistry, hematologic, and post-mortem findings in free-ranging bobcats (Lynx rufus) with notoedric mange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serieys, Laurel E.K.; Foley, Janet; Owens, Sean; Woods, Leslie; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Poppenga, Robert H.; Clifford, Deana L.; Stephenson, Nicole; Rudd, Jaime; Riley, Seth P.D.

    2013-01-01

    Notoedric mange was responsible for a population decline of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in 2 Southern California counties from 2002–2006 and is now reported to affect bobcats in Northern and Southern California. With this study we document clinical laboratory and necropsy findings for bobcats with mange. Bobcats in this study included free-ranging bobcats with mange (n = 34), a control group of free-ranging bobcats without mange (n = 11), and a captive control group of bobcats without mange (n = 19). We used 2 control groups to evaluate potential anomalies due to capture stress or diet. Free-ranging healthy and mange-infected bobcats were trapped or salvaged. Animals were tested by serum biochemistry, complete blood count, urine protein and creatinine, body weight, necropsy, and assessment for anticoagulant rodenticide residues in liver tissue. Bobcats with severe mange were emaciated, dehydrated, and anemic with low serum creatinine, hyperphosphatemia, hypoglycemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia, and sometimes septicemic when compared to control groups. Liver enzymes and leukocyte counts were elevated in free-ranging, recently captured bobcats whether or not they were infested with mange, suggesting capture stress. Bobcats with mange had lower levels of serum cholesterol, albumin, globulin, and total protein due to protein loss likely secondary to severe dermatopathy. Renal insufficiency was unlikely in most cases, as urine protein:creatinine ratios were within normal limits. A primary gastrointestinal loss of protein or blood was possible in a few cases, as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, intestinal parasitism, colitis, gastric hemorrhage, and melena. The prevalence of exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides was 100% (n = 15) in bobcats with mange. These findings paint a picture of debilitating, multisystemic disease with infectious and toxic contributing factors that can progress to death in individuals and potential decline in populations.

  7. Serum chemistry, hematologic, and post-mortem findings in free-ranging bobcats (Lynx rufus) with notoedric mange.

    PubMed

    Serieys, Laurel E K; Foley, Janet; Owens, Sean; Woods, Leslie; Boydston, Erin E; Lyren, Lisa M; Poppenga, Robert H; Clifford, Deana L; Stephenson, Nicole; Rudd, Jaime; Riley, Seth P D

    2013-12-01

    Notoedric mange was responsible for a population decline of bobcats ( Lynx rufus ) in 2 Southern California counties from 2002-2006 and is now reported to affect bobcats in Northern and Southern California. With this study we document clinical laboratory and necropsy findings for bobcats with mange. Bobcats in this study included free-ranging bobcats with mange (n = 34), a control group of free-ranging bobcats without mange (n = 11), and a captive control group of bobcats without mange (n = 19). We used 2 control groups to evaluate potential anomalies due to capture stress or diet. Free-ranging healthy and mange-infected bobcats were trapped or salvaged. Animals were tested by serum biochemistry, complete blood count, urine protein and creatinine, body weight, necropsy, and assessment for anticoagulant rodenticide residues in liver tissue. Bobcats with severe mange were emaciated, dehydrated, and anemic with low serum creatinine, hyperphosphatemia, hypoglycemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia, and sometimes septicemic when compared to control groups. Liver enzymes and leukocyte counts were elevated in free-ranging, recently captured bobcats whether or not they were infested with mange, suggesting capture stress. Bobcats with mange had lower levels of serum cholesterol, albumin, globulin, and total protein due to protein loss likely secondary to severe dermatopathy. Renal insufficiency was unlikely in most cases, as urine protein:creatinine ratios were within normal limits. A primary gastrointestinal loss of protein or blood was possible in a few cases, as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, intestinal parasitism, colitis, gastric hemorrhage, and melena. The prevalence of exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides was 100% (n = 15) in bobcats with mange. These findings paint a picture of debilitating, multisystemic disease with infectious and toxic contributing factors that can progress to death in individuals and potential decline in populations.

  8. [Digital radiology with storage phosphors in cephalometric study in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Calderazzi, A; Palla, L; Battolla, L; Caramella, D; Barbieri, L

    1992-09-01

    Conventional radiology is continually modified with the development of digital systems which can be used for several types of radiologic examinations. Our study was aimed at evaluating the advantages of these new technologies in the orthodontic field, where the problems associated with image quality and radiation protection are major especially in young patients; the latter goal is achievable by dramatically reducing radiation dose and by avoiding repeating the exam. In our study, we compared lateral teleradiographs of the skull for cephalometric analysis obtained using conventional and digital diagnostic methods. The preliminary results demonstrated that the two imaging techniques did not differ relative to bone structure representation, even though the digital system provided better visualization of soft tissue structures. Computed radiography also allowed a marked reduction in the number of repeats and reduced radiation dose. The current disadvantages of this imaging method are the high initial cost of the equipment, reduced work rate, and the need of frequent technical assistance.

  9. Using diagnostic radiology in human evolutionary studies

    PubMed Central

    SPOOR, FRED; JEFFERY, NATHAN; ZONNEVELD, FRANS

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of medical imaging and associated computer graphics techniques to the study of human evolutionary history, with an emphasis on basic concepts and on the advantages and limitations of each method. Following a short discussion of plain film radiography and pluridirectional tomography, the principles of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their role in the investigation of extant and fossil morphology are considered in more detail. The second half of the paper deals with techniques of 3-dimensional visualisation based on CT and MRI and with quantitative analysis of digital images. PMID:10999271

  10. Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer in Asiatic cheetah using nuclei derived from post-mortem frozen tissue in absence of cryo-protectant and in vitro matured domestic cat oocytes.

    PubMed

    Moulavi, F; Hosseini, S M; Tanhaie-Vash, N; Ostadhosseini, S; Hosseini, S H; Hajinasrollah, M; Asghari, M H; Gourabi, H; Shahverdi, A; Vosough, A D; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2017-03-01

    Recent accomplishments in the field of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) hold tremendous promise to prevent rapid loss of animal genetic resources using ex situ conservation technology. Most of SCNT studies use viable cells for nuclear transfer into recipient oocytes. However, preparation of live cells in extreme circumstances, in which post-mortem material of endangered/rare animals is improperly retained frozen, is difficult, if not impossible. This study investigated the possibility of interspecies-SCNT (iSCNT) in Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus), a critically endangered subspecies, using nuclei derived from frozen tissue in absence of cryo-protectant at -20 °C and in vitro matured domestic cat oocytes. No cells growth was detected in primary culture of skin and tendon pieces or following culture of singled cells prepared by enzymatic digestion. Furthermore, no live cells were detected following differential viable staining and almost all cells had ruptured membrane. Therefore, direct injection of donor nuclei into enucleated cat oocytes matured in vitro was carried out for SCNT experiments. Early signs of nuclear remodeling were observed as early as 2 h post-iSCNT and significantly increased at 4 h post-iSCNT. The percentages of iSCNT reconstructs that cleaved and developed to 4-16 cell and morula stages were 32.3 ± 7.3, 18.2 ± 9.8 and 5.9 ± 4.3%, respectively. However, none of the iSCNT reconstructs developed to the blastocyst stage. When domestic cat somatic and oocytes were used for control SCNT and parthenogenetic activation, the respective percentages of oocytes that cleaved (51.3 ± 13.9 and 77.3 ± 4.0%) and further developed to the blastocyst stage (11.3 ± 3.3 and 16.8 ± 3.8%) were comparable. In summary, this study demonstrated that enucleated cat oocytes can partially remodel and reactivate non-viable nuclei of Asiatic cheetah and support its reprogramming back to the embryonic stage. To our knowledge, this is

  11. Radiological study of Mersing District, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Alajerami, Yasser; Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Bt Basri, Nor Afifah

    2013-04-01

    A potential site has been selected for a nuclear power plant (NPP) in Mersing District of Malaysia. This study aims at providing the base line data of this district for the first time, in line with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for NPP sitting criteria. The mean dose rate, mean population weighted dose rate and annual effective dose are found to be 140 nGy h-1, 0.836 mSv y-1 and 0.857 mSv, respectively. A hyper Purity Germanium Detector (HPGe) is used in determining the activity concentrations of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K. The activity concentration ranges from 16±1 to 410±15 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, 17±1 to 271±8 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra and 13±3 to 1434±57 Bq kg-1 for 40K. In addition, a Low Background Alpha Beta Series 5 XLB Automatic was used in the determination of gross alpha and gross beta activity. The result ranges from 202±50 to 2325±466 Bq kg-1 for gross alpha and 164±17 to 2447±103 Bq kg-1 for gross beta. Contour maps were produced for isodose, activity concentration of 232Th, 226Ra, 40K, gross alpha and gross beta for the study area. The results are compared with UNSCEAR (2000).

  12. Basic radiological studies contamination control experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Duce, S.W.; Winberg, M.R.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the results of experiments relating to contamination control performed in support of the Environmental Restoration Programs Retrieval Project. During the years 1950 to 1970 waste contaminated with plutonium and other transuranic radionuclides was disposed of in shallow land-filled pits and trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Due to potential for migration of radionuclides to an existing aquifer the feasibility of retrieving and repackaging the waste for placement in a final repository is being examined as part of a retrieval project. Contamination control experiments were conducted to determine expected respirable and nonrespirable plutonium contaminated dust fractions and the effectiveness of various dust suppression techniques. Three soil types were tested to determine respirable fractions: Rocky Flats Plant generic soil, Radioactive Waste Management Complex generic soil, and a 1:1 blend of the two soil types. Overall, the average respirable fraction of airborne dust was 5.4% by weight. Three contamination control techniques were studied: soil fixative sprays, misting agents, and dust suppression agents. All of the tested agents proved to be effective in reducing dust in the air. Details of product performance and recommended usage are discussed.

  13. Validated Method for the Screening and Quantification of Baclofen, Gabapentin and Pregabalin in Human Post-Mortem Whole Blood Using Protein Precipitation and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Limon; Smith, Amy; Patel, Rajan; Andrews, Rebecca; Paterson, Sue

    2017-03-10

    There has been a rapid increase in the number of prescriptions for baclofen (BLF), gabapentin (GBP) and pregabalin (PGL) in the UK since their introduction to therapy. Recent studies across the European Union and USA have shown the illicit abuse potential of these drugs and deaths have been observed. A simple, reliable and fully validated method was developed for the screening and quantification of BLF, GBP and PGL in human post-mortem (PM) blood. The analytes and their deuterated analogs as internal standard were extracted from blood using a single addition acetonitrile protein precipitation reaction followed by analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) with triggered dynamic multiple reaction monitoring mode for simultaneous confirmation and quantification. The assay was linear from 0.05 to 1.00 µg/mL for BLF and 0.5 to 50.0 µg/mL for GBP and PGL, respectively with r2 > 0.999 (n = 9) for all analytes. Intra-day and inter-day imprecisions (n = 80) were calculated using one-way ANOVA; no significant difference (P > 0.99) was observed for all analytes over 8 non-consecutive days. The average recovery for all analytes was >98.9%. The limits of detection and quantification were both 0.05 µg/mL for BLF, and 0.5 µg/mL for GBP and PGL. The method was highly selective with no interference from endogenous compounds or from 54 drugs commonly encountered in PM toxicology. To prove method applicability, 17 PM blood samples submitted for analysis were successfully analyzed. The concentration range observed in PM blood for BLF was 0.08-102.00 µg/mL (median = 0.25 µg/mL), for GBP 1.0-134.0 µg/mL (median = 49.0 µg/mL) and 2.0-540.0 µg/mL (median = 42.0 µg/mL) for PGL.

  14. [Pneumothorax in multiple trauma. Radiologic and CT study].

    PubMed

    Borrè, A; Ferraris, M M; Iacono, C; Verna, V; Scala, A

    1992-10-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the necessity to perform chest Computerized Tomography (CT) in multiple traumatized patients to diagnose pleuropulmonary lesions and, particularly, pneumothorax: the correct identification of this condition, although minimal, is important especially in prevision of long anesthesias and/or positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) therapy. This assisted respiratory technique improves arterial oxygenation but causes a barotrauma which may cause some complications; particularly, a small undetected pneumothorax can suddenly increase so as to cause pulmonary collapse with sometimes dramatic symptoms. Chest X-ray films and CT scans, performed in rapid succession on patient's admission in Emergency Ward, were compared in 21 subjects. CT is indispensable in case of severe chest parietal lesions which can mask the radiological evidence of pulmonary or pleural conditions, as it occurred in 3 of our cases. Moreover, CT resulted more reliable than chest X-rays (18 versus 10 correct diagnoses) especially in the detection of small antero-inferior pneumothorax flaps, in which direct radiological signs cannot be identified, in default of radio-geometrical assumptions. Indirect radiological signs of pneumothorax must be recognized but critically considered in order to avoid over-staging.

  15. Energy Deposition and Radiological Studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Tropin, I. S.; Eidelman, Y. I.

    2015-06-25

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system – all with corresponding radiation shielding – was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable design options.

  16. Development and validation of a direct headspace GC-FID method for the determination of sevoflurane, desflurane and other volatile compounds of forensic interest in biological fluids: application on clinical and post-mortem samples.

    PubMed

    Kovatsi, Leda; Giannakis, Dimitrios; Arzoglou, Vasileios; Samanidou, Victoria

    2011-05-01

    A simple and reliable headspace GC-flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of seven volatile compounds of forensic interest: sevoflurane, desflurane, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, acetone and acetaldehyde. All seven compounds including acetonitrile (internal standard) eluted within 10 min and were well resolved with no endogenous interference. Good linearity was observed in the range of 1-12 mg/dL for both anesthetics and 2.5-40 mg/dL for the other five analytes. The method showed good precision, sensitivity and repeatability. Most of the analytes remained stable during the storage of samples at 4°C. Desflurane and acetone degraded (>10%), when the samples remained on the autosampler for more than 2 and 3 h, respectively. The method was finally applied on clinical and post-mortem blood and urine samples. The clinical samples were collected both from patients who underwent surgery, as well as from the occupationally exposed medical and nursing staff of the university hospital, working in the operating rooms. The hospital staff samples were found negative for all compounds, while the patients' samples were found positive for the anesthetic administered to the patient. The post-mortem blood samples were found positive for ethanol and acetaldehyde.

  17. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience.

  18. A study of composite restorations as a tool in forensic identification

    PubMed Central

    Hemasathya, Bahavathi Ananthan; Balagopal, Sundaresan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Comparing ante-mortem and post-mortem dental data is a principal method of identification in forensic odontology. Radiographic images of amalgam have been used in dental forensics for identification due to their unique appearance. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether radio-opaque composite restorations have a potential for identification in forensic odontology. Materials and Methods: Thirty typodont mandibular first molar teeth were prepared with Class-II (proximo-occlusal) cavities and restored with a radio-opaque composite (Tetric N-Ceram). Two sets of standardized radiographs were taken from the 30 teeth, keeping the radiological parameters constant. One set of these 30 radiographs was named as SET 1. Ten randomly chosen radiographs from the other set and two other radiographs of Class-II composite restorations in typodont teeth constituted SET 2. Thirty dentally trained examiners were asked to match the 12 radiographic images of SET 2 with those of SET 1. Results: The results show that 15 examiners were able to correctly match all the 12 images. Statistical analysis was done using kappa statistical test. Conclusion: This study shows that, if the post-mortem radiographs are accurate duplicates of ante-mortem radiographs of composite restorations, then the shape of the composite restoration is unique and can be used for identification. PMID:23960413

  19. Forensic aspects of maxillofacial radiology.

    PubMed

    Wood, R E

    2006-05-15

    Radiology has been used extensively in conventional dental identification, anatomically based identification and identification using maxillofacial skeletal landmarks such as the frontal sinus. Examples of these are well documented in the literature. The purpose of this paper was to revisit the methods where radiographic methods may be used to determine identity using the teeth, the root structures and the frontal sinuses. Additionally suggestions are offered for management of radiography in mass disasters and cases where age determination is required. Computer assisted tomography can be used in the assessment of the degree of fit of a weapon to a wound in cases of blunt force skull injury and plane films can assist in depicting the pattern of post mortem skull fractures. Micro-computed tomography has been used in matching weapons to wounds in sharp-force injury cases. The radiologist's role in cases of civil litigation and fraud is discussed and case examples are given. There are gaps in the science where radiological methods are used. The author offers several suggestions for possible research projects to close some of these gaps.

  20. A Comparative Study Using Numerical Methods for Surface X Ray Doses with Conventional and Digital Radiology Equipment in Pediatric Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Posa Ioan; Florin, Georgescu Remus; Virgil, Ciobanu; Antonescu, Elisabeta

    2011-09-14

    The place of the study is a pediatrics clinic which realizes a great variety of emergency, ambulatory ad hospital examinations. The radiology compartment respects work procedures and a system to ensure the quality of X ray examinations. The results show a constant for the programmator of the digital detector machine for the tension applied to the tube. For the screen-film detector machine the applied tension increases proportionally with the physical development of the child considering the trunk thickness.

  1. A Comparative Study Using Numerical Methods for Surface X Ray Doses with Conventional and Digital Radiology Equipment in Pediatric Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Posa Ioan; Florin, Georgescu Remus; Virgil, Ciobanu; Antonescu, Elisabeta

    2011-09-01

    The place of the study is a pediatrics clinic which realizes a great variety of emergency, ambulatory ad hospital examinations. The radiology compartment respects work procedures and a system to ensure the quality of X ray examinations. The results show a constant for the programmator of the digital detector machine for the tension applied to the tube. For the screen-film detector machine the applied tension increases proportionally with the physical development of the child considering the trunk thickness.

  2. [Update on the radiological study of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro Ballester, A; Marco Domenech, S F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis has made a comeback in recent years. This upsurge has been attributed to factors such as increased immigration and the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifests radiologically with parenchymal involvement, lymph node involvement, pleural effusion, and/or miliary disease. In post-primary tuberculosis, the earliest radiological sign is small nodules and branching centrilobular lesions that increase in size and coalesce to form ill-defined patchy consolidations; cavitations are very characteristic of active disease. The aim of this article is to describe the radiologic findings for pulmonary tuberculosis and its complications.

  3. Imaging Guidelines for Enhancing Justifications for Radiologic Studies.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Baek, Jung Hwan; Jung, Seung Eun; Do, Kyung Hyun; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Min-Jeong; Choi, Miyoung; Lee, Min; Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A

    2016-02-01

    Justification in the field of radiology refers to the appropriate use of radiologic imaging modalities, and may be achieved by establishing clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs). Recently, CIGs have been shown to be useful in selecting the proper medical imaging modality, resulting in the reduction of inappropriate radiologic examinations, thereby enhancing justifications. However, the development of CIGs is both time-consuming and difficult as the methodology of evidence-based medicine should be adhered to. Thus, although the radiologic societies in developed countries such as the United Kingdom and USA are already developing and implementing CIGs in their clinical practices, CIGs are not yet readily available in many other countries owing to differences in medical circumstances and resources. In this review, we assess the role and limitations of CIGs by examining the current status of CIGs in developed countries, and also describe the specific efforts made to establish CIGs in Korea.

  4. Imaging Guidelines for Enhancing Justifications for Radiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Justification in the field of radiology refers to the appropriate use of radiologic imaging modalities, and may be achieved by establishing clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs). Recently, CIGs have been shown to be useful in selecting the proper medical imaging modality, resulting in the reduction of inappropriate radiologic examinations, thereby enhancing justifications. However, the development of CIGs is both time-consuming and difficult as the methodology of evidence-based medicine should be adhered to. Thus, although the radiologic societies in developed countries such as the United Kingdom and USA are already developing and implementing CIGs in their clinical practices, CIGs are not yet readily available in many other countries owing to differences in medical circumstances and resources. In this review, we assess the role and limitations of CIGs by examining the current status of CIGs in developed countries, and also describe the specific efforts made to establish CIGs in Korea. PMID:26908986

  5. Introduction to Radiological Monitoring; A Programmed Home Study Course. Four Self-Study Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Battle Creek, MI.

    This progrmed course of study is designed to prepare local government officials and individual citizens to act in nuclear emergencies or disasters. Each of the four units has two lessons beginning with a brief overview and proceeding with self study frames. Line drawings are used to illustrate effects. Topics covered are the radiological monitor…

  6. Digital radiological research in forensic dental investigation: case studies.

    PubMed

    Nuzzolese, E; Di Vella, G

    2012-04-01

    The advent of dental digital radiology and new portable X-ray devices allows the execution of periapical X-ray images not only in the dental surgery but also in hitherto difficult locations such as field military hospitals, archaeological excavation sites, morgues and in cases of house arrest. In this work authors evaluated the feasibility of Nomad Examiner (Aribex inc.) handheld X-ray device combined with a digital sensor and a portable pc in forensic odontology applications. Employed for the first time forensically during the 2004 Tsunami victim identification process, the Nomad Examiner has now passed all security and conformity requirements of US and EU regulations. Examples of the practical use and the technical features of this device are seen when employed in odontological assessment of skeletonised and carbonized individuals and the assessment of individuals under house arrest complaining dental lesions. Results from the use this portable device demonstrate the benefits of a dental radiological assessment during an autopsy with the aim of human identification and the importance of a complete dental assessment (clinical and radiological) when evaluating dental traumatic lesions of individuals who cannot visit a dental surgery. In the first example forensic dentist would work alongside a forensic pathologist. On the other hand in the second example an odontologist - dentist could be appointed as an expert witness directly by a Court.

  7. External Factors That Influence the Practice of Radiology: Proceedings of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology Meeting.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; McNeil, Barbara J; Palkó, András; Thrall, James H; Krestin, Gabriel P; Muellner, Ada; Kressel, Herbert Y

    2017-02-04

    In both the United States and Europe, efforts to reduce soaring health care costs have led to intense scrutiny of both standard and innovative uses of imaging. Given that the United States spends a larger share of its gross domestic product on health care than any other nation and also has the most varied health care financing and delivery systems in the world, it has become an especially fertile environment for developing and testing approaches to controlling health care costs and value. This report focuses on recent reforms that have had a dampening effect on imaging use in the United States and provides a glimpse of obstacles that imaging practices may soon face or are already facing in other countries. On the basis of material presented at the 2015 meeting of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology, this report outlines the effects of reforms aimed at (a) controlling imaging use, (b) controlling payer expense through changes in benefit design, and (c) controlling both costs and quality through "value-based" payment schemes. Reasons are considered for radiology practices on both sides of the Atlantic about why the emphasis needs to shift from providing a large volume of imaging services to increasing the value of imaging as manifested in clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction, and overall system savings. Options for facilitating the shift from volume to value are discussed, from the use of advanced management strategies that improve workflow to the creation of programs for patient engagement, the development of new clinical decision-making support tools, and the validation of clinically relevant imaging biomarkers. Radiologists in collaboration with industry must enhance their efforts to expand the performance of comparative effectiveness research to establish the value of these initiatives, while being mindful of the importance of minimizing conflicts of interest. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  8. Anismus, Physiology, Radiology: Is It Time for Some Pragmatism? A Comparative Study of Radiological and Anorectal Physiology Findings in Patients With Anismus

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Lesley; Szczachor, Justina; Jawad, Ahsin; MacLeod, Andrew; Lim, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Anismus is a functional disorder featuring obstructive symptoms and paradoxical contractions of the pelvic floor. This study aims to establish diagnosis agreement between physiology and radiology, associate anismus with morphological outlet obstruction, and explore the role of sphincteric pressure and rectal volumes in the radiological diagnosis of anismus. Methods Consecutive patients were evaluated by using magnetic resonance imaging proctography/fluoroscopic defecography and anorectal physiology. Morphological radiological features were associated with physiology tests. A categorical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, and agreement was assessed via the kappa coefficient. A Mann-Whitney test was used to assess rectal volumes and sphincterial pressure distributions between groups of patients. A P-value of <0.05 was significant. Results Forty-three patients (42 female patients) underwent anorectal physiology and radiology imaging. The median age was 54 years (interquartile range, 41.5–60 years). Anismus was seen radiologically and physiologically in 18 (41.8%) and 12 patients (27.9%), respectively. The agreement between modalities was 0.298 (P = 0.04). Using physiology as a reference, radiology had positive and negative predictive values of 44% and 84%, respectively. Rectoceles, cystoceles, enteroceles and pathological pelvic floor descent were not physiologically predictive of animus (P > 0.05). The sphincterial straining pressure was 71 mmHg in the anismus group versus 12 mmHg. Radiology was likely to identify anismus when the straining pressure exceeded 50% of the resting pressure (P = 0.08). Conclusion Radiological techniques detect pelvic morphological abnormalities, but lead to overdiagnoses of anismus. No proctographic pathological feature predicts anismus reliably. A stronger pelvic floor paradoxical contraction is associated with a greater likelihood of detection by proctography. PMID:27847787

  9. Radiology Reporting System Data Exchange With the Electronic Health Record System: A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Bashiri, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In order to better designing of electronic health record system in Iran, integration of health information systems based on a common language must be done to interpret and exchange this information with this system is required. Background: This study provides a conceptual model of radiology reporting system using unified modeling language. The proposed model can solve the problem of integration this information system with the electronic health record system. By using this model and design its service based, easily connect to electronic health record in Iran and facilitate transfer radiology report data. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2013. The study population was 22 experts that working at the Imaging Center in Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran and the sample was accorded with the community. Research tool was a questionnaire that prepared by the researcher to determine the information requirements. Content validity and test-retest method was used to measure validity and reliability of questioner respectively. Data analyzed with average index, using SPSS. Also Visual Paradigm software was used to design a conceptual model. Result: Based on the requirements assessment of experts and related texts, administrative, demographic and clinical data and radiological examination results and if the anesthesia procedure performed, anesthesia data suggested as minimum data set for radiology report and based it class diagram designed. Also by identifying radiology reporting system process, use case was drawn. Conclusion: According to the application of radiology reports in electronic health record system for diagnosing and managing of clinical problem of the patient, with providing the conceptual Model for radiology reporting system; in order to systematically design it, the problem of data sharing between these systems and electronic health records system would eliminate. PMID:26156904

  10. Is there an association between clinical features, response to diagnostic analgesia and radiological findings in horses with a magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of navicular disease or other injuries of the podotrochlear apparatus?

    PubMed

    Parkes, Rebecca; Newton, Richard; Dyson, Sue

    2015-04-01

    Previous descriptions of the clinical features of navicular disease occurred before the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed a more definitive diagnosis of foot pain. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical features of horses with lesions of the podotrochlear apparatus with those with other causes of foot pain. It was hypothesised that primary navicular bone disease would be associated with more advanced radiological findings than other diagnoses. A retrospective study was performed of all horses examined at a referral centre with a definitive diagnosis of foot pain based on MRI ± post-mortem examination. Clinical examination findings, response to diagnostic analgesia and radiological grading of the navicular bone were compared among five diagnosis groups: (1) primary navicular bone pathology (NB); (2) lesions of the collateral sesamoidean ligament and/or distal sesamoidean impar ligament (CSL + DSIL); (3) primary deep digital flexor tendon injury (DDFT); (4) navicular bone pathology and other lesions of the podotrochlear apparatus ± DDFT (PTA) and (5) Other. There were 702 horses (NB, 62; CSL + DSIL, 180; DDFT, 69; PTA, 92; Other, 299). Horses with PTA injuries were more frequently unilaterally lame than other groups (P = 0.04). Horses with DDFT injury were more likely to exhibit pain on turning than other groups (P <0.01). There were no associations between response to diagnostic analgesia and diagnostic group, and no association between radiological grade and diagnostic group. Clinical examination findings generally did not discriminate between diseases of the PTA and other causes of foot pain. Overall radiological scores of the navicular bone did not accurately predict navicular bone pathology.

  11. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  12. Production of human metabolites by gastrointestinal bacteria as a potential source of post-mortem alteration of antemortem drug/metabolite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Stephanie M; Powers, Robert H; Bell, Suzanne C

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bacterial species are capable of transforming complex chemical substances. Several of these species, native to the human gastrointestinal tract, are active in postmortem decomposition. They have potential to cause biotransformations affecting compound-to-metabolite ratios within the human body, especially after death. Investigation of postmortem effects could supply valuable information, especially concerning compound identification and confirmation. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Clostridium perfringens on diazepam and flunitrazepam in Reinforced Clostridial Medium, and to compare bacterial biotransformation products to those of human metabolism. A decrease in diazepam concentration between pre- and post-incubation was observed for samples inoculated with Escherichia coli (14.7-20.2%) as well as Bacteroides fragilis (13.9-25.7%); however there was no corresponding increase in concentration for the monitored human metabolites. Flunitrazepam demonstrated a greater concentration loss when incubated with individual bacterial species as well as mixed culture (79.2-100.0%). Samples incubated with Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, and mixed culture resulted in nearly complete conversion of flunitrazepam. Increased 7-aminoflunitrazepam concentrations accounted for the majority of the conversion; however discrepancies in the mass balance of the reaction suggested the possibility of a minor metabolite that was not monitored in the current analysis. These experiments served as a pilot study and proof of concept that can be adapted and applied to a realm of possibilities. Ultimately, this methodology would be ideal to study compounds that are too toxic or lethal for animal and human metabolic investigations.

  13. Hard x-ray micro-tomography of a human head post-mortem as a gold standard to compare x-ray modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalstra, M.; Schulz, G.; Dagassan-Berndt, D.; Verna, C.; Müller-Gerbl, M.; Müller, B.

    2016-10-01

    An entire human head obtained at autopsy was micro-CT scanned in a nano/micro-CT scanner in a 6-hour long session. Despite the size of the head, it could still be scanned with a pixel size of 70 μm. The aim of this study was to obtain an optimal quality 3D data-set to be used as baseline control in a larger study comparing the image quality of various cone beam CT systems currently used in dentistry. The image quality of the micro-CT scans was indeed better than the ones of the clinical imaging modalities, both with regard to noise and streak artifacts due to metal dental implants. Bony features in the jaws, like the trabecular architecture and the thin wall of the alveolar bone were clearly visible. Therefore, the 3D micro-CT data-set can be used as the gold standard for linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of anatomical features in and around the oral cavity when comparing clinical imaging modalities.

  14. Bubbles Quantified In vivo by Ultrasound Relates to Amount of Gas Detected Post-mortem in Rabbits Decompressed from High Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Møllerløkken, Andreas; Havnes, Marianne B.; Brubakk, Alf O.; González-Díaz, Oscar; Fernández, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism of decompression sickness is not fully understood but there is evidence that it can be caused by intravascular and autochthonous bubbles. Doppler ultrasound at a given circulatory location is used to detect and quantify the presence of intravascular gas bubbles as an indicator of decompression stress. In this manuscript we studied the relationship between presence and quantity of gas bubbles by echosonography of the pulmonary artery of anesthetized, air-breathing New Zealand White rabbits that were compressed and decompressed. Mortality rate, presence, quantity, and distribution of gas bubbles elsewhere in the body was examined postmortem. We found a strong positive relationship between high ultrasound bubble grades in the pulmonary artery, sudden death, and high amount of intra and extra vascular gas bubbles widespread throughout the entire organism. In contrast, animals with lower bubble grades survived for 1 h after decompression until sacrificed, and showed no gas bubbles during dissection. PMID:27493634

  15. The effect of sodium fluoride, formaldehyde, and storage temperature on the stability of methamidophos in post-mortem blood and liver.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiwen; Niu, Qing; Zhang, Fan; Xiao, Kun; Liu, Ling; Wang, Yujin; Jia, Juan; Cao, Jie; Fu, Shanlin; Yun, Keming

    2016-12-19

    Poisoning by organophosphorus insecticides such as methamidophos makes up a significant portion of forensic identification cases in China. Stability of methamidophos during specimen storage remains largely unknown. This study aimed to examine the long-term stability of methamidophos in postmortem specimens. Three experimental dogs after oral administration of methamidophos were sacrificed, and blood and liver specimens were collected and stored at various conditions. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to measure the methamidophos concentrations after 0, 4, 7, 12, 16, 60, and 180 days of storage. The results showed that methamidophos was not stable and followed first-order degradation kinetics at all storage conditions investigated. The degradation half-life in blood was 12.2, 16.9, 11.0, and 1.0 days when the samples were stored at room temperature (RT, 20 °C), 4 °C, -20 °C, and at RT with 1 % sodium fluoride (NaF), respectively. The degradation half-life in liver was 4.1, 9.8, 17.8, and 2.0 days when the samples were stored at RT, 4 °C, -20 °C, and at RT with liver fixed in 10 % formaldehyde solution, respectively. These findings are significant in guiding sample storage and data interpretation. Specimens containing methamidophos should be stored at -20 °C and analyzed as early as possible. Addition of NaF in blood and fixation of liver in formaldehyde should be avoided due to the accelerated degradation of methamidophos under these conditions. The preliminary study suggests that it might be possible to calculate methamidophos concentration at the time of death based on its first-order degradation kinetic under specific storage conditions.

  16. Hepatic parasitosis in two wood mice, Apodemus sylvaticus (Rodentia: Muridae), due to Aonchotheca annulosa (Nematoda: Trichuridae), and Eucoleus bacillatus (Nematoda: Trichuridae). Erratic parasitism or post mortem migration?

    PubMed

    Debenedetti, Ángela L; Sáez-Durán, Sandra; Sainz-Elipe, Sandra; Galán-Puchades, Maria Teresa; Fuentes, Màrius V

    2014-10-01

    Aonchotheca annulosa and Eucoleus bacillatus are two capillariin nematodes parasitizing the intestinal and stomach mucosa, respectively, of various rodent species, and two, among others, component species of the helminth fauna of the wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus. A capillariin each was found in the liver parenchyma of two wood mice in a post-fire regeneration enclave in Serra Calderona Natural Park (Valencian Community, Spain). Due to their location, the preliminary identification of the helminths corresponded to Calodium hepaticum, a hepatic capillariin with rodents as its main host. So far, this species had never been found in Serra Calderona. To verify the preliminary identification, a comparative morphometric study between the specimens from Serra Calderona and a preserved individual of C. hepaticum from another enclave was carried out. Morphometric analysis revealed that the adult helminth as well as the eggs found in the liver of the first mouse belonged to A. annulosa, whereas the second one was identified as a male E. bacillatus. Moreover, the liver from both hosts showed a visible pathology, being the consequence of aberrant migration of the parasites. This is the first evidence that A. annulosa and E. bacillatus may migrate erratically and thus produce ectopic foci in other organs.

  17. Talking to the dead: using Post-mortem data in the assessment of stress in tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) (Péron and Lesueur, 1822).

    PubMed

    Wosnick, Natascha; Bornatowski, Hugo; Ferraz, Carolina; Afonso, André; Sousa Rangel, Bianca; Hazin, Fábio Hissa Vieira; Freire, Carolina Arruda

    2017-02-01

    Sharks are very sensitive to stress and prone to a high mortality rate after capture. Since approximately 50 million of sharks are caught as bycatch every year, and current recommendations to reduce the impact of commercial fishing strongly support immediate release, it is imperative to better understand post-release mortality caused by the stress of capture and handling. Blood samples allow the assessment of stress levels which are valuable tools to reduce mortality in commercial, recreational and scientific fishing, being essential for the improvement in those conservation measures. Biochemical analyses are widely used for sharks as stress indicators, with secondary plasma parameters (lactate, glucose and ions) being the most often employed assays. However, it is virtually impossible to determine baseline plasma parameters in free-ranging sharks, since blood withdrawal involves animal capture and restrain, which are stressful procedures. This study aims at analyzing secondary parameters of five healthy tiger sharks captured with circular hooks and handlines in Fernando de Noronha (Northeastern Brazil) and comparing them with secondary parameters of three dead tiger sharks caught off Recife (also Northeastern Brazil). The results showed that the analysis of some plasma constituents in dead animals may be an efficient tool to assess stress and lethality. However, traditional parameters such as glucose and calcium, need to be used with caution. The results also demonstrated the extreme importance of urea and phosphorus for assessing stress response and mortality in tiger sharks, both parameters frequently neglected and of utmost importance for shark's homeostasis.

  18. Identification by proteomic analysis of early post-mortem markers involved in the variability in fat loss during cooking of mule duck "foie gras".

    PubMed

    Theron, Laetitia; Fernandez, Xavier; Marty-Gasset, Nathalie; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Chambon, Christophe; Viala, Didier; Astruc, Thierry; Molette, Caroline

    2011-12-14

    Fat loss during cooking of duck "foie gras" is the main quality issue for both processors and consumers. Despite the efforts of the processing industry to control fat loss, the variability of fatty liver cooking yield remains high and uncontrolled. To better understand the biological basis of this phenomenon, a proteomic study was conducted. To analyze the protein fraction soluble at low ionic strength (LIS), we used bidimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry for the identification of spots of interest. To analyze the protein fraction not soluble at low ionic strength (NS), we used the shotgun strategy. The analysis of data acquired from both protein fractions suggested that at the time of slaughter, livers with low fat loss during cooking were still in anabolic processes with regard to energy metabolism and protein synthesis, whereas livers with high fat loss during cooking developed cell protection mechanisms. The variability in the technological yield observed in processing plants could be explained by a different physiological stage of liver steatosis.

  19. Effects of post-mortem storage conditions of bovine epididymides on sperm characteristics: investigating a tool for preservation of sperm from endangered species

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Julie; Ragborg, Mette M.; Pedersen, Hanne S.; Kristensen, Torsten N.; Pertoldi, Cino; Callesen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish and validate a reliable and efficient protocol for the recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal spermatozoa used for in vitro fertilization, using bulls of two different age classes. Testicles from 26 (37–51 weeks old, group 1) and 19 (52–115 weeks old, group 2) Danish Holstein bulls were collected after slaughter and stored at 5°C. After 0, 24 or 48 h, epididymides were isolated and spermatozoa collected. Assessments included spermatozoal motility, viability and morphology before and after cryopreservation and in vitro embryo production. Results showed that live spermatozoa can be collected from epididymides of bulls after their death. Storage of the testicles at 5°C for 24 h followed by cryopreservation of recovered epididymal spermatozoa resulted in 21% (group 1) and 31% (group 2) blastocysts produced in vitro. These results illustrate that epididymal spermatozoa recovered from testicles kept in specific conditions can be used to preserve genetic material from endangered and threatened species or populations in nature as well as in domestic and zoo animals. PMID:28066554

  20. The metabolic syndrome of fructose-fed rats: effects of long-chain polyunsaturated ω3 and ω6 fatty acids. V. Post-mortem findings.

    PubMed

    Mellouk, Zoheir; Louchami, Karim; Hupkens, Emeline; Sener, Abdullah; Ait Yahia, Dalila; Malaisse, Willy J

    2012-12-01

    The present study deals with the possible effects of dietary ω3 and ω6 fatty acids upon the metabolic syndrome found in rats exposed for 8 weeks to a diet containing 64% (w/w) D-fructose instead of starch. Fructose-fed rats were found to display a modest increase in plasma albumin and protein concentration and more pronounced increases in plasma urea, creatinine, phospholipids, triglycerides and cholesterol concentrations, glycated hemoglobin concentration and liver contents of cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids. The plasma concentrations of HDL-cholesterol, calcium and iron were decreased, however, in the fructose-fed rats. In general, the partial substitution of sunflower oil by either safflower oil or salmon oil opposed the metabolic perturbations otherwise associated with the fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in the fructose-fed rats, with salmon oil demonstrating particular efficacy. Consideration is given to the possible biological determinants of these perturbations and their attenuation in rats exposed to safflower or salmon oil.

  1. Proteomic analysis of duck fatty liver during post-mortem storage related to the variability of fat loss during cooking of "foie gras".

    PubMed

    Theron, Laetitia; Fernandez, Xavier; Marty-Gasset, Nathalie; Chambon, Christophe; Viala, Didier; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Astruc, Thierry; Molette, Caroline

    2013-01-30

    Fat loss during cooking of duck "foie gras" is the main problem for both manufacturers and consumers. Despite the efforts of the processing industry to control fat loss, the variability of fatty liver cooking yields remains high and uncontrolled. To understand the biochemical effects of postslaughter processing on fat loss during cooking, this study characterizes for the first time the protein expression of fatty liver during chilling using a proteomic approach. For this purpose the proteins were separated according to their solubility: the protein fraction soluble in a buffer of low ionic strength (S) and the protein fraction insoluble in the same buffer (IS). Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the S fraction and mass spectrometry for the identification of spots of interest. This analysis revealed 36 (21 identified proteins) and 34 (26 identified proteins) spots of interests in the low-fat-loss and high-fat-loss groups, respectively. The expression of proteins was lower after chilling, which revealed a suppressive effect of chilling on biological processes. The shot-gun strategy was used to analyze the IS fraction, with the identification of all the proteins by mass spectrometry. This allowed identification of 554 and 562 proteins in the low-fat-loss and high-fat-loss groups, respectively. Among these proteins, only the proteins that were up-regulated in the high-fat-loss group were significant (p value = 3.17 × 10(-3)) and corresponded to protein from the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that the variability of technological yield observed in processing plants could be explained by different aging states of fatty livers during chilling, most likely associated with different proteolytic patterns.

  2. Optical properties of the deep brain in the red and NIR: changes observed under in-vivo, post-mortem, frozen and formalin-fixated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitzschke, A.; Lovisa, B.; Seydoux, O.; Zellweger, M.; Pfleiderer, M.; Haenggi, M.; Oertel, M.; Tardy, Y.; Wagnières, G.

    2015-07-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a promising approach to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) symptoms in cellular or animal models. Unfortunately, little information is available on the optical parameters playing a role in the light dosimetry during PBM. We conducted a study to determine the effective attenuation coefficient μeff of PD-relevant human deep brain tissues at 671 and 808 nm, using a multichannel fluence rate-meter comprising sub-millimeter isotropic detectors. The first step involved measurements of tissue modifications induced by postmortem situation and tissue storage on rabbit brains. The parameter μeff was measured using various tissue conditions (in vivo, immediately after sacrifice, after six weeks' storage at -20°C or in 10 % formaldehyde solution) on eight female New Zealand white rabbits. In the second step, fluence rate was measured at various locations of a frozen human deep brain when the deep brain was illuminated from the sphenoidal sinus. The results were processed by an iterative Monte-Carlo algorithm to generate sets of optical parameters, and results collected on rabbit brains were used to extrapolate the μeff value that would be observed in human deep brain tissues in vivo. Under all tissue conditions, the value of μeff at 808 nm was smaller than that at 671 nm. After long-term storage for six weeks at -20°C, μeff decreased, on average by 15 to 25 % at all wavelengths, while it increased by 5 to 15 % at all wavelengths after storage in formaldehyde. Therefore, a reasonable estimate of in vivo human deep brain μeff values at 671 and 808 nm can be obtained by multiplying the data we report by 120 %.

  3. Suicide terrorism and post-mortem benefits.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jacqueline M; Dickins, Thomas E

    2014-08-01

    Lankford claims that suicide terrorists are suicidal, but that their suicidal tendencies are often frustrated by injunctive social norms. Martyrdom represents a solution, and terrorist organizations exploit this. In this commentary, we claim that this argument has not been fully made and that such ideation in itself does not explain a willingness to engage in punitive actions against an enemy. We suggest the psychology of kinship as a possible missing factor.

  4. Radiology/Imaging. Clinical Rotation. Instructor's Packet and Student Study Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Instruction and Materials Center.

    The instructor's packet, the first of two packets, is one of a series of materials designed to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This packet…

  5. Radiological clinical trials: Proposal of a problem-finding questionnaire to improve study success

    PubMed Central

    Valdora, Francesca; Bignotti, Bianca; Calabrese, Massimo; Houssami, Nehmat; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    AIM To develop a survey to help define the main problems in radiological clinical trials. METHODS Since 2006, we have managed seven different radiological clinical trials recruiting patients in academic and non-academic centres. We developed a preliminary questionnaire using a four-round Delphi approach to identify problems occurring in radiological clinical trials run at our centre. We investigated the recruitment experience, involvement of all multi-disciplinary team members and main obstacles to completing the projects. A final round of Delphi processes elucidated solutions to the identified problems. RESULTS Among 19/20 (95%) respondents, 10 (53%) were young physicians (under 35 years old), and the respondents included non-faculty members, fellows, residents, and undergraduate students. Ninety-four percent (18/19) of respondents showed interest in conducting clinical trials. On a scale of 1 to 10, the problems with higher/worse scores (8-9) were related to technical or communication problems. The most frequent problems across all studies were technical problems related to clinical trial equipment, insufficient willingness to participate, obstacles to understanding the design of electronic-case report form and extra work. CONCLUSION The developed questionnaire identified the main recurring problems in radiological clinical trials as perceived by end-users and helped define possible solutions that are mostly related to having dedicated clinical trial research staff. PMID:28074173

  6. Regional inequality in radiology research output in the UK: a 5-year bibliometric study.

    PubMed

    Yoong, P; Johnson, C A; Rehman, J M; Toms, A P

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the patterns of peer-reviewed general radiology publication rates with reference to deaneries in the UK. This was a retrospective bibliometric analysis of publications in the six highest cited general radiology journals. Publications were identified using a manual search in PubMed between 2005 and 2009. Publications originating from UK radiology departments were identified and subcategorised into primary institution of origin, deanery and publication type. The total number of radiology trainees in each deanery was obtained from the General Medical Council. 913 publications were included in the study. Original papers constituted 48.7% (n=445), review articles 30.3% (n=277) and case reports 17.4% (n=159). The median number of publications in each deanery was 27 [interquartile range (IQR) 11-60], and the median number of publications per trainee was 0.49 (IQR 0.31-0.88). The largest proportion of publications came from the London deanery (n=354, 38.8%), followed by Eastern 86 (9.4%), Oxford and Yorkshire 70 (7.7% each). Relative to the number of trainees within each deanery, Oxford had the highest number of publications per trainee (1.78), followed by East Midlands (1.5), London (1.25) and Eastern (0.99). There was a significantly higher publication rate for those deaneries with academic radiologists (p<0.0001). There is a marked difference in the volume of published work in the general radiology literature among UK deaneries, even accounting for differences in the number of trainees. This probably means that opportunities for training in research are similarly non-uniform.

  7. Insider Threat Case Studies at Radiological and Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Noah Gale; Hobbs, Christopher

    2015-04-13

    Seven case studies are presented. The cases include thefts of various materials and sabotage. For each case there is an overview of the incident, a timeline, a profile of the perpetrator, and a discussion of the security system failures which allowed the incident to take place.

  8. The survival of metallic residues from gunshot wounds in cremated bone: a radiological study.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Borgonovo, Simone; Brandone, Alberto; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-05-01

    In literature, many studies have been performed in order to investigate the presence of GSR ("gunshot residue") and metallic residues in general with radiological techniques on several types of material, but the survival of metallic residues on charred samples has never been systematically performed. In this study, 31 adult bovine ribs underwent a shooting test. Every rib was shot with a single bullet, at a near-contact shooting distance, using two kinds of projectile: 17 samples were shot with a full metal-jacketed bullet and the remaining 14 with an unjacketed bullet. After the shooting test, every rib underwent a "charring cycle" in an electric oven up to 800°C. Every sample underwent radiological investigation with conventional radiography, before and after the burning process, to evaluate any changes in number and distribution of metallic residues. Radiographs showed survival of radiopaque residues in every sample, even after the charring process, especially when the bullet used was of the unjacketed type.

  9. The cubital tunnel: a radiologic and histotopographic study

    PubMed Central

    Macchi, Veronica; Tiengo, Cesare; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Sarasin, Gloria; Tubbs, Shane; Maffulli, Nicola; De Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Entrapment of the ulnar nerve at the elbow is the second most common compression neuropathy in the upper limb. The present study evaluates the anatomy of the cubital tunnel. Eighteen upper limbs were analysed in unembalmed cadavers using ultrasound examination in all cases, dissection in nine cases, and microscopic study in nine cases. In all cases, thickening of the fascia at the level of the tunnel was found at dissection. From the microscopic point of view, the ulnar nerve is a multifascicular trunk (mean area of 6.0 ± 1.5 mm2). The roof of the cubital tunnel showed the presence of superimposed layers, corresponding to fascial, tendineous and muscular layers, giving rise to a tri-laminar structure (mean thickness 523 ± 235 μm). This multilayered tissue was hyperechoic (mean thickness 0.9 ± 0.3 mm) on ultrasound imaging. The roof of the cubital tunnel is elastic, formed by a myofascial trilaminar retinaculum. The pathological fusion of these three layers reduces gliding of the ulnar nerve during movements of the elbow joint. This may play a role in producing the symptoms typical of cubital tunnel syndrome. Independent from the surgical technique, decompression should span the ulnar nerve from the triceps brachii muscle to the flexor carpi ulnaris fascia. PMID:24917209

  10. Radiological Studies for the LCLS Beam Abort System

    SciTech Connect

    Santana Leitner, M.; Vollaire, J.; Mao, X.S.

    2008-03-25

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a pioneer hard x-ray free electron laser is currently under construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is expected that by 2009 LCLS will deliver laser pulses of unprecedented brightness and short length, which will be used in several forefront research applications. This ambitious project encompasses major design challenges to the radiation protection like the numerous sources and the number of surveyed objects. In order to sort those, the showers from various loss sources have been tracked along a detailed model covering 1/2 mile of LCLS accelerator by means of the Monte Carlo intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. This article covers the FLUKA studies of heat load; prompt and residual dose and environmental impact for the LCLS beam abort system.

  11. [Diagnosis. Radiological study. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Because of its low cost, availability in primary care and ease of interpretation, simple X-ray should be the first-line imaging technique used by family physicians for the diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, this technique should only be used if there are sound indications and if the results will influence decision-making. Despite the increase of indications in patients with rheumatological disease, the role of ultrasound in patients with osteoarthritis continues to be limited. Computed tomography (CT) is of some -although limited- use in osteoarthritis, especially in the study of complex joints (such as the sacroiliac joint and facet joints). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has represented a major advance in the evaluation of joint cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with osteoarthritis but, because of its high cost and diagnostic-prognostic yield, this technique should only be used in highly selected patients. The indications for ultrasound, CT and MRI in patients with osteoarthritis continue to be limited in primary care and often coincide with situations in which the patient may require hospital referral. Patient safety should be bourne in mind. Patients should be protected from excessive ionizing radiation due to unnecessary repeat X-rays or inadequate views or to requests for tests such as CT, when not indicated.

  12. [Anterior cervical fusion with tantalum interbody implants. Clinical and radiological results in a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Vicario, C; Lopez-Oliva, F; Sánchez-Lorente, T; Zimmermann, M; Asenjo-Siguero, J J; Ladero, F; Ibarzábal, A

    2006-04-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is a widely accepted surgical technique in the treatment of cervical disc disease. Tantalum cages have been recently introduced in spine surgery for interbody fusion because of the advantages of their mechanical properties. We present the results of a prospective clinical and radiological study on 24 consecutive patients who underwent an ACDF with tantalum cages. Clinical evaluation was assessed preoperatively and after surgery by a questionnaire that included a Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) of neck and arm pain, the Oswestry Disability Index and the Zung Depression Scale. Results were classified by Odom's criteria. Radiological evaluation included flexion-extension X-rays, and changes in distance between spinous processes and Cobb angle were measured. Postoperatively patients were reviewed 3 and 12 months after surgery. A statistical significative improvement in all clinical data was reported. According to Odom's criteria in 75% of patients the results were considered like excellent or good. Only one case of radiological and clinical pseudoarthrosis was confirmed. No significative differences were reported 3 and 12 months after surgery. Tantalum cages are a very promising and usefull alternative among implants available for ACDF. Compatibility with MRI postoperative studies and the unnecessariness of autograft are some of their advantages.

  13. Preclosure radiological safety evaluation: Exploratory Studies Facility; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schelling, F.J.; Smith, J.D.

    1993-07-01

    A radiological safety evaluation is performed to determine the impacts of Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) design changes on the preclosure public radiological safety for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Although the ESF design has undergone significant modification, incorporation of the modified design requires only modest changes to the conceptual repository configuration. To the extent feasible, the results of earlier safety evaluations presented in SAND84-2641, SAND88-7061, and SAND89-7024, which were based on the original ESF configuration, are compared with the results for the modified configuration. This comparison provides an estimate of the range of analysis uncertainty. This preliminary analysis indicates that there are no Q-scenarios, which are defined as those scenarios with a net occurrence probability of greater than 10{sup {minus}6}/yr and produce a radiological dose at the 5-km controlled area boundary of greater than 0.5 rem. The analysis yielded estimates for an underground accident of a probability of 3.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}15}/yr and a dose of 1.5 rem. For a surface-initiated accident, a probability of 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}/yr and a dose of 0.6 rem was estimated.

  14. Arthropathy of Wilson's disease. Study of clinical and radiological features in 32 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Golding, D N; Walshe, J M

    1977-01-01

    The principal clinical features and radiological findings relating to the locomotor system have been studied in 32 consecutive hospital admissions of patients with Wilson's disease. 5 of these patients were recently diagnosed and had as yet received no treatment, while 27 were routine admissions for follow-up and biochemical supervision of their illness. No patient was specifically included or excluded from the series because of the presence or absence of locomotor symptoms. The most common radiological abnormality was a generalized increase of radiolucency, interpreted as skeletal demineralization (21 cases), followed by premature osteoarthrosis (8 cases). Changes in the spine were common and included osteochondritis, reduction of intervertebral joint spaces, osteoarthrosis, and a tendency to squaring of vertebral bodies. Other bony changes included fluffy irregularity of femoral trochanters, osteochondritis dissecans of the knees, osteophytic protrusions at bone ends, and bunches of tongue-like osteophytes at joint margins. The symptoms associated with these radiological abnormalities comprised back pain and stiffness with restricted movement, pain and stiffness of knees, hips, and wrists, and tenderness to pressure over margins of affected joints. Joint hypermobility was also observed in 9 patients. Episodes of acute polyarthritis with serological changes were seen in 5 cases; all these episodes appeared to be related directly to treatment with penicillamine. Images PMID:857745

  15. [Conventional radiology, digital radiology with photostimulable phosphor, laser digitalization of thoracic radiographic films at the bedside. A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Miceli, M; Stamati, R; Burci, P; Guidarelli, G; Sartoni Galloni, S

    1992-10-01

    The bedside chest images obtained with conventional radiology and with "on line" and "off line" digital modalities were compared to evaluate the respective capabilities in visualizing chest anatomical structures. Seventy patients were submitted to bedside chest examinations with a portable unit; both a conventional film and a digital system (PCR Graphics 1, Philips) with photostimulable phosphor imaging plate were fitted in the radiographic cassette. The former was digitized using an "off line" laser beam unit (FD 2000, Dupont); the latter was subsequently postprocessed by modifying contrast, optical density and spatial frequencies. Thus, 4 different viewing modalities were obtained for each examination: a) conventional radiography; b) standard digital radiography; c) postprocessed digital radiography; d) digitized conventional radiography. Detectability rates of chest anatomical structures were analyzed by 4 independent radiologists on the different images and expressed by a score 1-4. The values were always higher with digital modalities than with the conventional one and the differences were statistically significant (Student's t-test modified by Bonferroni). In particular, the greatest difference was found between c) and a) in retrocardiac lung parenchyma and in skeletal structures, in favour of c). Concerning the comparative adequacy of the various digital modalities, higher detectability rates of chest anatomical structures were obtained with c), but also with b), than with d).

  16. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  17. Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

    1983-03-01

    This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS.

  18. Radiological study of two disseminated maligant non-Hodgkin lymphomas affecting only the bones in children

    SciTech Connect

    Vanel, D; Rebibo, G.; Tamman, S.; Bayle, C.; Hartmann, O.

    1982-12-01

    Malignant non-Hodgkin lymphomas are a neoplastic proliferation of lymphoid cells whose clinical manifestations are extremely variable. All tissues can be affected. There may be localization in lymphoid organs (Waldeyer's ring, spleen, digestive tract), other localizations (lungs, pleura, liver, bone marrow, central nervous system) and unusual localizations. Although bone marrow is often affected, bone involvement is very rare in the early stages of the disease. This report concerns the radiological study of two disseminated malignant non-Hodgkin lymphomas affecting only the bone in children.

  19. Free serratus anterior artery perforator flap: a case report with an anatomic and radiological study.

    PubMed

    Tamburino, Serena; Menez, Tiphaine; Laloze, Jérôme; Michot, Audrey; Paillet, Pierre; Perrotta, Rosario Emanuele; Casoli, Vincent

    2017-02-24

    Perforator flaps have become very popular in reconstructive surgery. The thoracodorsal and lateral thoracic artery perforator flaps are highly studied, and successful clinical series have been reported, whereas the literature concerning the lateral intercostal and serratus anterior artery perforator flaps is quite poor and their vascular anatomy needs yet to be clarified. We describe a case of free serratus anterior artery perforator flap for the reconstruction of a dorsal defect of the foot, followed by an anatomic and radiological study. A 17-year-old boy reported a fracture of the first and second metatarsal bone of the left foot, with a dorsal skin defect, due to a motorcycle accident. After the osteosynthesis treatment, a perforator was identified through a handheld Doppler in the lateral chest area and a cutaneous paddle was designed. Retrograde dissection revealed the perforator's direct link to the serratus anterior pedicle. In our knowledge, an elucidated method to preoperatively visualize the perforating vessel of the serratus anterior artery has not yet been described. Thus, an anatomic study on 8 hemithorax and a radiological study on 33 computed tomographic angiographies of the chest were carried out to clarify the vascular anatomy of the serratus anterior artery perforators and to verify the possibility of their preoperative visualization. The authors believe that the serratus anterior artery perforator could be preoperatively investigated, thus making this flap a valuable option when harvesting a perforator flap in the lateral chest area.

  20. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  1. The effect of reduction mammaplasty on the vertebral column: a radiologic study.

    PubMed

    Karaaslan, Onder; Demirkiran, H Gokhan; Silistreli, Ozlem; Sonmez, Erhan; Bedir, Yagmur Kaan; Can, Melih; Caliskan, Gorkem; Aslan, Cem; Oral, Meltem Ayhan; Kankaya, Yuksel

    2013-01-01

    Some studies emphasized that anatomic mechanisms of vertebral aberrations could be associated with large breasts. The effect of mammaplasty operation on the vertebral column and body posture seems to be beneficial; in this trial, it was planned to investigate the objective radiologic effect of reduction mammaplasty on the posture of the vertebral column in a group of patients operated due to the large breasts. Thirty-four white women with large breasts were enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into three groups according to their breast cup sizes. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the lumbosacral and thoracic spine were taken at baseline preoperatively, and the same radiographic images were taken in an average of 12 months later than the reduction mammaplasty operation. All were evaluated and compared for thoracic kyphosis angle and lumbar lordosis angle both preoperatively and postoperatively. The mean thoracic kyphosis angle was 40,53 preoperatively and 39,38 postoperatively. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative measurements in all groups (P > 0,05). The mean lumbar lordosis angle was 54,71 preoperatively and 53,18 postoperatively. Regarding the preoperative and postoperative measurements of lumbar lordosis angles, no statistically significant difference was found between the groups (P > 0,05). Although breast size may be an important factor that affects body posture, reduction mammaplasty operations have little or no radiologic effect on the vertebral column.

  2. Feasibility study for a realistic training dedicated to radiological protection improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courageot, Estelle; Reinald, Kutschera; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Sylvie, Jahan; Riedel, Alexandre; Therache, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Any personnel involved in activities within the controlled area of a nuclear facility must be provided with appropriate radiological protection training. An evident purpose of this training is to know the regulation dedicated to workplaces where ionizing radiation may be present, in order to properly carry out the radiation monitoring, to use suitable protective equipments and to behave correctly if unexpected working conditions happen. A major difficulty of this training consist in having the most realistic reading from the monitoring devices for a given exposure situation, but without using real radioactive sources. A new approach is developed at EDF R&D for radiological protection training. This approach combines different technologies, in an environment representative of the workplace but geographically separated from the nuclear power plant: a training area representative of a workplace, a Man Machine Interface used by the trainer to define the source configuration and the training scenario, a geolocalization system, fictive radiation monitoring devices and a particle transport code able to calculate in real time the dose map due to the virtual sources. In a first approach, our real-time particles transport code, called Moderato, used only an attenuation low in straight line. To improve the realism further, we would like to switch a code based on the Monte Carlo transport of particles method like Geant 4 or MCNPX instead of Moderato. The aim of our study is the evaluation of the code in our application, in particular, the possibility to keep a real time response of our architecture.

  3. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.H.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

  4. High hand joint mobility is associated with radiological CMC1 osteoarthritis: the AGES-Reykjavik study

    PubMed Central

    Jónsson, H.; Elíasson, G. J.; Jónsson, Á.; Eiríksdóttir, G.; Sigurđsson, S.; Aspelund, T.; Harris, T. B.; Guđnason, V.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objective Previous studies have indicated that joint hypermobility may affect the development of clinical and radiological hand osteoarthritis (OA), but this question has not been addressed in epidemiological studies. Our objective was to investigate this relationship in a population-based study. Patients and methods The study group consisted of 384 unselected older participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility–Reykjavik Study (161 males, median age 76, range 69–90, and 223 females median age 75, range 69–92). The criterion used for joint mobility was the single maximal degree of hyperextension of digits 2 and 5 on both hands (HYP°). Results HYP° was more prevalent in females and on the left hand in both men and women. Both genders had a positive association between the degree of mobility measured by HYP° and radiological scores for the first carpometacarpal joint (CMC1) OA. Thus, those with HYP° ≥70 had an odds ratio of 3.05 (1.69–5.5, P < 0.001) of having a Kellgren–Lawrence score of ≥3 in a CMC1 joint. There was also a trend towards a negative association between HYP° and proximal interphalangeal joint scores. Conclusion Hand joint mobility, defined as hyperextension in the metacarpophalangeal joints (HYP°) is more prevalent in females and on the left side. It was associated with more severe radiographic OA in the CMC1 joints in this population. The reasons for this relationship are not known, but likely explanations involve ligament laxity and CMC1 joint stability. These findings may relate to the left-sided predominance of radiographic OA in the CMC1 joints observed in many prevalence studies. PMID:19010064

  5. StarClose Vascular Closure Device: Prospective Study on 222 Deployments in an Interventional Radiology Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Atique; Carter, Ranjana M. S. Phillips-Hughes, Jane; Boardman, Philip; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-07-15

    The StarClose device (Abbott Vascular Devices; Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA) utilizes an externally placed Nitinol clip to achieve arterial closure following femoral artery puncture. The objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy and complications of the StarClose device in patients undergoing interventional radiological procedures. Preprocedural clotting status, pulse and blood pressure, severity of vessel calcification, sheath size, and time to deployment were recorded. Postdeployment complications immediately postprocedure, at 1 h, at 2 h, and at 1 week were recorded. A duplex scan was performed in the first 10 patients to assess any immediate vascular complications. Deployments were successful in 96% achieving immediate hemostasis. Mean deployment time was 48 s. There were no major complications. The StarClose device was found to have a high technical and clinical efficacy.

  6. Radiological Insertion of Denver Peritoneovenous Shunts for Malignant Refractory Ascites: A Retrospective Multicenter Study (JIVROSG-0809)

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Shunsuke; Sone, Miyuki; Arai, Yasuaki; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Aramaki, Takeshi; Sato, Yozo; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Ueno, Teruko; Matsueda, Kiyoshi; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Tsushima, Takahiro

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Peritoneal venous shunts (PVSs) are widely used for palliating symptoms of refractory malignant ascites and are recognized as one of the practical methods. However, reliable clinical data are insufficient because most previous reports have been small studies from single centers. We conducted a retrospective, multicenter study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of radiologically placed PVSs in patients with malignant refractory ascites. Methods: A total of 133 patients with malignant ascites refractory to medical therapies were evaluated for patient characteristics, technical success, efficacy, survival times, adverse events, and changes in laboratory data. Results: PVSs were successfully placed in all patients and were effective (i.e., improvement of ascites symptoms lasting 7 days or more) in 110 (82.7%). The median duration of symptom palliation was 26 days and median survival time was 41 days. The most frequent adverse event was PVS dysfunction, which occurred in 60 (45.1%) patients, among whom function was recovered with an additional minimally invasive procedure in 9. Abnormalities in coagulation (subclinical disseminated intravascular coagulation) occurred in 37 (27.8%) patients, although only 7 (5.3%) developed clinical disseminated intravascular coagulation. Other major adverse events were gastrointestinal bleeding (9.8%), sepsis (3.8%), and acute heart failure (3.0%). PVS was least effective in patients with elevated serum creatinine, bloody ascites, or gynecologic tumor. Conclusions: Radiological PVS is a technically feasible and effective method for palliating the symptoms from refractory malignant ascites, but preoperative evaluation and monitoring the postprocedural complications are mandatory to preclude severe adverse events after PVS.

  7. Inappropriateness of Cardiovascular Radiological Imaging Testing; A Tertiary Care Referral Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Carpeggiani, Clara; Marraccini, Paolo; Morales, Maria Aurora; Prediletto, Renato; Landi, Patrizia; Picano, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Aims Radiological inappropriateness in medical imaging leads to loss of resources and accumulation of avoidable population cancer risk. Aim of the study was to audit the appropriateness rate of different cardiac radiological examinations. Methods and Principal Findings With a retrospective, observational study we reviewed clinical records of 818 consecutive patients (67±12 years, 75% males) admitted from January 1-May 31, 2010 to the National Research Council – Tuscany Region Gabriele Monasterio Foundation cardiology division. A total of 940 procedures were audited: 250 chest x-rays (CXR); 240 coronary computed tomographies (CCT); 250 coronary angiographies (CA); 200 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). For each test, indications were rated on the basis of guidelines class of recommendation and level of evidence: definitely appropriate (A, including class I, appropriate, and class IIa, probably appropriate), uncertain (U, class IIb, probably inappropriate), or inappropriate (I, class III, definitely inappropriate). Appropriateness was suboptimal for all tests: CXR (A = 48%, U = 10%, I = 42%); CCT (A = 58%, U = 24%, I = 18%); CA (A = 45%, U = 25%, I = 30%); PCI (A = 63%, U = 15%, I = 22%). Top reasons for inappropriateness were: routine on hospital admission (70% of inappropriate CXR); first line application in asymptomatic low-risk patients (42% of CCT) or in patients with unchanged clinical status post-revascularization (20% of CA); PCI in patients either asymptomatic or with miscellaneous symptoms and without inducible ischemia on non-invasive testing (36% of inappropriate PCI). Conclusion and Significance Public healthcare system – with universal access paid for with public money – is haemorrhaging significant resources and accumulating avoidable long-term cancer risk with inappropriate cardiovascular imaging prevention. PMID:24312272

  8. Graduates' Transition from Study to Employment of Radiologic Technology Graduates of the Lyceum University of the Philippines--Batangas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Anacleta P.

    2012-01-01

    A ten-year tracer study of Radiologic Technology graduates of Lyceum of the Philippines University SY 1997-2007 using a survey-structured questionnaire was conducted to examine retrospective contribution of their education to their current work. The objectives of the study included the determination of graduates' job-placement profile; how…

  9. Migrating partial seizures of infancy: expansion of the electroclinical, radiological and pathological disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    McTague, Amy; Appleton, Richard; Avula, Shivaram; Cross, J Helen; King, Mary D; Jacques, Thomas S; Bhate, Sanjay; Cronin, Anthony; Curran, Andrew; Desurkar, Archana; Farrell, Michael A; Hughes, Elaine; Jefferson, Rosalind; Lascelles, Karine; Livingston, John; Meyer, Esther; McLellan, Ailsa; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Spinty, Stefan; Kurian, Manju A; Kneen, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    Migrating partial seizures of infancy, also known as epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, is a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with poor prognosis, presenting with focal seizures in the first year of life. A national surveillance study was undertaken in conjunction with the British Paediatric Neurology Surveillance Unit to further define the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic features of this disorder. Fourteen children with migrating partial seizures of infancy were reported during the 2 year study period (estimated prevalence 0.11 per 100,000 children). The study has revealed that migrating partial seizures of infancy is associated with an expanded spectrum of clinical features (including severe gut dysmotility and a movement disorder) and electrographic features including hypsarrhythmia (associated with infantile spasms) and burst suppression. We also report novel brain imaging findings including delayed myelination with white matter hyperintensity on brain magnetic resonance imaging in one-third of the cohort, and decreased N-acetyl aspartate on magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Putaminal atrophy (on both magnetic resonance imaging and at post-mortem) was evident in one patient. Additional neuropathological findings included bilateral hippocampal gliosis and neuronal loss in two patients who had post-mortem examinations. Within this cohort, we identified two patients with mutations in the newly discovered KCNT1 gene. Comparative genomic hybridization array, SCN1A testing and genetic testing for other currently known early infantile epileptic encephalopathy genes (including PLCB1 and SLC25A22) was non-informative for the rest of the cohort.

  10. Determining a pre-mining radiological baseline from historic airborne gamma surveys: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bollhöfer, Andreas; Beraldo, Annamarie; Pfitzner, Kirrilly; Esparon, Andrew; Doering, Che

    2014-01-15

    Knowing the baseline level of radioactivity in areas naturally enriched in radionuclides is important in the uranium mining context to assess radiation doses to humans and the environment both during and after mining. This information is particularly useful in rehabilitation planning and developing closure criteria for uranium mines as only radiation doses additional to the natural background are usually considered 'controllable' for radiation protection purposes. In this case study we have tested whether the method of contemporary groundtruthing of a historic airborne gamma survey could be used to determine the pre-mining radiological conditions at the Ranger mine in northern Australia. The airborne gamma survey was flown in 1976 before mining started and groundtruthed using ground gamma dose rate measurements made between 2007 and 2009 at an undisturbed area naturally enriched in uranium (Anomaly 2) located nearby the Ranger mine. Measurements of (226)Ra soil activity concentration and (222)Rn exhalation flux density at Anomaly 2 were made concurrent with the ground gamma dose rate measurements. Algorithms were developed to upscale the ground gamma data to the same spatial resolution as the historic airborne gamma survey data using a geographic information system, allowing comparison of the datasets. Linear correlation models were developed to estimate the pre-mining gamma dose rates, (226)Ra soil activity concentrations, and (222)Rn exhalation flux densities at selected areas in the greater Ranger region. The modelled levels agreed with measurements made at the Ranger Orebodies 1 and 3 before mining started, and at environmental sites in the region. The conclusion is that our approach can be used to determine baseline radiation levels, and provide a benchmark for rehabilitation of uranium mines or industrial sites where historical airborne gamma survey data are available and an undisturbed radiological analogue exists to groundtruth the data.

  11. N-Nitrosodiethylamine-Induced Pig Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma Model: Radiological and Histopathological Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiao; Zhou Xiangping Guan Yongsong; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Scutt, Diane; Gong Qiyong

    2006-06-15

    Experimental research involving animal models plays a critical role in the development and improvement of minimally invasive therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As a large animal, the pig is commonly used for surgery and interventional radiology research. In this study, liver multicentric HCC with cirrhosis was induced in six China Taihu pigs by intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg of N-nitrosodiethylamine once a week for 3 months, followed by a period of 10-12 months without N-nitrosodiethylamine treatment. All pigs were in generally good health until the end of the study. The tumor nodules appeared hyperattenuating in the arterial phase of a dynamic computed tomography (CT) scan. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and CT angiography demonstrated that the tumors derived their blood supply mainly from the hepatic artery system. Lipiodol-CT showed Lipiodol retention in tumor areas. The histology and electron microscopic ultrastructure of the chemically induced liver HCC in this study resembled human HCC with a cirrhosis background. An immunohistochemistry study confirmed that the tumors were of hepatocyte origin. All highly, moderately, and poorly differentiated HCC tumors were identified in this study. Cholangiocarcinoma was not seen in any of the animals. Due to its comparable size to human anatomy, the pig liver HCC model would give a better scope for interventional and surgical manipulations than small animal models.

  12. Incidental Computer Tomography Radiologic Findings through Research Participation in the North Texas Healthy Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Anna; Malone, Kendra; Balyakina, Elizabeth; Fulda, Kimberly G.; Cardarelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Although variation exists in the classification and practice of managing clinical findings in research, emerging views suggest that researchers bear some responsibility in the management of incidental findings. This study contributes to the documentation of the population characteristics and prevalence of medical findings incidental to research participation, specifically findings related to coronary calcium scores and computed tomography (CT) scans that investigated cardiovascular disparities in an asymptomatic population. Methods A total of 571 asymptomatic adult participants were recruited in the North Texas Healthy Heart Study. Participants completed a 16-slice CT scan of the heart and abdomen. Findings of radiology reports and 3 years of follow-up documentation were reviewed. Results A total of 246 clinically apparent findings were identified in 169 asymptomatic participants (32.9% of participants who completed a CT scan). Another 245 participants (48%) had findings of unknown significance, a total of 307 findings. At least 4 cases in this study led to a clinically significant intervention. Conclusion Although CT scans were completed for research purposes, study procedures resulted in the diagnosis and treatment of individuals who were previously asymptomatic. Potential clinical benefits in imaging research are moderated by considerations regarding possible harm and costs resulting from uncertain findings and the use of CT scans for nonclinical purposes. The continued development of protocols for the handling of incidental findings in research and the establishment of guidelines are needed to ensure that research procedures mirror the best interests of participants. PMID:24808109

  13. Invited review: study design considerations for clinical research in veterinary radiology and radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Scrivani, Peter V; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    High quality clinical research is essential for advancing knowledge in the areas of veterinary radiology and radiation oncology. Types of clinical research studies may include experimental studies, method-comparison studies, and patient-based studies. Experimental studies explore issues relative to pathophysiology, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. Method-comparison studies evaluate agreement between techniques or between observers. Patient-based studies investigate naturally acquired disease and focus on questions asked in clinical practice that relate to individuals or populations (e.g., risk, accuracy, or prognosis). Careful preplanning and study design are essential in order to achieve valid results. A key point to planning studies is ensuring that the design is tailored to the study objectives. Good design includes a comprehensive literature review, asking suitable questions, selecting the proper sample population, collecting the appropriate data, performing the correct statistical analyses, and drawing conclusions supported by the available evidence. Most study designs are classified by whether they are experimental or observational, longitudinal or cross-sectional, and prospective or retrospective. Additional features (e.g., controlled, randomized, or blinded) may be described that address bias. Two related challenging aspects of study design are defining an important research question and selecting an appropriate sample population. The sample population should represent the target population as much as possible. Furthermore, when comparing groups, it is important that the groups are as alike to each other as possible except for the variables of interest. Medical images are well suited for clinical research because imaging signs are categorical or numerical variables that might be predictors or outcomes of diseases or treatments.

  14. [Radiological and clinical study of the ulna's end instability after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure].

    PubMed

    Brunet, P; Moineau, G; Liot, M; Burgaud, A; Dubrana, F; Le Nen, D

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the ulnar proximal stump's behaviour after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure. The procedure was performed for post-traumatic disorders of the distal radio-ulnar joint. This is a retrospective study of 14 patients. The mean age of patients at the operation was 49 years. Most of them began immediate mobilisation into pronation and supination. After a 5 year follow-up period, the clinical examination was centred on the ulnar proximal stump. An original radiologic study was made with static and dynamic X-Ray. Seven patients indicated pain on the ulnar stump during pronosupination. A clunk on the ulnar side of the wrist was noticed by three patients and an instability of the ulnar stump was observed two times. Clinically, there were a sagittal instability in all patients and a frontal instability four times. The sagittal instability was confirmed by dynamic X-Ray on each occasion, but the frontal instability was never confirmed. Every patient had instability of the ulnar stump; however, it was well tolerated. In practice, 12 patients were satisfied or very satisfied (86%). Instability of the proximal ulnar stump remains a problem, because it occurs despite a strict technique.

  15. Spaced education activates students in a theoretical radiological science course: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The present study aimed at determining if the addition of spaced education to traditional face-to-face lectures increased the time students kept busy with the learning content of a theoretical radiological science course. Methods The study comprised two groups of 21 third-year dental students. The students were randomly assigned to a “traditional group” and a “spaced education group”. Both groups followed a traditional face-to-face course. The intervention in the spaced education group was performed in way that these students received e-mails with a delay of 14 days to each face-to-face lecture. These e-mails contained multiple choice questions on the learning content of the lectures. The students returned their answers to the questions also by e-mail. On return they received an additional e-mail that included the correct answers and additional explanatory material. All students of both groups documented the time they worked on the learning content of the different lectures before a multiple choice exam was held after the completion of the course. All students of both groups completed the TRIL questionnaire (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation) for the evaluation of courses at university after the completion of the course. The results for the time invested in the learning content and the results of the questionnaire for the two groups were compared using the Mann–Whitney-U test. Results The spaced education group spent significantly more time (216.2 ± 123.9 min) on keeping busy with the learning content compared to the traditional group (58.4 ± 94.8 min, p < .0005). The spaced education group rated the didactics of the course significantly better than the traditional group (p = .034). The students of the spaced education group also felt that their needs were fulfilled significantly better compared to the traditional group as far as communication with the teacher was concerned (p = .022). Conclusions Adding spaced

  16. Radiological study of exposure levels in El Maghara underground coal mine.

    PubMed

    Amer, Hany A; Shawky, S; Hussein, Mohamed I; Abd el-Hady, M L

    2002-08-01

    Coal is largely composed of organic matter, but it is the inorganic matter in coal minerals and trace elements that have been cited as possible causes of health, environmental and technological problems associated with the use of coal. Some trace elements in coal are naturally radioactive. These radioactive elements include uranium (U), thorium (Th) and their numerous decay products, including radium (Ra) and radon (Rn). Although these elements are less chemically toxic than other coal constituents, such as arsenic, selenium or mercury, questions have been raised concerning the possible risk from radiation. In order to accurately address these questions and to predict the mobility of radioactive elements during the coal fuel cycle, it is important to determine the specific activity, distribution and form of radioactive elements in coal. The assessment of the radiation exposure from coal burning is critically dependent on the specific activity of radioactive elements in coal and in the fly ash that remains after combustion. The El-Maghara coal mine is the only producing coal mine in Egypt. It is located in the middle of the Sinai desert about 250 km north-east of Cairo, where a coal-fired power plant is intended to be built. In this study, a pre-operational radiological baseline of the site and the occupational radiation exposures due to radon progeny in the mine were determined. The specific activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in soil and coal dust samples collected along the main gallery ranges were found to be 6-22.9, 9.6-47.3 and 77-489 Bq kg-1, respectively. Soil samples collected around the mine showed concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in the ranges 2.7-20.2, 3.2-12.6 and 14.6-201 Bq kg-1, respectively. All of the mean values of radon progeny were lower than the action levels for working places recommended in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 65.

  17. Introducing DeBRa: a detailed breast model for radiological studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Andy K W; Gunn, Spencer; Darambara, Dimitra G

    2009-07-21

    Currently, x-ray mammography is the method of choice in breast cancer screening programmes. As the mammography technology moves from 2D imaging modalities to 3D, conventional computational phantoms do not have sufficient detail to support the studies of these advanced imaging systems. Studies of these 3D imaging systems call for a realistic and sophisticated computational model of the breast. DeBRa (Detailed Breast model for Radiological studies) is the most advanced, detailed, 3D computational model of the breast developed recently for breast imaging studies. A DeBRa phantom can be constructed to model a compressed breast, as in film/screen, digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis studies, or a non-compressed breast as in positron emission mammography and breast CT studies. Both the cranial-caudal and mediolateral oblique views can be modelled. The anatomical details inside the phantom include the lactiferous duct system, the Cooper ligaments and the pectoral muscle. The fibroglandular tissues are also modelled realistically. In addition, abnormalities such as microcalcifications, irregular tumours and spiculated tumours are inserted into the phantom. Existing sophisticated breast models require specialized simulation codes. Unlike its predecessors, DeBRa has elemental compositions and densities incorporated into its voxels including those of the explicitly modelled anatomical structures and the noise-like fibroglandular tissues. The voxel dimensions are specified as needed by any study and the microcalcifications are embedded into the voxels so that the microcalcification sizes are not limited by the voxel dimensions. Therefore, DeBRa works with general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes allow different types of imaging modalities and detector characteristics to be simulated with ease. DeBRa is a versatile and multipurpose model specifically designed for both x-ray and gamma-ray imaging studies.

  18. Introducing DeBRa: a detailed breast model for radiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Andy K. W.; Gunn, Spencer; Darambara, Dimitra G.

    2009-07-01

    Currently, x-ray mammography is the method of choice in breast cancer screening programmes. As the mammography technology moves from 2D imaging modalities to 3D, conventional computational phantoms do not have sufficient detail to support the studies of these advanced imaging systems. Studies of these 3D imaging systems call for a realistic and sophisticated computational model of the breast. DeBRa (Detailed Breast model for Radiological studies) is the most advanced, detailed, 3D computational model of the breast developed recently for breast imaging studies. A DeBRa phantom can be constructed to model a compressed breast, as in film/screen, digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis studies, or a non-compressed breast as in positron emission mammography and breast CT studies. Both the cranial-caudal and mediolateral oblique views can be modelled. The anatomical details inside the phantom include the lactiferous duct system, the Cooper ligaments and the pectoral muscle. The fibroglandular tissues are also modelled realistically. In addition, abnormalities such as microcalcifications, irregular tumours and spiculated tumours are inserted into the phantom. Existing sophisticated breast models require specialized simulation codes. Unlike its predecessors, DeBRa has elemental compositions and densities incorporated into its voxels including those of the explicitly modelled anatomical structures and the noise-like fibroglandular tissues. The voxel dimensions are specified as needed by any study and the microcalcifications are embedded into the voxels so that the microcalcification sizes are not limited by the voxel dimensions. Therefore, DeBRa works with general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes allow different types of imaging modalities and detector characteristics to be simulated with ease. DeBRa is a versatile and multipurpose model specifically designed for both x-ray and γ-ray imaging studies.

  19. A radiologic study of an ancient Egyptian mummy with a prosthetic toe.

    PubMed

    Brier, Bob; Vinh, Phuong; Schuster, Michael; Mayforth, Howard; Johnson Chapin, Emily

    2015-06-01

    A radiologic examination (both CT and traditional X-ray) of two mummies curated at the Albany Institute of History and Art revealed the identity of the mummified remains as well as details of the person's life style parameters (markers of occupational stress). These mummies, brought to the Institute over 100 years ago, were unstudied until 1989. This preliminary study led to the misappropriation of the remains, and subsequent switching of the remains within their coffins. Recent and more detailed analyses lead to the correct identification of sex, a re-association of the remains to their interment coffins, as well as a detailed analysis of occupational markers. A prosthetic toe was identified in one of the mummies which lead to the functional exploration of prosthetics in the past including their use as part of funerary processing in ancient Egypt. Finally, details of the embalming process place the wrapped mummy within the time frame identified on the coffin of the mummy identified as Ankhefenmut as well as confirming his social status.

  20. Radiological studies in the hot spring region of Mahallat, Central Iran.

    PubMed

    Beitollahi, M; Ghiassi-Nejad, M; Esmaeli, A; Dunker, R

    2007-01-01

    Five hot springs called 'Abegarm-e-Mahallat', located in the central part of Iran, have a mean water temperature of 46 +/- 1 degrees C and are used by visitors as spas. This is an area of high natural radiation background due to the presence of (226)Ra and its decay products in the deposited travertine (CaCO(3)). The mean concentration of (226)Ra in these hot springs, measured by the emanation method, ranged from 0.48 +/- 0.05 to 1.35 +/- 0.13 Bq l(-1). (222)Rn concentrations measured in the hot springs using a liquid scintillation counter ranged from 145 +/- 37 to 2731 +/- 98 Bq l(-1). Mean radon concentrations in air were 487 +/- 160 and 15.4 +/- 2.7 Bq m(-3) for indoor and outdoor, respectively. Radiation levels above that of normal background ( approximately 100 nGy h(-1)) were mainly limited to the Quaternary travertine formations in the vicinity of the hot springs. The results of environmental radiological studies in this region are presented and discussed.

  1. [Radiologic and skeletal-anatomical study of mummies at the Tourin Egyptian Museum].

    PubMed

    Gallino, M; Santamaria, E

    1995-11-01

    The authors present a study performed on three Egyptian mummies, coming from the same inviolate grave belonging to the Necropolis of Gebelin. The grave bore no indications on the occupiers' identity and for that reason Schiaparelli identified it as "Tomb of the Unknown". The mummies and their funerary furniture are now exposed at the Egyptian Museum of Turin. Standard radiographies of the mummies have been taken in situ by means of a portable radiological equipment. It has also been possible to examine directly the anatomic aspect of one unbandaged skeletal mummy. The procedure was simple, reliable, not expensive and did not expose the mummies to damages due to an eventual transfer. Reliable data on the findings have been taken in that way: the three burials, one of them is likely a reburial, belong to three grown-up subjects, whose sex was male for two and probably female for the third. No bone pathology has been found. One of the cadavers seems to be dead due to a serious cranic injury, probably the effect of a heavy bladed weapon.

  2. Radiologic examination requisition procedures: a study of their effectiveness in a community hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, J.

    1983-02-01

    One hundred consecutive radiologic examinations were reviewed with particular attention to the clinical information included. The referring physician originated this clinical information in only 33% of cases. Other personnel, including nurses and aides, added information on the requisitions 57% of the time. When nonphysician personnel completed the requisitions, 46% of the cases were completed with either inappropriate or misleading clinical information. In 9% of the cases, there was no clinical information. This falls short of the requirements of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals. Because all of the cases originated by physicians were appropriately completed, a strong plea is made for requiring physicians to originate radiologic requisitions.

  3. Breathing guidance in radiation oncology and radiology: A systematic review of patient and healthy volunteer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Sean Keall, Paul; Keall, Robyn

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The advent of image-guided radiation therapy has led to dramatic improvements in the accuracy of treatment delivery in radiotherapy. Such advancements have highlighted the deleterious impact tumor motion can have on both image quality and radiation treatment delivery. One approach to reducing tumor motion irregularities is the use of breathing guidance systems during imaging and treatment. These systems aim to facilitate regular respiratory motion which in turn improves image quality and radiation treatment accuracy. A review of such research has yet to be performed; it was therefore their aim to perform a systematic review of breathing guidance interventions within the fields of radiation oncology and radiology. Methods: From August 1–14, 2014, the following online databases were searched: Medline, Embase, PubMed, and Web of Science. Results of these searches were filtered in accordance to a set of eligibility criteria. The search, filtration, and analysis of articles were conducted in accordance with preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Reference lists of included articles, and repeat authors of included articles, were hand-searched. Results: The systematic search yielded a total of 480 articles, which were filtered down to 27 relevant articles in accordance to the eligibility criteria. These 27 articles detailed the intervention of breathing guidance strategies in controlled studies assessing its impact on such outcomes as breathing regularity, image quality, target coverage, and treatment margins, recruiting either healthy adult volunteers or patients with thoracic or abdominal lesions. In 21/27 studies, significant (p < 0.05) improvements from the use of breathing guidance were observed. Conclusions: There is a trend toward the number of breathing guidance studies increasing with time, indicating a growing clinical interest. The results found here indicate that further clinical studies are warranted that quantify the

  4. Age estimation using development of third molars in South Indian population: A radiological study

    PubMed Central

    Priyadharshini, K. Indra; Idiculla, Jose Joy; Sivapathasundaram, B.; Mohanbabu, V.; Augustine, Dominic; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the estimation of chronological age based on the stages of third molar development following the eight stages (A–H) method of Demirjian et al. in Chennai population of South India. Materials and Methods: A sample consisting of 848 individuals (471 males and 377 females) aged between 14 and 30 years was randomly selected for the clinical evaluation and 323 orthopantomograms with clinically missing third molars were taken for radiological evaluation using Demirjian's method from a Chennai population of known chronological age and sex. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's Chi-square test and mean values were compared between the study groups using t-test or analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's highly significant difference (HSD). In the present study, P < 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The results showed that the mean age of having clinically completely erupted maxillary third molars was 22.41 years in male subjects and 23.81 years in female subjects and that of mandibular third molars was 21.49 years in male subjects and 23.34 years in female subjects. Mandibular third molars were clinically missing more often in females than in males. Eruption of mandibular third molars was generally ahead of the emergence of maxillary third molars into the oral cavity. Third molar development between male and female subjects showed statistically significant differences at calcification stage F and stage G in maxillary third molars and stage F in mandibular third molars (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There are differences indicating that maxillary and mandibular third molar eruption reached Demirjian's formation stages earlier in males than in females. It is suggested that in future studies, to increase the accuracy of age determination, indications of sexual maturity and ossification should also be evaluated in addition to third molar mineralization. PMID:25984465

  5. A Study to Identify the Optimum Method of Providing Biomedical Engineering/Maintenance Support of Radiologic Equipment at General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    This study was done to determine the optimum method of providing biomedical engineering /maintenance support of diagnostic radiologic equipment at...General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital (GLWACH). The study concluded that the optimum method of providing biomedical engineering /maintenance

  6. Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria; Souhami, Luis; Gois Manso, Paulo; Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina; Araujo Segreto, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  7. [Bibliometric study of the activity, structure, and evolution of radiology in Spain].

    PubMed

    Miguel-Dasit, A

    2006-01-01

    From a bibliometric perspective, we reviewed: 1) the scientific activity in the field of diagnostic imaging in Spain, based on the percentage of presentations at the SERAM congresses (1994-1998) later published as articles in scientific journals. The value obtained (15%) is low in comparison with other international congresses, although similar to values for other national congresses in radiology. Both in national and international congresses, collaboration among radiologists from different institutions or countries and between radiologists and clinicians increases the percentage of publications, thus confirming the positive correlation between collaboration and scientific productivity. 2) We also examined the relationship between scientific productivity and the hierarchical structure of Spanish radiology departments (resident, associate, section chief, and department chief). Hierarchical groupings with the participation of residents were found to be more stable from year to year in scientific production, and the group residents + associates had the highest percentage of authorship (21%). 3) Finally, we reviewed the literature to assess the visibility and dissemination of the journal Radiología, estimating the impact factor that the journal would obtain if it were included in the Journal Citation Reports (JRC) database. We emphasize the importance of the inclusion of Radiología both in Medline, the best known and most widely used source of information in the health sciences, and in the JCR.

  8. Radiological progression and lung function in silicosis: a ten year follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T P; Chan, S L; Lam, K P

    1987-01-01

    Chest radiographs and spirometric tests were performed on 81 patients who had silicosis from two granite quarries in 1975, 73 of whom were followed up for two to 10 (mean 7.2) years. Each patient's initial and most recent chest radiographs were assessed independently by three experienced readers, and the yearly declines in forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity were estimated from two to four (mean 3.45) serial spirometric readings. Estimates of individual dust exposure were based on extensive historical data on hygiene. All but 11 patients were no longer exposed to dust by the start of follow up, but 24 (45%) of 53 patients who had simple silicosis and 11 (55%) of 20 who had the complicated disease showed radiological evidence of disease progression. In patients who had simple silicosis and showed no radiological progression the yearly declines in forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity were modest (64 ml/year and 59 ml/year, respectively), whereas significantly greater declines in lung function were seen in those who showed radiological evidence of progression (97 ml/year and 95 ml/year, respectively). In addition to radiological progression the previous average dust concentration to which patients had been exposed also influenced declines in both forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity after allowing for the effects of age, smoking, duration of exposure, history of tuberculosis, initial state of disease, and baseline lung function. The probability of radiological progression was most strongly influenced by the average dust concentration previously exposed to. The progression of simple silicosis is thus accompanied by appreciable declines in lung function and is strongly affected by previous levels of exposure to dust. PMID:3115361

  9. Preliminary study of a radiological survey in an abandoned uranium mining area in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Rabesiranana; M, Rasolonirina; F, Solonjara A.; Andriambololona., Raoelina; L, Mabit

    2010-05-01

    The region of Vinaninkarena located in central Madagascar (47°02'40"E, 19°57'17"S), is known to be a high natural radioactive area. Uranium ore was extracted in this region during the 1950s and the early 1960s. In the mid-1960s, mining activities were stopped and the site abandoned. In the meantime, the region, which used to be without any inhabitants, has recently been occupied by new settlers with presumed increase in exposure of the local population to natural ionizing radiation. In order to assess radiological risk, a survey to assess the soil natural radioactivity background was conducted during the year 2004. This study was implemented in the frame of the FADES Project SP99v1b_21 entitled: Assessment of the environmental pollution by multidisciplinary approach, and the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Cooperation Project MAG 7002 entitled: Effects of air and water pollution on human health. Global Positioning System (GPS) was used to determine the geographical coordinates of the top soil samples (0-15cm) collected. The sampling was performed using a multi integrated scale approach to estimate the spatial variability of the parameters under investigation (U, Th and K) using geo-statistical approach. A total of 205 soil samples was collected in the study site (16 km2). After humidity correction, the samples were sealed in 100 cm3 cylindrical air-tight plastic containers and stored for more than 6 months to reach a secular equilibrium between parents and short-lived progeny (226Ra and progeny, 238U and 234Th). Measurements were performed using a high-resolution HPGe Gamma-detector with a 30% relative efficiency and an energy resolution of 1.8 keV at 1332.5 keV, allowing the determination of the uranium and thorium series and 40K. In case of secular equilibrium, a non-gamma-emitting radionuclide activity was deduced from its gamma emitting progeny. This was the case for 238U (from 234Th), 226Ra (from 214Pb and 214Bi) and 232Th (from 228Ac, 212Pb or

  10. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations in the COPDGene Study: Associated Radiologic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kazerooni, Ella A.; Lynch, David A.; Liu, Lyrica X.; Murray, Susan; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Criner, Gerard J.; Kim, Victor; Bowler, Russell P.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Anzueto, Antonio R.; Make, Barry J.; Hokanson, John E.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Washko, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis—given the increasing emphasis on quantitative computed tomographic (CT) phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)—that a relationship exists between COPD exacerbation frequency and quantitative CT measures of emphysema and airway disease. Materials and Methods: This research protocol was approved by the institutional review board of each participating institution, and all participants provided written informed consent. One thousand two subjects who were enrolled in the COPDGene Study and met the GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) criteria for COPD with quantitative CT analysis were included. Total lung emphysema percentage was measured by using the attenuation mask technique with a −950-HU threshold. An automated program measured the mean wall thickness and mean wall area percentage in six segmental bronchi. The frequency of COPD exacerbation in the prior year was determined by using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed to examine the relationship of exacerbation frequency with lung function and quantitative CT measurements. Results: In a multivariate analysis adjusted for lung function, bronchial wall thickness and total lung emphysema percentage were associated with COPD exacerbation frequency. Each 1-mm increase in bronchial wall thickness was associated with a 1.84-fold increase in annual exacerbation rate (P = .004). For patients with 35% or greater total emphysema, each 5% increase in emphysema was associated with a 1.18-fold increase in this rate (P = .047). Conclusion: Greater lung emphysema and airway wall thickness were associated with COPD exacerbations, independent of the severity of airflow obstruction. Quantitative CT can help identify subgroups of patients with COPD who experience exacerbations for targeted research and therapy development for individual phenotypes. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10

  11. Safe Corridor to Access Clivus for Endoscopic Trans-Sphenoidal Surgery: A Radiological and Anatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ye; Zhang, Siwen; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penetration of the clivus is required for surgical access of the brain stem. The endoscopic transclivus approach is a difficult procedure with high risk of injury to important neurovascular structures. We undertook a novel anatomical and radiological investigation to understand the structure of the clivus and neurovascular structures relevant to the extended trans-nasal trans-sphenoid procedure and determine a safe corridor for the penetration of the clivus. Method We examined the clivus region in the computed tomographic angiography (CTA) images of 220 adults, magnetic resonance (MR) images of 50 adults, and dry skull specimens of 10 adults. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) of the CT images was performed, and the anatomical features of the clivus were studied in the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes. The data from the images were used to determine the anatomical parameters of the clivus and neurovascular structures, such as the internal carotid artery and inferior petrosal sinus. Results The examination of the CTA and MR images of the enrolled subjects revealed that the thickness of the clivus helped determine the depth of the penetration, while the distance from the sagittal midline to the important neurovascular structures determined the width of the penetration. Further, data from the CTA and MR images were consistent with those retrieved from the examination of the cadaveric specimens. Conclusion Our findings provided certain pointers that may be useful in guiding the surgery such that inadvertent injury to vital structures is avoided and also provided supportive information for the choice of the appropriate endoscopic equipment. PMID:26368821

  12. How to Develop, Validate, and Compare Clinical Prediction Models Involving Radiological Parameters: Study Design and Statistical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyunghwa; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-01-01

    Clinical prediction models are developed to calculate estimates of the probability of the presence/occurrence or future course of a particular prognostic or diagnostic outcome from multiple clinical or non-clinical parameters. Radiologic imaging techniques are being developed for accurate detection and early diagnosis of disease, which will eventually affect patient outcomes. Hence, results obtained by radiological means, especially diagnostic imaging, are frequently incorporated into a clinical prediction model as important predictive parameters, and the performance of the prediction model may improve in both diagnostic and prognostic settings. This article explains in a conceptual manner the overall process of developing and validating a clinical prediction model involving radiological parameters in relation to the study design and statistical methods. Collection of a raw dataset; selection of an appropriate statistical model; predictor selection; evaluation of model performance using a calibration plot, Hosmer-Lemeshow test and c-index; internal and external validation; comparison of different models using c-index, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination improvement; and a method to create an easy-to-use prediction score system will be addressed. This article may serve as a practical methodological reference for clinical researchers. PMID:27134523

  13. [The causes of arthrosis of the hip-joint. A radiologic study (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mutter, K; Schlegel, K F

    1975-06-01

    It is often possible to establish the origin of an arthosis of the hip joint radiologically. Only in 17 out of 445 patients were we unable to arrive at a classification because the arthrosis was already too advanced. Data relating to the history are of limited value -- only 21% of our patients knew of earlier disorders of the joint --, so definition of causes an radiographs is important. The high percentage of arthroses the origin of which is known, makes it likely that the concept of "primary arthrosis" is unnecessary, since behind it there hide those cases of apparently ill-defined arhtroses which -- as shown in our results -- can be further differentiated. This radiologically based classification will serve to increase the possibilities of progressing from symptomatic to prophylactic treatment.

  14. A case study in developing a radiology information technology (RIT) specialist position for supporting digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Stockman, Troy

    2006-01-01

    Support services in providing PACS to healthcare facilities are becoming more complex. Imaginative staffing models are imperative to provide a successful PACS program to customers. Choosing the right staffing grid of support staff can be assisted by locations with like volumes or geographic areas. The RIT (radiology information technology) specialist is an excellent asset in a growing PACS environment. RITs can be the crucial liaison between the radiology department and the customer. RITs with different backgrounds can be recruited based on what type of support services your customers need. RITs are a great resource for one-on-one training from physicians to nursing staff. This mobile PACS spokesperson can take the concerns of the customers to the PACS administrator to open dialogue and communication that will win customer loyalty in this ever changing world of technology.

  15. Application of Analytical Hierarchy Process Approach for Service Quality Evaluation in Radiology Departments: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadzadeh, Khalil; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Hassani, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiology department as a service provider organization requires realization of quality concept concerning service provisioning knowledge, satisfaction and all issues relating to the customer as well as quality assurance and improvement issues. At present, radiology departments in hospitals are regarded as income generating units and they should continuously seek performance improvement so that they can survive in the changing and competitive environment of the health care sector. Objectives: The aim of this study was to propose a method for ranking of radiology departments in selected hospitals of Tehran city using analytical hierarchical process (AHP) and quality evaluation of their service in 2015. Materials and Methods: This study was an applied and cross-sectional study, carried out in radiology departments of 6 Tehran educational hospitals in 2015. The hospitals were selected using non-probability and purposeful method. Data gathering was performed using customized joint commission international (JCI) standards. Expert Choice 10.0 software was used for data analysis. AHP method was used for prioritization. Results: “Management and empowerment of human resources’’ (weight = 0.465) and “requirements and facilities” (weight = 0.139) were of highest and lowest significance respectively in the overall ranking of the hospitals. MS (weight = 0.316), MD (weight = 0.259), AT (weight = 0.14), TS (weight = 0.108), MO (weight = 0.095), and LH (0.082) achieved the first to sixth rankings respectively. Conclusion: The use of AHP method can be promising for fostering the evaluation method and subsequently promotion of the efficiency and effectiveness of the radiology departments. The present model can fill in the gap in the accreditation system of the country’s hospitals in respect with ranking and comparing them considering the significance and value of each individual criteria and standard. Accordingly, it can predict an integration of qualitative

  16. A Study of Direct and Indirect Costs Resulting from a Radiological Attack by Terrorists

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.E.; McFee, J.; Langstead, J.

    2007-07-01

    An uncontrolled release of radioactivity caused by a terrorist attack is expected to result in an - incident of national significance - and have the potential consequence of a significant economic impact. The magnitude of the economic impact and the range of impacted entities are somewhat controversial. This paper will discuss the elements and methodology that comprise the buildup of an estimate for a specific critical infrastructure. The radiological attack event was studied by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to estimate the health and economic impacts of a radionuclide attack. The cost estimate was based on response actions outlined in the DHS National Response Plan and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Response Protocol Toolbox: Planning for and Responding to Drinking Water Contamination Threats and Incidents. A response plan was developed to support the options for the estimate. Several response and cleanup options were evaluated to determine a range of potential costs. It is the breakdown of the cost elements and their relative size that is discussed in this paper. The first step in the estimating process was the development of the terrorist attack characteristics that were to be estimated. Example response timelines were developed to determine what immediate operational response actions are possible to mitigate the attack consequences. Based on the attack assumptions, costs were estimated for a number of response and remediation options that may be employed. Finally, each parameter was evaluated to account for the range of values possible and its effect on the total cost. Cost estimates were based on data from standard references, internet searches on specific subjects, and information from recent terrorist activities. These costs were broken down into Micro-economic Level Costs (primarily associated with Medical Treatment, Remediation, and Business Interruption) and Macroeconomic Level Costs (primarily associated with the value of life lost

  17. Study of a remediated coal ash depository from a radiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Jónás, Jácint; Somlai, János; Tóth-Bodrogi, Edit; Hegedűs, Miklós; Kovács, Tibor

    2016-12-29

    Coal-fired power plants play a significant role in the production of electricity. The Ra-226 concentration of coals mined in the Ajka region can reach up to 3000 Bq/kg. This study focuses on the effects of a Hungarian (Ajka) remediated coal ash depository on the environment and the effectiveness of the cover layer. During the remediation, a method patented in Hungary was used, in which the upper layer of the depository, which had settled like concrete, was ploughed and mixed with woodchips before being planted with vegetation. The gamma dose rate H*(10) of the depository and its vicinity was measured using Automess 6150AD-b at 32 points, surface Rn-222 exhalation at 19 points and air radon concentration at 34 points; at 32 points, soil gas radon content was measured with AlphaGUARD and soil permeability with RADON-JOK. The nuclide content of nine samples was determined using an HPGe gamma spectrometer and their Rn-222 exhalation rates were measured using the AlphaGUARD. H*(10) was 290 (130-525) nSv/h at the covered depository; CRa-226 was 1997 Bq/kg, 960 Bq/kg and 104 Bq/kg for the ash, cover layer and background soil respectively. CRn-222 in the soil was 25-161 kBq/m(3), and soil gas permeability K was between 6.4E-13 and 1.80E-11 m(2). The radon exhalation of the uncovered and covered depository was 259-1100 mBq/m(2)s. The exhalation and emanation coefficients of the samples were 0.05-0.32 mBq/kgs and 8-22%. The effects of vegetation on the migration of radon were also examined. The results show that the Ajka coal ash depository involves higher radiological risk than that reported by previously published studies on depositories. The applied cover layer halved the field radon exhalation; in addition, the vegetation reduced the convective airflow and, with this, the migration of Rn.

  18. Radiation exposure and chromosome abnormalities. Human cytogenetic studies at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, 1963-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, T.; Kohno, S.; Minamihisamatsu, M. )

    1990-03-01

    The results of human cytogenetic studies performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan for about 25 years are described. The studies were pursued primarily under two major projects: one involving people exposed to radiation under various conditions and the other involving patients with malignant diseases, especially leukemias. Whereas chromosome abnormalities in radiation-exposed people are excellent indicators of radiation exposure, their behavior in bone marrow provide useful information for a better understanding of chromosome abnormalities in leukemias and related disorders. The role of chromosome abnormalities in the genesis and development of leukemia and related disorders is considered, suggesting a view for future studies in this field.

  19. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF FEMORAL SHAFT FRACTURES: STUDY OF 200 CASES

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; da Silva, Luciano Lucindo; Ferreira, Fábio Vieira; Ferro, Ademar Martins; da Rocha, Valney Luís; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate epidemiological and radiological characteristics of the femoral shaft fractures, surgically treated from 1990 to 2005 at Hospital de Acidentados – Clínica Santa Isabel – in Goiânia, Goiás, aiming to contribute to better preventive and therapeutic measures planning to adopt on those fractures. Methods: 200 patients' files and x-rays with femoral shaft fractures have been retrospectively evaluated. Patients below the age of 10 years were not included because the treatment for this group was conservative. 25 files have been discarded for not supplying all the necessary data to the study. The patients were assessed for sex, age, side of the fracture, bone exposure, mechanisms of trauma, classification of the fractures, associated trauma, time for bone healing and types of surgical devices. Statistic analyses were made by chi-squared, Fisher and Student's-t tests, adopting as a significance level p<0.05. Results: significant results (p < 0.05) were found in: 70% of men, 80% closed fractures and 65% of women above the age of 60. Fractures resulting from simple falls were more frequent in women, above 60 years old, with simpler traces, and the ones caused by projectiles of firearm in men, from 20 to 60 years, with unstable traces. Trampling accidents were prevalent among youngsters between 10 and 19 years old. Car accidents showed all the types of fractures, mostly associated to other traumas, reaching its peak incidence in the age group of 20-30 years. The treatment with Küntscher Nail resulted in a longer mean consolidation time, as well as fractures with unstable traces (B3,C1,C2,C3). Conclusion: we found a bi-modal characteristic the femoral shaft fractures, consistently to literature data, where the high energy mechanisms (traffic accidents, high falls and wounds from firearms), have been more frequent in young adults, men, generating unstable traces of fractures, with more serious associated trauma, while the other group with low

  20. Post mortem analysis of fatigue mechanisms in LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 - LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 - LiMn2O4/graphite lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Michael; Darma, Mariyam Susana Dewi; Kleiner, Karin; Riekehr, Lars; Mereacre, Liuda; Ávila Pérez, Marta; Liebau, Verena; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The fatigue of commercial lithium ion batteries after long-term cycling at two different temperatures and cycling rates is investigated. The cells are opened after cycling and post-mortem analysis are conducted. Two main contributions to the capacity loss of the batteries are revealed. The loss of active lithium leads to a relative shift between anodes and cathodes potentials. A growth of the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on the anode is determined as well as the formation of lithium fluoride species as an electrolyte decomposition product. Those effects are reinforced by increasing cycling rates from 1C/2C (charge/discharge) to 2C/3C as well as by increasing cycling temperatures from 25 °C to 40 °C. The other contribution to the capacity loss originates from a fatigue of the blended cathodes consisting of LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM), LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) and LiMn2O4 (LMO). Phase-specific capacity losses and fatigue mechanisms are identified. The layered oxides tend to form microcracks and reveal changes of the surface structure leading to a worsening of the lithium kinetics. The cathode exhibits a loss of manganese at 40 °C cycling temperature. Cycling at 40 °C instead of 25 °C has the major impact on cathodes capacity loss, while cycling at 2C/3C rates barely influences it.

  1. Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobczak, James

    This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

  2. Usefulness of Blood Cultures and Radiologic Imaging Studies in the Management of Patients with Community-Acquired Acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mi-Ran; Kim, Seong-Jong; Kim, Jieun; Wie, Seong-Heon; Cho, Yong Kyun; Lim, Seung-Kwan; Lee, Jin Seo; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyuck; Cheong, Hee Jin; Park, Dae Won; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Chung, Moon-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to examine the usefulness of blood cultures and radiologic imaging studies for developing therapeutic strategies in community-acquired acute pyelonephritis (CA-APN) patients. Materials and Methods We prospectively collected the clinical data of CA-APN patients who visited 11 hospitals from March 2010 to February 2011. Results Positive urine and blood cultures were obtained in 69.3% (568/820) and 42.7% (277/648), respectively, of a total of 827 CA-APN patients. Blood culture identified the urinary pathogen in 60 of 645 (9.3%) patients for whom both urine and blood cultures were performed; the organisms isolated from urine were inconsistent with those from blood in 11 and only blood cultures were positive in 49 patients. Final clinical failure was more common in the bacteremic patients than the non-bacteremic ones (8.0% vs. 2.7%, P = 0.003), as was hospital mortality (3.6% vs. 0.3%, P = 0.003). Likewise, durations of hospitalization and fever were significantly longer. Bacteremia was independent risk factor for mortality (OR 9.290, 1.145-75.392, P = 0.037). With regard to radiologic studies, the detection rate of APN was 84.4% (445/527) by abdominal computed tomography and 40% (72/180) by abdominal ultrasonography. Eighty-one of 683 patients (11.9%) were found to have renal abscess, perinephric abscess, urolithiasis, hydronephorosis/hydroureter or emphysematous cystitis, which could potentially impact on clinical management. Patients with Pitt score ≥ 1, flank pain or azotemia were significantly more likely to have such structural abnormalities. Conclusion Blood cultures are clinically useful for diagnosis of CA-APN, and bacteremia is predictive factor for hospital mortality. Early radiologic imaging studies should be considered for CA-APN patients with Pitt scores ≥1, flank pain or azotemia. PMID:28271650

  3. High correlation between in vivo [123I]β-CIT SPECT/CT imaging and post-mortem immunohistochemical findings in the evaluation of lesions induced by 6-OHDA in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is widely used in pre-clinical animal studies to induce degeneration of midbrain dopamine neurons to create animal models of Parkinson's disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential of combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) for the detection of differences in 6-OHDA-induced partial lesions in a dose- and time-dependent manner using the dopamine transporter (DAT) ligand 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-[123I]iodophenyl)tropane ([123I]β-CIT). Methods Rats were unilaterally lesioned with intrastriatal injections of 8 or 2 × 10 μg 6-OHDA. At 2 or 4 weeks post-lesion, 40 to 50 MBq [123I]β-CIT was administered intravenously and rats were imaged with small-animal SPECT/CT under isoflurane anesthesia. The striatum was delineated and mean striatal activity in the lesioned side was compared to the intact side. After the [123I]β-CIT SPECT/CT scan, the rats were tested for amphetamine-induced rotation asymmetry, and their brains were immunohistochemically stained for DAT and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The fiber density of DAT- and TH-stained striata was estimated, and TH-immunoreactive cells in the rat substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) were stereologically counted. Results The striatal uptake of [123I]β-CIT differed significantly between the lesion groups and the results were highly correlated to both striatal DAT- and TH-immunoreactive fiber densities and to TH-immunoreactive cell numbers in the rat SNpc. No clear progression of the lesion could be seen. Conclusions [123I]β-CIT SPECT/CT is a valuable tool in predicting the condition of the rat midbrain dopaminergic pathway in the unilateral partial 6-OHDA lesion model of Parkinson's disease and it offers many advantages, allowing repeated non-invasive analysis of living animals. PMID:23758882

  4. A Comparative Study Environmental and Radiological Causes Of Cancer In River Nile State, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Eyad; Khair, Hatim

    The causes of cancer in River Nile state are differ between environmental and radiological, this paper tried to make comparison between the two causes, to determine the real cause behind the large rising of cancer cases in this state, considering the daily habits for the patients and the possible contamination in the natural resources around them. The noticeable thing that most of cancer cases are might be due to the high concentration of nitrate pollutant detected in natural resources such as drinking water; also by looking to the radioactive elements we see there's high concentration of some radioactive elements specially the K-40 which found in Portulaca Oleracea.

  5. Radiological study on newly developed composite corn advance lines in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekunle Olatunji, Michael; Bemigho Uwatse, Onosohwo; Uddin Khandaker, Mayeen; Amin, Y. M.; Faruq, G.

    2014-12-01

    Owing to population growth, there has been high demand for food across the world, and hence, different agricultural activities such as use of phosphate fertilizers, recycling of organic matters, etc, have been deployed to increase crop yields. In Malaysia, a total of nine composite corn advance lines have been developed at the Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Malaya and are being grown under different conditions with a bid to meet the average daily human need for energy and fiber intake. To this end, the knowledge of radioactivity levels in these corn advance lines are of paramount importance for the estimation of possible radiological hazards due to its consumption. Hence, the radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K in the corn have been determined using HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations in the corn ranged from 0.05 to 19.18 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, from 0.10 to 3.22 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra and from 26.4 to 129 Bq kg-1 for 40K. In order to ascertain the radiological safety of the population regarding maize consumption, the daily intakes of these radionuclides as well as the annual effective dose were estimated. The total effective dose obtained due to the ingestion of radionuclides via maize consumption is 15.39 μSv y-1, which is less than the international recommendations.

  6. Biomedical Studies with the Free Electron Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-15

    were obtained within 5 hours post mortem, side branches ligated and perfused with Krebs solution. Coronary artery segments with high grade stenosis and...light. Twenty-four hours post injection ion. Animals were also sacrfliced in causing selective tumor necrosis of Photofrin 11. the experimental ani- !4...melanotic melanoma, which 8.61 were destined for localization and up- 8.41 take studies, were sacrificed 24 hours 8.28 post injection of doses of

  7. CHAOS: Prenatal imaging findings with post mortem contrast radiographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanika; Venkatesan, Bhuvaneswari; Manoharan, Kiruba Shankar; Rajalakshmi, Vaithianathan; Menon, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome is a rare fetal anomaly with characteristic constellation of prenatal findings on ultrasound and MRI. The typical triad of imaging features are enlarged and echogenic lungs, flattening or inversion of diaphragm and fetal hydrops. Early prenatal recognition of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome by ultrasound and/or MRI is mandatory for the appropriate perinatal management. We report a case of a male fetus with typical imaging findings of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome on ultrasound and MRI at 19 weeks of gestation. The role of contrast radiographs of fetal airways, including retrograde laryngogram, in confirming the postnatal diagnosis of this fetal condition is demonstrated. The prenatal imaging findings were correlated with contrast radiographs of upper airways, sonography of aborted fetus and fetal autopsy findings. PMID:27761192

  8. The New Zealand Hacker Case: A Post Mortem

    SciTech Connect

    Popovsky, Barbara; Ryan, Daniel J.; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2005-10-01

    A typical incident response pits technicians against networks that aren't prepared forensically. [1, 2] If practitioners do consider collecting network forensic data, they face a choice between expending extraordinary effort (time and money) collecting forensically sound data, or simply restoring the network as quickly as possible. In this context, the concept of organizational network forensic readiness has emerged. The following is a discussion of selected computer crime cases, using publically available information, spanning a period of time of several years, that together demonstrate the need for a preventive and proactive response to malicious intrusion over a reactive one. It concludes with recommendations for how to "operationalize" organizational network forensic readiness.

  9. Apoplexia uteri: a rarely described post-mortem finding.

    PubMed

    Beggan, C; Jaber, K; Leader, M

    2013-08-01

    We present a case of apoplexia uteri, a rarely described condition of haemorrhagic necrosis in an atrophic endometrium and myometrium associated with terminal stress. This entity is well recognised in older literature but few recent publications have addressed this condition. It is thought to occur in association with hypoperfusion with passive hyperaemia and reperfusion injury. This case serves to highlight this rarely encountered entity as a possible cause of haemorrhage in an atrophic endometrium in the 'perimortem' period. Incidental findings are occasionally observed in the course of forensic autopsy practice and knowledge of rarely encountered entities, such as that described in this case, is essential to prevent diagnostic uncertainty and misdiagnosis.

  10. Le post mortem d'une evaluation conjecturelle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurteau, Marthe; Nadeau, Marc-Andre

    1987-01-01

    A responsive model of evaluation was used for program evaluation in a French-speaking university. Two objectives were addressed: determining the local utility of the program being assessed and identifying the advantages and limits of the model and comparing them to those reported in the literature. (RB)

  11. Role of forensic odontologist in post mortem person identification

    PubMed Central

    Pramod, Jahagirdar B.; Marya, Anand; Sharma, Vidhii

    2012-01-01

    The natural teeth are the most durable organs in the bodies of vertebrates, and humankind's understanding of their own past and evolution relies heavily upon remnant dental evidence found as fossils. The use of features unique to the human dentition as an aid to personal identification is widely accepted within the forensic field. Comparative dental identifications play a major role in identifying the victims of violence, disaster or other mass tragedies. The comparison of ante-mortem and postmortem dental records to determine human identity has long been established. Indeed, it is still a major identification method in criminal investigations, mass disasters, grossly decomposed or traumatized bodies, and in other situations where visual identification is neither possible nor desirable. This article has comprehensively described some of the methods, and additional factors aiding in postmortem person identification. PMID:23559914

  12. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population. PMID:26235144

  13. Study of Radiologic Technologists' Perceptions of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) Competence and Educational Issues in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Daniel M; Trepp, Errol R; Ipaki, Maryam; Ng, Curtise K C

    2015-06-01

    Although the implementation of picture archiving and communication system (PACS) could increase productivity of radiology departments, this depends on factors such as the PACS competence of radiologic technologists (RTs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the RTs' perceptions of PACS competence and educational issues in Western Australia (WA). A hardcopy questionnaire was distributed to WA RTs for obtaining their perceptions of PACS competence and educational issues. Descriptive (percentage of frequency, mean and standard deviation) and inferential statistics (t test and analysis of variance) were used to analyze the responses of the multiple choice and five-point scale questions from the returned questionnaires. The questionnaire response rate was 57.7% (173 out of 300). The mean values of all PACS competence questions except questions 2e-g are in the range of 3.9-4.9, i.e., around competent to very competent. Participants indicated they received adequate PACS training (mean 3.8). Statistically significant variables influencing RTs' perceptions of their PACS competence and educational issues including the age (p < 0.01), gender (p < 0.05), years of practice (p < 0.005-0.05), primary duty (p < 0.05), medical imaging qualification (p < 0.001), general computer skills (p < 0.001), and type of PACS education received (p < 0.001-0.05). The WA RTs indicated that they were competent in using the modality workstation, PACS and radiology information system, and received adequate training. However, future PACS education programs should be tailored to different RTs' groups. For example, multiple training modules might be necessary to support the PACS competence development of older RTs and those with lower general computer literacy.

  14. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part II: Imaging studies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Matuszewska, Genowefa; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech

    2012-09-01

    Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis followed by early initiation of treatment, prevent the destruction of joints and progression to disability in the majority of patients. A traditional X-ray fails to capture early inflammatory changes, while late changes (e.g. erosions) appear after a significant delay, once 20-30% of bone mass has been lost. Sonography and magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that erosions are seen in the first 3 months from the appearance of symptoms in 10-26% of patients, while in 75% they are seen in the first 2 years of the disease. Power Doppler ultrasound and dynamic magnetic resonance studies allow for qualitative, semiquantitative and quantitative monitoring of the vascularization of the synovium. In addition, magnetic resonance enables assessment of the bone marrow. The ultrasonographic examination using a state-of-the-art apparatus with a high-frequency probe allows for images with great spatial resolution and for the visualization of soft tissues and bone surfaces. However, the changes seen in ultrasonography (synovial pathologies, the presence of exudate, tendons changes, cartilage and bone lesions, pathologies of tendon attachments and ligaments - enthesopathies) are not only specific for rheumatoid arthritis and occur in other rheumatic diseases. Qualitative methods are sufficient for diagnosing the disease through ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Whereas semiquantitative and quantitative scales serve to monitor the disease course - efficacy of conservative treatment and qualification for radioisotope synovectomy or surgical synovectomy - and to assess treatment efficacy.

  15. 9 CFR 310.1 - Extent and time of post-mortem inspection; post-mortem inspection staffing standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accompanying rules. (i) Inspection Using the Viscera Truck. Steers and Heifers Maximum slaughter rates (head...) Inspection Using Viscera Table, Tongue-In Presentation of Heads. Steers and Heifers Maximum slaughter rates..., Tongue-Out Presentation of Heads. Steers and Heifers Maximum slaughter rates (head per hour) Number...

  16. 9 CFR 310.1 - Extent and time of post-mortem inspection; post-mortem inspection staffing standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... inspector performs the viscera and upper carcass inspection. 1 1 The “Maximum Slaughter Rates” figures... accompanying rules. (i) Inspection Using the Viscera Truck. Steers and Heifers Maximum slaughter rates (head... 1 1 1 85 to 86 1 2 1 87 to 143 2 2 1 Cows and Bulls Maximum slaughter rates (head per hour)...

  17. 9 CFR 310.1 - Extent and time of post-mortem inspection; post-mortem inspection staffing standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section for one (a) and two (b) inspector kills are overstated... kills or paragraph (b)(2)(i)(B) of this section for two inspector kills must be used along with their... kills considering walking distance according to the table in this subdivision: Determine the...

  18. 9 CFR 310.1 - Extent and time of post-mortem inspection; post-mortem inspection staffing standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section for one (a) and two (b) inspector kills are overstated... kills or paragraph (b)(2)(i)(B) of this section for two inspector kills must be used along with their... kills considering walking distance according to the table in this subdivision: Determine the...

  19. 9 CFR 310.1 - Extent and time of post-mortem inspection; post-mortem inspection staffing standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section for one (a) and two (b) inspector kills are overstated... kills or paragraph (b)(2)(i)(B) of this section for two inspector kills must be used along with their... kills considering walking distance according to the table in this subdivision: Determine the...

  20. Current radiology. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular.

  1. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  2. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation of Turmeric Powder as a Pulpotomy Medicament in Primary Teeth: An in vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Manohar; Purohit, Kanchan; Acharya, Jitendra; Kumar, Rajesh; Garg, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Many plants with biological and antimicrobiological properties have been studied since there has been a relevant increase in the incidence of antibiotic overuse and misuse. In dentistry, phytomedicines have been used as anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, analgesic, and sedative agents. Turmeric is used extensively in foods for its flavor and color, as well as having a long tradition of use in the Chinese and Ayurvedic systems of medicine, particularly as an anti-inflammatory and for the treatment of flatulence, jaundice, menstrual difficulties, hematuria, hemorrhage, and colic. This article studies ahead with a new idea of using powdered turmeric as a material of pulpotomy procedure in primary teeth. How to cite this article Purohit RN, Bhatt M, Purohit K, Acharya J, Kumar R, Garg R. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation of Turmeric Powder as a Pulpotomy Medicament in Primary Teeth: An in vivo Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(1):37-40. PMID:28377653

  3. A radiological study of some ornamental stones: the bluish granites from Extremadura (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, D.; Neves, L.; Pereira, A.; Peinado, M.; Blanco, J. A.; Tejado, J. J.

    2012-02-01

    In the area of Trujillo (Extremadura, Spain) we have found a variety of striking bluish and secondary yellow granites outcropping within the Plasenzuela pluton. They are all quarried under different names and are characterized by leucocratic minerals in which a bluish phosphate is dispersed throughout the rock. Their physical and mechanical properties make these granites a perfect option for most applications as ornamental rocks. Within the pluton the radiological background is fairly homogeneous, with no significant differences between the gamma ray fluxes of the different facies. U (6.4 ± 0.51 ppm), Th (2.9 ± 0.47 ppm) and K2O (4.32 ± 0.26%) contents determined in the laboratory by gamma-ray spectrometry from representative samples are in good accordance with fast in situ measurements carried out with the same technique and also with conventional chemical analysis. Estimated activities for K-40, Ra-226 and Th-232 were, on average, 1022 ± 36 Bq kg-1, 84 ± 9 Bq kg-1 and 6.8 ± 1.6 Bq kg-1. On the basis of these results, the I index of EU technical document 112 was determined, with an average result of 0.66 ± 0.03. This suggests that the rock can be used with no restrictions for all types of construction purposes. Striking differences were observed between the blue facies and the yellow facies in radon exhalation tests from crushed material (0.03 Bq kg-1 vs. 0.20 Bq kg-1). Since both granites have similar uranium contents (6.3 ppm and 6.5 ppm, respectively), these results can probably be explained in terms of important differences in the mineralogical distribution of this chemical element, radon emanation being enhanced in the yellow facies. However, due to the ordinary use as ornamental stone, the yellow facies does not present a radiological risk in terms of excess effective dose due to internal exposure to radon.

  4. A longitudinal study of back pain and radiological changes in the lumbar spines of middle aged women. II. Radiographic findings.

    PubMed Central

    Symmons, D P; van Hemert, A M; Vandenbroucke, J P; Valkenburg, H A

    1991-01-01

    The natural history of radiological changes in the lumbar spine was evaluated in two groups of middle aged Dutch women selected from the general population. One group (n = 236) had recurrent back pain and the other (n = 241) had never experienced back pain. At the beginning of the study disc degeneration was more common in the group with back pain. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures were equally common in both groups. Nine years later both groups showed an increase in prevalence of disc degeneration and osteoporotic fractures. The strongest predictor for change in disc degeneration was the presence of degeneration at the beginning of the study. The development of disc degeneration for the first time was related to body mass index. PMID:1826598

  5. Dynamic Cervical Implant versus Anterior Cervical Diskectomy and Fusion: A Prospective Study of Clinical and Radiologic Outcome.

    PubMed

    Richter, Heiko; Seule, Martin; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical and radiologic outcome in patients treated with a dynamic cervical implant (DCI) or anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF). Study Design A prospective comparative cohort study. Methods The study included 60 patients with one- or two-level cervical degenerative disk disease (DDD) undergoing treatment with either DCI (n = 30) or ACDF (n = 30). Clinical and radiologic outcomes were assessed 3 and 12 months after surgery. Clinical scoring systems included the Visual Analog Scale for Neck (VAS-N) and Arm pain (VAS-A), the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD), and the European Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). Results Both the DCI and ACDF group showed significant clinical improvement 12 months after surgery using the VAS-N (p = 0.034 and p < 0.001, respectively), VAS-A (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), NPAD (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), and EQ-5D (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). There were no significant differences in clinical outcome comparing both groups at the 3- and 12-month follow-up. The fusion rate at 12 months after surgery was 39.4% and 80.0% in the DCI and ACDF groups, respectively. Radiolucency was found in 90.9% in the DCI group at 12-month follow-up. Conclusion The clinical results for DCI treatment are equivalent to those for ACDF in the treatment of one- and two-level cervical DDD at 12 months after surgery. Further studies are necessary to investigate the high rates of radiolucency and fusion associated with DCI treatment.

  6. Histopathological study of the outer membrane of the dura mater in chronic sub dural hematoma: Its clinical and radiological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Bokka, Sriharsha; Trivedi, Adarsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: A chronic subdural hematoma is an old clot of blood on the surface of the brain between dura and arachnoid membranes. These liquefied clots most often occur in patients aged 60 and older with brain atrophy. When the brain shrinks inside the skull over time, minor head trauma can cause tearing of blood vessels over the brain surface, resulting in a slow accumulation of blood over several days to weeks. Aim of the Study: To evaluate the role of membrane in hematoma evaluation and to correlate its histopathology with clinic-radiological aspects of the condition and overall prognosis of patients. Material and Methods: The study incorporated all cases of chronic SDH admitted to the Neurosurgery department of JLN Hospital and Research Centre, Bhilai, between November 2011 and November 2013. All such cases were analyzed clinically, radiologically like site, size, thickness in computed tomography, the attenuation value, midline shift and histopathological features were recorded. Criteria for Inclusion: All cases of chronic subdural haematoma irrespective of age and sex were incorporated into the study. Criteria for Exclusion: All cases of acute subdural haematoma and cases of chronic sub dural hematoma which were managed conservatively irrespective of age and sex were excluded from the study Results: In our series of cases, the most common histopathological type of membrane was the inflammatory membrane (Type II) seen in 42.30% of cases followed by hemorrhagic inflammatory membrane (Type III) seen in 34.62% of cases while scar inflammatory type of membrane (Type IV) was seen in 23.08% of cases. No case with noninflammatory type (Type I) was encountered. PMID:26889276

  7. Data mining in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-04-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining.

  8. Peer review in cardiothoracic radiology.

    PubMed

    Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-09-01

    A variety of peer review methods can be used as part of quality assurance and quality improvement in cardiothoracic radiology. Traditionally, peer review in radiology is a retrospective process relying primarily on review of previously interpreted studies at the time of follow-up or additional imaging. However, peer review can be enhanced with other methods such as double reads, focused practice review, practice audit, and correlation with operative and pathologic findings. Furthermore, feedback from referring physicians can be extremely useful in improving the quality of a radiology practice. This article discusses peer review in radiology with a focus on cardiothoracic imaging. Types of peer review, advantages and shortcomings, and future challenges are addressed.

  9. How Doctors Generate Diagnostic Hypotheses: A Study of Radiological Diagnosis with Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Marcio; Scarpin, Daniel J.; Amaro, Edson; Passos, Rodrigo B. D.; Sato, João R.; Friston, Karl J.; Price, Cathy J.

    2011-01-01

    Background In medical practice, diagnostic hypotheses are often made by physicians in the first moments of contact with patients; sometimes even before they report their symptoms. We propose that generation of diagnostic hypotheses in this context is the result of cognitive processes subserved by brain mechanisms that are similar to those involved in naming objects or concepts in everyday life. Methodology and Principal Findings To test this proposal we developed an experimental paradigm with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using radiological diagnosis as a model. Twenty-five radiologists diagnosed lesions in chest X-ray images and named non-medical targets (animals) embedded in chest X-ray images while being scanned in a fMRI session. Images were presented for 1.5 seconds; response times (RTs) and the ensuing cortical activations were assessed. The mean response time for diagnosing lesions was 1.33 (SD ±0.14) seconds and 1.23 (SD ±0.13) seconds for naming animals. 72% of the radiologists reported cogitating differential diagnoses during trials (3.5 seconds). The overall pattern of cortical activations was remarkably similar for both types of targets. However, within the neural systems shared by both stimuli, activation was significantly greater in left inferior frontal sulcus and posterior cingulate cortex for lesions relative to animals. Conclusions Generation of diagnostic hypotheses and differential diagnoses made through the immediate visual recognition of clinical signs can be a fast and automatic process. The co-localization of significant brain activation for lesions and animals suggests that generating diagnostic hypotheses for lesions and naming animals are served by the same neuronal systems. Nevertheless, diagnosing lesions was cognitively more demanding and associated with more activation in higher order cortical areas. These results support the hypothesis that medical diagnoses based on prompt visual recognition of clinical signs and

  10. Environmental radiological studies downstream from Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station

    SciTech Connect

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Eagle, R.J.; Dawson, J.W.; Brunk, J.L.; Jokela, T.A.

    1985-03-22

    This report summarizes the information compiled in 1984 while assessing the environmental impact of radionuclides in aquatic releases from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station. Gamma-emitting radionuclides discharged since 1981 are found in many of the dietary components derived from the creeks receiving the effluent wastewater. Some soils and crops are found to contain radionuclides that originate from the contaminated water that was transferred to land during the irrigation season. /sup 134/Cs and /sup 137/Cs are the primary gamma-emitting radionuclides detected in the edible flesh of fish from the creeks. Concentrations in the flesh of fish decreased exponentially with distance from the plant. No significant differences in the /sup 137/Cs activity were found between male and female fish of equal size, but concentrations may vary in fish of different size, with the season and diet. 21% of the total /sup 137/Cs and /sup 134/Cs discharged between 1981 and 1984 is associated with the creek sediments to a distance of 27 km from the plant. Fractions of the missing inventory have been transferred to land during the irrigation season or to downstream regions more distant than 27 km from the plant. The radiocesium content of the sediments in 1984 decreased significantly in a downstream direction, much in the same manner as concentrations decreased in fish. Radioactivity originating from the plant was not above detection limits in any terrestrial food item sampled beyond 6.5 km from the plant. Based on the usage factors provided by individuals interviewed in a 1984 survey, the fish and aquatic-organism ingestion pathway contributed the largest radiological dose to humans utilizing products contaminated with the radionuclides in the liquid wastes discharged from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station in 1984.

  11. Adenomatoid Tumor of the Adrenal Gland in Young Woman: From Clinical and Radiological to Pathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mishevska, Sasha Jovanovska; Jovanovic, Rubens

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid tumors are neoplasms of mesothelial origin, usually occurring in the male and female genital tracts. Extragenital localization sites such as adrenal glands are rare but have been reported. When found in the adrenals, they represent great clinical, radiological and pathological diagnostic challenge, with wide range of differential diagnoses to be considered. We present a case of a 30 years old female, with incidental ultrasound finding of unilateral tumor in the right adrenal gland. Multi slices CT scan was of value in localizing this tumor, but not in the precise diagnosis. The tumor ranged from 5.6 cm to 6.4 cm in greatest diameter. Clinical and hormonal examinations excluded Sy. Cushing, M. Conn and pheochromocytoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic right adrenalectomy. A large tumor (d: 8 × 7 × 3 cm) was removed showing no infiltration of the adrenal cortex or medulla, or extra-adrenal extension into the periadrenal adipose tissue. Histological examination showed numerous cystic spaces lined by flattened cubical epithelial cells. The small cystic spaces were separated by edematous fibrovascular stroma with rare epithelial cells with vacuolated cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical staining was positive with vimentin (+), S100 (+), MCA mesothelial Ag (+), CD 68 (+) and negative with acitin (-), CK7 (-), CD3 (-). Adenomatoid tumor is a rare benign neoplasm that should be added in the differential diagnosis of any adrenal tumor occurring in adrenal gland. The histological and immunohistochemical profiles of this adrenal adenomatoid tumor are very supportive in reaching the diagnosis of this benign tumor of a mesothelial cell origin, helping to avoid invasive treatment. PMID:28058099

  12. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education.

    PubMed

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  13. Decreasing sampling costs by increasing statistical efficiency through geostatistics: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ferns, T.W.; Ariss, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    The INEL (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) conducted a post- mortem examination of a dioxin cleanup study having a data base of over 2000 sampling points. The result of the post-mortem study was that approximately 60% of the sampling and analysis budget could have been saved, had geostatistics been used in the sampling design. Additionally, the final product of the sampling plan would have had greater utility at the site closure negotiations because of the reliability map uniquely generated through a technique known as ''kriging.'' We feel that kriging is an important cost saving tool which should be utilized more often in Installation Restoration Program (IRP) work. Directional variograms showing data anisotropy and sample planning information are shown. Maps delineating the dioxin isopleths and areal variances are also presented. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Radiological and Functional Outcome of Medial Epicondyle Fracture Treated Surgically in Children and Adolescents: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Kishor; Kharel, Krishna; Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Fractures of the medial humeral epicondyle represent approximately 10% of all pediatric elbow fractures. Surgically treated pediatric fractures of the medial humeral epicondyle were analyzed retrospectively for their epidemiological, clinical, radiological and surgical parameters. The evaluation includes the Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS). Methods: Twenty-five surgically treated fractures of the medial humeral epicondyle were analyzed. A valgus stress test was performed under general anesthesia or sedation. All patients underwent open reduction internal fixation using a similar technique. The medial epicondylar fragment was anatomically reduced and fixed in all cases with screws and Kirschner wires. At final evaluation, union was assessed radiologically, and elbow function was assessed by MEPS. Results: An evaluation of all our patients after a mean follow-up of 8.75 months (SD=4.76) after initial surgery was possible. The mean age of patients at the time of injury was 10.8 years (SD=2.3). Fifteen (60%) dominant elbows were injured in our study and twelve (48%) elbows had an associated elbow dislocation. On examination in the operating room post anesthesia, all the elbow injuries revealed some degree of valgus instability. All our patients (n=25) showed good to excellent results in MEPS. Radiographically, union was achieved in all cases. Three patients developed postoperative ulnar nerve neuropraxia; all recovered at time of final follow-up. Conclusion: Our results suggest that open reduction internal fixation of displaced medial epicondyle fractures leads to satisfactory motion and function. A valgus stress test in the operating room can reveal the true nature of joint instability that can warrant operative stabilization of medial epicondylar injuries. PMID:28168131

  15. Comparative study of clinico-bacterio-radiological profile and treatment outcome of smokers and nonsmokers suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Deepti; Arora, Piyush; Meena, Manoj; Sarin, Rohit; Chakraborty, Pitambar; Jaiswal, Anand; Goyal, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death and disease worldwide. Tobacco smoking has been linked as a risk factor for TB. This study was aimed to affirm the strength of association between smoking and pulmonary TB. Materials and Methods: Pulmonary TB patients aged between 18 and 65 years were enrolled and followed-up until treatment completion. Two consecutive sputum smears were examined from each patient for the presence of acid-fast bacilli (AFB) using Ziehl–Neelsen technique. Radiological severity of disease was assessed using guidelines of National TB Association of USA. Sputum smears for AFB were graded for positivity as per WHO Revised National TB Control Programme criteria. Response was determined in terms of sputum conversion at the end of intensive phase and final treatment outcomes. Results: Sputum smear grading of 3+ increased from 12.5% to 68.18% and 66.66% as smoking index increased from <100 to 100–299 and >300 (P < 0.05). In nonsmokers, 79.2% patients had minimal disease while only 4.2% had advanced disease as compared to smokers where 52.4% had moderate disease, 26.2% advanced disease, and 21.4% minimal disease (P < 0.01). Smokers had significantly lower treatment success rate (69%) as against nonsmokers and former smokers (93.8% and 90.9%, respectively, P = 0.001) owing to a higher default rate among smokers (28.5%) than nonsmokers (6.3%) and former smokers (9.1%). Conclusion: Smokers during initial presentation, as well as at end of the treatment demonstrate more radiological findings, cavitary disease, and worse sputum AFB smear grading. Smokers also have a poorer treatment success rate largely due to high percentage of default rate thus suggesting noncompliance as a main confounder to treatment success. Focus needs to be made to reduce defaulters which are more common among smokers. PMID:27625444

  16. Pericardial pathology 900 years ago. A study and translations from an Arabic medical textbook.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, Rabie E; Elfaqih, Salah R

    2007-03-01

    This is a study and translation of the section on pericarditis in Al Taisir book written by the Muslim physician Ibn Zuhr Avenzoar who lived and practiced in Eshbeelia nowadays Seville, Andalusia, Spain between 1091-1162 AD. Ibn Zuhr described the serous type of pericarditis as well as the pathological findings in fibrinous pericarditis. His description of the latter may also fit with the picture of chronic fibrous pericarditis. He also described acute purulent pericarditis and involvement of the pericardium in cases of acute carditis with hectic fever. Ibn Zuhr's description of the pericardial effusion in serous pericarditis as looking like urine indicates that he must have seen a sample of the fluid obtained either by pericardiocentesis or during a post-mortem examination. However, his description of solid substances accumulating on the inside of the hearts covering looking like layers upon layers of membranes could not have been made possible without post-mortem dissection.

  17. Historical Radiological Event Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    During and after radiological events EPA's RadNet monitors the environment for radiation. EPA monitored environmental radiation levels during and after Chernobyl, Fukushima and other international and domestic radiological incidents.

  18. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications.

  19. Open Reduction and Volar Plate Fixation of Dorsally Displaced Distal Radius Fractures: A Prospective Study of Functional and Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivan, Anand Kumar; Hegde, Anoop; Shetty, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The fractures of the distal radius have always posed a unique challenge to the orthopaedic fraternity. The complex ligamentous and bony anatomy offers a wide variety of fractures to be dealt with around this zone. Over the years these injuries have become common especially in the elderly age group as well as the implants and surgical techniques have improved. Aim To assess the radiological and functional outcome after fixation of intra-articular dorsally displaced distal radius fractures with open reduction and volar Locking Compression Plate fixation (LCP). To study the complications occurring with this technique. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Orthopaedics at ARS Hospital, Tirupur, Tamil Nadu, from June 2015 to June 2016. A total of 20 skeletally mature patients with Lidstrom class 2D and 2E fresh closed distal radius fractures were enrolled in the study. All the patients underwent open reduction with locking compression plating with titanium LCPs using the volar approach. The patients were reviewed regularly at three, six, 12 and 24 weeks. Final assessment of radiographic fracture union was done and scored as per the ‘Radiographic Scoring System to Evaluate Union of Distal Radius Fractures {Radius Union Scoring System (RUSS)}’ and the functional assessment of the wrist was done using the Mayo wrist score. The final results were tabulated and calculated statistically using ‘frequency and proportions’ and ‘Chi-square tests’ were used to assess the test of association. Results Of the 20 patients reviewed, one patient had excellent Mayo wrist score, five had good scores, 12 had satisfactory and two patients had poor results. Seven patients had a RUSS score less than five points and four patients had RUSS score of five points, four patients had six points, two patients had seven points and three patients had eight points. One patient was noted to have dorsal collapse of the fracture during the

  20. Teaching, leadership, scholarly productivity, and level of activity in the chiropractic profession: a study of graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic radiology residency program

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kenneth J.; Siordia, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to track the graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) radiology residency program, review their scholarly productivity, and report those involved in teaching and leadership positions. Methods Former LACC residents’ career information was identified through publicly available electronic documents including Web sites and social media. PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature databases were searched for chiropractic graduate job surveys, and proportional comparisons were made between the career paths of LACC radiology residency graduates and those of non–residency-trained chiropractors. Results Of 47 former LACC residents, 28 (60%) have or previously had careers in tertiary (chiropractic) education; and 12 (26%) have attained a department chair position or higher at tertiary teaching institutions. Twenty-two (47%) have or previously had private radiology practices, whereas 11 (23%) have or previously had clinical chiropractic practices. Often, residency graduates hold or have held 2 of these positions at once; and one, all 3. Chapters or books were authored by 13 (28%). Conclusion Radiology residency LACC graduates are professionally active, particularly in education, and demonstrate scholarly productivity. PMID:23966885

  1. Workflow management systems in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Thomas; Meetz, Kirsten; Schmidt, Joachim

    1998-07-01

    In a situation of shrinking health care budgets, increasing cost pressure and growing demands to increase the efficiency and the quality of medical services, health care enterprises are forced to optimize or complete re-design their processes. Although information technology is agreed to potentially contribute to cost reduction and efficiency improvement, the real success factors are the re-definition and automation of processes: Business Process Re-engineering and Workflow Management. In this paper we discuss architectures for the use of workflow management systems in radiology. We propose to move forward from information systems in radiology (RIS, PACS) to Radiology Management Systems, in which workflow functionality (process definitions and process automation) is implemented through autonomous workflow management systems (WfMS). In a workflow oriented architecture, an autonomous workflow enactment service communicates with workflow client applications via standardized interfaces. In this paper, we discuss the need for and the benefits of such an approach. The separation of workflow management system and application systems is emphasized, and the consequences that arise for the architecture of workflow oriented information systems. This includes an appropriate workflow terminology, and the definition of standard interfaces for workflow aware application systems. Workflow studies in various institutions have shown that most of the processes in radiology are well structured and suited for a workflow management approach. Numerous commercially available Workflow Management Systems (WfMS) were investigated, and some of them, which are process- oriented and application independent, appear suitable for use in radiology.

  2. Radiologic assessment of third molar tooth and spheno-occipital synchondrosis for age estimation: a multiple regression analysis study.

    PubMed

    Demirturk Kocasarac, Husniye; Sinanoglu, Alper; Noujeim, Marcel; Helvacioglu Yigit, Dilek; Baydemir, Canan

    2016-05-01

    For forensic age estimation, radiographic assessment of third molar mineralization is important between 14 and 21 years which coincides with the legal age in most countries. The spheno-occipital synchondrosis (SOS) is an important growth site during development, and its use for age estimation is beneficial when combined with other markers. In this study, we aimed to develop a regression model to estimate and narrow the age range based on the radiologic assessment of third molar and SOS in a Turkish subpopulation. Panoramic radiographs and cone beam CT scans of 349 subjects (182 males, 167 females) with age between 8 and 25 were evaluated. Four-stage system was used to evaluate the fusion degree of SOS, and Demirjian's eight stages of development for calcification for third molars. The Pearson correlation indicated a strong positive relationship between age and third molar calcification for both sexes (r = 0.850 for females, r = 0.839 for males, P < 0.001) and also between age and SOS fusion for females (r = 0.814), but a moderate relationship was found for males (r = 0.599), P < 0.001). Based on the results obtained, an age determination formula using these scores was established.

  3. Radiological sinonasal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Alrumaih, Redha A.; Ashoor, Mona M.; Obidan, Ahmed A.; Al-Khater, Khulood M.; Al-Jubran, Saeed A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of common radiological variants of sinonasal anatomy among Saudi population and compare it with the reported prevalence of these variants in other ethnic and population groups. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 121 computerized tomography scans of the nose and paranasal sinuses of patients presented with sinonasal symptoms to the Department of Otorhinolarngology, King Fahad Hospital of the University, Khobar, Saudi Arabia, between January 2014 and May 2014. Results: Scans of 121 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria were reviewed. Concha bullosa was found in 55.4%, Haller cell in 39.7%, and Onodi cell in 28.9%. Dehiscence of the internal carotid artery was found in 1.65%. Type-1 and type-2 optic nerve were the prevalent types. Type-II Keros classification of the depth of olfactory fossa was the most common among the sample (52.9%). Frontal cells were found in 79.3%; type I was the most common. Conclusions: There is a difference in the prevalence of some radiological variants of the sinonasal anatomy between Saudi population and other study groups. Surgeon must pay special attention in the preoperative assessment of patients with sinonasal pathology to avoid undesirable complications. PMID:27146614

  4. Significance of Radiological Variables Studied on Orthopantamogram to Pridict Post-Operative Inferior Alveoler Nerve Paresthesia After Third Molar Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nitin; Rastogi, Madhur Kant; Sharma, Shalini

    2014-01-01

    Context: Removal of impacted third molar is a procedure that is often associated with post-operative complications. The rate of complications is somewhat high because of its proximity to the vital structures. Inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia is one of the common complications of impacted their molar surgery. This is due to intimate relationship between roots of mandibular third molar and inferior alveolar canal. To access the proximity of inferior alveolar canal to third molar many diagnostic methods are suggested but in conventional radiography orthopantamogram is considered as the best. There are many findings onorthopantamogram that are suggestive of close proximity of nerve to the canal. In this study authors reviewed seven radiographic findings related to proximity of roots to the inferior alveolar nerve as seen on orthopantamogram and try to find a relationship between these radiographic variables and presence of post-operative paresthesia. Study Design: The study containd 100 impacted third molars need to be removed. Presence of radiographic findings on orthopantamogram were noted and analyzed, to find a relationship with occurrence of post-operative inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia. Materials and Methods: This study comprises of 100 impacted third molar teeth indicated for extraction. Cases were randomly selected from the patients, needs to undergo extraction of impacted mandibular third molar. After extraction cases were evaluated for occurrence of inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia. Stastical Analyisis: Data was transferred to SPss 21 software for frequency calculation, and two tailed p-values were obtained betweens these variables and post-operative paresthesia, by applying Fischer’s exact test (GRAPH PAD SOFTWARE). Results: Out of seven, four radiological findings that are grooving of roots, hooked roots, bifid roots and obliteration of white line are significantly related to post-operative paresthesia while bending of canal, narrow canal and

  5. Planning and Developing Open and Distance Learning : A Quality Assurance Approach. Radiological Studies in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Reginald F.

    This book presents a blueprint for using a quality assurance-based approach to planning and developing open and distance learning (ODL) courses in the United Kingdom. The following are among the specific topics discussed: (1) typical aims of ODL (opening access to education; responding to student needs; designing self-study materials; student…

  6. Arterial blood supply of the mesocolic areas. An anatomical and radiological study.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, E; Guidotti, A; Mancini, S

    1989-01-01

    The authors report on first observations on the vascularization of the areae mesocolicae which resulted from radioanatomical studies made in collaboration with the Institute of General Clinical Surgery of the University of Siena. Three areae can be distinguished: colocolica (Treitz), sigmoidea or intersigmoidea, and intercolica. The investigations were carried out using selective preoperative angiography and the injection of anatomical preparations.

  7. Morphometry of distal end radius in the Indian population: A radiological study

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Nagar, Manoj; Gaur, Suresh Chandra; Gupta, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The morphometry of distal end radius (DER) comprises the four necessary parameters: radial inclination, palmer tilt, radial height, and ulnar variance. The unblemished intellect about the morphometry is urged for the management of fracture of DER. The goal of our study was to determine the values of morphometric parameters of the DER from the adult Indian. Materials and Methods: It was a single hospital- based observational cross-sectional, prospective study. Radial inclination, radial height, and ulnar variance were measured on posteroanterior view, and the measurement of palmer tilt was accomplished on the lateral view. All the statistical analysis was done by Microsoft XL 2007 (data add in function were installed for data analysis). T-test was used for comparing the means of the parameters. Results: Two hundred and forty two (n = 242) X-rays were included in this study to analyze. The mean value (n = 242) of radial inclination was 23.27°± (standard deviation [SD]) 7.42° (range: 11.3–42.1°), palmer tilt 10.07° ± (SD) 5.28° (range: 1–16.9°), radial height 11.31 mm ± (SD) 4.9 mm (range: 7.1–30.4 mm), and ulnar variance 0.66 mm ± (SD) 2.46 mm (range: −2.4 to +4.1). Conclusion: This study may provide an inauguratory plinth to prosecute the further analytical research in the Indian population. Moreover, the data may also be used as a reference data for the anatomical alignment while treating the injuries of the DER in the Indian population. PMID:27904215

  8. A Radiological Study on the Topographical Relationships between the Vestibular, Cochlear and Facial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Unel, Sacide; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Albayram, Sait; Kiris, Adem; Isik, Zehra; Ceyhan, Elvan; Isildak, Huseyin; Savas, Yildiray; Keser, Zafer

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to investigate the topographical relationship between these nerves along their course from the brainstem through the internal acoustic canal IAC in the living human brain using MR imaging. Materials and Methods: We performed three-dimensional gradient echo balanced Fast Field Echo (3D bFFE) sequence oblique parasagittal MR imaging in 73 healthy subjects. The IACs were analyzed from the brainstem end of the IAC to the fundus in contiguous sections. At five levels, the topographical relationships between the facial and vestibulocochlear nerves (VCN) were recorded. In the lateral portions of the IACs where they separated from each other, the relative sizes of the individual nerves were examined. Results: In general, the facial nerve (FN), which is a round structure, is located anteriorly and superiorly to the vestibulocochlear nerve throughout its course. The vestibulocochlear nerve is usually rectangular; however, it was found to be round and at times triangular in shape near the brainstem, before it became crescent-shaped at the porus in 89% of the cases. The superior vestibular nerve kept its posterosuperior position in the canal, and the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN) and the cochlear nerve (CN) travelled inferior to it. The superior and inferior vestibular nerves were divided by the falciform crest in 53% of the cases. The inferior vestibular nerve was the smallest nerve in 52% of the cases, and the cochlear nerve was the largest in 36% of the cases. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the largest in vivo MR study, and most of our findings differ from previous cadaver studies. Determination of these topographical relationships may facilitate our understanding of the complicated physiological relationships between the 7th and 8th nerve complexes during surgery in this region. PMID:25610197

  9. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  10. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  11. [Anatomical and radiological studies on additional mandible teeth anesthesia considering innervation variability].

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, S V; Dydykin, S S; Kuzin, A V

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents studies on nutritional foramina of the mandible. Some nutritional foramina located in the frontal mandibular region on the lingual surface and containing significant blood vessels and nerves are found to be more typical for teeth-bearing mandible. In retromolar area in case of third molars presence intraosseous canals were revealed leading to inferior alveolar nerve canal. One should consider intraligamental and lingual anesthesia by lower incisors extraction. Intraosseous anesthesia and retromolar area infiltration significantly increase anesthesia efficiency by third molar extraction.

  12. Relationship between radiological grading and clinical status in knee osteoarthritis. a multicentric study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Controversy exists regarding the relationship between radiographic findings and clinical status in knee osteoarthritis. Although the surgical indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) should be based on pain, clinical status, and the deterioration of quality of life, the radiographic study is the most commonly used criterion for preoperative evaluation. The objective of this study is to find out the relationship between the Ahlbäck classification and clinical status in patients undergoing TKA. Methods 1329 protocols were collected from preoperative studies in four multicentric working groups (the Interax, Duracon, Scorpio, and Triathlon Spanish groups) in 30 Spanish hospitals. Mean age was 70.4 years (SD: 6.8; range: 35 to 98); 76.3% of patients were women. Patients entered the study whenever the surgeon found that medical treatment was insufficient to control pain and functional limitation. Data were collected using electronic Case Report Forms, and included Ahlbäck grading scores, Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Score (HSS), SF-12, and other clinical and epidemiologic variables. Results According to the Ahlbäck grading system, patients were divided as follows: 243 grade I (18.3%), 358 grade II (26.9%), 416 grade III (31.3%), 241 grade IV (18.1%), and 71 grade V (5.3%). As for HSS, the following scores were obtained: <60 points in 925 patients (69.6%), 60 to 69 points in 286 patients (21.5%), 70 to 84 points in 112 patients (8.4%) and 85 to 100 points in 6 patients (0.5%). Scores showed a statistically significant difference depending on Ahlbäck grade, with a clear tendency towards decrease in HSS scores as the Ahlbäck grade increases (p<0.001). However, the HSS score difference between Ahlbäck grades I and V was of 9.56 points only. Comparing the status of the patients at the start (1994) and at the end (2010) of the data collection process, we observed that patients who underwent surgery in the last years were older and showed a lower Ahlb

  13. In vitro study of the antimicrobial effects of radiological contrast agents used in arthrography.

    PubMed

    Bruins, M J; Zwiers, J H; Verheyen, C C P M; Wolfhagen, M J H M

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration arthrography using an iodinated contrast medium is a useful tool for the investigation of septic or aseptic loosening of arthroplasties and of septic arthritis. Previously, the contrast media have been thought to cause false negative results in cultures when present in aspirated samples of synovial fluid, probably because free iodine is bactericidal, but reports have been inconclusive. We examined the influence of the older, high osmolar contrast agents and the low osmolar media used currently on the growth of ten different micro-organisms capable of causing deep infection around a prosthesis. Five media were tested, using a disc diffusion technique and a time-killing curve method in which high and low inocula of micro-organisms were incubated in undiluted media. The only bactericidal effects were found with low inocula of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in ioxithalamate, one of the older ionic media. The low and iso-osmolar iodinated contrast media used currently do not impede culture. Future study must assess other causes of false negative cultures of synovial fluid and new developments in enhancing microbial recovery from aspirated samples.

  14. Arthrocentesis and temporomandibular joint disorders: clinical and radiological results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    De Riu, Giacomo; Stimolo, Mirella; Meloni, Silvio Mario; Soma, Damiano; Pisano, Milena; Sembronio, Salvatore; Tullio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the efficacy of arthrocentesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Material and Methods. In this prospective clinical case series, 30 consecutive patients with TMJ disorders underwent arthrocentesis using saline and sodium hyaluronate injections. Outcome measures were TMJ pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), joint noises, and anatomical changes in the TMJ architecture. Patients were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the beginning of treatment and 60 days after the last arthrocentesis. Pretreatment and posttreatment clinical parameters were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests, and McNemar's test was used to evaluate CBCT and MRI changes (P < 0.05). Results. At 1-year follow-up examinations, visual analogue scale scores indicated that pain was reduced significantly and mean postoperative MMO was increased significantly. CBCT findings showed no significant change, and MRI showed only slight reductions in inflammatory signs. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, we can conclude that arthrocentesis is a simple, minimally invasive procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and significant clinical benefits in patients with TMJ disorders. This trial is registered with NCT01903512.

  15. The effect of rheumatoid arthritis on the anatomy of the female cervical spine: a radiological study.

    PubMed

    Higashino, K; Sairyo, K; Katoh, S; Nakano, S; Enishi, T; Yasui, N

    2009-08-01

    The effect of rheumatoid arthritis on the anatomy of the cervical spine has not been clearly documented. We studied 129 female patients, 90 with rheumatoid arthritis and 39 with other pathologies (the control group). There were 21 patients in the control group with a diagnosis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and 18 with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All had plain lateral radiographs taken of the cervical spine as well as a reconstructed CT scan. The axial diameter of the width of the pedicle, the thickness of the lateral mass, the height of the isthmus and internal height were measured. The transverse diameter of the transverse foramen (d1) and that of the spinal canal (d2) were measured, and the ratio d1/d2 calculated. The width of the pedicles and the thickness of the lateral masses were significantly less in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in those with other pathologies. The area of the transverse foramina in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was significantly greater than that in the other patients. The ratio of d1 to d2 was not significantly different. A high-riding vertebral artery was noted in 33.9% of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 7.7% of those with other pathologies. This difference was statistically significant. In the rheumatoid group there was a significant correlation between isthmus height and vertical subluxation and between internal height and vertical subluxation.

  16. Defecatory disorders, anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction: a polygamy? Radiologic and manometric studies in 41 patients.

    PubMed

    Siproudhis, L; Ropert, A; Lucas, J; Raoul, J L; Heresbach, D; Bretagne, J F; Gosselin, M

    1992-06-01

    A consecutive series of 41 patients with defecatory disorders was prospectively studied by anal manometry and evacuation proctography to determine the relationship between abnormalities and symptoms. The patients (29 female, 12 male, aged 41 +/- 2.3 years) all complained of difficulty in evacuation. All had normal colonoscopy and biochemistry. There was no evidence of megacolon or megarectum, and no symptoms had been previously treated by pelvic floor surgery. All subjects completed detailed questionnaires related to gastrointestinal symptoms with special reference to excessive straining and discomfort, digital manipulations during defecation, a sense of pelvic heaviness and incomplete evacuation. Each patient underwent clinical examination, anal manometry and defecography during a single outpatient visit. Rectocele (16 patients) was significantly associated with vaginal digitation, lower stool frequency, delayed rectal emptying and decreased rectal sensation to distension. Increased anal pressure on straining (14 patients) was also related to a poor rectal emptying in 13 patients. Neither perineal descent (24 patients) nor external rectal prolapse (12 patients) was related to objective obstruction. Nevertheless there was an association with pelvic heaviness and lower anal manometric recordings. Five among 16 patients with rectocele had manometric anismus. Forty percent of patients with intussusception also had a paradoxical sphincter response during defaecation. Furthermore, associated abnormalities were extremely common (34 of 41 patients), accurate interpretation of which was necessary for planning effective therapy.

  17. Arthrocentesis and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: Clinical and Radiological Results of a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    De Riu, Giacomo; Soma, Damiano; Pisano, Milena; Sembronio, Salvatore; Tullio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the efficacy of arthrocentesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Material and Methods. In this prospective clinical case series, 30 consecutive patients with TMJ disorders underwent arthrocentesis using saline and sodium hyaluronate injections. Outcome measures were TMJ pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), joint noises, and anatomical changes in the TMJ architecture. Patients were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the beginning of treatment and 60 days after the last arthrocentesis. Pretreatment and posttreatment clinical parameters were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests, and McNemar's test was used to evaluate CBCT and MRI changes (P < 0.05). Results. At 1-year follow-up examinations, visual analogue scale scores indicated that pain was reduced significantly and mean postoperative MMO was increased significantly. CBCT findings showed no significant change, and MRI showed only slight reductions in inflammatory signs. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, we can conclude that arthrocentesis is a simple, minimally invasive procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and significant clinical benefits in patients with TMJ disorders. This trial is registered with NCT01903512. PMID:24319462

  18. Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF): A single-center clinical and radiological follow-up study of 20 patients.

    PubMed

    Tessitore, Enrico; Molliqaj, Granit; Schaller, Karl; Gautschi, Oliver Pascal

    2017-02-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is an alternative to standard posterior approaches for achieving fusion in the lumbar spine. It allows exposure of the lateral aspect of the lumbar disc through a lateral approach with the possibility to insert a wide footprint interbody cage as a stand-alone procedure or associated with a uni- or bilateral percutaneous fixation. This is a retrospective series of 20 consecutive patients operated with a XLIF procedure from 2014 to 2015. N=10 women and N=10 men with a mean age of 67.5years (range 37.9-81.2) were included in the study. N=18 patients have been operated at one level, while N=2 patients underwent a double-level XLIF. The index levels were: L2-L3 in 2, L3-L4 in 7, L4-L5 in 9 and L3-L5 in 2 patients, respectively. The mean clinico-radiological follow-up was 9.8months (range 2.5-16.6). The clinical outcome was assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Euro-Qol (EQ)-5D, visual analogue scale (VAS) and EQ-5D index scores. Preoperative, postoperative and follow-up sagittal balance was assessed by EOS full spine X-ray. Furthermore, presence or absence of fusion was assessed by thin cuts CT scan at the end of the follow-up. The analysis highlighted a clear clinical improvement for the study collective. The mean ODI improved from 41.6 preoperatively to 23.5 at the last follow-up (p<0.0036). EQ-5D VAS and EQ-5D index improved from 45.5 to 71.8 (p<0.0001) and from 0.454 to 0.693 (p<0.0002), respectively. Analysis of the sagittal balance revealed an increase of the total lumbar lordosis, however not in a statistically significant manner (p=0.164). Furthermore, an increase of 55.7% in mean disc height (from 7.0mm to 10.9mm) has been observed (p<0.0001). Surprisingly, the right foramen height was increased in a statistically significant manner compared to the left one, but both of them increased in absolute values. However, foraminal area on both sides did not significantly increase. The mean canal area was 115.7mm(2

  19. Predicting the limits of the endoscopic endonasal approach in children: a radiological anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Carl A; Smotherman, Carmen R; Kraemer, Dale F; Aldana, Philipp R

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) has been established as an alternative approach to craniovertebral junction (CVJ) pathology in adults. The authors have previously described the nasoaxial line (NAxL) as an accurate predictor of the lower limit of the EEA to the CVJ in adults. The surgical anatomy limiting the EEA to the pediatric CVJ has not been well studied. Furthermore, predicting the lower limit of the EEA in various pediatric age groups is important in surgical planning. To better understand the anatomy affecting the EEA to the CVJ, the authors examined the skull base anatomy relevant to the EEA in children of different age groups and used the NAxL to predict the EEA lower limit in children. METHODS Axial brain CT scans of 39 children with normal skull base anatomy were reconstructed sagittally. Children were divided into 4 groups according to age: 3-6, 7-10, 11-14, and 15-18 years old. The intersection of the NAxL with the odontoid process of C-2 was described for each group. Analyses of variance were used to estimate the effect of age, sex, interaction between age and sex on different anatomical parameters relevant to the endonasal corridor (including the length of the hard palate [HPLe]), dimensions of choana and piriform aperture, and the length of the NAxL to C-2. The effect of the HPLe on the working distance of NAxL to the odontoid was also estimated using analysis of covariance, controlling for age, sex, and their interaction. RESULTS The NAxL extended to the odontoid process in 38 of the 39 children. Among the 39 children, the NAxL intersected the upper third of the odontoid process in 25 while intersecting the middle third in the remaining 13 children. The measurements of the inferior limits did not differ with age, varying between 9 and 11 mm below the hard palate line at the ventral surface of C-2. Significant increases in the size of the piriform aperture and choana and the HPLe were observed after age 10. The HPLe predicted the

  20. Comparison of Radiological Parameters between Normal and Patellar Dislocation Groups in Korean Population: A Rotational Profile CT-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jatin; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan; Jin, Cheng; Song, Eun-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patellofemoral instability is a common cause of anterior knee pain in adolescents and young adults. Most normal and pathological values for diagnosing patellofemoral instability are based on Western literature. We conducted this radiological study to determine normal values for different patellofemoral parameters in a Korean population and to evaluate their usefulness in diagnosis. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the rotational profile computerized tomography (CT) scans of the patellar dislocation and control groups. Trochlear, patellar, rotational profile, and trochleo-patellar alignment parameters were compared between the groups. Receiver operating characteristic curves were drawn for significant parameters, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the cut-off values. Results There were 48 patients in the patellar dislocation group and 87 patients in the control group. In the control group and patellar dislocation group, the mean sulcus angle was 132.5° and 143.3°, respectively, trochlear depth was 6.04 mm and 3.6 mm, bisect offset was 56.4% and 99.9%, lateral patellar tilting was 9.8° and 19.2°, patellar facet asymmetry was 63.5% and 45.16%, and the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance was 10.91 mm and 27.16 mm, respectively. Conclusions The trochlear depth, bisect offset, patella tilting, and TT-TG distance were parameters that significantly contributed to patellar instability. Rotational profile CT can be considered a good diagnostic tool to assess all these parameters that help to identify anatomical aberration resulting in patellofemoral instability, thereby helping in formulating the most effective treatment plan. PMID:27894178

  1. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  2. Evaluation of clinicians' knowledge and practices regarding medical radiological exposure: findings from a mixed-methods investigation (survey and qualitative study)

    PubMed Central

    Lumbreras, B; Vilar, J; González-Álvarez, I; Guilabert, M; Parker, L A; Pastor-Valero, M; Domingo, M L; Fernández-Lorente, M F; Hernández-Aguado, I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of initiatives aiming to increase clinician awareness of radiation exposure; to explore the challenges they face when communicating with patients; to study what they think is the most appropriate way of communicating the long-term potential risks of medical radiological exposure to patients. Design A quantitative and qualitative evaluation through a survey and focal groups. Setting San Juan Hospital and Dr Peset Hospital (Southeast Spain) and clinicians from Spanish scientific societies. Participants The surveys were answered (a) in person (216: all the radiologists (30), urologists (14) and surgeons (44) working at both participant hospitals; a sample of general practitioners from the catchment area of one hospital (45), and a consecutive sample of radiologists attending a scientific meeting (60)) or (b) electronically through Spanish scientific societies (299: radiologists (45), pneumologists (123), haematologists (75) and surgeons (40)). Clinicians were not randomly selected and thus the results are limited by the diligence of the individuals filling out the survey. Primary and secondary outcome measures Clinicians' knowledge and practices regarding medical radiological exposure, and what they considered most appropriate for communicating information to patients. Results Nearly 80% of the clinicians surveyed had never heard of the European recommendations. Fewer than 20% of the clinicians surveyed identified correctly the radiation equivalence dose of intravenous urography or barium enema. It was reported by 31.7% that they inform patients about the long-term potential risks of ionising radiation. All participants agreed that the most appropriate way to present information is a table with a list of imaging tests and their corresponding radiation equivalence dose in terms of chest X-rays and background radiation exposure. Conclusions Medical radiological exposure is frequently underestimated and rarely explained to patients. With a

  3. Generic performance assessment for a deep repository for low and intermediate level waste in the UK--a case study in assessing radiological impacts on the natural environment.

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Patton, D; Copplestone, D; Norris, S; O'Sullivan, P

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of radionuclides in soil and surface water, taken from a generic performance assessment of a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste, assumed to be located in the UK, have been used as the basis for a case study in assessing radiological impacts on the natural environment. Simplified descriptions of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem types likely to be impacted have been developed. A scoping assessment has identified (226)Ra, (210)Po, (234)U, (230)Th and (238)U as having the highest potential for impact, with doses from internally incorporated alpha emitters as being potentially of particular importance. These nuclides, together with (36)Cl and (129)I (which have proved to be of importance in radiological risk assessments for humans) were included in a more detailed dose assessment. A basic methodology for dose assessment of ecosystems is described, and has been applied for the defined impacted ecosystems. Paucity of published data on concentration factors prevented a more detailed assessment for terrestrial ecosystems. For the aquatic ecosystem, a more detailed assessment was possible and highest calculated absorbed dose rates (weighted for the likely higher biological effectiveness of alpha radiation) were about 6.5 microGy h(-1). We conclude that harm to the impacted ecosystems is unlikely and make the observation that the lack of concentration factor or transfer factor data for a sufficiently wide range of species, ecosystems and nuclides appears to be the principal obstacle to establishing a comprehensive framework for the application of radiological protection to ecosystems.

  4. The human trochlear and abducens nerves at different ages - a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Muthu; Sharma, Saroj; Jacob, Tony G; Bhardwaj, Daya N; Nag, Tapas C; Roy, Tara Sankar

    2015-02-01

    The trochlear and abducens nerves (TN and AN) control the movement of the superior oblique and lateral rectus muscles of the eyeball, respectively. Despite their immense clinical and radiological importance no morphometric data was available from a wide spectrum of age groups for comparison with either pathological or other conditions involving these nerves. In the present study, morphometry of the TN and AN was performed on twenty post-mortem samples ranging from 12-90 years of age. The nerve samples were processed for resin embedding and toluidine blue stained thin (1µm) sections were used for estimating the total number of myelinated axons by fractionator and the cross sectional area of the nerve and the axons by point counting methods. We observed that the TN was covered by a well-defined epineurium and had ill-defined fascicles, whereas the AN had multiple fascicles with scanty epineurium. Both nerves contained myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of various sizes intermingled with each other. Out of the four age groups (12-20y, 21-40y, 41-60y and >61y) the younger groups revealed isolated bundles of small thinly myelinated axons. The total number of myelinated fibers in the TN and AN at various ages ranged from 1100-3000 and 1600-7000, respectively. There was no significant change in the cross-sectional area of the nerves or the axonal area of the myelinated nerves across the age groups. However, myelin thickness increased significantly in the AN with aging (one way ANOVA). The present study provides baseline morphometric data on the human TN and AN at various ages.

  5. Assessment of radiological protection systems among diagnostic radiology facilities in North East India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Thokchom Dewan; Jayaraman, T; Arunkumar Sharma, B

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to assess the adequacy level of radiological protection systems available in the diagnostic radiology facilities located in three capital cities of North East (NE) India. It further attempts to understand, using a multi-disciplinary approach, how the safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology framed by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to achieve adequate radiological protection in facilities, have been perceived, conceptualized, and applied accordingly in these facilities. About 30 diagnostic radiology facilities were randomly selected from three capitals of states in NE India; namely Imphal (Manipur), Shillong (Meghalaya) and Guwahati (Assam). A semi-structured questionnaire developed based on a multi-disciplinary approach was used for this study. It was observed that radiological practices undertaken in these facilities were not exactly in line with safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology of the AERB and the IAEA. About 50% of the facilities had registered/licensed x-ray equipment with the AERB. More than 80% of the workers did not use radiation protective devices, although these devices were available in the facilities. About 85% of facilities had no institutional risk management system. About 70% of the facilities did not carry out periodic quality assurance testing of their x-ray equipment or surveys of radiation leakage around the x-ray room, and did not display radiation safety indicators in the x-ray rooms. Workers in these facilities exhibited low risk perception about the risks associated with these practices. The majority of diagnostic radiology facilities in NE India did not comply with the radiological safety codes/standards framed by the AERB and IAEA. The study found inadequate levels of radiological protection systems in the majority of facilities. This study suggests a need to establish firm measures that comply with the radiological safety codes/standards of the

  6. Latin American dose survey results in mammography studies under IAEA programme: radiological protection of patients in medical exposures (TSA3).

    PubMed

    Mora, Patricia; Blanco, Susana; Khoury, Helen; Leyton, Fernando; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz, María Yolanda; Garay, Fernando; Telón, Flaviano; Aguilar, Juan Garcia; Roas, Norma; Gamarra, Mirtha; Blanco, Daniel; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Nader, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela) working under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation Programme: TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures have joined efforts in the optimisation of radiation protection in mammography practice. Through surveys of patient doses, the region has a unique database of diagnostic reference levels for analogue and digital equipment that will direct future optimisation activities towards the early detection of breast cancer among asymptomatic women. During RLA9/057 (2007-09) 24 institutions participated with analogue equipment in a dose survey. Regional training on methodology and measurement equipment was addressed in May 2007. The mean glandular dose (DG) was estimated using the incident kerma in air and relevant conversion coefficients for both projections craneo caudal and mediolateral oblique (CC and MLO). For Phase 2, RLA9/067 (2010-11), it was decided to include also digital systems in order to see their impact in future dose optimisation activities. Any new country that joined the project received training in the activities through IAEA expert missions. Twenty-nine new institutions participated (9 analogue and 20 digital equipment). A total of 2262 patient doses were collected during this study and from them D(G) (mGy) for both projections were estimated for each institution and country. Regional results (75 percentile in mGy) show for CC and MLO views, respectively: RLA9/057 (analogue) 2.63 and 3.17; RLA/067: 2.57 and 3.15 (analogue) and 2.69 and 2.90 (digital). Regarding only digital equipment for CC and MLO, respectively, computed radiography systems showed 2.59 and 2.78 and direct digital radiography (DDR) systems 2.78 and 3.04. Based on the IAEA Basic Safety Standard (BSS) reference dose (3 mGy), it can be observed that there is enough room to start

  7. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  8. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  9. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients.

  10. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... decoded SIR’s Health Policy and Economics team provides information on the varied activities the society engages in to ensure proper coding of interventional radiology services. SIR is committed to assisting you, your institution ...

  11. Interventional Radiology in China

    SciTech Connect

    Teng Gaojun Xu Ke; Ni Caifang; Li Linsun

    2008-03-15

    With more than 3000 members, the Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology (CSIR) is one of the world's largest societies for interventional radiology (IR). Nevertheless, compared to other societies such as CIRSE and SIR, the CSIR is a relatively young society. In this article, the status of IR in China is described, which includes IR history, structure and patient management, personnel, fellowship, training, modalities, procedures, research, turf battle, and insightful visions for IR from Chinese interventional radiologists.

  12. Environmental monitoring in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sol, S.; Garcia, R.; Sánchez, D.; Ramirez, G.; Chavarin, E. U.; Rivera, T.

    2017-01-01

    The procedures in Interventional Radiology involve long times of exposure and high number of radiographic images that bring higher radiation doses to patients, staff and environmental than those received in conventional Radiology. Currently for monitoring the dose, the thermoluminescent dosimetry use is recommended. The aim of this work was to carry out the monitoring of the environmental scattered radiation inside the IR room using two types of thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD-100 (reference dosimeter), CaSO4:Dy (synthesized in our laboratory). The results indicate that the TLD-100 is not effective for the environmental monitoring of low-energy Rx rooms. The CaSO4:Dy presented good behaviour over the 6 months of study. The results will be specific to each room so it is recommended such studies as part of the program of quality control of each Rx room.

  13. Risk of Cataract after Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: A 20-Year Prospective Cohort Study among US Radiologic Technologists

    PubMed Central

    Bekiroglu, Nural; Hauptmann, Michael; Alexander, Bruce H.; Freedman, D. Michal; Doody, Michele Morin; Cheung, Li C.; Simon, Steven L.; Weinstock, Robert M.; Bouville, André; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2008-01-01

    The study aim was to determine the risk of cataract among radiologic technologists with respect to occupational and nonoccupational exposures to ionizing radiation and to personal characteristics. A prospective cohort of 35,705 cataract-free US radiologic technologists aged 24–44 years was followed for nearly 20 years (1983–2004) by using two follow-up questionnaires. During the study period, 2,382 cataracts and 647 cataract extractions were reported. Cigarette smoking for ≥5 pack-years; body mass index of ≥25 kg/m2; and history of diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, or arthritis at baseline were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) associated with increased risk of cataract. In multivariate models, self-report of ≥3 x-rays to the face/neck was associated with a hazard ratio of cataract of 1.25 (95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.47). For workers in the highest category (mean, 60 mGy) versus lowest category (mean, 5 mGy) of occupational dose to the lens of the eye, the adjusted hazard ratio of cataract was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.40). Findings challenge the National Council on Radiation Protection and International Commission on Radiological Protection assumptions that the lowest cumulative ionizing radiation dose to the lens of the eye that can produce a progressive cataract is approximately 2 Gy, and they support the hypothesis that the lowest cataractogenic dose in humans is substantially less than previously thought. PMID:18664497

  14. Radiologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rubesin, Stephen E; Levine, Marc S

    2003-11-01

    Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract have many causes. Holes in the wall of gastrointestinal organs can be created by blunt or penetrating trauma, iatrogenic injury, inflammatory conditions that penetrate the serosa or adventitia, extrinsic neoplasms that invade the gastrointestinal tract, or primary neoplasms that penetrate outside the wall of gastrointestinal organs. This article provides a radiologic approach for investigating the wide variety of gastrointestinal perforations. General principles about contrast agents and studies are reviewed, and then perforations in specific gastrointestinal organs are discussed.

  15. OVERVIEW AND FINDINGS FROM THE RELIGIOUS ORDERS STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Wilson, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The Religious Orders Study is a longitudinal clinical-pathologic cohort study of aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this manuscript, we summarize the study methods including the study design and describe the clinical evaluation, assessment of risk factors, collection of ante-mortem biological specimens, brain autopsy and collection of selected post-mortem data. The results: 1) review the relation of neuropathologic indices to clinical diagnoses and cognition proximate to death; 2) examine the relation of risk factors to clinical outcomes; 3) examine the relation of risk factors to measures of neuropathology; and 4) summarize additional study findings. We then discuss and contextualize the study findings. PMID:22471860

  16. Turf wars in radiology: what must academic radiology do?

    PubMed

    Rao, Vijay M; Levin, David C

    2007-09-01

    In a previous article in this series, the authors called on private practice radiology groups to better support radiology research financially but also pointed out that academic radiology must make some changes as well. In this article, the authors discuss those changes in detail. They include revising the structure of the radiology residency, changing the timing of the American Board of Radiology oral examinations, requiring that all residents receive research training, and emphasizing the value of clinical and translational research. The Society of Chairmen of Academic Radiology Departments needs to assume a leadership role in implementing these changes.

  17. Radiology trainees in the UK and Ireland: academic background, publication rates and research plans.

    PubMed

    McWeeney, D M; Walker, T W M; Gilbert, F J; McCarthy, P A

    2009-12-01

    To assess the level of achievement of current trainees, we investigated the academic qualifications, publication rates and future research plans of 240 radiology trainees in the UK and Ireland. All radiology trainees in the UK and Ireland were surveyed by a questionnaire enquiring about academic record and career ambitions. Our study shows that the level of academic achievement of radiology trainees is high, and provides interesting information concerning the current group of radiology trainees in these regions. It will be of interest both to radiology trainers and to doctors hoping to pursue a career in radiology. It also demonstrates that a potential recruitment crisis in academic radiology exists.

  18. Long-term results of external auditory canal closure and mastoid obliteration in cochlear implantation after radical mastoidectomy: a clinical and radiological study.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Vincenzo; Pasanisi, Enrico; Bacciu, Andrea; Bacciu, Salvatore

    2014-08-01

    Cochlear implant candidates with mastoid cavity present a significant challenge to safe cochlear implantation because of possible spread of infection to the inner ear as well as an increased risk of electrode array extrusion. Closure of the external auditory canal is one of the several surgical techniques utilized to block the potential entry routes for infection and to protect the implanted device. The main concern after external auditory canal closure is the risk of developing a cholesteatoma, which can lead to an asymptomatic erosion of the temporal bone and/or cochlear implant failure. In this study we present the results of very long-term (mean 12 years) clinical and radiological follow-up in 12 patients who underwent external auditory canal closure associated with mastoid and Eustachian tube obliteration to facilitate cochlear implantation. To date, with a mean ± SD follow-up of 12 ± 4.7 years (range 5-21 years), the only complication experienced was the breakdown of the EAC closure in one patient, successfully treated by performing a rotation skin flap. The results of this study confirmed that external auditory canal closure is a reliable technique in cochlear implantation after radical mastoidectomy provided that a rigorous surgical technique is performed. A right balance between the need to reduce costs and to avoid unnecessary doses of radiation to patients and the task of a radiological surveillance may be represented by performing computed tomography 12-18 months postoperatively and then, only if clinically warranted.

  19. Radiological contribution to the diagnosis of early postoperative complications after lung resection for primary tumor: a revisional study

    PubMed Central

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Boccuzzi, Francesco; Dervishi, Najada; Lisi, Elena; Veltri, Andrea; Ardissone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the post-operative course of the interventions of lung resection for primary tumor, complications of different nature and severity can arise, recognizing different pathogenetic mechanisms and differing according to the type of resection performed and to the time elapsed after surgery. The low diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography requires a thorough knowledge of the radiologist about all radiographic findings, both normal and pathological, which can be found in the immediate post-operative period (within 30 days after surgery). This article aims to describe the incidence, the clinical features and the radiological aspects of immediate complications following pulmonary resections, with specific reference to those in which the diagnostic imaging provides a fundamental contribution. PMID:27621893

  20. Radiological design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-08-16

    The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design.

  1. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  2. Advances in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2010-12-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic radiology are discussed on the basis of current publications in Investigative Radiology. Publications in the journal during 2009 and 2010 are reviewed, evaluating developments by modality and anatomic region. Technological advances continue to play a major role in the evolution and clinical practice of diagnostic radiology, and as such constitute a major publication focus. In the past 2 years, this includes advances in both magnetic resonance and computed tomography (in particular, the advent of dual energy computed tomography). An additional major focus of publications concerns contrast media, and in particular continuing research involving nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, its etiology, and differentiation of the gadolinium chelates on the basis of in vivo stability.

  3. Radiology's value chain.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  4. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  5. [Radiological diagnosis of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Issever, A S; Link, T M

    2011-02-01

    Having at their disposal a wide range of imaging techniques, radiologists play a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with osteoporosis. The radiological tests range from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is the only reference method accepted by the WHO, to conventional radiographs for fracture characterization, to more recent techniques for analyzing trabecular structure, and the findings are decisive in initiating correct management of osteoporosis patients. This review provides an overview of established radiological techniques and an outline of new diagnostic approaches.

  6. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  7. Marketing a Radiology Practice.

    PubMed

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Flanders, Adam E; Sundaram, Baskaran; Colarossi, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In addition to being a profession, the practice of radiology is a business, and marketing is an important part of that business. There are many facets to marketing a radiology practice. The authors present a number of ideas on how to go about doing this. Some marketing methods can be directed to both patients and referring physicians. Others should be directed just to patients, while still others should be directed just to referring physicians. Aside from marketing, many of them provide value to both target audiences.

  8. Food Signs in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob; Al Damegh, Saleh

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Certain diseases show classic radiological signs that resemble various types of food items like fruits, meat, vegetables, eggs, bakery, grocery and confectionary items. In this article various food signs are discussed and correlated with the various food items in a pictorial way. The objective of this pictorial essay is to provide the information and learn the characteristic radiological signs resembling various food items. These food signs are easy to recognize and allows a confident diagnosis on the basis of imaging findings alone or can narrow down the differential diagnosis. PMID:21475464

  9. ”Evaluation of safety margin” in ameloblastoma of the mandible by surgical, radiological, and histopathological methods: An evidence-based study

    PubMed Central

    Kalaiselvan, S.; Dharmesh Kumar Raja, A. V.; Saravanan, B.; Vigneswari, A. Srivel; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to elicit the amount of safety margin necessary around the ameloblastic lesion in view of preventing further recurrence. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of 25 cases of mandibular ameloblastoma. Diagnosis was based on clinical and radiological analysis and confirmed by histopathological report. An incisional biopsy was done preoperatively to confirm the diagnosis. Segmental resection was planned for all the cases. After the resection, postoperative panoramic radiograph of the specimen was taken followed by histopathological examination of its margin to detect tumor cell infiltration. Results and Conclusion: In all our cases, the ameloblastoma was infiltrating in nature. A follow-up period of 10 years showed neither recurrence nor implant failure. In our study, we conclude our safe margin for infiltrating variant of ameloblastoma based on histopathological report of the resected specimen. PMID:27829762

  10. Radiologic Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a radiologic technology program. The guide contains four major sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining purpose and objectives; a program description,…

  11. Practical interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Von Sonnenberg, E.; Mueller, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes techniques employed in interventional radiology with emphasis on imaging leading to intervention. Includes the entire array of procedures available to the radiologist, discussing the indications, materials, technique, results, and complications for each. Covers the chest, abdomen, bone, pediatric considerations, and nursing care.

  12. Radiology in emergency medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.; Barsan, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a discussion of radiologic modalities currently being used in emergency situations. Radiographs, echocardiographs, radionuclide scans and CT scans are systematically analyzed and evaluated to provide a step-by-step diagnostic process for emergency physicians to follow when a radiologist is not present.

  13. Collaborative Radiological Response Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Exercise and Evaluation Guide EMS Emergency Medical Services EPA Environmental Protection Agency FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation FEMA Federal...Investigation (FBI), water regulators, food regulators, agricultural agencies, hazardous waste regulators, local environmental health agencies...FEDERAL PLANNING EFFORTS The United States Environmental Protection Agency ( EPA ) has had radiological responsibilities since 1970.18 The General

  14. Research Training in Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

  15. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  16. Radiological Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

    Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

  17. Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

    2009-10-01

    One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health.

  18. Gastrostomy tube placement by endoscopy versus radiologic methods in patients with ALS: a retrospective study of complications and outcome.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jeffrey A; Chen, Richard; Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Sufit, Robert L; Heller, Scott; Siddique, Teepu; Wolfe, Lisa

    2013-05-01

    Gastrostomy tube placement for malnutrition and weight loss stabilization occurs in many patients with ALS. We sought to compare the outcome and complications of gastrostomy tube placement by endoscopic (PEG) and multiple radiologic (RIG) methods in ALS patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted on all ALS patients evaluated at Northwestern University who received gastrostomy tubes between January 2009 and March 2012. One hundred and eight gastrostomy tube attempts were made on a total of 100 different patients. Failed gastrostomy tube placement occurred in 15.7% of PEGs and 1.9% of RIGs. Post-procedure aspiration was recognized after 10.5% PEG and 0 RIG attempts. Multivariate analysis revealed a linear increase in risk of post-procedure aspiration for every increase in ALSFRS swallow score. No statistically significant differences in failure or complications were observed when comparing two different methods of RIG (push-type vs. pull-type). Our findings support gastrostomy tube placement by radiographic methods in ALS patients. Gastrostomy tube placement by RIG was more often successful and less often associated with aspiration. Our findings add to the growing body of literature that argues for early gastrostomy tube placement in young patients with prominent bulbar involvement.

  19. A Study of Emergency Room Health CAre Providers and the Fixed Facility Physical Capabilities to Manage the Presenting Radiologically Injured Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    Richter, Harold W. Berk, Charles D. Teatus, Nancy E . Larkham, Elroy J. Friesen , and Richard W. Epllich, "A Systems Approach to the Management of Radiation...RADIATION ............................ 41 E . NAVAL HOSPITAL, PORTSMOUTH PLAN FOR HOSPITAL RECEPTION OF RADIOLOGICAL CASUALTIES...the Hospital Reception of Radiological Casualties Plan for Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Virginia (Appendix E ). Typically, basic radiation physics

  20. Techniques and indications in radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, S.

    1987-01-01

    The stated purpose of this book is to review modern radiologic diagnostic techniques as applied to the study of the kidney and urinary tract, and their pertinent indications. This goal is partially accomplished in the first two segments of the book, which consist of about 100 pages. These include a synoptic description of various techniques - including classic uroradiologic studies such as excretory urography and retrograde pyelography, plus sonography, computed tomography, angiography, and nuclear medicine. The diagnostic signs and the differential diagnoses are fairly well described, aided by a profusion of tables and diagrams. The overall quality of the reproduction of the illustrations is good.

  1. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results according to Glenosphere Position in Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Short-term Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Sung Guk; Lee, Jae Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background In a previous biomechanical study, eccentric glenospheres with more inferior position of the center of rotation were shown to improve range of motion and reduce the incidence of scapular notching after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and radiological results of RSA using an eccentric glenosphere to those using a concentric glenosphere and to determine the usefulness of the eccentric glenosphere. Methods From 2009 to 2015, we performed a retrospective review of 20 consecutive patients who underwent RSA using a deltopectoral approach. Nine patients underwent RSA using a concentric glenosphere (group A) while 11 had an eccentric glenosphere (group B). The average follow-up period was 13.9 months (range, 12 to 18 months). All glenoid components were placed with 15° of inferior tilt. Clinical results were assessed using the visual analog pain scale score (VAS), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) score, the Korean shoulder scoring system (KSS), and the Constant score. On radiological evaluation, prosthesisscapular neck angle (PSNA), peg-glenoid rim distance (PGRD), scapular neck-inferior glenoshere rim distance (inferior glenoshpere overhang), acromion-greater tuberosity (AT) distance, glenoid-greater tuberosity (GT) distance, and severity of notching according to the Nerot-Sirveaux classification were assessed. Results The clinical results improved significantly in both groups, but there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. A significant intergroup difference was observed with regard to PGRD (24.8 ± 1.6 mm for group A vs. 22.2 ± 1.9 mm for group B; p = 0.002) and inferior glenosphere overhang (2.0 ± 1.7 mm for group A vs. 5.8 ± 1.6 mm for group B; p = 0.000). Seven of 9 patients in group A developed notching compared with 2 of 11 patients in group B (p = 0.022). The other radiological parameters such as inferior tilt and AT and GT distances were

  2. Initial Study of Radiological and Clinical Efficacy Radioembolization Using 188Re-Human Serum Albumin (HSA) Microspheres in Patients with Progressive, Unresectable Primary or Secondary Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Mirosław L.; Ćwikła, Jarosław B.; Sankowski, Artur J.; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Grimes, Josh; Celler, Anna; Buscombe, John R.; Bator, Andrzej; Pech, Maciej; Mikołajczak, Renata; Pawlak, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this initial study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological effectiveness of radioembolization (RE) using 188Re-Human Serum Albumin (HSA) microspheres in patients with advanced, progressive, unresectable primary or secondary liver cancers, not suitable to any other form of therapy. Material/Methods Overall, we included 13 patients with 20 therapy sessions. Clinical and radiological responses were assessed at 6 weeks after therapy, and then every 3 months. The objective radiological response was classified according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) v.1.0 by sequential MRI. Adverse events were evaluated using NCI CTCAE v.4.03. Results There were 4 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 6 with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), 2 with neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC), and 1 patient with ovarian carcinoma. Mean administered activity of 188Re HSA was 7.24 GBq (range 3.8–12.4) A high microspheres labeling efficacy of over 97±2.1% and low urinary excretion of 188Re (6.5±2.3%) during first 48-h follow-up. Median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 7.1 months (CI 6.2–13.3) and progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.1 months (CI 2.4–9.9). In those patients who had a clinical partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), and disease progression (DP) as assessed 6 weeks after therapy, the median OS was 9/5/4 months, respectively, and PFS was 5/2/0 months, respectively. The treatment adverse events (toxicity) were at an acceptable level. Initially and after 6 weeks, the CTC AE was grade 2, while after 3 months it increased to grade 3 in 4 subjects. This effect was mostly related to rapid cancer progression in this patient subgroup. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study indicate that RE using 188Re HSA is feasible and a viable option for palliative therapy in patients with extensive progressive liver cancer. It was well tolerated by most patients, with a low level of toxicity during the 3 months of

  3. Dynamic Hip Screw with Trochanteric Stablization Plate Fixation of Unstable Inter-Trochanteric Fractures: A Prospective Study of Functional and Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashwin; Sadasivan, Anand Kumar; Hegde, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of unstable intertrochanteric fractures have posed a unique challenge to orthopaedicians over years. Several surgical techniques and implants have been developed for the same. Fractures of the lateral wall have been considered as the major cause of femoral medialization after fixation by Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS). Studies have shown that supplementation of trochanteric stabilization plate reduces the incidence of femoral medialization. Aim To assess the radiological union and hip function after fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures with DHS and Trochanteric Stabilization Plate (TSP). Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted with a total of 32 patients between age groups of 30-70 years with Evan Jensen unstable and very unstable type of intertrochanteric fractures, between August 2013 to March 2015 in the Department of Orthopaedics ARS Hospital, Tirupur, Tamil Nadu, India. They underwent open reduction and DHS and TSP fixation. They were started on full weight bearing mobilization on post op day three. They were reviewed at post-op weeks 3,6,12 and 24. Hip mobilization and rehabilitation exercises were instituted during course of reviews. Radiographs were taken to assess fracture union and hip function was evaluated during follow-ups. At the end of 24 weeks, degree of radiographic union was scored as per Radiological Union Score for Hip (RUSH). Hip function was scored with Harris hip score. Analyses were done using frequency and proportions. Chi-square tests were used to assess the test of association. Results Fifteen patients had RUSH scores between 10-20 and 17 patients had scores between 20-30 points. RUSH score had mean of 21.03+/- 2.132 points. 9 of 32 patients had excellent results as per Harris hip score, 10 had good, nine had fair and four had poor. On comparison of Harris hip score with RUSH score: Interval between 10-20 points, of 15 patients; two had excellent results, five had good, five had fair and three

  4. Strategies for incorporating radiology into early medical school curricula.

    PubMed

    Naeger, David M; Webb, Emily M; Zimmerman, Leslie; Elicker, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    Clinically oriented material is being incorporated increasingly early into medical school curricula. Traditional models of incorporating radiology early on, mainly as an adjunct to pathology or anatomy instruction, are not focused on learning important aspects of clinical radiology. Medical students can be better served by an integrated curriculum that focuses on appropriate ordering of radiology studies, an intuitive understanding of imaging modalities, and understanding the patient experience.

  5. Predictor of Hand Radiological Progression in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Receiving TNF Antagonist Therapy by Change in Grayscale Synovitis—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Chou; Su, Fu-Mei; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Chen, Jia-Feng; Cheng, Tien-Tsai; Lai, Han-Ming; Chiu, Wen-Chan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This prospective study aimed to compare synovial ultrasound scores to conventional measures (DAS28, CRP levels) in predicting radiographic progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis under TNF antagonist therapy. Methods Patients with RA who received TNF antagonist therapy were enrolled, all of whom underwent clinical, laboratory, and ultrasonographic assessments with grayscale and power Doppler assessments of bilateral elbows (anterior and posterior recess), wrists (dorsal, palmar, and ulnar aspects), second and third MCP joints (dorsal and palmar recess), and PIP II and III (dorsal and palmar) at baseline and at 1, 3 months. Hand radiographic damage was evaluated using van der Heijde modified Total Sharp Score (TSS) at baseline and 12 months. Results Thirty-two patients (384 joints, 832 synovial sites) continued the same treatment regimen for 12 months and completed the study, 41.6% of whom showed radiographic progression during the study period. Baseline DAS28 (P = 0.123), CRP level (P = 0.177), grayscale synovitis (P = 0.092), and power Doppler synovitis (P = 0.120) could not predict radiological damage in the TNF antagonist therapy group. However, ΔTSS was significantly related to changes in grayscale synovitis between baseline and 1 month (P = 0.011), but not at 3 months (P = 0.591), and was not related to changes in the power Doppler score at 1 (P = 0.634) and 3 months (P = 0.298). Conclusions Our data confirm that delayed improvement in grayscale synovitis between baseline and 1 month more accurately reflects 1-year radiological damage than conventional measures such as DAS28 score and CRP level. Therefore, we recommend serial ultrasound follow-up of patients with RA receiving TNF antagonist therapy. PMID:28212115

  6. Clinico-radiological Outcome Analysis of Parallel Plating with Perpendicular Plating in Distal Humeral Intra-articular Fractures: Prospective Randomised Study

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Vishal; Banshiwal, Ramesh Chandra; Verma, Rajender Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The distal humeral fractures are common fractures of upper limb and are difficult to treat. These fractures, if left untreated or inadequately treated, leads to poor outcomes. Management of distal humeral fractures are pertained to many controversies and one among them is position of plates. Aim To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with intra-articular distal humerus fractures, treated using parallel and perpendicular double plating methods. Materials and Methods A total of 38 patients with distal humerus fractures, 20 in perpendicular plating group (group A) and 18 in parallel plating group (group B), were included in this prospective randomised study. At each follow up patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically for union and the outcomes were measured in terms of Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) consisting of pain intensity, range of motion, stability and function. MEP score greater than 90 is considered as excellent; Score 75 to 89 is good; Score 60 to 74 is fair and Score less than 60 is poor. Results In our study, 15 patients (75%) in group A, and 13 patients (72.22%) in group B achieved excellent results. Two patients (10%) in group A and 4 patients (22.22%) in group B attained good results. Complications developed in 2 patients in each groups. No significant differences were found between the clinical outcomes of the two plating methods. Conclusion Neither of the plating techniques are superior to the other, as inferred from the insignificant differences in bony union, elbow function and complications between the two plating techniques.

  7. Nuclear and radiological Security: Introduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James Christopher

    2016-02-24

    Nuclear security includes the prevention and detection of, and response to, theft, sabotage, unauthorized access, illegal transfer, or other malicious acts involving nuclear or other radioactive substances or their associated facilities. The presentation begins by discussing the concept and its importance, then moves on to consider threats--insider threat, sabotage, diversion of materials--with considerable emphasis on the former. The intrusion at Pelindaba, South Africa, is described as a case study. The distinction between nuclear security and security of radiological and portable sources is clarified, and the international legal framework is touched upon. The paper concludes by discussing the responsibilities of the various entities involved in nuclear security.

  8. Radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices for breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Luciana Batista; de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, the radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was investigated for future applications in brachytherapy. The main goal was to determine the radiological viability of ceramic and polymeric devices in vitro by performing simple radiological diagnostic methods such as conventional X-ray analysis and mammography due to its easy access to the population. The radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was determined using conventional X-ray, mammography and CT analysis.

  9. [Emphysematous pyelonephritis: radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kably, M I; Elamraoui, F; Chikhaoui, N

    2003-10-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare and severe form of acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli accounts for 60% of the cases. Predisposing factors are: diabetus mellitus, recent urinary tract infection and obstruction. There is a female predominance (2/1). Conventional radiography reveals the renal emphysema in 85% of the cases. Ultrasonography shows hyperechoic areas corresponding to the gaz. CT scan is the best technique, allowing the exact localization of the gaz inside the renal parenchyma. The natural course of the disease allows its radiologic classification in 4 grades. EPN has a poor prognosis if only a medical treatment is initiated. Every urinary tract infection, in a diabetic patient must be treated, and must lead to a radiologic exploration, which allows an early detection of severe forms of the disease.

  10. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  11. Autopsy studies of coal miners' lungs. Phase 2. Final report August 77-July 80

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckley, V.A.; Chapman, J.S.; Collings, P.L.; Douglas, A.N.; Fernie, J.M.

    1981-11-01

    This report is based on a post mortem study of the lungs and hearts of various groups of coal workers drawn from an original cohort of 500 men. The men had worked in collieries which took part in Pneumoconiosis Field Research and which covered the range of mining conditions in Britain. The aim of the study was to relate pathological evidence of pneumoconiosis, emphysema and bronchitis and the radiographic appearances of pneumoconiosis to both the dust retained in the lung and the respirable dust to which the men were exposed. Also included were studies of right-sided heart disease and respiratory function during life in relation to lung pathology.

  12. Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 μg m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were

  13. eFRMAC Overview: Data Management and Enabling Technologies for Characterization of a Radiological Release A Case Study: The Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Incident

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, Daniel J.; Clark, Harvey W.; Essex, James J.; Wagner, Eric C.

    2013-07-01

    The eFRMAC enterprise is a suite of technologies and software developed by the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Emergency Response to coordinate the rapid data collection, management, and analysis required during a radiological emergency. This enables the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center assets to evaluate a radiological or nuclear incident efficiently to facilitate protective actions to protect public health and the environment. This document identifies and describes eFRMAC methods including (1) data acquisition, (2) data management, (3) data analysis, (4) product creation, (5) quality control, and (6) dissemination.

  14. Radiation exposure in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, N. G. V.; Braz, D.; Vallim, M. A.; Filho, L. G. P.; Azevedo, F. S.; Barroso, R. C.; Lopes, R. T.

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate dose values in patients and staff involved in some interventional radiology procedures. Doses have been measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters for single procedures (such as renal and cerebral arteriography, t